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1

Jordan Schnitzer Jordan Schnitzer  

E-print Network

to European art. Below left: UTAGAWA Hiroshige (1797­1868). Japanese; Edo period, 1857. Suid Bridge/ MURPHY GALLERIES StairsDown p p European Art Korean Art Icon SORENG GALLERY Chinese Art PREBLE/ MURPHY* ElevatorE European Art Korean Art Icon 13000 Jordan Schnitzer 7000 Artist Project sPAce BArker

2

Symmetric cones Jordan algebras  

E-print Network

Symmetric cones Jordan algebras The partial differential equation A partial differential equation;Symmetric cones Jordan algebras The partial differential equation Outline 1 Symmetric cones Geometric characterization Algebraic characterization 2 Jordan algebras Exponential and logarithm Trace forms and determinant

Hildebrand, Roland

3

On Jordan's measurements Frdric Brechenmacher  

E-print Network

1 On Jordan's measurements Frédéric Brechenmacher Univ. Lille : ANR CaaF? ("ANR-10-JCJC 0101"). Introduction The Jordan measure, the Jordan curve theorem, as well as the other generic references to Camille Jordan

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

4

Jordan Form Numerical. . .  

E-print Network

Similarity Jordan Form Numerical. . . Applications Proofs Basis change A short proof Home Page, Alabama, USA Oct 3, 2007 Jordan Normal Form Revisited Speaker: Tin-Yau Tam Graduate Student Seminar tamtiny@auburn.edu #12;Similarity Jordan Form Numerical. . . Applications Proofs Basis change A short

Tam, Tin-Yau

5

Digital Jordan Curve Theorems Christer O. Kiselman  

E-print Network

Digital Jordan Curve Theorems Christer O. Kiselman's digital Jordan curve theorem states that the complement of a Jordan curve in the digital plane of Jordan curves. 1 Introduction The classical Jordan curve theorem says that the complement

Kiselman, Christer

6

Dendrochronology in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dendrochronology is a valuable tool for the study of past climate and increases our knowledge of climate variability beyond the short period covered by instrumental data. Two annual tree-ring width chronologies were developed for northern Jordan (Pinus halepensis and Quercus aegilops), one chronology for Carmel Mountain, Israel (Pinus halepensis), and one chronology for southern Jordan (Juniperus phoenicia). The results of

Ramzi Touchan; Malcolm K. Hughes

1999-01-01

7

Special Education in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to provide a brief background about special education system in Jordan and particularly describes the present types of programmes and legislation provided within the country to students with special needs, as well as integration movement. Jordan has historically provided a limited number of educational opportunities

Abu-Hamour, Bashir; Al-Hmouz, Hanan

2014-01-01

8

MR JORDAN KENNY Student Member  

E-print Network

MR JORDAN KENNY Student Member Students' Union President J ordan Kenny was born in Bristol. He of Bath. Jordan recently graduated from the University with a BA (Hons) in Sport and Social Science. Whilst at the University, Jordan undertook a considerable number of roles encompassing a range of areas

Burton, Geoffrey R.

9

Consanguineous marriage in Jordan.  

PubMed

We conducted a population-based study of consanguineous marriages in Jordan. About two thousand households were interviewed. First cousin marriages were encountered in 32.03%, second cousin in 6.8%, distant relation in 10.5%, and no relation in 50% of all marriages, respectively. Inbreeding coefficients were compared with those of other countries. The most important variables affecting inbreeding were social tradition, religion, education, and place of residence--urban vs. rural. Secular trends appear rather stable since the early decades of the twentieth century, especially for first cousin marriages. Jordan society showed a deeply rooted traditional behavioral pattern when inbreeding is considered. PMID:1642259

Khoury, S A; Massad, D

1992-07-15

10

Book review: A Taste of Jordan Algebras  

E-print Network

Book review: A Taste of Jordan Algebras by Kevin McCrimmon Jordan algebras owe their name JORDAN (1838-1922) but after the German physicist Pascual JORDAN (1902-1980) who (in two papers 1932) = ((a · a) · b) · a, (J) which JORDAN considers a fundamental in defining his new class of algebras

Bertram, Wolfgang - Institut de Mathématiques ?lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

11

Book review: A Taste of Jordan Algebras  

E-print Network

Book review: A Taste of Jordan Algebras by Kevin McCrimmon Jordan algebras owe their name JORDAN (1838­1922) but after the German physicist Pascual JORDAN (1902­1980) who (in two papers 1932) = ((a . a) . b) . a, (J) which JORDAN considers a fundamental in defining his new class of algebras

Bertram, Wolfgang - Institut de Mathématiques ?lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

12

Jordan cohomology for operator algebras Great Plains Operator Theory Symposium  

E-print Network

Jordan cohomology for operator algebras Great Plains Operator Theory Symposium Kansas State) Jordan cohomology for operator algebras 1 / 23 #12;Outline · Jordan Derivations · Jordan Weak*-Amenability · Jordan 2-cocycles NOTE: Jordan can mean Jordan algebra or Jordan triple (depending on my fancy) Bernard

Russo, Bernard

13

Phosphate Mines, Jordan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium).

The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

2008-01-01

14

Water Resources in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Water resources in Jordan are very limited, among the lowest in the world on a per capita basis. The annual per capita share\\u000a of water is currently estimated at 135 m3 and this Figure is expected to drop to 90 m3 in the year 2020 as a result of the\\u000a disproportional increase in population relative to water resources development. Moreover,

Anwar Jiries

15

JORDAN GEOMETRIES BY INVERSIONS WOLFGANG BERTRAM  

E-print Network

JORDAN GEOMETRIES BY INVERSIONS WOLFGANG BERTRAM Abstract. Jordan geometries are defined as spaces equipped with point reflections Sx fixing x, and therefore the theories of Jordan geometries actions of torsors and of symmetric spaces is introduced. Jordan geometries give rise both to symmetry

16

Jordan Canonical Form Recall the following definition  

E-print Network

Jordan Canonical Form Recall the following definition: Definition 1. We say that two square is an example of a matrix in Jordan Canonical Form. Here we note that , , and but #12;. Hence, three of the four the notion of a Jordan matrix via two sets of examples. Example 1. The following are Jordan matrices: #12

Lee, Carl

17

Jordan Loops Using Prover9/Mace4 to understand Jordan Loops  

E-print Network

Jordan Loops Using Prover9/Mace4 to understand Jordan Loops Kyle Pula June 22nd, 2007 Kyle Pula Using Prover9/Mace4 to understand Jordan Loops #12;Jordan Loops Jordan Loops A loop is a set with binary) and x · e = e · x = x A Jordan loop is a commutative loop satisfying x2 y · x = x2 · yx (1) Kyle Pula

Veroff, Robert

18

Establishment of Mechatronics Engineering Professional Groups in Jordan  

E-print Network

Establishment of Mechatronics Engineering Professional Groups in Jordan Dr. Nathir Rawashdeh - Jordan "Establishment of Mechatronics Engineering Professional Groups in Jordan", Nathir Rawashdeh #12;Outline TEMPUS Project Develop Joint Master Degree Establish Labs Link with Industry Jordan

19

Geophysical investigations in Jordan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A number of geophysical investigations have been undertaken in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan to provide data for understanding the tectonic framework, the pattern of seismicity, earthquake hazards and geothermal resources of the country. Both the historical seismic record and the observed recent seismicity point to the dominance of the Dead Sea Rift as the main locus of seismic activity but significant branching trends and gaps in the seismicity pattern are also seen. A wide variety of focal plane solutions are observed emphasizing the complex pattern of fault activity in the vicinity of the rift zone. Geophysical investigations directed towards the geothermal assessment of the prominent thermal springs of Zerga Ma'in and Zara are not supportive of the presence of a crustal magmatic source. ?? 1990.

Kovach, R.L.; Andreasen, G.E.; Gettings, M.E.; El-Kaysi, K.

1990-01-01

20

JORDAN SUPERALGEBRAS DEFINED BY Consuelo Martinez  

E-print Network

JORDAN SUPERALGEBRAS DEFINED BY BRACKETS Consuelo Mart´inez Ivan Shestakov Efim Zelmanov Abstract Jordan superalgebras defined by brackets on associative commutative su- peralgebras are studied. In particular, all Jordan super- algebras of brackets are i-special. The speciality of these superalgebras

21

Directions to Jordan Hall From San Francisco  

E-print Network

Directions to Jordan Hall From San Francisco: · Take Highway 101 South. · Exit at Embarcadero Rd, underneath the placard that reads "Jordan Hall". From San Jose: · Take Highway 101 North. · Exit at the end of Palm Drive, underneath the placard that reads "Jordan Hall". From Oakland/East Bay: · Take

Grill-Spector, Kalanit

22

A Statistical Model for Euclidean Jordan Algebras  

E-print Network

A Statistical Model for Euclidean Jordan Algebras@uottawa.ca Abstract We give a review of the basic structure theory of Euclidean Jordan alge- bras on the symmetric cone of a Euclidean Jordan algebra. 1 Basic concepts We start by reviewing our

23

Dr. Ibrahim Badran Amman, Jordan June,2008  

E-print Network

1 Dr. Ibrahim Badran (C.V.) Amman, Jordan June,2008 #12;2 Dr. Ibrahim Badran 1- Present Posts University Amman ­ Jordan - Member of the Board of Trustees of the National Council for Family Affairs of Development in the Arab World Amman .1988 7- Energy in Jordan Amman ,1988 8- Nuclear Energy and The Chernobyl

24

JORDAN HALL Directions from San Francisco  

E-print Network

JORDAN HALL Directions from San Francisco · Take Highway 101 South. · Exit at Embarcadero Rd, underneath the placard that reads "Jordan Hall". Directions from San Jose · Take Highway 101 North. · Exit at the end of Palm Drive, underneath the placard that reads "Jordan Hall". Directions from Oakland/East Bay

Wagner, Anthony

25

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE  

E-print Network

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU give a method to construct new restricted k[E]-modules of constant Jordan type from k[E]-modules of constant Jordan type and use it to realize several Jordan types. The constraints on the Jordan type

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

26

Probabilistic inference in graphical models Michael I. Jordan  

E-print Network

Probabilistic inference in graphical models Michael I. Jordan jordan@cs.berkeley.edu Division in graphical models Correspondence: Michael I. Jordan EECS Computer Science Division 387 Soda Hall # 1776 Berkeley, CA 94720-1776 Phone: (510) 642-3806 Fax: (510) 642-5775 email: jordan@cs.berkeley.edu #12;Jordan

Chuang, Yung-Yu

27

JORDAN FORM CHEAT SHEET Here is the basic recipe for finding the Jordan form of a matrix A.  

E-print Network

JORDAN FORM CHEAT SHEET Here is the basic recipe for finding the Jordan form of a matrix A. (1 enumerate all of the possible Jordan forms: you write the various roots along the diagonal as many times the number of Jordan blocks for A - rI on this subspace. (4) Now find the Jordan form of A - rI restricted

Hill, Mike

28

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos  

E-print Network

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

29

Un portrait kaleidoscopique du jeune Camille Jordan  

E-print Network

Un portrait kal´eidoscopique du jeune Camille Jordan Fr´ed´eric Brechenmacher Universit´e d'Artois, Laboratoire de math´ematiques de Lens (EA 2462) rue Jean Souvraz S.P. 18, F- 62300 Lens France Camille Jordan math´ematiques entre 1870 et 1914 12 3 Le premier th´eor`eme de Jordan : l'origine du groupe lin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

The Geometry of Jordan Matrix Models  

E-print Network

We elucidate the geometry of matrix models based on simple formally real Jordan algebras. Such Jordan algebras give rise to a nonassociative geometry that is a generalization of Lorentzian geometry. We emphasize constructions for the exceptional Jordan algebra and the exceptional Jordan C*-algebra and describe the projective spaces related to the exceptional cubic matrix model and the E_6 matrix model. The resulting projective spaces are shown to be exceptional versions of projective twistor space, thus revealing the existence of exceptional twistor string theories that are dual to octonionic matrix models.

Michael Rios

2005-03-08

31

JORDAN H. KRAEMER VITA WINTER 2012  

E-print Network

JORDAN H. KRAEMER VITA WINTER 2012 Department of Anthropology 47 Albion Street Social of Human-Computer Interaction, I. Shklovski, J. Vertesi, S. Lindtner, L. Suchman, eds. #12;VITA JORDAN H of the American Anthropological Association, New Orleans, Nov. 17-21. 2008 "Sexuality, Subjectivity, and Consumer

Loudon, Catherine

32

1. Photocopied July 1971 from Photo 745, Jordan Narrows Folder ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Photocopied July 1971 from Photo 745, Jordan Narrows Folder #1, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. JORDAN STATION, JULY 2, 1909. GENERAL VIEW. - Salt Lake City Water & Electrical Power Company, Jordan Narrows Hydroelectric Plant, Jordan River, Riverton, Salt Lake County, UT

33

2. Photocopied July 1971 from photostat Jordan Narrows Folder #1, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Photocopied July 1971 from photostat Jordan Narrows Folder #1, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. JORDAN NARROWS STATION. PLAN AND SECTION. - Salt Lake City Water & Electrical Power Company, Jordan Narrows Hydroelectric Plant, Jordan River, Riverton, Salt Lake County, UT

34

Shared Water Resources in the Jordan River Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to chronicle the history of river basin development plans of the Jordan River basin riparians (Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, the Palestinian Authority, and Syria) and to analyze the agreements among the Jordan River basin riparians in light of international law principles. The relationship among the Jordan River basin riparians is complicated by the fact that

Karen Hudes

35

JORDAN ANALOGUE OF LAURENT POLYNOMIAL ALGEBRA YOJI YOSHII  

E-print Network

JORDAN ANALOGUE OF LAURENT POLYNOMIAL ALGEBRA YOJI YOSHII Abstract. Quantum tori or the octonion algebra in the variety of Jordan alge- bras. We call these algebras Jordan tori, and we announce the classification of Jordan tori. 1. Introduction Throughout this report, we assume that F is a field

Yoshii, Yoji

36

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE  

E-print Network

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU Abstract. We introduce the class of restricted k[A]-modules and pt-Jordan types for a finite abelian p on Jordan types for modules of constant Jordan type when t is 1. We state conjectures giving constraints

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

37

Is there a Jordan geometry underlying quantum physics?  

E-print Network

Is there a Jordan geometry underlying quantum physics? Wolfgang Bertram # January 19, 2008 Abstract of Jordan algebra theory might give new strength to such approaches: there is a ``Jordan geometry'' belonging to the Jordan part of the algebra of observables, in the same way as Lie groups belong to the Lie

38

JORDAN GEOMETRIES AN APPROACH VIA INVERSIONS WOLFGANG BERTRAM  

E-print Network

JORDAN GEOMETRIES ­ AN APPROACH VIA INVERSIONS WOLFGANG BERTRAM Abstract. Jordan geometries]) as spaces equipped with point reflections Sx fixing x, and therefore the theories of Jordan geometries action of torsors and of symmetric spaces is introduced. Jordan geometries give rise both to inversive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

39

8.EE Kimi and Jordan  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Kimi and Jordan are each working during the summer to earn money in addition to their weekly allowance, and they are saving all their money. Kimi earns...

2012-05-01

40

7-1 Chapter 7--Memory System Design Computer Systems Design and Architecture by V. Heuring and H. Jordan 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan  

E-print Network

and H. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Chapter 7: Memory System Design Topics 7.1 Introduction. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Fig 7.1 The CPU­Memory Interface Sequence of events: Read: 1. CPU and H. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Tbl 7.1 Some Memory Properties Symbol Definition Intel

41

7-1 Chapter 7--Memory System Design Computer Systems Design and Architecture by V. Heuring and H. Jordan 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan  

E-print Network

and H. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Chapter 7: Memory System Design Topics 7.1 Introduction. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Fig 7.1 The CPU­Memory Interface Sequence of events: Read: 1. CPU. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Tbl 7.1 Some Memory Properties Symbol Definition Intel Intel Power

42

7-47 Chapter 7--Memory System Design Computer Systems Design and Architecture by V. Heuring and H. Jordan 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan  

E-print Network

. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Fig 7.30 The Cache Mapping Function The cache mapping function Systems Design and Architecture by V. Heuring and H. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Memory Fields Computer Systems Design and Architecture by V. Heuring and H. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Fig 7

Boyer, Michel

43

Chaotic inflation in Jordan frame supergravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the inflationary scenario with non-minimal coupling in 4D Jordan frame supergravity. We find that there occurs a tachyonic instability along the direction of the accompanying non-inflaton field in generic Jordan frame supergravity models. We propose a higher order correction to the Jordan frame function for solving the tachyonic mass problem and show that the necessary correction can be naturally generated by the heavy thresholds without spoiling the slow-roll conditions. We discuss the implication of the result on the Higgs inflation in NMSSM.

Lee, Hyun Min

2010-08-01

44

Sparse Recovery on Euclidean Jordan Algebras  

E-print Network

Feb 3, 2013 ... We consider the sparse recovery problem on Euclidean Jordan algebra (SREJA), which ... are necessary and sufficient conditions for exact s-sparse recovery via NNMEJA. ...... ws stands for the best s-rank approximation of w.

2013-02-03

45

Jordan ships oil shale to China  

SciTech Connect

Jordan and China have signed an agreement to develop oil shale processing technology that could lead to a 200 ton/day oil shale plant in Jordan. China will process 1200 tons of Jordanian oil shale at its Fu Shun refinery. If tests are successful, China could build the demonstration plant in Jordan's Lajjun region, where the oil shale resource is estimated at 1.3 billion tons. China plans to send a team to Jordan to conduct a plant design study. A Lajjun oil shale complex could produce as much as 50,000 b/d of shale oil. An earlier 500 ton shipment of shale is said to have yielded promising results.

Not Available

1986-12-01

46

Homotope polynomial identities in prime Jordan systems Fernando Montaner  

E-print Network

explicitely in D'Amour and McCrimmon's cuadratic extension. Those results lead, in its applications-Rowen's theorem for Jordan algebras [4]. For Jordan pairs and triple systems, in view of D'Amour and Mc

47

Temporary Anion States of Polyatomic Hydrocarbons KENNETH D. JORDAN'  

E-print Network

Temporary Anion States of Polyatomic Hydrocarbons KENNETH D. JORDAN' OSpemnenr Of C%sITIkby. M k I. A biographyand photograph of Kenneth D. Jordan appear In previous paper in this issue. far outweighsthat

Simons, Jack

48

5-1 Chapter 5--Processor Design--Advanced Topics Computer Systems Design and Architecture by V. Heuring and H. Jordan 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan  

E-print Network

by V. Heuring and H. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Chapter 5: Processor Design-- Advanced. Heuring and H. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Microprogramming: Basic Idea Control unit job--Advanced Topics Computer Systems Design and Architecture by V. Heuring and H. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H

49

3. Photocopied July 1971 from Photo 741, Jordan Narrows Folder ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. Photocopied July 1971 from Photo 741, Jordan Narrows Folder #1, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. INTERIOR VIEW, JULY 2, 1909. - Salt Lake City Water & Electrical Power Company, Jordan Narrows Hydroelectric Plant, Jordan River, Riverton, Salt Lake County, UT

50

POLYNOMIAL IDENTITIES AND NON-IDENTITIES OF SPLIT JORDAN PAIRS  

E-print Network

POLYNOMIAL IDENTITIES AND NON-IDENTITIES OF SPLIT JORDAN PAIRS Erhard Neher Abstract. We show that split Jordan pairs over rings without 2-torsion can be distinguished by polynomial identities with integer coefficients. In particular, this holds for simple finite-dimensional Jordan pairs over

Neher, Erhard

51

Simplicity of the Heart of a Nondegenerate Jordan System 1  

E-print Network

Simplicity of the Heart of a Nondegenerate Jordan System 1: In this paper we prove that the heart of a nondegenerate Jordan* * system (algebra, triple system or pair systems and those of their corr* *esponding Jordan systems. 2000 Math. Subj. Class.: 17C05, 17C10

52

Jordan structures and non-associative Wolfgang Bertram  

E-print Network

Jordan structures and non-associative geometry Wolfgang Bertram Institut Elie Cartan, Universit hand and with the approach of non- commutative geometry on the other hand. Keywords: Jordan pair, Lie abundantly that some people even consider them as still belonging to the garden), and Jordan algebras a bit

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

53

Quadratic Jordan superpairs covered by grids Dedicated to Ottmar Loos  

E-print Network

Quadratic Jordan superpairs covered by grids Dedicated to Ottmar Loos on the occasion of his 60th of Jordan superpairs defined over (su- per)commutative superrings. Our framework has two novelties: we allow that it is possible to work in this generality we classify Jordan superpairs covered by a grid. There has recently

54

THE KAC JORDAN SUPERALGEBRA: AUTOMORPHISMS AND MAXIMAL SUBALGEBRAS  

E-print Network

THE KAC JORDAN SUPERALGEBRA: AUTOMORPHISMS AND MAXIMAL SUBALGEBRAS ALBERTO ELDUQUE, JES´US LALIENA, AND SARA SACRIST´AN Abstract. In this note the group of automorphisms of the Kac Jordan superalgebra is described, and used to classify the maximal subalgebras. 1. Introduction. Finite dimensional simple Jordan

55

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art University of Oregon  

E-print Network

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art University of Oregon FACILITY RENTAL RATE INFORMATION The University opportunities for skiing, hiking, mountaineering, and boating. The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer that will deepen the appreciation and understanding of the human experience. The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

56

Jordan Pairs and Hopf Algebras John R. Faulkner  

E-print Network

Jordan Pairs and Hopf Algebras John R. Faulkner A (quadratic) Jordan pair is constructed from a Z-graded Hopf algebra having divided power sequences over. The notion of a divided power representation of a Jordan pair is introduced and the universal

57

On some nongeneric perturbations of an arbitrary nilpotent Jordan structure  

E-print Network

On some nongeneric perturbations of an arbitrary nilpotent Jordan structure C-P. Jeannerod Abstract perturbations of the form J+B( ) where B( ) has valuation profile conforming to the nilpotent Jordan structure J depending on a parameter, Jordan structure, valuation profile, perturbed eigenvalues, similarity transform

Jeannerod, Claude-Pierre

58

Jordan J. Gerth A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of  

E-print Network

Sky Cover By Jordan J. Gerth A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements, Professor, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences #12;#12;i Sky Cover Jordan J. Gerth1 Department of Atmospheric, Madison, Wisconsin 1 Corresponding author address: Jordan Gerth, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

59

Supporting Information Jordan et al. 10.1073/pnas.0806306105  

E-print Network

Supporting Information Jordan et al. 10.1073/pnas.0806306105 SI Text Functional Analysis with pClamp 8.2. For display, single channel records were filtered digitally to 70 Hz. Jordan et al. www, green; ABC2, cyan; R-domain, pink. Jordan et al. www.pnas.org/cgi/content/short/0806306105 2 of 14 #12

Jordan, King

60

The Constitution of Christian Communal Boundaries and Spheres in Jordan  

E-print Network

1 The Constitution of Christian Communal Boundaries and Spheres in Jordan Géraldine Chatelard districts (Ajlun, Salt, and Karak) east of the Jordan River in villages and towns. There were few Christians of the province of Syria, the Greek Orthodox church, to which all Christians East of the Jordan river were

Boyer, Edmond

61

National Mechatronics Day Philadelphia University, April 23, 2013, Jordan  

E-print Network

National Mechatronics Day Philadelphia University, April 23, 2013, Jordan Program Tuesday, 23rd April 9:00 ­ 09:30 Registration 9:30 ­ 10:00 Opening Ceremony - Jordan National Anthem, Quran Versus. - Mechatronics Chair Talk (Dr. Mohammed Bani Younis). - Jordan National Tempus Office (Prof. Ahmad Abu Al

62

Local and Subquotient Inheritance of Simplicity in Jordan Systems 1  

E-print Network

Local and Subquotient Inheritance of Simplicity in Jordan: In this paper we prove that the local algebras of a simple Jorda* *n pair are simple. Jordan pairs all for Jordan triple systems and alg* *ebras. Finally, we characterize the inner ideals of a simple pair

63

Pseudo-euclidean Jordan algebras Amir Baklouti and Said Benayadi  

E-print Network

Pseudo-euclidean Jordan algebras Amir Baklouti and Sa¨id Benayadi Universit´e Paul Verlaine-Metz, LMAM, CNRS UMR 7122, Ile du Saulcy, F-57045 Metz cedex, France Abstract A pseudo-euclidean Jordan algebra is a Jordan algebra J with an associative non-degenerate sym- metric bilinear form B. B is said

Boyer, Edmond

64

MAXIMAL JORDAN ALGEBRAS OF MATRICES WITH BOUNDED NUMBER OF EIGENVALUES  

E-print Network

1 MAXIMAL JORDAN ALGEBRAS OF MATRICES WITH BOUNDED NUMBER OF EIGENVALUES L. Grunenfelder, T. Kosir, M. Omladic, and H. Radjavi Abstract. We consider maximal Jordan algebras of matrices with bounded, and we also give a list of some reducible such algebras. We also study automorphisms of Jordan algebras

Ko?ir, Toma?

65

JORDAN QUADRUPLE SYSTEMS MURRAY BREMNER AND SARA MADARIAGA  

E-print Network

JORDAN QUADRUPLE SYSTEMS MURRAY BREMNER AND SARA MADARIAGA To our friend and colleague Luiz Antonio Peresi on his retirement Abstract. We define Jordan quadruple systems by the polynomial identities of degrees 4 and 7 satisfied by the Jordan tetrad {a, b, c, d} = abcd + dcba as a quadri- linear operation

66

Electric Energy Access in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overall energy profile and access in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. The urbanization of the population has similar levels in Jordan and Lebanon at 80 and 90%, respectively, whereas Syria still has a 48 % rural population. All three economies rely on services in varying amounts the largest being in Jordan at 73% and the smallest is

Sami Karaki; Farid Chaaban; Riad Chedid; Toufic Mezher; Ali Hamzeh; Ahmad Harb; Fayez Abdulla

67

Audit professional examination in emerging economy Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the consistency of Jordan's certified public accountant examination, and its agreement with professional viewpoints regarding the relative importance of examination topics. The study examines the grades of 15 consecutive examinations and surveyed 156 auditors and 31 examination committee (EC) members. The results indicate that the rankings of examination topics derived from the examination grades are different from

Mohamad T. A. El-Rajabi; Angappa Gunasekaran

2004-01-01

68

Energy analysis of Jordan's commercial sector  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents some insight into energy consumption in the commercial and public service sector (CAPSS) in Jordan. In this sector, space- and water-heating is dependent particularly upon the combustion of fossil fuels. Which thereby contribute significantly to air pollution and the build-up of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The results of a recent survey were used to evaluate the

J. O. Jaber; M. S. Mohsen; A. Al-Sarkhi; B. Akash

2003-01-01

69

CV (K. Jordan) 1 CURRICULM VITAE  

E-print Network

. L. (2011). Racial profiling in decisions to search: A preliminary analysis using propensity, G. E. (2009). Exploring the perceived extent of and citizens' support for consumer racial profiling of the racial gradient thesis. Journal of Crime and Justice. Jordan, K. L. (2012). Preventive detention and out

Wu, Shin-Tson

70

CV (K. Jordan) 1 CURRICULM VITAE  

E-print Network

-67. Higgins, G. E., Jennings, W. G., Jordan, K. L., & Gabbidon, S. L. (2011). Racial profiling in decisions' support for consumer racial profiling: Results from a national poll. Journal of Criminal Justice, 37/ethnicity on the perceived prevalence and support for racial profiling at airports. Criminal Justice Policy Review, 20

Van Stryland, Eric

71

Education and Social Hierarchies in Rural Jordan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A field study conducted in the east Jordan Valley (September 1981-August 1983) explored the role of formal education in the maintenance of sex-gender hierarchy and other social heirarchies. Two rural secondary schools were studied, one for boys and one for girls, both attended by members of several different social/ethnic groups who consider

Layne, Linda L.

72

English in Jordan: Attitudes and Prestige  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper attempts to discuss the attitudes of a number of Jordanian university students towards English as a foreign language and the place it occupies in Jordan. Although research of a similar nature has been done, this study complements others by following 420 students in their university studies, and it provides another avenue for examining

Al-Saidat, Emad M.

2009-01-01

73

Faculty for Factory: A University-Industry Link Program in Jordan  

E-print Network

Faculty for Factory: A University- Industry Link Program in Jordan Yousef Al Abdallat and Tarek A. Tutunji University of Jordan, Jordan Philadelphia University, Jordan Mechatronics REM 2012 Nov 21-23, 2012 the universities and the industry Faculty For Factory #12;Outline · Higher Education in Jordan · Mechatronics

74

Jordan type structures over a set with two Ral Felipe a,b  

E-print Network

Jordan type structures over a set with two operations Raúl Felipe a,b and Raúl Velásquez a the notion of Jordan di-structures, which are a generalization of the notion of Jordan algebra possessing two op- erations. We show that every dialgebra is a Jordan di-structure and is a noncommutative Jordan

75

The Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in Jordan is marked by a major depositional hiatus that differs in magnitude from place to place due to variable structural movements of the Syrian Arc Fold Belt that resulted in irregularity of Jordan/Levant depositional basin after the deposition of Maastrichtian succession. To elucidate the nature of this hiatus, fieldwork was carried out at a number of locations including lithofacies and stratigraphic analysis, and a multi-proxy study of microplanktonic biostratigraphy (calcareous nannofossilis and planktonic formaminifera). However, the duration of this hiatus extended over latest Maastrichtian and early Danian stages. This is based on the absence of the planktonic foraminifera; Pseudoguembelina hariaensis (CF3), Pseudoguembelina palpebra (CF2), Plummerita hantkeninoides (CF1), Guembelitria cretacea (P0), Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina (P&) zones and Parasubbotina pseudobulloides (P1a) subzones and the coeval calcareous nannofossils Nephrolithus frequens and Markalius inversus zones. We estimate that in the paleo-lows areas an unexpected 3.96 Ma hiatus is present. Conversely, in swell areas, the duration of the hiatus represents the entire Danian-Selandian interval and revealed an unexpected 10.33 Ma hiatus, especially in the central part of Jordan. Subsequently, a marked transgression took place over the whole of Jordan which resulted in the prevalence of deep water conditions (Zones P4 or equivalent NP7/8); this caused the deposition of a retrogradational parasequence set of middle shelf pelagic marl and chalk during a rapid relative rise of sea-level. A correlative hiatus and time gap have also been reported in different parts of the Arabian and African plates, indicating that Jordan was influenced by regional tectonics that combined with the latest Maastrichtian sea-level fall resulted in a long-term sub-marine hiatus and/or non-deposition of sediments. A combination of sea level changes and tectonic uplift are the likely cause for such a long gap in the sediment record in the region.

Farouk, Sherif; Marzouk, Akmal M.; Ahmad, Fayez

2014-11-01

76

75 FR 41898 - Slash Support, Inc. Gamehouse Products Support Workers South Jordan, UT; Notice of Revised...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Gamehouse Products Support Workers South Jordan, UT; Notice of Revised Determination...Gamehouse Products Support Workers, South Jordan, Utah. The negative determination was...GameHouse Products Support Workers, South Jordan, Utah, who were engaged in...

2010-07-19

77

Jordan Canonical Form Given d N and K, the Jordan block Jd() is the upper-triangular (d d)-matrix  

E-print Network

Jordan Canonical Form Given d N and K, the Jordan block Jd() is the upper-triangular (d ? d. Observations/Facts. (a) The number m of Jordan blocks (counting multiple occurrences of the same block. (c) The number of Jordan blocks corresponding to a given eigenvalue is the geometric multi- plicity

Smith, Gregory G.

78

Department of Statistics: Kingdom of Jordan  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1949, the Kingdom of Jordan's official Department of Statistics has created this website to provide broad access to important information about the country to audiences around the world. In the "About Us" area, visitors can learn about their census techniques and also take in a bit of additional information about their organization and the services they offer. The tabs on the left-hand side of the homepage give users access to economic reports, agriculture surveys, environmental statistics, and e-government. One particularly compelling report included in this area addresses the subject of the Iraqi population in Jordan, and it is a document which will interest political scientists and others. The site also contains a "What's New" section and statistical reports and the like in Arabic.

79

Jordan Frame Supergravity and Inflation in NMSSM  

E-print Network

We present a complete explicit N=1, d=4 supergravity action in an arbitrary Jordan frame with non-minimal scalar-curvature coupling of the form $\\Phi(z, \\bar z)\\, R$. The action is derived by suitably gauge-fixing the superconformal action. The theory has a modified Kaehler geometry, and it exhibits a significant dependence on the frame function $\\Phi (z, \\bar z)$ and its derivatives over scalars, in the bosonic as well as in the fermionic part of the action. Under certain simple conditions, the scalar kinetic terms in the Jordan frame have a canonical form. We consider an embedding of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) gauge theory into supergravity, clarifying the Higgs inflation model recently proposed by Einhorn and Jones. We find that the conditions for canonical kinetic terms are satisfied for the NMSSM scalars in the Jordan frame, which leads to a simple action. However, we find that the gauge singlet field experiences a strong tachyonic instability during inflation in this model. Thus, a modification of the model is required to support the Higgs-type inflation.

Sergio Ferrara; Renata Kallosh; Andrei Linde; Alessio Marrani; Antoine Van Proeyen

2010-07-08

80

Structural Control of Hydrology, Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry along the Eastern Escarpment of the Jordan Rift Valley, JORDAN.  

E-print Network

??The relationship of structural geology and hydrogeological characteristics NW Jordan. Superior 3 phase tectonic model was derived from re-evaluation of structural elements which are strongly (more)

Sahawneh, Julia

2011-01-01

81

Quality Assurance and Accreditation of Engineering Education in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides a study of the quality assurance and accreditation in the Jordanian higher education sector and focuses mainly on engineering education. It presents engineering education, accreditation and quality assurance in Jordan and considers the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST) for a case study. The study highlights the

Aqlan, Faisal; Al-Araidah, Omar; Al-Hawari, Tarek

2010-01-01

82

Research in Context Scientific Production and Researchers' Experience in Jordan  

E-print Network

1 Research in Context Scientific Production and Researchers' Experience in Jordan Pénélope Larzillière The social and political context of research in Jordan is made up of the national system of research, with its institutions and its policies, plus the complex web of constraints, which ranges from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

The Prevalence of Speech Disorders among University Students in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problem: There are no available studies on the prevalence, and distribution of speech disorders among Arabic speaking undergraduate students in Jordan. Method: A convenience sample of 400 undergraduate students at the University of Jordan was screened for speech disorders. Two spontaneous speech samples and an oral reading of a passage were

Alaraifi, Jehad Ahmad; Amayreh, Mousa Mohammad; Saleh, Mohammad Yusef

2014-01-01

84

THE STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION OF EMPLOYMENT IN JORDAN  

E-print Network

#12;THE STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION OF EMPLOYMENT IN JORDAN Ragui Assaad Working Paper 674 May 2012 and evolution of employment in Jordan over the past quarter century. Although, this is only the first wave classification codes: J21, J62 Keywords: Employment Structure; Employment Dynamics; Job Creation; Labor Market

Levinson, David M.

85

Education Reform and the Quality of Kindergartens in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study evaluates a major education reform in Jordan--the implementation of public kindergartens--and provides an example of how evaluation can be incorporated into education reform. In the context of education reform in Jordan, 532 public kindergartens have been created over the last five years. A stratified random sample of

Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Obeidat, Osama M.; Lansford, Jennifer E.

2010-01-01

86

Jordan Reforms Public Education to Compete in a Global Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The King of Jordan's vision for education is resulting in innovative projects for the country. King Abdullah II wants Jordan to develop its human resources through public education to equip the workforce with skills for the future. From King Abdullah II's vision, the Education Reform for a Knowledge Economy (ERfKE) project implemented by the

Erickson, Paul W.

2009-01-01

87

Barriers to Utilizing ICT in Education in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored barriers to utilizing information and communication technologies (ICT) for teaching and learning in the country of Jordan as indicated by participating stakeholders: students, teachers, and administrators. Jordan is a developing country in the heart of the Middle East with both tremendous opportunity as well as significant

Alkhawaldeh, Nayef Ibrahim; Menchaca, Michael

2014-01-01

88

Gender and the Expansion of University Education in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores how gender is threaded through the expansion and privatization of higher education in Jordan. Due to the justified current concern with the educational deficit of Muslim girls, it is easy to overlook the educational advances made by girls in some Islamic countries. In Jordan, girls have profited more than boys from the

Jansen, Willy

2006-01-01

89

Social Support and Stress among University Students in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perception of social support and perceived stress among university students in Jordan. A sample of 241 university students from private and government universities in Jordan answered self-report questionnaires including the perceived social support scale and perceived stress scale.

Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M.; Dawani, Hania A.

2008-01-01

90

Cop Rock: Protest, Identity, and Dancing Riot Police in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

In January 1997, a diverse group of Jordanians gathered outside of Amman to demonstrate against the opening of the first Israeli trade fair to be held in Jordan. The fair, intended to strengthen economic ties between Israel and Jordan, was organized as a provision of the 1994 peace treaty signed between the two countries. The Jordanian government anticipated a large

Jillian Schwedler

2005-01-01

91

Combating a Religious Radical Ideology v. Suppressing Islamic Opposition: Jordans Approach to Counterterrorism  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the aftermath of 9\\/11, criminal law reform in Jordan was part of the worldwide expansion of criminal laws facilitated by UNSC Resolution 1373 that was enacted under mandatory Chapter VII of the UN Charter. The introduced criminal law amendments were largely offered as a symbolic response to 9\\/11; it was built on the assumption of inadequacy of criminal law

Abeer Ghazi Jarrar

2009-01-01

92

MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE JON F. CARLSON*, ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER* AND JULIA PEVTSOVA*  

E-print Network

MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE JON F. CARLSON*, ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER* AND JULIA PEVTSOVA* Abstract. We introduce the class of modules of constant Jordan type for * *a to be the Jordan type ass* *ociated to a module of constant Jordan type

Pevtsova, Julia

93

Math. H110 Gauss-Jordan Inversion October 16, 1998 Prof. W. Kahan Page 1  

E-print Network

Math. H110 Gauss-Jordan Inversion October 16, 1998 Prof. W. Kahan Page 1 Gauss-Jordan Inversion accurate on some machines, is based upon Gauss-Jordan Elimination, a process that resembles Gaussian purpose is twofold; first to explain how Gauss- Jordan Elimination works when pivotal exchanges

California at Berkeley, University of

94

JORDAN TRIPLE DISYSTEMS MURRAY R. BREMNER, RAUL FELIPE, AND JUANA SANCHEZ-ORTEGA  

E-print Network

JORDAN TRIPLE DISYSTEMS MURRAY R. BREMNER, RA´UL FELIPE, AND JUANA S´ANCHEZ-ORTEGA Abstract. We for Jordan triple systems to obtain a new variety of nonassociative triple systems, called Jordan triple dialgebra. We apply the BSO algorithm to the Jordan triple product and use computer algebra to verify

95

Extensions of Jordan Bases for Invariant Subspaces of a Matrix Rafael Bru*  

E-print Network

1 ( i i \\ ! } Extensions of Jordan Bases for Invariant Subspaces of a Matrix Rafael Bru A characterization is obtained for the matrices A with the property that every (some) Jordan basis of every A-invariant subspace can be extended to a Jordan basis of A. These results are based on a criterion for a Jordan basis

Schneider, Hans

96

GEOMORPHIC FEATURES AND SOIL FORMATION OF ARID LANDS IN NORTHEASTERN JORDAN  

E-print Network

GEOMORPHIC FEATURES AND SOIL FORMATION OF ARID LANDS IN NORTHEASTERN JORDAN GEOMORPHOLOGISCHE. BUCKb and H. C. MONGERc a Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid-22110-Jordan; b University the geomorphic features and soil formation of the arid lands in northeastern Jordan, to provide information

Ahmad, Sajjad

97

p-POWER POINTS AND MODULES OF CONSTANT p-POWER JORDAN TYPE  

E-print Network

p-POWER POINTS AND MODULES OF CONSTANT p-POWER JORDAN TYPE SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU Abstract. We modules of constant pt-Jordan type, constant pt-power-Jordan type as generalizations of modules of constant Jordan type, and pt-support, non-maximal pt-support spaces. We obtain a filtration of modules

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

98

Jordan and Weiss: Graphical Models: Probabilistic inference 1 Graphical models: Probabilistic inference  

E-print Network

Jordan and Weiss: Graphical Models: Probabilistic inference 1 Graphical models: Probabilistic inference Michael I. Jordan jordan@cs.berkeley.edu Division of Computer Science and Department of Statistics. Jordan EECS Computer Science Division 387 Soda Hall # 1776 Berkeley, CA 94720-1776 Phone: (510) 642

Jordan, Michael I.

99

US-Jordan Free Trade Agreement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US-Jordon Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was signed on October 24, 2000 to "eliminate duties and commercial barriers to bilateral trade in goods and services originating in the United States and Jordan." The FTA has seven major sections which cover tariff elimination, services, intellectual property rights, electronic commerce, labor provisions, environmental provisions, and consultation and dispute settlement. Along with the text of the agreement, accompanying documents and information include the complete US and Jordanian tariffs schedule, joint statement on World Trade Organization issues, and the FTA official press release and fact sheet.

100

F-BF Kimi and Jordan  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Kimi and Jordan are each working during the summer to earn money in addition to their weekly allowance. Kimi earns \\$9 per hour at her job, and her all...

101

False vacuum decay in Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmologies  

SciTech Connect

We examine the bubble nucleation rate in a first-order phase transition taking place in a background Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology. We compute the leading order terms in the nucleation rate when the Jordan-Brans-Dicke field is large (i.e., late times) by means of a Weyl rescaling of the fields in the theory. We find that despite the fact that the Jordan-Brans-Dicke field (hence the effective gravitational constant) has a time dependence in the false vacuum, at late times the nucleation rate is time independent. 21 refs.

Holman, R.; Wang, Yun (Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kolb, E.W.; Vadas, S.L. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Weinberg, E.J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1989-12-01

102

False vacuum decay in Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The bubble nucleation rate in a first-order phase transition taking place in a background Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology is examined. The leading order terms in the nucleation rate when the Jordan-Brans-Dicke field is large (i.e., late times) are computed by means of a Weyl rescaling of the fields in the theory. It is found that despite the fact that the Jordan-Brans-Dicke field (hence the effective gravitational constant) has a time dependence in the false vacuum at late times the nucleation rate is time independent.

Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.; Vadas, Sharon L.; Wang, Yun; Weinberg, Erick J.

1989-01-01

103

A Jordan GNS Construction for the Holonomy-Flux *-algebra  

E-print Network

The holonomy-flux *-algebra was recently proposed as an algebra of basic kinematical observables for loop quantum gravity. We show the conventional GNS construction breaks down when the the holonomy-flux *-algebra is allowed to be a Jordan algebra of observables. To remedy this, we give a Jordan GNS construction for the holonomy-flux *-algebra that is based on trace. This is accomplished by assuming the holonomy-flux *-algebra is an algebra of observables that is also a Banach algebra, hence a JB algebra. We show the Jordan GNS construction produces a state that is invariant under all inner derivations of the holonomy-flux *-algebra. Implications for the corresponding Jordan-Schrodinger equation are also discussed.

Michael Rios

2005-05-09

104

The anglerfish Lophius litulon (Jordan) is distributed throughout Japanese  

E-print Network

356 The anglerfish Lophius litulon (Jordan) is distributed throughout Japanese waters, in the Gulf, this species and a second anglerfish, Lophiomus setigerus (Vahl), are consumed as food, and their livers

105

Feasibility of Starting a Waterjet Fabrication Plant in Amman, Jordan  

E-print Network

This project is an attempt to investigate the feasibility of starting a waterjet fabrication plant in Amman, Jordan to precisely cut marble, granite, and ceramics. The frame work of the feasibility study included analyzing ...

Ahmad, Khaled A.

2010-05-14

106

Is there a Jordan geometry underlying quantum physics?  

E-print Network

the Lie geometry and the Jordan geometry are well-adapted to describe certain features of quantum theory an affirmative answer to the first question. From a more contemporary perspective, E. Alfsen and F. E. Schultz

107

Equivalence of the Einstein and Jordan frames  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

No experiment can measure an absolute scale: every dimensionful quantity has to be compared to some fixed unit scale in order to be measured, and thus only dimensionless quantities are really physical. The Einstein and Jordan frames are related by a conformal transformation of the metric, which amounts to rescaling all length scales. Since the absolute scale cannot be measured, both frames describe the same physics and are equivalent. In this article we make this explicit by rewriting the action in terms of dimensionless variables, which are invariant under a conformal transformation. For definitiveness, we concentrate on the action of Higgs inflation, but the results can easily be generalized. In addition, we show that the action for f (R ) gravity, which includes Starobinsky inflation, can be written in a frame-independent form.

Postma, Marieke; Volponi, Marco

2014-11-01

108

3-qubit entanglement: A Jordan algebraic perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is by now well known that three qubits can be totally entangled in two physically distinct ways. Here we review work classifying the physically distinct forms of 3-qubit entanglement using the elegant framework of Jordan algebras, Freudenthal-Kantor triple systems and groups of type E7. In particular, it is shown that the four Freudenthal-Kantor ranks correspond precisely to the four 3-qubit entanglement classes: (1) Totally separable A-B-C, (2) Biseparable A-BC, B-CA, C-AB, (3) Totally entangled W, (4) Totally entangled GHZ. The rank 4 GHZ class is regarded as maximally entangled in the sense that it has non-vanishing quartic norm, the defining invariant of the Freudenthal-Kantor triple system. While this framework is specific to three qubits, we show here how the essential features may be naturally generalised to an arbitrary number of qubits.

Borsten, L.

2014-09-01

109

Quality assurance guides health reform in Jordan.  

PubMed

In November 1995, a World Bank mission went to Jordan to conduct a study of the health sector. The study recommended three strategies to reform the health sector: decentralization of Ministry of Health (MOH) management; improvement of clinical practices, quality of care, and consumer satisfaction; and adoption of treatment protocols and standards. The MOH chose quality assurance (QA) methods and quality management (QM) techniques to accomplish these reforms. The Monitoring and QA Directorate oversees QA applications within MOH. It also institutes and develops the capacity of local QA units in the 12 governorates. The QA units implement and monitor day-to-day QA activities. The QM approach encompasses quality principles: establish objectives; use a systematic approach; teach lessons learned and applicable research; use QA training to teach quality care, quality improvement, and patient satisfaction; educate health personnel about QM approaches; use assessment tools and interviews; measure the needs and expectations of local health providers and patients; ensure feedback on QA improvement projects; ensure valid and reliable data; monitor quality improvement efforts; standardize systemic data collection and outcomes; and establish and disseminate QA standards and performance improvement efforts. The Jordan QA Project has helped with the successful institutionalization of a QA system at both the central and local levels. The bylaws of the QA councils and committees require team participation in the decision-making process. Over the last two years, the M&QA Project has adopted 21 standards for nursing, maternal and child health care centers, pharmacies, and medications. The Balqa pilot project has developed 44 such protocols. Quality improvement (COUGH) studies have examined hyper-allergy, analysis of patient flow rate, redistribution of nurses, vaccine waste, and anemic pregnant women. There are a considerable number of on-going clinical and non-clinical COUGH studies. Four epidemiological studies are examining maternal mortality, causes of death, morbidity, and perinatal mortality. PMID:12347468

Abubaker, W; Abdulrahman, M

1996-01-01

110

Born-Jordan Quantization and the Uncertainty Principle  

E-print Network

The Weyl correspondence and the related Wigner formalism lie at the core of traditional quantum mechanics. We discuss here an alternative quantization scheme, whose idea goes back to Born and Jordan, and which has recently been revived in another context, namely time-frequency analysis. We show that in particular the uncertainty principle does not enjoy full symplectic covariance properties in the Born and Jordan scheme, as opposed to what happens in the Weyl quantization.

Maurice A. de Gosson

2013-03-11

111

Precambrian Research 123 (2003) 295319 Late-and post-orogenic Neoproterozoic intrusions of Jordan  

E-print Network

. Crustal evolution in the northernmost Arabian Nubian Shield occurred about the time of terminal collision, G. Saffarinia, H. Al-Zubic a Geology Department, University of Jordan, 11942 Amman, Jordan b

Stern, Robert J.

