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1

Jordan.  

PubMed

Jordan is a country of 91,000 sq km, only 11% of which is arable. The 1980 population was 2.8 million, growing at 3.65% per year. Most of the people are of Arab stock, including between 1 and 1 1/4 million Palestinians. 95% of the people are Sunni Muslims. The national language is Arabic, and literacy is 71%. The infant mortality rate in 1984 was 50/1000, and life expectancy is 64 years. Suffrage is universal. The 1986 gross domestic product was $4.3 billion, per capita $1530; the growth rate was 2.6%. 80% of the people are employed in agriculture and 20% in industry. The major resources are phosphate and potash. The dinar is worth $0.35. Jordan's economy grew during the 1960s and 1970s, and it achieved the 10% growth rate called for in its 1st 5-year plan (1976-80). The 2nd 5-year plan saw a slow-down in the economy, and the 3rd 5-year plan aims at a growth rate of only 5.1% and the creation of 97,000 new jobs. A major weakness of the economy is its dependence on money from abroad -- $0.5 billion from other Arab countries, wages of expatriate Jordanians working in the Gulf states, and $1.7 billion in US aid between 1952 and 1987. 1986 exports amounted to $732 million, imports to $2.4 billion. Jordan was settled by Canaanites around 2000 BC and was ruled successively by Egyptians, Assyrians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Turks, and from 1919 to 1946 Britain. The independent Hashemite Kingdom, a constitutional monarchy, was founded in 1946. War with Israel ended with the establishment of the present official border in 1949, but Israel has occupied the West Bank of the Jordan since 1967, and the militant pro-Syrian Palestinian fedayeen maintained a guerrilla war within Jordan until 1973. In 1974 King Hussein recognized the Palestine Liberation Organization as the sole representative of the Palestinian people. However, by reconvening Parliament in 1984 with representatives from the West Bank, the King contradicted his recognition of the claims of the Palestine Liberation Organization to represent all Palestinians. King Hussein has urged the Palestine Liberation Organization to accept UN Security Council resolutions 242 and 338 and renounce the use of violence. The November 1987 Arab League summit in Amman was a major victory for Hussein's diplomatic efforts. PMID:12177997

1988-06-01

2

Nearly generalized Jordan derivations  

E-print Network

Let $A$ be an algebra and let $X$ be an $A$-bimodule. A $\\Bbb C-$linear mapping $d:A \\to X$ is called a generalized Jordan derivation if there exists a Jordan derivation (in the usual sense) $\\delta:A \\to X$ such that $d(a^2)=ad(a)+\\delta(a)a$ for all $a \\in A.$ The main purpose of this paper to prove the Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability and superstability of the generalized Jordan derivations.

Gordji, M Eshaghi

2008-01-01

3

n-Jordan homomorphisms  

E-print Network

Let $n\\in \\Bbb N,$ and let $A,B$ be two rings. An additive map $h: A\\to B$ is called n-Jordan homomorphism if $h(a^n)=(h(a))^n$ for all $a \\in {A}$. Every Jordan homomorphism is an n-Jordan homomorphism, for all $n\\geq 2,$ but the converse is false, in general. In this paper we investigate the n-Jordan homomorphisms on Banach algebras. Indeed some results related to continuity are given as well.

Gordji, M Eshaghi

2008-01-01

4

Nearly generalized Jordan derivations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let $A$ be an algebra and let $X$ be an $A$-bimodule. A $\\\\Bbb C-$linear mapping $d:A \\\\to X$ is called a generalized Jordan derivation if there exists a Jordan derivation (in the usual sense) $\\\\delta:A \\\\to X$ such that $d(a^2)=ad(a)+\\\\delta(a)a$ for all $a \\\\in A.$ The main purpose of this paper to prove the Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability and superstability of the

M. Eshaghi Gordji; N. Ghobadipour

2008-01-01

5

Nearly generalized Jordan derivations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let A be an algebra and let X be an A-bimodule. A ?-linear mapping d: A ? X is called a generalized Jordan derivation if there exists a Jordan derivation (in the usual sense) ?: A ? X such that d(a\\u000a 2) = ad(a)+?(a)a for all a ? A. The main purpose of this paper is to prove the Hyers-Ulam-Rassias

M. Eshaghi Gordji; N. Ghobadipour

2011-01-01

6

JORDAN SUPERALGEBRAS DEFINED BY BRACKETS  

E-print Network

.Martinez, I.Shestakov, E.Zelmanov In [KMZ] it was shown that all Jordan superalgebras that correspond [KMZ], [MZ]. In particular, we show that the Jordan superalgebras of the Cheng-Kac series are special

7

QUADRATIC RECIPROCITY JORDAN SCHETTLER  

E-print Network

is a quadratic residue mod p -1 if n is a quadratic nonresidue mod p 0 if p|n. The law of quadratic reciprocityQUADRATIC RECIPROCITY JORDAN SCHETTLER Abstract. The goals of this project are to have the reader proof of Gauss's Theorema Aureum of quadratic reciprocity. 1. Quadratic Residues and Legendre Symbols

Bigelow, Stephen

8

Horseflies of Jordan.  

PubMed

The horsefly (Diptera: Tabanidae) fauna of Jordan consists of 21 species belonging to seven genera. The present study adds 17 new records to this little-known group of haematophagous insects. Most of the new records were collected from several localities within the Jordan Valley. These new records are Chrysops flavipes Meigen, Atylotus farinosus (Szilády), Dasyrhamphis umbrinus (Meigen), Haematopota coronata Austen, Hybomitra decora (Loew), Hybomitra mendica (Villeneuve), Tabanus accensus Austen, T. albifacies Loew, T. bifarius Loew, T. darimonti Leclercq, T. laetetinctus Becker, T. leleani Austen, T. pallidipes Austen, T. regularis Jaennicke, T. rupinae Austen, T. sufis Jaennicke and Therioplectes tunicatus (Szilády). Tabanus albifacies and T. sufis were the most common species collected by hand nets (19.85% and 17.73%, respectively) and D. umbrinus, Haematopota minuscula Austen, and Haematopota coronata were the least common species (0.12% for each). Zoogeographical analysis of the recorded species showed that 12 species are of Mediterranean origin, four are of Afrotropical origin, two of European origin and at least three species can be considered as endemic to the Middle East. PMID:15189248

Al-Talafha, H; Amr, Z S; Baker, M Abu; Bader, A Katbeh

2004-06-01

9

DERIVATIONS AND PROJECTIONS ON JORDAN TRIPLES  

E-print Network

DERIVATIONS AND PROJECTIONS ON JORDAN TRIPLES Introduction to non-associative algebra, continuous and differential equations. #12;Pascual Jordan (1902­1980) Pascual Jordan was a German theoretical and mathematical in the Department of Mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is noted for his work with Michael

Russo, Bernard

10

A conversation with Jordan Cohen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan Cohen calls himself 'sort of an engineer and sort of a linguist.' This diverse background has been the foundation for his long history working with speech technology, including almost 30 years with government agencies, with a little time out in the middle to work in IBM's speech recognition group. Until recently he was the chief technology officer of VoiceSignal,

Charlene O'hanlon

2006-01-01

11

SOLAR ENERGY POTENTIAL IN JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is aimed to constitute a database for the researchers interested in utilizing solar power in Jordan. It presents the investigation for seven sites distributed on all territory of the country. Based on long-term measured solar irradiation levels, provided by the National Energy Research Center, solar insolation profiles as well as solar irradiance characteristics are estimated. The obtained results

Yaser Anagreh; Ahmad Bataineh; Muhammad Al-Odat

12

WENDY'S XENHARMONIC KEYBOARD JORDAN SCHETTLER  

E-print Network

WENDY'S XENHARMONIC KEYBOARD JORDAN SCHETTLER 1. MOTIVATION Wendy Carlos is an American composer Beauty in the Beast because of the experimentation with various so-called xenharmonic scales, i.e., scales other than the familiar 12-tone scale on a standard keyboard. This standard keyboard has equal

Sideris, Thomas C.

13

Probabilistic inference in graphical models Michael I. Jordan  

E-print Network

Probabilistic inference in graphical models Michael I. Jordan jordan@cs.berkeley.edu Division in graphical models Correspondence: Michael I. Jordan EECS Computer Science Division 387 Soda Hall # 1776 Berkeley, CA 94720-1776 Phone: (510) 642-3806 Fax: (510) 642-5775 email: jordan@cs.berkeley.edu #12;Jordan

Chuang, Yung-Yu

14

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos  

E-print Network

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

15

Water shortage in Jordan — Sustainable solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The large environmental challenge that Jordan faces today is the scarcity of water. Definitely, water is the significant feature in the population\\/resource equation where water resources in Jordan are limited and the country's population has continued to rise. A high rate of natural population growth, combined with massive influxes of refugees, has transformed into an imbalance condition between population and

Nidal Hadadin; Maher Qaqish; Emad Akawwi; Ahmed Bdour

2010-01-01

16

8.EE Kimi and Jordan  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Kimi and Jordan are each working during the summer to earn money in addition to their weekly allowance, and they are saving all their money. Kimi earns...

17

Stability and superstability of Jordan homomorphisms and Jordan derivations on Banach algebras and C *-algebras: A fixed point approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using fixed point methods, we prove the Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability and superstability of Jordan homomorphisms (Jordan *-homomorphisms), and Jordan derivations (Jordan *-derivations) on Banach algebras (C*-algebras) for the generalized Jensen-type functional equationrf(x+yr)+rf(x-yr)=2f(x), where r is a fixed positive real number in (1,?).

M. Eshaghi Gordji; A. Najati; A. Ebadian

2011-01-01

18

Jordan-Brans-Dicke Theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is primarily an historical survey of the origins and evolution of only one of a variety of many scalar-tensor (ST) alternatives to the standard Einstein equations of General Relativity. This review will only address itself to what has become known as the Brans-Dicke, or more properly Jordan-Brans-Dicke, theory based on the 1961 publications of Brans and Dicke. These papers substantially duplicate much of the work of Jordan and his group. However, for several reasons, including the stature of Dicke, this theoretical work from the 1960's was seminal in triggering an explosion of interest, both theoretical and experimental, into Einstein's theory and its alternatives. Until that time the early corroboration of Einstein's equations seemed to preclude interest in investigation of alternatives. From the 1960's on however, ST theories provided a remarkable impetus for renewed exploration into gravitational physics. Perhaps this has been their most significant contribution to the field of space-time physics, now especially in cosmology.

Brans, Carl H.

2014-03-01

19

Generalized Jordan-Wigner Transformations  

E-print Network

We introduce a new spin-fermion mapping, for arbitrary spin $S$ generating the SU(2) group algebra, that constitutes a natural generalization of the Jordan-Wigner transformation for $S=1/2$. The mapping, valid for regular lattices in any spatial dimension $d$, serves to unravel hidden symmetries in one representation that are manifest in the other. We illustrate the power of the transformation by finding exact solutions to lattice models previously unsolved by standard techniques. We also present a proof of the existence of the Haldane gap in $S=$1 bilinear nearest-neighbors Heisenberg spin chains and discuss the relevance of the mapping to models of strongly correlated electrons. Moreover, we present a general spin-anyon mapping for the case $d \\leq 2$.

C. D. Batista; G. Ortiz

2000-08-25

20

Jordan ships oil shale to China  

SciTech Connect

Jordan and China have signed an agreement to develop oil shale processing technology that could lead to a 200 ton/day oil shale plant in Jordan. China will process 1200 tons of Jordanian oil shale at its Fu Shun refinery. If tests are successful, China could build the demonstration plant in Jordan's Lajjun region, where the oil shale resource is estimated at 1.3 billion tons. China plans to send a team to Jordan to conduct a plant design study. A Lajjun oil shale complex could produce as much as 50,000 b/d of shale oil. An earlier 500 ton shipment of shale is said to have yielded promising results.

Not Available

1986-12-01

21

Jordan structures in mathematics and physics  

E-print Network

The aim of this paper is to offer an overview of the most important applications of Jordan structures inside mathematics and also to physics, up-dated references being included. For a more detailed treatment of this topic see - especially - the recent book Iordanescu [364w], where sugestions for further developments are given through many open problems, comments and remarks pointed out throughout the text. Nowadays, mathematics becomes more and more nonassociative and my prediction is that in few years nonassociativity will govern mathematics and applied sciences. Keywords: Jordan algebra, Jordan triple system, Jordan pair, JB-, JB*-, JBW-, JBW*-, JH*-algebra, Ricatti equation, Riemann space, symmetric space, R-space, octonion plane, projective plane, Barbilian space, Tzitzeica equation, quantum group, B\\"acklund-Darboux transformation, Hopf algebra, Yang-Baxter equation, KP equation, Sato Grassmann manifold, genetic algebra, random quadratic form.

Iordanescu, Radu

2011-01-01

22

Jordan structures in mathematics and physics  

E-print Network

The aim of this paper is to offer an overview of the most important applications of Jordan structures inside mathematics and also to physics, up-dated references being included. For a more detailed treatment of this topic see - especially - the recent book Iordanescu [364w], where sugestions for further developments are given through many open problems, comments and remarks pointed out throughout the text. Nowadays, mathematics becomes more and more nonassociative and my prediction is that in few years nonassociativity will govern mathematics and applied sciences. Keywords: Jordan algebra, Jordan triple system, Jordan pair, JB-, JB*-, JBW-, JBW*-, JH*-algebra, Ricatti equation, Riemann space, symmetric space, R-space, octonion plane, projective plane, Barbilian space, Tzitzeica equation, quantum group, B\\"acklund-Darboux transformation, Hopf algebra, Yang-Baxter equation, KP equation, Sato Grassmann manifold, genetic algebra, random quadratic form.

Radu Iordanescu

2011-06-22

23

Jordan *-homomorphisms on $C^*$-algebras  

E-print Network

In this paper, we investigate Jordan *-homomorphisms on $C^*$-algebras associated with the following functional inequality $\\|f(\\frac{b-a}{3})+f(\\frac{a-3c}{3})+f(\\frac{3a+3c-b}{3})\\| \\leq \\|f(a)\\|.$ We moreover prove the superstability and the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of Jordan *-homomorphisms on $C^*$-algebras associated with the following functional equation

Gordji, M Eshaghi; Park, C

2008-01-01

24

LECTURE NOTES FOR 416: JORDAN CANONICAL FORM CHARLES REZK  

E-print Network

;2 CHARLES REZK We can define the direct sum V1 · · · Vk of a finite collection V1, . . . , Vk of FLECTURE NOTES FOR 416: JORDAN CANONICAL FORM CHARLES REZK Jordan form. Let F and r 1. The Jordan, for an arbitrary linear operator T : V V on a finite dimensional space. The proof naturally breaks up into two

Rezk, Charles

25

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE  

E-print Network

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU, generalized p-points, modules of constant Jordan type . 1 #12;2 SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU pt-s -Jordan type

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

26

INFLUENCE OF GULF WARS ON SUSTAINABILITY OF GROUNDWATER IN JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gulf wars have caused severe damages to the environment in Iraq, Kuwait, Jordan and the whole region. Examples of some impacts on the sustainability of water resources in Jordan are presented. Jordan is a small country of about 90000 km 2 , with about 6 million inhabitants. More than half a million used to work in Kuwait and other Gulf

Fathi Shaqour; Ismail Hashem; John Webb

27

Jordan $*-$homomorphisms between unital $C^*-$algebras  

E-print Network

Let $A,B$ be two unital $C^*-$algebras. We prove that every almost unital almost linear mapping $h:A\\longrightarrow B$ which satisfies $h(3^nuy+3^nyu) = h(3^nu)h(y)+h(y)h(3^nu)$ for all $u\\in U(A)$, all $y\\in A$, and all $n = 0, 1, 2,...$, is a Jordan homomorphism. Also, for a unital $C^*-$algebra $A$ of real rank zero, every almost unital almost linear continuous mapping $h:A\\longrightarrow B$ is a Jordan homomorphism when $h(3^nuy+3^nyu) = h(3^nu)h(y)+h(y)h(3^nu)$ holds for all $u\\in I_1(A_{sa})$, all $y\\in A,$ and all $n = 0, 1, 2,... ~$. Furthermore, we investigate the Hyers--Ulam--Rassias stability of Jordan $*-$homomorphisms between unital $C^*-$algebras by using the fixed points methods.