112

Stability of ternary Jordan homomorphisms and derivations associated to the generalized Jensen equation  

E-print Network

In this paper, we establish the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of Jordan homomorphisms and Jordan derivations between ternary algebras via the generalized Jensen equation $rf(\\frac{sx+ty}{r})=sf(x)+tf(y)$.

Gordji, M Eshaghi; Rassias, J M

2009-01-01

113

Social origins of alliances: uneven and combined development and the case of Jordan 1955-7  

E-print Network

This thesis answers the question: what explains Jordans international alignments between 1955 and 1957? In so doing, the thesis addresses the broader question of why states in the Global South make alignments and ...

Allinson, James Christopher

2012-06-29

114

76 FR 76703 - Jordan Whittaker; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14259-000] Jordan Whittaker; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...and supplemented November 17 and 21, 2011. d. Applicant: Jordan Whittaker. e. Name of Project: Eightmile Hydroelectric...

2011-12-08

115

Photochemistry of ,,OCS...n cluster ions Andrei Sanov, Sreela Nandi, Kenneth D. Jordan,a)  

E-print Network

Photochemistry of ,,OCS...n cluster ions Andrei Sanov, Sreela Nandi, Kenneth D. Jordan,a) and W, and back to (CO2)2 for n 13. Fleischman and Jordan predicted, based on electronic structure calculations

Sanov, Andrei

116

Emigration for Higher Education: The Case of Palestinians Living in Israel Studying in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored reasons for the rapid increase in the number of Palestinian Arabs from Israel (PAI) studying higher education (HE) in Jordan. Four hundred and sixty PAI studying in Jordan answered a questionnaire assessing factors related to HE in both countries. Lenient admission requirements and cultural-language similarity explain Jordan's

Arar, Khalid; Haj-Yehia, Kussai

2010-01-01

117

Preferential Trade Liberalisation, Fiscal Policy Responses and Welfare: A Dynamic CGE Model for Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims at assessing the effects on the Jordanian economy of the Association Agreement (AA) between Jordan and the European Union (EU). Particular emphasis is placed on the effects on consumer welfare. The EU-Jordan AA was signed in 1997 and entered into force in May 2002. It eliminates progressively tariffs on most industrial goods imported by Jordan from the

Omar Feraboli

2007-01-01

118

Scent marking within and between groups of wild banded N. R. Jordan1  

E-print Network

Scent marking within and between groups of wild banded mongooses N. R. Jordan1 , F. Mwanguhya1; intrasexual competition; Mungos mungo. Correspondence Neil R. Jordan, The Vincent Wildlife Trust, 3 & 4 be involved in direct competition for mates (Jordan, Cherry & Manser, 2007). However, an intruding individual

Rüedi, Peter

119

The Implementation of Mobile Bank Usage from marketing point of view of bank managers in Jordan.  

E-print Network

The Implementation of Mobile Bank Usage from marketing point of view of bank managers in Jordan of view in Jordan on the different dimensions of the study (Gender of bank managers, Age of bank managers between the Implementation of Mobile Bank Usage from marketing point of view of bank managers in Jordan

120

The Jordan socle and finitary Lie algebras Antonio Fernandez Lopez 1  

E-print Network

1 The Jordan socle and finitary Lie algebras Antonio Fern´andez L´opez 1 Departamento de ´Algebra introduce the notion of Jordan socle for nondegenerate Lie al- gebras, which extends the definition of socle given in [7] for 3-graded Lie algebras. Any non- degenerate Lie algebra with essential Jordan socle

121

Minimal Ideals of Jordan Systems 1 Jose A. Anquela, Teresa Cortes  

E-print Network

Minimal Ideals of Jordan Systems 1 Jos´e A. Anquela, Teresa Cort´es anque/n, 33007 Oviedo, Spain Abstract: We show that minimal ideals of Jordan systems (algebras, triple systems, the heart, appear naturally when studying Jordan systems [10, III.6]. Indeed, having a nonzero heart can

122

Jordan Thayer (UNH) Learning During Search 1 / 20 Learning Inadmissible Heuristics During Search  

E-print Network

Jordan Thayer (UNH) Learning During Search ­ 1 / 20 Learning Inadmissible Heuristics During Search Jordan Thayer, Austin Dionne, and Wheeler Ruml jtd7, ajv2, ruml at cs.unh.edu With thanks to NSF Grant s Motivation Learning Performance Conclusions Backup Slides Jordan Thayer (UNH) Learning During Search ­ 2 / 20

Ruml, Wheeler

123

CATEGORIES OF JORDAN STRUCTURES AND GRADED LIE D. M. CAVENY AND O. N. SMIRNOV  

E-print Network

CATEGORIES OF JORDAN STRUCTURES AND GRADED LIE ALGEBRAS D. M. CAVENY AND O. N. SMIRNOV Abstract to the category of Jordan pairs via a functorial modification of the TKK construction. For instance, we prove that L = L-1 L0 L1 can be constructed from a Jordan pair if and only if L0 = [L-1, L1] and the second

124

7 CFR 319.56-62 - Fresh beans, shelled or in pods, from Jordan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Fresh beans, shelled or in pods, from Jordan. 319.56-62 Section 319.56-62...Fresh beans, shelled or in pods, from Jordan. Fresh beans (Phaseolus vulgaris...into the continental United States from Jordan only under the conditions...

2014-01-01

125

PEIRCE GRADINGS OF JORDAN SYSTEMS 1 Jos'e A. Anquela and Teresa Cort'es  

E-print Network

PEIRCE GRADINGS OF JORDAN SYSTEMS 1 Jos'e A. Anquela and Teresa Cort of a Jordan pair or triple system V inherit strong primeness, pri* *mitivity and simplicity from V Peirce gradings V = V2 V1 V0 of a Jordan pair V are introduced in [8, * *11] as a generalization

126

Jordan T. Thayer (UNH) Bounded Suboptimal Search 1 / 19 Bounded Suboptimal Search  

E-print Network

Jordan T. Thayer (UNH) Bounded Suboptimal Search ­ 1 / 19 Bounded Suboptimal Search: A Direct Approach Using Inadmissible Estimates Jordan T. Thayer and Wheeler Ruml jtd7, ruml at cs Search s Three Ideas EES Conclusion Jordan T. Thayer (UNH) Bounded Suboptimal Search ­ 2 / 19 Grid Four

Ruml, Wheeler

127

Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml (UNH) Suboptimal Search 1 / 28 A Survey of Suboptimal Search Algorithms  

E-print Network

Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml (UNH) Suboptimal Search ­ 1 / 28 A Survey of Suboptimal Search Algorithms Jordan T. Thayer and Wheeler Ruml jtd7, ruml at cs.unh.edu slides at: http://www.cs.unh.edu/~jtd7 s Outline s Not Discussed Suboptimal Bounded Suboptimal Anytime Search Summary Jordan Thayer and Wheeler

Ruml, Wheeler

128

To appear: M. I. Jordan, (Ed.), Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers.  

E-print Network

To appear: M. I. Jordan, (Ed.), Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers. IMPROVING of California Santa Cruz, CA AND MICHAEL I. JORDAN Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA Abstract #12; 2 TOMMI S. JAAKKOLA AND MICHAEL I. JORDAN the essential Markov properties underlying the graph

Jordan, Michael I.

129

Jordan Thayer (UNH) Bounded Suboptimal Search 1 / 18 Finding Acceptable Solutions Faster  

E-print Network

Jordan Thayer (UNH) Bounded Suboptimal Search ­ 1 / 18 Finding Acceptable Solutions Faster Using Inadmissible Information Jordan Thayer & Wheeler Ruml Supported by DARPA CSSG program (grant HR0011-09-1-0021) and NSF (grant IIS-0812141) #12;Bounded Suboptimal Heuristic Search Motivation EES Results Jordan Thayer

Ruml, Wheeler

130

Alg`ebres de Jordan et theorie des invariants. Bruno Blind*  

E-print Network

Alg`ebres de Jordan et th´eorie des invariants. Bruno Blind* J'avancerai, je chercherai, jusqu mort `a distance. Abstract: Let V be a simple complex euclidean Jordan algebra of rank three invariant le polyn^ome d´eterminant de l'alg`ebre de Jordan complexe V , simple, euclidienne et de rang

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

General and Special Education Systems in Jordan: Present and Future Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educating a student with special needs became an interest in Jordan at the end of the 1960s. This article provides an overview of the general and special education systems in Jordan. Historical and demographical information is included for the purpose of placing the education of children in Jordan within the context of its land and the population

Al Jabery, Mohammad; Zumberg, Marshall

2008-01-01

132

STRONGLY REGULAR JORDAN TRIPLE SYSTEMS ARE SHIFT-FREE eulalia garc'ia rus  

E-print Network

STRONGLY REGULAR JORDAN TRIPLE SYSTEMS ARE SHIFT* *esult is here proved for Jordan triple systems. x1. Introduction. Recall that an associative if and only if the Jordan triple * *system T defined on R by P (a)b = ab*a is strongly regular. Finiteness

133

Philadelphia University P.O. Box (1) Philadelphia University 19392 Jordan  

E-print Network

[1/3] Philadelphia University P.O. Box (1) Philadelphia University 19392 Jordan Fax Number: +962 in Computer Science Personal Information Date of Birth : April 7, 1961 Place of Birth : Irbid, Jordan of Science (With Honor) Computer Science Department, The Yarmouk University, Ibid, Jordan. 1980 Secondary

134

DERIVATIONS ON BANACH JORDAN PAIRS by a. fernandez lopez, h. marhnine, and c. zarhouti  

E-print Network

DERIVATIONS ON BANACH JORDAN PAIRS by a. fern´andez l´opez, h. marhnine, and c. zarhouti Dedicated], that derivations on semisimple Banach Jordan algebras are continuous. In the more general context of Banach triple]. In this paper we deal with derivations acting on Banach Jordan pairs. On the one hand, the problem of automatic

135

hal-00146076,version1-15May2007 Distributions vectorielles homog`enes sur une alg`ebre de Jordan  

E-print Network

hal-00146076,version1-15May2007 Distributions vectorielles homog`enes sur une alg`ebre de Jordan;Abstract: We study distributions on a Euclidean Jordan algebra V with values in a finite dimensional Jordan. 2 #12;I. Introduction. Soient V une alg`ebre de Jordan r´eelle, simple et euclidienne et G la com

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

77 FR 53885 - Jordan Cove Energy Project LP, Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP; Notice of Extension of Comment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...PF12-7-000; Docket No. PF12-17-000] Jordan Cove Energy Project LP, Pacific Connector...Additional Public Scoping Meetings for the Jordan Cove Liquefaction and Pacific Connector...scoping process and comment period for Jordan Cove Energy Project LP's (Jordan...

2012-09-04

137

Math. H110 Jordan's Normal Form December 7, 2000 10:38 am Prof. W. Kahan Page 1  

E-print Network

Math. H110 Jordan's Normal Form December 7, 2000 10:38 am Prof. W. Kahan Page 1 Jordan's Normal one invertible matrix C that transforms B by Similarity into a diagonal sum C­1 BC = of Jordan Blocks column and prepending a first column of zeros. For example, here is a 4-by-4 Jordan Block: ?I + J

California at Berkeley, University of

138

NOETHERIAN BANACH JORDAN PAIRS N. Boudi*, A. Fern'andez L'opezy, E. Garc'ia  

E-print Network

NOETHERIAN BANACH JORDAN PAIRS N. Boudi*, A. Fern'andez L by Benslimane and Boudi [BeB1] to the alternative case. For a Jordan algebra J or a Jordan pair V a* *nd Boudi [BeB2] proved that a complex Noetherian Banach Jordan algebra is finite dimensional

139

Strongly prime Jordan pairs with nonzero socle Antonio Fern'andez L'opez and Maribel Toc'on Barroso  

E-print Network

Strongly prime Jordan pairs with nonzero socle Antonio Fern'andez L'opez and Maribel Abstract A free-characteristic description of strongly prime Jordan pairs with minimal inner and Racine [33] for Jordan algebras and extended later by Fern'andez et al. [18] to Jordan triples

140

77 FR 59393 - Jordan Cove Energy Project LP; Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP; Notice of Additional Public...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...PF12-7-000; Docket No. PF12-17-000] Jordan Cove Energy Project LP; Pacific Connector...Additional Public Scoping Meetings for the Jordan Cove Liquefaction and Pacific Connector...public scoping meetings to take comments on Jordan Cove Energy Project LP's (Jordan...

2012-09-27

141

Characterization of historical mortars in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the petrographic and mineralogical characterization of mortars from different archaeological sites in Jordan which encompass Nabatean, Late-Antique and Early Islamic (Umayyad) sites, in some cases offering a sequence of different period mortars from the same building. These sites include the Nabataean city of Petra, the Late Antique town of Umm al Jimal and the castle of Qasr Al Hallabat. These mortars were produced with different raw materials and manufacturing technologies, which are reflected on distinctive variations of mineralogy, texture and crystal size and aggregates composition (including volcanic ashes, ceramic fragments, burnt organic material) size and their puzzolanic properties. As a consequence these mortars present different physical properties and reveal nowadays very different states of conservation. There is a dramatic change in mortar properties between those manufactured in pre-Islamic period and those from early Islamic - Ummayad times with a general trend in which these last ones present coarser crystal and aggregate sizes with less puzzolanic aggregates that result in less durable mortars. All of this reflects changes in the different stages of production of the mortar, from the use of either hydraulic, lime putty or slaked lime and the selection of aggregates to the application techniques (polishing). This reflects the evolution of building technology that took place in this area during early Islamic period and how petrological information can shed light on historical interpretation of building technologies. Research funded by AECID (PCI A/032184/10), GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-16) and MCU (Analisis y Documentacin de tipologa arquitectnica y tcnicas constructivas en el periodo de transicin Bizantino-Omeya en Jordania)

Gomez-Heras, M.; Arce, I.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

2012-04-01

142

Black hole stability in Jordan and Einstein frames  

E-print Network

We investigate the classical stability of Schwarzschild black hole in Jordan and Einstein frames which are related by the conformal transformations. For this purpose, we introduce two models of the Brans-Dicke theory and Brans-Dicke-Weyl gravity in Jordan frame and two corresponding models in the Einstein frame. The former model is suitable for studying the massless spin-2 graviton propagating around the Schwarzschild black hole, while the later is designed for the massive spin-2 graviton propagating around the black hole. It turns out that the black hole (in)stability is independent of the frame which shows that the two frames are equivalent to each other.

Yun Soo Myung; Taeyoon Moon

2014-04-18

143

Jordan cells in logarithmic limits of conformal field theory  

E-print Network

It is discussed how a limiting procedure of conformal field theories may result in logarithmic conformal field theories with Jordan cells of arbitrary rank. This extends our work on rank-two Jordan cells. We also consider the limits of certain three-point functions and find that they are compatible with known results. The general construction is illustrated by logarithmic limits of (unitary) minimal models in conformal field theory. Characters of quasi-rational representations are found to emerge as the limits of the associated irreducible Virasoro characters.

Jorgen Rasmussen

2006-11-25

144

Black hole stability in Jordan and Einstein frames  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the classical stability of Schwarzschild black hole in Jordan and Einstein frames that are related by the conformal transformations. For this purpose, we introduce two models of the Brans-Dicke theory and Brans-Dicke-Weyl gravity in the Jordan frame and two corresponding models in the Einstein frame. The former model is suitable for studying the massless spin-2 graviton propagating around the Schwarzschild black hole, while the latter is designed for the massive spin-2 graviton propagating around the black hole. It turns out that the black hole (in)stability is independent of the frame which shows that the two frames are equivalent to each other.

Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon

2014-05-01

145

Food Habits of the Yellowstone Whitefish Prosopium Williamsoni Cismontanus (Jordan)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quantitative analysis of the food habits of 385 whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni cismontanus (Jordan)) and 52 trout from the Yellowstone and Gallatin Rivers was made. Collections were taken over a period of 1 year beginning in September, 1947, on the Yellowstone and on the Gallatin Rivers. Fingerling whitefish used the same food organisms as did adults but consumed smaller numbers

Martin Laakso

1951-01-01

146

Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of

Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

2013-01-01

147

Jordan: A Refugee Haven ---Country Profile Graldine Chatelard  

E-print Network

Jordan since the Palestinian exodus of 1948 has played a key role in the country's politics, economy to regional geopolitics, the fluctuations of the oil economy in the Persian Gulf, and efforts by the kingdom was that of "returnees" from Gulf countries, most of them expelled from Kuwait following the 1991 Gulf War. In addition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

148

Zeta functional equation on Jordan algebras of type II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the Jordan algebras methods, specially the properties of Peirce decomposition and the Frobenius transformation, we compute the coefficients of the zeta functional equation, in the case of Jordan algebras of type II. As particular cases of our result, we can cite the case of studied by Gelbart [Mem. Amer. Math. Soc. 108 (1971)] and Godement and Jacquet [Zeta functions of simple algebras, Lecture Notes in Math., vol. 260, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1972], and the case of studied by Muro [Adv. Stud. Pure Math. 15 (1989) 429]. Let us also mention, that recently, Bopp and Rubenthaler have obtained a more general result on the zeta functional equation by using methods based on the algebraic properties of regular graded algebras which are in one-to-one correspondence with simple Jordan algebras [Local Zeta Functions Attached to the Minimal Spherical Series for a Class of Symmetric Spaces, IRMA, Strasbourg, 2003]. The method used in this paper is a direct application of specific properties of Jordan algebras of type II.

Kayoya, J. B.

2005-02-01

149

Oral Health Patterns among Schoolchildren in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about the oral hygiene patterns among schoolchildren in Jordan. A school-based cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2010. A simple random sampling method was used. Each student participant completed a detailed questionnaire regarding oral hygiene habits. Data were coded and analyzed using SPSS software version

ALBashtawy, Mohammed

2012-01-01

150

Intermediate inflation in the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an intermediate inflationary stage in a Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory. In this scenario we analyze the quantum fluctuations corresponding to adiabatic and isocurvature modes. The model is compared to that described by using the intermediate model in Einstein general relativity theory. We assess the status of this model in light of the WMAP7 data.

Cid, Antonella; del Campo, Srgio

2012-10-01

151

JORDAN CREEK STUDY, OWYHEE COUNTY, ID IN 1975-1976  

EPA Science Inventory

A set of 3 intensive surveys was completed on Jordan Creek in Owyhee County, ID (17050108) during August and October 1975 and June 1976. Studies were conducted to determine the water quality condition of the stream and to assess the impact of pollution sources. The study includ...

152

Gendered Utilization Differences of Mental Health Services in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A revised Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL), translated into Arabic, was distributed to a sample of 87 nonpsychotic mental health out-patients in Zarka, Jordan (male = 61, female = 26). Findings revealed no significant gendered differences, but higher responses among women in all dimensions. Regardless of gender, patients also expected and were satisfied with medicinal treatment; explained etiologies as having supernatural

Alean Al-Krenawi; John R. Graham; Jamil Kandah

2000-01-01

153

Library Education in Tunisia and Jordan: A Comparative Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the state of development of library education in Jordan and Tunisia and pinpoints problems affecting this development in order to verify if library education in countries with similar cultures and type of economy evolves similarly and faces same problems. A brief introduction to the countries is provided. (EJS)

Bouazza, A.; Nimer, R.

1986-01-01

154

Children and Nationalism in a Palestinian Refugee Camp in Jordan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes engagement of children in a Palestinian refugee camp in Jordan with projects of nationalism. Outlines different visions for the children's future and ways these visions inform actions of their proponents. Focuses on how children draw upon different discourses of national community in the process of developing identities that are strongly

Hart, Jason

2002-01-01

155

Another elementary proof of the Jordan form of a matrix  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we establish the Jordan Form for a matrix using the elementary concepts of vector differentiation and partial fractions. The idea comes from the resolvent of the operator. For the matrix, the Laurent series is finite and easy to compute through rational representation. We also give a proof of some famous theorems in matrix analysis as consequences from the result.

Budhi, Wono Setya

2012-05-01

156

Optimal environmental benefits of utilising alternative energy technologies in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

With rapid population growth and increase in industrial activities, more energy is consumed, resulting in environmental pollution and economic difficulties. Therefore, the need for utilising renewable energy resources has emerged. Although Jordan does not have adequate fuel supplies (90% of its crude oil is imported), it is gifted with alternative resources. Because of the political and economical constraints that hinder

Bassam Mrayyan

2004-01-01

157

Modernizing Mansaf: The Consuming Contexts of Jordan's National Dish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mansaf is the national feast dish of Jordan. As such, it is commonly associated with a traditional culture based on an agro-pastoral lifestyle in which meat and yogurt were readily available and hosts had ample time to attend to the needs of guests. This nostalgic ideal is not representative of contemporary Jordanian experience, yet mansaf remainsespecially for those of Bedouin

Sally Howell

2003-01-01

158

Ghazi I. Alkhatib Princess Sumaya University for Technology, Jordan  

E-print Network

Ghazi I. Alkhatib Princess Sumaya University for Technology, Jordan Models for Capitalizing on Web: trends and discoveries / Ghazi I. Alkhatib, editor. p. cm. -- (Advances in information technology and web. I. Alkhatib, Ghazi, 1947- TK5105.888.M577 2012 006.7--dc23 2011045667 British Cataloguing

Goy, Anna

159

Negation Errors in English by University of Jordan Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This cross-sectional study attempted to determine whether the English negation errors made by the University of Jordan's students were similar to the English negation errors proposed by Klima and Bellugi (1966), or influenced by the Arabic syntactic structures of negative sentences. Data of negative structures were gathered, and error counts were

Eisouh, Zuhair S.

2011-01-01

160

Negotiating Cultural Identities through Language: Academic English in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses how a group of multilingual scholars in Jordan negotiate multiple linguistic and cultural affiliations. These writers' experiences demonstrate the varied ways English's global dominance affects individuals' lives. The scholars find both empowerment and disempowerment in English, viewing English as linked to Western hegemony

Pedersen, Anne-Marie

2010-01-01

161

CMPE 310 Layout Editor Tutorial Jordan Bisasky Allegro PCB Design  

E-print Network

CMPE 310 Layout Editor Tutorial Jordan Bisasky Allegro PCB Design Allegro PCB Design of the PCB project tutorial. Before starting with PCB Design, you must have a completed schematic PCB Editor: Start >All Programs >Cadence SPB 16.01 > PCB Editor > Allegro PCB Design XL Create a new

Patel, Chintan

162

FTK TrackFitter Firmware Design Summary Jordan Webster  

E-print Network

FTK TrackFitter Firmware Design Summary Jordan Webster March 26, 2013 Abstract Track fitting is oneFitter, and then summarizes the current firmware design [First draft: March 23, 2013]. 1 #12;Contents 1 Fitting tracks on the AUX 3 2 Firmware responsibilities 3 2.1 Inputs

163

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-print Network

. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long...

Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

2011-12-08

164

Bounds for Jordan-Thiry scalar field constant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Assuming the conversation of scalar charge in the neutron decay reaction, we suggest a correction to an earlier paper of ours. Using the approach already mentioned in that paper, we use the Stubbs et alexperiment to derive an upper limit for the value of the Jordan-Thiry scalar field coupling constant.

Macedo, Paulo G.

1991-06-01

165

Local PI Theory of Jordan Systems II Fernando Montaner*  

E-print Network

Local PI Theory of Jordan Systems II Fernando having a generalized identity: If J is anondegenerate Jorda* *n system with nonzero PI-elements, then the extended central closure of J has nonzero so* *cle, equal to its PI-ideal. Introduction

166

Wind as an alternative source of energy in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interest and motivation for harnessing wind power have grown tremendously during the nineteen-eighties in many developed countries as a result of frequent energy crises on the one hand and persisting issues of environmental pollution on the other. These activities have stimulated at the same time, the scientific and research community in Jordan to launch a serious series of investigations

S. M Habali; Mohammad Amr; Isaac Saleh; Rizeq Taani

2001-01-01

167

International Education: A Case Study from the University of Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes international education at the University of Jordan (UJ). Specifically it investigates a random sample of international students comprising Americans, Europeans and Asians. A field survey approach with qualitative and quantitative dimensions was used. Questionnaires were used to solicit information from the students. In

Jabbar, Sinaria Kamil Abdel

2012-01-01

168

Writing Instruction in Jordan: Past, Present, and Future Trends  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated English-language writing instruction in Jordan at three levels, namely primary and secondary state schools, a private school, and a state university. To address this issue, the researchers used tape-recorded interviews and class observations as primary tools of collecting data for the study. It turned out that a host of

Al-Jarrah, Rasheed S.; Al-Ahmad, Sayyah

2013-01-01

169

Distribution of Upper Pliocene brines in the northern Jordan Rift Valley, Israel and Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the triangle of Lake Tiberias (LT), Yarmouk Gorge and Lower Jordan Valley (Fig. 1), fresh groundwaters are frequently deteriorated by variable admixture of ascending subsurface Upper-Pliocene brines. Element ratios and water isotopes reveal, that common source brine is present and is modified by water rock interaction and dilution with freshwater. This common source brine is inferred from the composition of the known Ha'on well brine being characterized by molar ratios of Na/Cl=0.53, 1000Br/Cl=5.5 and Ca/Mg=0.39 (Mller et al., 2011). The low Ca/Mg, a ratio also found for Newe Ur, is unique in an environment in which ratios >1 dominate because of omnipresent dolomitization of abundant limestones. Interaction with abundant intrusive basaltic bodies would add sodium and hence increase the low Na/Cl ratio to >1. Uptake of halite increases Na/Cl but decreases Br/Cl ratios. These ratios resemble seawater after 37-fold enrichment in Li molality by evaporation (McCaffrey et al. 1987). Although being diluted by freshwater the Ha'on well brine proves the presence of an evaporated seawater mother brine residing at unknown depth. The derivatives of inferred Ha'on mother brine are present around Lake Tiberias, in the lower Yarmouk Valley and in the northern Rift Valley at least as far southwards as Newe Ur. Areas of structural weakness, where the major fault systems occur, are the main distribution areas for these brines. The study provides an example whereby hydrochemical analyses are applied as key tool to better understand deep fluid transport processes at basin-scale, which are supported by numerical modeling of groundwater flow. Mller P., Siebert C., Geyer S., Inbar N., Rosenthal E., Flexer A., Zilberbrand M. (2011): Relationship of brines in the Kinnarot Basin, Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley. Geofluids 12(2): 166-181. McCaffrey M.A., Lazar B., Holland H.D. (1987): The evaporation path of seawater and the coprecipitation of Br- and K+ with halite. J. Sediment. Petrol. 57: 928-937.

Siebert, Christian; Mller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Guttman, Joseph; Yellin-Dror, Annat; Inbar, Nimrod; Magri, Fabien

2014-05-01

170

Jordan-Holder sequences and self-adjoint a, b-modules  

E-print Network

Jordan-H¨older sequences and self-adjoint ?a, b?-modules Piotr P. Karwasz ¦ April 7, 2011 Abstract Given the lack of uniqueness of the Jordan-H¨older composition series in the theory of ?a, b?-modules we series. This article will focus on the properties of Jordan-H¨older composition series of self-adjoint ?a

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

171

Exceptional Lie algebras, SU(3) and Jordan pairs: part 2. Zorn-type representations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A representation of the exceptional Lie algebras reflecting a simple unifying view, based on realizations in terms of Zorn-type matrices, is presented. The role of the underlying Jordan pair and Jordan algebra content is crucial in the development of the structure. Each algebra contains three Jordan pairs sharing the same Lie algebra of automorphisms and the same external su(3) symmetry. The applications in physics are outlined.

Marrani, Alessio; Truini, Piero

2014-07-01

172

Worker programs and resource use: Evidence from better work jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper examines data collected for the Better Work program in Jordan which aims to protect laborers in the garment industry from poor working conditions. Data are examined to look for benefits to the factories participating in the program beyond improved compliance with labor law. In particular, potential impacts to firm energy use are examined and correlations are tested between electricity use rates and measures of worker outcomes and a number of factory traits such as size and production input costs. Evidence was found to back up work done in Vietnam with regard to resource use and distribution of electricity expenses. It was also found that the type of data being collected is not ideal for examinations of energy, and more direct methods are desirable, and that considerable production obstacles are worker skill level, electricity prices, and to a greater degree in Jordan than in previously examined countries, water prices.

Robins, Nathan

173

Press, Regime and Society in Jordan Since 1989  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Originally published in 1998 in the Occasional Paper series of the Inter-University Consortium for Arab Studies, Montreal, this paper by doctoral candidate Adam Jones offers a rare scholarly glimpse into recent press-regime relations in Jordan. Winner of the University of British Columbia Political Science Association Essay Prize (Ph.D. division), this paper seeks to place post-1989 events in Jordan in their historical, regional, and cultural context. "Based in part on interviews with key figures in the Jordanian press and government, it considers the complex interaction among press, regime, and society during the 1990s. A postscript appraises the situation in light of the regime's crackdown of September 1997."

Jones, Adam (Adam Jason), 1963-.

1998-01-01

174

75 FR 38800 - Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Application Ready for Environmental Analysis...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...that the following hydroelectric application has been...Applicant: Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership...Project: Flannagan Hydroelectric Project. f. Location...Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16...

2010-07-06

175

75 FR 6371 - Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...that the following hydroelectric application has been...Applicant: Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership...Project: Flannagan Hydroelectric Project f. Location...Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16...

2010-02-09

176

76 FR 46793 - Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 12740-003-VA] Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National...

2011-08-03

177

76 FR 12101 - Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Environmental Assessment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [ Project No. 12737-002] Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National Environmental...

2011-03-04

178

76 FR 71967 - Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 12740-003-VA] Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment In accordance with the...

2011-11-21

179

76 FR 70437 - Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [ Project No. 12737-002] Jordan Hydroelectric Limited Partnership; Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment In accordance with the...

2011-11-14

180

Oil ShaleAn Alternative Energy Source for Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil shale presents the only available fossil fuel in Jordan besides limited reserves of natural gas. Jordanian oil shalewith a proven amount of about 5 10 tonsis of quite good quality. It has relatively low ash and moisture content, gross calorific value of 7.5 MJ\\/kg, and oil yield of 812%. The reserves should be sufficient to satisfy the county's

E. S. Hrayshat

2008-01-01

181

Towards establishing a multiple sclerosis biobank in Jordan.  

PubMed

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a promising approach in unraveling genetic associations to multiple sclerosis (MS), a complex, multifactorial disease. Biobanks are repositories of patient biospecimens and information that can promote GWAS research. However, the success of GWAS and biobanking is dependent on the level of participation of MS patients in genetic research. In order to initiate MS-based biobanking and GWAS research in Jordan, the willingness of MS patients to participate in long-term, genetic research in Jordan and their preferred type of a consent form were investigated. MS patients (289) were recruited for genetic studies. Personal and clinical information were collected from those who enrolled in the study. Approximately 96% of MS patients agreed to participate in genetic studies. The female:male ratio among patients was 2:1 with most patients being diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS (88%). The mean age of onset was 28.3years, the mean duration of illness was 6years, and the mean Expanded Disability Status Scale was 2.8. Relatedness of parents was significantly associated with having secondary-progressive MS. Approximately 85% of the patients preferred open consent with 37% of them preferring to renew their consent. All the patients approved to be recontacted and update their information via accessing their medical files or physicians. These observations support the establishment of a specialized MS biobank in Jordan and pave the way to participate in international large-scale genetic initiatives. PMID:24456262

Ahram, Mamoun; Zaza, Rand; Ibayyan, Leena; Dahbour, Said; Bahou, Yacoub; El-Omar, Ammar; Samhouri, Bilal; El-Khateeb, Mohammad

2014-11-01

182

(Never) Mind your p's and q's: Von Neumann versus Jordan on the foundations of quantum theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1927, in two papers entitled "On a new foundation [Neue Begrndung] of quantum mechanics," Pascual Jordan presented his version of what came to be known as the Dirac-Jordan statistical transformation theory. Jordan and Paul Dirac arrived at essentially the same theory independently of one another at around the same time. Later in 1927, partly in response to Jordan and Dirac and avoiding the mathematical difficulties facing their approach, John von Neumann developed the modern Hilbert space formalism of quantum mechanics. We focus on Jordan and von Neumann. Central to the formalisms of both are expressions for conditional probabilities of finding some value for one quantity given the value of another. Beyond that Jordan and von Neumann had very different views about the appropriate formulation of problems in quantum mechanics. For Jordan, unable to let go of the analogy to classical mechanics, the solution of such problems required the identification of sets of canonically conjugate variables, i.e., p's and q's. For von Neumann, not constrained by the analogy to classical mechanics, it required only the identification of a maximal set of commuting operators with simultaneous eigenstates. He had no need for p's and q's. Jordan and von Neumann also stated the characteristic new rules for probabilities in quantum mechanics somewhat differently. Jordan and Dirac were the first to state those rules in full generality. Von Neumann rephrased them and, in a paper published a few months later, sought to derive them from more basic considerations. In this paper we reconstruct the central arguments of these 1927 papers by Jordan and von Neumann and of a paper on Jordan's approach by Hilbert, von Neumann, and Nordheim. We highlight those elements in these papers that bring out the gradual loosening of the ties between the new quantum formalism and classical mechanics. This paper was written as part of a joint project in the history of quantum physics of the Max Planck Institut fr Wissenschaftsgeschichte and the Fritz-Haber-Institut in Berlin.

Duncan, A.; Janssen, M.

2013-03-01

183

Gauss-Jordan Method (GJ) Matrix Multiplication Linear Independence (LI) Rank Inverse Math 364: Principles of Optimization, Lecture 2  

E-print Network

Gauss-Jordan Method (GJ) Matrix Multiplication Linear Independence (LI) Rank Inverse Math 364 University Spring 2012 Haijun Li Math 364: Principles of Optimization, Lecture 2 Spring 2012 1 / 15 #12;Gauss-Jordan and methods from linear algebra, including Gauss-Jordan method, matrix multiplication, linear independence

Li, Haijun

184

Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml (UNH) Distance Estimates For Search 1 / 40 Using Distance Estimates In Heuristic Search  

E-print Network

Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml (UNH) Distance Estimates For Search ­ 1 / 40 Using Distance Estimates In Heuristic Search Jordan T. Thayer and Wheeler Ruml jtd7, ruml at cs.unh.edu slides at: http Search Bounded Suboptimal Anytime Search Summary Backup Slides Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml (UNH

Ruml, Wheeler

185

DERIVATIONS ON BANACH JORDAN PAIRS by a. fern'andez l'opez, h. marhnine, and c. zarhouti  

E-print Network

DERIVATIONS ON BANACH JORDAN PAIRS by a. fern'andez l'opez, h* * Villena in [26], that derivations on semisimple Banach Jordan algebras are continuous. In * *the more], and semiprimitive Banach (associative) pairs [23]. In this paper we deal with derivations acting on Banach Jordan

186

GOLDIE THEORY FOR JORDAN ALGEBRAS antonio fern'andez l'opez, eulalia garc'ia rus and fernando montaner  

E-print Network

GOLDIE THEORY FOR JORDAN ALGEBRAS antonio fern'andez l'opez, eulalia garc. * * At the same time, Jordan versions of the main notions of the associative theory * *are studied. In particular, it is proved that the nondegenerate Jordan algebras of fin* *ite capacity are precisely

187

The Unveiling Ceremony of Confucius Institute at Philadelphia University, The Unveiling Ceremony of Confucius Institute at Philadelphia University, Jordan  

E-print Network

1 The Unveiling Ceremony of Confucius Institute at Philadelphia University, Jordan The Unveiling Ceremony of Confucius Institute at Philadelphia University, Jordan was held on September the 16th , 2012 of directors from Philadelphia University, Jordan and its Chinese partner, Liaocheng University, China. #12

188

The Effect of an Education Program for Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are few support services for parents of children with a disability in Jordan. The present exploratory study investigated whether the provision of an education program in Jordan for mothers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder increased mothers' understanding of their child's behaviour, improved the mothers' coping skills,

Al-Khalaf, Amany; Dempsey, Ian; Dally, Kerry

2014-01-01

189

Teaching for Sustainable Development in Higher Education Institutions: University of Jordan as a Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Jordan, a rapid movement of educational reform is taking place nowadays. Curricula development, teacher education, using information and communication technology (ICT), improving teaching and learning strategies and integrating different subjects are among the main objectives of this reform. One of the main challenges in Jordan in order to cope

Abu-Hola, Imfadi R. M.; Tareef, Atif Bin

2009-01-01

190

Effects of Collateral Pledges in Reducing Credit Risks - Confronting Banks in Jordan, as Lending Institutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research aims at investigating the effects of Collaterals pledges in reducing credit Risks .To achieve research goals data were collected from all commercial banks operating in Jordan. Research concluded that banks in Jordan use collaterals effectively and in a wide range, and collaterals size have a direct impact on credit risk. Credit risk differs with collaterals. This study aims

Ahmad Zakaria Siam

2007-01-01

191

An Exploration of Higher Education Graduation Rates: A Case Study of Women in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Jordan is viewed as a country of social, political, and economic advancement. It currently leads the region in literacy rates and is well on its way to achieving gender equity. Despite Jordan's reputation as one of the most 'advanced' countries in the region, there have been conflicted reports on higher education completion rates of women. Some

Allaf, Carine

2010-01-01

192

High-precision radiocarbon dating and historical biblical archaeology in southern Jordan  

E-print Network

High-precision radiocarbon dating and historical biblical archaeology in southern Jordan Thomas E, Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, University of Oxford, Dyson Perrins Building¨nggassstrasse 51, CH-3000 Bern 9, Switzerland; and **Friends of Archaeology, P.O. Box 2440, Amman 11181, Jordan

Schulze, Jürgen P.

193

Potentials for development of hydro-powered water desalination in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the increase in population and development in agriculture, Jordan will deplete all of its renewable sources of fresh water in the next few years. On the other hand, the level of the Dead Sea has been falling at a high rate for the past three decades, due to the diversion of water from the Jordan River for irrigation.

Bilal A. Akash; Mousa S. Mohsen

1998-01-01

194

Jordan Tatter Scholarship in Horticulture Sponsored by the Michigan Vegetable Council  

E-print Network

Jordan Tatter Scholarship in Horticulture Sponsored by the Michigan Vegetable Council and the Michigan Horticultural Society Graduate Student Application Form Submission Deadline: October 1 (annually) Submit application to behe@msu.edu Summary: The Jordan Tatter Scholarship in Horticulture was initiated

195

Women's Perspectives on Retention in Higher Education in Jordan: Commute and Choice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Jordan is viewed as a country of social, political, and economic and advancement. It currently leads the region in literacy rates and is well on its way to achieving gender equity. However, some reports claim that Jordan maintains the widest gender gap in higher education completion in the region while others report that the percentage of females

Allaf, Carine

2013-01-01

196

Curriculum Orientations of Pre-Service Teachers in Jordan: A Required Reform Initiative for Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this study was to determine the curriculum orientations of pre-service teachers at a university in Jordan. Rigorous translation procedures were utilized to validate an Arabic version of the Curriculum Orientation Inventory (COI) for use in Jordan. The validated COI was administered to a sample of 259 pre-service teachers who

Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer; Abu-Alruz, Jamal; Alsharqawi, Subhi

2012-01-01

197

Experiences of Students with Disabilities in a Public University in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined students with disabilities perspectives toward their experiences in a public University in Jordan using a survey approach. The aim of this study was to take a closer look at the experiences of students with disabilities in Jordan and, in light of new legislation, to identify obstacles in the higher education system. It found

Al-Hmouz, Hanan

2014-01-01

198

Hermitian generalized Jordan triple systems and certain applications to field theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We define Hermitian generalized Jordan triple systems and prove a structure theorem. We also give some examples of the systems and study mathematical properties. We apply a Hermitian generalized Jordan triple system to a field theory and obtain a Chern-Simons gauge theory.

Kamiya, Noriaki; Sato, Matsuo

2014-05-01

199

4-1 Chapter 4--Processor Design Computer Systems Design and Architecture by V. Heuring and H. Jordan 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan  

E-print Network

. Jordan © 1997 V. Heuring and H. Jordan Abstract and Concrete RTN for SRC add Instruction Abstract RTN[ra] R[rb] + R[rc]: Step RTN T0 MA PC: C PC + 4; T1 MD M[MA]: PC C; T2 IR MD; T3 A R[rb]; T4 C A + R[rc]; T5 R[ra] C; Concrete RTN for the add instruction Parts of 2 RTs (IR M[PC]: PC PC + 4

200

Radionuclides, trace elements, and radium residence in phosphogypsum of Jordan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Voluminous stockpiles of phosphogypsum (PG) generated during the wet process production of phosphoric acid are stored at many sites around the world and pose problems for their safe storage, disposal, or utilization. A major concern is the elevated concentration of long-lived 226Ra (half-life = 1,600 years) inherited from the processed phosphate rock. Knowledge of the abundance and mode-of-occurrence of radium (Ra) in PG is critical for accurate prediction of Ra leachability and radon (Rn) emanation, and for prediction of radiation-exposure pathways to workers and to the public. The mean (??SD) of 226Ra concentrations in ten samples of Jordan PG is 601 ?? 98 Bq/kg, which falls near the midrange of values reported for PG samples collected worldwide. Jordan PG generally shows no analytically significant enrichment (< 10%) of 226Ra in the finer (< 53 ??m) grain size fraction. Phosphogypsum samples collected from two industrial sites with different sources of phosphate rock feedstock show consistent differences in concentration of 226Ra and rare earth elements, and also consistent trends of enrichment in these elements with increasing age of PG. Water-insoluble residues from Jordan PG constitute <10% of PG mass but contain 30-65% of the 226Ra. 226Ra correlates closely with Ba in the water-insoluble residues. Uniformly tiny (< 10 ??m) grains of barite (barium sulfate) observed with scanning electron microscopy have crystal morphologies that indicate their formation during the wet process. Barite is a well-documented and efficient scavenger of Ra from solution and is also very insoluble in water and mineral acids. Radium-bearing barite in PG influences the environmental mobility of radium and the radiation-exposure pathways near PG stockpiles. ?? 2010 US Government.

Zielinski, R.A.; Al-Hwaiti, M. S.; Budahn, J.R.; Ranville, J.F.

2011-01-01

201

Radionuclides, trace elements, and radium residence in phosphogypsum of Jordan.  

PubMed

Voluminous stockpiles of phosphogypsum (PG) generated during the wet process production of phosphoric acid are stored at many sites around the world and pose problems for their safe storage, disposal, or utilization. A major concern is the elevated concentration of long-lived (226)Ra (half-life=1,600years) inherited from the processed phosphate rock. Knowledge of the abundance and mode-of-occurrence of radium (Ra) in PG is critical for accurate prediction of Ra leachability and radon (Rn) emanation, and for prediction of radiation-exposure pathways to workers and to the public. The mean (SD) of (226)Ra concentrations in ten samples of Jordan PG is 60198Bq/kg, which falls near the midrange of values reported for PG samples collected worldwide. Jordan PG generally shows no analytically significant enrichment (<10%) of (226)Ra in the finer (<53?m) grain size fraction. Phosphogypsum samples collected from two industrial sites with different sources of phosphate rock feedstock show consistent differences in concentration of (226)Ra and rare earth elements, and also consistent trends of enrichment in these elements with increasing age of PG. Water-insoluble residues from Jordan PG constitute <10% of PG mass but contain 30-65% of the (226)Ra. (226)Ra correlates closely with Ba in the water-insoluble residues. Uniformly tiny (<10?m) grains of barite (barium sulfate) observed with scanning electron microscopy have crystal morphologies that indicate their formation during the wet process. Barite is a well-documented and efficient scavenger of Ra from solution and is also very insoluble in water and mineral acids. Radium-bearing barite in PG influences the environmental mobility of radium and the radiation-exposure pathways near PG stockpiles. PMID:20623320

Zielinski, Robert A; Al-Hwaiti, Mohammad S; Budahn, James R; Ranville, James F

2011-04-01

202

Chemical characterization of counterfeit captagon tablets seized in Jordan.  

PubMed

Fenethylline, commonly known by the trademark name 'captagon', is one of the most popular drugs of abuse among the young affluent communities of the Middle East. The Drug Control Department of the Public Security Directorate of Jordan has put captagon under control in the year 1988. Samples from 124 batches seized were analyzed by means of gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The analysis demonstrates the presence of amphetamine, caffeine and several other substances, besides, the absence of fenethylline. Based on GC-MS analytical data, comparisons were made between the various samples to determine the similarities and obtain inferences with respect to commonality of origin. PMID:15978343

Alabdalla, Mahmoud A

2005-09-10

203

Bedload transport associated with high stream power, Jordan River, Israel  

PubMed Central

During a flood of a magnitude that recurs once in 100 years, boulders up to 1700 mm in size were transported in the Jordan and Meshushim Rivers, northern Israel. Bedload discharge rates were estimated for periods of 3-72 hr of peak flow by a combination of hydrologic and geomorphic methods. Bedload transport rate is proportional to unit stream power in excess of that necessary for initial motion, raised to the power 3/2, as has been shown for data on other rivers. PMID:16592661

Inbar, Moshe; Schick, Asher P.

1979-01-01

204

Depositional Environments of the Jordan Formation, Winona, MN  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This project involves a field trip to the Jordan Formation in Winona, MN. Student teams are assigned a section of the outcrop from which they are to determine a stratigraphic column. The class then performs a lateral analysis and builds a composite stratigraphic column for the formation. As a final product, the students write up the class's observations about the formation. Project Webpages Project Summary and Write-up Outline (Acrobat (PDF) 115kB Jul7 05) Instructor Notes for Project (Acrobat (PDF) 91kB Jul7 05) Outlines and Notes (Acrobat (PDF) 1.1MB Jul7 05) for each class session for this project

Hickson, Tom

205

Early Bronze Age Dolmens in Jordan and their orientations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents the results of a survey of dolmen fields of the Early Bronze I in Jordan, in the Wadi Zarqa Valley, started in October 2004 and still in progress. Our data show, with a very high statistical significance, that in many sites of the Early Bronze IA a large majority of dolmens were built oriented along the N-S direction. A first interpretative hypothesis of these results, based on the astronomical contents of the mythology of the nearby civilizations culturally connected to the Palestinian area, is suggested.

Polcaro, A.; Polcaro, F.

206

Evaluating patients perceptions regarding generic medicines in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to explore Jordanian patients perceptions toward generic medicines and to evaluate their opinions regarding generic substitution. Method A cross-sectional descriptive study involving Jordanian patients was undertaken, using a self-administrated anonymous questionnaire. The response rate was 80% (n=400/500). Results The study showed that cost of medicines is high according to 83% of the patients. Most patients (92%) preferred to be prescribed the cheapest medicine. Majority of patients (79%) believed that cost should be considered before a drug is prescribed. Most patients (78%) accepted generic substitution and believed that it can provide significant saving. Surveyed patients (78%) agreed that they should have the option of choosing between generic and originator and 74% believed that physicians should give them that choice. These results showed a significant statistical correlation with the monthly income of the patient, percentage cost they pay and number of medicines prescribed (P<0.05). Conclusion The high cost of medicines in Jordan is believed to be the main driver for choosing generic medicines Furthermore; patients have positive attitudes towards generic medicines. The involvement of patients in the treatment decision would result in more adherence and improvement in health. The insights gained from patients in this study will be useful to health organisations and policy makers to design a robust generic policy to use medicines cost-effectively in Jordan. PMID:24764538

2013-01-01

207

Autour de pratiques algbriques de Poincar : hritages de la rduction de Jordan  

E-print Network

Autour de pratiques algébriques de Poincaré : héritages de la réduction de Jordan Frédéric réduction canonique (dite de Jordan) de leurs substitutions. Cette pratique algébrique s'avère jouer un rôle des travaux de Jordan sur les groupes linéaires au prisme de l'héritage d'Hermite sur la réduction des

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Salinization Sources Along the Lower Jordan River Under Draught Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lower Jordan River, once a flowing freshwater river, is suffering from an ongoing reduction of discharge and water quality. The river flows between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, an aerial distance of about 105 Km. The severe reduction is caused by an excessive exploitation of its sources and diversion of sewage and agricultural drainage into the river. The extreme low flows and low water quality threaten the natural existence of the river and its potential use for agriculture. In spite of its importance, little research has been done in the river. The objectives of the study were to measure the discharge and water composition along the river and to evaluate the main sources that control its flow and chemical characteristics. The hypothesis of the study was that interaction with subsurface flows significantly affects the river flow and chemical composition. The research is based on a detailed field study, which included flow rate measurements in the river and its tributaries, water sampling and analysis and mass balance calculations of water and solutes. A portable Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) was used to measure velocities and bathymetry at different locations across the river sections. Due to accessibility constraints, a floating traverse construction, which enables the ADV's deployment from one bank of the river, was developed. It was found that flow rate ranges between 500-1,100 L/s in northern (upstream) sections and 300-1,650 L/s in the south. This low discharge represents a significant reduction from historical values and is lower than recent published estimations. This research represents base flows only, as the measurements were done during a period of two consecutive draught years. Calculated mass balance of water flows in the northern sections shows that the subsurface source contributes to the river around 200-670 L/s (30-80% of the river flow). Calculations of solute balance show that the subsurface flows add 20-50% of the mass of solutes (e.g. Sulfate) that flows in the river. The assumption of a hydraulic gradient that points at inflows from subsurface flows is encouraged by high water levels measured in nearby piezometers. Possible natural subsurface sources include shallow groundwater or rising of water from deep formations. The existence of adjacent thermal wells strengthens the reasonability of such water rise. Possible anthropogenic sources include return flows and effluents. The results are consistent and agree with the geochemical and isotopic analyses. It is concluded that the impact of the subsurface component on the Jordan River is significant and must be taken into consideration, for future water management schemes and implementation of the Peace Treaty between Israel and Jordan.

Holtzman, R.; Shavit, U.; Segal, M.; Vengosh, A.; Farber, E.; Gavrieli, I.

2003-12-01

209

How Symbiosis Can Guide Evolution Richard A. Watson Jordan B. Pollack  

E-print Network

How Symbiosis Can Guide Evolution Richard A. Watson Jordan B. Pollack Dynamical and Evolutionary organisms of distinct species without direct transfer of genetic information. 1 Introduction Symbiosis relationship) are mutually beneficial. Despite being undeniably common, the phenomenon of symbiosis

Pollack, Jordan B.

210

Evolving L-Systems To Generate Virtual Gregory S. Hornby and Jordan B. Pollack  

E-print Network

Evolving L-Systems To Generate Virtual Creatures Gregory S. Hornby and Jordan B. Pollack DEMO Lab the di?cult and time consuming task of specify- ing morphologies and behaviors. But, while arti#12;cial

Pollack, Jordan B.

211

Anytime Heuristic Search: Frameworks and Algorithms Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml  

E-print Network

Anytime Heuristic Search: Frameworks and Algorithms Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml jtd7, ruml at cs to gracefully expand to consume all of the allotted time, using it to produce a solution of greater quality than

Ruml, Wheeler

212

Towards improved partnerships in the water sector in the Middle East : A case study of Jordan  

E-print Network

This dissertation focuses on the use of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the water sector in Jordan, a Middle East pioneer with respect to experimenting with different approaches to delivering water services in both ...

Odeh, Nancy

2009-01-01

213

GENERIC AND MAXIMAL JORDAN TYPES ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER*, JULIA PEVTSOVA*, AND ANDREI SUSLIN*  

E-print Network

GENERIC AND MAXIMAL JORDAN TYPES ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER*, JULIA PEVTSOVA and representation theory of finite groups is naturally extended to other algebraic structures. Friedlander and B by the NSF. 1 #12; 2 ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER*, JULIA

214

GENERIC AND MAXIMAL JORDAN TYPES ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER*, JULIA PEVTSOVA*, AND ANDREI SUSLIN*  

E-print Network

GENERIC AND MAXIMAL JORDAN TYPES ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER*, JULIA PEVTSOVA and representation theory of finite groups is naturally extended to other algebraic structures. Friedlander and B #12; 2 ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER*, JULIA PEVTSOVA*, AND ANDREI SUSLIN* dual of the representing

Pevtsova, Julia

215

A Piperitenone Oxide Chemotype of Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds. Growing Wild in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The essential oil obtained from Mentha longifolia plants growing wild in Jordan has been analyzed by GC and GC\\/MS. The main consituent has been isolated and identified as piperitenone oxide (83.7%).

Ibrahim M. Abu-Al-Futuh; Osama H. Abdelmageed; Raya M. Jamil; Pinarosa Avato

2000-01-01

216

Action with Acceleration II: Euclidean Hamiltonian and Jordan Blocks  

E-print Network

The Euclidean action with acceleration has been analyzed in [1], hereafter cited as reference I, for its Hamiltonian and path integral. In this paper, the state space of the Hamiltonian is analyzed for the case when it is pseudo-Hermitian (equivalent to a Hermitian Hamiltonian), as well as the case when it is inequivalent. The propagator is computed using both creation/destruction operators as well as the path integral. A state space calculation of the propagator shows the crucial role played by the dual state vectors that yields a result impossible to obtain from a Hermitian Hamiltonian acting on a Hilbert space. When it is not pseudo-Hermitian, the Hamiltonian is shown to be a direct sum of Jordan blocks.

Belal E. Baaquie

2012-11-30

217

Investigation of desert subsoil nitrate in Northeastern Badia of Jordan.  

PubMed

High levels of naturally occurring nitrate were observed under desert pavement surfaces in NE Badia of Jordan. The subsoil nitrate inventory varies from about 24,351 to 28,853 kg NO(3)(-)/ha to a depth of 60 cm which is more than two times greater than nitrate in nonpavement soils, although both soils occurred within similar landscape and microclimate conditions. The results indicated that pavement particle size and cover percent are the primary factors contributing to the observed variations in nitrate accumulation. Desert pavement soils fully covered with fine clasts showed higher nitrate concentrations compared to soils moderately covered with coarse-grained pavements. The results also showed that high levels of nitrate were generally reached between 20 and 30 cm depth before the concentrations decreased. Chloride showed distribution profiles similar to those of nitrate. No observable difference was observed in nitrate level under desert pavement with abundant lichens compared to non-lichen pavement surface. PMID:23178770

Al-Taani, Ahmed A; Al-Qudah, Khaldoun A

2013-01-01

218

The Jordan Report 2000: Accelerated Development of Vaccines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On March 2, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) released its latest report on the state of vaccine research and development. This edition of the Jordan Report "highlights the triumphs of vaccinology during the 20th century and the ways in which new technologies promise better vaccines against both old and new disease-causing organisms." Prepared by 24 scientists from NIAID with contributions from outside researchers, the 173-page report offers a comprehensive overview of vaccine development against nearly 60 diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Users can read the full text of the report (in .pdf format), the press release, and a White House statement on a new vaccine initiative. The site also offers links to a number of related NIAID publications, fact sheets, and sites.

219

Antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants grown in Jordan.  

PubMed

In the present study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of 16 Jordanian medicinal plant extracts against four reference bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhi. For that purpose, whole plants were extracted and antimicrobial susceptibility testing and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determined. Ethanolic extracts of most medicinal plants exerted a dose-dependent cytotoxiciy against different reference bacteria. Origanum syriaca, Varthemia iphionoides, Psidium guajava, Sarcopoterium spinosa plant extracts were most active against S. aureus (MIC; 70 ?g/mL), E. faecalis (MIC; 130 ?g/mL), E. coli (MIC; 153 ?g/mL), and S. typhi (MIC; 110 ?g/mL), respectively. Results indicate that medicinal plants grown in Jordan might be a valuable source of starting materials for the extraction and/or isolation of new antibacterial agents. PMID:23455195

Masadeh, Majed Mohammad; Alkofahi, Ahmad Suleiman; Tumah, Haitham Najeeb; Mhaidat, Nizar Mahmoud; Alzoubi, Karem Hasan

2013-03-01

220

General analysis of inflation in the Jordan frame supergravity  

SciTech Connect

We study various inflation models in the Jordan frame supergravity with a logarithmic Khler potential. We find that, in a class of inflation models containing an additional singlet in the superpotential, three types of chaotic inflation can be realized: the Higgs-type inflation, power-law inflation, and inflation with/without a running kinetic term. The former two are possible if the holomorphic function dominates over the non-holomorphic one in the frame function, while the inflation with/without a running kinetic term occurs when both are comparable. Interestingly, the fractional-power potential can be realized by the running kinetic term. We also discuss the implication for the Higgs inflation in supergravity.

Nakayama, Kazunori [Theory Center, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu, E-mail: kazunori@post.kek.jp, E-mail: fuminobu.takahashi@ipmu.jp [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

2010-11-01

221

Risk factors for human brucellosis in northern Jordan.  

PubMed

Little is known about the risk factors of human brucellosis in Jordan. A case-control study was conducted involving 56 Jordanians who had been treated for brucellosis and at least 3 matched controls for each case (n = 247). Matching was for sex, age, locality (the same village) and socioeconomic standard. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. In all, 17 risk factors were examined related to: contact with various livestock, milk and milk product consumption, drinking-water treatment and disease awareness. Most variables were associated with brucellosis in the univariate analysis but the final logistic model included only 4: milking sheep and goats (OR 3.5), consumption of raw feta cheese made from sheep and goat milk (OR 2.8) and consumption of cows' milk (OR 0.4) and boiled feta cheese (OR 0.4). Small ruminant farmers need to be trained in safer milking practices and feta cheese making procedures. PMID:23516823

Abo-Shehada, M N; Abu-Halaweh, M

2013-02-01

222

Database compilation: hydrology of Lake Tiberias (Jordan Valley)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A long-term series of water balance data over the last 50 years is compiled to gain insights into the hydrology of the Lake Tiberias (LT) and surrounding aquifers. This database is used within the framework of a German-Israeli-Jordanian project (DFG Ma4450-2) in which numerical modeling is applied to study the mechanisms of deep fluid transport processes affecting the Tiberias basin. The LT is the largest natural freshwater lake in Israel. It is located in the northern part of the Dead Sea Rift. The behavior of the lake level is a result of the regional water balance caused mainly by interaction of two factors: (i) fluctuations of water inflow to the Lake, (ii) water exploitation in the adjacent aquifers and consumptions from the lake (pumping, diversion, etc). The replenishment of the lake occurs through drainage from surrounding mountains (Galilee, Golan Heights), entering the lake through the Jordan River and secondary streams (85%), direct precipitation (11%), fresh-saline springs discharging along the shoreline, divertion from Yarmouk river and internal springs and seeps. The major losses occur through the National Water Carrier (ca. 44%), evaporation (38%), local consumption and compensation to Jordan (in sum 12%). In spite of the increasing role of water exploitation, the natural inflow to the Lake remains the dominant factor of hydrological regime of the Tiberias Lake. Additionally, series of natural yield to the LT are reconstructed with precipitation data measured in the Tiberias basin (1922-2012). The earlier period (1877-1921) is evaluated considering long rainfall records at Beirut and Nazareth stations (Middle East Region). This data enables to use the LT yield as a complex indicator of the regional climate change. Though the data applies to the LT, this example shows the importance of large database. Their compilation defines the correct set-up of joint methodologies such as numerical modeling and hydrochemical analyses aimed to understand large-scale hydrological processes.

Shentsis, Izabela; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Magri, Fabien

2014-05-01

223

Food security and humanitarian assistance among displaced Iraqi populations in Jordan and Syria.  

PubMed

The Iraq conflict resulted in the largest displacement in the Middle East in recent history, and provision of health services to the displaced population presents a critical challenge. With an increase in the number of people affected by complex emergencies and the number of people displaced in urban settings, the international community must adapt intervention strategies to meet the specific demands and contexts of this population. The study aimed to provide information on food security and livelihoods for Iraqi refugees in Syria and Jordan to inform humanitarian assistance planning. National cross-sectional cluster sample surveys of displaced Iraqi populations displaced were conducted in Jordan (October 2008) and Syria (March 2009). Clusters of ten households were randomly selected using probability-based sampling; a total of 1200 and 813 Iraqi households in Jordan and Syria, respectively, were interviewed about food security and receipt of humanitarian assistance. In Syria, 60% of households reported the household food situation had declined since the arrival period as compared to 46% in Jordan. Food aid receipt was reported by 18.0% of households in Jordan and 90.3% of households in Syria. In Jordan, 10.2% of households received cash assistance and in Syria 25.3% of households received cash assistance. In Jordan, cash assistance was associated with low socioeconomic status, large household size, and UNHCR registration. In Syria, female headed households, Damascus residents, families with children, and those registered with UNHCR were more likely to receive cash assistance. Food insecurity remains a concern among displaced Iraqi households in both Jordan and Syria. Improved targeting of both food and cash assistance and the expansion of cash-based programs could lead to a more effective use of funds and facilitate the implementation of assistance programs that are sustainable in the context of declining funding availability. PMID:21168249

Doocy, Shannon; Sirois, Adam; Anderson, Jamie; Tileva, Margarita; Biermann, Elizabeth; Storey, J Douglas; Burnham, Gilbert

2011-01-01

224

Binary operations on Jordan algebras: An application to statistical inference in linear models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of best unbiased estimators (UMVUE) in Normal Linear Mixed Models, YN(X?, ? i = 1k?i2Vi), are given. These conditions rely on the existence of Jordan algebras, in the sequence of [19], [6], [9], [7], [3] and [8]. We also take [2] in mind where lattices of Jordan algebras are presented for estimation purposes in these models and [1] where such estimation is exemplified.

Covas, Ricardo; Zmy?lony, Roman; Carvalho, Francisco

2012-09-01

225

THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT AND WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT IN JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan is a middle-income country with a per capita income of $ 1.666 and a population of approximately 5.5 million. In Jordan, water is the single most critical natural resources where the per capita share of water is less than 175 cubic meter per year. The water scarcity is exacerbated by rapid population increases, the growing industrial and services sectors,

S. Al-Naber; M. Shatanawi

226

Waste Water Reuse for Agriculture Pilot Project at the Jordan University of Science and Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of water scarcity in Jordan, marginal water (treated wastewater in particular) use in agriculture is highly required.\\u000a However, this needs to be done with precautions to avoid harming the valuable agricultural soils and to prevent any consumer\\u000a health risk.\\u000a \\u000a The Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST) has a large campus (11 km2) and has reused water from the

Ziad Al-Ghazawi; Jumah Amayreh; Laith Rousan; Amal Hijazi

227

A strategy for the introduction of desalination powered by renewable energy in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the ADIRA project (www.adira.gr) a strategy has been developed facilitating the up-take of desalination powered by renewable energy in Turkey, Morocco, Jordan and Egypt. This strategy has been documented in a central report called the Master Plan for the Wide Implementation of Autonomous Desalination Systems in Turkey, Morocco, Jordan and Egypt. In this paper the work and results for

Hazim Mohameed Qiblaweya; Michael Papapetrou; Fawzi Banat

2009-01-01

228

On the equivalence of Gaussian elimination and Gauss-Jordan reduction in solving linear equations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel general approach to round-off error analysis using the error complexity concepts is described. This is applied to the analysis of the Gaussian Elimination and Gauss-Jordan scheme for solving linear equations. The results show that the two algorithms are equivalent in terms of our error complexity measures. Thus the inherently parallel Gauss-Jordan scheme can be implemented with confidence if parallel computers are available.

Tsao, Nai-Kuan

1989-01-01

229

Overweight and Obesity Among School Children in Jordan: Prevalence and Associated Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To estimate the prevalence of overweight and obesity and determine their associated factors among school children aged 612years\\u000a in the north of Jordan. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among school children in the north of Jordan in the period between March 2006 and May\\u000a 2006. A total of 2,131 children (1,052 boys and 1,079 girls) were selected at

Yousef Khader; Omama Irshaidat; Mohammad Khasawneh; Zouhair Amarin; Mousa Alomari; Anwar Batieha

2009-01-01

230

Participatory groundwater management in Jordan: Development and analysis of options  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater over-exploitation has been on the rise in Jordan. Competing demands have grown in the face of perennial water shortages, a situation which has been exacerbated by drought conditions in the past decade. This paper reports findings of a project in which management options to address over-exploitation were developed for one of Jordan's principal aquifer systems, the Amman-Zarqa Basin. Options for addressing the situation were developed through a participatory approach that involved government officials and various public and private sector interest groups. Particular efforts were made to involve well irrigators, who are likely to be heavily impacted by the changes required to reduce groundwater pumping to a sustainable level. With information obtained from a rapid appraisal survey as well as from interviews with farmers, community groups, government officials, and technical experts, an extensive set of options was identified for evaluation. Based on integrated hydrogeologic, social, and economic analysis, five complementary management options were recommended for implementation. These included the establishment of an Irrigation Advisory Service, buying out farm wells, placing firm limits on well ion and irrigated crop areas, exchanging treated wastewater for groundwater, and measures to increase the efficiency of municipal and industrial water use. Various combinations and levels of these options were grouped in scenarios, representing possible implementation strategies. The scenarios were designed to assist decision makers, well owners and other stakeholders in moving gradually towards a sustainable ion regime. Social and economic aspects of each option and scenario were analyzed and presented to stakeholders, together with a of legal, institutional and environmental ramifications. Combining scientific analysis with a participatory approach in the Amman Zarqa Basin groundwater management was devised as a prototype to be used in the management of other groundwater basins in Jordan. This participatory management approach would also be useful in other parts of the world that are experiencing similar groundwater over-exploitation problems. La surexploitation des eaux souterraines prend de l'importance en Jordanie. Les demandes en concurrence ont augment face des dficits permanents d'eau, situation qui a t exacerbe par la scheresse de la dernire dcennie. Cet article rend compte de l'aboutissement d'un projet dans lequel des options de gestion portant sur la surexploitation ont t dveloppes pour l'un des principaux systmes aquifres de Jordanie, le bassin d'Amman Zarqa. Des options pour aborder cette situation ont t dveloppes grce une approche participative qui implique des fonctionnaires du gouvernement et des groupes d'intrts varis des secteurs public et priv. Des efforts particuliers ont t faits pour impliquer les irrigants utilisant des puits, qui sont probablement ceux qui ont le plus fort impact sur les changements attendus permettant de remettre le systme en quilibre. partir des informations obtenues de campagnes rapides d'valuation, telles que des runions de communauts et des entrevues avec des experts techniques du gouvernement, un large jeu d'options a t identifi pour l'valuation. Bases sur une analyse hydrogologique, sociale et conomique, cinq options complmentaires de gestion ont t recommandes pour la ralisation. Ce sont la cration d'un Service Consultatif d'Irrigation, achetant les puits agricoles, fixant des limites fermes aux prlvements des puits et aux zones irrigues, changeant les eaux uses traites avec des eaux souterraines, et la mise en place de mesures pour accrotre l'efficacit des usages collectifs et industriels. Des combinaisons et des niveaux varis de ces options ont t regroups en scnarios, prsentant les stratgies possibles de mise en uvre. Les scnarios ont t mis au point pour assister les dcideurs, les propritaires de puits et les autres acteurs pour atteindr

Chebaane, Mohamed; El-Naser, Hazim; Fitch, Jim; Hijazi, Amal; Jabbarin, Amer

231

Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik. Holistic Sentiment Analysis Across Languages: Multilingual Super-vised Latent Dirichlet Allocation. Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, 2010.  

E-print Network

Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik. Holistic Sentiment Analysis Across Languages: Multilingual Sentiment Analysis Across Languages: Multilingual Supervised Latent Dirichlet Allocation}, } 1 #12;Holistic Sentiment Analysis Across Languages: Multilingual Supervised Latent Dirichlet Allocation Jordan Boyd

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

232

Honor killing attitudes amongst adolescents in Amman, Jordan.  

PubMed

The present study examines attitudes towards honor crimes amongst a sample of 856 ninth grade students (mean age?=?14.6, SD?=?0.56) from 14 schools in Amman, Jordan. Descriptive findings suggest that about 40% of boys and 20% of girls believe that killing a daughter, sister, or wife who has dishonored the family can be justified. A number of theoretically meaningful predictors were examined: Findings suggest that attitudes in support of honor killings are more likely amongst adolescents who have collectivist and patriarchal world views, believe in the importance of female chastity amongst adolescents, and morally neutralize aggressive behavior in general. Findings for parental harsh discipline are mixed: While the father's harsh discipline is predictive of honor killing attitudes, the mother's behavior is not. Furthermore, support for honor killing is stronger amongst male adolescents and adolescents for low education backgrounds. After controlling for other factors religion and the intensity of religious beliefs are not associated with support for honor killings. Models were tested separately for male and female respondents and suggested no systematic differences in predictors. Limitations and implications are discussed. PMID:23744567

Eisner, Manuel; Ghuneim, Lana

2013-01-01

233

The position of AIDS in Pakistan, UAE and Jordan.  

PubMed

AIDS is a term used for Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome. It is, by definition, the end-stage disease manifestation of an infection with a virus called human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The virus infects mainly two system of the body i.e. the immune system and central nervous system (CNS) and the occurrence of disease is due to the damage of these two systems. The statistics on AIDS are alarming, especially for Sub-Saharan Africa India. Some scientific studies indicated that upto one-third of all sexually active adults living in this region are already infected, up to 40% of all women and one in 10 to one in 5 children born in this part are actively infected with HIV and will be dead before having reached their fifth birthday. The information on HIV infected young adults were collected both from official and non-official sources of the following countries, Jordan, UAE, Pakistan. A big difference in number of patients was found between official and non-official data. Anyhow, both data (official & non-official) are alarming due to the increase in number of HIV cases. 21st century is especially dangerous to the next generation of Pakistan and Arab World because of increase in percentage of HIV cases during the last 5 years. PMID:16414795

Ahmad, M; Abu-Hijleh, L A

1997-01-01

234

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Jordan Valley Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The Jordan Valley Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits in accordance with criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface radiometric reconnaissance and geochemical sampling were used for overall evaluation of the quadrangle. Detailed rock sampling, geologic mapping, and examination of uranium deposits and occurrences were performed in areas suspected to be favorable. The northeast part of the McDermitt caldera within the quadrangle is favorable for volcanogenic deposits associated with the ring-fracture zone. The favorable area contains the Aurora uranium deposit, the Bretz mercury mine, and the Cottonwood Creek occurrence. The Triangle Ranch area and the Snake River Plain, both in the northeast part of the quadrangle, have environments that may be favorable for uranium deposits in sandstone but are considered unevaluated due to lack of subsurface data and lack of detailed investigations. Rocks in the remainder of the quadrangle are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits because of low uranium contents, basic to intermediate compositions, or lack of favorable structures.

Berry, M R; Castor, S B; Robins, J W

1982-04-01

235

Jordan, an active Volvox transposable element similar to higher plant transposons.  

PubMed

We have isolated a 1595-bp transposable element from the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri following its insertion into the nitrate reductase (nitA) locus. This element, which we have named Jordan, has short (12-bp) terminal inverted repeats and creates a 3-bp target site duplication, like some higher plant transposons of the classic type. Contained within the first 200 bp of one end of the element are 55-bp inverted repeats, one of which begins with the terminal inverted repeat. Revertants of the transposon insertion into the nitA locus were obtained at a rate of approximately 10(-4) per Volvox embryo per generation. In each revertant examined, all transposon sequences were completely excised, but footprints containing both sets of duplicated bases, in addition to three to nine extra bases, were left behind. Jordan contains no significant open reading frames and so appears to be nonautonomous. DNA gel blot analysis indicates that Jordan is a member of a large family of homologous elements in the Volvox genome. We have isolated and characterized several of these homologs and found that they contain terminal very similar to those of Jordan. Efforts to utilize Jordan and its homologs as tools to tag and clone developmentally interesting genes of Volvox are discussed. PMID:8400878

Miller, S M; Schmitt, R; Kirk, D L

1993-09-01

236

Potential Impacts on Surface Water Quality from the Utilization of Oil Shale at Lajjoun Area\\/Southern Jordan Using Geographic Information Systems and Leachability Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface water is one of the major water resources for drinking and agricultural purposes in Jordan. It is the largest contributor to the irrigation sector and it is the second largest source for domestic consumption. Jordan also has a huge amount of oil shale that exists in the Southern and Eastern parts of the country. It is estimated that Jordan

A. Al-Harahsheh; R. Al-Adamat; M. Al-Farajat

2010-01-01

237

Chen, Zhao & Jordan Preprint (BSSA) October 6, 2006 1 Full 3D Tomography for Crustal Structure of the Los Angeles Region  

E-print Network

Chen, Zhao & Jordan Preprint (BSSA) October 6, 2006 1 Full 3D Tomography for Crustal Structure of the Los Angeles Region by Po Chen, Li Zhao and Thomas H. Jordan Abstract We apply full 3D tomography (F3DT. To #12;Chen, Zhao & Jordan Preprint (BSSA) October 6, 2006 2 our knowledge, this study is the first

Chen, Po

238

Jordan Paradise et al., "Developing Oversight Frameworks for Nanobiotechnology," 9(1) MINN. J.L. SCI. & TECH. 399-416 (2008).  

E-print Network

Jordan Paradise et al., "Developing Oversight Frameworks for Nanobiotechnology," 9(1) MINN. J.L. SCI. & TECH. 399-416 (2008). 399 Developing Oversight Frameworks for Nanobiotechnology Jordan Paradise/or intermediate size; and (3) ability to control or manipulate at the atomic scale.1 © 2008 Jordan Paradise, Susan

Kokkoli, Efie

239

94:1392-1404, 2005. First published May 4, 2005; doi:10.1152/jn.00136.2005JN Jun Liu and Larry M. Jordan  

E-print Network

. Jordan Receptors 2Aand 5-HT7Activity Involving Spinal 5-HT Neonatal Rat Brain Stem Produces Locomotor-Like Activity Involving Spinal 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A Receptors Jun Liu and Larry M. Jordan Department of Physiology; accepted in final form 3 May 2005 Liu, Jun and Larry M. Jordan. Stimulation of the parapyramidal region

Manitoba, University of

240

FEEDING HABITS OF IMMATURE STAGES OF ISOPERLA NANA (INSECTA: PLECOPTERA: PERLODIDAE) IN JORDAN CREEK (VERMILION COUNTY, ILLINOIS)  

E-print Network

FEEDING HABITS OF IMMATURE STAGES OF ISOPERLA NANA (INSECTA: PLECOPTERA: PERLODIDAE) IN JORDAN) is an important component of the stream food webs of Jordan Creek (Vermilion County, Illinois) because of its of the genus Isoperla differ among species. Some species facultatively consume food (Feminella and Stewart 1986

Taylor, Steven J.

241

Gender Equality in Secondary Education: A Study of Girls' Educational Access and Participation in Jordan between 2000 and 2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the changes of male and female enrollment in urban and rural areas in Jordan and the school-related factors, as well as government policies that contributed to its change. Both qualitative methods and archival research were utilized to collect data in urban and rural areas in Jordan. A selective sample of twelve people

Belal, Fatima Omar

2010-01-01

242

Ethnopharmacological survey of wild medicinal plants in Showbak, Jordan.  

PubMed

Two main research questions are framing this investigation: (1) the main taxa of the medicinal importance value altered the Showbak forest stand and species composition? (2) The most safe species and what are the toxic ones (unsafe). These two research questions are the vital ones to draw a clear image about the wild medicinal plants of this investigated area of Showbak region in Jordan. 79 wild medicinal plant species were investigated in this study which are used in traditional medication for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Aaronsohnia factorovskyi Warb. et Eig., Achillea santolina L., Adiantum capillus-veneris L., Artemisia herba-alba L., Ceratonia siliqua L., Clematis recta L., Herniaria hirsuta L., Malva neglecta Wallr., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta chalepensis L., Salvia triloba L., Sarcopoterium spinosa (L.) Spach., Thymbra capitata (L.) Hof, and Urginea maritima Barker. Many of the wild medicinal plants investigated were toxic and needed to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the local healers. These plants include Calotropis procera Willd R.Br., Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Sch., Datura stramonium L., Digitalis purpurea L., Ecballium elaterium (L.) A.Rich., Euphorbia helioscopia L., Euphorbia tinctoria Boiss., Glaucium corniculatum (L.) Curt., Hyoscyamus aureus L., Mandragora officinarum L., Nerium oleander L., Ricinus communis L., Solanum nigrum L., Withania somnifera (L.) Dunel. The conservation of medicinal plants and natural resources is becoming increasingly important, so this research is trying to collect information from local population concerning the use of medicinal plants in Showbak; identify the most important specie; determine the relative importance value of the species and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) for the medicinal plants. Obtaining results is relied on the interviewee's personal information and the medicinal use of specific plants. PMID:19429338

Al-Qura'n, S

2009-05-01

243

An algorithm for calculation of the Jordan canonical form of a matrix  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Jordan canonical forms are used extensively in the literature on control systems. However, very few methods are available to compute them numerically. Most numerical methods compute a set of basis vectors in terms of which the given matrix is diagonalized when such a change of basis is possible. Here, a simple and efficient method is suggested for computing the Jordan canonical form and the corresponding transformation matrix. The method is based on the definition of a generalized eigenvector, and a natural extension of Gauss elimination techniques.

Sridhar, B.; Jordan, D.

1973-01-01

244

The snowmelt of Mt. Hermon and its contribution to the sources of the Jordan River  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The water resources of the upper Jordan River Basin, particularly the main springs, are partially fed by the snowmelt of Mt. Hermon. Mount Hermon is an uplifted anticline extending along the northern border of Israel, and covering an area of 1200 km 2, of which 750 km 2 is included in the Jordan River watershed. Most of Mt. Hermon is composed of karstic limestone of Jurassic age, > 2000 m thick. The annual amount of precipitation over the Jordan River sources watershed is estimated to be 8.5 10 8 m 3. The water yield of the Jordan tributaries is 5 10 8 m 3, with 4 10 8 m 3 of it being discharge from karstic springs. To date, there are almost no data or estimates of the magnitude of snowmelt recharge and its areal and temporal distribution. Inaccessibility to most parts of the mountain is the main reason for the lack of data. During the last four years research has been conducted to find characteristic parameters that represent the relationship between the Mt. Hermon snowcover and its contribution to dry weather discharge of the Jordan River tributaries. Snow depth and water content were measured at several locations in the altitude range 1500-2100 m above sea level (a.s.l.). The snow-covered area was obtained from Landsat images and from aerial photographs. The snow lines were delineated on 1:250 000 scale maps and their area was measured. These data were compared with the dry weather water yield of the Jordan tributaries and the main springs. Significant contribution from the snowpack was found only above 1400 m. The areal extent of the pertinent snowcover is 185 km 2, representing about 25% of the total drainage basin of the Jordan head waters. The mean water content at the snow gaging sites increased from 10 cm at an elevation of 1500 m-65 cm at an altitude of 2100 m a.s.l. Based on these values, a preliminary estimate yielded a volume of 5 10 7 m 3, which is about 30% of the dry weather discharge. This may be considered as the potential snowmelt recharge to the Jordan River main springs.

Gil'ad, D.; Bonne, J.

1990-03-01

245

An Integrated Learning Management System for Islamic Studies: An Innovation from Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of ICT in the Middle East is expanding at a fast rate; hence managers and decision makers must decide on the best learning solution for their organizations. This article describes how a small team of individuals in Jordan developed an effective learning solution to a social problem. This may provide some useful lessons for other

Rumzan, Ismael; Chowdhury, Imran; Mirza, Saudah; Idil, Raidah Shah

2010-01-01

246

Water management with water conservation, infrastructure expansions, and source variability in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A regional hydroeconomic model is developed to include demand shifts from nonprice water conservation programs as input parameters and decision variables. Stochastic nonlinear programming then jointly identifies the benefit-maximizing portfolio of conservation and leak reduction programs, infrastructure expansions, and operational allocations under variable water availability. We present a detailed application for 12 governorates in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. It

David E. Rosenberg; Richard E. Howitt; Jay R. Lund

2008-01-01

247

Faster Bounded-Cost Search Using Inadmissible Estimates Jordan T. Thayer  

E-print Network

Faster Bounded-Cost Search Using Inadmissible Estimates Jordan T. Thayer Department of Computer how bounded-cost search can incorporate inadmissible estimates of solution cost and so- lution length of actually finding that goal. If we had both of these estimates, we could optimize the goal of bounded- cost

Ruml, Wheeler

248

On the Myth of the Crisis of Representation: A Response to Gilbourne, Jones and Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author observes that, in "Applied Utility and the Auto-Ethnographic Short Story: Persuasions for, and Illustrations of, Writing Critical Social Science," Gilbourne, Jones and Jordan present claims about why we might choose to represent auto-ethnographic data in a literary form such as short story and for the "potential" or

Gard, Michael

2014-01-01

249

The EFQM Self-Assessment Processes in HEIs in Spain and in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to compare the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) self-assessment model in higher education institutions (HEIs) in Spain and in Jordan. Case study methodology on eight services provided by a public university in Spain and seven services provided by one public university and one private university in

Tari, Juan Jose; Madeleine, Carolina

2010-01-01

250

Chemical and Mineralogical Characteristics of Dry Deposition in the Surrounding of a Cement Factory in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dry deposition samples were collected from 28 residential rooftops in Fuhais, Jordan, during the dry seasons of the year 2004. The samples were analyzed for trace and heavy metal concentrations to investigate the impact of total suspended particles emitted from the cement industry in the city of Fuhais. The cement factory has been operational for the past 50 years, and

Anf H. Ziadat; Mufeed Batarseh; Tayel El-Hasan; Bruce W. Berdanie; Anwar Jiries

2006-01-01

251

Political Economy of Cost-Sharing in Higher Education: The Case of Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article analyzes patterns of expenditure on higher education in Jordan, explores the current system's adequacy, efficiency, and equity, and identifies its strengths and weaknesses in light of current constraints and future challenges. Among the constraints are the relatively low public expenditure on higher education, leaving households to

Kanaan, Taher H.; Al-Salamat, Mamdouh N.; Hanania, May D.

2011-01-01

252

Linear maps preserving maximal deviation and the Jordan structure of quantum systems  

SciTech Connect

In the algebraic approach to quantum theory, a quantum observable is given by an element of a Jordan algebra and a state of the system is modelled by a normalized positive functional on the underlying algebra. Maximal deviation of a quantum observable is the largest statistical deviation one can obtain in a particular state of the system. The main result of the paper shows that each linear bijective transformation between JBW algebras preserving maximal deviations is formed by a Jordan isomorphism or a minus Jordan isomorphism perturbed by a linear functional multiple of an identity. It shows that only one numerical statistical characteristic has the power to determine the Jordan algebraic structure completely. As a consequence, we obtain that only very special maps can preserve the diameter of the spectra of elements. Nonlinear maps preserving the pseudometric given by maximal deviation are also described. The results generalize hitherto known theorems on preservers of maximal deviation in the case of self-adjoint parts of von Neumann algebras proved by Molnar.

Hamhalter, Jan [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-12-15

253

Jordan Form of (i+j over j) over Z[subscript p  

E-print Network

The Jordan Form over field Z[subscript p] of J[superscript p][subscript p]n is diagonal for p > 3 with characteristic polynomial, ?(x) = x[superscript 3] - 1, for p prime, n natural number. These matrices have dimension ...

Strauss, Nicholas

254

Loneliness among Students with Blindness and Sighted Students in Jordan: A Brief Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated loneliness among students with blindness and those who are sighted in Jordan, and examined whether loneliness levels vary according to gender. Students included 90 students with blindness and 79 sighted students selected from high schools and universities in the capital city of Amman. The instrument used to collect

Hadidi, Muna S.; Al Khateeb, Jamal M.

2013-01-01

255

Obstacles of Teaching Mathematics Faced by the Class Teachers in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study is to investigate the obstacles of teaching mathematics faced by the class teachers in Jordan. To achieve this purpose a study sample of 192 male and female class teachers was selected randomly from government schools. The instrument of the study was a questionnaire used to investigate the obstacles of mathematics

Nejem, Khamis Mousa; Muhanna, Waffa

2013-01-01

256

Impact of managers emotional intelligence on marketing creativity in Jordan Commercial banks" Innovative Marketing, International  

E-print Network

Impact of managers emotional intelligence on marketing creativity in Jordan Commercial banks: This study aims to investigate the Impact of Managers Emotional Intelligence on marketing creativity that there is high impact of emotional intelligence and its components of (self-awareness, and emotions control

257

Spencer Liberto, Dilan Ustek, Jordan Yuan How Does a C Program Talk to a Scribbler Robot?  

E-print Network

Spencer Liberto, Dilan Ustek, Jordan Yuan How Does a C Program Talk to a Scribbler Robot? MyroC/Scribbler Language The MyroC library and your Scribbler robot have an agreed upon low-level language or byte code Bluetooth. CSC 499 MAP Adviser Henry Walker The robot gives out a signal to the workstation every 5

Walker, Henry MacKay

258

Heavy metals in urban soils of central Jordan: Should we worry about their environmental risks?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty soil samples collected from central Jordan were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry for Pb, Cd, Zn, Cr, and Hg. The samples were also investigated for mineralogy using X-ray, electron, and optical microscopes. Sequential extraction procedures were used to predict the percentages of the Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cr present in each of the soil geochemical phases. The clay mineral

K. M. Banat; F. M. Howari; A. A. Al-Hamad

2005-01-01

259

Mutualism, Parasitism, and Evolutionary Adaptation Richard A. Watson 1 Torsten Reil 2 Jordan B. Pollack 1  

E-print Network

@cs.brandeis.edu Abstract Our investigations concern the role of symbiosis as an enabling mechanism in evolutionary mechanism in evolutionary innovation. In its strongest form, symbiosis can lead to symbiogenesisMutualism, Parasitism, and Evolutionary Adaptation Richard A. Watson 1 Torsten Reil 2 Jordan B

Pollack, Jordan B.

260

How Symbiosis Can Guide Evolution Richard A. Watson Jordan B. Pollack  

E-print Network

How Symbiosis Can Guide Evolution Richard A. Watson Jordan B. Pollack Dynamical and Evolutionary, enlightened evolutionary theory recognises symbiosis as an integral process, and a fundamental source information. 1 Introduction Symbiosis, in its general definition, is simply the living together of different

Pollack, Jordan B.

261

Mobile Phone Applications in the University Classroom: Perceptions of Undergraduate Students in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this study is to determine the level of mobile phone applications in university classrooms in Jordan. A sample of 313 undergraduate students participated in the study by completing the researchers' designed questionnaire, which is composed of 13 items. The results of the study indicate that participants perceived a high

Ashour, Rateb; Alzghool, Haneen; Iyadat, Yousef; Abu-Alruz, Jamal

2012-01-01

262

Medical Problems in a Sample of Children with Intellectual Impairments in Jordan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical problems of 262 children attending special schools for persons having intellectual impairments in Jordan were examined. The most common problems were neurological problems (affecting 38.55%), followed by dental disease, orthopedic problems, vision and eye problems, hearing/ear problems, urinary diseases, and heart problems. (JDD)

Yousef, Jamal M. S.

1993-01-01

263

The price of medicines in Jordan: the cost of trade-based intellectual property  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan dramatically strengthened the level of intellectual property protection it provides for pharmaceutical products in consequence of joining the World Trade Organization in 2000 and signing a Free Trade Agreement with the United States in 2001. This study assesses the impact of higher levels of intellectual property protection on access to medicines by quantifying the effects on the private retail

Ryan B Abbott; Rania Bader; Lina Bajjali; Taher Abu ElSamen; Thamer Obeidat; Hanan Sboul; Mustafa Shwayat; Ibrahim Alabbadi

2012-01-01

264

Capability and Fidelity of Mote-class Wireless Jordan Cote, Bing Wang, Wei Zeng, Zhijie Shi  

E-print Network

Capability and Fidelity of Mote-class Wireless Sniffers Jordan Cote, Bing Wang, Wei Zeng, Zhijie, and hence requires no change to the application; (2) it does not consume scarce resources (e.g., CPU, memory a large number of message exchanges, which can be very resource consuming [12]. sniffer can handle

Shi, Zhijie Jerry

265

Challenges to Stakeholder Participation in Water Reuse for Irrigation in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developing new water resources continues to be a challenge in water scarce regions and water reuse offers a sustainable means by which water availability can be maximised. In Jordan, treated domestic wastewater (reclaimed water) already provides a valuable contribution to the annual water budget. This resource is used for irrigation either directly around wastewater treatment plants, or indirectly after reclaimed

Gemma Carr; Rob Potter; Stephen Nortcliff

2010-01-01

266

Growing School Networks for Instructional Improvement in Jordan, 2009-2010. CPRE Research Report, # RR-70  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the last decade, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has made a substantial commitment to improving the quality of its public education system. The main vehicle for this work has been the Education Reform for Knowledge Economy (ERfKE) initiative. To date, key investments have been made in early childhood education, school infrastructure,

Robinson, Marian A.

2011-01-01

267

Fighting Poverty: "Making Up" a New Society Around the Use of Human Development in Jordan.  

E-print Network

1 Fighting Poverty: "Making Up" a New Society Around the Use of Human Development in Jordan­349). Poverty is a phenomenon of a subjective and controversial nature, rooted into a specific sociological, historical, and political context. Therefore, the processes of defining (constructing) poverty, measuring it

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

Facebook Use in Education: Experiences of University Science Education Students in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to determine the level of Facebook use in education in one public university located in the middle part of Jordan. A sample of 189 undergraduate students enrolled in the science education courses participated in the study by responding to a questionnaire composed of 15 items. The results of the study indicated that

Abu-Alruz, Jamal

2014-01-01

269

Artificial Ontogenies for Real World Design and Assembly John Rieffel1, Jordan Pollack1  

E-print Network

Artificial Ontogenies for Real World Design and Assembly John Rieffel1, Jordan Pollack1 1 DEMO Lab representations provided by Artifi- cial Ontogenies to fully automate both design and assembly. We demonstrate the ability of Artificial Ontogenies to cross one hurdle of real-world assembly, namely reliably building

Pollack, Jordan B.

270

Construct Validation of an Arabic Version of the Learning Transfer System Inventory for Use in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to translate and validate an Arabic version of the Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) for use in Jordan. The study also investigated the perceptions of transfer system characteristics across selected individual and situational variables. The LTSI was administered to 450 employees of 28 different public and

Khasawneh, Samer; Bates, Reid; Holton, Elwood F., III

2006-01-01

271

I Know There Is No Justice: Palestinian Perceptions of Higher Education in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study utilizes critical ethnography methods to illustrate Palestinian refugee perceptions of higher education in Jordan. Participants addressed their assimilation to the Jordanian national identity as a means of obtaining education. Content and access to education were more important than assimilation, maintenance of ethnic

Marar, Marianne Maurice

2011-01-01

272

Polymorphisms in Factor II and Factor V thrombophilia genes among Circassians in Jordan.  

PubMed

Thrombosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Genetic factors are one component of thrombosis. We studied the prevalence of two mutations that are known risk factors in the pathogenesis of arterial and venous thrombosis in the genetically isolated Circassian population in Jordan. Factor II G20210A and Factor V Leiden single nucleotide polymorphisms were analysed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism method in 104 random unrelated subjects from the Circassian population in Jordan. The prevalence rates among the Circassian population in Jordan for Factor II G20210A was 12.2% and for Factor V Leiden was 7.7%. We have shown that the population is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and that the prevalences of both mutations are within the range of other ethnic groups. This is the first study to describe Circassian health related genetic characteristics in Jordan. Such population-based studies will contribute to understanding the interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors. It will remain to be seen whether carriers of Factor II G20210A and Factor V Leiden are more likely to develop thrombosis. This issue should be studied in the future to determine the need for screening of these mutations particularly in thrombophilia patients. PMID:23011539

Dajani, R; Arafat, A; Hakooz, N; Al-Abbadi, Z; Yousef, Al-Motassem; El Khateeb, M; Quadan, F

2013-01-01

273

Distribution and dynamics of mangrove forests of South Asiaq Chandra Giri a,*, Jordan Long b  

E-print Network

Distribution and dynamics of mangrove forests of South Asiaq Chandra Giri a,*, Jordan Long b Keywords: Mangrove forests Mangrove forest cover change South Asia Landsat Remote sensing Image processing a b s t r a c t Mangrove forests in South Asia occur along the tidal sea edge of Bangladesh, India

Tomkins, Andrew

274

Why Adults Participate in Learning Activities in Jordan: Guidelines for Recruitment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Knowledge of Jordan's historical background and the role of well-educated individuals and groups in motivating adults to participate in learning activities is essential for finding ways to recruit and retain adults in education programs. Some means that have proven effective include the following: (1) persuading religious and social leaders to

Nimer, Kamal

275

Epidemiological pattern of imported malaria in Jordan from 2007 to 2011.  

PubMed

Imported malaria is of major health concern to countries considered as free from this infection and Jordan is no exception. The aim of this study was to highlight various epidemiological aspects of imported malaria into Jordan over a period of five years. Information pertinent to all malaria cases registered in the Ministry of Health (Jordan) from January 2007 to November 2011 was retrieved from the database of the Department of Parasitic and Zoonotic Diseases. Data was grouped according to age, gender, country of acquisition and etiologic agents. During the study period, a total of 304 malaria cases were registered, 192 cases among Jordanians returning home and the remaining were detected among foreign nationals who arrived in the country for work or tourism. The majority of infections were due to Plasmodium falciparum (199 cases) followed by Plasmodium vivax (93) and then Plasmodium malariae (8). Mixed infection was detected in just 4 cases. The origin of these imported cases was in a descending order; Eritrea, Cte d'Ivoire, India, Sudan, Liberia and Pakistan. These countries contributed to 86.5% of cases while the remaining were acquired from other areas. It is believed that most Jordanians with imported malaria were military personnel who participated in Peace Keeping Forces with the United Nations. It is concluded that with the exception of imported cases reported herein, Jordan remains a malaria free country. Continuous vigilance by health authorities is needed to avoid reintroduction of the disease into the kingdom. PMID:24522127

Jamain, H M; Abu Shaqra, Q A; Kanani, K A

2013-12-01

276

GENERIC AND MAXIMAL JORDAN TYPES ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER, JULIA PEVTSOVA, AND ANDREI SUSLIN  

E-print Network

GENERIC AND MAXIMAL JORDAN TYPES ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER, JULIA PEVTSOVA, AND ANDREI SUSLIN Abstract. Friedlander and B. Parshall developed a theory of support varieties for finite dimensional p-restricted Lie M. FRIEDLANDER , JULIA PEVTSOVA , AND ANDREI SUSLIN study of kG-modules, where kG is the group

277

GENERIC AND MAXIMAL JORDAN TYPES ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER, JULIA PEVTSOVA, AND ANDREI SUSLIN  

E-print Network

GENERIC AND MAXIMAL JORDAN TYPES ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER, JULIA PEVTSOVA, AND ANDREI SUSLIN Abstract. Friedlander and B. Parshall developed a theory of support varieties for finite dimensional p-restricted Lie-linear partially supported by the NSF. 1 #12;2 ERIC M. FRIEDLANDER , JULIA PEVTSOVA , AND ANDREI SUSLIN dual

Pevtsova, Julia

278

Fathers in a Coma: Father-Son Relationships in Neil Jordan's Fiction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Copyright (c) 2008 by Samuele Grassi. This text may be archived and redistributed both in electronic form and in hard copy, provided that the author and journal are properly cited and no fee is charged for access. Abstract. This paper will analyze father-son relationships in some of Neil Jordan's novels and short stories. His writing often deals with this theme,

Samuele Grassi

279

WATER SCARCITY IN RELATION TO FOOD SECURITY AND SUSTAINABLE USE OF BIODIVERSITY IN JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY - Jordan is classified as a dry land country, which suffers from water scarcity similar to other counties in the region. Due to water scarcity the only fresh water ecosystem Azraq Wetland Oasis was destroyed. The destruction was a result of water over pumping from the greater basaltic Azraq basin, resulting in lowering water table to unprecedented levels. Hundreds

D. M. H. Al-Eisawi

280

Title: Working Together in Shale Gas Policy Hosts: Todd Cowen, Teresa Jordan and Christine Shoemaker  

E-print Network

Title: Working Together in Shale Gas Policy Hosts: Todd Cowen, Teresa Jordan and Christine and environmental groups. The Shale Gas Roundtable of the Institute of Politics at the University of Pittsburgh produced a report with several recommendations dealing especially with shale gas research, water use

Angenent, Lars T.