Gordji, M Eshaghi

2009-01-01

28

Jordan *-homomorphisms on $C^*$-algebras  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we investigate Jordan *-homomorphisms on $C^*$-algebras associated with the following functional inequality $\\\\|f(\\\\frac{b-a}{3})+f(\\\\frac{a-3c}{3})+f(\\\\frac{3a+3c-b}{3})\\\\| \\\\leq \\\\|f(a)\\\\|.$ We moreover prove the superstability and the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of Jordan *-homomorphisms on $C^*$-algebras associated with the following functional equation $$f(\\\\frac{b-a}{3})+f(\\\\frac{a-3c}{3})+f(\\\\frac{3a+3c-b}{3})=f(a).$$

M. Eshaghi Gordji; N. Ghobadipour

2008-01-01

29

Assessment of Early Childcare Programs in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Forty-five child caregivers and 120 parents participated in this study to examine perceptions of childcare programs in Jordan. The researchers developed a questionnaire that consisted of 6 dimensions: health, education, parent-caregiver relationship, facilities, building/landscape, and playground. Moreover, interviews with 10…

Al-Omari, Aieman A.; Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Dababneh, Khouloud A.

2011-01-01

30

Wave Packets and Turbulent Peter Jordan1  

E-print Network

Wave Packets and Turbulent Jet Noise Peter Jordan1 and Tim Colonius2 1 D´epartement Fluides 2013 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords aeroacoustics, jet noise, turbulence, coherent structures, control Abstract Turbulent jet noise is a controversial fluid mechanical puzzle that has amused

Dabiri, John O.

31

A negotiated solution for the Jordan Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of water in the Jordan Basin has been a key factor in the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, and between Israel and its neighbors. Efficient water use requires cooperation rather than confrontation, however. In this paper, we explore possible ways of sharing water through a negotiation game with two players -Arabs and Israelis. We determine the gross

M. Atwi; J. Sánchez Chóliz

2011-01-01

32

Mineralogy and chemistry of natrolite from Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

AB ST R ACT :A natrolite-cemented palagonite ash tuff unit is reported in a palaeo-basin in northeast Jordan. Phillipsite and chabazite are also identified. The zeolites were formed due to transformation of volcanic glass granules into palagonite by the reaction with percolating water in a closed hydrological system. Consequently, Si, Al, Ca, Na and K are leached out and precipitated

K. I BRAHIM

33

Dr. Ibrahim Badran Amman, Jordan June,2008  

E-print Network

Responsibilities - Dean of Faculty of Engineering Philadelphia University 2000 ­ 2007 - Advisor to the Prime of Illumination Engineering Baghdad 1976 5- General Recommendations for Illumination Amman, 1978 #12;4 6- Problems of Development in the Arab World Amman .1988 7- Energy in Jordan Amman ,1988 8- Nuclear Energy and The Chernobyl

34

The Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in Jordan is marked by a major depositional hiatus that differs in magnitude from place to place due to variable structural movements of the Syrian Arc Fold Belt that resulted in irregularity of Jordan/Levant depositional basin after the deposition of Maastrichtian succession. To elucidate the nature of this hiatus, fieldwork was carried out at a number of locations including lithofacies and stratigraphic analysis, and a multi-proxy study of microplanktonic biostratigraphy (calcareous nannofossilis and planktonic formaminifera). However, the duration of this hiatus extended over latest Maastrichtian and early Danian stages. This is based on the absence of the planktonic foraminifera; Pseudoguembelina hariaensis (CF3), Pseudoguembelina palpebra (CF2), Plummerita hantkeninoides (CF1), Guembelitria cretacea (P0), Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina (P&) zones and Parasubbotina pseudobulloides (P1a) subzones and the coeval calcareous nannofossils Nephrolithus frequens and Markalius inversus zones. We estimate that in the paleo-lows areas an unexpected 3.96 Ma hiatus is present. Conversely, in swell areas, the duration of the hiatus represents the entire Danian-Selandian interval and revealed an unexpected 10.33 Ma hiatus, especially in the central part of Jordan. Subsequently, a marked transgression took place over the whole of Jordan which resulted in the prevalence of deep water conditions (Zones P4 or equivalent NP7/8); this caused the deposition of a retrogradational parasequence set of middle shelf pelagic marl and chalk during a rapid relative rise of sea-level. A correlative hiatus and time gap have also been reported in different parts of the Arabian and African plates, indicating that Jordan was influenced by regional tectonics that combined with the latest Maastrichtian sea-level fall resulted in a long-term sub-marine hiatus and/or non-deposition of sediments. A combination of sea level changes and tectonic uplift are the likely cause for such a long gap in the sediment record in the region.

Farouk, Sherif; Marzouk, Akmal M.; Ahmad, Fayez

2014-11-01

35

Integrable chains with Jordan - Schwinger representations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The restiction to the class of Jordan - Schwinger representations of sl(n + 1) results in simple relations for the L matrices and in explicit expressions for the general Yang-Baxter operators as products of two parameter permutation operators. Limits are studied which are related to the finite dimensional representations and to degenerate Yangians. The analogy to the sl(2) case leads to analogous forms of global spin chain operators.

Kirschner, Roland

2013-01-01

36

Impact of Syrian Refugees on Jordan's Water Management Research Questions  

E-print Network

: -Water management in Jordan -Environmental impact assessments of refugee camps -Water resource. Refugee Camps in Jordan should not be located in areas experiencing severe water shortage or groundwater.S. Urban Planning Advisers: Clara Irazabal and Tess Russo Zaatari Refugee Camp #12;

37

Energy systems impacts desalination in Jordan Poul Alberg stergaard*  

E-print Network

. KEYWORDS Energy systems analysis, EnergyPLAN, desalination, Jordan, wind power * Corresponding author #12 of Heat and Power (CHP) plants) and heat from solar collectors. From an energy systems perspective1 Energy systems impacts desalination in Jordan Poul Alberg Ã?stergaard* Department of Development

Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

38

Jordan Reforms Public Education to Compete in a Global Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The King of Jordan's vision for education is resulting in innovative projects for the country. King Abdullah II wants Jordan to develop its human resources through public education to equip the workforce with skills for the future. From King Abdullah II's vision, the Education Reform for a Knowledge Economy (ERfKE) project implemented by the…

Erickson, Paul W.

2009-01-01

39

USING CONSTRUCTED WET LANDS TO IMPROVE WASTEWATER QUANTITY IN JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agricultural irrigation is considered to be the most economical way to dispose of municipal wastewater in sanitary manner in Jordan and reduce the gap between water supply and demand in Jordan, Hence, our concern should be targeted towards developing an energy-saving and resource-recycling system for wastewater purification. This paper present a newly implemented research project about the Use Of Constructed

Abeer Al-Balawenah

40

The History Of Organized Sports In Jordan (physical Activity)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work records and evaluates the overall development of organized sports in Jordan from a historical perspective in chronological order. A history of physical activities in the traditional Bedouin society before 1921 was also included in order to provide a historical basis for the modern era of organized sports in Jordan. The modern era (1921-1984), consisting of the formation of

Suha Maher Khalifeh

1986-01-01

41

Private and Privatised Higher Educational Institutions in Jordan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of private higher education in Jordan, analyzing major challenges associated with the privatization of education and evaluating Jordan's experience in meeting the educational needs of the country as well as neighboring countries. Raises questions that have a bearing on issues related to the efficiency of education,…

Zughoul, Muhammad Raji

2000-01-01

42

Barriers to Utilizing ICT in Education in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored barriers to utilizing information and communication technologies (ICT) for teaching and learning in the country of Jordan as indicated by participating stakeholders: students, teachers, and administrators. Jordan is a developing country in the heart of the Middle East with both tremendous opportunity as well as significant…

Alkhawaldeh, Nayef Ibrahim; Menchaca, Michael

2014-01-01

43

FlexCVG-Feb07 June 2010 JORDAN T. HASTINGS  

E-print Network

in a collaborative GIS for the Lake Tahoe region Chief Scientist / Research Director, go2 Systems, Inc., Irvine:5-6, pp.465-480 Hastings, Jordan T. and Tierney, Tim, 2008. Data-Sharing Technologies: The RETAAC Example/hastings/index.html Hastings, Jordan T., Raines, Gary L., and Schweickert, Richard A., 2003. The Lake Tahoe

Faulds, James E.

44

Systematics and distribution of horse flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Jordan.  

PubMed

The horse fly fauna of Jordan consists of 24 species belonging to seven genera. The present study adds two new records; Tabanus unifasciatus and Tabanus lunatus. Keys and illustrations for the horse flies of Jordan are presented based on examined materials. Distribution and geographic ranges for each species is also given. PMID:16007956

Al-Talafha, H; Amr, Z S; Baker, M Abu; Bader, A Katbeh

2005-06-01

45

Combating a Religious Radical Ideology v. Suppressing Islamic Opposition: Jordan’s Approach to Counterterrorism  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the aftermath of 9\\/11, criminal law reform in Jordan was part of the worldwide expansion of criminal laws facilitated by UNSC Resolution 1373 that was enacted under mandatory Chapter VII of the UN Charter. The introduced criminal law amendments were largely offered as a symbolic response to 9\\/11; it was built on the assumption of inadequacy of criminal law

Abeer Ghazi Jarrar

2009-01-01

46

Mushroom poisoning: a case report from Jordan.  

PubMed

An eight years male child with his family ate fresh mushroom at lunch time from back garden at their home in a village in the North of Jordan. By the evening approximately six hours later all started feeling nausea, abdominal cramps and vomiting they rushed to nearest primary health care center. After getting general medical medication they were transfer to a referral hospital at city of Irbid. The boy got deteriorated with diarrhea in addition to the previous gastrointestinal complains and died on third day. The message from this case is to ascertain in the public opinion that unknown type of mushroom even eaten previously could be poisonous and fetal. PMID:22816180

Shotar, Ali M; Alzyoud, Sukaina A; Samara, Omar; Obeidat, Jamal; Qasaimeh, G R

2012-02-15

47

US-Jordan Free Trade Agreement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US-Jordon Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was signed on October 24, 2000 to "eliminate duties and commercial barriers to bilateral trade in goods and services originating in the United States and Jordan." The FTA has seven major sections which cover tariff elimination, services, intellectual property rights, electronic commerce, labor provisions, environmental provisions, and consultation and dispute settlement. Along with the text of the agreement, accompanying documents and information include the complete US and Jordanian tariffs schedule, joint statement on World Trade Organization issues, and the FTA official press release and fact sheet.

48

Radiation Dominated Universe for Jordan-Brans-Dicke Cosmology  

E-print Network

Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology with a standard kinetic term for the scalar field and no mass term has the same radiation dominated solution as standard Einstein cosmology without the cosmological constant. Because of this, the primordial nucleosynthesis (Big - Bang nucleosynthesis) result obtained for standard cosmology remains the same for Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology. We show that Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology with a mass term for the scalar field as well as explaining dark energy for the present era, can also explain radiation dominated cosmology for the primordial nucleosynthesis era.

M. Arik; L. Amon Susam

2010-06-22

49

Construction of the Jordan basis for the Baker map  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Jordan canonical form basis states for an invertible chaotic map, the Baker map, are constructed. A straightforwardly obtained recursion formula is presented for construction of the Jordan states and of the spectral decomposition of the Frobenius-Perron evolution operator. Comparison of this method with earlier, subdynamics techniques demonstrates that it is much more direct and simpler. The physical significance of the Jordan states is approached from the point of view of an entropy evolution equation. The method is also applied to the Bernoulli map, yielding its eigenstates more straightforwardly than done previously.

Fox, Ronald F.

1997-06-01

50

Equivalence of the Einstein and Jordan frames  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

No experiment can measure an absolute scale: every dimensionful quantity has to be compared to some fixed unit scale in order to be measured, and thus only dimensionless quantities are really physical. The Einstein and Jordan frames are related by a conformal transformation of the metric, which amounts to rescaling all length scales. Since the absolute scale cannot be measured, both frames describe the same physics and are equivalent. In this article we make this explicit by rewriting the action in terms of dimensionless variables, which are invariant under a conformal transformation. For definitiveness, we concentrate on the action of Higgs inflation, but the results can easily be generalized. In addition, we show that the action for f (R ) gravity, which includes Starobinsky inflation, can be written in a frame-independent form.

Postma, Marieke; Volponi, Marco

2014-11-01

51

A Jordan GNS Construction for the Holonomy-Flux *-algebra  

E-print Network

The holonomy-flux *-algebra was recently proposed as an algebra of basic kinematical observables for loop quantum gravity. We show the conventional GNS construction breaks down when the the holonomy-flux *-algebra is allowed to be a Jordan algebra of observables. To remedy this, we give a Jordan GNS construction for the holonomy-flux *-algebra that is based on trace. This is accomplished by assuming the holonomy-flux *-algebra is an algebra of observables that is also a Banach algebra, hence a JB algebra. We show the Jordan GNS construction produces a state that is invariant under all inner derivations of the holonomy-flux *-algebra. Implications for the corresponding Jordan-Schrodinger equation are also discussed.

Michael Rios

2005-05-09

52

MICHAEL I. JORDAN Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science  

E-print Network

Vitae MICHAEL I. JORDAN Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science DepartmentGroot Memorial Lecture, Carnegie Mellon University, 2009. Pao-Lu Hsu Lecture, Beijing University, 2009. Institute

California at Irvine, University of

53

Bedouin in Jordan: exploring their rights to health  

E-print Network

to and Quality of Reproductive and Child Health Care to Marginal Peoples: Bedouin in Jordan and Lebanon the Royal Medical Services (RMS) formerly served the families of soldiers, since 2008 there has been free

Davies, Christopher

54

Report on Israel and Jordan Visit April 29, 2013  

E-print Network

-- in areas such as conflict management, food security, water policy, innovation and planted the seeds for expanded or new collaborations with Tel Aviv University, and with the University of Jordan. Our new collaboration with the University of Maryland

Hill, Wendell T.

55

Feasibility of Starting a Waterjet Fabrication Plant in Amman, Jordan  

E-print Network

Engineering Management Field Project Feasibility of Starting a Waterjet Fabrication Plant in Amman, Jordan By Khaled A. Ahmad Spring Semester, 2010 An EMGT Field Project report submitted to the Engineering Management... and library search support. 3 Preface It has been my desire for a long time to investigate what it takes to start a water jet fabrication plant in Amman, Jordan to precisely cut marble, granite, and ceramics. I worked in the manufacturing...

Ahmad, Khaled A.

2010-05-14

56

Stability of ternary Jordan homomorphisms and derivations associated to the generalized Jensen equation  

E-print Network

In this paper, we establish the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of Jordan homomorphisms and Jordan derivations between ternary algebras via the generalized Jensen equation $rf(\\frac{sx+ty}{r})=sf(x)+tf(y)$.

Gordji, M Eshaghi; Rassias, J M

2009-01-01

57

Stability of ternary Jordan homomorphisms and derivations associated to the generalized Jensen equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we establish the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of Jordan homomorphisms and Jordan derivations between ternary algebras via the generalized Jensen equation $rf(\\\\frac{sx+ty}{r})=sf(x)+tf(y)$.

M. Eshaghi Gordji; E. Rashidi; J. M. Rassias

2009-01-01

58

Historic and Traditional Urban Centers in Jordan: the Physical Transformation of Architecture and Landscape  

E-print Network

Historic and Traditional Urban Centers in Jordan: the Physical Transformation of Architecture (Vietnam) Abstract: Traditionally, the richness of Jordan consists of its history; ancient civilizations to discuss the relationship between traditional and modern planning methodology and building techniques

59

Faculty for Factory: A University-Industry Link Program in Jordan  

E-print Network

in the Gulf area, specifically, Saudi Arabia and UAE. #12;Jordanian Industry · Jordan economy is among for mechatronics in Jordan · The size of the "production, automation, and manufacturing" industry is small

60

The performance of water utilities in Jordan.  

PubMed

This paper aims to measure the relative performance of Jordan's water utilities for water sector (WS) and wastewater sector (WWS), and to investigate the major factors behind their inefficiencies. DEA (non-parametric method) and Tobit model (parametric method) were used at two stages. At the first stage DEA was used to evaluate the utilities' efficiency and to investigate the utilities' scale effect on efficiency. At the second stage Tobit model (regression) is applied to determine the impact of the non-controllable factors on utilities' inefficiencies where the efficiency score is the dependent variable in the regression. The results of DEA showed that there is a potential to reduce inputs level: water supply and operational expense (OPEX) for WS, and treated wastewater and OPEX for WWS, by around 15-20 and 23-27%, respectively. Aqaba and Jarash utilities are the most efficient utilities in the WS, while it is Amman utility in the WWS. The utility size has relatively moderate effect on the relative performance. It is concluded that the medium utility size for WS and large utility size for WWS is the most appropriate. Tobit model results indicate that commercialization activities have a clear positive impact on efficiency improvement for both sectors. PMID:20729581

Al-Assa'd, Tamer; Sauer, Johannes

2010-01-01

61

Pharmacy Education in Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait  

PubMed Central

The practice of pharmacy, as well as pharmacy education, varies significantly throughout the world. In Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia, the profession of pharmacy appears to be on the ascendance. This is demonstrated by an increase in the number of pharmacy schools and the number of pharmacy graduates from pharmacy programs. One of the reasons pharmacy is on the ascendance in these countries is government commitment to fund and support competitive, well-run pharmacy programs. In this report we describe pharmacy education in 3 Middle East countries: Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia. All 3 countries offer bachelor of pharmacy (BPharm) degrees. In addition, 2 universities in Jordan and 1 in Saudi Arabia offer PharmD degree programs. The teaching methods in all 3 countries combine traditional didactic lecturing and problem-based learning. Faculties of pharmacy in all 3 countries are well staffed and offer competitive remuneration. All 3 countries have a policy of providing scholarships to local students for postgraduate training abroad. The majority of students in Jordan and Kuwait are female, while the ratio of male to female students in Saudi Arabia is even. Students’ attitudes towards learning are generally positive in all 3 countries. In Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, most pharmacy graduates work in the public sector, while in Jordan, the majority work in the private sector. PMID:17136159

Al-Wazaify, Mayyada; Matowe, Lloyd; Albsoul-Younes, Abla; Al-Omran, Ola A.

2006-01-01

62

A Response to Jordan's (2004) "Explanatory Adequacy and Theories of Second Language Acquisition"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a recent paper (Jordan, Geoff Jordan takes issue with some of my claims about second language acquisition (SLA) theory. Specifically, he queries the necessity of a property theory, and he finds my discussion of explanation unsatisfactory. In this brief reply, I try to answer his criticisms. In a brief but interesting paper, Geoff Jordan (2004:…

Gregg, Kevin R.

2005-01-01

63

To appear: M. I. Jordan, Ed., Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers.  

E-print Network

. AN INTRODUCTION TO VARIATIONAL METHODS FOR GRAPHICAL MODELS MICHAEL I. JORDAN Massachusetts Institute variational algo- rithms can be formulated in each case. #12;2 MICHAEL I. JORDAN ET AL. 1. IntroductionTo appear: M. I. Jordan, Ed., Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers

Kearns, Michael

64

Multiway Spectral Clustering: A Margin-based Perspective Zhihua Zhang Michael I. Jordan  

E-print Network

Multiway Spectral Clustering: A Margin-based Perspective Zhihua Zhang Michael I. Jordan zzhang@stat.berkeley.edu jordan@stat.berkeley.edu Department of Statistics Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer, Shortreed and Meila, 2005, Ding et al., 2005, Bach and Jordan, 2006, von Luxburg, 2007). In the spectral

O'Brien, James F.

65

Jordan and Weiss: Graphical Models: Probabilistic inference 1 Graphical models: Probabilistic inference  

E-print Network

inference Michael I. Jordan jordan@cs.berkeley.edu Division of Computer Science and Department of StatisticsJordan and Weiss: Graphical Models: Probabilistic inference 1 Graphical models: Probabilistic Hebrew University RUNNING HEAD: Probabilistic inference in graphical models Correspondence: Michael I

Jordan, Michael I.

66

Hidden Markov decision trees Michael I. Jordan , Zoubin Ghahramaniy, and Lawrence K. Saul  

E-print Network

Hidden Markov decision trees Michael I. Jordan , Zoubin Ghahramaniy, and Lawrence K. Saul fjordan by Jordan and Jacobs (1994), where the decisions were treated as hidden multinomial random variables factorized variational approximations described by Saul and Jordan (1996), which allow tractable

Ghahramani, Zoubin

67

Hidden Markov decision trees Michael I. Jordan \\Lambda , Zoubin Ghahramani y , and Lawrence K. Saul \\Lambda  

E-print Network

Hidden Markov decision trees Michael I. Jordan \\Lambda , Zoubin Ghahramani y , and Lawrence K. Saul an output y is generated. A statistical approach to decision tree modeling was presented by Jordan described by Saul and Jordan (1996), which allow tractable substructures (e.g., the decision tree and Markov

Jordan, Michael I.

68

To appear: M. I. Jordan, (Ed.), Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers.  

E-print Network

of California Santa Cruz, CA AND MICHAEL I. JORDAN Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA Abstract #12; 2 TOMMI S. JAAKKOLA AND MICHAEL I. JORDAN the essential Markov properties underlying the graphTo appear: M. I. Jordan, (Ed.), Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers. IMPROVING

Jordan, Michael I.

69

To appear: M. I. Jordan, (Ed.), Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers.  

E-print Network

. AN INTRODUCTION TO VARIATIONAL METHODS FOR GRAPHICAL MODELS MICHAEL I. JORDAN Massachusetts Institute variational algo- rithms can be formulated in each case. #12;2 MICHAEL I. JORDAN ET AL. 1. IntroductionTo appear: M. I. Jordan, (Ed.), Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers

Ghahramani, Zoubin

70

To appear: M. I. Jordan, (Ed.), Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers.  

E-print Network

. AN INTRODUCTION TO VARIATIONAL METHODS FOR GRAPHICAL MODELS MICHAEL I. JORDAN Massachusetts Institute variational algo­ rithms can be formulated in each case. #12; 2 MICHAEL I. JORDAN ET AL. 1. IntroductionTo appear: M. I. Jordan, (Ed.), Learning in Graphical Models, Kluwer Academic Publishers

Kearns, Michael

71

GEOMORPHIC FEATURES AND SOIL FORMATION OF ARID LANDS IN NORTHEASTERN JORDAN  

E-print Network

GEOMORPHIC FEATURES AND SOIL FORMATION OF ARID LANDS IN NORTHEASTERN JORDAN GEOMORPHOLOGISCHE the geomorphic features and soil formation of the arid lands in northeastern Jordan, to provide information area (89 400 km2 ) of Jordan (Figure 1). The Jordanian Badia is a part of the `Mediterranean Sahara

Ahmad, Sajjad

72

Education reform and the quality of kindergartens in Jordan.  

PubMed

The present study evaluates a major education reform in Jordan-the implementation of public kindergartens-and provides an example of how evaluation can be incorporated into education reform. In the context of education reform in Jordan, 532 public kindergartens have been created over the last five years. A stratified random sample of kindergartens was selected to represent these new public kindergartens (n = 84) and previously existing private kindergartens (n = 23). Independent observers rated the quality of kindergarten environments in seven domains. Overall, 13% of public kindergarten environments were observed to be inadequate, 43% were of minimal quality, 43% were good, and 1% were excellent. In four of the seven domains, the quality of public kindergartens was significantly higher than the quality of private kindergartens; there were no significant differences in the other domains. Findings suggest the importance of continuing to implement high quality kindergartens in Jordan and of incorporating evaluations into education reform. PMID:21170163

Al-Hassan, Suha M; Obeidat, Osama M; Lansford, Jennifer E

2010-10-01

73

Education reform and the quality of kindergartens in Jordan  

PubMed Central

The present study evaluates a major education reform in Jordan—the implementation of public kindergartens—and provides an example of how evaluation can be incorporated into education reform. In the context of education reform in Jordan, 532 public kindergartens have been created over the last five years. A stratified random sample of kindergartens was selected to represent these new public kindergartens (n = 84) and previously existing private kindergartens (n = 23). Independent observers rated the quality of kindergarten environments in seven domains. Overall, 13% of public kindergarten environments were observed to be inadequate, 43% were of minimal quality, 43% were good, and 1% were excellent. In four of the seven domains, the quality of public kindergartens was significantly higher than the quality of private kindergartens; there were no significant differences in the other domains. Findings suggest the importance of continuing to implement high quality kindergartens in Jordan and of incorporating evaluations into education reform. PMID:21170163

Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Obeidat, Osama M.; Lansford, Jennifer E.

2010-01-01

74

Characterization of historical mortars in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the petrographic and mineralogical characterization of mortars from different archaeological sites in Jordan which encompass Nabatean, Late-Antique and Early Islamic (Umayyad) sites, in some cases offering a sequence of different period mortars from the same building. These sites include the Nabataean city of Petra, the Late Antique town of Umm al Jimal and the castle of Qasr Al Hallabat. These mortars were produced with different raw materials and manufacturing technologies, which are reflected on distinctive variations of mineralogy, texture and crystal size and aggregates composition (including volcanic ashes, ceramic fragments, burnt organic material) size and their puzzolanic properties. As a consequence these mortars present different physical properties and reveal nowadays very different states of conservation. There is a dramatic change in mortar properties between those manufactured in pre-Islamic period and those from early Islamic - Ummayad times with a general trend in which these last ones present coarser crystal and aggregate sizes with less puzzolanic aggregates that result in less durable mortars. All of this reflects changes in the different stages of production of the mortar, from the use of either hydraulic, lime putty or slaked lime and the selection of aggregates to the application techniques (polishing). This reflects the evolution of building technology that took place in this area during early Islamic period and how petrological information can shed light on historical interpretation of building technologies. Research funded by AECID (PCI A/032184/10), GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-16) and MCU (Analisis y Documentación de tipología arquitectónica y técnicas constructivas en el periodo de transición Bizantino-Omeya en Jordania)

Gomez-Heras, M.; Arce, I.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

2012-04-01

75

Two-dimensional streamflow simulations of the Jordan River, Midvale and West Jordan, Utah  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Jordan River in Midvale and West Jordan, Utah, flows adjacent to two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites: Midvale Slag and Sharon Steel. At both sites, geotechnical caps extend to the east bank of the river. The final remediation tasks for these sites included the replacement of a historic sheet-pile dam and the stabilization of the river banks adjacent to the Superfund sites. To assist with these tasks, two hydraulic modeling codes contained in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Dimensional Surface-Water Modeling System (MD_SWMS), System for Transport and River Modeling (SToRM) and Flow and Sediment Transport and Morphological Evolution of Channels (FaSTMECH), were used to provide predicted water-surface elevations, velocities, and boundary shear-stress values throughout the study reach of the Jordan River. A SToRM model of a 0.7 mile subreach containing the sheet-pile dam was used to compare water-surface elevations and velocities associated with the sheet-pile dam and a proposed replacement structure. Maps showing water-surface elevation and velocity differences computed from simulations of the historic sheet-pile dam and the proposed replacement structure topographies for streamflows of 500 and 1,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) were created. These difference maps indicated that the velocities associated with the proposed replacement structure topographies were less than or equal to those associated with the historic sheet-pile dam. Similarly, water-surface elevations associated with the proposed replacement structure topographies were all either greater than or equal to water-surface elevations associated with the sheet-pile dam. A FaSTMECH model was developed for the 2.5-mile study reach to aid engineers in bank stabilization designs. Predicted water-surface elevations, velocities and shear-stress values were mapped on an aerial photograph of the study reach to place these parameters in a spatial context. Profile plots of predicted cross-stream average water-surface elevations and cross-stream maximum and average velocities showed how these parameters change along the study reach for two simulated discharges of 1,040 ft3/s and 2,790 ft3/s. The profile plots for the simulated streamflow of 1,040 ft3/s show that the highest velocities are associated with the constructed sheet-pile replacement structure. Results for the simulated streamflow of 2,790 ft3/s indicate that the geometry of the 7800 South Bridge causes more backwater and higher velocities than the constructed sheet-pile replacement structure.

Kenney, Terry A.; Freeman, Michael L.

2011-01-01

76

Approximate ternary Jordan derivations on Banach ternary algebras  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let A be a Banach ternary algebra over a scalar field R or C and X be a ternary Banach A-module. A linear mapping D:(A,[ ]A)-->(X,[ ]X) is called a ternary Jordan derivation if D([xxx]A)=[D(x)xx]X+[xD(x)x]X+[xxD(x)]X for all x?A. In this paper, we investigate ternary Jordan derivations on Banach ternary algebras, associated with the following functional equation f((x+y+z)\\/4)+f((3x-y-4z)\\/4)+f((4x+3z)\\/4)=2f(x). Moreover, we prove

M. Bavand Savadkouhi; M. Eshaghi Gordji; J. M. Rassias; N. Ghobadipour

2009-01-01

77

Approximate ternary Jordan derivations on Banach ternary algebras  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let A be a Banach ternary algebra over a scalar field R or C and X be a ternary Banach A-module. A linear mapping D:(A,[ ]A)?(X,[ ]X) is called a ternary Jordan derivation if D([xxx]A)=[D(x)xx]X+[xD(x)x]X+[xxD(x)]X for all x?A. In this paper, we investigate ternary Jordan derivations on Banach ternary algebras, associated with the following functional equation f((x+y+z)\\/4)+f((3x?y?4z)\\/4)+f((4x+3z)\\/4)=2f(x). Moreover, we prove

M. Bavand Savadkouhi; M. Eshaghi Gordji; J. M. Rassias; N. Ghobadipour

2009-01-01

78

Food Habits of the Yellowstone Whitefish Prosopium Williamsoni Cismontanus (Jordan)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quantitative analysis of the food habits of 385 whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni cismontanus (Jordan)) and 52 trout from the Yellowstone and Gallatin Rivers was made. Collections were taken over a period of 1 year beginning in September, 1947, on the Yellowstone and on the Gallatin Rivers. Fingerling whitefish used the same food organisms as did adults but consumed smaller numbers

Martin Laakso

1951-01-01

79

Higher order Jordan Osserman Pseudo-Riemannian manifolds  

E-print Network

We study the higher order Jacobi operator in pseudo-Riemannian geometry. We exhibit a family of manifolds so that this operator has constant Jordan normal form on the Grassmannian of subspaces of signature (r,s) for certain values of (r,s). These pseudo-Riemannian manifolds are new and non-trivial examples of higher order Osserman manifolds.