281

Review of the Jordan Rollover System (JRS) vis--vis other dynamic crash test devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of most of the existing rollover dynamic devices was conducted in view of assessing their flexibility, reliability, repeatability and crash reconstruction potential. The outcomes indicate the Jordan Rollover System (JRS) to offer the better potential with respect to a repeatable dynamic test procedure in all aspects than the Inverted Drop Test, the Dolly Test Procedure SAE J2114 or

E. C. Chirwa; R. Rhoads Stephenson; Stephen A. Batzer; Raphael H. Grzebieta

2010-01-01

282

Epilepsy in a Sample of Children with Intellectual Disability in Jordan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the prevalence of epileptic seizures in 378 children attending special education centers for students with intellectual disability in Amman, Jordan. Findings indicated that 20% had a history of epilepsy. Epilepsy was more prevalent among children with severe disability than mild intellectual disability, males than females, and

Yousef, Jamal M. S.

1995-01-01

283

A class of Hermitian generalized Jordan triple systems and Chern-Simons gauge theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We find a class of Hermitian generalized Jordan triple systems (HGJTSs) and Hermitian (?, ?)-Freudenthal-Kantor triple systems (HFKTSs). We apply one of the most simple HGJTSs which we find to a field theory and obtain a typical u(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory with a fundamental matter.

Kamiya, Noriaki; Sato, Matsuo

2014-09-01

284

Assessment of wind-generation potentiality in Jordan using the site effectiveness approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wind data gathered over 310 years is used for a feasibility analysis of optimum future utilization of wind-generator potentiality in 22 sites covering all landscape types and regions in Jordan. The yearly mean wind speed and the yearly average available wind energy flux were computed for each site. Yearly mean wind speeds at a height of 24 m could reach

H. D. Ammari; A. Al-Maaitah

2003-01-01

285

Treatment of domestic wastewater by subsurface flow constructed wetlands in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of subsurface flow constructed wetlands for treating domestic wastewater in Jordan is described. The objective was to study the performance of subsurface flow constructed wetlands as a low-cost technology for treating domestic wastewater. Results show that subsurface flow constructed wetlands are capable of reducing biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), different forms of nitrogen, total suspended solids (TSS), fecal coliform

Abbas Al-Omari; Manar Fayyad

2003-01-01

286

On the Stability of Spherically Symmetric Configurations in Newtonian Limit of Jordan, Brans-Dicke Theory  

E-print Network

We discuss stability of spherically symmetric static solutions in Newtonian limit of Jordan, Brans-Dicke field equations. The behavior of the stable equilibrium solutions for the spherically symmetric configurations considered here, it emerges that the more compact a model is, the more stable it is. Moreover, linear stability analysis shows the existence of stable configurations for any polytropic index.

S. Kozyrev

2003-04-08

287

The Impact of Foreign Housemaids on the Children of Working Mothers: A Case Study from Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of grandparents and other close relatives in caring for the children of working mothers has been diminishing in modern societies everywhere including Jordan. Concurrently, the dependence on housemaids to care for the children of working mothers has been on the rise. The impact of housemaids on young Jordanian children (4-5 years old) was

Jabbar, Sinaria Kamil Abdel

2014-01-01

288

Inorganic analysis of dust fall and office dust in an industrial area of Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article deals with the determination and comparison of heavy metals and water-soluble anions and cations in indoor dust and outdoor dust fall in the petroleum refinery area in Jordan. Three sampling sites were considered in the Jordanian petroleum refinery complex for the collection of dust fall and office dust samples. These samples were analyzed for water-soluble anions (F?, Cl?,

Qasem M. Jaradat; Kamal A. Momani; Abdel-Aziz Q. Jbarah; Adnan Massadeh

2004-01-01

289

The Contested Energy Future of Amman, Jordan: Between Promises of Alternative Energies and a Nuclear Venture  

E-print Network

The Contested Energy Future of Amman, Jordan: Between Promises of Alternative Energies and nuclear energy. Alternative eco-friendly energy resources represent only a small part of the potential authorities and local business elites are often seen as major players in the energy transition in the city

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

290

Photopigment spectral absorbance of Lake Malaw^ i R. JORDAN*, K. KELLOGG, D. HOWE, F. JUANES*,  

E-print Network

Photopigment spectral absorbance of Lake Malaw^ i cichlids R. JORDAN*, K. KELLOGG§, D. HOWE, F Resources, 02C Ferguson Building, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A. and **Cornell University, Department absorbance of photoreceptor cells from 15 species of Lake Malaw^ i cichlids. Each fish had one rod

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

291

An approach to setting up a national customer satisfaction index: the Jordan case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper was to develop a national customer satisfaction index (CSI) in Jordan and to derive its theory using generalized maximum entropy. During the course of this research, we conducted two different surveys to complete the framework of this CSI. The first one is a pilot study conducted based on a CSI basket in order to select

Amjad D. Al-Nasser; Mohammad Y. Al-Rawwash; Anas S. Alakhras

2011-01-01

292

Jordan's Farm is a 160-acre family farm located in Cape Elizabeth, ME.  

E-print Network

employees, including skilled labor from Puerto Rico, retail workers, and workers to help with processing.sustainableunh.unh.edu. #12;Jordan's Farm: A Tradition of Family Farming (Continued) traveling farm stand, and processed foods that Penny sees is with the lettuce. In the summertime, the lettuce does not grow as well as it used to

New Hampshire, University of

293

The Use of the Arabic CBM Maze among Three Levels of Achievers in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the applicability of the Arabic version of the Curriculum Based Measurement Maze (CBM Maze) for Jordanian students. A sample of 150 students was recruited from two public primary schools in Jordan. The students were ranked into high, moderate, and low achievers in terms of their performance in the Arabic course. Then all of

Abu-Hamour, Bashir

2013-01-01

294

Potential Use of Course Management Systems in Higher Education Institutions in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the increased adoption of the CMS (course management systems) as an instructional tool, it is important to address the potential use of this technology in Jordanian higher education institutions. This study investigates the potential to use CMS tools in instruction in the academic institutions in Jordan. This study does not seek to evaluate

Al-Shboul, Muhannad

2011-01-01

295

Accreditation in Higher Business Education in the Private Sector: The Case of Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the development of a quantitative research designed to examine the accreditation system of undergraduate Business Administration program in private universities in Jordan, in comparison with the standards of the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) in the United Kingdom. The research has set out a description of Jordanian

Sabri, Hala Ahmad; El-Refae, Ghaleb Awad

2006-01-01

296

Educating Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities in Regular Schools in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a description of current practices in educating students with mild intellectual disabilities in regular schools in Jordan. The data were obtained using several methods, including interviews with special education staff at the Ministry of Education, summaries of documents and published research related to resource rooms and

Al Khatib, Jamal M.; Al Khatib, Fareed

2008-01-01

297

Becoming Jordan's Writers: Developing Powerful Writing Instruction in the Middle East  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States involvement in the Middle East has been prominent in our recent national history, sometimes clouded by myths and misrepresentations of the people of that region of the world. This article details the experiences of teacher-researchers working with teachers and students in Amman, Jordan, to develop powerful English writing

Lehman, Christopher; DeLiddo, Emily

2010-01-01

298

On the Union of Jordan Regions and Collision-Free Translational Motion Amidst Polygonal Obstacles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let ?1,..., ?m bem simple Jordan curves in the plane, and letK1,...,Km be their respective interior regions. It is shown that if each pair of curves ?i, ?j,i ?j, intersect one another in at most two points, then the boundary ofK=?

Klara Kedem; Ron Livne; Jnos Pach; Micha Sharir

1986-01-01

299

Arabic language proficiency and the academic achievement of foreign university students at the University of Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined how the academic achievement of foreign university students at the University of Jordan was related to their Arabic proficiency. The aim of this study is to shed light on and to provide an understanding of the factors that link the Arabic language proficiency of foreign students with their academic achievement. To elaborate, one of the significant factors

Hadia Adel Khazna Katbi

2000-01-01

300

Recharge mechanism and hydrochemistry evaluation of groundwater in the Nuaimeh area, Jordan, using environmental isotope techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between the stable isotopic and chemical composition of precipitation and groundwater was studied in the Nuaimeh area of the Ajloun Highlands in Jordan. The isotopic composition values of precipitation and groundwater are almost identical. The spatial variation of stable isotopes in precipitation is mainly due to the effect of seasonal temperature, altitude and amount. The groundwater reveals identical

William Bajjali

2006-01-01

301

Environmental assessment for paper and cardboard industry in Jordan a cleaner production concept  

Microsoft Academic Search

An environmental assessment for Jordan Paper and Cardboard Factory (JPCF) was conducted. Cleaner production concept, what it can achieve, and how it can be applied to JPCF was tested. Using the waste audit tool, five independent options were identified as having potential for improvements; these were on site reuse, technological changes, raw material changes, good housekeeping, and product changes. For

Ghaleb Y Abbasi; Bassim E Abbassi

2004-01-01

302

Evaluation of archaeological site potential on the Tall al-Kharrar area (Jordan) using magnetic and resistivity methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic and resistivity geophysical surveys were conducted over the Tall al-Kharrar archaeological site, at Wadi al-Kharrar, east of Jordan River, Jordan. The objective of the survey was to (1) map buried structures; (2) locate buried artifacts; (3) identify target zones quickly, thereby reducing the required amount of costly excavations; and (4) evaluate the applicability of geophysics to the archaeological study of historic sites in Jordan. Measurements of the total magnetic field and pole-dipole resistivity surveys yielded anomalies, which are associated with walls, floors, mosaic floors with ornaments, iron construction tools, channels, and a church abattoir.

Batayneh, Awni; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Tobasi, Ula; Haddadin, George

2001-11-01

303

Migrating a Digital Library to a Private Cloud Jian Wu, Pradeep Teregowda, Kyle Williams, Madian Khabsa, Douglas Jordan,  

E-print Network

Khabsa, Douglas Jordan, Eric Treece, Zhaohui Wu, and C.Lee Giles Information Sciences and Technology, a consumer can avail computing resources in an automated fashion without resorting to human interactions

Giles, C. Lee

304

76 FR 8997 - Notice of Decision To Issue Permits for the Importation of Fresh Strawberries From Jordan Into...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...designated phytosanitary measures will be sufficient to mitigate the risks of introducing or disseminating plant pests or noxious weeds via the importation of fresh strawberries from Jordan. DATES: Effective Date: February 16, 2011. FOR FURTHER...

2011-02-16

305

Special Education Practicum at The University of Jordan: Preliminary Indicators of Students' Satisfaction and Concerns  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

teachers are needed. The Special Education program at the University of Jordan places student teachers for their practicum in different educational settings. The purpose of this study was to report preliminary information about students' satisfaction and concerns

AL Jabery, Mohammad A.; AL Khamra, Hatem A.

2013-01-01

306

Antone tarazi: the first palestinian neurosurgeon and the first neurosurgeon in jordan: a neurosurgeon of two countries.  

PubMed

Antone (Tony) Tarazi (1927-1999) was the first Palestinian neurosurgeon and the first neurosurgeon in Jordan. In 1952, Tarazi received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. After completing neurosurgery training at the Montreal Neurological Institute in 1960, he returned to Palestine to practice neurosurgery in both Palestine and Jordan. For almost 10 years, he alone carried the load of neurosurgery for a population of >3 million people. His skills and knowledge enabled him to achieve admirable results with limited available resources. Tarazi was the president of the Palestinian Neurosurgical Society, a member of Jordan medical societies, and a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. His continuous efforts to improve medical services extended beyond neurosurgery to many other fields. This article recounts Antone Tarazi's achievements and contributions to neurosurgery in Palestine and Jordan. PMID:25263256

Awad, Ahmed J; Jane, John A

2014-12-01

307

Wide spread zeolitization of the Neogene - Quaternary volcanic tuff in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Representative samples were collected from well exposed Neogene - Quarternary scoria cones of north east Jordan. The results of this study have led to the discovery of eleven new localities of zeolite associated with the volcanic tuff. The zeolitization process of the volcanic tuff in Jordan is widespread and of regional distribution. The identified zeolites are phillipsite and chabazite with subordinate associations of faujasite and analcime. The zeolitization process resulted from the transformation of sideromelane into palagonite by the reaction of the scoria with the circulating meteoric water. The variation in the Na/K, Na/Ca and Si/Al ratios of the circulating water was responsible for the variation in the mineralogy and chemistry of the zeolites and the associated authigenic minerals.

Khoury, Hani N.; Ibrahim, Khalil M.; Al Dwairi, Reyad A.; Torrente, Domingo G.

2015-01-01

308

The origin and mechanisms of salinization of the lower Jordan river  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The chemical and isotopic ( 87Sr/ 86Sr, ? 11B, ? 34S sulfate, ? 18O water, ? 15N nitrate) compositions of water from the Lower Jordan River and its major tributaries between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea were determined in order to reveal the origin of the salinity of the Jordan River. We identified three separate hydrological zones along the flow of the river: A northern section (20 km downstream of its source) where the base flow composed of diverted saline and wastewaters is modified due to discharge of shallow sulfate-rich groundwater, characterized by low 87Sr/ 86Sr (0.7072), ? 34S sulfate (-2), high ? 11B (36), ? 15N nitrate (15) and high ? 18O water (-2 to-3) values. The shallow groundwater is derived from agricultural drainage water mixed with natural saline groundwater and discharges to both the Jordan and Yarmouk rivers. The contribution of the groundwater component in the Jordan River flow, deduced from mixing relationships of solutes and strontium isotopes, varies from 20 to 50% of the total flow. A central zone (20-50 km downstream from its source) where salt variations are minimal and the rise of 87Sr/ 86Sr and SO 4/Cl ratios reflects predominance of eastern surface water flows. A southern section (50-100 km downstream of its source) where the total dissolved solids of the Jordan River increase, particularly during the spring (70-80 km) and summer (80-100 km) to values as high as 11.1 g/L. Variations in the chemical and isotopic compositions of river water along the southern section suggest that the Zarqa River ( 87Sr/ 86Sr0.70865; ? 11B25) has a negligible affect on the Jordan River. Instead, the river quality is influenced primarily by groundwater discharge composed of sulfate-rich saline groundwater (Cl -=31-180 mM; SO 4/Cl0.2-0.5; Br/Cl2-310 -3; 87Sr/ 86Sr0.70805; ? 11B30; ? 15N nitrate 17, ? 34S sulfate=4-10), and Ca-chloride Rift valley brines (Cl -=846-1500 mM; Br/Cl6-810 -3; 87Sr/ 86Sr0.7080; ? 11B>40; ? 34S sulfate=4-10). Mixing calculations indicate that the groundwater discharged to the river is composed of varying proportions of brines and sulfate-rich saline groundwater. Solute mass balance calculations point to a 10% contribution of saline groundwater (Cl -=282 to 564 mM) to the river. A high nitrate level (up to 2.5 mM) in the groundwater suggests that drainage of wastewater derived irrigation water is an important source for the groundwater. This irrigation water appears to leach Pleistocene sediments of the Jordan Valley resulting in elevated sulfate contents and altered strontium and boron isotopic compositions of the groundwater that in turn impacts the water quality of the lower Jordan River.

Farber, Efrat; Vengosh, Avner; Gavrieli, Ittai; Marie, Amer; Bullen, Thomas D.; Mayer, Bernhard; Holtzman, Ran; Segal, Michal; Shavit, Uri

2004-05-01

309

Prevalence of MTHFR C677T single nucleotide polymorphism in genetically isolated populations in Jordan.  

PubMed

Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T single nucleotide polymorphism is a major inherited risk factor of venous thromboembolism. We sought to determine its prevalence in genetically isolated populations of Chechens and Circassians in Jordan. The MTHFR C677T mutation was analyzed from blood samples taken from 120 random unrelated Chechens and 72 Circassians. The prevalence of the MTHFR mutation in the Chechen population was 27.5% (allele frequency 15%); the prevalence among the Circassians was 50% (allele frequency 29.2%). The prevalence in the Chechen population is similar to that in Jordan and other world populations, but it is higher in the Circassian population. This study will contribute to understanding the interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors underlying thrombosis and will be useful in deciding which genetic variants should be tested in a clinical genetic testing service. PMID:23749065

Dajani, Rana; Fathallah, Raja; Arafat, Ala; AbdulQader, Mohammed Emad; Hakooz, Nancy; Al-Motassem, Yousef; El-Khateeb, Mohammad

2013-10-01

310

A fixed point method for perturbation of bimultipliers and Jordan bimultipliers in C?-ternary algebras  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Let A be a C?-ternary algebra. A C-bilinear T :AA?A is called a C?-ternary algebra bi-multiplier, if it satisfies T([abc],d)=[T(a,b)cd], T(a,[bcd])=[abT(c,d)] for all a,b,c,d?A. Also, the mapping T :AA?A is a called C?-ternary algebra Jordan bimultiplier, if it satisfies T([aaa],a)=[T(a,a)aa], T(a,[aaa])=[aaT(a,a)] for all a ?A. Using the fixed point method, we investigate the generalized Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability of bimultipliers and Jordan bimultipliers in C?-ternary algebras. The concept of Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability originated from the Th.M. Rassias' stability theorem that appeared in his paper: [Th. M. Rassias, Proc. Am. Math. Soc. 72, 297 (1978)].

Ebadian, A.; Ghobadipour, N.; Eshaghi Gordji, M.

2010-10-01

311

Mortality and causes of death in Jordan 1995-96: assessment by verbal autopsy.  

PubMed Central

Mortality indicators and causes of death in Jordan were assessed by verbal autopsy. A random sample of 100 clusters of ca. 300 households each were monitored for one year by notification assistants selected from the study area itself. Registered deaths were reported to research assistants who visited the family to complete the verbal autopsy form, which was structured and contained about 100 questions. Causes of death were determined by two physicians according to preset algorithms. A total of 965 deaths were reported among 198,989 persons, giving a crude death rate of 5 per 1000 population per year. The three leading causes of death were diseases of the circulatory system, malignancies and accidents. In the absence of a health information system, verbal autopsy as implemented in Jordan can serve as a reliable substitute. PMID:10516786

Khoury, S. A.; Massad, D.; Fardous, T.

1999-01-01

312

Retrospective surgical incidence and case distribution of cystic echinococcosis in Jordan between 1994 and 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

A retrospective follow-up study on the surgical incidence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) was carried out in major governmental, military and private hospitals throughout Jordan between 1994 and 2000. A total of 472 cases were recorded over the 7-year period and an overall mean annual surgical incidence (MASI) of 2.3 per 100,000 inhabitants was estimated. The highest number of surgical cases

Khaled M. Al-Qaoud; Philip S. Craig; Sami K. Abdel-Hafez

2003-01-01

313

Embryonic and larval development in barfin flounder Verasper moseri (Jordan and Gilbert)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Broodstock of Verasper moseri (Jordan and Gilbert) aged 34 years old were selected, and reinforced cultivation was conducted to promote maturation under\\u000a controlled water temperature and photoperiod conditions. Fertilized eggs were obtained by artificial fertilization, and the\\u000a development of embryos, larvae and juveniles was observed continuously. The results showed that the fertilized eggs of V. moseri were spherical, with transparent

Rongbin Du; Yongqiang Wang; Haibin Jiang; Liming Liu; Maojian Wang; Tianbao Li; Shubao Zhang

2010-01-01

314

Completeness of Inner Product Spaces Induced by States on Jordan and C ?-Algebras  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show that a state ? on a Jordan algebra 𝓐 induces complete inner product space if and only if ? is a convex combination of pure states. Inner product spaces generated by Type I n factor states and states on spin factors are described. We initiate study of completely positive maps in this connection by showing that pure completely positive map on a C ?-algebra gives always complete inner product space in the Stinespring construction.

Turilova, Ekaterina

2014-12-01

315

Parasitoid complex of citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella on lemon in the Central Jordan Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

From March 1997 to June 1999, samples of lemonleaves infested with citrus leafminer (CLM),Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton(Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae), were collectedfrom the Al-Masalha Citrus Orchard in theCentral Jordan Valley in order to rear CLMparasitoids and to study their populationtrends. Nine species of eulophid parasitoidswere reared from CLM larvae; these were Cirrospilus ingenuus Gahan, C. pictusNees, Pnigalio agraules, Pnigalio sp. B,Pnigalio sp. C,

Mazen A. Ateyyat

2002-01-01

316

Seasonal variation of fungal spore populations in the atmosphere of Zarqa area, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fungi are among the most important aeroallergens. The aim of this study was to provide aeromycological baseline information\\u000a about Zarqa area, Jordan, for the first time. During the entire survey and from 170 settle plate exposures, a total of 735\\u000a mould- and 274 yeast colony-forming units (CFU) were collected. mould colonies were assigned to 35 genera and 59 species.\\u000a The

Mohammed H. Abu-Dieyeh; Raghda Barham; Khaled Abu-Elteen; Radhi Al-Rashidi; Inaam Shaheen

2010-01-01

317

Economic Value of Tree Fruit Production in Jordan Valley from a Virtual Water Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The continuous high demand of water resources for agricultural uses in Jordan is leading to a water crisis. A possible partial\\u000a solution may be to import food which requires large amounts of water to grow instead of cultivating high water consuming crops.\\u000a Crops such as banana and citrus cause a huge virtual water loss, which can be reduced by cultivating

Khaldoon Abdalah Mourad; Hartmut Gaese; Amer S. Jabarin

2010-01-01

318

Rainfall-runoff Water Harvesting Prospects for Greater Amman and Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article evaluates the prospects for rainfall-runoff water harvesting as a means of increasing water supplies in Greater Amman and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Rain\\/all-runoff water harvesting is a small-scale water conservation approach for catching\\/storing rainfalls and certain runoff waters in a localized area. before the waters enter the usual hydrologic cycle. Generally the methods are small basic impounding

Herbert C. Preul

1994-01-01

319

Multivariate and principal component statistical analysis of contamination in urban and agricultural soils from north Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Multivariate analysis and principal component analysis was performed on 37 samples gathered from different regions in north\\u000a Jordan. Twenty-eight descriptors (variables) for each sample were used in these calculations, among them were metal ion concentration,\\u000a such as Pb, Cr, Co, Zn, Ca, Mg, Fe, Na, K, Al, Cu, Ni, Ti, Si and Mn. Other descriptors were pH, electrical conductivity

S. R. Salman; Y. H. Abu Ruka'h

1999-01-01

320

Fluvial adjustment of the Lower Jordan River to a drop in the Dead Sea level  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water utilization in the upper part of the Jordan Basin has led to a significant reduction in inflow to the Dead Sea. Over the last 70 years, a drop of about 22 m in mean sea level has occurred and has resulted in a continual adjustment of the Lower Jordan River. The impacts of this lowering on the channel morphology of the Lower Jordan River were examined using aerial photographs. Until the late 1970s, the drop in the sea level was small but still led to channel extension. Since the early 1980s, a rapid drop in sea level took place leading to major changes in channel morphology and deep incisions. The greatest change in channel width was recorded near the river mouth. Between 1850 and 1980, there were only insignificant changes in channel sinuosity, but subsequently, a 25% increase of channel sinuosity has been recorded. Most of changes in the channel sinuosity were recorded in the newly exposed area. Over the last 30 years, the active channel width has narrowed by almost four times. Until the late 1980s, the channel was relatively stable with minor bank collapses and only one bar detected near the Jisr Abdallah. During the 1990s, a number of bars developed along the channel. The downcutting is in parallel with the sea level drop resulting in the development of terraces along the lower part of the study reach. In 1983, the channel incision reached 8 km upstream and by 1993 it was about 11 km.

Hassan, Marwan A.; Klein, Micha

2002-06-01

321

Public support and consent preference for biomedical research and biobanking in Jordan.  

PubMed

The success of any biobank depends on a number of factors including public's view of research and the extent to which it is willing to participate in research. As a prototype of surrounding countries, public interest in research and biobanking in addition to the influence and type of informed consent for biobanking were investigated in Jordan. Data were collected as part of a national survey of 3196 individuals representing the Jordanian population. The majority of respondents (88.6%) had a positive perception of the level of research in Jordan and they overwhelmingly (98.2%) agreed to the concept of investing as a country in research. When respondents were asked if the presence of an informed consent would influence their decision to participate in biobanking, more individuals (19.8%) considered having an informed consent mechanism as a positive factor than those who considered it to have negative connotations (13.1%). However, a substantial portion (65%) did not feel it affected their decision. The majority of survey participants (64%) expressed willingness to participate in biobanking and over 90% of them preferred an opt-in consent form whether general (75.2%) or specific for disease or treatment (16.9%). These results indicate a promising ground for research and biobanking in Jordan. Educational programs or mass awareness campaigns to promote participation in biobanking and increase awareness about informed consent and individual rights in research will benefit both the scientific community as well as the public. PMID:22968133

Ahram, Mamoun; Othman, Areej; Shahrouri, Manal

2013-05-01

322

93:3442-3452, 2005. First published Jan 5, 2005; doi:10.1152/jn.00578.2004JN X. Dai, B. R. Noga, J. R. Douglas and L. M. Jordan  

E-print Network

. R. Douglas and L. M. Jordan Method Immunohistochemicalc-fosLocomotion Using the Localization 1, 2006; 95 (2): 1278-1284.J Neurophysiol K. P. Carlin, Y. Dai and L. M. Jordan Thoraco Method X. Dai, B. R. Noga, J. R. Douglas, and L. M. Jordan Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine

Manitoba, University of

323

Evaluating Social and National Education Textbooks Based on the Criteria of Knowledge-Based Economy from the Perspectives of Elementary Teachers in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Knowledge-based economy is a new implemented trend in the field of education in Jordan. The ministry of education in Jordan attempts to implement this trend's philosophy in its textbooks. This study examined the extent to which the (1st-3rd grade) social and national textbooks reflect knowledge-based economy criteria from the perspective of

Al-Edwan, Zaid Suleiman; Hamaidi, Diala Abdul Hadi

2011-01-01

324

Forecasting the demand on solar water heating systems and their energy savings potential during the period 20012005 in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan is an example of a developing country that depends almost exclusively on imported oil. Luckily, Jordan is blessed with good solar energy resources. However, only 24% of Jordanian families are installing solar water heating systems (SWHS). The objective of this research is to forecast the yearly demand on SWHS by the household sector during the period 20012005 and to

M. M. Kablan

2003-01-01

325

Features of Computerized Educational Games in Sciences of the Elementary Phase in Jordan from the Point of View of Specialists in Teaching Science and Computer Subjects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study aims at introducing the features of the computerized educational games in sciences at the elementary school in Jordan according to the specialists in teaching science and computer subjects, through answering some questions such as: What are the features of the computerized educational games in sciences at the elementary schools in Jordan

Al Sarhan, Khaled Ali; AlZboon, Saleem Odeh; Olimat, Khalaf Mufleh; Al-Zboon, Mohammad Saleem

2013-01-01

326

DNA before Watson & Crick-The Pioneering Studies of J. M. Gulland and D. O. Jordan at Nottingham  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A description placed in a historical context, of the physico-chemical investigations of DNA carried out in the period 1940-1950 by a group at University College, Nottingham led by J.M.Gulland and D.O.Jordan. The isolation of a pure sample of DNA from calf thymus was followed by its analysis by potentiometric titrations and by measurements at variable pH of viscosity and streaming birefringence. Unlike the phosphoric acid groups, the primary amino and enolic hydroxyl groups could only be titrated after prior treatment with strong acid or strong base. The conclusion of Gulland and Jordan, that extremes of pH caused liberation of amino and enolic hydoxyl groups by disruption of hydrogen bonds between neighbouring polynucleotide chains, proved to be of considerable importance. The article includes life histories of Gulland and Jordan, and reference to Linus Pauling's remarkable foresight during his Sir Jesse Boot Foundation Lecture delivered at Nottingham in 1948.

Booth, Harold; Hey, Michael J.

1996-10-01

327

Groundwater-level trends and forecasts, and salinity trends, in the Azraq, Dead Sea, Hammad, Jordan Side Valleys, Yarmouk, and Zarqa groundwater basins, Jordan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Changes in groundwater levels and salinity in six groundwater basins in Jordan were characterized by using linear trends fit to well-monitoring data collected from 1960 to early 2011. On the basis of data for 117 wells, groundwater levels in the six basins were declining, on average about -1 meter per year (m/yr), in 2010. The highest average rate of decline, -1.9 m/yr, occurred in the Jordan Side Valleys basin, and on average no decline occurred in the Hammad basin. The highest rate of decline for an individual well was -9 m/yr. Aquifer saturated thickness, a measure of water storage, was forecast for year 2030 by using linear extrapolation of the groundwater-level trend in 2010. From 30 to 40 percent of the saturated thickness, on average, was forecast to be depleted by 2030. Five percent of the wells evaluated were forecast to have zero saturated thickness by 2030. Electrical conductivity was used as a surrogate for salinity (total dissolved solids). Salinity trends in groundwater were much more variable and less linear than groundwater-level trends. The long-term linear salinity trend at most of the 205 wells evaluated was not increasing, although salinity trends are increasing in some areas. The salinity in about 58 percent of the wells in the Amman-Zarqa basin was substantially increasing, and the salinity in Hammad basin showed a long-term increasing trend. Salinity increases were not always observed in areas with groundwater-level declines. The highest rates of salinity increase were observed in regional discharge areas near groundwater pumping centers.

Goode, Daniel J.; Senior, Lisa A.; Subah, Ali; Jaber, Ayman

2013-01-01

328

Climate Change impacts on the Jordan River, Israel: Downscaling application from a Regional Climate Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper aims to evaluate the impact of future climate change on streamflow and water resources in the Jordan River watershed. Such changes are expected to play an important role in water availability, planning and policy as well as in the ability to comply with international treaty obligations. Currently, Global Climate Models (GCMs) and Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are the leading tools available for assessing long term climatic evolution and for projecting future conditions of transient atmospheric circulation variables that are a response to unseen CO2 levels. However, the scale at which the results are generated, in the 100s or even 10s of kilometers is too coarse to answer questions regarding local precipitation, water management or agriculture decisions. Here we statistically downscale precipitation output from a regional climate model focused on the Middle East, as well as temperature, radiation, relative humidity and wind speed, which were used to asses local changes in potential evaporation (using Penman-Monteith equation). The climate model used is the ICTP RegCM3 model driven from the lateral boundaries by results of ECHAM5/MPI-OM1. Transient climate simulation from 1960 to 2060 (SRES A1B emission scenario after 2001) are used. The results are then used as input into a hydrological model calibrated for the upper catchments of the Jordan River. This allows us to evaluate the impact on streamflow and water resources and to compare the predicted baseflow and surface flow components of the tested watersheds. We compared the average hydrological variables of 3 periods: 1. 1980-2005; 2. 2010-2035; and 3. 2035-2060. No significant differences were observed between period 1 and 2, however significant differences were observed after 2030, i.e. during period 3, where we found 12% reduction in rainfall, 3.7% increase in potential evaporation, 10% reduction in baseflow, 18% reduction in surface flow and 12% reduction in total flow of the Jordan River.

Samuels, R.; Rimmer, A.; Krichak, S.; Alpert, P.

2009-04-01

329

Wood remains from the Late Triassic (Carnian) of Jordan and their paleoenvironmental implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During field work in the Triassic of Jordan fossil wood remains have been discovered at five horizons (S-1AR-S-5AR) of the Late Triassic (Carnian) Abu Ruweis Formation in NW Jordan. In most horizons wood remains are too badly preserved to allow for a detailed xylotomic investigation. Only two horizons provided material which exhibited anatomical details: (1) in horizon S-1AR we found rare and rather small fragments of woody charcoal exhibiting cellular details (representing the first macroscopic evidence of paleo-wildfires from the Late Triassic of the Middle East), and (2) in horizon S-5AR surfaces of partly compressed (gagatized) and partly permineralized wood fragments exhibited anatomical details that could be investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. All wood remains that allow for a detailed investigation show features typical of gymnosperms, but at the moment nothing can be said about a more specific taxonomic affinity of most of the woods, although wood from horizon S-5AR exhibits characteristics of protopinoid wood. Our data provide evidence that gymnospermous woody vegetation cover has existed in the source areas of the sediments deposited in the Abu Ruweis Formation in Jordan and that this woody vegetation occasionally experienced wildfires. This, together with lithological data, provides evidence for a seasonally dry (maybe even arid) climate during deposition of the Abu Ruweis Formation. On a larger scale our findings contribute to the very scarce current knowledge about Late Triassic wildfires on the entire continent Gondwana, from where so far only three records of macro-charcoals, as undisputed evidence of paleo-wildfires, have been published from this period.

Abu Hamad, Abdalla M. B.; Jasper, Andr; Uhl, Dieter

2014-07-01

330

Investigation of the active constituents of Portulaca oleraceae L. (Portulacaceae) growing in Jordan.  

PubMed

The phytochemical analysis of the fresh aerial parts of Portulaca oleracea (Portulacaceae), growing in Jordan, using conventional chromatographic procedures resulted in the isolation of Beta-sitosterol, Beta-sitosterol-glucoside, N,N'-dicyclohexylurea, and allantoin. The last three compounds were isolated for the first time from this plant. The structure elucidation of these compounds was attained by the use of spectral data (UV, IR, MS, 1H-, 13C- and 2D-NMR), X-ray crystallography and by comparison with authentic samples. PMID:16414585

Rasheed, Asia N; Afifi, Fatma U; Shaedah, Mayadeh; Taha, Mutasem O

2004-01-01

331

Spherically Symmetric Jordan-Brans-Dicke Quantum Gravity with de Broglie Bohm Pilot Wave Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We obtain two dimensional analogue of the Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) gravity action described in four dimensional spherically symmetric curved space time metric. There will be two scalar fields, namely, the Brans Dicke (BD) ? and scale factor of 2-sphere part of the space time ?. We obtained suitable duality transformations between ( ?, ?) and ( ?, S) where ? and S is respectively amplitude and phase part of the corresponding de Broglie pilot wave function Covariant conservation of mass-energy current density of particles ensemble J a = ?? a S, is established by applying a particular dynamical conformal frame described by ( ?, S).

Ghaffarnejad, Hossein

2014-08-01

332

Geochemical orientation for mineral exploration in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a supplement to previous accounts of geochemical exploration conducted in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan by the Natural Resources Authority of the Royal Government of Jordan and the U.S. Geological Survey. The field work on which this report is based was sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development, U.S. Department of State. Procedures used in collecting various kinds of rocks, ores, slags, eluvial and alluvial sediments, heavy-mineral concentrates, and organic materials for use as geochemical sample media are summarized, as are the laboratory procedures followed for the analysis of these sample materials by semiquantitative spectrographic, atomic absorption, fluorometric, and X-ray diffraction methods. Geochemical evaluations of the possibilities for economic mineral deposits in certain areas are presented. The results of these preliminary investigations open concepts for further use in geochemical exploration in the search for metallic mineral deposits in Jordan. Perhaps the most desirable new activity would be hydrogeochemical exploration for uranium and base metals, accompanied by interpretation of such remote-sensing data as results of airborne radiometric surveys and computer-enhanced LANDSAT imagery. For more conventional approaches to geochemical exploration, however, several fundamental problems regarding proper choice of geochemical sample media for different geologic and geographic parts of the Country must be solved before effective surveys can be made. The present results also show that such common geochemical exploration techniques as the determination of the trace-element contents of soils, plant ash, and slags have direct application also toward the resolution of several archaeological problems in Jordan. These include the relation of trace-elements chemistry of local soils to the composition of botanic remains, the trace-elements composition of slags to the technological development of the extractive metallurgy of copper and iron in the region, and the use of charcoal from slags for the C-14 dating of periods of archaeometallurgical activity. Less directly, interpretations based on the distribution in time and space of the archaeometallurgical activities of the region might add to the knowledge of early climatic conditions and vegetative cover of the area.

Overstreet, W.C.; Grimes, D.J.; Seitz, J.F.

1982-01-01

333

La structure de Jordan des matrices de transfert des modeles de boucles et la relation avec les hamiltoniens XXZ  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lattice models such as percolation, the Ising model and the Potts model are useful for the description of phase transitions in two dimensions. Finding analytical solutions is done by calculating the partition function, which in turn requires finding eigenvalues of transfer matrices. At the critical point, the two dimensional statistical models are invariant under conformal transformations and the construction of rational conformal field theories, as the continuum limit of these lattice models, allows one to compute the partition function at the critical point. Many researchers think however that the paradigm of rational conformal conformal field theories can be extended to include models with non diagonalizable transfer matrices. These models would then be described, in the scaling limit, by logarithmic conformal field theories and the representations of the Virasoro algebra coming into play would be indecomposable. We recall the construction of the double-row transfer matrix DN (?, u) of the Fortuin-Kasteleyn model, seen as an element of the Temperley-Lieb algebra. This transfer matrix comes into play in physical theories through its representation in link modules (or standard modules). The vector space on which this representation acts decomposes into sectors labelled by a physical parameter d, the number of defects, which remains constant or decreases in the link representations. This thesis is devoted to the identification of the Jordan structure of DN(?, u) in the link representations. The parameter ? = 2 cos ? = -(q + q-1) fixes the theory : for instance ? = 1 for percolation and 2 for the Ising model. On the geometry of the strip with open boundary conditions, we show that DN(?, u) has the same Jordan blocks as its highest Fourier coefficient, FN. We study the non-diagonalizability of FN through the divergences of some of the eigenstates of ?(F N) that appear at the critical values of ?. The Jordan cells we find in ?(DN(?, u)) have rank 2 and couple sectors d and d' when specific constraints on ?, d, d' and N are satisfied. For the model of critical dense polymers (? = 0) on the strip, the eigenvalues of ?(DN(?, u)) were known, but their degeneracies only conjectured. By constructing an isomorphism between the link modules on the strip and a subspace of spin modules of the XXZ model at q = i, we prove this conjecture. We also show that the restriction of the Hamiltonian to any sector d is diagonalizable, and that the XX Hamiltonian has rank 2 Jordan cells when N is even. Finally, we study the Jordan structure of the transfer matrix T N(?, ?) for periodic boundary conditions. When ? = ?a/b and a, b ? Z , the matrix TN(?, ?) has Jordan blocks between sectors, but also within sectors. The approach using FN admits a generalization to the present case and allows us to probe the Jordan cells that tie different sectors. The rank of these cells exceeds 2 in some cases and can grow indefinitely with N. For the Jordan blocks within a sector, we show that the link modules on the cylinder and the XXZ spin modules are isomorphic except for specific curves in the (q, ?) plane. By using the behavior of the transformation ?d N in a neighborhood of the critical values (qc, ? c), we explicitly build Jordan partners of rank 2 and discuss the existence of Jordan cells with higher rank. Keywords : phase transitions, Ising model, Potts model, Fortuin-Kasteleyn model, transfer matrix method, XXZ Hamiltonian, logarithmic conformal field theory, Jordan structure.

Morin-Duchesne, Alexi

334

Archaeological evidences of the tectonic activity of Shueib Structure (NW Jordan)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Archaeological damage in buried ruins often offers an excellent record of recent tectonic activity. The lower Jordan valley has experienced a continuous occupation in the last 5000 year, being frequent archaeological remains of human settlements along the valley. In this work we studied the Early Neolithic-to-Middle Islamic Periods archaeological site of Tall al-Hammam (Arabic name, Hill of Baths). This ruin is located 27 km southwest of Amman city and it constitutes the largest Bronze Age archaeological site in Jordan. It consists of two main parts; the Upper Tall and the Lower Tall. This ruin lies within the southwestern termination of the Shueib structure (SHS); a Cretaceous fold-bend fault structure thought inactive through the entire Cenozoic. The relics, in the lower Tall, show clear fault-related damage in some walls. Two Middle Bronze Age (MBA) walls are displaced 26 and 20 cm respectively, according with a NNE-SSW fault plane. Apart of wall displacements, hundreds of joints and cracks in boulders of the walls are present. They strike generally NW-SE and NE-SW. Both archaeological evidences, boulder fractures and walls distortion, are coherent with the present-day tectonic setting of the Dead Sea Transform Fault in the region, and suggest a Quaternary reactivation of the SHS.

Al-Awabdeh, Mohammad; Azan, J. Miguel; Prez-Pea, J. Vicente; Booth-Rea, Gillermo

2014-05-01

335

Chronic Diseases, Lack of Medications, and Depression Among Syrian Refugees in Jordan, 20132014  

PubMed Central

Introduction Studying mental and physical health problems in refugees facilitates providing suitable health care, thus improving their quality of life. We studied depression tendency in Syrian refugees in Jordan in the light of chronic diseases and medication availability. Also, depression prevalence and depression comorbidity with chronic diseases were identified. Methods In this multicenter cross-sectional survey, data from Syrian refugees attending Caritas centers in 6 Jordanian cities from November 2013 through June 2014 were analyzed. Participants demographics, depression, previously diagnosed chronic diseases, and newly diagnosed chronic diseases and the availability of medications were studied. Logistic regression was used to examine predictors for depression. Results Of 765 refugees who participated, about one-third demonstrated significant depression as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. Descriptive analyses showed that depression was comorbid in 35% of participants with previously diagnosed chronic diseases and in 40% of participants with newly diagnosed chronic diseases. Newly diagnosed chronic diseases and lack of medications significantly contributed to depression, but the regression model as a whole explained less than 5% of the variance. Conclusion Because the regression model showed low effect size, we concluded that newly diagnosed chronic diseases and medication shortages could not predict depression in Syrian refugees residing in Jordan. Therefore, further studies of additional factors are recommended. Prompt measures have to be taken to prevent the spread of chronic diseases and improve mental health in this fragile population. PMID:25633485

Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Tawalbeh, Loai Issa; Khoury, Laurice Sami

2015-01-01

336

Quitting smoking and utilization of smoking cessation services in Jordan: a population-based survey.  

PubMed

Increasing rates of smoking in Jordan have been documented. It is therefore important to understand the trends and factors associated with attempts to quit smoking, such as the utilization of smoking cessation clinics and hotlines. A population sample of 3196 adults aged 18+ years were interviewed about their smoking habits; 1032 (32.3%) were current smokers and 93 (2.9%) had successfully quit smoking (8.7% of ever-smokers). A high percentage of current smokers (62.8%) had tried, unsuccessfully, to quit smoking. Almost half of them had heard of smoking cessation clinics and hotlines, but only 2.4% had ever utilized them. After being informed about these services, 53.0% of current smokers agreed that they were likely to utilize them. Only 19.9% of current smokers had ever received advice from a health-care practitioner about contacting these services. The study should guide decision-makers on strategies to reduce the high smoking rates in Jordan. PMID:25343466

Jaghbir, M; Shareif, S; Ahram, M

2014-09-01

337

Drinking water sources, availability, quality, access and utilization for goats in the Karak Governorate, Jordan.  

PubMed

Goat production is an important agricultural activity in Jordan. The country is one of the poorest countries in the world in terms of water scarcity. Provision of sufficient quantity of good quality drinking water is important for goats to maintain feed intake and production. This study aimed to evaluate the seasonal availability and quality of goats' drinking water sources, accessibility, and utilization in different zones in the Karak Governorate in southern Jordan. Data collection methods comprised interviews with purposively selected farmers and quality assessment of water sources. The provision of drinking water was considered as one of the major constraints for goat production, particularly during the dry season (DS). Long travel distances to the water sources, waiting time at watering points, and high fuel and labor costs were the key reasons associated with the problem. All the values of water quality (WQ) parameters were within acceptable limits of the guidelines for livestock drinking WQ with exception of iron, which showed slightly elevated concentration in one borehole source in the DS. These findings show that water shortage is an important problem leading to consequences for goat keepers. To alleviate the water shortage constraint and in view of the depleted groundwater sources, alternative water sources at reasonable distance have to be tapped and monitored for water quality and more efficient use of rainwater harvesting systems in the study area is recommended. PMID:25307764

Al-Khaza'leh, Ja'far Mansur; Reiber, Christoph; Al Baqain, Raid; Valle Zrate, Anne

2015-01-01

338

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/8: Cooperative Border Security for Jordan: Assessment and Options  

SciTech Connect

This document is an analysis of options for unilateral and cooperative action to improve the security of Jordan's borders. Sections describe the current political, economic, and social interactions along Jordan's borders. Next, the document discusses border security strategy for cooperation among neighboring countries and the adoption of confidence-building measures. A practical cooperative monitoring system would consist of hardware for early warning, command and control, communications, and transportation. Technical solutions can expand opportunities for the detection and identification of intruders. Sensors (such as seismic, break-wire, pressure-sensing, etc.) can warn border security forces of intrusion and contribute to the identification of the intrusion and help formulate the response. This document describes conceptual options for cooperation, offering three scenarios that relate to three hypothetical levels (low, medium, and high) of cooperation. Potential cooperative efforts under a low cooperation scenario could include information exchanges on military equipment and schedules to prevent misunderstandings and the establishment of protocols for handling emergency situations or unusual circumstances. Measures under a medium cooperation scenario could include establishing joint monitoring groups for better communications, with hot lines and scheduled meetings. The high cooperation scenario describes coordinated responses, joint border patrols, and sharing border intrusion information. Finally, the document lists recommendations for organizational, technical, and operational initiatives that could be applicable to the current situation.

Qojas, M.

1999-03-01

339

Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art  

SciTech Connect

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

Miller, Naomi J.

2011-09-01

340

Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about epilepsy and their predictors among university students in Jordan.  

PubMed

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge about epilepsy and the attitudes toward people with epilepsy (PWE) and their predictors among university students in Jordan. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed in three of the largest public universities in Jordan, and a total of 500 questionnaires were collected from each university. The number of students who reported that they had heard or read about epilepsy was 1165 (77.6%), and their data were analyzed. A significant proportion of students thought that epilepsy could be caused by the evil spirit (31.5%) and the evil eye (28.1%) or that it could be a punishment from God (25.9%). Epilepsy's most commonly reported treatment methods were the Holy Quran (71.4%), medications (71.3%), and herbs (29.3%). The most common negative attitudes toward PWE were that the students would refuse to marry someone with epilepsy (50.5%) and that children with epilepsy must join schools for persons with disabilities (44.4%). Male students, students of humanities, and students with a low socioeconomic status tended to have more negative attitudes toward PWE. In conclusion, many students have misconceptions about the causes, treatment, and nature of epilepsy, and students have moderate negative attitudes toward PWE. Universities should have health promotion programs to increase awareness of their students about major public health problems such as epilepsy. PMID:25461223

Hijazeen, Jameel Khaleel; Abu-Helalah, Munir Ahmad; Alshraideh, Hussam Ahmad; Alrawashdeh, Omar Salameh; Hawa, Fadi Nather; Dalbah, Tariq Asem; Abdallah, Fadi Walid

2014-12-01

341

A mathematical model for the dynamic optimization of the energy supply in Jordan  

SciTech Connect

A least-cost energy-supply mixture that would satisfy the total basic energy and electric power requirements for all sectors of the economy in Jordan during each year of the planning period 1990-2000 is presented. Two submodels and a main model were designed. The first submodel simulated the interaction among variables that affect the energy and electricity demand of the household sector. It utilized a system dynamic approach and the simulation language DYNAMO. The second submodel applied the techniques of econometric analysis and multilinear regression to forecast the demand of the other energy demand sectors. The main model used dynamic linear programming to compute the least-cost energy-supply mixture for every year of the planning period. A nonlinear software GINO was utilized to implement the main model. The study applied a managerial problem solving approach to the energy problem in Jordan. Study results were used to develop guidelines for a national energy strategy directed at more efficient energy production and consumption.

El-Kablan, M.M.

1991-01-01

342

Prevalence of coeliac disease among adult patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism in Jordan.  