Peter B. Gilkey; Raina Ivanova; Tan Zhang

2002-05-25

80

Pharmacy students' perceptions of the teaching evaluation process in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess pharmacy students' perceptions of the usefulness of the teaching evaluation (TE) instrument and the rationale behind their responses. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A comprehensive survey instrument is constructed by the authors. Pharmacy students at University of Jordan (JU) are asked to complete the survey instrument. The questionnaire is completed during students first

Ibrahim Al-Abbadi; Fadi Alkhateeb; Nile Khanfar; Bahaudin Mujtaba; Latif David

2009-01-01

81

Children and Nationalism in a Palestinian Refugee Camp in Jordan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes engagement of children in a Palestinian refugee camp in Jordan with projects of nationalism. Outlines different visions for the children's future and ways these visions inform actions of their proponents. Focuses on how children draw upon different discourses of national community in the process of developing identities that are strongly…

Hart, Jason

2002-01-01

82

Children and Nationalism in a Palestinian Refugee Camp in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on fieldwork in a Palestinian refugee camp in Jordan, this article describes the engagement of children with projects of nationalism. In their position of marginality to both the Jordanian nation-state and the emerging Palestinian national entity, the children of Hussein Camp are the objects of different visions for their own collective future. The article offers a description of these

JASON HART

2002-01-01

83

Oral Health Patterns among Schoolchildren in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about the oral hygiene patterns among schoolchildren in Jordan. A school-based cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2010. A simple random sampling method was used. Each student participant completed a detailed questionnaire regarding oral hygiene habits. Data were coded and analyzed using SPSS software version…

ALBashtawy, Mohammed

2012-01-01

84

Jordan: A Refugee Haven ---Country Profile Graldine Chatelard  

E-print Network

been transiting Jordan in significant numbers since the second Palestinian uprising started in 2000 to seek asylum in Europe and elsewhere. Conversely, domestic politics have created a limited trend of the Jordanian economy by providing start-up money for Jordanian businesses and for large state

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

85

Salinization Sources Along the Lower Jordan River Under Draught Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Lower Jordan River, once a flowing freshwater river, is suffering from an ongoing reduction of discharge and water quality. The river flows between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, an aerial distance of about 105 Km. The severe reduction is caused by an excessive exploitation of its sources and diversion of sewage and agricultural drainage into the

R. Holtzman; U. Shavit; M. Segal; A. Vengosh; E. Farber; I. Gavrieli

2003-01-01

86

Assessing Water and Health Linkages In Irbid, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was launched in Greater Irbid Municipality (GIM), a city of about 650,000 inhabitants in the northern part of Jordan, during the summer of 2005 (May through August) in order to collect data on the linkage between the quantity and quality of water supplied to households, and the health of children under the age of five. This study comes

Munjed Al-Sharif; Jamal Abu-Ashour

2007-01-01

87

Depression, hostility, and substance use among university students in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: University students are a target population for a number of research studies due to a high prevalence of mental health and psychosocial problems.Aims: To examine the relationship between depressive symptoms, hostility, and substance use among university students in Jordan.Methods: This is a descriptive correlation study. Data were collected on demographics, depressive symptoms, hostility, and substance use from 572 university

Ayman M. Hamdan-Mansour; Jehad O. Halabi; Hania A. Dawani

2009-01-01

88

Multicriteria Analysis For Water Productivity in the Jordan Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple variables associated with agricultural sector, including crop water consumption, salinity tolerance, marketing, evapotranspiration and other factors related to industrial sector, were incorporated into a multi-criteria analysis (MCA). The MCA utilized Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) which resulted in the prioritization of water use for management in the Jordan Valley. The inputs to the MCA were generated through metrological variables for

Yasin A. AL-Zubi; Atef Al-Kharabsheh

2003-01-01

89

Body image dissatisfaction among adolescent schoolgirls in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study has investigated the occurrence of body image dissatisfaction among adolescent schoolgirls in Amman, Jordan, and the risk factors that are known to predispose it including individual, familial and social variables. A sample of 326 adolescent girls aged 10–16 years was recruited from public and private schools in Amman. Participants completed a socio-demographic data sheet, eating attitude test,

Tamara Y. Mousa; Rima H. Mashal; Hayder A. Al-Domi; Musa A. Jibril

2010-01-01

90

Infection Control Procedures in Commercial Dental Laboratories in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risk of cross-infection in dental clinics and laboratories has attracted the attention of practitioners for the past few years, yet several medical centers have discarded compliance with infection control guidelines, resulting in a non-safe environ- ment for research and medical care. In Jordan, there is lack of known standard infection control programs that are conducted by the Jordanian Dental

Ziad Nawaf Al-Dwairi

91

Workshop on Jordan structures in analysis and geometry 2006  

E-print Network

. tea/coffee/snacks Lecture Hall 2001 (Chair: CH Chu) 11:10 ­ 12:00 Harald Upmeier (University. tea/coffee/snacks 15:50 ­ 16:20 Borut Zalar (University of Maribor, Slovenia) Algebraic Jordan) The Omega Limit Set Associated with a Cone-Preserving Linear Map. tea/coffee/snacks 15:50 ­ 16:20 Remo V

Wong, Ngai-Ching

92

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE  

E-print Network

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU-points, shifted subgroups. 1 #12;2 SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU Let G be an abelian p-group. An element x in JG

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

93

Contrary Siblings: Syria, Jordan and the Iraq War  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan and Syria, severed parts of the same country, were in many ways ‘siblings’: their systemic situation, as economically weak small states surrounded by more powerful enemies, was similarly vulnerable; their leaders at the time of the Iraq War were of a similar ‘modernising’ generation; the identities of their populations were similarly Arab-Islamic. Yet, they followed diametrically opposite policies toward

Raymond Hinnebusch; Neil Quilliam

2006-01-01

94

Composite spherically symmetric configurations in Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory  

E-print Network

In this article, a study of the scalar field shells in relativistic spherically symmetric configurations has been performed. We construct the composite solution of Jordan-Brans-Dicke field equation by matching the conformal Brans solutions at each junction surfaces. This approach allows us to associate rigorously with all solutions as a single glued "space", which is a unique differentiable manifold M^4.

S. Kozyrev

2010-09-23

95

Alternate energy installations on the Jordan College campus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since planning its first solar installation in 1974, Jordan College has constructed eight alternate energy demonstration units, some of which contributed greatly to reducing energy expenses. Active and passive systems using either air or water are utilized for the heating of space and domestic hot water, both separately and jointly. A wind energy conversion system is providing electricity for the

Coxon

1981-01-01

96

Effect of climate change on agriculture sustainability in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jordan is a vulnerable country in terms of climate change impact. In the latest assessment report published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Jordan will suffer from reduced agricultural productivity due to more erratic rainfall patterns, reduced freshwater resources and increased temperatures. The Initial National Communication (INC) to the United Nations Framework Convention to Climate Change (UNFCCC) foresees that over the next three decades, Jordan will witness a rise in temperature, drop in rainfall, reduced ground cover, reduced water availability, heat-waves, and more frequent dust storms. Coupled with the effect of continuing drought incidents, plant cover removal was greatly accelerated. Climate change can impact agricultural sustainability in Jordan in two interrelated ways: first, by diminishing the long-term ability of agroecosystems to provide food and fiber locally; and second, by inducing shifts in agricultural regions that may encroach upon natural habitats, at the expense of floral and faunal diversity. Global warming may encourage the expansion of agricultural activities into regions now occupied by natural ecosystems such as rangelands in the Badia region and forests. Such encroachment will have adverse effects on the fragile ecosystem in those areas (Badia and steppe areas). Primary model test results showed that the reduction of rainfall by 10 to 20% had a negative impact while the increase in rainfall by 10 to 20% had a positive impact on grain yield for both barley and wheat at the different temperature regimes. This is due to the fact that water is the main limiting growth factor for wheat and barley under rainfed agriculture on Jordan. The warming (increase in temperature by 1 to 4Ë? C) had negative impact on barley grain yield while it had a positive impact on grain yield of wheat.

Khresat, S.

2009-04-01

97

SHORT-TERM RESPONSE OF JORDAN’S SALAMANDER TO A SHELTERWOOD TIMBER HARVEST IN WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA  

E-print Network

tmccaydmail.colgate.edu Abstract: The effects of shelterwood cutting on the abundance of fordan’s salamander (Plethodon jordanr) in western North Carolina were examined during 1997 and 1998. Terrestrial salamander assemblages were sampled before, immediately after, and one year after timber harvest on control and treatment plots to estimate abundance. We also surveyed salamanders immediately after the harvest along transects radiating out from cut plots to determine whether cutting triggered salamander emigration from disturbed plots. Both before and after timber harvest, the site was strongly dominated by Jordan’s salamander. No significant effects of initial shelterwood cutting on Jordan’s salamander abundance were apparent after timber harvest. Abundance of this species decreased from precutting to post-cutting sampling on both control and treatment plots, which likely reflected the drought that characterized both post-cutting sampling periods, but not pre-cutting sampling. No emigration of salamanders from the cut plots was detected after timber harvest. These findings suggest that at a stand scale, shelterwood harvests may pose less of a short-term threat to salamander populations than clearcutting, but more study is necessary to assess broad-scale tradeoffs between harvest yield and biological impacts associated with alternative timber harvest methods. [Key words: salamander, timber harvesting, North Carolina.] *Corresponding author.

Chad E. Bartman; Kathleen C. Parker; Joshua Laerm; Timothy A& cay

98

Body image dissatisfaction among adolescent schoolgirls in Jordan.  

PubMed

The present study has investigated the occurrence of body image dissatisfaction among adolescent schoolgirls in Amman, Jordan, and the risk factors that are known to predispose it including individual, familial and social variables. A sample of 326 adolescent girls aged 10-16 years was recruited from public and private schools in Amman. Participants completed a socio-demographic data sheet, eating attitude test, and body shape questionnaire. Approximately, 21.2% of participants displayed body image dissatisfaction in which physical changes associated with puberty and exhibiting negative eating attitudes were associated with this dissatisfaction. Additionally, mass media messages, as well as peers and family pressures towards thinness were associated with participants' preoccupation with their body image. In conclusion, negative body image perception was observed in the present sample. Therefore, well-controlled prospective studies and development of intervention programs on body image among adolescent girls in Jordan are needed. PMID:19910269

Mousa, Tamara Y; Mashal, Rima H; Al-Domi, Hayder A; Jibril, Musa A

2010-01-01

99

Business continuity management in emerging markets: the case of Jordan.  

PubMed

Despite their considerable growth in last few decades, emerging markets (EM) face numerous risks that have the potential to slow down or obstruct their development. Three main issues are discussed in this paper: first, the risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets and Jordan in particular; secondly, the role of business continuity management (BCM) in emerging markets; and thirdly, potential factors that underpin the role of BCM in emerging markets. These issues are significant, as they represent the role of BCM in highly dynamic and fast changing business environments. The paper provides a discussion of the significance of BCM in reducing or preventing risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets, especially those in Jordan. PMID:22576137

Sawalha, Ihab H; Anchor, John R

2012-01-01

100

Worker programs and resource use: Evidence from better work jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper examines data collected for the Better Work program in Jordan which aims to protect laborers in the garment industry from poor working conditions. Data are examined to look for benefits to the factories participating in the program beyond improved compliance with labor law. In particular, potential impacts to firm energy use are examined and correlations are tested between electricity use rates and measures of worker outcomes and a number of factory traits such as size and production input costs. Evidence was found to back up work done in Vietnam with regard to resource use and distribution of electricity expenses. It was also found that the type of data being collected is not ideal for examinations of energy, and more direct methods are desirable, and that considerable production obstacles are worker skill level, electricity prices, and to a greater degree in Jordan than in previously examined countries, water prices.

Robins, Nathan

101

Nursing practice problems in private hospitals in Jordan: students' perspectives.  

PubMed

This paper grew from an exploration of clinical practice problems in a private hospital in Jordan. Senior nursing students in a governmental university studied these issues while focusing on leadership and management issues. The private sector is of a secondary focus in nursing research. In Jordan, nursing studies that explore the nursing profession and its related issues have been limited in the literature. A student assignment in the "Nursing Leadership and Management" course required the students to work in groups to identify a nursing practice problem, and its contributing causes and suggested solutions. The nursing shortage; job dissatisfaction; burnout; and turnover were the identified nursing practice problems. Causes and solutions of these problems were explored. PMID:17689428

Mrayyan, Majd T

2007-03-01

102

Soil erosion and land degradation in the Highlands of Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Highlands of Jordan has a Mediterranean type of climate characterized by hot dry summers and cold wet winters. Unsustainable land use practices, recurrent droughts and climate change are the main causes of land degradation in the Highlands area of Jordan. Unsustainable land use practices include improper plowing, inappropriate rotations, inadequate or inexistent management of plant residues, overgrazing of natural vegetation, forest cutting, land fragmentation and over-pumping of groundwater. In addition, Jordan's rapid population growth (2.8% per year) is exerting considerable pressure upon its limited arable land through uncontrolled and random urbanization activities. Water erosion is the most widespread Land degradation type in the country. It greatly increases on slopes where the vegetation cover is (seasonally) reduced. It is further aggravated by a loss of soil structure and reduced infiltration rates. Wind erosion occurs most frequently in the arid and semi-arid portions of the southern Highlands, especially in areas with sandy or loamy soils. Rangeland degradation is the second most widespread land degradation type that is driven by overgrazing. The impact of overgrazing on the vegetation is evident from the excessive uprooting of the green matter (grass and bushes), leading to reduced seeding, reduced regeneration, and the consequent loss of plant cover which make the soil more susceptible to water and wind erosion. It is estimated that about 41 percent of Jordan's total land area is characterized as degraded of which 22 percent of the total land mass is classified as moderately degraded and agricultural productivity is greatly reduced. Observed aspects of land degradation include the recession of forest areas, high rate of erosion by water (formation of rills and gullies), expansion of urbanized area, reduction in soil organic matter and soil structure deterioration. Implementation of soil erosion control measures such as contour cultivation, terracing, management of crop residues, and stonewalls construction helped in reducing erosion.

Khresat, Saeb

2013-04-01

103

Evaluation of Traffic Noise Pollution in Amman, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The City of Amman, Jordan, has been subjected to persistent increase in road traffic due to overall increase in prosperity, fast development and expansion of economy, travel and tourism. This study investigates traffic noise pollution in Amman. Road traffic noise index L\\u000a 10(1 h) was measured at 28 locations that cover most of the City of Amman. Noise measurements were

Ahmad Jamrah; Abbas Al-Omari; Reem Sharabi

2006-01-01

104

MULTIPLICATIVE JORDAN DECOMPOSITION IN GROUP RINGS OF 3-GROUPS, II  

E-print Network

group G. Since Q is a perfect field, every element a of Q[G] has a unique additive Jordan decomposition], and using variants of many of the same ar- guments, [LP1] came close to determining all nonabelian 3-groups group algebra Q[G0], we let T denote the sum of the group elements of T. As is well known, (1 - t)T = 0

Passman, Donald S.

105

Oil Shale—An Alternative Energy Source for Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil shale presents the only available fossil fuel in Jordan besides limited reserves of natural gas. Jordanian oil shale—with a proven amount of about 5 × 10 tons—is of quite good quality. It has relatively low ash and moisture content, gross calorific value of 7.5 MJ\\/kg, and oil yield of 8–12%. The reserves should be sufficient to satisfy the county's

E. S. Hrayshat

2008-01-01

106

Depositionally and Diagenetically Controlled Reservoir Heterogeneity at Jordan Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on the San Andres reservoir in the University Lands Jordan field which has produced 68 MMSTB (11 à 10⁶ stock-tank m³) of the 182 MMSTB (29 à 10⁶ stock-tank m³) of original oil place (OOIP); an estimated 44 MMSTB (7 à 10⁶ stock-tank m³) of mobile oil remains in this reservoir. The reservoir is divided into four

R. P. Major; Mark Holtz

1990-01-01

107

Towards establishing a multiple sclerosis biobank in Jordan.  

PubMed

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a promising approach in unraveling genetic associations to multiple sclerosis (MS), a complex, multifactorial disease. Biobanks are repositories of patient biospecimens and information that can promote GWAS research. However, the success of GWAS and biobanking is dependent on the level of participation of MS patients in genetic research. In order to initiate MS-based biobanking and GWAS research in Jordan, the willingness of MS patients to participate in long-term, genetic research in Jordan and their preferred type of a consent form were investigated. MS patients (289) were recruited for genetic studies. Personal and clinical information were collected from those who enrolled in the study. Approximately 96% of MS patients agreed to participate in genetic studies. The female:male ratio among patients was 2:1 with most patients being diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS (88%). The mean age of onset was 28.3 years, the mean duration of illness was 6 years, and the mean Expanded Disability Status Scale was 2.8. Relatedness of parents was significantly associated with having secondary-progressive MS. Approximately 85% of the patients preferred open consent with 37% of them preferring to renew their consent. All the patients approved to be recontacted and update their information via accessing their medical files or physicians. These observations support the establishment of a specialized MS biobank in Jordan and pave the way to participate in international large-scale genetic initiatives. PMID:24456262

Ahram, Mamoun; Zaza, Rand; Ibayyan, Leena; Dahbour, Said; Bahou, Yacoub; El-Omar, Ammar; Samhouri, Bilal; El-Khateeb, Mohammad

2014-11-01

108

Prevalence of food insecurity among women in northern Jordan.  