PubMed

The prevalence of coeliac disease among patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism has not been studied before in Jordan and other Arab countries. A cross-sectional record-based review was made of all adult autoimmune hypothyroidism patients who attended a referral centre in Jordan, during an 8-month period. Coeliac disease in these patients was diagnosed by the attending physician based on positive serological tests for anti-endomysial antibodies IgA and IgG followed by duodenal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Of 914 patients recruited, 117 (12.8%) were seropositive for coeliac disease. Of 87 seropositive patients who underwent duodenal biopsy, 39 had positive histological findings of coeliac disease (44.8%). Extrapolating from these findings the overall rate of coeliac disease among autoimmune hypothyroidism patients was estimated to be 5.7%. In multivariate logistic regression coeliac disease was significantly associated with older age (> 40 years), presence of other autoimmune diseases, vitamin B12 deficiency and anaemia. PMID:24932934

Farahid, O H; Khawaja, N; Shennak, M M; Batieha, A; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

2014-01-01

343

Rapid landscape change in 6th century Jordan: driven by climate or man-made?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compared to the rich cities of antiquity, many areas in the Levant appear today degraded. European travel reports of the 19th century and excavations in Jordan created the impression that population numbers were strongly reduced during the Islamic periods, leading to 'empty' lands which were only resettled during the early 20th century. However, our case study near the ancient site Abila of the Decapolis in northern Jordan found that the land was probably never 'empty' and always fertile - but valley fills provide evidence for a rapid and intense landscape change during the Late Byzantine period. This was probably caused by a significant shift to aridity which also triggered socio-economic changes of subsistence strategies from agriculture to pastoralism. The dates of sediments which are available so far indicate that the climatic change seemingly occurred rapidly within approximately 100 years during the late 6th and early 7th century AD, and rubble layers let it seem probable that it was associated with frequent heavy rainfall events. It might have been caused or triggered by a global climate event creating the "year without sun" or 'Mystery Veil' which the Byzantine historian Procopius described in the year 536 AD. If similar events repeat under the current climate change, it will be difficult to mitigate them.

Lucke, Bernhard

2014-05-01

344

Educational Attainment and Attitudes Towards War in Muslim Countries Contemplating War: The Cases of Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses the little understood relationship between educational attainment and public attitudes towards war in four predominantly Muslim countries contemplating war: Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Turkey. The multivariate analysis using public opinion data suggests that the educational attainment of respondents has no statistically significant association with believing that war is necessary for obtaining justice. In a separate analysis, there

M. Najeeb Shafiq; Karen Ross

2010-01-01

345

Chemical characterisation and manufacturing technology of late Roman to early Byzantine glass from Beit Ras\\/Capitolias, Northern Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The finding of considerable collections of glass artefacts, together with considerable lumps of glass chunks, fuel ash slag and kiln fragments related to glass processing strongly suggests a local secondary production (working) of glass at the Beit Ras\\/Capitolias archaeological site in northern Jordan from the late Roman to the early Byzantine period. The chemical analysis of ancient glasses can provide

Ramadan Abd-Allah

2010-01-01

346

Chemical Composition and Manufacturing Technology of a Collection of Various Types of Islamic Glazes Excavated from Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A collection of Islamic glazed pottery shards that were excavated from the archaeological site of Dohaleh\\/Northern Jordan were chemically analysed. The glazes belong to three different decorative styles. The chemical analysis of the glazes was carried out using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence. The chemical analysis results enable the classification of the glazes into the three distinct compositional groups with reference

Ziad Al-Saad

2002-01-01

347

Irreducibility and reducibility of Lauricella's system of differential equations ED and the Jordan-Pochhammer differential equation  

E-print Network

Introduction A systematic study of special functions of hypergeometric type using integrals of multivalued and Phrase: Lauricella's FD, Jordan-Pochhammer equation, Hypergeometric integrals, Monodromy representations, Irreducibility of the monodromy group, Contents 1 Hypergeometric integrals 3 1.1 Lauricella's differential

Sasaki, Takeshi

348

Situation Report--Bahrain, Central African Republic, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Syria, Yemen Arab Republic.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data relating to population and family planning in twelve foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Bahrain, Central African Republic, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. Information is provided, where appropriate and available, under two

International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

349

GRASSMANN MANIFOLDS OF JORDAN ALGEBRAS Abstract. We show that, in a JB-algebra, the projections form a Banach manifold  

E-print Network

GRASSMANN MANIFOLDS OF JORDAN ALGEBRAS Cho-Ho Chu Abstract. We show that, in a JB and geometry is well-known (cf. [10]). Recently, various differentiable manifolds associated with a JB B(H) of bounded operators on a Hilbert space H have been studied in [1, 5], via the complex JB

350

New records for the horse fly fauna (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Jordan with remarks on ecology and zoogeography.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The horse fly fauna (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Jordan is the richest in the Levant, with 24 known species. During the 20-year project the ecology and zoogeography of the Lepidoptera of the Near East, USDA, Agricultural Research Service scientists in Gainesville, FL and Israeli scientists regularly c...

351

75 FR 62500 - Notice of Availability of a Pest Risk Analysis for the Importation of Fresh Strawberries From Jordan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Notice of Availability of a Pest Risk Analysis for the Importation of Fresh Strawberries...public that we have prepared a pest risk analysis that evaluates the risks associated with...strawberries from Jordan. Based on this analysis, we believe that the application...

2010-10-12

352

Estimation of animal and olive solid wastes in Jordan and their potential as a supplementary energy source: An overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomass is a potential source of energy that can reduce our dependency on oil as the main source of energy. In addition to municipal solid waste, animal and olive wastes are the main sources of organic waste in Jordan. In 2005, there were more than 2.4 million heads of sheep, about 72 thousand cows, and 40 million hens being raised

Jamal Abu-Ashour; Hani Abu Qdais; Mohammad Al-Widyan

2010-01-01

353

Hydraulic properties of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer, Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, southeastern Minnesota, 1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An aquifer test of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer was conducted in the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community located southwest of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. A well open to the Jordan Sandstone was pumped at 600 gallons per minute for 57 hours. Drawdown was monitored in three observation wells located near the pumped well. These wells were open to: (1) the Jordan Sandstone, the principal unit of the aquifer; (2) the Prairie du Chien Group, a secondary, carbonate-rock unit of the aquifer; and (3) a confined, glacial-drift sand aquifer. Test results indicate that the Jordan Sandstone had a transmissivity of 6,267 ft2/d, a storativity of 1.193 x 10-4, a horizontal hydraulic conductivity of 31 ft/d based on a saturated thickness of 204 ft, and a ratio of vertical to horizontal hydraulic conductivity of 5.29 x 10-4. The pumped well was hydraulically connected to the Prairie du Chien Group observation well. No drawdown was observed in the observation well completed in the confined, glacial-drift sand aquifer; thus, a hydraulic connection of this observation well to the pumped well was not indicated.

Ruhl, James F.

1999-01-01

354

Endolithic cyanobacteria in soil gypsum: Occurrences in Atacama (Chile), Mojave (United States), and Al-Jafr Basin (Jordan) Deserts  

E-print Network

Endolithic cyanobacteria in soil gypsum: Occurrences in Atacama (Chile), Mojave (United States, United States, and Al-Jafr Basin, Jordan, revealed endolithic cyanobacteria communities just below communities. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that in addition to Chroococcidiopsis, a few other cyanobacteria

Ahmad, Sajjad

355

Hidden Markov decision trees \\Lambda Michael I. Jordan y , Zoubin Ghahramani z , and Lawrence K. Saul y  

E-print Network

.) Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. #12; augment the decisionHidden Markov decision trees \\Lambda Michael I. Jordan y , Zoubin Ghahramani z , and Lawrence K of Toronto Toronto, ON Canada M5S 1A4 Abstract We study a time series model that can be viewed as a decision

Ghahramani, Zoubin

356

Soft skills or hard cash ? the impact of training and wage subsidy programs on female youth employment in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Throughout the Middle East, unemployment rates of educated youth have been persistently high and female labor force participation, low. This paper studies the impact of a randomized experiment in Jordan designed to assist female community college graduates find employment. One randomly chosen group of graduates was given a voucher that would pay an employer a subsidy equivalent to the minimum

Matthew Groh; Nandini Krishnan; David McKenzie; Tara Vishwanath

2012-01-01

357

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Ring Expansion of Cyclopropanols and Cyclobutanols Jordan P. Markham, Steven T. Staben, and F. Dean Toste*  

E-print Network

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Ring Expansion of Cyclopropanols and Cyclobutanols Jordan P. Markham, Steven T of heteroatom4 nucleophiles or -bonds5 to gold(I)-activated alkynes have recently been described. We hy- pothesized that related cationic gold(I) complexes might be capable of catalyzing ring expansion6 reactions

Toste, Dean

358

Predators and Prey: Jordan Lake State Recreation Area. An Environmental Education Learning Experience Designed for Grades K-3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides hands-on environmental education activities for the classroom and the outdoor setting of Jordan Lake State Recreation Area. The activity packet, designed for grades K-3, meets curriculum objectives of the standard course of study established by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. It includes on-site

Boswell, Henry, III; Stamm, Daniel K.

359

Diversity in Geoscience Degrees and Academic Careers, U.S.A. 2004 Summarized by T. Jordan, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-print Network

Diversity in Geoscience Degrees and Academic Careers, U.S.A. 2004 Summarized by T. Jordan, Earth in the US earn undergraduate degrees in geosciences (inclusive of earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences). In 2001, the % of BS/BA degrees among 3968 total graduates included: Group in Geosciences Percent of total

Mahowald, Natalie

360

Situation Report--Algeria, Bangladesh, Fiji, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Iran, Jordan, New Zealand, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data relating to population and family planning in nine foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Algeria, Bangledesh, Fiji, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Iran, Jordan, New Zealand, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone. Information is provided under two topics, general background and family planning situation, where

International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

361

Heavy Metal Contamination of Soil, Plant and Air of Scrapyard of Discarded Vehicles at Zarqa City, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ninety soil samples, forty plant samples (Anabasis articulata), and twenty air samples were collected from the scrap yard of discarded vehicles near Zarqa city, Jordan. These samples were analyzed for heavy metals: Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Mn, Al, and Fe. Longitudinal and vertical profiles of soil samples were studied. Generally, the levels of all heavy metals studied in the scrap

Qasem M. Jaradat; Adnan Masadeh; Mohammed A. Zaitoun; Baheyah M. Maitah

2005-01-01

362

DIRASAT n. 1 volume n. 36, Jordan University, 2009 Conservation of Palestinian Urban Heritage: The Danger of Destruction and  

E-print Network

DIRASAT n. 1 volume n. 36, Jordan University, 2009 Conservation of Palestinian Urban Heritage and methods of the destruction of Palestinian urban cultural heritage by Israeli occupying authorities between and its historical identity. The role of Palestinian Authority is highlighted by the management of natural

363

Utility of multi temporal satellite images for crop water requirements estimation and irrigation management in the Jordan Valley  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Identifying the spatial and temporal distribution of crop water requirements is a key for successful management of water resources in the dry areas. Climatic data were obtained from three automated weather stations to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ETO) in the Jordan Valley according to the...

364

Hydrogeochemical investigation of groundwater in Jericho area in the Jordan Valley, West Bank, Palestine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resources in the Middle East, particularly in Palestine, are extremely scarce and costly. The Jordan Valley is a fertile productive region, described as the food basket of Palestine. Groundwater originating from the Quaternary Aquifer System forms the main water resource in the Jordan Valley. However, the quality of this groundwater is threatened mainly by the high chloride concentration. The most representative area of the Jordan Valley is Jericho area, which was chosen to be the study area. The study area (65 km2) is almost a flat area with a gentle decline towards the east. It is the lowest land on earth with ground levels reaching 400 meters below sea level (mbsl) near the Dead Sea shores. The Quaternary Aquifer System in the study area could be divided into an upper alluvial layer with thickness varying from 40 to 150 m and a lower low-permeable Lisan layer, which crops out in the eastern part of the study area with thickness over 200 m. Hydrogeochemical investigation reveals that the water is generally earth alkaline with higher content of earth alkalis and prevailing chloride. According to Stuyfzand (1986) and Piper's (1944) classification systems, water type in the Alluvial Aquifer varies from fresh hard CaMgHCO3 or MgCaHCO3 water in the west and northwest to brackish very-hard MgNaCl or NaMgCl in the middle. In the east, the water becomes brackish-salt extremely-hard MgNaCl or NaCl. Groundwater quality is deteriorating (increase in salinity) spatially towards the east and vertically with increasing depth (when nearing the Lisan Formation). As an indication of groundwater salinity, total dissolved solids show some variability with time over the last 21 years (1983-2004). In short-time scale, there are high seasonal and yearly fluctuations with regard to salinity, specifically in Cl- and SO42- contents. Spring water from the Upper Cenomanian Aquifer (CaHCO3) represents the fresh end member, while Rift Valley Brines (RVB-CaNaCl) and Dead Sea Brines (DSB-MgNaCl) represent the saline end members. Existing water types are mixtures of the 3 end members. There is a consistency in results and analysis of geological, hydrogeological, hydrochemical and geophysical data. There are three probable sources of increase in groundwater salinity: mixing with saline end members (RVB/DSB); dissolution of minerals of the Lisan Formation (calcite, dolomite, gypsum and halite); and to some extent, agricultural effluent pollution.

Da'as, Ammar; Walraevens, Kristine

2013-06-01

365

To appear in Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10, M. I. Jordan, M. J. Kearns, and S. A. Solla, eds., MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (1998).  

E-print Network

To appear in Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10, M. I. Jordan, M. J. Kearns are then all presumed to have arisen from a single isolated cell. This process of cell isolation is time­consuming

Sahani, Maneesh

366

Toappear in Jordan, MI, Kearns MJ, and Solla,SA Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10. MIT Press: Cambridge, MA, 1998.  

E-print Network

Toappear in Jordan, MI, Kearns MJ, and Solla,SA Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems. In general, Gibbs sampling can be very time consuming, but in practice 10 to 20 samples per unit have proved

Ghahramani, Zoubin

367

To appear in Jordan, MI, Kearns MJ, and Solla, SA Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10. MIT Press: Cambridge, MA, 1998.  

E-print Network

To appear in Jordan, MI, Kearns MJ, and Solla, SA Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems. In general, Gibbs sampling can be very time consuming, but in practice 10 to 20 samples per unit have proved

Hinton, Geoffrey E.

368

Pharmacological and Phytochemical Appraisal of Selected Medicinal Plants from Jordan with Claimed Antidiabetic Activities  

PubMed Central

Plant species have long been regarded as possessing the principal ingredients used in widely disseminated ethnomedical practices. Different surveys showed that medicinal plant species used by the inhabitants of Jordan for the traditional treatment of diabetes are inadequately screened for their therapeutic/preventive potential and phytochemical findings. In this review, traditional herbal medicine pursued indigenously with its methods of preparation and its active constituents are listed. Studies of random screening for selective antidiabetic bioactivity and plausible mechanisms of action of local species, domesticated greens, or wild plants are briefly discussed. Recommended future directives incurring the design and conduct of comprehensive trials are pointed out to validate the usefulness of these active plants or bioactive secondary metabolites either alone or in combination with existing conventional therapies. PMID:24482764

Afifi, Fatma U.; Kasabri, Violet

2013-01-01

369

A Pan-African alkaline pluton intruding the Saramuj Conglomerate, south-west Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The geological setting, petrography and bulk mineral chemistry of a monzodiorite and a presumably consanguineous megaporphyry with large (up to 25 cm) labradorite megacrysts, both intruding the upper Proterozoic Saramuj Conglomerate in south-west Jordan (south eastern shore of the Dead Sea), were examined. The crystallization temperatures of the monzodiorite and the megaporphyry as determined from pyroxene thermometry and supported by contact metamorphic mineralogy are about 700 and 900C, respectively. The intrusion depth of the monzodiorite is about 3 4 km. The monzodiorite was emplaced in the Saramuj Conglomerate at about 595 + 2 Ma ago according to Rb/Sr and U/Pb age determinations. The stratigraphic positions of the monzodiorite, megaporphyry and their host rock (the Saramuj Conglomerate) were compared with time-equivalent lithologies in the Arabian-Nubian Shield.

Jarrar, Ghaleb; Wachendorf, Horst; Zachmann, Dieter

1993-04-01

370

Atmospheric heavy metal pollution in Aqaba city, Jordan, using Phoenix dactylifera L. leaves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The leaves of date palms ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) were evaluated as biomonitors of heavy metal contamination in the city of Aqaba, Jordan. The concentrations of iron (Fe), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and chromium (Cr) were determined using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Samples of unwashed leaves for testing were collected from different locations with different degrees of metal pollution (urban, suburban, industrial, highway, and rural sites). Separate leaves were taken from outside the city to be used as a control sample. Samples collected from industrial areas were found to have high contents of all metals except for nickel, copper, and lead, which were found at high concentrations in the samples collected from highway sites. Significant correlations between the heavy metal concentrations in date palm trees in unwashed leave samples were obtained. The principle component analysis (PCA) along with correlation analysis provide significant information about the origin of heavy metals in palm tree samples.

Al-Khlaifat, Abdelaziz L.; Al-Khashman, Omar A.

371

Stability of the Einstein static universe in the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emergent theory assumes that the universe originates from an Einstein static (ES) state rather than the big bang singularity, and, thus, provides a possible way to resolve the singularity problem. The stability against all kinds of perturbations that ensures the past eternity of the ES state is crucial for a successful realization of the emergent scenario. Recently, it has been found that in the context of the Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) theory there exists a stable ES solution under homogenous and anisotropic perturbations. In this paper, we extend the analysis to the stability against tensor and inhomogeneous scalar perturbations. We find that, different from general relativity and f(R) theory, a stable ES solution is allowed in the JBD theory when different kinds of perturbations are considered, although the stability conditions are tighter for tensor and inhomogeneous scalar perturbations than those for homogenous and anisotropic ones.

Huang, He; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

2014-05-01

372

Laboratory measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An effort to investigate the potential of remote sensing for monitoring nonpoint source pollution was conducted. Spectral reflectance characteristics for four types of soil sediments were measured for mixture concentrations between 4 and 173 ppm. For measurements at a spectral resolution of 32 mm, the spectral reflectances of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments were distinctly different over the wavelength range from 400 to 980 nm at each concentration tested. At high concentrations, spectral differences between the various sediments could be detected by measurements with a spectral resolution of 160 nm. At a low concentration, only small differences were observed between the various sediments when measurements were made with 160 nm spectral resolution. Radiance levels generally varied in a nonlinear manner with sediment concentration; linearity occurred in special cases, depending on sediment type, concentration range, and wavelength.

Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.

1977-01-01

373

Road dust resuspension in the vicinity of limestone quarries in Jordan.  

PubMed

Many areas in Jordan suffer from elevated levels of coarse particulate matter (PM10). One potentially significant source of the observed PM is the resuspension of road dust in the vicinity of limestone quarries. To obtain data to assess the impact from this source, PM10 road dust resuspension factors near Abusiiah, a town to the north east of Amman surrounded by many quarries and brick factories, were measured. Measurements included PM10 mass, particle size distributions, wind speed, and wind direction. The results showed that PM10 concentrations could be as high as 600 microg/m3, and most of the airborne PM is in the coarse fraction. Loading trucks play a major role in resuspending road dust, with an observed PM10 emission rate of >6000 mg/km. PMID:17063866

Abu-Allaban, Mahmoud; Hamasha, Safeia; Gertler, Alan

2006-10-01

374

Inorganic analysis of dust fall and office dust in an industrial area of Jordan.  

PubMed

This article deals with the determination and comparison of heavy metals and water-soluble anions and cations in indoor dust and outdoor dust fall in the petroleum refinery area in Jordan. Three sampling sites were considered in the Jordanian petroleum refinery complex for the collection of dust fall and office dust samples. These samples were analyzed for water-soluble anions (F-, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, C2O4(2-), and SO4(2-)) and cations (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) using auto-suppressed ion chromatography. Heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr, Fe, and Al) were determined using flame or graphite-furnace atomic absorption. No correlations were found between heavy metal concentrations in dust fall and office dust samples, indicating different sources. High enrichment factors for heavy metals were found in dust-fall samples, except for Fe and Cr. Zinc showed the highest and cadmium the lowest flux rates. PMID:15325874

Jaradat, Qasem M; Momani, Kamal A; Jbarah, Abdel-Aziz Q; Massadeh, Adnan

2004-10-01

375

The role of the extended family in women's risk of intimate partner violence in Jordan.  

PubMed

The extended family as a potential cause of and protection against intimate partner violence (IPV) remains relatively unstudied. This mixed-methods study used focus group discussions (FGDs) and a clinic-based survey to investigate several family-based risk and protective factors associated with women's risk of IPV in Jordan. Seventeen FGDs (total number of participants = 105) were conducted with women in Amman. Each transcript was coded for categories using open coding methodology and mapping. Relevant categories and subcategories were family support, family interference, family abuse, exposure to violence in childhood, and place of residence. For the survey, systematic probability proportionate to size methodology was used to select a sample of 517 literate, ever married, women from seven reproductive health clinics located throughout the country (response rate = < or = 70%); due to missing data, the analytic sample was restricted to 418 women. Measures assessed the categories mentioned above. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between IPV and the main predictors of interest (residence, family interference, family violence, exposure to violence as a child, and family support). The combined results of the FGDs and the survey demonstrated that the respondent's husband's exposure to violence in childhood and violence perpetrated by other family members were risk factors for IPV. Family interference was also significantly related to IPV but only when the respondent identified the interference as harmful to her relationship. Residence with the respondent's in-laws demonstrated mixed effects. A supportive family was protective against IPV, although the FGDs revealed that families were not always an effective source of assistance. Findings demonstrate the continued role of the wife's and husband's kin in women's risk of IPV in Jordan, highlighting the importance of a broader view of the context of IPV. PMID:19837499

Clark, Cari Jo; Silverman, Jay G; Shahrouri, Manal; Everson-Rose, Susan; Groce, Nora

2010-01-01

376

Microbiological quality of sous and tamarind, traditional drinks consumed in Jordan.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to evaluate the microbiological quality of sous (a drink prepared by extracting dried roots of Glycyrrhiza glabra) and tamarind (a drink prepared by infusing Tamarindus indica dried pulp), traditional drinks consumed in Jordan. Twenty-one samples of sous and 44 samples of tamarind were collected from the local market in Amman, Jordan. Water is the major component of the drinks. Sous drink is characterized by having an alkaline pH (range, 6.6 to 9.9; mean, 8.6), whereas tamarind drink has an acidic pH (range, 1.8 to 3.7; mean, 2.8). The drinks are not processed for safety before serving, and at some vendors drinks are not properly refrigerated. The mean counts for aerobic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts in sous drink samples were 5.9, 5.0, and 3.8 log CFU/ml, respectively; those in tamarind drink samples were 4.0, <1, and 5.8 log CFU/ml, respectively. The lactic acid bacteria isolated were Enterococcus raffinosus, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus durans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus buchneri. The yeast isolates in sous drink were from the genera Candida, Filobasidium, Hanseniaspora, Lodderomyces, Pichia, and Williopsis, and those in tamarind drink were from Arthroascus, Brettanomyces, Candida, Debaromyces, Filobasidiella, Hanseniaspora, Klavispora, Lodderomyces, Pichia, Saccharomycodes, Trichosporon, and Zygosaccharomyces. Enterobacteriaceae were detected in two sous samples and were identified as Enterobacter sakazakii and Erwinia sp., and in two tamarind samples and were identified as Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Salmonella was detected in one sous and one tamarind sample. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in only one sous sample. These findings highlight the importance of application of hygienic practices throughout preparation and vending of drinks, starting with raw ingredients and continuing through preparation, storage, display, and serving. PMID:15830669

Nassereddin, Reem A; Yamani, Mohammed I

2005-04-01

377

Investigations on the combustion metamorphism halo of bituminous micrites (Maqarin site, northern Jordan)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combustion metamorphism halo in a bituminous micrite sampled in an adit from the Maqarin site, in northern Jordan (Khoury et al., 1992) was studied by combining different methods (magnetic, thermal, chemical and mineralogical analysis). The magnetic investigations confirmed the existence of a significant magnetic anomaly between the cement bodies and the unaltered sediment. This finding is consistent with previous studies on combustion metamorphism (Cisowski and Fuller, 1987 ; Ron and Kolodny, 1992). The magnetic anomaly observed in Maqarin is found to be double, exhibiting two distinct maxima (for both susceptibility and remanent magnetisation). Combined mineralogical and magnetic characterisations show that the first anomaly is due to magnetite type iron oxides whereas the second anomaly originates from maghemite type oxides and that these ferromagnetic minerals are inherited from sulphide minerals (pyrite). The thermal analysis of the bituminous marl displays two major exothermic events (centered at ~320C and at ~440C) and one major endothermic event (centered at ~790C). These events are correlated with important mass losses. By using the evolved gases analysis (EGA), the two important exothermic events are interpreted as linked to the oxidation of two types of organic matter. The major endothermic event is well known and corresponds to decarbonatation. Using available information and new data acquired during this study, an attempt was done to reconstruct the temperature profile along Maqarin adit at the moment when combustion stopped between unaltered sediments (30 +/- 10 ) and the combusted zone (1100 +/- 50 C) Cisowski S. M. and Fuller M. Geol. Soc. of America Bulletin, 99, 21-29, 1987. Khoury H. N., Salameh E., Clark I. D., Fritz P., Bajjali W., Milodowski A. E., Cave M. R., Alexander W. R., J. Geochem. Explor., 46, 117-132, 1992. Ron H. and Kolodny Y., J. Geophys. Res., 97, NO. B5, 6927-6939, 1992. This investigation is part of the Maqarin Phase IV project supported by ANDRA, CEA, NAGRA, NIREX, SKB and Jordan University.

Vandamme, D.; Fontanini, L.; Trotignon, L.; Raynal, J.; Khoury, H.; Milodowski, A.; Rassineux, F.; Mder, U.; Bienvenu, P.

2003-04-01

378

Mound measurements - quantifying medium-term soil erosion under olive trees in Northern Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last few decades many quantitative erosion studies have revealed that olive orchard expansion and increased mechanization in southern European countries have led to increased soil erosion under olive trees. Consequently, these studies have suggested different methods of mitigation. In light of the 2014 European trading zone expansion to countries east and south of the Mediterranean, a further intensification of olive plantations is postulated to meet market demands. To attain first medium-term estimates of erosion in Northern Jordan and its driving factors, a new method measuring olive mounds was implemented. Seven fields with clearly erosive structures were chosen throughout the Wadi Al-Arab catchment in Northern Jordan. Topographic measurements were used to reconstruct the historical and recent surface level and calculate the volume eroded since the planting of the trees. A total of 81 bulk density measurements and 14 tree cores allowed the estimation of the soil loss in tons per hectare. The combination of modified land use map and slope information helped to identify similar olive fields with high erosive potential. Results show that the method provides medium-term quantitative estimates for averaged soil loss consistent with some existing results from similar research areas in the Mediterranean. They clearly indicate the significant potential for erosion in olive orchards with around 95 8 t ha- 1 yr- 1. Tillage practice and water erosion were identified as critical erosion processes, both depending on tillage characteristics, tillage timing, and soil parent material. The investigated fields represent about 19% of the catchment's surface area and are likely to contribute to the measured yearly sediment yield that fills up the Wadi Al-Arab reservoir with sediments.

Kraushaar, S.; Herrmann, N.; Ollesch, G.; Vogel, H.-J.; Siebert, C.

2014-05-01

379

Anti-TNF therapy in Jordan: a focus on severe infections and tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background A high rate of infection has been reported in patients receiving treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF). This study describes the rate of and risk factors for serious infections in patients receiving anti-TNF agents in Jordan. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted at a large tertiary referral center in the north of Jordan. Between January 2006 and January 2012, 199 patients who received an anti-TNF agent (infliximab, adalimumab, or etanercept) were included. Patients received the anti-TNF treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or other conditions. A serious infection was defined as any bacterial, viral, or fungal infection that required hospitalization, administration of appropriate intravenous antimicrobial therapy, and temporary withholding of anti-TNF treatment. Results The mean duration of anti-TNF treatment was 26.2 months. Steroids were used in 29.1% of patients, while 54.8% were given additional immunosuppressant therapy (methotrexate or azathioprine). Only one anti-TNF agent was given in 70.4% of patients, while 29.6% received different anti-TNF agents for the duration of treatment. Serious infections were documented in 39 patients (19.6%), including respiratory tract infections (41%), urinary tract infections (30.8%), and skin infections (20.5%), and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in three patients (7.7%). Exposure to more than one anti-TNF agent was the only factor associated with a significant increase in the rate of infection (relative risk 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.064.0, P=0.03). Conclusion Serious infections, including tuberculosis, were a common problem in patients receiving anti-TNF agents, and exposure to more than one anti-TNF agent increased the risk of serious infection. PMID:24790412

Alawneh, Khaldoon M; Ayesh, Mahmoud H; Khassawneh, Basheer Y; Saadeh, Salwa Shihadeh; Smadi, Mahmoud; Bashaireh, Khaldoun

2014-01-01

380

A retrospective study on imported malaria in Jordan. 1. Malaria among Jordanian UN peacekeeping forces.  

PubMed

Malaria is considered as one of the most threatening diseases affecting peacekeeping forces serving in malaria endemic countries. The Jordanian Armed Forces participated in many of the United Nations peacekeeping missions in over 20 countries across the world. Thin and thick blood smears were collected from military personnel returning to Jordan, and relevant data including occupation, age, sex, residence address and the country they served in were recorded. Mefloquine 250 mg/week was prescribed for prophylaxis during the period of stay for three contingents of Jordanian military forces deployed to East Timor. Members of two contingents were given post exposure prophylactic treatment of Doxycycline 100 mg coupled with Primaquine 15 mg daily for 14 days soon after returning to Jordan. Blood smears were taken from all soldiers suspected to be affected by malaria, and were monitored over a period of 15 weeks. A total of 811 malaria cases were reported during 1992-2011 among Jordanian military personnel whom served in over 20 countries. Most cases were reported among troops returning from Eretria (54.74%), East Timor (18.86%), Ivory Coast (9.12%) and Sierra Leone (5.1%). Troops aged between 20-40 years constituted 96.3% of the total reported cases. The majority of infections were due to Plasmodium vivax (83.5%), followed by Plasmodium falciparum (13.6%). The attack rates (AR) of malaria/100 soldiers among the three contingents were 10.8% for Timor 1, with no post-exposure prophylaxis, and 2.8% for Timor 2 and 3 with post-exposure prophylaxis. There was an evident reduction of malaria attack rate and relapse rate between the two groups Timor 1 (without post-exposure prophylaxis) and Timor 2 and 3 (given post exposure prophylaxis). PMID:24639137

Kanani, K; Amr, Z-S; Shadfan, B; Al-Rashadan, M; Bani Hani, R

2014-05-01

381

Climatic change impacts on water balance of the Upper Jordan River  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Eastern Mediterranean and Near East (EM/NE) is an extremely water scarce environment. It is expected that problems will increase due to climate change and population growth. The impact of climate change on water availability in EM/NE and in particular the Jordan River catchment is investigated in this study. Focus is set on the Upper Jordan River catchment (UJC) as it provides 1/3rd of freshwater resources in Israel and Palestine. It is a hydro-geologically extremely complex region with karstic groundwater flow and an orography with steep gradients. The methods used are high resolution coupled regional climate - hydrology simulations. Two IPCC scenarios (A2 and B2) of the global climate model ECHAM4 have been dynamically downscaled using the non-hydrostatic meteorological model MM5 in two nesting steps with resolutions of 54x54 km2 and 18x18 km2 for the period 1961-2099, whereby the time slice 1961-1989 represents the current climate. The meteorological fields are used to drive the physically based hydrological model WaSiM applied to the UJC. The hydrological model computes in detail the surface and subsurface water flow and water balance in a horizontal resolution of 450 x 450 m2 and dynamically couples to a 2-dim numerical groundwater model. Parameters like surface runoff, groundwater recharge, soil moisture and evapotranspiration can be extracted. Results show in both scenarios increasing yearly mean temperatures up to 4-5 K until 2099 and decreasing yearly precipitation amounts up to 25% (scenario A2). The effect on the water balance of the UJC are reduced discharge and groundwater recharge, increased evaporation and reduction of snow cover in the mountains which usually serves as an important freshwater reservoir for the summer discharge.

Heckl, A.; Kunstmann, H.

2009-04-01

382

The effect of e-service quality on customers' satisfaction in banks operating in Jordan: an empirical investigation of customers' perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this research is to examine the relationship between the e-service quality dimensions and customer satisfaction of banks in Jordan. Using a structured questionnaire, the primary data was collected from 457 customers who had e-banking transactions with banks in Jordan. Multiple regression analysis was employed to test the research model and hypotheses. The research findings indicate that e-service

Mohammed T. Nuseir; Mamoun N. Akroush; Bushra K. Mahadin; Abdullah Q. Bataineh

2010-01-01

383

Public centric e-governance in Jordan : A field study of people's perception of e-governance awareness, corruption, and trust  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the efforts made by Jordan in the direction of e-governance and people's perception of corruption, trust, and e-governance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Desk research was conducted using secondary data sources followed by a field survey conducted with 412 sample respondents in three major cities of Jordan. Following the triangulation approach, the responses

Rakesh Belwal; Khalid Al-Zoubi

2008-01-01

384

Reference crop evapotranspiration derived from geo-stationary satellite imagery - a case study for the Fogera flood plain, NW-Ethiopia and the Jordan Valley, Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

First results are shown of a project aiming to estimate daily values of reference crop evapotranspiration ET0 from geo-stationary satellite imagery. In particular, for Woreta, a site in the Ethiopian highland at an elevation of about 1800 m, we tested a radiation-temperature based approximate formula proposed by Makkink (MAK) adopting ET0 evaluated with the version of the Penman-Monteith equation described in the FAO Irrigation and Drainage paper 56 as the most accurate estimate. More precisely we used the latter with measured daily solar radiation as input (denoted by PMFAO-Rs). Our data set for Woreta concerns a period where the surface was fully covered with short green non-stressed vegetation. Our project was carried out in the context of the Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LANDSAF) facility. Among others, the scope of LANDSAF is to increase benefit from the EUMETSAT Satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In this study we applied daily values of downward solar radiation at the surface obtained from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) radiometer. In addition, air temperature at 2 m was obtained from 3-hourly forecasts provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Both MAK and PMFAO-Rs contain the psychrometric "constant", which is proportional to air pressure, which, in turn, decreases with elevation. In order to test elevation effects we tested MAK and its LANDSAF input data for 2 sites in the Jordan Valley located about 250 m b.s.l. Except for a small underestimation of air temperature at the Ethiopian site at 1800 m, the first results of our LANDSAF-ET0 project are promising. If our approach to derive ET0 proves successfully, then the LANDSAF will be able to initiate nearly real time free distribution of ET0 for the full MSG disk.

de Bruin, H. A. R.; Trigo, I. F.; Jitan, M. A.; Temesgen Enku, N.; van der Tol, C.; Gieske, A. S. M.

2010-07-01

385

Reference crop evapotranspiration derived from geo-stationary satellite imagery: a case study for the Fogera flood plain, NW-Ethiopia and the Jordan Valley, Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

First results are shown of a project aiming to estimate daily values of reference crop evapotranspiration ET0 from geo-stationary satellite imagery. In particular, for Woreta, a site in the Ethiopian highland at an elevation of about 1800 m, we tested a radiation-temperature based approximate formula proposed by Makkink (MAK), adopting ET0 evaluated with the version of the Penman-Monteith equation described in the FAO Irrigation and Drainage paper 56 as the most accurate estimate. More precisely we used the latter with measured daily solar radiation as input (denoted by PMFAO-Rs). Our data set for Woreta concerns a period where the surface was fully covered with short green non-stressed vegetation. Our project was carried out in the context of the Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LANDSAF) facility. Among others, the scope of LANDSAF is to increase benefit from the EUMETSAT Satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In this study we applied daily values of downward solar radiation at the surface obtained from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) radiometer. In addition, air temperature at 2 m was obtained from 3-hourly forecasts provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Both MAK and PMFAO-Rs contain the psychrometric "constant", which is proportional to air pressure, which, in turn, decreases with elevation. In order to test elevation effects we tested MAK and its LANDSAF input data for 2 sites in the Jordan Valley located about 250 m b.s.l. Except for a small underestimation of air temperature at the Ethiopian site at 1800 m, the first results of our LANDSAF-ET0 project are promising. If our approach to derive ET0 proves successfully, then the LANDSAF will be able to initiate nearly real time free distribution of ET0 for the full MSG disk.

de Bruin, H. A. R.; Trigo, I. F.; Jitan, M. A.; Temesgen Enku, N.; van der Tol, C.; Gieske, A. S. M.

2010-11-01

386

Sources and processes affecting the spatio-temporal distribution of pharmaceuticals and X-ray contrast media in the water resources of the Lower Jordan Valley, Jordan.  

PubMed

The closed basin of the Lower Jordan Valley with the Dead Sea as final sink features high evapotranspiration rates and almost complete reuse of treated wastewater for irrigation farming. This study focuses on the water transfer schemes and the presence, spreading, and potential accumulation of pharmaceutical residues in the local water resources based on findings of a five-year monitoring program. Overall 16 pharmaceuticals and 9 iodinated X-ray contrast media were monitored in groundwater, surface water, and treated wastewater. A total of 95 samples were taken to cover all geographical settings and flow paths from origin (wastewater) to target (groundwater). Nine substances were detected in groundwater, with concentrations ranging between 11 ng/L and 33,000 ng/L. Sometimes, detection rates were higher than in comparable studies: Diatrizoic acid 75%, iopamidol 42%, iopromide 19%, iomeprol 11%, carbamazepine and iohexol 8%, ibuprofen 6%, and fenofibrate and iothalamic acid 3%. Concentrations in groundwater generally increase from north to south depending on the application of treated wastewater for irrigation. Almost all substances occurred most frequently and with highest concentrations in treated wastewater, followed by surface water and groundwater. As exception, diatrizoic acid was found more frequently in groundwater than in treated wastewater, with concentrations being similar. This indicates the persistence of diatrizoic acid with long residence times in local groundwater systems, but may also reflect changing prescription patterns, which would be in accordance with increasing iopamidol findings and surveys at local hospitals. Trend analyses confirm this finding and indicate a high probability of increasing iopamidol concentrations, while other substances did not reveal any trends. However, no proof of evaporative enrichment could be found. The high spatial and temporal variability of the concentrations measured calls for further systematic studies to assess the long-term evolution of organic trace substances in this reuse setting. PMID:24821436

Zemann, Moritz; Wolf, Leif; Pschko, Antje; Schmidt, Natalie; Sawarieh, Ali; Seder, Nayef; Tiehm, Andreas; Htzl, Heinz; Goldscheider, Nico

2014-08-01

387

A comparison between Jordan and Einstein frames of Brans-Dicke gravity a la loop quantum cosmology  

E-print Network

It is well known that the Jordan and Einstein frames are equivalent to each other in classical Brans-Dicke theory, provided that one and the same metric is employed for the physical space-time. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper by cosmological models that the loop quantisation in the two different frames will lead to inequivalent effective theories. Analytical solutions have been found in both frames for the effective loop quantum Brans-Dicke cosmology without potential in: (i) vacuum case, (ii) additional massless scalar field case. In Einstein frame the analytical solution for the Brans-Dicke potential $\\propto\\varphi^2$ has been found. In all of those solutions the bouncing evolution of the scale factor has been obtained around Planck regime. The differences between the loop quantisation of the two frames are reflected by: (i) the evolution of the scale factor around the bounce, (ii) the scale of the bounce in the physical Jordan frame.

Michal Artymowski; Yonnge Ma; Xiangdong Zhang

2013-09-12

388

Mixing models and ionic geothermometers applied to warm (up to 60??C) springs: Jordan Rift Valley, Israel  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mixing models and evaluation of SiO2 contents of warm-water manifestations in the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley indicate that these waters are fed by aquifers with estimated temperatures of up to 68??C. These calculations and Na/K ratios, concentrations of Na, K and Ca, concentrations of atmospheric Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe; and concentrations of the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes all indicate below-boiling temperatures. No indications are available for the existence of above-boiling geothermal systems in the Jordan Rift Valley. Slightly higher than observed temperatures are concluded for a deep component at the springs of Hammat Gader (67??C), Gofra (68??C), the Russian Garden (40??C), and the Yesha well (53-65??C). These temperatures may encourage further developments for spas and bathing installations and, to a limited extent, for space heating, but are not favorable for geothermal power generation. ?? 1980.

Mazor, E.; Levitte, D.; Truesdell, A.H.; Healy, J.; Nissenbaum, A.

1980-01-01

389

Geochemical dissociation of major and trace elements in bed and suspended sediment phases of the phosphate mines effluent water, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bed and suspended (slime) sediment phases associated with effluent water that are produced from phosphate-ore-upgrading process at Al-Abyad mine in the southern part of Jordan were analyzed chemically and mineralogically. The results show that the effluent water is highly oxic and mildly alkaline in nature. The geochemical behavior of each phase was controlled by the effluent water physicochemical parameters,

Tayel El-Hasan

2006-01-01

390

Syrian refugees, between rocky crisis in Syria and hard inaccessibility to healthcare services in Lebanon and Jordan  

PubMed Central

Around 3% of the worlds population (n?=?214 million people) has crossed international borders for various reasons. Since March 2011, Syria has been going through state of political crisis and instability resulting in an exodus of Syrians to neighbouring countries. More than 1 million Syrian refugees are residents of Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Egypt and North Africa. The international community must step up efforts to support Syrian refugees and their host governments. PMID:24004474

2013-01-01

391

Syrian refugees, between rocky crisis in Syria and hard inaccessibility to healthcare services in Lebanon and Jordan.  

PubMed

Around 3% of the world's population (n?=?214 million people) has crossed international borders for various reasons. Since March 2011, Syria has been going through state of political crisis and instability resulting in an exodus of Syrians to neighbouring countries. More than 1 million Syrian refugees are residents of Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Egypt and North Africa. The international community must step up efforts to support Syrian refugees and their host governments. PMID:24004474

El-Khatib, Ziad; Scales, David; Vearey, Jo; Forsberg, Birger C

2013-01-01

392

The effects upon children in Jordan of the imprisonment of their fathersA social work perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

EnglishThis study examined the effects upon children in Jordan of fathers being imprisoned. Interviews were conducted with 26 mothers of children and NUDIST was used for qualitative data analysis. As elsewhere, the study confirmed that children are adversely affected and stigmatized: problems related to emotional development, behaviour and schooling were evident.FrenchCette tude examine les effets sur les enfants de Jordanie

Fakir Al Gharaibeh

2008-01-01

393

Ozone Levels in the North and South of Jordan: Effects of Transboundary Air Pollution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first phase of this work sought to assess the causes of air quality deterioration in the south of the region over the Red Sea near the resort areas of Eilat and Aqaba. Accordingly, a coordinated Jordanian-Israeli study was performed during the month of November 2007 along the boarder of the two countries. The Jordanian measurements were made at a fixed monitoring location in the city of Aqaba, while the Israeli measurements were made using a mobile laboratory at kibbutz Eilot some 3 km north of the coastal city of Eilat. The results indicated that pollution episodes are highly dependent on wind direction, where southerly winds carry local transportation (i.e., ship, trucks) and possibly some industrial emissions towards the north end of the Red Sea, while northerly winds are associated with the transport of regional O 3. The results revealed that under the prevailing (90% of the time) northerly wind flows, the quality of the air is relatively good for all primary pollutants but O3 was elevated, indicative of the downwind regional transport of this secondary species from the Mediterranean coast. However, during days with southerly air flow the air quality was significantly deteriorated with elevated levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The second phase of this work, which also involved Jordanian and Israeli scientists, was undertaken in the northern part of the region for a two-week period in May/June 2009. This part of the research was aimed at examining previous modeling results that indicated that elevated O3 levels should occur in Northern Jordan from emissions in Northern Israel that are transported a distance of more than 100 km. Ozone and other pollutants were monitored at five sites in Israel (Haifa, Neve Shanan, Kiryat Tivon, Afula, and Maoz Haim) and two in Jordan (Taiba and Irbid). The sites were located along the prevailing wind direction that presumably moves air-masses eastward from the Mediterranean coast, over the Israel Valley toward the Jordan Valley, and then into Northern Jordan. Results confirmed the previous modeling results, suggesting that peak O3 values are observed at later hours as a function of distance from the Mediterranean coast and that maximum O 3 levels are found over northern Jordan. Based on the findings of the first phase that showed elevated O 3 and NOx levels over the Gulf of Aqaba, more investigation was required to assess air quality in the city of Aqaba. Accordingly, long term air quality monitoring study conducted by Jordanian scientists was undertaken during the years 2008-2009. The study was conducted using a fixed air quality station located in the city. Results of this study indicated that topography of the city, with mountains surrounding the city from the east, played a major role in the air masses recirculation and hence the transport of primary pollutants, including NOx from the southern industrial area and the transportation emissions into the northern part of the city. However, high O3 episodes were found to be associated with northern wind in the absence of air masses recirculation indicating the role of long range transport in causing these elevated levels. Thus, based on the results of these studies and in order to reduce the potential health impacts of O3 and its precursors in downwind areas, strategies to control these pollutants should be developed. These strategies should be based on better energy, traffic and industrial management since these are the three main pollution sources. The strategies should include more efficient use of raw materials and energy, better combustion and production technologies that utilize less fuel and emit less pollutant. Measures should include controlling precursors' emissions at the sources located along the east Mediterranean coast, mainly power generation facilities, oil refineries, ports activities, and traffic. In addition, local emissions in the region such as emissions in the Gulf of Aqaba should be reduced by adopting strategies that include the use of cleaner fuel (industry, ships, and vehicles), e

Alsawair, Jihad Khalaf

394

Analysis of clinical records of dental patients attending Jordan University Hospital: Documentation of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze clinical records of dental patients attending the Dental Department at the University of Jordan Hospital: a teaching hospital in Jordan. Analysis aimed at determining whether dental specialists properly documented the drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections given to their patients. Methods: Dental records of the Dental Department at the Jordan University Hospital were reviewed during the period from April 3rd until April 26th 2007 along with the issued prescriptions during that period. Results: A total of 1000 records were reviewed with a total of 53 prescriptions issued during that period. Thirty records documented the prescription by stating the category of the prescribed drug. Only 13 records stated the generic or the trade names of the prescribed drugs. Of these, 5 records contained the full elements of a prescription. As for local anesthetic injections, the term LA used was found in 22 records while the names and quantities of the local anesthetics used were documented in only 13 records. Only 5 records documented the full elements of a local anesthetic injection. Conclusion: The essential data of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections were poorly documented by the investigated group of dental specialists. It is recommended that the administration of the hospital and the dental department implement clear and firm guidelines for dental practitioners in particular to do the required documentation procedure. PMID:19209291

Dar-Odeh, Najla; Ryalat, Soukaina; Shayyab, Mohammad; Abu-Hammad, Osama

2008-01-01

395

Anthropogenic Influence On Groundwater Quality In Jericho and And Adjoining Wadis (Lower Jordan Valley, Palestine)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lower Jordan Valley is part of the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift. The graben is filled by sedmiments of limnological and marine origin. Towards the Dead Sea, the occurance of gipseous and salty sediments on the valley floor increase. The southern part of the Lower Jordan Valley, where the city of Jericho is situated, is an arid area (<150 mm precipitation/year), with less amount of exploitable fresh groundwater or surface water. Jericho was founded on an alluvial fan, closely to the western mountain range in front of mouth of Wadi Qilt. The fan serves as reservoir for infiltrating water from wadi runoff and groundwater from the crataceous aquifers of the western shoulder. The fan is surrounded by unsuitable aquifers of the graben, which are filled with saline water. The aim of this study, which takes place inside the multilateral SMART-project, is to understand the vulnerability of the Jericho groundwater aquifers in connection with lowering the groundwater table by overexploitation and the intensively use of pesticides Jericho and its vicinity are of most importance for the Palestinians. However, beside the about 25,000 residents, the tourism industry and the vital agriculture depend on sufficient and expoitable fresh water resources. Because the demand of water is increasing, overexpoitaion takes place. Due to over extraction of groundwater a huge depression cone is evolving during the dry season which is filled up again according to the groundwater recharge in the rainy season. Concomitantly, depression cone in the fresh water aquifers leads to an infiltration of the surrounding saltwater. The amount of saltwater which infiltrates into the freshwater resource was calculated by different stable isotope methods (d2H, d18O) and hydrochemical analyses of wellwater. The agriculture is main consumer of groundwater - over 60% of the pumped water is used for inefficient irrigation. Additionally, an intensive use of pesticides in concentrated liquid and gaseous forms for vegetable gardening hold the danger to pollute the groundwater via irrigation return flow. This return flow most probably endangers the quality of the water resource, because shallow wells nearby extract it directly from the underground. However, one result of the first screening campaign concerning pesticide remnants in the groundwater wells of Jericho, just traces have been detected. Thus, the higher amount of chemicals is retained by the soil during infiltration of irrigated water. The detected low concentrations in groundwater of the fan may be the result of outleaching from agricultural areas from the mountain range. The flood water of Wadi Qilt infiltrates partly in the fluviatil sediments. The ongoing investigations in the Wadi Qilt-Jericho area include an approach of combined hydrochemical and hydraulic studies to simulate the complex groundwater system at the edge of the graben and to prepare a sustainable groundwater management strategy for the area of Jericho.