PubMed

Food insecurity--not having sufficient quantities of good-quality foods--is inversely related to physical and mental health and directly related to poor dietary intake. The objectives of this research were to (a) measure the prevalence of food insecurity among women in northern Jordan, (b) study the socioeconomic factors associated with an increased risk of food insecurity, and (c) investigate the relationship between household food insecurity and women's reported body-weight. This cross-sectional study was conducted using an interview-based questionnaire. In total, 500 women were interviewed in the waiting rooms of the outpatient clinics of two major public hospitals in northern Jordan. Food insecurity was assessed using the short form of the U.S. food security survey module. The prevalence of food insecurity was 32.4%. Income below the poverty-line, illiteracy, unemployment, rented housing, and woman heading the household were among the socioeconomic factors that increased the probability of food insecurity. No evidence was found to support the relationship between obesity and food insecurity. Except grains, food-insecure women with hunger had lower intake of all food-groups. This study demonstrated that the problem of food insecurity is present in Jordan. Food-insecure women with hunger are at a risk of malnutrition. Interventions that target reduction of the factors associated with food insecurity are necessary. PMID:22524119

Bawadi, Hiba A; Tayyem, Reema F; Dwairy, Amal N; Al-Akour, Nemeh

2012-03-01

109

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Beatrice Collier-Pandya, Jordan Fryers, Joshua Gibson, Michael Burnett  

E-print Network

-Pandya, Jordan Fryers, Joshua Gibson, Michael Burnett An Investigation into Green Laundry Products APSC 261-Pandya, Michael Burnett, Jordan Fryers & Joshua Gibson #12;1 Abstract The UBC Student Housing and Hospitality

110

Hidden Markov decision trees \\Lambda Michael I. Jordan y , Zoubin Ghahramani z , and Lawrence K. Saul y  

E-print Network

Hidden Markov decision trees \\Lambda Michael I. Jordan y , Zoubin Ghahramani z , and Lawrence K an output y is generated. A statistical approach to decision tree modeling was presented by Jordan A revised version of this technical report will appear in M. C. Mozer, M. I. Jordan and T. Petsche (eds

Ghahramani, Zoubin

111

Diagonalization and Jordan Normal Form--Motivation through "Maple"[R  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following an introduction to the diagonalization of matrices, one of the more difficult topics for students to grasp in linear algebra is the concept of Jordan normal form. In this note, we show how the important notions of diagonalization and Jordan normal form can be introduced and developed through the use of the computer algebra package…

Glaister, P.

2009-01-01

112

The Implementation of Mobile Bank Usage from marketing point of view of bank managers in Jordan.  

E-print Network

The Implementation of Mobile Bank Usage from marketing point of view of bank managers in Jordan. The study aims at determine the effect of the implementation of Mobile Bank Usage from marketing point of view in Jordan on the different dimensions of the study (Gender of bank managers, Age of bank managers

113

Jordan Thayer (UNH) Learning During Search 1 / 20 Learning Inadmissible Heuristics During Search  

E-print Network

s Motivation Learning Performance Conclusions Backup Slides Jordan Thayer (UNH) Learning During Search ­ 2 / 20 #12;Heuristics Guide Search Introduction s Heuristics s Motivation Learning Performance Conclusions Introduction s Heuristics s Motivation Learning Performance Conclusions Backup Slides Jordan Thayer (UNH

Ruml, Wheeler

114

Brownian measures on Jordan–Virasoro curves associated to the Weil–Petersson metric  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper existence of the Brownian measure on Jordan curves with respect to the Weil–Petersson metric is established. The step from Brownian motion on the diffeomorphism group of the circle to Brownian motion on Jordan curves in C requires probabilistic arguments well beyond the classical theory of conformal welding, due to the lacking quasi-symmetry of canonical Brownian motion on

Hélène Airault; Paul Malliavin; Anton Thalmaier

2010-01-01

115

Stability of ternary Jordan homomorphisms and derivations associated to the generalized Jensen equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we establish the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of Jordan\\u000ahomomorphisms and Jordan derivations between ternary algebras via the\\u000ageneralized Jensen equation $rf(\\\\frac{sx+ty}{r})=sf(x)+tf(y)$.

M. Eshaghi Gordji; E. Rashidi; J. M. Rassias

2009-01-01

116

The Effect of an Education Program for Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are few support services for parents of children with a disability in Jordan. The present exploratory study investigated whether the provision of an education program in Jordan for mothers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder increased mothers' understanding of their child's behaviour, improved the mothers' coping skills,…

Al-Khalaf, Amany; Dempsey, Ian; Dally, Kerry

2014-01-01

117

RISK FACTORS FOR LAMB AND KID MORTALITY IN SHEEP AND GOAT FARMS IN JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to identify the risk factors that are associated with neonatal mortality in lambs and kids in Jordan. The bacterial causes of mortality in lambs and kids were investigated. One hundred sheep and goat flocks were selected randomly from different areas of North Jordan at the beginning of the lambing season. The flocks were visited every other

L. SHARIF; J. OBEIDAT; F. AL-ANI

2005-01-01

118

p-POWER POINTS AND MODULES OF CONSTANT p-POWER JORDAN TYPE  

E-print Network

p-POWER POINTS AND MODULES OF CONSTANT p-POWER JORDAN TYPE SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU Abstract. We, constant p-power Jordan type, wild representation type. 1 #12;2 SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU [Ca] as the set

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

119

Experiences of Students with Disabilities in a Public University in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined students with disabilities perspectives toward their experiences in a public University in Jordan using a survey approach. The aim of this study was to take a closer look at the experiences of students with disabilities in Jordan and, in light of new legislation, to identify obstacles in the higher education system. It found…

Al-Hmouz, Hanan

2014-01-01

120

Technopolitical Alternative Strategies in Interstate Regional Development of the Jordan Rift Valley Beyond the Peace  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Jordan Valley, including the two interstate regions of the Dead Sea and Aqaba, is the focus of international cooperation and economic development for peace and confidence building in the aftermath of the ‘Declaration of Principles” between. Israel and the PLO on September 13, 1993, and the “Treaty of Peace” between Jordan and Israel on October 26, 1994. Technopolitical strategic

Masahiro Murakami; Usaid I. El-Hanbali; Aaron T. Wolf

1995-01-01

121

Brackish water desalination: an alternative for water supply enhancement in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to assess desalination technologies for the utilization of desalinated brackish water in Jordan. Brackish waters in Jordan are viewed as a potential and viable resources to alleviate water scarcity and overcome water budget deficit. The evaluation of various desalination technologies was carried out using multi-criteria analysis. The criteria adopted for evaluation was based on technical, economic, and

Mousa S. Mohsen; Odeh R. Al-Jayyousi

1999-01-01

122

SHORT-TERM RESPONSE OF JORDAN'S SALAMANDER TO A SHELTERWOOD TIMBER HARVEST IN WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of shelterwood cutting on the abundance of Jordan's salamander (Plethodon Jordan!) in western North Carolina were examined during 1997 and 1998. Terrestrial salamander assemblages were sampled before, immediately after, and one year after timber harvest on control and treatment plots to estimate abundance. We also sur- veyed salamanders immediately after the harvest along transects radiating out from cut

Chad E. Bartman; Kathleen C. Parker; Joshua Laerm; Timothy S. McCay

2001-01-01

123

Teaching for Sustainable Development in Higher Education Institutions: University of Jordan as a Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Jordan, a rapid movement of educational reform is taking place nowadays. Curricula development, teacher education, using information and communication technology (ICT), improving teaching and learning strategies and integrating different subjects are among the main objectives of this reform. One of the main challenges in Jordan in order to cope…

Abu-Hola, Imfadi R. M.; Tareef, Atif Bin

2009-01-01

124

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper\\/8: Cooperative Border Security for Jordan: Assessment and Options  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document is an analysis of options for unilateral and cooperative action to improve the security of Jordan's borders. Sections describe the current political, economic, and social interactions along Jordan's borders. Next, the document discusses border security strategy for cooperation among neighboring countries and the adoption of confidence-building measures. A practical cooperative monitoring system would consist of hardware for early

Qojas

1999-01-01

125

Particle size and X-ray analysis of Feldspar, Calvert, Ball, and Jordan soils  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pipette analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to characterize the particle size distribution and clay mineral content of the feldspar, calvert, ball, and jordan soils. In general, the ball, calvert, and jordan soils were primarily clay size particles composed of kaolinite and illite whereas the feldspar soil was primarily silt-size particles composed of quartz and feldspar minerals.

Chapman, R. S.

1977-01-01

126

Radionuclides, trace elements, and radium residence in phosphogypsum of Jordan.  

PubMed

Voluminous stockpiles of phosphogypsum (PG) generated during the wet process production of phosphoric acid are stored at many sites around the world and pose problems for their safe storage, disposal, or utilization. A major concern is the elevated concentration of long-lived (226)Ra (half-life = 1,600 years) inherited from the processed phosphate rock. Knowledge of the abundance and mode-of-occurrence of radium (Ra) in PG is critical for accurate prediction of Ra leachability and radon (Rn) emanation, and for prediction of radiation-exposure pathways to workers and to the public. The mean (±SD) of (226)Ra concentrations in ten samples of Jordan PG is 601 ± 98 Bq/kg, which falls near the midrange of values reported for PG samples collected worldwide. Jordan PG generally shows no analytically significant enrichment (<10%) of (226)Ra in the finer (<53 ?m) grain size fraction. Phosphogypsum samples collected from two industrial sites with different sources of phosphate rock feedstock show consistent differences in concentration of (226)Ra and rare earth elements, and also consistent trends of enrichment in these elements with increasing age of PG. Water-insoluble residues from Jordan PG constitute <10% of PG mass but contain 30-65% of the (226)Ra. (226)Ra correlates closely with Ba in the water-insoluble residues. Uniformly tiny (<10 ?m) grains of barite (barium sulfate) observed with scanning electron microscopy have crystal morphologies that indicate their formation during the wet process. Barite is a well-documented and efficient scavenger of Ra from solution and is also very insoluble in water and mineral acids. Radium-bearing barite in PG influences the environmental mobility of radium and the radiation-exposure pathways near PG stockpiles. PMID:20623320

Zielinski, Robert A; Al-Hwaiti, Mohammad S; Budahn, James R; Ranville, James F

2011-04-01

127

Sediment fingerprinting in Northern Jordan - approaching sediment comparability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jordan has a quantitative and qualitative water problem in combination with a growing demand by population increase. Around 65% of the freshwater used in Jordan is reported to originate from surface waters and reservoirs. Sediment loads harm the quality of these water bodies and fill up dams. A sediment fingerprint pilot study was implemented in an exemplary catchment in the NW of Jordan to investigate the possibility of geochemical differentiation between 6 sediment sources and calculate their relative contribution to the sink, the Wadi Al-Arab reservoir. The sediment fingerprint method relies on the comparability of sediment properties of the sources and the sink. However, selection processes during transport, preferential adsorption of elements on fine particles, and differences in inorganic carbonate content prevent a direct comparison. In previous studies this has been solved through selective sampling and analyzing certain grain size fractions or the mathematical derivation of correction factors. As no pre-knowledge existed in the Wadi Al-Arab catchment, selective grain size sampling would have implied the risk of neglecting important information already during the sampling process. Hence, a method was established that includes several steps to identify influential parameters (IPs), eliminate their impact and take account of their interrelations. It is based on a stepwise multiple regression analysis model (SMRAM) and generates element specific correction factors that take account for possible interdependencies between influential parameters as clay percentage and total organic and inorganic carbonates. In the further selection process of suitable elements for the fingerprint, we complemented the common used methods by a solubility analysis. Therefore, water profiles were physicochemical investigated in the dam lake. Differences in the chemical milieus during transport and sedimentation that affect the conservativeness of the chosen elements could be detected and taken account for. The study showed that common fingerprint elements and practices would have led to misinterpretations in the Wadi Al-Arab catchment and calls for a sound knowledge on catchment characteristics before the implementation of such a method.

Kraushaar, Sabine; Schumann, Thomas; Ollesch, Gregor; Siebert, Christian; Vogel, Hans-Joerg

2014-05-01

128

Nearly Jordan ?-Homomorphisms between Unital C?-Algebras  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let $A$ , $B$ be two unital ${C}^{\\\\ast }$ -algebras. We prove that every almost unital almost linear mapping $h$ : $A\\\\to B$ which satisfies $h({3}^{n}uy+{3}^{n}yu)=h({3}^{n}u)h(y)+h(y)h({3}^{n}u)$ for all $u\\\\in U(A)$ , all $y\\\\in A$ , and all $n=0,1,2,\\\\dots $ , is a Jordan homomorphism. Also, for a unital ${C}^{\\\\ast }$ -algebra $A$ of real rank zero, every almost unital almost

A. Ebadian; S. Kaboli Gharetapeh; M. Eshaghi Gordji

2011-01-01

129

Depositional Environments of the Jordan Formation, Winona, MN  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This project involves a field trip to the Jordan Formation in Winona, MN. Student teams are assigned a section of the outcrop from which they are to determine a stratigraphic column. The class then performs a lateral analysis and builds a composite stratigraphic column for the formation. As a final product, the students write up the class's observations about the formation. Project Webpages Project Summary and Write-up Outline (Acrobat (PDF) 115kB Jul7 05) Instructor Notes for Project (Acrobat (PDF) 91kB Jul7 05) Outlines and Notes (Acrobat (PDF) 1.1MB Jul7 05) for each class session for this project

Hickson, Tom

130

Pain management in Jordan: nursing students' knowledge and attitude.  

PubMed

Pain management requires knowledgeable and trained nurses. Because nursing students are the nurses of the future, it is important to ensure that students receive adequate education about pain management in nursing schools. The purpose of this study is to evaluate nursing students' knowledge and attitudes regarding pain management. A cross-sectional survey was used. The sample comprised 144 students from three nursing colleges in Jordan. Sixty-one percent were female and the average age was 21.6 years (SD 1.7). The students' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain was used. The rate of correct answers ranged from 11.1% to 64%. Students showed a low level of knowledge regarding pain management-the average score was just 16 (SD 5.11) out of 40. Students were weak in their knowledge of pain medications pharmacology (actions and side effects). Less than half of students (47.9%) recognised that pain may be present, even when vital signs are normal and facial expressions relaxed. Finally, students showed negative attitudes towards pain management, believing that patients should tolerate pain as much as they can before receiving opioids; almost half (48%) of students agreed that patients' pain could be managed with placebo rather than medication. In conclusion, Jordanian nursing students showed lower levels of pain knowledge compared with other nursing students around the world. This study underlines the need to include pain-management courses throughout undergraduate nursing curricula in Jordan. PMID:24280924

Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad

131

Characterization And Provenance Of Marble Chancel Screens, ?orthern Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research characterizes marble chancel screens and their supporting columns, confiscated from treasure thieves, probably from northern Jordan in order to manage the most fruitful conservation and restoration interventions for them. It provides new archaeometric data and determines the probable source of the marbles. The results of mineropetrographic, X-ray diffraction and carbon and oxygen stable isotope analyses show that the marbles most probably are Proconnesian-1. The results agree with the historical records supported by archaeometric analyses that Proconnesos marble was widely used during the Roman and Byzantine periods for architectural purposes. The results suggest that color style of Proconnesian marble astonished the Byzantine stonemasons and architects thus have been widely used.

Al-Naddaf, M.; Al-Bashaireh, K.; Al-Waked, F.

132

Osteoporosis knowledge among female school students in Jordan.  

PubMed

Although osteoporosis is a preventable disease affecting millions of people, public awareness remains low. This study used a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design to explore osteoporosis knowledge among adolescent female students in Jordan. A questionnaire was administered to 148 students recruited from a secondary school in the city of Irbid before and after a series of health education sessions based on the health belief model. A significant increase in overall scores for osteoporosis knowledge was seen (mean score pretest = 24.1 and posttest = 29.8, P < 0.001). Further research geared toward the follow-up of attained knowledge and behavioural change over time is greatly needed. PMID:20187542

Abushaikha, L; Omran, S; Barrouq, L

2009-01-01

133

The Jordan Report 2000: Accelerated Development of Vaccines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On March 2, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) released its latest report on the state of vaccine research and development. This edition of the Jordan Report "highlights the triumphs of vaccinology during the 20th century and the ways in which new technologies promise better vaccines against both old and new disease-causing organisms." Prepared by 24 scientists from NIAID with contributions from outside researchers, the 173-page report offers a comprehensive overview of vaccine development against nearly 60 diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Users can read the full text of the report (in .pdf format), the press release, and a White House statement on a new vaccine initiative. The site also offers links to a number of related NIAID publications, fact sheets, and sites.