Geyer, S.; Khayat, S.; Roediger, T.; Siebert, C.

2008-12-01

396

Quantifying selected morphometric characteristics for Jordanian side of the Jordan river basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Jordanian part of the Jordan river basin is almost 3679.692 km2. The river flows within the Jordan Rift Valley, a structurally complicated region which is cover almost by Upper Cretaceous chalky marls, bituminous limestone and nodular limestone, while the Quaternary sediments are mainly fluvitile deposits and Lisan marls. Other deposits are Tertiary and Jurassic. The present study includes the selected drainage basin characteristics, part of these characteristics refer as primary characteristics measurements and the others are found and concluded from the primary drainage basin characteristics and name as calculated basin characteristics. The drainage pattern is mainly dendritic but in some part is shows parallel pattern but not very mature. To simplify the study more and based on the detailed analysis of the drainage selected characteristics of the study area using various techniques and both topographic and geologic maps, the Jordan river basin is furtherly divided into 10 sub basin. Keywords: Jordan side of Jordan River Basin, Drainage Basin Morphology (Primary Basin Characteristics measurements, Calculated Basin Characteristics), Jordan. Table (1): Combined (Primary + Calculated) Basin Characteristics, Based on Toposheets 1:50,000 and Equations. Code Name of Catchment Area TDA (km2) 1 NCDA (km2) 2 BL (km2) 3 BP (km2) Total 4 BS (m) area 5 BR (m) 6 CDA (km2) 7 BW (km2) 8 SF 9 A Wadi Arab 413.905 302.02 239.3 27.8 34.4 636 ?111. 0.467 512.42 B Wadi Zeglab 130.039 95.23 95 15.7 25 966 32.81 0.37 256.26 C Wadi Jurum 84.62 50.28 61.6 22.4 36.36 400 34.34 ?1.7 34.4 D Wadi Yabis 208.02 150.930 122.1 25.2 46.29 400 57.09 0.47 259.78 E Wadi Kufanga 214.564 189.953 120.9 19.3 41.66 123 26.61 0.22 549.55 F Wadi Rajib 405.6 374.23 118.5 29.5 37.33 1285 31.37 0.27 438.88 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 476.293 394.83 258.1 29 28.56 1277 81.46 0.32 806.56 H Wadi el Mallaha 554.251 485.1 ?385 ?35 ?48.25 ?1435 69.25 0.18 ?2142.7 I Wadi Nimrin ?601.9 ?520.3 282.5 30 32.75 1032 81.6 0.29 974.13 J Wadi el Tarfa 590.5 507.40 277.9 27.9 40.33 1050 75.52 0.27 1029.25 Code Name of Catchment areaER 10 RB 11 CR 12 RR m/km 13 MCL (km) 14 TSL (km) 15 MCS (m/km) 16MCSR 17 A Wadi Arab 0.0499 402.25 0.742 22.88 33.4 157.8 52.78 0.139 B Wadi Zeglab 0.071 201.55 0.751 ?61.53 25.1 15.9 31.87 0.167 C Wadi Jurum ?0.193 27.00 1.078 17.86 15.3 61.6 26.14 ?0.248 D Wadi Yabis 0.070 203.92 0.941 15.87 23.7 122.1 39.38 0.194 E Wadi Kufanga 0.048 431.42 1.055 6.37 24.8 120.9 64.52 0.205 F Wadi Rajib 0.054 344.52 ?1.486 43.53 27.35 118.5 16.09 0.232 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 0.0398 633.15 0.906 44.35 ?43.7 258.1 26.64 0.169 H Wadi el Mallaha 0.024 ?1681. 1.186 41 23.5 ?285.7 ?68.48 0.061 I Wadi Nimrin 0.036 764.69 0.937 34.4 31.5 282.5 25.82 0.111 J Wadi el Tarfa 0.031 807.96 1.38 37.63 26.2 277.9 48.35 0.094. Code Name of Catchment AreaSD km2 18 CCM km2/km 19 MCSP 20 SR 21 RN m/km 22 FOS 23 DF 24 A Wadi Arab 1.411 0.71 4.59 1.53 897.4 57 0.51 B Wadi Zeglab 0.457 ?2.188 4.45 1.27 441.46 25 0.72 C Wadi Jurum 1.793 0.558 2.99 0.72 717.2 23 0.67 D Wadi Yabis 2.139 0.468 3.78 0.58 855.6 21 0.37 E Wadi Kufanga 4.543 0.220 3.09 ?1.55 558.8 20 0.75 F Wadi Rajib 3.778 0.265 6.85 0.43 4850.95 42 1.34 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 3.168 0.316 ?8.47 0.93 4045.53 73 0.896 H Wadi el Mallaha ?5.569 0.179 2.84 1.42 ?7991.51 ?159 2.26 I Wadi Nimrin 3.462 0.289 6.20 0.79 3572.8 60 0.74 J Wadi el Tarfa 3.679 0.271 3.77 1.2 3862.95 72 ?4.64 Continue to Table (1), Legend of Combined (Primary + Calculated) Basin Characteristics Lowest value . ? Highest value. Primary drainage Basin Characteristics TDA Total drainage Area NCDA Non-contributing drainage area BL Basin length BP Basin perimeter BS Average basin slope BR Basin relief MCL Main channel length TSL Total stream length MCS Main channel slope FOS No. of first order stream Calculated Basin Characteristics CDA Contributing drainage area BW Effective basin width SF Slope Factor ER Elongation ratio RB Rotundity of basin CR Compactness ratio RR Relative Relief MCSR Main Channel sinuosity ratio SD Stream

Abu Rukah, Y.

2009-04-01

397

Surface water management tool for arid lands of Jordan using GIS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Jordan as well as most of the developing countries located in the and regions, water is a priority issue at national and individual levels. Several programs and management practices are in place to conserve the water resources and implement new water supplies to meet the demand of various sectors of the water users. With very high demand on the ground water resources, the limited surface water becomes a promising option as a new and innovative water source. The limited rainfall amounts that fall over wide areas of the and lands of Jordan (called the Badia) are of significant quantity and due to lack of proper management, the water is lost due to high evaporation rate. Wadi Salma catchment is 95.63 km2 located in the northeast part of the study area was selected to establish rainfall-runoff records. Also field experiments were performed at various parts of the study area to define the hydrologic response. Rainfall-runoff records showed a runoff coefficient of 14--24% for Wadi Salma Catchment. Rainfall simulations tests were used to estimate Curve Numbers (CN); high values (93.4--95.5) were estimated for different land surfaces. Also infiltration tests showed higher initial infiltration rate (fo) of 2.5 mm/min--3.7 mm/min for the channel beds and nearly the same final infiltration rate ( fc) of 0.2 mm/min--0.6 mm/min for all parts. A GIS based simulation tool was developed to simulate the runoff for the study area and two storms were used to test the model. Using initial abstraction (Ia) as 42% of the potential soil storage (S') was found to be the best estimation for rainfall losses calculation. Using the Muskingum routing method, a traveling parameter (K) equal to the traveling time and weighting parameter (x) of 0.18 were estimated for the study area. The simulation tool calculated the peak discharge and runoff volume with acceptable accuracy for the whole catchment; the difference in peak discharge estimation was 4% --6% and in runoff volume is 7% for the first storm and 10% for the second storm.

Alayyash, Saad Mohammed

398

Adverse Reactions to Field Vaccination Against Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan.  

PubMed

Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is an emerging disease in the Middle East region and has been recently reported in Jordan. The aim of this study was to investigate the adverse reactions that were reported after vaccine administration. Geographical areas enrolled in the study were free of the disease and away from the outbreak governorate. Sixty-three dairy cattle farms, with a total of 19,539 animals, were included in the study. Of those, 56 farms reported adverse clinical signs after vaccine administration. The duration between vaccine administration and appearance of adverse clinical signs ranged from 1 to 20days (Mean=10.3, SD3.9). Clinical signs were similar to those observed with natural cases of lumpy skin disease. These were mainly fever, decreased feed intake, decreased milk production and variable sized cutaneous nodules (a few millimetres to around 2cm in diameter) that could be seen anywhere on the body (head, neck, trunk, perineum), udder, and/or teats. Nodules were raised and firm initially and then formed dry scabs that could be peeled off the skin. The characteristic deep 'sit fast' appearance was rarely seen and most lesions were superficial. Some cattle had swollen lymph nodes, while a few pregnant animals aborted. The percentage of affected cattle ranged from 0.3 to 25% (Mean=8, SD5.1). Fever, decreased feed intake, and decreased milk production were seen in 83.9, 85.7, and 94.6% in cattle on the affected farms, respectively. All affected cattle displayed skin nodules over their entire bodies, while 33.9 and 7.1% of the affected farms reported nodular lesions present on the udders and teats, respectively. No mortalities were reported due to vaccine adverse reactions. Duration (course) of clinical signs ranged from 3 to 20days (Mean=13.7, SD4.1). Two types of LSD vaccines were used by the farmers in this study. The first one was a sheep pox virus (SPPV) vaccine derived from the RM65 isolate [Jovivac() , manufactured by Jordan Bioindustries Centre (JOVAC)] and the other an unlabelled one, which was later identified using PCR as a strain of lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV). Blood and skin samples collected from cattle vaccinated with the LSDV vaccine were positive for LSDV using both general and species-specific PCR primers, whereas those from cattle vaccinated with the Jovivac() vaccine were negative. Adverse reactions observed in cattle after administration of the LSDV vaccine were reported to be more severe than those seen after Jovivac() vaccine administration and were comparable with clinical signs observed in natural infections. PMID:25098267

Abutarbush, S M; Hananeh, W M; Ramadan, W; Al Sheyab, O M; Alnajjar, A R; Al Zoubi, I G; Knowles, N J; Bachanek-Bankowska, K; Tuppurainen, E S M

2014-08-01

399

Identification of recharge areas and flow paths by natural tracers; The upper Jordan spring system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mt. Hermon ridge, the product of a tectonic uplift along the Dead Sea transform, rises to a maximum height of 2814 meters above msl. The ridge gives rise to several large karstic springs which discharge at the foot of the Mountain in Syria, Lebanon and Israel. Geologically, the ridge is an anticlinarium, exposing mainly Jurassic limestones. Flood events are rare despite high rainfall (average of 1600 mm/yr at the summit). The annual discharge of 230 MCM of the Dan spring makes it one of the largest karstic springs in the Middle East and the main source of the upper Jordan River. Another important source of the Jordan River is the Banias spring (70 MCM/yr) which is located only a few km east of the Dan and discharges from similar Jurassic limestones. Downstream of the Banias and in its immediate vicinity, the smaller Officer's spring emerges. Despite their proximity and similar geological setting, the three springs display some significant differences. While the Dan and the Officer's springs exhibit relatively constant, though different, discharge rates, temperatures and chemical compositions throughout the year, these parameters change seasonally in the Banias. Of the three, the Officer's spring has the highest temperature and salinity. The most striking difference in composition among the Dan, Banias and Officer's springs is in their sulfate content (7, 31-57 and 115 mg/l, respectively), as opposed to relatively similar chloride concentrations (6, 10 and 11 mg/l). Sulfate also exhibits distinct different isotopic compositions (?34SSO_4 = 1.5, 19 and 21 per mil), which suggests a marine source for the excess sulfate. We propose that the Banias spring is derived by mixing of two end members best represented by the Dan and Officer's springs. While the former is the outlet of a relatively shallow and well washed karstic system, the water of the latter flow through deeper parts of the anticline structure. These water encounter and dissolve the evaporitic gypsum of the upper Triassic Muheila Fm. Their deeper circulation leads to higher temperature and stable discharge. Such a model implies that the recharge of the Dan spring occurs over the western flanks of Mt. Hermon, whereas the Officer's spring is recharged at the summit of the geological structure.

Burg, A.; Gavrieli, I.; Bein, A.

2003-04-01

400

Age determinations in the Precambrian basement of the Wadi Araba area, southwest Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Precambrian basement of Jordan belongs to the northern margin of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Age determinations by U-Pb isotopic analyses on sized and magnetic zircon fractions, a monazite and an apatite sample and by Rb-Sr isotopic studies on whole-rocks and minerals of metasedimentary rocks, granodiorites, granites and dykes have elucidated the following events: (1)A major regional high-grade metamorphism accompanied by migmatization and synkinematic plutonism occurred at about 800 Ma according to U-Pb zircon ages of metasediments and granites. (2)During a postkinematic plutonic event between 615 and 600 Ma extensive masses of granodioritic to granitic composition and dykes were emplaced. The U-Pb data of zircons of the rocks yielded upper intercept ages with the concordia consistent with Rb-Sr biotite ages. The Rb-Sr mineral ages of the older metasedimentary rocks document the resetting of the Rb-Sr system due to the thermal pulse at this time. (3)A younger plutonic event produced diorites and dykes at about 570 Ma. The plutonic events are related to the Pan-African orogenic phase. The low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of the plutonic rocks (0.7032-0.7046) correspond to values reported from equivalent rocks throughout the Arabian-Nubian Shield and suggest that no significant portions of ancient sialic crustal material contributed to the generation of the granitic to granodioritic magmas.

Jarrar, Ghaleb; Baumann, Albrecht; Wachendorf, Horst

1983-05-01

401

High-precision radiocarbon dating and historical biblical archaeology in southern Jordan  

PubMed Central

Recent excavations and high-precision radiocarbon dating from the largest Iron Age (IA, ca. 1200500 BCE) copper production center in the southern Levant demonstrate major smelting activities in the region of biblical Edom (southern Jordan) during the 10th and 9th centuries BCE. Stratified radiocarbon samples and artifacts were recorded with precise digital surveying tools linked to a geographic information system developed to control on-site spatial analyses of archaeological finds and model data with innovative visualization tools. The new radiocarbon dates push back by 2 centuries the accepted IA chronology of Edom. Data from Khirbat en-Nahas, and the nearby site of Rujm Hamra Ifdan, demonstrate the centrality of industrial-scale metal production during those centuries traditionally linked closely to political events in Edom's 10th century BCE neighbor ancient Israel. Consequently, the rise of IA Edom is linked to the power vacuum created by the collapse of Late Bronze Age (LB, ca. 1300 BCE) civilizations and the disintegration of the LB Cypriot copper monopoly that dominated the eastern Mediterranean. The methodologies applied to the historical IA archaeology of the Levant have implications for other parts of the world where sacred and historical texts interface with the material record. PMID:18955702

Levy, Thomas E.; Higham, Thomas; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Smith, Neil G.; Ben-Yosef, Erez; Robinson, Mark; Mnger, Stefan; Knabb, Kyle; Schulze, Jrgen P.; Najjar, Mohammad; Tauxe, Lisa

2008-01-01

402

Prevalence and burden of gastrointestinal helminthes among local chickens, in northern Jordan.  

PubMed

We conducted a cross-sectional study from December 2004 to February 2005 and from June 2005 to August 2005. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal and tracheal helminthes among local chickens in northern Jordan. A total of 208 male and female local scavenging chickens were selected randomly. We examined the trachea and gastrointestinal tract of each bird for the presence of helminthes. We recovered three nematode and eight cestode species. No trematodes were found. One hundred and fifty-two birds (73.1%) (95% CI: 67, 79) were infected. The prevalences of different species were as follows: Ascaridia galli female 28%, male 43%; Capillaria obsignata 0.5%; Heterakis gallinarum 33%; Amoebotaenia cuneata 4.3%; Choanotaenia infundibulum female 23%, male 13%; Davainea proglottina 1.4%; Hymenolepsis cantaniana 11%; Hymenolepsis carioca female 35%, male 24%; Raillietina cesticillius female 5%, male 11%; Raillietina echinobothrida 16%; and Raillietina tetragona 18%. The prevalences of A. galli and R. cesticillus were higher in male than female hosts while those of C. infundibulum and H. carioca were higher in females. The median worm burden was 7 (range 0-168) worms per chicken. PMID:18329115

Abdelqader, A; Gauly, M; Wollny, C B A; Abo-Shehada, M N

2008-06-15

403

Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis ser. jordanica (serotype H71), a novel serovariety isolated in Jordan.  

PubMed

The novel strain of Bacillus thuringiensis J112 isolated from a soil sample in Jordan was classified and characterized in terms of toxicity against dipteran and nematode larvae, crystal protein pattern, plasmid profile, and cry gene content. A new name, Bacillus thuringiensis serovariety jordanica (H serotype 71), is proposed for the reference strain J112. The parasporal crystal proteins were toxic to 3(rd) instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster and to 2(nd) stage juveniles of root knot nematodes Meloidogyne javanica and M. incognita, but showed poor mosquitocidal activity towards Culex pipiens molestus and Culiseta longiareolata larvae. Solubilized and trypsin-digested crystal proteins possessed moderate hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that crystals are composed of several polypeptides ranging from 24 to 170 kDa, of which the 20-, 42-, 140-, and 170-kDa proteins were the major components. Analysis of the plasmid pattern of J112 revealed the presence of two large plasmidic bands of about 160 and 205 kbp. PCR with total DNA from strain J112 and specific primers for cry1, cry2, cry3, cry4, and cyt2A genes revealed that cry1, cry3A, cry4, cry5 and cyt2a genes are present. PMID:12783189

Khyami-Horani, Hala; Hajaij, Myriam; Charles, Jean-Franois

2003-07-01

404

The Psychosocial Experience of Adolescents with Haematological Malignancies in Jordan: An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis Study  

PubMed Central

The qualitative research method of interpretive phenomenological analysis was used to explore the lived experience of 14 Jordanian adolescents with haematological malignancies. They were admitted to two hospitals in Jordan and were interviewed for this study twice during the first six months after receiving their diagnosis. The results of this study revealed three themes: (1) Being in hospital, (2) The changing self, and (3) Fearing the unknown. When the participants were hospitalised due to their illness they were removed from their families and friends and prevented from engaging in their normal daily routine. Participants also reported receiving limited emotional and psychological support from health team members during hospitalisation. From the onset of cancer treatments, the bio-psychosocial side effects of the chemotherapy became one of the most distressing factors for participants affecting all aspects of their life and generated uncertainty about their future. The findings add to existing understanding of the lived experiences of cancer patients and in particular Jordanian adolescents. They provide a valuable insight for clinicians into improvements in service delivery to this group of patients. PMID:24550700

2014-01-01

405

Higgs Gravitational Interaction, Weak Boson Scattering, and Higgs Inflation in Jordan and Einstein Frames  

E-print Network

We study gravitational interaction of Higgs boson through the unique dimension-4 operator $\\xi H^\\dag H R$, with $H$ the Higgs doublet and $R$ the Ricci scalar curvature. We analyze the effect of this dimensionless nonminimal coupling $\\xi$ on weak gauge boson scattering in both Jordan and Einstein frames. We explicitly establish the longitudinal-Goldstone boson equivalence theorem with nonzero $\\xi$ coupling in both frames, and analyze the unitarity constraints. We study the $\\xi$-induced weak boson scattering cross sections at O(1-30)TeV scales, and propose to probe the Higgs-gravity coupling via weak boson scattering experiments at the LHC(14TeV) and the next generation pp colliders (50-100TeV). We further extend our study to Higgs inflation, and quantitatively derive the perturbative unitarity bounds via coupled channel analysis, under large field background at the inflation scale. We analyze the unitarity constraints on the parameter space in both the conventional Higgs inflation and the improved models in light of the recent BICEP2 data.

Jing Ren; Zhong-Zhi Xianyu; Hong-Jian He

2014-05-16

406

Moral distress and its correlates among mental health nurses in Jordan.  

PubMed

Moral distress has received much attention in international nursing published work in recent years. However, in the published work, little is known about the moral distress of mental health nurses. The aims of this study were to examine the intensity level of moral distress, to identify the best predictors of moral distress, and to examine relationships of moral distress with burnout, job satisfaction, intention to leave the current job, and both demographic and work-related variables of that group. Employing a descriptive correlational cross-section design and a convenience sampling method, data were collected using the Moral Distress Scale for Psychiatric Nurses, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Job Satisfaction Scale from 130 Jordanian mental health nurses working in the largest psychiatric hospital in Jordan. Results showed that the intensity level of moral distress was found to be moderately high, especially in an 'unethical conduct by caregivers' subscale. Age, income level, nurses' years of experience, and caseloads correlated significantly and negatively with moral distress, while educational level and intention to leave the current job correlated significantly and positively with moral distress. Interestingly, job satisfaction did not significantly correlate with moral distress. Income level, caseloads, burnout level, attending workshops in mental health, and educational level were the best predictors of moral distress. More studies on moral distress and continuing educational interventional programs aimed at minimizing the levels of moral distress and burnout at institutional and individual level are required. PMID:23320816

Hamaideh, Shaher H

2014-02-01

407

Seroprevalence of West Nile, Rift Valley, and sandfly arboviruses in Hashimiah, Jordan.  

PubMed Central

We conducted a serosurvey among patients of a health center in Hashimiah, a Jordanian town of 30,000 inhabitants located near a wastewater treatment plant and its effluent channel. Serum samples from 261 patients >/=5 years of age were assessed for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies against West Nile, sandfly Sicilian, sandfly Naples, and Rift Valley viruses; the seroprevalence of IgG antibodies was 8%, 47%, 30%, and 0%, respectively. Female participants were more likely to have been infected than male. Persons living within 2 km of the treatment plant were more likely to have been infected with West Nile (p=0.016) and sandfly Sicilian (p=0.010) viruses. Raising domestic animals within the house was a risk factor for sandfly Sicilian (p=0.003) but not for sandfly Naples virus (p=0.148). All serum samples were negative for IgM antibodies against the tested viruses. Our study is the first documentation of West Nile and sandfly viruses in Jordan and calls attention to the possible health hazards of living close to wastewater treatment plants and their effluent channels. PMID:10905968

Batieha, A.; Saliba, E. K.; Graham, R.; Mohareb, E.; Hijazi, Y.; Wijeyaratne, P.

2000-01-01

408

A Unique Human-Fox Burial from a Pre-Natufian Cemetery in the Levant (Jordan)  

PubMed Central

New human burials from northern Jordan provide important insights into the appearance of cemeteries and the nature of human-animal relationships within mortuary contexts during the Epipalaeolithic period (c. 23,00011,600 cal BP) in the Levant, reinforcing a socio-ideological relationship that goes beyond predator-prey. Previous work suggests that archaeological features indicative of social complexity occur suddenly during the latest Epipalaeolithic phase, the Natufian (c. 14,50011,600 cal BP). These features include sedentism, cemeteries, architecture, food production, including animal domestication, and burials with elaborate mortuary treatments. Our findings from the pre-Natufian (Middle Epipalaeolithic) cemetery of Uyun al-Hammam demonstrate that joint human-animal mortuary practices appear earlier in the Epipalaeolithic. We describe the earliest human-fox burial in the Near East, where the remains of dogs have been found associated with human burials at a number of Natufian sites. This is the first time that a fox has been documented in association with human interments pre-dating the Natufian and with a particular suite of grave goods. Analysis of the human and animal bones and their associated artefacts provides critical data on the nature and timing of these newly-developing relationships between people and animals prior to the appearance of domesticated dogs in the Natufian. PMID:21298094

Maher, Lisa A.; Stock, Jay T.; Finney, Sarah; Heywood, James J. N.; Miracle, Preston T.; Banning, Edward B.

2011-01-01

409

Chemical and Mineralogical study of Nabataean painted pottery from Petra, Jordan.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nabataean pottery is distinguished by the thinness of its walls, which were sometimes only 1.5 mm thick. It was a pinkish/red color, often decorated by hand with dark brown flower and leaf designs. The typical (egg-shell) shallow open bowls productions were very difficult to make on the potter's wheel, demonstrating how skilled their craftsmen were Nabataean painted pottery from Petra Jordan were examined in order to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the raw pigment materials used for their production and to elucidate the ceramic manufacturing technologies employed. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) were the analytical techniques used. The initial examination of the ceramic shreds in optical microscopy showed all samples to be identical in their paint and paste textures. The mineralogical composition of the paste (unpainted outer surface) is typical of a clay poor in calcium and fired at moderate-high temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere. The paste is composed of quartz, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, hematite, dolomite, and calcite. The latter two phases might be attributed to post-depositional contamination, since examination with both optical and scanning electron microscopes show fine carbonate particles deposited in the pores and cracks of the shred. The paint on the inner surface of the vessel, on the other hand is composed of hematite as a major phase with only some quartz and plagioclase.

Alawneh, Firas; Bala'awi, Fadi

410

Screening for soil streptomycetes from North Jordan that can produce herbicidal compounds.  

PubMed

A total of 231 different soil Streptomyces isolates were recovered from 16 different locations in North Jordan. They were assessed for their phytotoxic activity on seeds of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) placed adjacent to a 2 cm wide Streptomyces culture strips grown at 28C degrees for 3 weeks on starch casein nitrate (SCN) agar. Phytotoxicity was ascertained on the basis of suppressed seed germination, discoloration of the root tip, reduced root and the shoot growth and eventual death of the root. Twenty one of the isolates exhibited adverse effect against growth of germinated cucumber seeds, germination and growth of ryegrass seeds. Using filter paper bioassay method, culture filtrate from the SCN broth of the isolate R9; identified as Streptomyces aburaviensis, significantly inhibited seed germination, radicle and shoot growth ofryegrass, reduced radicle and shoot growth of cucumber and suppressed the shoot growth of milk thistle (Silybum marianum L.). Also, culture filtrate from the glucose-peptone-molasses (GPM) broth diluted (1:1) with sterilized distilled water caused complete inhibition of seed germination of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.). Dichloromethane extracted fraction of S. aburaviensis (strain R9) culture filtrate from GPM broth completely inhibited seed germination of ryegrass when applied at doses of 3 and 5 mg of dry weight, and the seedling growth of cucumber and milk thistle was severely reduced by the same doses. PMID:19275043

Bataineh, Sereen M B; Saadoun, Ismail; Hameed, Khalid M; Ababneh, Qotaiba

2008-01-01

411

Industrial apiculture in the Jordan valley during Biblical times with Anatolian honeybees  

PubMed Central

Although texts and wall paintings suggest that bees were kept in the Ancient Near East for the production of precious wax and honey, archaeological evidence for beekeeping has never been found. The Biblical term honey commonly was interpreted as the sweet product of fruits, such as dates and figs. The recent discovery of unfired clay cylinders similar to traditional hives still used in the Near East at the site of Tel Reov in the Jordan valley in northern Israel suggests that a large-scale apiary was located inside the town, dating to the 10thearly 9th centuries B.C.E. This paper reports the discovery of remains of honeybee workers, drones, pupae, and larvae inside these hives. The exceptional preservation of these remains provides unequivocal identification of the clay cylinders as the most ancient beehives yet found. Morphometric analyses indicate that these bees differ from the local subspecies Apis mellifera syriaca and from all subspecies other than A. m. anatoliaca, which presently resides in parts of Turkey. This finding suggests either that the Western honeybee subspecies distribution has undergone rapid change during the last 3,000 years or that the ancient inhabitants of Tel Reov imported bees superior to the local bees in terms of their milder temper and improved honey yield. PMID:20534519

Bloch, Guy; Francoy, Tiago M.; Wachtel, Ido; Panitz-Cohen, Nava; Fuchs, Stefan; Mazar, Amihai

2010-01-01

412

Pain Assessment and Management in Critically ill Intubated Patients in Jordan: A Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to describe: (1) pain indicators used by nurses and physicians to assess pain, (2) pain management interventions (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) used by nurses, and (3) indicators used by nurses to verify pain intervention effectiveness. Methodology A total of 301 medical records of currently admitted patients from six different ICUs in Jordan were reviewed using a data collection instrument developed by Glinas et al. (2004) Pain-related indicators were classified into non-observable (patients self-reports of pain) and observable (physiological and behavioral) categories. Results Only 105 (35%) of a total 301 reviewed medical records contained pain assessment data. From these medical records, 15 pain episodes were collected altogether. Observable indicators documented 98% of the 115 pain episodes. Patients self-reports of pain were documented only 1.7% of the time. In 78% and 46% of the 115 pain episodes, pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain management were documented, respectively. Only 37% of the pain episodes were reassessed with self- report (1%) and observable indicators (36%) to determine the effectiveness of the interventions. Conclusion Pain documentation for assessment, management, and reassessment was lacking and needs improvement. PMID:25505864

Ayasrah, Shahnaz Mohammad; ONeill, Teresa Mary; Abdalrahim, Maysoon Saleem; Sutary, Manal Mohammed; Kharabsheh, Muna Suliman

2014-01-01

413

Industrial apiculture in the Jordan valley during Biblical times with Anatolian honeybees.  

PubMed

Although texts and wall paintings suggest that bees were kept in the Ancient Near East for the production of precious wax and honey, archaeological evidence for beekeeping has never been found. The Biblical term "honey" commonly was interpreted as the sweet product of fruits, such as dates and figs. The recent discovery of unfired clay cylinders similar to traditional hives still used in the Near East at the site of Tel Re ov in the Jordan valley in northern Israel suggests that a large-scale apiary was located inside the town, dating to the 10th-early 9th centuries B.C.E. This paper reports the discovery of remains of honeybee workers, drones, pupae, and larvae inside these hives. The exceptional preservation of these remains provides unequivocal identification of the clay cylinders as the most ancient beehives yet found. Morphometric analyses indicate that these bees differ from the local subspecies Apis mellifera syriaca and from all subspecies other than A. m. anatoliaca, which presently resides in parts of Turkey. This finding suggests either that the Western honeybee subspecies distribution has undergone rapid change during the last 3,000 years or that the ancient inhabitants of Tel Re ov imported bees superior to the local bees in terms of their milder temper and improved honey yield. PMID:20534519

Bloch, Guy; Francoy, Tiago M; Wachtel, Ido; Panitz-Cohen, Nava; Fuchs, Stefan; Mazar, Amihai

2010-06-22

414

Physically based distributed hydrological modelling of the Upper Jordan catchment and investigation of effective model equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sufficient freshwater availability in the water scarce environment of the Upper Jordan Catchment (UJC) is a central prerequisite for peaceful agricultural and industrial development. Hydrological modelling is required to understand terrestrial water balance and to provide scientifically sound estimates on water availability. This article aims at two related objectives: First the water balance of the UJC, a hydrogeologically complex catchment located at the borders of Israel, Syria and the Lebanon, is investigated. It is for the first time that a physically based model is set up for this region that accounts both for the entire terrestrial water balance and in particular for the groundwater-surface water interaction. It is shown that the model is able to describe observed river discharges satisfactorily. Secondly, it is investigated if observed and simulated runoff components can be explained by simple lumped approaches based on 1) linear filter theory and 2) neural networks and what the number of degrees of freedom for the runoff components is. It is exemplary shown for the Ayun subcatchment of the UJC that the simulated river discharge, the direct runoff component and the interflow runoff component as modelled by the physically based distributed hydrological model WaSiM can be described by simple effective equations with only 3 to 5 degrees of freedom. Application of simple lumped approaches to observed river discharge values showed much weaker performance.

Kunstmann, H.; Heckl, A.; Rimmer, A.

2006-09-01

415

Higgs gravitational interaction, weak boson scattering, and Higgs inflation in Jordan and Einstein frames  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study gravitational interaction of Higgs boson through the unique dimension-4 operator ?HHScript R, with H the Higgs doublet and Script R the Ricci scalar curvature. We analyze the effect of this dimensionless nonminimal coupling ? on weak gauge boson scattering in both Jordan and Einstein frames. We explicitly establish the longitudinal-Goldstone equivalence theorem with nonzero ? coupling in both frames, and analyze the unitarity constraints. We study the ?-induced weak boson scattering cross sections at Script O(1-30) TeV scales, and propose to probe the Higgs-gravity coupling via weak boson scattering experiments at the LHC (14 TeV) and the next generation pp colliders (50-100 TeV). We further extend our study to Higgs inflation, and quantitatively derive the perturbative unitarity bounds via coupled channel analysis, under large field background at the inflation scale. We analyze the unitarity constraints on the parameter space in both the conventional Higgs inflation and the improved models in light of the recent BICEP2 data.

Ren, Jing; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian

2014-06-01

416

Hashemite, Ba(Cr,S)O4, a new mineral from Jordan.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hashemite, Ba(Cr,S)O4, the isostructural chromate analogue of baryte, has been found in west-central Jordan. It is associated with chromian ettringite, apatite and calcite in a phosphatic carbonate rock analogous to the Hatrurim formation in Israel. The mineral is orthorhombic, Pnma, with a 9.112(2), b 5.541(1), c 7.343(1) A, Z = 4. Strongest XRD lines are 3.516(100), 3.171(80), 3.669(60), 2.175(60), 2.150(45) A. Hashemite occurs as small, euhedral, dark brown, commonly zoned crystals with an average D 4.59 g/cm3 and H. 31/2. It is biaxial positive; dark varieties have alpha 1.952(2), beta 1.960(2), gamma 1.977(2); light varieties have alpha 1.810(2), beta 1.813(2), gamma 1.824(2), 2Vgamma 35o-57o.-J.A.Z.

Hauff, P.L.; Foord, E.E.; Rosenblum, S.

1983-01-01

417

Einstein and Jordan frames reconciled: a frame-invariant approach to scalar-tensor cosmology  

E-print Network

Scalar-Tensor theories of gravity can be formulated in different frames, most notably, the Einstein and the Jordan one. While some debate still persists in the literature on the physical status of the different frames, a frame transformation in Scalar-Tensor theories amounts to a local redefinition of the metric, and then should not affect physical results. We analyze the issue in a cosmological context. In particular, we define all the relevant observables (redshift, distances, cross-sections, ...) in terms of frame-independent quantities. Then, we give a frame-independent formulation of the Boltzmann equation, and outline its use in relevant examples such as particle freeze-out and the evolution of the CMB photon distribution function. Finally, we derive the gravitational equations for the frame-independent quantities at first order in perturbation theory. From a practical point of view, the present approach allows the simultaneous implementation of the good aspects of the two frames in a clear and straightforward way.

R. Catena; M. Pietroni; L. Scarabello

2007-09-19

418

Water levels and water-level changes in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers, Twin Cities metropolitan area, Minnesota, 1971-80  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mississippi, Minnesota, and St. Croix Rivers greatly influence flow patterns in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer. Water generally flows toward these streams from surrounding water-level highs. Heavy pumping has caused only localized cones of depression. In contrast, pumping in Minneapolis and St. Paul has greatly influenced ground-water flow in the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifer, resulting in a large cone of depression. Between 1971 and 1980 average water levels in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer changed less than 5 feet in most of the study area, while average water levels in the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifer rose as much as 60 feet in the center of the cone of depression. Water-level data suggest that (1) little variation of annual pumpage between 1971 and 1980 from the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer produced generally stable water levels in that aquifer, (2) decreased annual pumpage from 1971 to 1980 from the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifer caused rising water levels in that aquifer, and (3) a greater seasonal component of pumpage for the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifer than for the Prairie du Chien-Jordan produced larger and more widespread seasonal water-level declines in the Mount Simon-Hinckley than in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan, particularly during dry years. (USGS)

Schoenberg, Michael

1984-01-01

419

Provenance of north Gondwana Cambrian-Ordovician sandstone: U-Pb SHRIMP dating of detrital zircons from Israel and Jordan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A vast sequence of quartz-rich sandstone was deposited over North Africa and Arabia during Early Palaeozoic times, in the aftermath of Neoproterozoic Pan-African orogeny and the amalgamation of Gondwana. This rock sequence forms a relatively thin sheet (1-3 km thick) that was transported over a very gentle slope and deposited over a huge area. The sense of transport indicates unroofing of Gondwana terranes but the exact provenance of the siliciclastic deposit remains unclear. Detrital zircons from Cambrian arkoses that immediately overlie the Neoproterozoic Arabian-Nubian Shield in Israel and Jordan yielded Neoproterozoic U-Pb ages (900-530 Ma), suggesting derivation from a proximal source such as the Arabian-Nubian Shield. A minor fraction of earliest Neoproterozoic and older age zircons was also detected. Upward in the section, the proportion of old zircons increases and reaches a maximum (40%) in the Ordovician strata of Jordan. The major earliest Neoproterozoic and older age groups detected are 0.95-1.1, 1.8-1.9 and 2.65-2.7 Ga, among which the 0.95-1.1 Ga group is ubiquitous and makes up as much as 27% in the Ordovician of Jordan, indicating it is a prominent component of the detrital zircon age spectra of northeast Gondwana. The pattern of zircon ages obtained in the present work reflects progressive blanketing of the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield by Cambrian-Ordovician sediments and an increasing contribution from a more distal source, possibly south of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. The significant changes in the zircon age signal reflect many hundreds of kilometres of southward migration of the provenance. ?? 2006 Cambridge University Press.

Kolodner, K.; Avigad, D.; McWilliams, M.; Wooden, J.L.; Weissbrod, T.; Feinstein, S.

2006-01-01

420

Teaching Science in Engineering Freshman Class in Private University in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A United Nations initiative for the Arab region that established and calculated National Intellectual Capital Index has shown that Jordan is the wealthiest Arab country in its National Human Capital Index (i.e. metrics: literacy rate, number of tertiary schools per capita, percentage of primary teachers with required qualifications, number of tertiary students per capita, cumulative tertiary graduates per capita, percentage of male grade 1 net intake, percentage of female grade 1 net intake) and National Market Capital Index (i.e. metrics: high-technology exports as a percentage of GDP, number of patents granted by USPTO per capita, number of meetings hosted per capita) despite its low ranking when it comes to National Financial Capital (i.e. metric: GDP per capita). The societal fabric in Jordan fully justifies this: the attention paid to education is extreme and sometimes is considered fanatic (e.g. marriage of a lot of couples needs to wait until both graduate from the university). Also, the low financial capital has forced a lot of people to become resourceful in order to provide decent living standard to their beloved ones. This reality is partially manifested in the sharp increase in the number of universities (i.e. 10 public and 20 private ones) relative to a population of around 6.5 million. Once in an engineering freshman classroom, it is totally up to the lecturers teaching science in private Jordanian universities to excel in their performance and find a way to inject the needed scientific concepts into the students' brains. For that, clips from movies that are relevant to the topics and truthful in their scientific essence have been tested (e.g. to explain the pressure on humans due to rapidly increasing "g" force, a clip from the movie "Armageddon" proved very helpful to Physics 101 students, and entertaining at the same time), plastic toys have also been tested to illustrate simple physical concepts to the same students (e.g. a set called The Junior Engineer covers vast concepts relevant to Newton's Laws and Work-Energy Theorem, while originally aimed at 3-year old kids), and YouTube has become so rich in it scientific content that it has not been hard to find any experiment or simulation there so that the students connect the dry blackboard and chalk to real life. As freshmen are still immature and sensing their way through, wondering if they will be able to get the title of Engineer or not, the usage of such familiar mediums and tools such as movies, toys, videos and simulations to illustrate basics to them has proved efficient and is regarded as an ideal ice-breaker towards a challenging journey of engineering classes. As long as the scientific content is not compromised, we believe that more mediums should be tested. This paper will highlight these affairs.

Hawarey, M. M.; Malkawi, M. I.

2012-04-01

421

Assessing the potential boron toxicity of soils irrigated with reclaimed water in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron (B) is a potentially plant toxic ion and is present in domestic treated wastewater (reclaimed water) in Jordan in concentrations of around 1 mg L-1. As reclaimed water is used for irrigation in Jordan the concentration of B gives potential for detrimental effects on crop productivity. Such effects are dependent on the crop type and importantly, the concentration of B in the soil solution and on the readily exchanged component of the soil solid phase. Boron also behaves complexly in soil because it has sorbing tendencies. The sorption of B onto the soil solid phase removes it from solution and effectively reduces its toxicity potential to crops. However, desorption raises its availability in the soil solution and increases the potential for toxicity effects. To investigate B sorption behaviour in Jordanian soils, experimental work was conducted to describe how B sorption and desorption is affected by the concentration of B in the soil solution. Boron isotherms (to show the amount of B sorbed onto the soil surface relative to the amount of B remaining in the soil solution at constant pressure and temperature) were created which showed that the soil had a high affinity to adsorb B and that desorption of B occurs as the concentration of the soil solution is reduced (for example, through the addition of freshwater) to create a new equilibrium between the concentration of B in the soil solution and the amount of B sorbed onto the soil particles. This suggests that freshwater inputs to soil to which B has previously sorbed onto the soil solid phase during irrigation with reclaimed water will lead to the desorption of B, possibly raising the concentration in the soil solution. To test this hypothesis, the B concentration in the soil solution (B in the soil saturation paste extract) of soils irrigated with reclaimed water was determined. This work confirmed that soils to which a greater volume of reclaimed irrigation water had been applied had a higher concentration of B in the soil solution compared to soils to which less water had been applied. The difference was particularly noticeable when the concentration of B was compared to the concentration of non-sorbing chloride in the soil. Boron concentration was also determined by the established method of mannitol calcium chloride abstraction to give both the soluble and specifically and non-specifically sorbed B in the soil. This analysis showed good correlation between the concentration of B in the soil saturation extract and the concentration of B abstracted by mannitol calcium chloride. This correlation effectively describes the proportion of B in the soil which is soluble (determined in the saturation extract) and that which is readily desorbed (the concentration of B abstracted with mannitol calcium chloride minus the concentration in the saturation extract). Further work is needed into this relationship as it could offer a means by which the adsorption capacity of the soil can be rapidly appraised and the leaching requirement (the amount of water needed to desorb and transfer the B through the soil) can be better predicted.

Carr, Gemma; Nortcliff, Stephen

2010-05-01

422

Stability of n-Lie homomorphisms and Jordan n-Lie homomorphisms on n-Lie algebras  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The motivation of this paper is to apply the Hypers-Ulam stability problems of some kinds of functional equations to the classes of n-Lie homomorphisms and n-Lie algebras by using the structures of n-Lie homomorphisms and n-Lie algebras. In this paper, the generalized Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability of n-Lie homomorphisms and Jordan n-Lie homomorphisms on n-Lie algebras associated to the generalized Cauchy-Jensen-Rassias additive functional equation are investigated using the fixed point methods.

Kim, Seong Sik; Rassias, John Michael; Cho, Yeol Je; Kim, Soo Hawn

2013-05-01

423

Public awareness of the abuse of herbs and drugs to decrease body weight: a novel national survey in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesThe aim of this investigation was to measure the degree of public preferences regarding the various weight-loss practices\\u000a and to assess the level of awareness regarding the risks and health hazards associated with the application of unhealthful\\u000a measures to lose weight.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MethodsApproximately 30,000 individuals selected from various regions in Jordan filled in a self?reported questionnaire. Participants\\u000a were interviewed by welltrained

Saafan A. Al-Safi; Nehad M. Ayoub; Abeer M. Ayoub; Enaam Al-Momany; Imad Al-Doghim; Mosab Al-Balas; Ahmad S. Alkofahi; Faisal H. Aboul-Enein; Basil H. Aboul-Enein

2008-01-01

424

Condom use and HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Introduction To identify sociocultural determinants of self-reported condom use and HIV testing and examine variables related to accessibility, motivation and obstacles among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jordan. Design Cross-sectional study among MSM who were identified through services of a local non-governmental organization (NGO). Methods Respondents were studied with a semi-structured interview based on the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC) framework. The vignette-based EMIC interview considered locally relevant HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, risk perception and perceived causes, as well as awareness of services and sources of support. Results Of the 97 respondents, 27% reported that they used a condom at last intercourse; 38% had been tested at least once for HIV. Positive determinants of condom use were higher education level, acknowledging MSM as a high-risk group, seeking advice from a medical doctor and the perceived causes sex with prostitutes and sex with animals. Awareness of available treatment was a positive determinant of HIV testing. Blood transfusion as a perceived cause and asking advice from friends were negative determinants. Conclusions Jordanian MSM seem to be aware of the risk of HIV infection and effective prevention methods, and they are willing to be tested for HIV. Our findings addressed the importance of the sexual meaning of HIV/AIDS on the control of HIV/AIDS among MSM. More effective engagement of NGOs and MSM in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS is needed, enlisting the support of medical doctors and community health workers. Peer education should be strategically strengthened. Political commitment is needed to mitigate social stigma. PMID:24695243

Alkaiyat, Abdulsalam; Schaetti, Christian; Liswi, Mohammad; Weiss, Mitchell G

2014-01-01

425

Ophthalmology residency training in Jordan: an evaluation of quality and comparison with international standards  

PubMed Central

AIM To evaluate Jordanian ophthalmology residency programs in achieving competencies outlined by the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) and residents' satisfaction with available training programs in Jordan, and to highlight weakness points that may be improved and strengthened. METHODS A closed-ended questionnaire was circulated to all ophthalmologists who completed their training in Jordanian institutions between 2006 and 2011, to measure the quality of residency training and satisfaction level with regards to clinical conferences, journal clubs, scientific lectures, wet lab sessions, simulations, outpatient clinics and operating room training. Barriers to a successful board exam were cited. All ophthalmologists had official residency training in Jordanian Hospitals; this includes military, university, governmental and private sector hospitals. RESULTS Sixty-one questionnaires completed out of 69 circulated. Males (75.4%) were more than females. Mean age was 32.53.27y. A total 21 (34.4%) responders expressed an overall satisfaction, 38 (62.3%) were dissatisfied and 2 (3.3%) were equivocal. Respondents reported insufficient exposure to low-vision rehabilitation 57 (93.4%), or refraction and glasses prescription 34 (55.7%). Regarding operative experiences, the mean cataract extraction per-resident was 43 cataracts; the number of phacoemulsification surgery was 2.96 per-resident, 46 (75.4%) of responders never did a single phacoemulsification during residency. Nine (14.8%) had training in refractive surgery, and 15 (24.6%) assisted orbital surgery. Forty-four (72.1%) never assisted in vitreoretinal surgery. Among The graduates surveyed, 14 (23.0%) passed Jordanian licensing board exam at the first attempt, and felt that their residency programs adequately prepared them for the examinations. CONCLUSION Around two thirds (62.3%) of ophthalmologists expressed dissatisfaction with residency training at Jordanian programs, further study is required to assess each program separately and evaluate the system of accreditation in Jordanian residency programs. PMID:25349813

Al-Salem, Khalil M.; Al-Sarayra, Fawwaz A.; Abu Al-Dabaat, Mohammad; Shihadeh, Wisam; Al-Salem, Mohammad M.; Al-Salem, Mahmoud K.; Schaal, Shlomit

2014-01-01

426

Molecular epidemiology of nasal isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Jordan.  