134

Action with Acceleration II: Euclidean Hamiltonian and Jordan Blocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Euclidean action with acceleration has been analyzed in Ref. 1, and referred to henceforth as Paper I, for its Hamiltonian and path integral. In this paper, the state space of the Hamiltonian is analyzed for the case when it is pseudo-Hermitian (equivalent to a Hermitian Hamiltonian), as well as the case when it is inequivalent. The propagator is computed using both creation and destruction operators as well as the path integral. A state space calculation of the propagator shows the crucial role played by the dual state vectors that yields a result impossible to obtain from a Hermitian Hamiltonian. When it is not pseudo-Hermitian, the Hamiltonian is shown to be a direct sum of Jordan blocks.

Baaquie, Belal E.

2013-10-01

135

Risk factors for human brucellosis in northern Jordan.  

PubMed

Little is known about the risk factors of human brucellosis in Jordan. A case-control study was conducted involving 56 Jordanians who had been treated for brucellosis and at least 3 matched controls for each case (n = 247). Matching was for sex, age, locality (the same village) and socioeconomic standard. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. In all, 17 risk factors were examined related to: contact with various livestock, milk and milk product consumption, drinking-water treatment and disease awareness. Most variables were associated with brucellosis in the univariate analysis but the final logistic model included only 4: milking sheep and goats (OR 3.5), consumption of raw feta cheese made from sheep and goat milk (OR 2.8) and consumption of cows' milk (OR 0.4) and boiled feta cheese (OR 0.4). Small ruminant farmers need to be trained in safer milking practices and feta cheese making procedures. PMID:23516823

Abo-Shehada, M N; Abu-Halaweh, M

2013-02-01

136

Investigation of desert subsoil nitrate in Northeastern Badia of Jordan.  

PubMed

High levels of naturally occurring nitrate were observed under desert pavement surfaces in NE Badia of Jordan. The subsoil nitrate inventory varies from about 24,351 to 28,853 kg NO(3)(-)/ha to a depth of 60 cm which is more than two times greater than nitrate in nonpavement soils, although both soils occurred within similar landscape and microclimate conditions. The results indicated that pavement particle size and cover percent are the primary factors contributing to the observed variations in nitrate accumulation. Desert pavement soils fully covered with fine clasts showed higher nitrate concentrations compared to soils moderately covered with coarse-grained pavements. The results also showed that high levels of nitrate were generally reached between 20 and 30 cm depth before the concentrations decreased. Chloride showed distribution profiles similar to those of nitrate. No observable difference was observed in nitrate level under desert pavement with abundant lichens compared to non-lichen pavement surface. PMID:23178770

Al-Taani, Ahmed A; Al-Qudah, Khaldoun A

2013-01-01

137

Radionuclides in hot mineral spring waters in Jordan.  

PubMed

Hot mineral springs in Jordan are very attractive to people who seek physical healing but they are unaware of natural radioactive elements that may be contained in the hot mineral water. The activities of the natural radioactive isotopes were measured and the concentrations of the parents of their natural radioactive series were calculated. The measured radionuclides were 234Th, 226Ra, 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 228Th, 212Pb, 212Bi and 208Tl. In addition the activities of 235U and 40K were measured. The activities ranged from 0.14 to 34.8 Bq/l, while the concentrations of parent uranium and thorium isotopes ranged from 3.0 x 10(-3) to 0.59 mg/l. The results were compared with those for drinking water. PMID:11202689

Saqan, S A; Kullab, M K; Ismail, A M

2001-01-01

138

A class of generalised Jordan-Schwinger maps  

E-print Network

In this article we introduce a class of generalisations of the Jordan-Schwinger (JS) map which realises the recent proposed generalised sl(2) (G-sl(2)) algebra via two independent Generalised Heisenberg Algebras (GHA). Although the GHA and the G-sl(2) algebra exhibit more general algebraic structures than the Heisenberg and sl(2) algebras, the generalised JS map presents a compact and simple structure wich includes the standard JS map as a particular case. Finally, since in the GHA there is a physical interpretation in terms of composite particles, we will carry out this assertion in a manner that the generalised sl(2) algebra could be related to composite particles with angular momentum.

N M Oliveira-Neto; E M F Curado; M A Rego-Monteiro

2007-07-25

139

Towards improved partnerships in the water sector in the Middle East : A case study of Jordan  

E-print Network

This dissertation focuses on the use of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the water sector in Jordan, a Middle East pioneer with respect to experimenting with different approaches to delivering water services in both ...

Odeh, Nancy

2009-01-01

140

PSY 468: Motivation & Emotion Summer 2013 Instructor: Jordan Miller-Ziegler  

E-print Network

PSY 468: Motivation & Emotion ­ Summer 2013 Instructor: Jordan Miller, we will discuss two intersecting yet distinct topics: motivation and emotion. Questions in motivation center around whether, why, and how intensely people engage

Lockery, Shawn

141

Impact of managers emotional intelligence on marketing creativity in Jordan Commercial banks" Innovative Marketing, International  

E-print Network

, motivation, social skills, empathy) on marketing creativity in Jordan commercial banks. As well, this impact does not differ according to staff member's personal and functional variables (sex, age, education

142

Database compilation: hydrology of Lake Tiberias (Jordan Valley)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A long-term series of water balance data over the last 50 years is compiled to gain insights into the hydrology of the Lake Tiberias (LT) and surrounding aquifers. This database is used within the framework of a German-Israeli-Jordanian project (DFG Ma4450-2) in which numerical modeling is applied to study the mechanisms of deep fluid transport processes affecting the Tiberias basin. The LT is the largest natural freshwater lake in Israel. It is located in the northern part of the Dead Sea Rift. The behavior of the lake level is a result of the regional water balance caused mainly by interaction of two factors: (i) fluctuations of water inflow to the Lake, (ii) water exploitation in the adjacent aquifers and consumptions from the lake (pumping, diversion, etc). The replenishment of the lake occurs through drainage from surrounding mountains (Galilee, Golan Heights), entering the lake through the Jordan River and secondary streams (85%), direct precipitation (11%), fresh-saline springs discharging along the shoreline, divertion from Yarmouk river and internal springs and seeps. The major losses occur through the National Water Carrier (ca. 44%), evaporation (38%), local consumption and compensation to Jordan (in sum 12%). In spite of the increasing role of water exploitation, the natural inflow to the Lake remains the dominant factor of hydrological regime of the Tiberias Lake. Additionally, series of natural yield to the LT are reconstructed with precipitation data measured in the Tiberias basin (1922-2012). The earlier period (1877-1921) is evaluated considering long rainfall records at Beirut and Nazareth stations (Middle East Region). This data enables to use the LT yield as a complex indicator of the regional climate change. Though the data applies to the LT, this example shows the importance of large database. Their compilation defines the correct set-up of joint methodologies such as numerical modeling and hydrochemical analyses aimed to understand large-scale hydrological processes.

Shentsis, Izabela; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Magri, Fabien

2014-05-01

143

Design, sizing & simulation of solar powered desalination unit for brackish water in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the framework of a regional scientific cooperation project between USA, Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian Authority, Jordan (represented by the National Energy Research Center (NERC) has received two desalination units. The first unit is a US-military RO-desalination unit (ROWPU), producing 21.3 m\\/d of fresh water and operated with diesel generator. The second unit designed for brackish water also produces

Ahmed H. Muhaidat

2010-01-01

144

THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT AND WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT IN JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan is a middle-income country with a per capita income of $ 1.666 and a population of approximately 5.5 million. In Jordan, water is the single most critical natural resources where the per capita share of water is less than 175 cubic meter per year. The water scarcity is exacerbated by rapid population increases, the growing industrial and services sectors,

S. Al-Naber; M. Shatanawi

145

Overweight and Obesity Among School Children in Jordan: Prevalence and Associated Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To estimate the prevalence of overweight and obesity and determine their associated factors among school children aged 6–12 years\\u000a in the north of Jordan. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among school children in the north of Jordan in the period between March 2006 and May\\u000a 2006. A total of 2,131 children (1,052 boys and 1,079 girls) were selected at

Yousef Khader; Omama Irshaidat; Mohammad Khasawneh; Zouhair Amarin; Mousa Alomari; Anwar Batieha

2009-01-01

146

Miscellaneous Literature Related to Recreational Demand Adamowicz, Wiktor; Joffre Swait; Peter Boxall; Jordan Louviere; Michael Williams. 1997.  

E-print Network

Boxall; Jordan Louviere; Michael Williams. 1997. "Perceptions Versus Objective Measures of Environmental,-Anthony-C.; Hanemann, W.-Michael. "Valuation and Management of Tropical Forests: Implications of Uncertainty

147

Participatory groundwater management in Jordan: Development and analysis of options  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater over-exploitation has been on the rise in Jordan. Competing demands have grown in the face of perennial water shortages, a situation which has been exacerbated by drought conditions in the past decade. This paper reports findings of a project in which management options to address over-exploitation were developed for one of Jordan's principal aquifer systems, the Amman-Zarqa Basin. Options for addressing the situation were developed through a participatory approach that involved government officials and various public and private sector interest groups. Particular efforts were made to involve well irrigators, who are likely to be heavily impacted by the changes required to reduce groundwater pumping to a sustainable level. With information obtained from a rapid appraisal survey as well as from interviews with farmers, community groups, government officials, and technical experts, an extensive set of options was identified for evaluation. Based on integrated hydrogeologic, social, and economic analysis, five complementary management options were recommended for implementation. These included the establishment of an Irrigation Advisory Service, buying out farm wells, placing firm limits on well ion and irrigated crop areas, exchanging treated wastewater for groundwater, and measures to increase the efficiency of municipal and industrial water use. Various combinations and levels of these options were grouped in scenarios, representing possible implementation strategies. The scenarios were designed to assist decision makers, well owners and other stakeholders in moving gradually towards a sustainable ion regime. Social and economic aspects of each option and scenario were analyzed and presented to stakeholders, together with a of legal, institutional and environmental ramifications. Combining scientific analysis with a participatory approach in the Amman Zarqa Basin groundwater management was devised as a prototype to be used in the management of other groundwater basins in Jordan. This participatory management approach would also be useful in other parts of the world that are experiencing similar groundwater over-exploitation problems. La surexploitation des eaux souterraines prend de l'importance en Jordanie. Les demandes en concurrence ont augmenté face à des déficits permanents d'eau, situation qui a été exacerbée par la sécheresse de la dernière décennie. Cet article rend compte de l'aboutissement d'un projet dans lequel des options de gestion portant sur la surexploitation ont été développées pour l'un des principaux systèmes aquifères de Jordanie, le bassin d'Amman Zarqa. Des options pour aborder cette situation ont été développées grâce à une approche participative qui implique des fonctionnaires du gouvernement et des groupes d'intérêts variés des secteurs public et privé. Des efforts particuliers ont été faits pour impliquer les irrigants utilisant des puits, qui sont probablement ceux qui ont le plus fort impact sur les changements attendus permettant de remettre le système en équilibre. À partir des informations obtenues de campagnes rapides d'évaluation, telles que des réunions de communautés et des entrevues avec des experts techniques du gouvernement, un large jeu d'options a été identifié pour l'évaluation. Basées sur une analyse hydrogéologique, sociale et économique, cinq options complémentaires de gestion ont été recommandées pour la réalisation. Ce sont la création d'un Service Consultatif d'Irrigation, achetant les puits agricoles, fixant des limites fermes aux prélèvements des puits et aux zones irriguées, échangeant les eaux usées traitées avec des eaux souterraines, et la mise en place de mesures pour accroître l'efficacité des usages collectifs et industriels. Des combinaisons et des niveaux variés de ces options ont été regroupés en scénarios, présentant les stratégies possibles de mise en œuvre. Les scénarios ont été mis au point pour assister les décideurs, les propriétaires de puits et les autres acteurs pour atteindr

Chebaane, Mohamed; El-Naser, Hazim; Fitch, Jim; Hijazi, Amal; Jabbarin, Amer

148

One Region: Two Cultures. Comparing Israel and Jordan: A Unit for Elementary Students. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad 1998 (Israel and Jordan).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This social studies unit for elementary school students concentrates on comparing the different cultures of the neighboring countries of Israel and Jordan. The unit describes the educational objectives and explains that a variety of strategies are used to reach those objectives. It lists materials needed and procedures for evaluation, provides…

Fitzhugh, William P.

149

Honor killing attitudes amongst adolescents in Amman, Jordan.  

PubMed

The present study examines attitudes towards honor crimes amongst a sample of 856 ninth grade students (mean age?=?14.6, SD?=?0.56) from 14 schools in Amman, Jordan. Descriptive findings suggest that about 40% of boys and 20% of girls believe that killing a daughter, sister, or wife who has dishonored the family can be justified. A number of theoretically meaningful predictors were examined: Findings suggest that attitudes in support of honor killings are more likely amongst adolescents who have collectivist and patriarchal world views, believe in the importance of female chastity amongst adolescents, and morally neutralize aggressive behavior in general. Findings for parental harsh discipline are mixed: While the father's harsh discipline is predictive of honor killing attitudes, the mother's behavior is not. Furthermore, support for honor killing is stronger amongst male adolescents and adolescents for low education backgrounds. After controlling for other factors religion and the intensity of religious beliefs are not associated with support for honor killings. Models were tested separately for male and female respondents and suggested no systematic differences in predictors. Limitations and implications are discussed. PMID:23744567

Eisner, Manuel; Ghuneim, Lana

2013-01-01

150

Prevalence of intestinal helminths of dogs and foxes from Jordan.  

PubMed

Necropsy of 340 stray and semi-stray dogs (Canis familiaris) and nine red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Jordan revealed that 239 dogs (70.3%) and all foxes were infected with at least one intestinal helminth species. No trematodes were found in the intestine of these hosts. The overall infection rates with cestodes, nematodes and acanthocephalans in dogs were 66.8%, 4.4% and 2.9%, respectively. The following cestodes were identified: Echinococcus granulosus (9.4%), Taenia pisiformis (11.8%), T. hydatigena (7.4%), T. ovis (4.4%), T. multiceps (3.8%), T. taeniaeformis (2.9%), Dipylidium caninum (19.4%), Joyeuxiella (3.2%), Diplopylidium (2.4%), and Mesocestoides (0.9%). Other intestinal worms in dogs were Toxascaris (2.6%), Toxocara canis (1.2%), and Protospirura (0.6%) nematodes, and gigantorhynchiid acanthocephalans (2.9%). Intestinal helminths found in foxes included cestodes (D. caninum, Joyeuxiella, Diplopylidium, Mesocestoides), nematodes (Protospirura, Uncinaria stenocephala and Oxynema) and an acanthocephalan (Macracanthorhynchus). In both hosts, most helminths were recovered from the second intestinal segment of four equally divided segments. PMID:10540955

El-Shehabi, F S; Abdel-Hafez, S K; Kamhawi, S A

1999-11-01

151

GREYWATER GENERATION AND CHARACTERIZATION IN MAJOR CITIES IN JORDAN  

E-print Network

Jordan is a semi-arid country and suffers from water scarcity. Sustainable management of the limited resource can be employed from greywater reuse. The objectives of this study is to estimate the quantities of greywater generated in typical Jordanian households in the major cities of Irbid, Rusaifa, and Zarqa, to investigate greywater quality generated from the different household sources, and to gauge public acceptance towards greywater reuse. A social survey was designed and administered to identify the quantity of greywater generated. The survey covered a total of 150, 100 and 150 households in the cities of Irbid, Rusaifa and Zarqa; respectively, over a period of 12 weeks. Greywater samples were then collected form households in these cities to represent the different sources of greywater. Results of the study showed that the average per capita water consumption in the cities of Irbid, Rusaifa, and Zarqa was 82.67, 69.63, and 82.34 liters per day; respectively, and that the quantity of greywater generated was 63, 51, and 58 Lpcd; respectively. The study showed that greywater generated constituted 71 to 77 % of the total fresh household water consumption. Quality analyses indicated that treatment of greywater is necessary prior to reuse. The public acceptance survey indicated that the majority of people in the three cities oppose greywater reuse.

Ahmad Jamrah; Safa Ayyash

152

A survey of camel (Camelus dromedarius) diseases in Jordan.  

PubMed

Information on incidences of camel (Camelus dromedarius) diseases in Jordan is scarce. In this survey, 369 live and 156 slaughtered camels were examined in four Jordanian geographic regions and the proportion of diseased camels was calculated. Intestinal parasite ova were detected in 98% of camels; one or more species of external parasites were found on the skin of all camels; 33% had nasal myiasis; and hydatid cysts were identified in 44% of the slaughtered animals. Sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei var. cameli) and trypanasomiasis, two diseases of economic importance, were also diagnosed in 83% and 33% of the 32 and 257 examined camels, respectively. Rabies virus was detected in eight camels by use of fluorescent antibody examination of brain tissues. Foreign-body accumulation within the first and second stomach compartments was the predominant gastrointestinal disease of slaughtered adult camels (22%). Ten percent of slaughtered camels had bacterial pneumonia, with Pasteurella hemolytica most often isolated (56% of pneumonic lungs). Further investigation into the relationship between parasite burden and health in camels is required to assess the significance of the high prevalence of parasites. PMID:11237140

Al-Rawashdeh, O F; Al-Ani, F K; Sharrif, L A; Al-Qudah, K M; Al-Hami, Y; Frank, N

2000-09-01

153

Molecular identification of chlamydial cause of abortion in small ruminants in Jordan.  

PubMed

Chlamydophila abortus (Ch. abortus) is the etiological agent of ovine enzootic abortion (OEA) and one of the most common infectious agents of abortion in small ruminants worldwide. RFLP-PCR analysis of the outer membrane protein gene (OMP2 gene) was used for diagnosis and characterization of chlamydial causes of abortion in small ruminants in Jordan. Sixty-six placental tissues and 15 vaginal swabs were collected from aborted ewes and does to identify cause of abortion in Jordan. Thirty-eight placental samples (58 %) and 13 vaginal swabs (87 %) were positive for chlamydial DNA. Shedding of bacteria in vaginal swabs was detected within 7 days after abortion. The results of this study showed that chlamydiosis is one of the important causes of abortion in small ruminants in Jordan. In addition, vaginal swab is an excellent sample for molecular diagnosis of chlamydiosis. DNA sequencing and RFLP analysis of the OMP2 reveal that all chlamydial cause of abortion in small ruminants in Jordan are due to Ch. abortus. While, Ch. pecorum was not detected in any sample. OMP2 gene of the isolated Jordanian strain was identical (100 %) to Ch. abortus FAS strain. In conclusion, Ch. abortus is an important cause of abortion in Jordan; vaginal swab within 7 days of abortion can be used for molecular diagnosis of chlamydiosis in small ruminants. PMID:25109376

Ababneh, Huthaifa Salah; Ababneh, Mustafa Mohammed Kheir; Hananeh, Wael Mahmoud; Alsheyab, Fawzi Mohammad; Jawasreh, Khaleel Ibraheem; Al-Gharaibeh, Moath Ahmad; Ababneh, Mohammed Mahmoud

2014-12-01

154

Potential Impacts on Surface Water Quality from the Utilization of Oil Shale at Lajjoun Area\\/Southern Jordan Using Geographic Information Systems and Leachability Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface water is one of the major water resources for drinking and agricultural purposes in Jordan. It is the largest contributor to the irrigation sector and it is the second largest source for domestic consumption. Jordan also has a huge amount of oil shale that exists in the Southern and Eastern parts of the country. It is estimated that Jordan

A. Al-Harahsheh; R. Al-Adamat; M. Al-Farajat

2010-01-01

155

Influence of different water quantities and qualities on lemon trees and soil salt distribution at the Jordan Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influences of water quantity and quality on young lemon trees (Eureka) were studied at the University of Jordan Research Station at the Jordan Valley for 5 years (1996–2000). Five water levels and three water qualities were imposed via trickle irrigation system on clay loam soil. The primary effect of excess salinity is that it renders less water available to

A. M. Abu-Awwad

2001-01-01

156

A taxonomic review of the North American genus Orchopeas Jordan, 1933 (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae: Ceratophyllinae).  

PubMed

The 20 named taxa assigned to the North American flea genus Orchopeas Jordan, 1933 are reviewed. Four of these are treated as junior synonyms and the fifth as a nomen dubium. These are: Orchopeas sexdentatus firemani Hubbard, 1955 = Orchopeas schisintus (Jordan, 1929); Orchopeas schisintus nevadensis (Jordan, 1929) = Orchopeas schisintus agilis (Rothschild, 1905); Orchopeas howardi bolivari Barrera, 1955 = Orchopeas howardi (Baker, 1895); Orchopeas howardi texensis Eads, 1950 = Orchopeas fulleri Traub, 1950 and Orchopeas labiatus (nomen dubium). Six taxa originally assigned as subspecies of Orchopeas sexdentatus are elevated to the rank of full species and distribution and host preferences of all 15 species are discussed. Illustrations of the diagnostic features of all the species are provided. PMID:11217216

Lewis, R E

2000-12-01

157

Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric Constipation in South Jordan  

PubMed Central

Purpose Constipation is a common pediatric problem worldwide. This study aims to describe the clinical characteristics of pediatric constipation in south Jordan according to gender and age group. Methods All patients with constipation managed at our pediatric gastroenterology service between September 2009 and December 2012 were included. Hospital charts were reviewed. Demographic data, clinical characteristics, and final diagnosis were recorded. Data were analyzed according to gender and the following age groups: infants, pre-school, school age, and adolescents. Results During the study period, 126 patients were enrolled. The number (percentage) of patients according to age were the following infants: 43 (34.1%), pre-school: 55 (43.7%), school age: 25 (19.8%), and adolescents: 3 (2.4%). Males made up 54.8% of the study population. There were no statistical gender differences in any age group. The most common symptom in all age groups was dry, hard stool. Infrequent defecation was found in almost one-half of the patients. Fecal incontinence was more common in school-aged children compared to pre-school-aged children and adolescents. Abdominal pain was seen in almost 40% of the constipated children. Abdominal pain was more prevalent in girls and older children. Fecal mass in the rectum was the most common physical finding, with constipated boys exhibiting higher rates. Functional constipation was the most common etiology. Conclusion Clinical characteristics of constipation in children vary according to age group and gender. Older children had less frequent bowel motions, a longer duration of symptoms, and a higher prevalence of long-standing constipation compilations (fecal incontinence and abdominal pain). PMID:25349831

2014-01-01

158

Radioactivity and elemental analysis in the Ruseifa municipal landfill, Jordan.  

PubMed

In this study, a low background gamma-ray spectrometer based on a Hyper Pure Germanium detector was used to determine the activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in soil samples from various locations within the Ruseifa municipal landfill in Jordan. The chemical composition of the samples was also determined using a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer. The maximum and minimum annual outdoor effective doses were found to be 103 and 36microSva(-1) in the old landfill and Abu-Sayaah village, respectively. The annual outdoor effective dose at the recent landfill site was found to be 91microSva(-1). The annual effective dose equivalents from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation at the old landfill and the recent landfill were higher than the typical worldwide value of 70microSva(-1). Thus, some remediation of the soils on both old and recent landfills should be considered before any development for public activities. This could be achieved by mixing with clean soil from areas which are known to have lower radiation background. The concentration of heavy metals Zn, Cr, and Ba in the three sites included in this study were found to be higher than the background levels in the soil samples of the control area (Abu-Sayaah village). The enrichment factors for the above three elements were calculated and found to be: complex building site: Zn=2.52 and Ba=1.33; old landfill site: Cr=1.88, Zn=3.64, and Ba=1.26; and recent landfill site: Cr=1.57, Zn=2.19, and Ba=1.28. There was a strong negative correlation between the concentrations of the metallic elements (Mg, Al, Mn, Fe and Rb) and the concentrations of Zn, Ba, and Cr. Moreover, a strong positive correlation was found between Zn, Ba, and Cr. Thus these elements were enriched in the solid waste. PMID:18215446

Al-Jundi, J; Al-Tarazi, E

2008-01-01

159

Ethnopharmacological survey of wild medicinal plants in Showbak, Jordan.  

PubMed

Two main research questions are framing this investigation: (1) the main taxa of the medicinal importance value altered the Showbak forest stand and species composition? (2) The most safe species and what are the toxic ones (unsafe). These two research questions are the vital ones to draw a clear image about the wild medicinal plants of this investigated area of Showbak region in Jordan. 79 wild medicinal plant species were investigated in this study which are used in traditional medication for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Aaronsohnia factorovskyi Warb. et Eig., Achillea santolina L., Adiantum capillus-veneris L., Artemisia herba-alba L., Ceratonia siliqua L., Clematis recta L., Herniaria hirsuta L., Malva neglecta Wallr., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta chalepensis L., Salvia triloba L., Sarcopoterium spinosa (L.) Spach., Thymbra capitata (L.) Hof, and Urginea maritima Barker. Many of the wild medicinal plants investigated were toxic and needed to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the local healers. These plants include Calotropis procera Willd R.Br., Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Sch., Datura stramonium L., Digitalis purpurea L., Ecballium elaterium (L.) A.Rich., Euphorbia helioscopia L., Euphorbia tinctoria Boiss., Glaucium corniculatum (L.) Curt., Hyoscyamus aureus L., Mandragora officinarum L., Nerium oleander L., Ricinus communis L., Solanum nigrum L., Withania somnifera (L.) Dunel. The conservation of medicinal plants and natural resources is becoming increasingly important, so this research is trying to collect information from local population concerning the use of medicinal plants in Showbak; identify the most important specie; determine the relative importance value of the species and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) for the medicinal plants. Obtaining results is relied on the interviewee's personal information and the medicinal use of specific plants. PMID:19429338

Al-Qura'n, S

2009-05-01

160

Prevalence of depression among cancer patients in Jordan: a national survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals  The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of depression among cancer patients in Jordan and to study the relation\\u000a between several socio-demographic, disease- and treatment-related factors, and the occurrence of depression among those cancer\\u000a patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  A cross-sectional survey study was conducted at a major university hospital in Jordan. Cancer patients were interviewed for\\u000a socio-demographic information

N. M. Mhaidat; K. H. Alzoubi; S. Al-Sweedan; B. A. Alhusein

2009-01-01

161

Graduates in the kitchen. Educating girls: Jordan, Morocco and Syria.  

PubMed

Muslim girls in Jordan have become better educated due to 3 decades of free and compulsory (10 years) schooling policy. Fertility has declined from 7.7 during 1971-75 to 5.6 during 1987-90. 58% of Jordanian women use some form of family planning (FP). Over 90% of eligible children are enrolled in school and 60% go on for advanced 2-year vocational or specialized training. There are actually more girls than boys in school. Although female literacy is high, only 14% are engaged in the labor force. A leader from the Business and Professional Women's Club related that man is considered the breadwinner. Some professions are considered unsuitable for women's employment. Traveling after dark alone is considered problematic for a decent woman. A visit to a school revealed that girls envisioned receiving training and working until marriage, having children, and looking after grandchildren. Many thought 3-4 children was an appropriate family size. Government statistics show that men enroll primarily in the industrial training courses and agriculture, while women tended toward more manual vocations such as sewing, knitting, cooking, hair styling, and secretarial skills. Out of the entire class there were only 2 or 3 girls who envisioned working after having children. Husbands were assumed to always work; if unemployment occurred, the girls thought that a factory job might be a possibility. Conversations with several women in the engineering school were conducted in a lecture hall rather than the cafeteria so the boys would not think they were making themselves available to them. Concern was also expressed about working with men, but the issue of unwanted approaches was dismissed during work hours because of their academic qualifications. Only if one worked lake in the day would there be anticipation of problems. There were many styles of dress for women ranging from modern Western garb to traditional attire in grey and black with a slit for the eyes. The most traditional woman expressed that she saw no difficulty in becoming a structural engineer because her personality would triumph. PMID:12318177

Taylor, D

1993-01-01

162

Bloody diarrhoea cases caused by Shigella and amoeba in Jordan.  

PubMed

This study was done to evaluate the occurrence of bloody diarrhoea in Jordan in the period 1988-2000, with particular interest in Shigilla and amoeba cases in relation to the surveillance control system and hygiene policy. The cases were collected from various medical diagnostic laboratories. In addition to the clinical presentation, stool specimens or rectal swabs were collected and sub-cultured on the appropriate media. Shigella spp. and amoeba were identified using standard methods. Anti-microbial susceptibility tests were performed. One-way ANOVA and Least Significant Difference (LSD) were used for statistical analysis. The number of stool specimens tested for bloody diarrhoea was 34,529 in the study period. Positive stool samples were reported in 711 (2.1%) patients. Out of these 55% were males and 45 % were females. The highest number of cases 96 (13.5%) was reported in the year 1999. The highest incidence rate was (20.6) in the year 1996 and the lowest incidence rate (8.9) was in the year 2000. The highest number of cases during the period 1998-1992 was among age group 1-4 year. During the year 1993-1996 the highest number of cases was among group 5-14 year. The highest number of cases during the year 1997-2000 was among age group 15-24 year. There was a significant variation between numbers of bloody diarrhoeal cases and age groups (P < 0.001) as well as sex (P = 0.028). No significant variation (P = 0.06) was observed between number of bloody diarrhoea cases and seasons or months. The number of stool specimens tested for amoebiasis during the study period 1994-2000 was 229,040. Shigella was isolated from 304(0.13%) cases and amoeba was found in 24,211(10.6%) cases. The lowest incidence rate in bloody diarrhoeal cases in the year 2000 indicates good quality hygienic control. The increased resistance of Shigella to antibiotics may produce a future problem, which might require a further prescribing policy for treatment. PMID:14964404

Battikhi, M N G

2004-01-01

163

Linear maps preserving maximal deviation and the Jordan structure of quantum systems  

SciTech Connect

In the algebraic approach to quantum theory, a quantum observable is given by an element of a Jordan algebra and a state of the system is modelled by a normalized positive functional on the underlying algebra. Maximal deviation of a quantum observable is the largest statistical deviation one can obtain in a particular state of the system. The main result of the paper shows that each linear bijective transformation between JBW algebras preserving maximal deviations is formed by a Jordan isomorphism or a minus Jordan isomorphism perturbed by a linear functional multiple of an identity. It shows that only one numerical statistical characteristic has the power to determine the Jordan algebraic structure completely. As a consequence, we obtain that only very special maps can preserve the diameter of the spectra of elements. Nonlinear maps preserving the pseudometric given by maximal deviation are also described. The results generalize hitherto known theorems on preservers of maximal deviation in the case of self-adjoint parts of von Neumann algebras proved by Molnar.

Hamhalter, Jan [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-12-15

164

Accreditation in Higher Business Education in the Private Sector: The Case of Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the development of a quantitative research designed to examine the accreditation system of undergraduate Business Administration program in private universities in Jordan, in comparison with the standards of the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) in the United Kingdom. The research has set out a description of Jordanian…

Sabri, Hala Ahmad; El-Refae, Ghaleb Awad

2006-01-01

165

Tutorial at AICCSA'07 (May 13-16, 2007, Amman, Jordan)  

E-print Network

Tutorial at AICCSA'07 (May 13-16, 2007, Amman, Jordan) Title: Introduction to Accurate Stochastic Discrete-Event Simulation Duration: a half day tutorial Instructor: Krzysztof (Krys) Pawlikowski Professor of credibility of the results they yield. In this tutorial, we will discuss main problems and solutions

166

On the Union of Jordan Regions and Collision-Free Translational Motion Amidst Polygonal Obstacles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let ?1,..., ?m bem simple Jordan curves in the plane, and letK1,...,Km be their respective interior regions. It is shown that if each pair of curves ?i, ?j,i ?j, intersect one another in at most two points, then the boundary ofK=?

Klara Kedem; Ron Livne; János Pach; Micha Sharir

1986-01-01

167

Impact of Conflict in Syria on Syrian Children at the Zaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a study performed to investigate the impact of the conflict in Syria on Syrian refugee children. The Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan was chosen for this task. Two control (comparison) groups of children were selected: one from the Jordanian Ramtha district, which is just across the border from Syria, and that indirectly feel…

Jabbar, Sinaria Abdel; Zaza, Haidar Ibrahim

2014-01-01

168

A Community Service Approach to Solving Campus Water Consumption Issues: A Case Study from Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan faces a chronic imbalance in the population—water resources equation. The nationwide demand on water is increasing at a rate that exceeds the rate of increase in available water resources. As a result, the water deficit is expected to rise continuously and is anticipated to reach 400 million cubic meters in the year 2020. As part

Tarek M. Tarawneh; Ahmad AI-Qaisia; Sawsan Majali

2002-01-01

169

A Report to the 36th Session of the International Conference on Education in Geneve. Jordan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The educational system of Jordan follows principles set down by law in 1964. Education is compulsory for nine years, free to all students, and available equally to both sexes and all religious groups. Central administrative functions are carried out by the Ministry of Education which administers examinations, recruits teachers, and sets general…

Ministry of Education, Amman (Jordan).