PubMed

Asymptomatic carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can predispose the host to a wide range of infections. To inform public health strategies, this study sought to determine the prevalence and the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of MRSA from nasal swabs of health care workers (HCWs) and other healthy individuals in Jordan. Overall, 716 nasal swabs were collected from 297 HCWs, 141 adults and 278 children in the community. MRSA was recovered from 56 (7.8%) nasal swabs, which represented carriage rates of 10.1%, 4.3% and 7.2% among HCWs, adults and children, respectively. The MRSA isolates were resistant to oxacillin (100%), erythromycin (42.8%), tetracycline (37.5%), clindamycin (5.3%), fucidin (5.3%), and ciprofloxacin (3.5%). A total of 17 different spa types belonging to eight different clonal complexes (CCs) were identified. All isolates were mecA positive, and mecC-MRSA was not detected. Analysis of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements revealed that the majority (54; 96.4%) of the samples harbored the smaller type IV and V elements (the most common were SCCmec IVa or IVc, and there were two each of the IVg and V elements), and two were nontypable. The genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (luk-PV) were detected in 5.4% of the study isolates. A tst-positive, CC22-MRSA-SCCmecIVa clone (spa type t223) was identified as the dominant MRSA lineage among the nasal carriage isolates from both HCWs and other individuals (adults and children) in the community. These findings provide important information for public health personnel for the formulation of effective infection prevention and control strategies. Studies to further our understanding of the distribution, pathogenicity, transmissibility and fitness of this lineage would be prudent. PMID:25002017

Aqel, Amin A; Alzoubi, Hamed M; Vickers, Anna; Pichon, Bruno; Kearns, Angela M

2015-01-01

427

Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan: Disease Emergence, Clinical Signs, Complications and Preliminary-associated Economic Losses.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study are to report the emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Jordan and associated clinical signs, complications and preliminary economic losses. In mid-April, 2013, two adult dairy cattle developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD and were confirmed as positive by PCR. The two cases were in Bani Kenanah district, Irbid governorate, on the Jordanian border of Israel and Syria. The disease spread rapidly to all the districts of Irbid governorate. During the month following the emergence of the disease, data were collected related to the epidemiology of the disease and the numbers of affected cattle on the premises. Forty-one dairy cattle holdings were surveyed. The morbidity rate ranged from 3% to 100%, (Mean=35.1%, SD 28.5%). The mortality rate ranged from 0% to 20%, (Mean=1.3%, SD 4.4%). The case fatality rate ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean=6.2%, SD 22%). The overall morbidity rate was 26%, mortality rate 1.9% and case fatality rate 7.5%. Skin nodules, anorexia, decreased milk production and decreased body weight were common clinical signs, while mastitis and myiasis were seen as complications in a few affected animals. Decreased body weight ranged from 0% to 80%, (Mean=23.1%, SD 15.7%). Decreased milk production ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean=51.5%, SD 22.2%). Affected cattle were treated mainly with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The cost of treatment ranged from 0 to 84.3 British Pound/animal, (Mean=27.9 GBP, SD 22.5 GBP). LSD continues to spread through the Middle East region and poses a serious threat to the rest of Asia and Europe. International collaboration and communication is warranted to prevent the further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe. PMID:24148185

Abutarbush, S M; Ababneh, M M; Al Zoubi, I G; Al Sheyab, O M; Al Zoubi, M G; Alekish, M O; Al Gharabat, R J

2013-10-21

428

Relationship between the origin of precipitation in the Jordan Rift valley and their geochemical composition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rainwater was sampled during seven winters at eight sites along the Jordan Rift valley in Israel. The study area is divided into two regions: the northern part located between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea and the southern part between the Dead Sea and the Dead Sea-Red Sea water divide line in the Arava valley. The Dead Sea region is considered as a desert, the northern part of the study area is semidesert whereas the southern region is considered as extreme desert. Good agreement was found between the chemical and isotopic composition of rainwater its sources and air mass trajectories. In the arid areas, the contribution of salts was mainly from local sources (of up to 500 Km in diameter). Significant chemical divergence was found between rainwater deriving from marine air masses characterized by NaCl enrichment and rainwater deriving from continental air masses which are mainly characterized by Ca-carbonate enrichment. Six main marine and continental air mass trajectories were defined, i.e., northern, northwestern, western, southwestern, eastern and local. The northern air mass trajectories contribute more salts than the southwestern air mass trajectories which exhibit the lowest rainwater salinities. The western trajectory is exclusively marine originating from the Mediterranean, while the eastern trajectory is exclusively continental and originates in the Arabian Desert. Rainwater isotopes revealed three chemically differing systems. The western marine trajectories reflect chemical setting associated with East Mediterranean Meteoric Water Line system; the continental air masses are mainly associated with the Mean Meteoric Water Line system; and whenever the eastern component is significant, a Local Meteoric Water Line prevails.

Anker, Yaakov; Flexer, Akiva; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Ganor, Eliezer

2007-02-01

429

Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the 595 Ma shoshonitic Qunai monzogabbro, Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The last stage in the formation of the Arabian Nubian Shield in Jordan was dominated by post-orogenic igneous activity of the 610-542 Ma Araba Suite, including a monzogabbroic stock intruding the Saramuj Conglomerate, near the southeastern corner of the Dead Sea. The geological setting, petrography, geochemistry and geothermometry of the monzogabbro and other cogenetic varieties are used to shed light on the petrogenesis of this stock and reveal its magma source. The monzogabbro, megaporphyry dikes, and scattered syenite pockets are co-magmatic and alkaline, potassic and shoshonitic in nature. REE and trace elements patterns indicate that these magmas were produced from a mantle that had been modified by subduction-related metasomatism. The parental mafic magma could have been derived by 10% partial melting of LILE-enriched phlogopite-bearing spinel lherzolite, probably lithospheric mantle, in association with post-collisional extension. Fractional crystallization of this parental magma by olivine and pyroxene gave rise to the monzogabbroic magma. The megaporphyry dikes with their giant labradorite plagioclase megacrysts represent feeders of a voluminous volcanic activity that could have lasted for about 105 years. Thermodynamic modeling applying the MELTS software indicates crystallization of this suite in the temperature range of 1184-760 C at a pressure of 2 kbars, agreeing with olivine-pyroxene, pyroxene, and two-feldspar thermometry. The modeled mineralogy and sequence of crystallization of constituent minerals using MELTS is in remarkable agreement with the observed modal mineralogy of the monzogabbro. Furthermore, a great degree of congruity exists between the modeled and observed chemistry of the major minerals with only minor discrepancies between modeled composition of biotite and olivine.

Ghanem, Hind; Jarrar, Ghaleb H.

2013-12-01

430

Trend analysis in water quality of Al-Wehda Dam, north of Jordan.  

PubMed

Temporal status and trends in water quality of Al-Wehda Dam, Jordan, from 2006 to 2012 indicate that the dam is subject to a combination of impacts from rainstorm and agricultural runoffs. It also revealed that mineral dissolution, sediment load, rainfall events, evaporation, and water-level fluctuation are the major contributors to variations in water quality. The water chemistry of the impounded Al-Wehda Reservoir showed that Na, Ca, Mg, HCO?, and Cl are the principal ions, reflecting the dominance of carbonate weathering, with some contribution of silicates. The pH values showed a cyclic pattern with highest values observed in the spring seasons. Total dissolved solids (TDS), Ca, Mg, and HCO? are primarily related to leaching and evaporation, with elevated levels that occurred in the rainy winter months. In contrast, seasonal patterns in Na, K, Cl, and NH?-N contents showed decreased values in winter. Peaks in NO?-N observed in winter are strongly associated with agricultural runoff. Fluctuations in chlorophyll-a level were coincided with low ratio of total nitrogen (TN) to total phosphorus (TP). Seasonal variations in organic matter content were also apparent, with peaks that generally occurred in spring through early fall corresponding with high algal growth. On an annual basis, the vast majority of water quality data have generally declined, particularly, in 2011. However, it is not clear whether these decreases are related to change in management practices within the Yarmouk basin, or protective measures have been implemented. Comparison of in-lake and post-dam water quality from 2009 to 2011 showed variation in concentrations, where Ca, HCO?, NO?-N, Mg, and TDS showed relatively greater post-dam values than in-lake water, whereas pH, Na, Cl, K, COD, BOD?, and chlorophyll-a were consistently lower in post-dam water. This comparison emphasizes the importance of self-purification capacity of Al-Wehda Dam in reducing some contaminants. PMID:25027776

Al-Taani, Ahmed A

2014-10-01

431

Spatial distribution and pollution assessment of trace metals in surface sediments of Ziqlab Reservoir, Jordan.  

PubMed

Surface sediment samples were collected from Ziqlab dam in northwestern Jordan to investigate the spatial distribution of selected trace metals and assess their pollution levels. The results showed that the concentrations of Pb, Cd, and Zn exceeded the environmental background values. Cd, Ni, and Cr contents were higher than the threshold effect level (TEL) in 63, 83, and 60% of the reservoir sediments, respectively; whereas Pb, Zn, and Cu were less than the TEL limit. The concentrations of trace metals in reservoir sediment varied spatially, but their variations showed similar trends. Elevated levels of metals observed in the western part (adjacent to the dam wall) were coincided with higher contents of clay-silt fraction and total organic matters. Multivariate analysis indicated that Pb, Co, and Mn may be related to the lithologic component and/or the application of agrochemicals in the upstream agricultural farms. However, Cd and Zn concentrations were probably elevated due to inputs from agricultural sources, including fertilizers. Evaluation of contamination levels by the Sediment Quality Guidelines of the US-EPA, revealed that sediments were non-polluted to moderately polluted with Pb, Cu, Zn, and Cr, but non-polluted to moderately to heavily polluted with Ni and non-polluted with Mn. The geoaccumulation index showed that Ziqlab sediments were unpolluted with Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Co, and Mn, but unpolluted to moderately polluted with Cd. The high enrichment values for Cd and Pb (>2) indicate their anthropogenic sources, whereas the remaining elements were of natural origins consistent with their low enrichment levels. PMID:25632906

Al-Taani, Ahmed A; Batayneh, Awni T; El-Radaideh, Nazem; Ghrefat, Habes; Zumlot, Taisser; Al-Rawabdeh, Abdulla M; Al-Momani, Talal; Taani, Aymen

2015-02-01

432

Characterizing droughts under current and future climates in the Jordan River region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was applied in order to address the characteristics of current and future agricultural droughts in the Jordan River region located in the southeastern Mediterranean area. In the first step, the SPI was applied on spatially interpolated monthly precipitation data at multiple timescales, i.e. accumulated precipitation was considered over a number of timescales, for example: 1, 3, and 6 months. To investigate the performance of the drought index, correlation analyses were conducted with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) obtained from remote sensing. The results show that the 6 month SPI best explains the inter-annual variation of the NDVI. Hence, a timescale of 6 months is the most appropriate when addressing agricultural drought in the semi-arid region. In the second step, the 6 month SPI was applied to three climate projections based on the IPCC emission scenario A1B. When comparing the period 2031-2060 with 1961-1990, it is shown that the mean drought duration is projected to increase. Furthermore, the droughts are expected to become more severe because the frequency of severe and extreme droughts is projected to increase and the frequency of moderate drought is projected to decrease. To address the impact of drought on the agricultural sector, the irrigation water demand during drought was simulated with a hydrological model on a spatial resolution of 1 km. A large increase in the demand for irrigation water was simulated, showing that the agricultural sector is expected to become even more vulnerable to drought in the future.

Trnros, T.; Menzel, L.

2013-05-01

433

N-Acetyltransferase-2 Genotypes Among Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Attending Jordan University Hospital  

PubMed Central

Aim: To determine the frequency of major N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) alleles and genotypes among Jordanian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The study was approved by the IRB of the Jordan University Hospital. An informed consent was signed by every patient. DNA samples from 150 healthy volunteers and 108 patients with RA were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay (PCR-RFLP) to determine the frequency of four major alleles: NAT2*4, NAT2*5, NAT2*6, and NAT2*7. Results: The most prevalent genotypes are those that encode the slow acetylation phenotype. About 59.3% of the patients with RA carried the slow, 33.3% the intermediate, and 7.4% the fast-encoding genotypes. The frequency of NAT2 alleles was 0.241 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1840.298) for NAT2*4, 0.449 (95% CI 0.3830.515) for NAT2*5, 0.273 (95% CI 0.2140.332) for NAT2*6, and 0.037 (95% CI 0.0120.062) for NAT2*7 allele. The overall frequency of the slow acetylation genotype in patients with RA is similar to that in healthy Jordanian volunteers. However, the NAT2*5/7 genotype was found in seven patients (6.5%) with RA and was absent in Jordanian volunteers, and the z test revealed that the difference was statistically significant. This genotype constituted 10.9% of the genotypes encoding slow acetylation. Conclusion: The overall acetylator genotype in RA is similar to that in healthy volunteers. The overall slow acetylator genotypes do not seem to be a genetic risk factor for RA among Jordanians. However, the NAT2*5/7 genotype seems to be related to RA. The nature of this relationship needs further clarification. PMID:22731637

Oqal, Muna K.; Mustafa, Khader N.

2012-01-01

434

Jordan Schwinger map, 3D harmonic oscillator constants of motion, and classical and quantum parameters characterizing electromagnetic wave polarization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we introduce a generalization of the Jauch and Rohrlich quantum Stokes operators when the arrival direction from the source is unknown a priori. We define the generalized Stokes operators as the Jordan-Schwinger map of a triplet of harmonic oscillators with the Gell-Mann and Ne'eman matrices of the SU(3) symmetry group. We show that the elements of the Jordan-Schwinger map are the constants of motion of the three-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator. Also, we show that the generalized Stokes operators together with the Gell-Mann and Ne'eman matrices may be used to expand the polarization matrix. By taking the expectation value of the Stokes operators in a three-mode coherent state of the electromagnetic field, we obtain the corresponding generalized classical Stokes parameters. Finally, by means of the constants of motion of the classical 3D isotropic harmonic oscillator we describe the geometrical properties of the polarization ellipse.

Mota, R. D.; Xicotncatl, M. A.; Granados, V. D.

2004-02-01

435

Incidence and contamination level of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. in ready-to-eat meat products in Jordan.  

PubMed

The objective of the present study was to investigate the incidence and contamination levels of different Listeria monocytogenes serovars in ready-to-eat meat products (RTE-MP) collected from different outlets and processing plants in Jordan in order (i) to provide information to Jordanian health authorities on the incidence of L. monocytogenes in RTE-MP sold and consumed in Jordan and (ii) to ascertain the risks of these products for consumers. Two hundred forty RTE-MP samples, 120 beef and 120 poultry, were analyzed. European International Organization for Standardization (EN ISO) 11290-1 and -2 standard protocols were used for detection and enumeration of L. monocytogenes. The identity of suspected L. monocytogenes was confirmed using PCR. Three Listeria spp., L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, and L. welshimeri, were isolated. L. innocua and L. welshimeri were the most and least frequently isolated with 56 and 36 samples, respectively. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 41 samples (17.1%): 23 from beef and 18 from poultry samples. The contamination levels of L. monocytogenes were 100 CFU/g was found. The L. monocytogenes strains isolated fell into two serotypes (1 and 4) and four different serovars (1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 4b). PMID:20202341

Awaisheh, S S

2010-03-01

436

Prevalence and factors associated with the occurrence of preterm birth in Irbid governorate of Jordan: A retrospective study.  

PubMed

Prevention is important to reduce the prevalence of preterm births. Although prematurity has been well studied in developed countries, data from developing countries, such as Jordan, are still limited. This retrospective study analysed medical records to determine possible risk factors leading to preterm birth in the Irbid governorate of Jordan. All preterm births during the year 2011 were reviewed. Abstracted data included mother's age and gravidity. Newborn information included gender, birthweight and gestational age at birth. A total of 647 singleton births were included. There were more females than males (54.9% vs. 45.1%), with 75.6% being the second child or more. Half the mothers (50.2%) were 25-35 years of age. Factors associated with preterm birth were male gender (P?=?0.008), maternal age >?35 years (P?=?0.005) and first birth (P?=?0.003). Nurses need to provide support and education to mothers with potential risk about reproductive health and family planning. PMID:25213160

Mohammad, Khitam; Abu Dalou, Ahmad; Kassab, Manal; Gamble, Jenny; Creedy, Debra K

2014-09-11

437

Do School Incentives and Accountability Measures Improve Skills in the Middle East and North Africa? The Cases of Jordan and Tunisia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is general agreement that skill-enhancing school reforms in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region are necessary for economic, political and social reasons. Using student-level data from Jordan and Tunisia, this study assesses the relationship between skills and the following school incentive and accountability measures: pedagogical

Shafiq, M. Najeeb

2011-01-01

438

Mechanisms and Development Strategies for Teaching Thinking to Move the Role of Jordan Universities as the Product of the Think Tank from the Faculty Members Point of View  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study aimed at revealing the mechanisms and development strategies for teaching thinking to move the role of Jordan universities as the product of think tank from the faculty members point of view. Also aimed to determine the influence of academic rank in shaping the mechanisms and development strategies for teaching thinking in Jordanian

Ziadat, Ayed H.; Abu-Nair, Natheer S.; Abu Sameha, Mansour A.

2011-01-01

439

Work-Based Learning Programmes for Young People in the Mediterranean Region: Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Syria, Tunisia and Turkey. Comparative Analyses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines programmes for youth that combine learning in classrooms with participation in work in 10 Mediterranean countries: Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Syria, Tunisia and Turkey. It is one element, together with the development of a network of policymakers and experts from the

Sweet, Richard

2009-01-01

440

Fairness and Equity in Transboundary Water Resources: A Comparative Analysis of the TWO Analysis and WAS Models as applied to the Jordan River Basin  

E-print Network

: the asymmetrical relationship between Israel and Palestine over the shared waters of the Jordan River basin of the WAS and TWO models result in a fair and equitable allocation of water for Israel and the Occupied Palestinian: The Case Study ­ Israel and Palestine 5.1. Introduction

Wolf, Aaron

441

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Adrian Lee, Christan Hajen, Fangqing Chen, Jonathan Wong, Jordan Miller, Linus Yau  

E-print Network

Hajen, Fangqing Chen, Jonathan Wong, Jordan Miller, Linus Yau Re-envisioning the UBC Botanical Garden-envisioning the UBC Botanical Garden, as part of the CIVL 445 course deliverables. The purpose of this report is to present a conceptual design for redeveloping the UBC Botanical Garden with a justification and in

442

Islam, Modernity, and the Liminal Space Between: A Vertical Case Study of the Institute of Traditional Islamic Art and Architecture in Amman, Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation investigates the development and function of the Institute of Traditional Islamic Art and Architecture in Amman, Jordan. A vertical case study using grounded theory methodology, the research attempts to create a rich and holistic understanding of the Institute. Specific areas of study include the factors involved in the founding

Meehan, Mark W.

2012-01-01

443

VECTOR RESTORATION FOR VIDEO CODING J. S. McVeigh*, S.-W. Wu**, M. W. Siegel* and A. G. Jordan*  

E-print Network

VECTOR RESTORATION FOR VIDEO CODING J. S. McVeigh*, S.-W. Wu**, M. W. Siegel* and A. G. Jordan We present a novel concept, vector restoration, for motion compensated predictive coding of video, the predicted images are operated upon directly with the goal of restoring the original images at the decoder

Siegel, Mel

444

PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley  

E-print Network

PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea. In one of the hydrologic subsystems studied (the Fuliya block), the mixing of the shallow ground water the Arabian and the Sinai plates. Early research on radioactivity in ground water of Israel has shown

Yehoshua, Kolodny

445

Mohit Iyyer, Peter Enns, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Political Ideology Detection Using Recursive Neural Networks. Association for Computational Linguistics, 2014.  

E-print Network

Mohit Iyyer, Peter Enns, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Political Ideology Detection Using{Iyyer:Enns:Boyd-Graber:Resnik-2014, Title = {Political Ideology Detection Using Recursive Neural Networks}, Booktitle = {Association = {2014}, Location = {Baltimore, MD}, } 1 #12;Political Ideology Detection Using Recursive Neural Networks

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

446

Jordan's Strategies for Early Childhood Education in a Lifelong Learning Framework. UNESCO Policy Brief on Early Childhood. Number 39, July-August 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Jordan has been paying increased attention to early childhood education in recent years. In particular, the government allocated unprecedented resources to the sector through its Education Reform for the Knowledge Economy (ERfKE) 2003/08. Funded by the World Bank and other donor agencies, ERfKE is designed to revamp the education sector starting

Kaga, Yoshie

2007-01-01

447

Embryonic and larval development in barfin flounder Verasper moseri (Jordan and Gilbert)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Broodstock of Verasper moseri (Jordan and Gilbert) aged 3-4 years old were selected, and reinforced cultivation was conducted to promote maturation under controlled water temperature and photoperiod conditions. Fertilized eggs were obtained by artificial fertilization, and the development of embryos, larvae and juveniles was observed continuously. The results showed that the fertilized eggs of V. moseri were spherical, with transparent yolk and homogeneous bioplasm, and had no oil globule inside. The average diameter of the eggs was 1.770.02 mm. The eggs of V. moseri were buoyant in water with salinity above 35. The cleavage type was typical discoidal. Young pigment cells appeared when olfactory plates began to form. Hatching occurred at 187 h after fertilization at a water temperature of 8.5C. The newly hatched larvae, floating on the water surface, were transparent with an average total length of 4.690.15 mm. During the cultivation period, when the water temperature was raised from 9 to 14.5C, 4-day old larvae showed more melanophores on the body surface, making the larvae gray in color. The pectoral fins began to develop, which enabled the larvae to swim horizontally and in a lively manner. On days 7-8, the digestive duct formed. The yolk sac was small and black. The yolk sac was absorbed on day 11. Larvae took food actively, and body length and body height clearly increased. The rudiments of dorsal and anal fin pterygiophores were discernible and caudal fin ray elements formed on day 19. On day 24, the larval notochord flexed upwards, and the rays of unpaired fins began to differentiate. Pigment cells converged on the dorsal and anal fin rays, and the mastoid teeth on the mandible appeared. On day 29, the left eyes of juveniles began to move upwards. Depigmentation began in some juveniles and they became sandy brown in color on day 37. Most juveniles began to settle on the bottom of the tank. The left eyes of juveniles migrated completely to the right side on day 50, when the average body length attained 2.50.18 cm, and juveniles accomplished metamorphosis to young. The embryonic and larval characters of several flounder species are compared.

Du, Rongbin; Wang, Yongqiang; Jiang, Haibin; Liu, Liming; Wang, Maojian; Li, Tianbao; Zhang, Shubao

2010-01-01

448

Application of geoelectrical methods in the DS sinkhole problem, Israel and Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a new approach to use the geoelectric methods for studying the both uppermost part of section and salt layer conditions in the sinkhole development sites. The Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is used here to detect shallow deformations in subsurface sediments. Resistivity prospecting yields information about both lateral and vertical distribution of resistivity through the geological section and can therefore be used in both qualitative and quantitative ways for the identification of structure and features at shallow depths. As it follows from the modified Archie's Law, resistivity of the unsaturated sediments is determined by their porosity. The higher the porosity, the higher is the resistivity. It will also depend on volume of the electrolyte in pores and resistivity of the fluid . Note that after mechanical models available the higher porosity in sinkhole development sites is caused by the void presence at depth. 2D and 3D mapping was carried out in the Mineral Beach area in Israel and in the Ghor Al-Haditha site in Jordan. ERT method shown high resistivity anomaly of some thousands Ohm-m located along the salt edge. The Transient Electromagnetic Method (TEM) also referred to as the Time Domain Electromagnetic Method (TDEM) is sensitive to the bulk resistivity (conductivity) of the studied medium, especially in the low-resistivity range. Transient Electromagnetic (TEM) method in its FAST modification was used for studying the salt layer conditions (salt porosity, depth of the salt top and thickness of the salt layer) and distribution of bulk resistivity in vicinity of the salt border (to resolve the problem of water salinity). The methodology includes numerous measurements through the sinkhole development areas. Earlier the TEM method was used extensively worldwide for locating the fresh-saline water interface in coastal areas and for estimating groundwater salinity. In our study we have mapped salt layer geometrical parameters (e.g. depth to salt top, salt layer thickness) as well as salt resistivity that is measure of salt porosity. New methodology permits also 2D and 3D presentation of the acquired results in spite methodology itself of the data acquisition is of 1D in its origin. Acknowledgements This study has been supported by the USAID MERC Program M27-050

Levi, E.; Abueladas, A.-R.; Al-Zoubi, A.; Akkawi, E.; Ezersky, M.

2012-04-01

449

Continuity and change in ceramic manufacture: Archaeometric study of Late Byzantine-Early Islamic transition in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis investigates continuity and change of ceramics from Late Byzantine-Early Islamic transition period Jordan. The transition period has been characterized largely by an overlap of two ceramic traditions. The material culture of this period has been primarily viewed through formal and stylistic changes. However, ceramic technology and distribution have never been subjected to rigorous analytical study. In order to explain continuity and change in ceramic tradition the undertaken study has focused on the provenance and technology, using multifaceted analytical approach. This study of the transition period pottery has focused on the classification and technological features of potsherds from selected sites in Jordan (Amman, Aqaba, Beit Ras, Khirbet el-Nawafleh, Jarash, Jericho, Pella, Madaba, Gharndal, Humaimah, Um er-Rassas and Um el-Waleed). Samples were studied by particle-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and optical microscopy to analyze their chemical, mineralogical and textural features in the aim of determining their possible provenance and production technology. Compositional data were statistically processed with multivariate analysis using SYSTAT II software 2006. To obtain further information about possible source areas of raw materials used in ceramic production, clays were also sampled in the studied areas. Firing experiments were conducted for clays with compositions comparable with those of ceramic sherds, to better understand the firing technology of the pottery. The multifaceted analytical approach has revealed important information on ceramic production in Transjordan. Khirbet el-Nawafleh and Aqaba in the south, Jarash and Pella in the north, Amman and Madaba in the middle are possibly just a few important production centers during this period. The study shows a multidirectional socio-cultural exchange and economic trade patterns within each region and between adjacent regions, as well. Also, importation from adjacent provinces cannot be excluded for certain samples. Despite the different archaeological levels to which these samples belong to, this study illustrates some similarity in technological features and chemical composition. This in turn suggests that continuity is rather the trend in ceramic tradition of the society during the transition period. However, further work on clays, kilns, and pottery from other sites discovered in Jordan is necessary to confirm this conclusion.

Alawneh, Firas Mohamad

450

Home visits to improve breast health knowledge and screening practices in a less privileged area in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer afflicting women in Jordan. This study aimed to assess the effects of an educational intervention through home visits, including offering free mammography screening vouchers, on changing womens breast health knowledge and screening practices for early detection of breast cancer in a less privileged area in Jordan. Methods Two thousand four hundred breast health awareness home visits were conducted and 2363 women aged 20-79 years (median: 41) answered a pre-test interview-administrated questionnaire to assess their breast health knowledge and practices at the baseline. After a home-based educational session, 625 women aged 40years or older were referred to free mammography screening. Five hundred and ninety six homes were revisited six months later and out of these 593 women participated in a post-test. The womens retained breast health knowledge, the changes in their reported breast health practices and their usage of the free mammography voucher, were assessed. Results The mean knowledge score increased significantly (p?Jordan. PMID:24885063

2014-01-01

451

Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered 3D tissues Jordan S. Miller, Kelly R. Stevens, Michael T. Yang, Brendon M. Baker, Duc-Huy T. Nguyen,  

E-print Network

Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered 3D tissues Jordan S. Miller with isoflorane and the portal vein was cannulated. The liver was perfused and digested 1 Rapid casting

Bhatia, Sangeeta

452

Dental enamel hypoplasias and health changes in the Middle Bronze Age Early Iron Age transition at Pella in Jordan.  

E-print Network

Dental enamel hypoplasias are increasingly being used in epidemiological studies as indicators of health within both modern and prehistoric populations. This symptom of growth disruption is used here to examine possible changes in health occurring at the transition between the Bronze Age and Iron Age in Jordan, through examination of enamel hypoplasias in skeletal remains from two tombs at the archaeological site of Pella. A small but not statistically significant difference in prevalence and frequency of hypoplastic defects was found between the two time periods. These results suggest that the political and economic changes occurring at this time were not sufficiently stressful to cause a dramatic deterioration in health at the onset of the Early Iron Age.

unknown authors

453

Risk factors for strap-related lesions in working donkeys at the World Heritage Site of Petra in Jordan.  

PubMed

A risk analysis was undertaken in an attempt to improve improvised rump straps on donkeys carrying tourists at the World Heritage Site at Petra, Jordan. Tail-base lesions were identified in 63 of the 86 donkeys. Observations and questionnaires were used to collect data relating to the straps, donkey health and human attitudes. The worse lesions were associated with padded rather than unpadded straps, if tightly fitted. Padding could be a cause of, or a response to lesions, but results suggest that it did not effectively aid healing. Significantly worse lesions occurred with unclean than with clean straps and, contrary to many recommendations, cotton straps were associated with worse lesions than were synthetic straps. Since this was an exploratory study, findings should be considered to generate (not to test) hypotheses and any resulting interventions will require monitoring. Further possible risks are discussed, referring to medical and veterinary literature and applied expertise in working equines. PMID:17869139

Burn, Charlotte C; Pritchard, Joy C; Farajat, Murad; Twaissi, Ali A M; Whay, Helen R

2008-11-01

454

Geomorphology of Lake Lisan terraces along the eastern coast of the Dead Sea, Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake Lisan, the lake that filled the Jordan graben during the Last Glacial, left behind a well developed sequence of erosional and depositional shore terraces in the south east of the current Dead Sea. These terraces record a series of stillstands that were caused by small transgressions within an overall trend of falling lake levels. The terraces were observed in places where they had not been identified previously. The morphology of the terraces was investigated in six cross-sections using differential GPS altimetry. The levels of the terraces range between - 370 and - 148 m a.s.l. The high stand of Lake Lisan at - 148 m correlates well with the high level of - 150 m reported by Bowman and Gross [Bowman, D., Gross, T., 1992. The highest stand of Lake Lisan: ~ 150 meters below MSL. Israel Journal of Earth-Science 41, 233-237.] along the western coast of Lake Lisan. The lake terraces are horizontal, elongated and tectonically undisturbed, and have a sub-horizontal foreshore (tread) with an average slope of 8.2 and steep backshore cliff (riser) with an average slope of 17.7. The six cross-sections show a good altitudinal correlation between their terraces. Moreover, the terraces appear in undisturbed continuity on the aerial photos. These morphological characteristics demonstrate that the retreat of the lake was a result of substantial climatic changes, not of tectonic subsidence. In-situ stromatolites were found on most of the terraces, reflecting a shallow water environment and emphasizing that these terraces are recessional. Well-developed desert varnish and Tafoni observed on blocks sitting on the terrace surfaces imply a long period of exposure and a low rate of post lacustrine erosion. The formation of Lisan terraces is constrained mainly by coastal slope, water depth and underlying lithology. The morphological analysis of these terraces allows identification of two kinds of pseudo-terraces, which were formed as a result of tread or riser destruction. U/Th and OSL dating allowed the dating of three events within the lake level curve more precisely. The high level of - 148 m occurred at 30.5 0.22 ka BP, consistent with the Heinrich Event 3 and Dansgaard-Oeschger stadial 5, the coldest period in the NGRIP Greenland Ice Core record. The next lower terrace at - 154 m was formed at 22.9 ka BP 0.29 and corresponds to the stadial 2C, the final phase of the Last High Glacial. The correlation between the Lisan high stands and climatic stadials suggests that Northern-Hemispheric cold periods led to periods with a more positive water balance in the Near East. At ~ 10 0.8 ka BP Lake Lisan experienced a sharp drop to - 200 m followed by a transgression between 9.5 to 7 ka BP.

Abu Ghazleh, Shahrazad; Kempe, Stephan

2009-07-01

455

Screening for domestic violence in Jordan: validation of an Arabic version of a domestic violence against women questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Abuse against women causes a great deal of suffering for the victims and is a major public health problem. Measuring lifetime abuse is a complicated task; the various methods that are used to measure abuse can cause wide variations in the reported occurrences of abuse. Furthermore, the estimated prevalence of abuse also depends on how abuse is culturally defined. Researchers currently lack a validated Arabic language instrument that is also culturally tailored to Arab and Middle Eastern populations. Therefore, it is important to develop and evaluate psychometric properties of an Arabic language version of the newly developed NorVold Domestic Abuse Questionnaire (NORAQ). Design and methods: The five core elements of the NORAQ (emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, current suffering of the abuse, and communication of the history of abuse to the general practitioner) were translated into Arabic, translated back into English, and pilot tested to ensure cultural sensitivity and appropriateness for adult women in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Participants were recruited from the Jordanian Ministry of Health-Maternal and Child Health Care Centers in two large cities in Jordan. Results: A self administered NORAQ was completed by 175 women who had attended the centers. The order of factors was almost identical to the original English and Swedish languages questionnaire constructs. The forced 3-factor solution explained 64.25% of the variance in the measure. The alpha reliability coefficients were 0.75 for the total scale and ranged from 0.75 to 0.77 for the subscales. In terms of the prevalence of lifetime abuse, 39% of women reported emotional abuse, 30% physical abuse, and 6% sexual abuse. Conclusion: The Arabic version of the NORAQ has demonstrated initial reliability and validity. It is a cost-effective means for screening incidence and prevalence of lifetime domestic abuse against women in Jordan, and it may be applicable to other Middle East countries. PMID:21445377

Haddad, Linda G; Shotar, Ali; Younger, Janet B; Alzyoud, Sukaina; Bouhaidar, Claudia M

2011-01-01

456

Full-Genome Sequence of Human Betacoronavirus 2c Jordan-N3/2012 after Serial Passage in Mammalian Cells  

PubMed Central

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is the etiologic agent of a highly lethal pneumonia. Here, we report the full-genome sequence of the Jordan-N3/2012 strain after serial passage in two distinct mammalian cell lines. The genome exhibits noteworthy stability, which may inform the development of vaccines and therapeutics used to treat infection with this virus. PMID:24874668

Redden, Cassie L.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Johnson, Reed; Hensley, Lisa E.; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Luke, Thomas; Kochel, Tad; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.

2014-01-01

457

Techno-economic Analysis of Electricity Generation by Means of a Proposed 50 MW Grid-connected Wind Power Plant for Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complying with the decision made by the Jordanian government to install a new wind power plant with a capacity ranging between 5075 MWto complement the Hofa and Ibrahimiyya wind power plants, whose electricity production presently forms only about 0.035% of the total electricity generated in Jordan mainly by power plants operating on conventional fuelsa 50 MW grid-connected wind power plant

E. S. Hrayshat

2009-01-01

458

Artificial maturation of an immature sulfur- and organic matter-rich limestone from the Ghareb Formation, Jordan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An immature (Ro=0.39%), S-rich (S(org)/C = 0.07), organic matter-rich (19.6 wt. % TOC) limestone from the Ghareb Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in Jordan was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis (200, 220 ..., 300??C; 72 h) to study the effect of progressive diagenesis and early catagenesis on the amounts and distributions of hydrocarbons, organic sulfur compounds and S-rich geomacromolecules. The use of internal standards allowed the determination of absolute amounts. With increasing thermal maturation, large amounts of alkanes and alkylthiophenes with predominantly linear carbon skeletons are generated from the kerogen. The alkylthiophene isomer distributions do not change significantly with increasing thermal maturation, indicating the applicability of alkylthiophenes as biomarkers at relatively high levels of thermal maturity. For a given carbon skeleton, the saturated hydrocarbon, alkylthiophenes and alkylbenzo[b]thiophenes are stable forms at relatively high temperatures, whereas the alkylsulfides are not stable. The large amount of alkylthiophenes produced relative to the alkanes may be explained by the large number of monosulfide links per carbon skeleton. These results are in good agreement with those obtained previously for an artificial maturation series of an immature S-rich sample from the Gessoso-solfifera Formation.An immature (Ro = 0.39%), S-rich (Sorg/C = 0.07), organic matter-rich (19.6 wt.% TOC) limestone from the Ghareb Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in Jordan was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis (200, 220, ..., 300??C; 72 h) to study the effect of progressive diagenesis and early catagenesis on the amounts and distributions of hydrocarbons, organic sulfur compounds and S-rich geomacromolecules. The use of internal standards allowed the determination of absolute amounts. With increasing thermal maturation, large amounts of alkanes and alkylthiophenes with predominantly linear carbon skeletons are generated from the kerogen. The alkylthiophene isomer distributions do not change significantly with increasing thermal maturation, indicating the applicability of alkylthiophenes as biomarkers at relatively high levels of thermal maturity. For a given carbon skeleton, the saturated hydrocarbon, alkylthiophene and alkylbenzo[b]thiophenes are stable forms at relatively high temperatures, whereas the alkylsulfides are not stable. The large amount of alkylthiophenes produced relative to the alkanes may be explained by the large number of monosulfide links per carbon skeleton. These results are in good agreement with those obtained previously for an artificial maturation series of an immature S-rich sample from the Gessoso-solfifera Formation.

Koopmans, M.P.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; De Leeuw, J. W.; Lewan, M.D.; Damste, J.S.S.

1998-01-01

459

Ephedra alte (joint pine): an invasive, problematic weedy species in forestry and fruit tree orchards in Jordan.  

PubMed

A field survey was carried out to record plant species climbed by Ephedra alte in certain parts of Jordan during 2008-2010. Forty species of shrubs, ornamental, fruit, and forest trees belonging to 24 plant families suffered from the climbing habit of E. alte. Growth of host plants was adversely affected by E. alte growth that extended over their vegetation. In addition to its possible competition for water and nutrients, the extensive growth it forms over host species prevents photosynthesis, smothers growth and makes plants die underneath the extensive cover. However, E. alte did not climb all plant species, indicating a host preference range. Damaged fruit trees included Amygdalus communis, Citrus aurantifolia, Ficus carica, Olea europaea, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Punica granatum. Forestry species that were adversely affected included Acacia cyanophylla, Ceratonia siliqua, Crataegus azarolus, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia palaestina, Quercus coccifera, Quercus infectoria, Retama raetam, Rhamnus palaestina, Rhus tripartita, and Zizyphus spina-christi. Woody ornamentals attacked were Ailanthus altissima, Hedera helix, Jasminum fruticans, Jasminum grandiflorum, Nerium oleander, and Pyracantha coccinea. Results indicated that E. alte is a strong competitive for light and can completely smother plants supporting its growth. A. communis, F. carica, R. palaestina, and C. azarolus were most frequently attacked. PMID:22645486

Qasem, Jamal R

2012-01-01

460

The domestication of water: water management in the ancient world and its prehistoric origins in the Jordan Valley.  

PubMed

The ancient civilizations were dependent upon sophisticated systems of water management. The hydraulic engineering works found in ancient Angkor (ninth to thirteenth century AD), the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan (thirteenth to fifteenth century AD), Byzantine Constantinople (fourth to sixth century AD) and Nabatean Petra (sixth century BC to AD 106) are particularly striking because each of these is in localities of the world that are once again facing a water crisis. Without water management, such ancient cities would never have emerged, nor would the urban communities and towns from which they developed. Indeed, the 'domestication' of water marked a key turning point in the cultural trajectory of each region of the world where state societies developed. This is illustrated by examining the prehistory of water management in the Jordan Valley, identifying the later Neolithic (approx. 8300-6500 years ago) as a key period when significant investment in water management occurred, laying the foundation for the development of the first urban communities of the Early Bronze Age. PMID:20956370

Mithen, Steven

2010-11-28

461

Ephedra alte (Joint Pine): An Invasive, Problematic Weedy Species in Forestry and Fruit Tree Orchards in Jordan  

PubMed Central

A field survey was carried out to record plant species climbed by Ephedra alte in certain parts of Jordan during 20082010. Forty species of shrubs, ornamental, fruit, and forest trees belonging to 24 plant families suffered from the climbing habit of E. alte. Growth of host plants was adversely affected by E. alte growth that extended over their vegetation. In addition to its possible competition for water and nutrients, the extensive growth it forms over host species prevents photosynthesis, smothers growth and makes plants die underneath the extensive cover. However, E. alte did not climb all plant species, indicating a host preference range. Damaged fruit trees included Amygdalus communis, Citrus aurantifolia, Ficus carica, Olea europaea, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Punica granatum. Forestry species that were adversely affected included Acacia cyanophylla, Ceratonia siliqua, Crataegus azarolus, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia palaestina, Quercus coccifera, Quercus infectoria, Retama raetam, Rhamnus palaestina, Rhus tripartita, and Zizyphus spina-christi. Woody ornamentals attacked were Ailanthus altissima, Hedera helix, Jasminum fruticans, Jasminum grandiflorum, Nerium oleander, and Pyracantha coccinea. Results indicated that E. alte is a strong competitive for light and can completely smother plants supporting its growth. A. communis, F. carica, R. palaestina, and C. azarolus were most frequently attacked. PMID:22645486

Qasem, Jamal R.

2012-01-01

462

Effectiveness of an electrical barrier in blocking a sea lamprey spawning migration on the Jordan River, Michigan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mark-recapture studies indicated that a pulsed-DC electrical barrier set to a 2-ms pulse width and 10 pulses/s completely blocked the spawning migration of sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus in the Jordan River, Michigan. Capture efficiency of fyke nets averaged 24% for four groups, about 300 tagged sea lampreys each, released upstream of the barrier; no unmarked sea lampreys and none of the 1,194 sea lampreys tagged and released downstream of the barrier were captured in the fyke nets while the barrier was energized. At a lower pulsator setting (1-ms pulse width; 10 pulses/s), 1 of 900 sea lampreys released below the barrier was recaptured in the nets. Sea lampreys from downstream were captured in the fyke nets after the barrier was de-energized, indicating that the barrier should remain in operation later than mid-July. Both sea lampreys and teleosts exposed to the electrical field were stunned but exhibited no apparent damage at either barrier setting. The pulsed-DC electrical barrier should help reduce the use of chemical lampricides for controlling sea lampreys in some Great Lakes streams and would be particularly suited for streams where even the smallest low-head barrier would create an unacceptably large impoundment.

Swink, William D.

1999-01-01

463

Effect of culture on acceptance of telemedicine in Middle Eastern countries: case study of Jordan and Syria.  

PubMed

We investigated issues that affect the use and adoption of telemedicine in Middle Eastern countries, taking the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic as case studies. Our study is based on interviews with key stakeholders (including doctors, technicians, engineers, and decision makers) and questionnaires administered to key stakeholders (including patients), ensuring opinion was gained from people from a full range of backgrounds and roles in the healthcare system. We found doctor and patient resistance was a major issue preventing the adoption of telemedicine in both countries, followed by poor infrastructure, lack of funding, and lack of information technology training. Our research identifies that culture is a greater issue than technical matters for the adoption of telemedicine in Middle Eastern countries. Based on our preliminary results we developed a guideline framework for each country that might be applied to telemedicine projects at the pre-implementation phase. The proposed guideline framework was validated through a return visit to the stakeholders and seeking further opinion. PMID:23540280

Alajlani, Mohannad; Clarke, Malcolm

2013-04-01

464

Possible impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on water resources of the Jordan River and the Sea of Galilee  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Insights are provided to the hitherto unexplained decreasing trends in the available water for consumption from the Sea of Galilee and in the outflow of the main springs of the Jordan River with respect to the nearby rainfall. The loss of available water of about 110 million m3 yr-1 (about 6.5% of the national water consumption in Israel) is shown to be caused by a decreasing trend in the factor of precipitation enhancement by uplifting on topographic barriers. Previous studies, reviewed here, show that the most probable cause of this decreasing trend is an increasing trend in the concentrations of submicron air pollution particles during the last half century. These particles slow down the conversion of cloud drops into raindrops and snow flakes, thus decreasing precipitation from short-lived clouds such as form in moist air that crosses topographic barriers. This decreasing trend was partially mitigated by cloud seeding for rain enhancement, but apparently, the air pollution dominated and caused a net loss of orographic precipitation. A large portion of the water resources in this semiarid part of the world results from orographic precipitation. Therefore this is an issue with major economic and societal implications, not only to the study area but to many other densely populated parts of the world where the livelihood of the inhabitants depends on water resulting from orographic precipitation, which might be compromised by the air pollution produced by the very people who depend on that water.

Givati, Amir; Rosenfeld, Daniel

2007-10-01

465

Seroprevalence of, and risk factors for, peste des petits ruminants in sheep and goats in Northern Jordan.  

PubMed

Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an economically important disease that affect sheep and goat industry in Asia and Africa. In this study, we investigated the seroprevalence, and risk factors, of PPR in sheep and goat flocks from five different governorates (Irbid, Jarash, Ajloun, Mafraq and Zarka) located in Northern Jordan. Serum samples from 929 and 400 sheep and goats, respectively, corresponding to 122 sheep flock and 60 goats flock were collected. Seroprevalence was determined using PPR competitive ELISA. Health status and management information were collected using a semi-structured pre-tested questionnaire. The individual true prevalence of PPR in sheep and goats was 29 and 49%, respectively. The flock level true prevalence of PPR was 60 and 74% in sheep and goats, respectively. In both sheep and goat flocks, large flock size, visiting live animals market and inadequate veterinary services were identified as risk factors for PPR seropositivity. Mixed (sheep and goats) raising was identified as a risk factor for PPR seropositivity in sheep flocks only. PMID:18291541

Al-Majali, Ahmad M; Hussain, Nazmi O; Amarin, Nadim M; Majok, Aggrey A

2008-06-15

466

Groundwater vulnerability assessment and evaluation of human activity impact (HAI) within the Dead Sea groundwater basin, Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater vulnerability to contamination was determined within the Dead Sea groundwater basin, Jordan, using the DRASTIC model and evaluation of human activity impact (HAI). DRASTIC is an index model composed of several hydrogeological parameters and, in this study, the recharge parameter component was calculated as a function of rainfall, soil permeability, slope percentage, fault system, and the intersection locations between the fault system and the drainage system, based on the hydrogeologic characteristics of hard-rock terrain in an arid region. To evaluate the HAI index, a land use/cover map was produced using an ASTER VNIR image, acquired for September 2004, and combined with the resultant DRASTIC model. By comparing the DRASTIC and HAI indices, it is found that human activity is affecting the groundwater quality and increasing its pollution risk. The land use/cover map was verified using the average nitrate concentrations in groundwater associated with land in each class. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in order to study the model sensitivity. The analyses showed that the depth to water table and hydraulic conductivity parameters have no significant impact on the model, whereas the impact of vadose zone, aquifer media, and recharge parameters have a significant impact on the DRASTIC model.

Al-Hanbali, Ahmad; Kondoh, Akihiko

2008-05-01

467

The radioactivity of seasonal dust storms in the Middle East: the May 2012 case study in Jordan.  

PubMed

Dust storms in the Middle East are common during spring. Some of these storms are massive and carry a large amount of dust from faraway regions, which pose health and pollution risks. The huge dust storm event occurred in early May, 2012 was investigated for its radioactive content using gamma ray spectroscopy. Dust samples were collected from Northern Jordan and it was found that the storm carried a large amount of both artificial and natural radioactivity. The average activity concentration of fallout (137)Cs was 17.0Bq/kg which is larger than that found in soil (2.3Bq/kg), and this enrichment is attributed to particle size effects. (7)Be which is of atmospheric origin and has a relatively short half-life, was detected in dust with relatively large activity concentrations, as it would be expected, with an average of 2860Bq/kg, but it was not detected in soil. Despite the large activity concentration of (7)Be, dose assessment showed that it does not contribute significantly to the effective dose through inhalation. The concentrations of the primodial nuclides (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U were 547, 30.0 and 49.3Bq/kg, respectively. With the exception of (40)K, these were comparable to what was found in soil. PMID:25461517

Hamadneh, Hamed S; Ababneh, Zaid Q; Hamasha, Khadeejeh M; Ababneh, Anas M

2015-02-01

468

Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence Among Women Visiting Health Care Centers in Palestine Refugee Camps in Jordan.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among a sample of women visiting health care centers in Palestine refugee camps in Jordan. We found that different types of IPV, including physical, emotional, sexual, economic, and control behaviors by the partners were experienced by the participants. This study was among a number of studies that investigated this phenomenon in residents of Palestinian camps. It adds to existing studies in this field, however, as it focuses on the prevalence of the top five types of IPV in these women. Cooccurrence of IPV, that is, experiencing two or more types of partner violence at the same time, was noticed in these women. Experiencing control by one's partner and the presence of different attitudes between men and women toward the use of violence were factors contributing to the occurrence of this phenomenon in these women. National efforts aiming at breaking the cycle of violence should be fostered through media and public awareness campaigns. Changing people's attitudes concerning men's use and women's acceptance of violence should be the aim of these efforts. PMID:25255940

Al-Modallal, Hanan; Abu Zayed, Ishtaiwi; Abujilban, Sanaa; Shehab, Tariq; Atoum, Maysoun

2014-09-25

469

Climate change and archaeological site distribution during the past four millennia in northern Jordan utilizing oxygen isotope analysis of human tooth enamel and geographic information system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The enamels of one hundred and ninety two teeth were analyzed for their oxygen isotopic composition from five archaeological sites in northern Jordan (Ya'amoun, Pella, Yasieleh, Sa'ad and Waqqas) to reconstruct the climate from the Middle Bronze Age II (1800--1500 BCE) to the Late Byzantine Period (491--640 CE). Results showed that the Middle Bronze Age II delta 18O values were the highest indicating warmer and drier climate conditions. The Late Bronze Age II and the Iron Age I/II experienced more favorable climate conditions. The Early Byzantine period delta18O values indicate wetter conditions compared to the Late Byzantine period but the latter was wetter than the Middle Bronze Age II. The geographic distribution of the archaeological sites in Jordan was affected by climate that changed over the prehistory of the country (from the Paleolithic to the Ottoman Period). Archaeological sites decreased in number during dry periods like the Middle Bronze Age II but increased during wet periods like the Roman one. Proximity to water sources was favored during the various cultural periods, where the northwestern and the mid-western areas witnessed dense occupation. On the other hand, areas that presently receive less than 200mm annual rainfall were not favored even during the wet periods. There were major climate events that overran the whole Mediterranean region during the Holocene, where Jordan was subject to them as well. These climatic events (prolonged droughts and/or insufficient precipitation) were identified using Bryson's archaeoclimate model that simulates the amount of precipitation, evapotranspiration and temperature during the last 12,000 years. These climate events coincided with the collapse of many societies in the Levant, such as the Middle Bronze Age societies of Mesopotamian cities.

Alakkam, Abdulla Ahmed

470

New structural/tectonical model and its implication on hydrological thinking and groundwater management - the Lake Tiberias, Jordan Rift Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake Tiberias is a fresh water lake located at the Kinneret basin which is approximately 30 km long and 10 km wide. It comprises a link in the chain of pull-apart basins that characterizes the structure of the conspicuous Jordan Rift Valley (JRV). The basin surface is about 200 m below mean sea level (msl) and basin-fill attains a thickness of up to 8 km. Until recently, studies focused mainly on the upper strata of basin fill. Consequently, a complete three dimensional geological model, including clear view of the tectonic framework at the Kinneret Basin was incomplete. This situation imposes great difficulty in understanding the local hydrological system and as consequence enforce constrains on groundwater management of the regional aquifers that flows towards the lake. A recently proposed structural/tectonical model (Inbar, 2012) enables revaluation of several geohydrological aspects at Sea of Galilee and its surroundings and a new hydrological model based on those findings aims to clarify those aspects with relation to groundwater management. The deep-seated stratigraphical units were seismically studied at the Kinnarot Valley (southern part of Kinneret basin) where sufficient information is available (Inbar, 2012). This study shows the subsidence and northwestward tilting of the basin floor (pre-rift formations) and the flow of thick Late Miocene salt accumulation accordingly. Furthermore, shallower seismic data, collected at the lake itself, shows a suspected salt dome close to the western boundary fault of the basin (Resnikov et al., 2004). Salt flow is now suggested to be a substantial factor in the tectonic play. At the lake surroundings there are several springs and boreholes where brine immerges from an estimated depth of about 2-3 kilometers. Significant differences in brine characteristics raised questions regarding the location of brine traps, flow mechanism and the mixture process between the fresh water and the brine. However, the effect of the juxtaposing salt rock to the hydrological system was overlooked. Recent study reported an anomaly in groundwater chemistry at the western shore, indicating a possible contribution of halite dissolution into the ascending brine (Mller et al., 2011). This correlates to the results of the salt tectonic model and the suspected salt diapir above mentioned. Moreover, Arbel-1 borehole (drilled at 2003 at the same area) showed rapid salinity increase during pumping. Today the well is shut off. Based on the above findings, a numerical model is built. The studied profile crosses the rift from the Galilee at the west to the Golan and Ajlun at the east reaching a depth of 6 kilometers. The model indicates the possible brine flow paths across the rift and their interaction with fresh water aquifers and lake springs. References Inbar, N. (2012), The Evaporatic Subsurface Body in Kinnarot Basin: Stratigraphy, Structure, Geohydrology, 131 pp, Tel Aviv University. Mller, P., Siebert, C., Geyer, S., Inbar, N., Rosenthal, E., Flexer, A., and Zilberbrand, M. (2011), Relationships of Brines in the Kinnarot Basin, Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley, Geofluids (doi: 10.1111/j.1468-8123.2011.00353.x). Reznikov, M., Ben-Avraham, Z., Garfunkel, Z., Gvirtzman, H. and Rotstein, Y., 2004. Structural and stratigraphic framework of Lake Kinneret: Isr. J. Earth Sci., v. 53, p. 131-149.

Inbar, Nimrod; Magri, Fabien; Yellin-Dror, Annat; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Mller, Peter; Siebert, Christian; Guttman, Josef

2014-05-01

471

Modeling the risk of groundwater contamination using modified DRASTIC and GIS in Amman-Zerqa Basin, Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amman-Zerqa Basin (AZB) is the second largest groundwater basin in Jordan with the highest abstraction rate, where more than 28% of total abstractions in Jordan come from this basin. In view of the extensive reliance on this basin, contamination of AZB groundwater became an alarming issue. This paper develops a Modified DRASTIC model by combining the generic DRASTIC model with land use activities and lineament density for the study area with a new model map that evaluates pollution potential of groundwater resources in AZB to various types of pollution. It involves the comparison of modified DRASTIC model that integrates nitrate loading along with other DRASTIC parameters. In addition, parameters to account for differences in land use and lineaments density were added to the DRASTIC model to reflect their influences on groundwater pollution potential. The DRASTIC model showed only 0.08% (3 km2) of the AZB is situated in the high vulnerability area and about 30% of the basin is located in the moderately vulnerable zone (mainly in central basin). After modifying the DRASTIC to account for lineament density, about 87% of the area was classified as having low pollution potential and no vulnerability class accounts for about 5.01% of the AZB area. The moderately susceptible zone covers 7.83% of the basin's total area and the high vulnerability area constitutes 0.13%. The vulnerability map based on land use revealed that about 71% of the study area has low pollution potential and no vulnerability area accounts for about 0.55%, whereas moderate pollution potential zone covers an area of 28.35% and the high vulnerability class constitutes 0.11% of AZB. The final DRASTIC model which combined all DRASTIC models shows that slightly more than 89% of the study area falls under low pollution risk and about 6% is considered areas with no vulnerability. The moderate pollution risk potential covers an area of about 4% of AZB and the high vulnerability class constitutes 0.21% of the basin. The results also showed that an area of about 1761 km2 of bare soils is of low vulnerability, whereas about 28 km2 is moderately vulnerable. For agriculture and the urban sector, approximately 1472 km2 are located within the low vulnerability zone and about 144 km2 are moderately vulnerable, which together account for about 8% of the total agriculture and urban area. These areas are contaminated with human activities, particularly from the agriculture. Management of land use must be considered when changing human or agricultural activity patterns in the study area, to reduce groundwater vulnerability in the basin. The results also showed that the wells with the highest nitrate levels (81-107 mg/l) were located in high vulnerable areas and are attributed to leakage from old sewage water.

Al-Rawabdeh, Abdulla M.; Al-Ansari, Nadhir A.; Al-Taani, Ahmed A.; Al-Khateeb, Fadi L.; Knutsson, Sven

2014-09-01

472

The Establishment of an ISO Compliant Cancer Biobank for Jordan and its Neighboring Countries Through Knowledge Transfer and Training  

PubMed Central

Research studies aimed at advancing cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment depend on a number of key resources, including a ready supply of high-quality annotated biospecimens from diverse ethnic populations that can be used to test new drugs, assess the validity of prognostic biomarkers, and develop tailor-made therapies. In November 2011, KHCCBIO was established at the King Hussein Cancer Center (KHCC) with the support of Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) funding from the European Union (khccbio.khcc.jo). KHCCBIO was developed for the purpose of achieving an ISO accredited cancer biobank through the collection, processing, and preservation of high-quality, clinically annotated biospecimens from consenting cancer patients, making it the first cancer biobank of its kind in Jordan. The establishment of a state-of-the-art, standardized biospecimen repository of matched normal and lung tumor tissue, in addition to blood components such as serum, plasma, and white blood cells, was achieved through the support and experience of its European partners, Trinity College Dublin, Biostr Ireland, and accelopment AG. To date, KHCCBIO along with its partners, have worked closely in establishing an ISO Quality Management System (QMS) under which the biobank will operate. A Quality Policy Manual, Validation, and Training plan have been developed in addition to the development of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for consenting policies on ethical issues, data privacy, confidentiality, and biobanking bylaws. SOPs have also been drafted according to best international practices and implemented for the donation, procurement, processing, testing, preservation, storage, and distribution of tissues and blood samples from lung cancer patients, which will form the basis for the procurement of other cancer types. KHCCBIO will be the first ISO accredited cancer biobank from a diverse ethnic Middle Eastern and North African population. It will provide a unique and valuable resource of high-quality human biospecimens and anonymized clinicopathological data to the cancer research communities world-wide. PMID:24620764

Barr, Martin; Souan, Lina; MacGabhann, Peadar; Mller, Jeanette; Al Ashhab, Maxim; Jasser, Mohammed; Hamza, Khetam; Al Hassoon, Sallam; Kuhn, Uwe; Infante, Daniela; Lawlor, Denise; Gately, Kathy; Amireh, Eyad; O'Byrne, Kenneth

2014-01-01

473

Impact of an educational program on nursing students caring and self-perception in intensive clinical training in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Background Framing and development of clinical skills in nursing students during their clinical practice is critical because this can shape their future caring skills. Professional caring empowers patients and contributes to their well-being and health. Education may enhance the capacity of nurses to be effective caring practitioners. Their study program encourages caring behavior in nursing students, consequently affecting their professional self-perception. Methods The present study investigated the effect of an educational program on caring behavior and professional self-perception in nursing students using a controlled pre/post test study design. The study sample consisted of 50 nursing students undertaking their final year in 20102011. Subjects were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. The study was conducted in two critical care units affiliated to the Maan and Queen Rania hospitals in the south of Jordan. The instruments utilized were the Caring Dimensions Inventory, Nursing Students Attitude Observational Checklist, and Professional Self-Concept of Nurses Instrument. Results The study findings favor the effect of the educational program because there was increased knowledge and understanding of caring theory and related concepts, a more holistic approach to care, enhanced caring practices, and improved self-perception in the study group compared with the control group during different periods of assessment. The study group showed significantly better caring perception in psychological, technical, and professional terms than the control group during different periods of assessment. There was a significant positive trend of overall professional self-perception for the study group compared with the control group. Conclusion Nursing curricula should incorporate concepts and principles that guide students in developing caring, safe, competent, and professional behavior. Nursing students must seek educational opportunities to acquire knowledge for role preparation, to participate in knowledge generation, and for personal and professional development. PMID:23745088

Khouri, Rawda

2011-01-01

474

Flow of ground water through fractured carbonate rocks in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan Aquifer, southeastern Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Contamination of groundwater from point and nonpoint sources (such as landfills, feedlots, agricultural chemicals applied to fields, and septic systems) is a recognized problem in the karst area of southeastern Minnesota. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the Legislative Commission on Minnesota Resources, Began a study in October 1987 to improve the understanding of local groundwater flow through karst terrain in southeastern Minnesota. The objectives of the study are to: (1) describe the orientations of systematic rock fractures and solution channels of the Prairie du Chien Group of Ordovician-age carbonate rocks in southeastern Minnesota, and, if possible, to define the principal and minor axes of these orientations; and (2) evaluate the effect of fractures and solution channels in the Prairie du Chien Group on the local flow of groundwater. Groundwater in the Upper Carbonate aquifer regionally flows toward the periphery of the aquifer and locally flows into streams and bedrock valleys. The hydraulic gradient in this aquifer generally is greatest near areas of groundwater seepage to streams. Regional groundwater flow in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer generally is to the south and east in much of Fillmore and Houston Counties and in the southern parts of Olmsted and Winona Counties. Groundwater seepage to selected streams was evaluated by current-meter measurements of downstream gains or losses of streamflow and by an experimental approach based on radon activity in streams. The activity of radon in groundwater ranges from two to four orders of magnitude greater than the activity in surface water; therefore, groundwater seepage to streams generally increases the in-stream radon activity. (Lantz-PTT)

Ruhl, J.F.

1989-01-01

475

Cryptococcus neoformans varieties from material under the canopies of eucalyptus trees and pigeon dropping samples from four major cities in Jordan.  

PubMed

To our best knowledge, any study related to the ecological distribution of Cryptococcus neoformans in Jordan does not exist in the medical literature. In order to determine the environmental occurrence of both varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans in Jordan, pigeon droppings and material under the canopies of eucalyptus trees were collected from four major cities of this country. For the isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans variety gattii from environmental sources, 500 samples of the mixed soil debris, including tree materials, under the eucalyptus trees from cities of Amman, Irbid, Jerash, and Ajlun were collected. Also, 509 samples of pigeon droppings were collected from the same cities for the isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans variety neoformans. After inoculating the samples onto modified Staib agar medium in Petri dishes, a total of 336 melanoid yeast colonies were picked up during screening process. At the end of serial mycological studies, none of these isolates was identified as Cryptococcus neoformans, but all were Cryptococcus species other than C. neoformans. For determining the exact status, more extensive environmental studies need to be done in the future. PMID:15518348

Hamasha, Akram Mohammad Saad; Yildiran, Sinasi Taner; Gonlum, Ahmet; Saracli, Mehmet Ali; Doganci, Levent

2004-08-01

476

Ground-water flow in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer related to contamination by coal-tar derivatives, St Louis Park, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A Three-dimensional, finite-difference, groundwater flow model of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer was developed to assess the movement of coal-tar derivatives from a coal-tar distillation and wood-preserving plant in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. The model was calibrated for steady-state and transient conditions. Sensitivity testing indicated that leakage to the upper model layer and the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the basal confining unit of the St. Peter were the most sensitive model hydrologic properties. Model simulations indicated that water introduced into the aquifer through wells open to several aquifers would raise the potentiometric surface of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan by as much as 3 ft in the area of the former plant. Other simulations suggested that withdrawal from certain upgradient wells may have altered local hydraulic gradients. These factors contributed to the potential for movement of contaminants from the area of the former plant to wells. Simulations of a proposed gradient-control plan indicate that the actions would be effective in limiting the expansion of the contaminated volume. These simulations also show, however, that control of discharge from all wells in the area will be important to the overall effectiveness of the plan. (USGS)

Stark, J.R.; Hult, M.F.

1985-01-01

477

Early diagenesis and chalk-chert hardgrounds in the Coniacian-Campanian of central Jordan; implications for sedimentation on Late Cretaceous shallow pelagic ramps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hardgrounds and omission surfaces are rare in the predominantly hemi-pelagic chalk, chert and phosphorite association that comprises the Senonian Belqa Group in central Jordan. However, hardgrounds of regional extent are described from the base of the Dhiban Chalk Member (Santonian-Campanian) in Wadi Mujib, central Jordan, and at Jibal Khureij, southern Wadi Araba that reveal a complex pattern of sedimentation and early diagenesis. The chalk-chert-phosphorite succession was deposited in a shallow pelagic ramp setting in fluctuating water depths. Chalks represent high-stands, separated by a regressive chert-rich unit (Tafilah Member). Synchronous hardground successions traced over 100 km, reveal a complex diagenetic and depositional history of early lithification, phosphatisation, penecontemporaneous deformation, submarine bioerosion, colonisation by colonial corals and/or bivalves followed by deposition of turbid detrital chalk passing up to pelagic coccolith ooze. Variations in the hardground successions are attributed to their relative position on the pelagic ramp in overall response to a third order sea-level rise.

Powell, J. H.; Moh'd, B. K.

2009-04-01

478

Original Investigation Use of antihypertensive drugs doi: 10.5455/medscience.2012.01.8047 Prescription pattern of antihypertensive drugs in Family Practice Clinics at Jordan University Hospital  

E-print Network

This study aims at assessing the prescription pattern of antihypertensive drugs in hypertensive patients attending the Family Practice Clinics at Jordan University Hospital in Amman, Jordan and evaluating their blood pressure control according to the international guidelines. The study sample involved 416 hypertensive Jordanian patients, 259 (62.3%) of them were females and 157 (37.7%) were males, with ages ranged from 18 to 94 years (mean SD 59.2 10.2 years). Data was obtained from hypertensive patients by using patient's medical records and a designed questionnaire. Our results demonstrate that 192, 157, 52 and 13 patients were receiving one, two, three and more than three antihypertensive drugs, respectively. Only 2 patients were not receiving any therapy. Among the single prescriptions, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors were the most commonly prescribed, whereas diuretics were the most prescribed antihypertensive drugs in combined therapy. A significant reduction (p<0.0001) in systolic and diastolic blood pressures was observed. Means+ SD of systolic/diastolic blood pressure in the last and first visits were 133.418.4/ 83.210.1 and157.413.9/94.6 8.2, respectively. Despite the use of different antihypertensive drugs, most of the patients did not achieve recommended blood pressure control according to the international guidelines.

Essam Al-drabah; Yacoub Irshaid; Nada Yasein; Suheil Zmeili

479

Head shape and size of adult males as possible indicators of childhood stress in northern Jordan (1900-1978): a study in human biology and political economy.  

PubMed

Stature, sitting height, stature by weight, and head circumference change with varying economic conditions during early childhood. Our hypothesis is that adult head shape, as well as head size, is influenced by changes in childhood nutrition. When economic conditions are bad, nutrition and health suffer, and the result is dolichocephaly. To test this hypothesis, we measured the head length, width, and circumference of 398 adult males in Jordan. Fifty-six percent are ethnic Jordanians, and 44% are ethnic Palestinians. We divided the modern history of Jordan and the West Bank into four periods developed from historical economic data. The results of the study show that the cephalic index (CI) among Jordanians increased significantly with economic improvement but decreased slightly during the best economic period, whereas CI remained stable across all periods among Palestinians. The pattern among Jordanians can be explained in terms of maternal environment and early childhood nutrition. The lack of pattern in Palestinians may be due to changing nursing practices, bottle feeding, or sleeping position. When economic conditions were bad, Jordanian mothers and infants suffered from malnutrition and deficits in health care services during pre- and postnatal periods. Infants were born with very low birth weight and longer heads. However, the highest mean value of head size, circumference, among Jordanians and Palestinians is obtained from individuals who were children during the bad economic period, an unexpected result. No significant linear or quadratic trend was found for either Palestinians' or Jordanians' head circumference over time. PMID:19317596

Abu Dalou, Ahmad Y; Al-Shiyab, Abdel-Halim; Benfer, Robert A

2008-08-01

480

Telecardiology Application in Jordan: Its Impact on Diagnosis and Disease Management, Patients' Quality of Life, and Time- and Cost-Savings  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To assess the impact of live interactive telecardiology on diagnosis and disease management, patients' quality of life, and time- and cost-savings. Methods. All consecutive patients who attended or were referred to the teleclinics for suspected cardiac problems in two hospitals in remote areas of Jordan during the study period were included in the study. Patients were interviewed for relevant information and their quality of life was assessed during the first visit and 8 weeks after the last visit. Results. A total of 76 patients were included in this study. Final diagnosis and treatment plan were established as part of the telecardiology consultations in 71.1% and 77.3% of patients, respectively. Patients' travel was avoided for 38 (50.0%) who were managed locally. The majority of patients perceived that the visit to the telecardiology clinic results in less travel time (96.1%), less waiting time (98.1%), and lower cost (100.0%). Telecardiology consultations resulted in an improvement in the quality of life after two months of the first visit. Conclusions. Telecardiology care in remote areas of Jordan would improve the access to health care, help to reach proper diagnosis and establish the treatment plan, and improve the quality of life. PMID:25400661

Khader, Yousef Saleh; Jarrah, Mohamad Ismail; Al-Shudifat, Abde-Ellah M.; Shdaifat, Amjad; Aljanabi, Husham; Al-Fakeh, Shadwan Ismeil; Turk, Elias Emil; Zayed, Khaled Ali; Al Quran, Hanadi A.; Ellauzi, Ziad Mohd; Al Tahan, Mohammad

2014-01-01

481

Parity meter for charge qubits: An efficient quantum entangler B. Trauzettel,1,2 A. N. Jordan,3,4 C. W. J. Beenakker,1 and M. Bttiker3  

E-print Network

Parity meter for charge qubits: An efficient quantum entangler B. Trauzettel,1,2 A. N. Jordan,3,4 C parity meter based on two double quantum dots alongside a quantum point contact. Such a device off the parity meter. Two applications of the parity meter are discussed: the measurement of Bell

482

Development of Marine Sciences in Arab Universities. Meeting of Experts Held at the Marine Science Station (Aqaba, Jordan, December 1-5, 1985). Unesco Reports in Marine Science 39.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Unesco Reports in Marine Science" are designed to serve as a complement to the "Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science." This report focuses on the current situation in marine sciences in Arab universities. A special meeting was convened in Jordan during December, 1985, to discuss the objectives of teaching and research in the marine

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

483

[Crystal chemical and micromorphologic evaluation of ancient bone discoveries (Arabia Petraea, Jordan) from the 10th millennium B.C].  

PubMed

As specialisations of osteoarchaeometry become increasingly developed, so the need of new analytical techniques and tests of a skillful applicability becomes more necessary. The crystal-chemical and micromorphological evaluations of preserved bone discoveries implicate reliable methods as X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and spectroscopy with the skeletal materials and the soil environment in which bones are found. The reactivity of soils varies widely as geological and sedimentological conditions offer typical but different environments: gravels, chalk soil, clay, salt soils, sands, cave earths are examples of this wide variety, including atmospheric and biogenetic implications. The last mentioned features are strongly effective also in aride regions, with the well known fluctations of high parching and dewiness. However, despite the diversity in deposition and burial modes only few parameters govern the gradual decomposition of bone material: 1. pH value of the surrounding medium; 2. humidity of the surrounding medium, may be governed directly by autolysis; 3. transport of matter, related to grain size, pore volume, solubility behaviour; 4. physical pressure; 5. destruction by microorganisms; as well as the surrounding medium will be altered by the uptake and the transformation of the products of bone decomposition. The materials of investigation were skeletal fragments buried of ea. 10,000 a within the soft dune sediment of the western border mountains of Wadi el Araba (Arabia Petraea, Jordan). The discovered bones are, as a common feature of this locality Basta, strongly sintered--indication on the afore mentioned reactivity of the aride soil as well. Bone fragments were partially burnt at Sabra locality and discolored, and sintered also at these circumstances. The reactivity of the bone fragments is shown in terms of exchange reactions within the crystal structure of the bone mineral, apatite Ca5(PO4)3OH at the calcium sites, hydroxyl sites, and phosphate sites. These reaction schemes are interpreted in the details. This decomposition by substitution will often preserve the external appearance of buried bones. Fig. 1 and 2 show the extent of the actual ion exchange with the surrounding soil strata resp. transformed areas (sinter sheets); in the case of Basta material as a nearly total rearrangement of the anion lattice (phosphate, silicate vs. carbonate) as well as verified by Scanning-electron microscopy (Fig. 3, 4) and phase analyses by X-ray diffraction (Fig. 5-7): calcite and quartz are the principal components of the sinters, additional diffuse apatite lines appear in bone samples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3114040

Newesely, H

1987-01-01

484

Strontium isotopes in Melanopsis sp. as indicators of variation in hydrology and climate in the Upper Jordan Valley during the Early-Middle Pleistocene, and wider implications.  

PubMed

Aquifers dominated by Pleistocene basalts and Jurassic to Cretaceous calcareous rocks feed the Hula basin which is drained by the Jordan River into Lake Kinneret. The sedimentary sequence of Lower-Middle Pleistocene Benot Ya'akov Formation (BYF) exposed by excavations of the 0.78Ma lake-side site of Gesher Benot Ya'aqov (GBY) consists of six cycles representing ca. 100ka history of the Hula basin. This study characterizes the types of water sources in the catchment, tests the use of the Strontium (Sr) isotopes in the common extant snail Melanopsis sp. as a tracer for water in its habitat, and uses this tracer in the fossil specimens from GBY to investigate the palaeohydrology of the Hula paleolake during the corresponding period. The Sr isotope composition ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) of extant Melanopsis shells in the Hula catchment range widely (0.7046-0.7079). These analyses define distinct groups of water sources and aquifers, while the Jordan River at the GBY site has values around 0.70685. The values for fossil Melanopsis from GBY vary along stratigraphy; they are highest around 0.70710 in Cycles 1 and 2, decrease to around 0.70685 in Cycle 3, and exhibit upward trending fluctuations in the subsequent cycles to 0.70703 in Cycle 6. This trend reveals the dominance of the Hermon Jurassic aquifer during the earlier, colder periods before the Matuyama-Brunhes Boundary (MBB) and enhanced influence of the Golan basaltic aquifers, in subsequent warmer periods, indicating that the MBB coincides with climate warming as supported by other indicators. Hence, this global geochronological indicator of 0.78Ma is also potentially a global palaeoclimatic marker. The similarity between the Sr isotope composition of the Jordan River waters and Melanopsis and those from Cycle 3 suggests that the current climate corresponds to that of the warmest period within the record of GBY, clarifying the comparative interpretation of this 100k.yr. climate record. PMID:21036385

Spiro, Baruch; Ashkenazi, Shoshana; Starinsky, Abraham; Katz, Amitai

2011-04-01

485

Tidal-bundle sequences in the Jordan Sandstone (Upper Cambrian), southeastern Minnesota, U.S.A.: Evidence for tides along inboard shorelines of the Sauk Epicontinental Sea  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study documents for the first time tidal bundling in a lower Paleozoic sheet sandstone from the cratonic interior of North America, providing insights into the hydrodynamics of ancient epicontinental seas. The Jordan Sandstone (Upper Cambrian) in the Upper Mississippi Valley contains large-scale planar tabular cross-sets with tidal-bundle sequences, which were analyzed in detail at an exceptional exposure. Tidal-bundle sequences (neap-spring-neap cycles) were delineated by foreset thickening-thinning patterns and composite shale drapes, the latter of which represent accumulations of mud during the neap tides of neap-spring-neap tidal cycles. Fourier analysis of the bundle thickness data from the 26 measurable bundle sequences revealed cycles ranging from 15 to 34 bundles per sequence, which suggests a semidiurnal or mixed tidal system along this part of the Late Cambrian shoreline. We extend the tidal interpretation to widespread occurrences of the same facies in outcrops of lesser quality, where the facies is recognizable but too few bundles are exposed for tidal cycles to be measured. By doing so, this study shows that tidally generated deposits have a significant geographic and temporal extent in Upper Cambrian strata of central mid-continent North America. The deposition and preservation of tidal facies was related to the intermittent development of shoreline embayments during transgressions. The tidally dominated deposits filled ravined topographies that were repeatedly developed on the updip parts of the shoreface. Resulting coastal geomorphologies, accompanied perhaps by larger-scale changes in basinal conditions and/or configuration, led to changes in depositional conditions from wave-dominated to tide-dominated. Outcrops of the Jordan Sandstone tidal facies in the Upper Mississippi Valley represent the farthest inboard recorded transmission of ocean-generated tides in the Laurentian epicontinental seas, demonstrating that tidal currents were significant agents in the transport of sand along the far cratonic interior shorelines of Cambrian North America. The results of this study improve the facies-level understanding of the genesis of sheet sandstones. Furthermore, tidalites documented here occur in a specific position within a sequence stratigraphic architecture for the Jordan Sandstone. This provides a framework to compare these ancient deposits and processes to younger (e.g., Carboniferous) epicontinental systems where stratal and sediment dynamics are better documented. ?? 2003, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

Tape, C.H.; Cowan, C.A.; Runkel, A.C.

2003-01-01

486

Assessment of natural recharges of the Plio-Plistocene shallow aquifer system in Al Uja area /Lower Jordan Valley / Occupied Palestinian Territories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Al Uja area locates in the Lower Jordan Valley/West Bank at 250 m below sea level. The availability of ground water, fertile soil, and warm climate during winter months make it remarkable for its agricultural activities where 600 hectares are under irrigation. Al Uja karstic spring that drain water from the Mountain carbonate aquifer system with a discharge rate between 0.5 and 8 MCM/a , and nine groundwater boreholes that tape water from the shallow Plio-Plistocene aquifer system, with an annual abstraction of 3.5 MCM are the water sources. The south-north fault system of the Jordan Rift Valley separates the two aquifer system. The shallow aquifer system locates to the east of the fault, where the Mountain aquifer system locates to the west. The Mountain aquifer consists of high fractured and karstified limestone and dolomite of Upper Cretaceous age, and the shallow aquifer system consists of gravel, sand, silt, and clay layers of the Dead Sea group. Groundwater recharge of the Mountain aquifer system takes place in the highland area in the West with an annual precipitation of about 550 mm. Formations of the shallow aquifer system crop out in the Jordan Valley where rainfall does not exceed 250 mm/a . Due to the high evaporation rate, direct recharge is neglected. Only small portion of flooding water about 0.4MCM/a infiltrate through wadi Al Uja drainage system in to the Alluvial deposits to the shallow aquifer system. In the other hand, and since more than 40 years, the nine groundwater boreholes are taping about 3 MCM/a, water table decline of about 5 m. Currently, water table locates between -290 m in the west and decrease to - 311 m in the east. Groundwater flows from the Mountain aquifer in the west to the Shallow aquifer in the east through the major fault system. The permeability of the Mountain carbonate layers is 2.49E-1 m/min and decrease to 1.6 E-2 m/min in the layers of the Shallow aquifer system, this decrease of Kf-value east wards cause a semi-barrier for groundwater flow regime, also water salinity increase from 1500 S/cm in Mountain aquifer to 3000 few hundred m to the east of the fault and rise to 6000 S/cm in the eastern part. The groundwater flows east wards through a corridor of 1500 meter length along the fault system.

Manasra, Kayan; Marei, Amer; Sbiah, Mohamed; Uter, Hussam; Abu Thaher, Ayman

2013-04-01

487

Diel distribution of age-0 largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, in B. E. Jordan Lake, North Carolina (USA) and its relation to cover  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used prepositioned area electrofishers (PAEs, 10X1.5 m) to assess diel differences in distribution of age-0 largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, in August 1992-1993 in a paired sampling design. PAEs were placed parallel to shore in an embayment of an unvegetated reservoir (B. E. Jordan Lake, North Carolina, USA). The catch per unit effort (CPUE=fish/PAE) was significantly higher at night than during the day in both years, indicating that age-0 largemouth bass exhibit nocturnal inshore movements. Age-0 largemouth bass captured inshore during day were smaller than those captured at night, indicating that movement patterns may change ontogenetically. Inshore-offshore movements of age-0 largemouth bass were significantly reduced in the presence of cover, suggesting that diel movements were influenced by specific habitat components. Diel movements likely were related to foraging, resting and predator avoidance behavior and could affect population dynamics and introduce bias in assessment programs.

Irwin, E.R.; Noble, R.L.

2000-01-01

488

The Prey Pathway: A Regional History of Cattle (Bos taurus) and Pig (Sus scrofa) Domestication in the Northern Jordan Valley, Israel  

PubMed Central

The faunal assemblage from the 9th-8th millennium BP site at Sha'ar Hagolan, Israel, is used to study human interaction with wild suids and cattle in a time period just before the appearance of domesticated animals of these species in the Jordan Valley. Our results, based on demographic and osteometric data, indicate that full domestication of both cattle and suids occurred at the site during the 8th millennium. Importantly, domestication was preceded in both taxa by demographic and metric population parameters indicating severe overhunting. The possible role of overhunting in shaping the characteristics of domesticated animals and the social infrastructure to ownership of herds is then explored. PMID:23405240

Marom, Nimrod; Bar-Oz, Guy

2013-01-01

489

Correlation between the silica concentration and the orifice temperature in the warm springs along the jordan-dead sea rift valley  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analysis of twenty-one thermal springs emerging along the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley in Israel indicates a very good correlation between the concentration of dissolved silica and the temperature of the spring orifice. Dissolution of quartz was identified as the apparent source of the silica in the water. Application of the silica geothermometer for mixed systems suggests that the springs in the Tiberias Lake Basin are supplied with hot water from deep reservoir (or reservoirs) at a temperature of 115??C (239??F). The same temperature was postulated earlier by the application of the Na-K-Ca hydro-geothermometer to a group of thermal springs in the same basin. The temperature of the reservoir supplying hot brines to the springs emerging along the western shore of the Dead Sea is estimated at 90??C (194??F).

Levitte, D.; Eckstein, Y.

1978-01-01

490

Factor Structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale: Cross-Cultural Comparisons Between Jordanian Arab and Malaysian Muslim University Students in Jordan.  

PubMed

This study reported the differences in factor structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) among Jordanian Arab and Malaysian Muslim participants and further examined its validity and reliability. A convenience sample of 553 Jordanian Arab and 183 Malaysian Malay Muslim university students was recruited from governmental universities in northern Jordan. The findings of this study revealed that this scale consists of two factors for the Jordanian Arab group, representing the "Religious Well-Being" and the "Existential Well-Being" subscales, and consists of three factors for the Malaysian group, representing the "Affiliation/Meaning and Purpose," "Positive Existential Well-Being/God Caring and Love," and "Alienation/Despair" subscales. In conclusion, the factor structure of the SWBS for both groups in this study was psychometrically sound with evidence of acceptable to good validity and reliability. Furthermore, this study supported the multidimensional nature of the SWBS and the earlier notion that ethnicity shapes responses to this scale. PMID:24867886

Musa, Ahmad S

2014-05-27

491

Nutritional and ecological evaluation of dairy farming systems based on concentrate feeding regimes in semi-arid environments of Jordan.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional and ecological aspects of feeding systems practiced under semi-arid environments in Jordan. Nine dairy farms representing the different dairy farming systems were selected for this study. Feed samples (n=58), fecal samples (n=108), and milk samples (n=78) were collected from the farms and analysed for chemical composition. Feed samples were also analysed for metabolisable energy (ME) contents and in vitro organic matter digestibility according to Hohenheim-Feed-Test. Furthermore, fecal nitrogen concentration was determined to estimate in vivo organic matter digestibility. ME and nutrient intakes were calculated based on the farmer's estimate of dry matter intake and the analysed composition of the feed ingredients. ME and nutrient intakes were compared to recommended standard values for adequate supply of ME, utilizable crude protein, rumen undegradable crude protein (RUCP), phosphorus (P), and calcium (Ca). Technology Impact Policy Impact Calculation model complemented with a partial life cycle assessment model was used to estimate greenhouse gas emissions of milk production at farm gate. The model predicts CH4, N2O and CO2 gases emitted either directly or indirectly. Average daily energy corrected milk yield (ECM) was 19kg and ranged between 11 and 27kg. The mean of ME intake of all farms was 184MJ/d with a range between 115 and 225MJ/d. Intake of RUCP was lower than the standard requirements in six farms ranging between 19 and 137g/d, was higher (32 and 93g/d) in two farms, and matched the requirements in one farm. P intake was higher than the requirements in all farms (mean oversupply=19g/d) and ranged between 3 and 30g/d. Ca intake was significantly below the requirements in small scale farms. Milk nitrogen efficiency N-eff (milk N/intake N) varied between 19% and 28% and was mainly driven by the level of milk yield. Total CO2 equivalent (CO2 equ) emission ranged between 0.90 and 1.88kg CO2/kg ECM milk, where the enteric and manure CH4 contributed to 52% of the total CO2 equ emissions, followed by the indirect emissions of N2O and the direct emissions of CO2 gases which comprises 17% and 15%, respectively, from total CO2 equ emissions. Emissions per kg of milk were significantly driven by the level of milk production (r (2)=0.93) and of eDMI (r (2)=0.88), while the total emissions were not influenced by diet composition. A difference of 16kg ECM/d in milk yield, 9% in N-eff and of 0.9kg CO2 equ/kg in ECM milk observed between low and high yielding animals. To improve the nutritional status of the animals, protein requirements have to be met. Furthermore, low price by-products with a low carbon credit should be included in the diets to replace the high proportion of imported concentrate feeds and consequently improve the economic situation of dairy farms and mitigate CO2 equ emissions. PMID:24596499

Alqaisi, Othman; Hemme, Torsten; Hagemann, Martin; Susenbeth, Andreas

2014-01-01

492

STEM Education in Jordan Applicable to Developing Future Geophysicists: An Example Combining Electrical Engineering and Medical Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students in developing countries interested in STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering & math) often choose majors that will improve their job opportunities in their home country when they graduate, e.g. engineering or medicine. Geoscience might be chosen as a sub-discipline of civil engineering, but rarely as a primary major unless there are local economic natural resources. The Institute of International Education administers the ExxonMobil Middle East and North Africa region scholars program designed to develop skilled students with a focus on geoscience and to build relationships with academic leaders by offering select faculty the opportunity to participation in the AGU fall meeting. At the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST), research in electrical engineering applied to medicine has potential links to geosciences. In geophysics, neural wavelet analysis (NWA) is commonly used to process complex seismic signals, e.g. for interpreting lithology or identifying hydrocarbons. In this study, NWA was used to characterize cardiac arrhythmias. A classification scheme was developed in which a neural network is used to identify three types of arrhythmia by distinct frequency bands. The performance of this scheme was tested using patient records from two electrocardiography (ECG) databases. These records contain normal ECG signals, as well as abnormal signals from atrial fibrillation (AF), ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) arrhythmias. The continuous wavelet transform is applied over frequencies of 0-50 Hz for times of 0-2s. For a normal ECG, the results show that the strongest signal is in a frequency range of 4-10 Hz. For AF, a low frequency ECG signal in the range of 0-5 Hz extends over the whole time domain. For VT, the low frequency spectrum is in the range of 2-10 Hz, appearing as three distinct bands. For VF, a continuous band in the range of 2-10 Hz extends over the whole time domain. The classification of the three arrhythmias used a Back-propagation neural network whose input is the energy level calculated from the wavelet transform. The network was trained using 13 different patterns (3 for AF, 5 for VT and 5 for VF) and blind tested on 25 records. The classification scheme correctly identified all 9 VF records, 5 of 6 VT records, and 9 of 10 AF records. Manual interpretation of time-frequency seismic data is computationally intensive because large volumes of data are generated during the time-frequency analysis process. The proposed NWA method has the potential to partially automate the interpretation of seismic data. Also, a relatively straight-forward adaptation of the proposed NWA-based classification scheme may help identify hydrocarbon-laden reservoirs, which have been observed to contain enhanced low-frequency content in the time-frequency domain (Castagna, Sun, & Siegfried, 2003).

Fraiwan, A.; Khadra, L.; Shahab, W.; Olgaard, D. L.

2010-12-01

493

Aspen Jordan Final Paper  

E-print Network

. An Environmental Studies class chose the first 30 diners at lunch and dinner meals, and weighed the food waste from their plates. The results showed that dining tray-free at lunch can reduce solid food waste by 14.4 percent, while tray-free dining at dinner can reduce solid food waste by 47.1 percent. The class also counted

Aalberts, Daniel P.

494

Minnesota River at Jordan  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Great Lakes water availability studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey aim to help characterize how much water the Basin has now, how water availability is changing, and how much water it can expect to have in the future....

495

Configuration of water table and distribution of downward leakage to the Prairie du Chien-Jordan Aquifer in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The configuration of the water table as plotted at a contour interval of 20 feet (6 metres) on quadrangle maps (scale 1:2,500) of the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area. Control points used for mapping were water levels in wells, lakes and sloughs, and places where topographic contours cross perennial streams. A computer program, using a variation of Darcy's law, was developed to determine distribution of 1) downward leakage to the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer under steady-state conditions, using estimated vertical-hydraulic conductivity values for overlying materials; 2) calculated vertical hydraulic conductivity values, assuming uniform leakage to the aquifer; and 3) additional leakage to the aquifer resulting from increased pumpage during the summer. For data determination and data input to the computer program, the area was gridded into units of 1-minute longitude by 1-minute latitude, about 600 acres (243 hectares) per unit. Previous work estimated the increased summer pumpage (1971) of ground water to be 127 million gallons (481x106 litres) per day. Calculations, made Within the limits of governing assumptions, indicate that 10 to 20 percent of increased summer pumpage is derived from increased leakage. Most of the remainder is probably from captured natural discharge and induced recharge from major streams within the influence of summer cones of depression. Based on available data and estimates of vertical hydraulic conductivity for geologic units, major leakage to the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer is indicated to occur in formation subcrop areas, especially where these areas are. overlain by the most permeable glacial drift.

Larson-Higdem, Dana C.; Larson, S.P.; Norvitch, Ralph F.

1975-01-01

496

Modelling surface runoff and water productivity in small dryland watersheds with water-harvesting interventions, an application from Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vast areas of the rangelands (badia) of West Asia and North Africa are severely degraded due to over-grazing, cutting of shrubs and ploughing. Because of the scarce vegetation cover and the often dense soil surface crust, a large part of the limited rainfall runs off to wadis or evaporates back to the atmosphere with little local benefit. To develop and evaluate techniques for rehabilitation of the degraded lands an integrated research project was implemented with two communities in the badia of Jordan. The average annual rainfall in the research area is approximately 150 mm/yr. The project tested different micro-catchment water-harvesting techniques (earthen dikes planted with fodder shrubs) to capture the runoff and improve plant survival and growth in the watersheds. To estimate the long-term benefits of these water-harvesting systems and to assist with watershed-level planning and design a model is needed. However, current models can not capture the spatially variable runoff and water-harvesting processes in these environments. The objective of the research was to develop a model for estimating the runoff and biomass production of small badia watersheds with and without water-harvesting interventions. The basic spatial unit of the model is a square grid cell. Each cell is assigned to a specific land use unit, based on the characteristics of the soil and surface that affect the runoff, infiltration, and biomass production potential of the land. The model computes infiltration and runoff for each cell from daily rainfall with a curvilinear equation, based on data from plot studies. The runoff is routed using a 10-m digital elevation model and can infiltrate in downstream cells. The water infiltrated in each cell is summed for the August-September hydrologic year; and the annual biomass production is computed based on the water productivity potential of the cell. The model was applied to a 119-ha watershed, where 11 ha of micro-catchments were implemented, using a 32-year rainfall record. The slopes in the watershed vary between 0 and 12% with the majority of the land ranging between 2 and 6%. The soils are generally shallow (less than 0.5 m) and on the stony hilltops the bedrock is sometimes exposed. However, deep alluvial soils are found in local depressions and along the main wadi. The majority of the land is ploughed for barley, with alternate fallow years. During fallow years, some natural vegetation grows in the land. Due to the limited and often poorly distributed rain the barley produces none or little grain, and is usually grazed by flocks of sheep and goats in spring. Highly degraded natural rangeland vegetation is found on the stony upper-slopes, but the deep soils along the main wadi turn green after good rainfall. Model simulations, using best parameter estimates, indicated that the water-harvesting interventions reduced the average runoff out of the watershed by 3%. Because the micro-catchments are established in the gently sloping lands, there may be an option to combine these micro-catchment systems with small dams or reservoirs to capture the runoff from more rocky upstream areas. The average biomass production of the water-harvesting intervention area increased from 0.44 ton/ha under the original farmer management to 0.56 ton/ha per year under water-harvesting. Even more importantly, the water harvesting resulted in much more stable biomass production, with a coefficient of variation of 0.42, as compared to 0.89 for the original farmer treatment. Field observations also indicated that the micro-catchments and the year-round cover of shrubs in the water-harvesting area reduced erosion and provided a micro-environment that improved the biodiversity of the site. The model has helped us to better understand the system and to compute the economics of these interventions. Data collection is on-going to improve the parameterization of the model, including the erosion component.

Bruggeman, A.; Akroush, S.; Mudabber, M.; Ziadat, F.; Oweis, T.

2009-04-01

497

Determination of flow losses in the Cape Fear River between B. Everett Jordan Lake and Lillington, North Carolina, 2008-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 2008-2010, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a hydrologic investigation in cooperation with the Triangle J Council of Governments Cape Fear River Flow Study Committee and the North Carolina Division of Water Resources to collect hydrologic data in the Cape Fear River between B. Everett Jordan Lake and Lillington in central North Carolina to help determine if suspected flow losses occur in the reach. Flow loss analyses were completed by summing the daily flow releases at Jordan Lake Dam with the daily discharges at Deep River at Moncure and Buckhorn Creek near Corinth, then subtracting these values from the daily discharges at Cape Fear River at Lillington. Examination of long-term records revealed that during 10,227 days of the 1983-2010 water years, 408 days (4.0 percent) had flow loss when conditions were relatively steady with respect to the previous day's records. The flow loss that occurred on these 40 days ranged from 0.49 to 2,150 cubic feet per second with a median flow loss of 37.2 cubic feet per second. The months with the highest number of days with flow losses were June (16. percent), September (16.9 percent), and October (19.4 percent). A series of synoptic discharge measurements made on six separate days in 2009 provided "snapshots" of overall flow conditions along the study reach. The largest water diversion is just downstream from the confluence of the Haw and Deep Rivers, and discharges substantially decrease in the main stem downstream from the intake point. Downstream from Buckhorn Dam, minimal gain or loss between the dam and Raven Rock State Park was noted. Analyses of discharge measurements and ratings for two streamgages-one at Deep River at Moncure and the other at Cape Fear River at Lillington-were completed to address the accuracy of the relation between stage and discharge at these sites. The ratings analyses did not indicate a particular time during the 1982-2011 water years in which a consistent bias occurred in the computations of discharge records that would indicate false flow losses. A total of 34 measured discharges at a streamgage on the Haw River below B. Everett Jordan Lake near Moncure were compared with the reported hourly flow releases from Jordan Lake Dam. Because 28 of 34 measurements were within plus or minus 10 percent of the hourly flow releases reported by the U.S Army Corps of Engineers, use of the current discharge computation tables for reporting Jordan Lake Dam flow releases is generally supported. A stage gage was operated on the Cape Fear River at Buckhorn Dam near Corinth to collect continuous stage-only records. Throughout the study period, flow over the dam was observed along its length, and flow loss within the study reach is not attributed to river-level fluctuations at the dam. Water-use information and (or) data were obtained for five industrial facilities, a regional power utility, two municipalities, one small hydropower facility on the Deep River, and one quarry operation also adjacent to the Deep River. The largest water users are the regional power producer, a small hydropower operation, and the two municipalities. The total water-use diversions for these facilities range from almost 25.5 to 38.5 cubic feet per second (39.5 to 59.5 million gallons per day) during the winter and summer periods, respectively. This range is equivalent to 69 to 104 percent of the 37 cubic feet per second median flow loss. The Lockville hydropower station is on the Deep River about 1 mile downstream from the streamgage near Moncure. Run-of-river operations at the facility do not appear to affect flow losses in the study reach. The largest water user in the study area is a regional power producer at a coal-fired power-generation plant located immediately adjacent to the Cape Fear River just downstream from the confluence of the Haw an Deep Rivers. Comparisons of daily water withdrawals, sup-plied by the regional power producer, and discharge records at a streamgage on the diversion canal indicated many days when consumption exceeded the producer's estimates for the cooli

Weaver, J. Curtis; McSwain, Kristen Bukowski

2013-01-01

498

Rising cesarean deliveries among apparently low-risk mothers at university teaching hospitals in Jordan: analysis of population survey data, 20022012  

PubMed Central

Background: Cesarean delivery conducted without medical indication places mothers and infants at risk for adverse outcomes. This study assessed changes in trends of, and factors associated with, cesarean deliveries in Jordan, from 2002 to 2012. Methods: Data for ever-married women ages 1549 years from the 2002, 2007, and 2012 Jordan Population and Family Health Surveys were used. Analyses were restricted to mothers who responded to a question regarding the hospital-based mode of delivery for their last birth occurring within the 5 years preceding each survey (2002, N?=?3,450; 2007, N?=?6,307; 2012, N?=?6,365). Normal birth weight infants and singleton births were used as markers for births that were potentially low risk for cesarean delivery, because low/high birth weight and multiple births are among the main obstetric variables that have been documented to increase risk of cesareans. Weighted descriptive and multivariate analyses were conducted using 4 logistic regression models: (1) among all mothers; and among mothers stratified (2) by place of delivery; (3) by birth weight of infants; and (4) by singleton vs. multiple births. Results: The cesarean delivery rate increased significantly over time, from 18.2% in 2002, to 20.1% in 2007, to 30.3% in 2012. Place of delivery, birth weight, and birth multiplicity were significantly associated with cesarean delivery after adjusting for confounding factors. Between 2002 and 2012, the rate increased by 99% in public hospitals vs. 70% in private hospitals; by 93% among normal birth weight infants vs. 73% among low/high birth weight infants; and by 92% among singleton births vs. 29% among multiple births. The changes were significant across all categories except among multiple births. Further stratification revealed that the cesarean delivery rate was 2.29 times higher in university teaching hospitals (UTHs) than in private hospitals (P< .001), and 2.31 times higher than in government hospitals (P< .001). Moreover, in UTH