170

Factors Influencing the Career Planning and Development of University Students in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to translate and validate an Arabic version of the career influence inventory for use in Jordan. The study also investigated perceptions of university students of the influential factors that have influenced their career planning and development. The validated career influence inventory was administered to 558…

Khasawneh, Samer

2010-01-01

171

Born--Jordan Quantization and the Equivalence of Matrix and Wave Mechanics  

E-print Network

The aim of the famous Born and Jordan 1925 paper was to put Heisenberg's matrix mechanics on a firm mathematical basis. Born and Jordan showed that if one wants to ensure energy conservation in Heisenberg's theory it is necessary and sufficient to quantize observables following a certain ordering rule. One apparently unnoticed consequence of this fact is that Schr\\"odinger's wave mechanics cannot be equivalent to Heisenberg's more physically motivated matrix mechanics unless its observables are quantized using this rule, and not the more symmetric prescription proposed by Weyl in 1926, which has become the standard procedure in quantum mechanics. This observation confirms the superiority of Born-Jordan quantization, as already suggested by Kauffmann. We also show how to explicitly determine the Born--Jordan quantization of arbitrary classical variables, and discuss the conceptual advantages in using this quantization scheme. We finally suggest that it might be possible to determine the correct quantization scheme by using the results of weak measurement experiments.

Maurice A. de Gosson

2014-05-11

172

Water management with water conservation, infrastructure expansions, and source variability in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A regional hydroeconomic model is developed to include demand shifts from nonprice water conservation programs as input parameters and decision variables. Stochastic nonlinear programming then jointly identifies the benefit-maximizing portfolio of conservation and leak reduction programs, infrastructure expansions, and operational allocations under variable water availability. We present a detailed application for 12 governorates in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. It

David E. Rosenberg; Richard E. Howitt; Jay R. Lund

2008-01-01

173

Rheumatoid arthritis in Jordan: a cross sectional study of disease severity and associated comorbidities  

PubMed Central

Treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to target is advocated using disease activity measures. The impact of RA on the general health status of affected patients in Jordan is not well described. This study reported the severity of RA in Jordan and its association with consequent disabilities and comorbidities. A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted at King Abdullah University Hospital in the north of Jordan. All patients who were diagnosed with RA were included. Patients’ demographics, comorbidities, disease activity score (DAS 28), and clinical disease activity index (CDAI) were collected. Both DAS 28 and CDAI were utilized to categorize RA disease activity. A total of 465 patients with RA were included: 82% were females; mean age ± standard deviation (SD) was 47.62±14.6 years; and mean disease duration ± SD was 6±4.45 years. The mean ± SD for the DAS 28 and CDAI was 5.1±1.5 and 23±14.2, respectively. According to the DAS 28, 51% of the patients were in the high disease activity category and only 5% were in remission. On the other hand, according to the CDAI, 44% were in the high disease activity category and only 1% were in remission. In Jordan, patients with RA have a high severe disease rate and a low remission rate. The disease is often progressive and associated with comorbidities that need to be managed. PMID:24876781

Alawneh, Khaldoon M; Khassawneh, Basheer Y; Ayesh, Mahmoud H; Smadi, Mahmoud

2014-01-01

174

Fighting Poverty: "Making Up" a New Society Around the Use of Human Development in Jordan.  

E-print Network

1 Fighting Poverty: "Making Up" a New Society Around the Use of Human Development in Jordan­349). Poverty is a phenomenon of a subjective and controversial nature, rooted into a specific sociological, historical, and political context. Therefore, the processes of defining (constructing) poverty, measuring it

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

175

The Impact of Marketing Actions on Relationship Quality in the Higher Education Sector in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This field/analytical study examined the marketing actions (antecedents) and performance (consequences) of relationship quality in a higher education setting. To analyze data collected from a random sample of 271 undergraduate students at AL-Zaytoonah Private University of Jordan, the linear structural relationship (LISREL) model was used to…

Al-Alak, Basheer A. M.

2006-01-01

176

Title: Working Together in Shale Gas Policy Hosts: Todd Cowen, Teresa Jordan and Christine Shoemaker  

E-print Network

Title: Working Together in Shale Gas Policy Hosts: Todd Cowen, Teresa Jordan and Christine and environmental groups. The Shale Gas Roundtable of the Institute of Politics at the University of Pittsburgh produced a report with several recommendations dealing especially with shale gas research, water use

Angenent, Lars T.

177

Dissolved-oxygen regime of the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the Jordan River in Salt Lake County decrease considerably as the river flows northward. Mean concentrations of dissolved oxygen decreased from 8.1 milligrams per liter at the Jordan Narrows to 4.7 milligrams per liter at 500 North Street during April 1981 to September 1982. Coincident with the decrease, the biochemical-oxygen demand increased from 5 to 7 milligrams per liter. About 50 percent of the dissolved-oxygen concentrations and 90 percent of the 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand measured downstream from 1700 South Street exceeded the State intended-use standards. An estimated 6. million pounds of oxygen-demanding substances as measured by 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand were discharged to the Jordan River during 1981 from point sources downstream from 9000 South Street. Seven wastewater-treatment plants contributed 77 percent of this load, nonstorm base flows contributed 22 percent, and storm flows less than 1 percent. The Surplus Canal diversion at 2100 South Street removed about 70 percent of this load, and travel time of about 1 day also decreased the actual effects of the load on the river. Reaeration rates during September and October were quite high (average K2 at 20 degrees Celsius was about 12 per day) between the Jordan Narrows and 9000 South Street, but they decreased to 2.4 per day in the reach from 1330 South to 1800 North Streets. (USGS)

Stephens, D. W.

1984-01-01

178

A hierarchy of symmetry breaking in the Nonsymmetric Kaluza-Klein (Jordan-Thiry) Theory  

E-print Network

The paper is devoted to the hierarchy problem of a symmetry breaking in the Nonsymmetric Kaluza-Klein (Jordan-Thiry) Theory. The basic idea consists in a deformation of a vacuum states manifold to the cartesian product of vacuum states manifolds of every stage of a symmetry breaking.

M. W. Kalinowski

2003-07-15

179

Searching for Approximate Equilibria in Empirical Games Patrick R. Jordan, Yevgeniy Vorobeychik, and Michael P. Wellman  

E-print Network

Agents and Multiagent Systems (www.ifaamas.org). All rights reserved. In empirical game modeling from them, constitutes the empirical game. Strategic reasoning about the empirical game de- scriptionSearching for Approximate Equilibria in Empirical Games Patrick R. Jordan, Yevgeniy Vorobeychik

Vorobeychik, Eugene

180

Guttman-Jordan Facet Design and the Study of Law-Related Attitudes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of an Attitude-Behavior Scale through an application of Guttman-Jordan facet design is detailed. The attitude scale was constructed to meet the need in law-related education for a valid attitudinal instrument to be used in research settings and in attitude change situations. A legal education program was used as a treatment in a…

Jacobson, Michael; Palonsky, Stuart

181

The Contested Energy Future of Amman, Jordan: Between Promises of Alternative Energies and a Nuclear Venture  

E-print Network

policies, among which are included a green growth program and the building of a nuclear power plant and nuclear energy. Alternative eco-friendly energy resources represent only a small part of the potentialThe Contested Energy Future of Amman, Jordan: Between Promises of Alternative Energies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

182

E-government adoption in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan: Factors from social perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan provides an example of a nation improving global competitiveness through development of strong Information Communication Technology (ICT) with the aim of becoming a knowledge based country and a regional Information Technology (IT) centre. E- government is an important part of this strategy, however there appears to be a lack of understanding of the social factors

Mohammad Kamel Alomari; Kuldeep Sandhu; Peter Woods

2009-01-01

183

The practical reality theory and business ethics in non-Western context: evidence from Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is aimed at investigating the degree to which business managers in developing countries adhere to business ethics with special reference to the case of Jordan and comparing results with findings of previous studies. This comparison is done to assess whether business managers in different countries make compromises in their ethical stance under pressure of practical reality; and exploring

Fuad N. Al-Shaikh

2003-01-01

184

Recording and Preserving Cultural Heritage in the Middle East. Aerial Archaeology in Jordan, 1997-2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerial archaeology plays a crucial role in Western Europe in finding, recording, monitoring and presenting cultural heritage. In the Middle East, however, although it was pioneered almost a century ago, it has subsequently played a slight role in cultural heritage management. Since 1997 there has again been aerial reconnaissance for archaeology in Jordan and now that project has begun to be funded on a scale that will permit it to undertake a far more systematic role. This is of crucial importance anywhere in the Middle East where population rises have been especially high and impacted on landscapes and archaeology. Jordan has probably the highest rate of increase anywhere in the region - c. 1800% since 1943 - so that there, more than anywhere else, a cost-effective tool like Aerial Archaeology is of vital importance. There have been over 160 hours of flying undertaken since 1997 with some 20,000 photographs of hundreds of sites. Jordan remains the only country in the Middle East with such a programme but recent Workshops in Aerial Archaeology in Jordan were opened to archaeologists from neighbouring countries and played a role in raising awareness of the potential of the technique.

Kennedy, D.

2009-04-01

185

Assessment of nitrate contamination of karst springs, Bani Kanana, northern Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contamination of groundwater from point and non-point sources is one of the major problems of water resources in Jordan. Altogether one hundred and six groundwater samples were collected from twenty six karst springs emerging from Umm Rijam aquifer and three wells tapping Amman-Wadi As Sir aquifer, and investigated for NO3 - concentrations. Results showed that NO3 - concentration in spring

Mutewekil M. Obeidat; Fayez Y. Ahmad; Nezar A. Hamouri; Adnan M. Massadeh; Faisal S. Athamneh

2008-01-01

186

Hydrochemical processes in the lower Jordan valley and in the Dead Sea area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in the concentrations of major, some minor and trace elements occurring in both surface and groundwater of the lower Jordan River–Dead Sea drainage basin have been investigated in order to identify the characteristics of the regional aquifers and their recharge areas. Spider patterns of elements and rare earth distribution patterns pinpoint the characteristic chemical features of groundwater. As compared

P. Möller; E. Rosenthal; S. Geyer; J. Guttman; P. Dulski; M. Rybakov; M. Zilberbrand; C. Jahnke; A. Flexer

2007-01-01

187

Epidemiological pattern of imported malaria in Jordan from 2007 to 2011.  

PubMed

Imported malaria is of major health concern to countries considered as free from this infection and Jordan is no exception. The aim of this study was to highlight various epidemiological aspects of imported malaria into Jordan over a period of five years. Information pertinent to all malaria cases registered in the Ministry of Health (Jordan) from January 2007 to November 2011 was retrieved from the database of the Department of Parasitic and Zoonotic Diseases. Data was grouped according to age, gender, country of acquisition and etiologic agents. During the study period, a total of 304 malaria cases were registered, 192 cases among Jordanians returning home and the remaining were detected among foreign nationals who arrived in the country for work or tourism. The majority of infections were due to Plasmodium falciparum (199 cases) followed by Plasmodium vivax (93) and then Plasmodium malariae (8). Mixed infection was detected in just 4 cases. The origin of these imported cases was in a descending order; Eritrea, Côte d'Ivoire, India, Sudan, Liberia and Pakistan. These countries contributed to 86.5% of cases while the remaining were acquired from other areas. It is believed that most Jordanians with imported malaria were military personnel who participated in Peace Keeping Forces with the United Nations. It is concluded that with the exception of imported cases reported herein, Jordan remains a malaria free country. Continuous vigilance by health authorities is needed to avoid reintroduction of the disease into the kingdom. PMID:24522127

Jamain, H M; Abu Shaqra, Q A; Kanani, K A

2013-12-01

188

Recommendation title: APP Store Concept OOC TEAM: David Carmichael, Logan Jordan, Tim Korb, David Shaw  

E-print Network

Page | 1 Recommendation title: APP Store Concept OOC TEAM: David Carmichael, Logan Jordan, Tim Korb of internal "App Store" such that the colleges and administrative departments could more broadly utilize by utilizing the created apps; and second order efficiencies from having visibility on available existing

189

Current trends in drug abuse associated fatalities – Jordan, 2000–2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is the first study that addresses drug abuse associated fatalities in Jordan. It is aimed to give a close picture to the demography, toxicological data, manner, cause of death and other associated findings in such cases. Postmortem forensic pathology reports for all autopsies examined in the National Institute of Forensic Medicine were reviewed over a 5-year period and

Mu’men S. Hadidi; Mudhaffar I. Ibrahim; Imad M. Abdallat; Kamal A. Hadidi

2009-01-01

190

A Free Energy Model for Thin-film Shape Memory Alloys Jordan E. Massad*1  

E-print Network

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Dept., UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 ABSTRACT Thin-film shape memory alloysA Free Energy Model for Thin-film Shape Memory Alloys Jordan E. Massad*1 , Ralph C. Smith1 and Greg comparison with thin-film NiTi superelastic hysteresis data. Keywords: Shape memory alloy model; thin film

191

The characteristics of the role of early childhood education mentors in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to explore empirically how far the roles adopted by the mentors of early childhood education students teaching in Jordan coincide with a model of roles suggested in the literature of teacher training. This study is an attempt to draw from the literature as many views about the role of the mentor as possible and then to attempt

Fathi M. Ihmeideh; Ahmad M. Qablan

2008-01-01

192

Spencer Liberto, Dilan Ustek, Jordan Yuan How Does a C Program Talk to a Scribbler Robot?  

E-print Network

Bluetooth. CSC 499 MAP Adviser Henry Walker The robot gives out a signal to the workstation every 5Spencer Liberto, Dilan Ustek, Jordan Yuan How Does a C Program Talk to a Scribbler Robot? MyroC/Scribbler Language The MyroC library and your Scribbler robot have an agreed upon low-level language or byte code

Walker, Henry MacKay

193

On the Stability of Spherically Symmetric Configurations in Newtonian Limit of Jordan, Brans-Dicke Theory  

E-print Network

We discuss stability of spherically symmetric static solutions in Newtonian limit of Jordan, Brans-Dicke field equations. The behavior of the stable equilibrium solutions for the spherically symmetric configurations considered here, it emerges that the more compact a model is, the more stable it is. Moreover, linear stability analysis shows the existence of stable configurations for any polytropic index.

S. Kozyrev

2003-04-08

194

Multi-criteria analysis of non-conventional energy technologies for water desalination in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gap between water supply and demand is widening in Jordan. Sound measures to overcome this gap are essential for sustainable water development. In this paper non-conventional energy technologies for water desalination are discussed. These include hydropower, solar, wind, and nuclear technologies. Using multi-criteria analysis, options were evaluated for best water uses considering water productivity and environmental sustainability criteria. It

Bilal A. Akash; Odeh R. Al-Jayyousi; Mousa S. Mohsen

1997-01-01

195

Design of stand-alone brackish water desalination wind energy system for Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than 100 underground water wells drilled in Jordan are known to have brackish water with total desolved solids (TDS) over 1500 ppm but not greater than 4000 ppm. The world standard for potable water limits the TDS count to 500 ppm in addition to being free from live microorganisms or dangerous mineral and organic substances. A reverse osmosis desalination

S. M. Habali; I. A. Saleh

1994-01-01

196

The role of desalination in bridging the water gap in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water resources of Jordan have always been scarce. The demand for water in the country exceeds the available resources and the gap between the water supply and demand is continuously increasing. Furthermore, the quality of water resources has dramatically deteriorated in recent years, which prevented the utilization of some resources. To secure the economic sustainability of the country, it

H. A. Abu Qdais; F. Batayneh

2002-01-01

197

MINERALOGY AND PETROGRAPHY OF NEW OCCURENCES DEPOSITS OF THE ZEOLITIC TUFF IN NORTHEAST JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrences deposits of the zeolitic tuff were studied in four areas through detailed geological mapping at a scale 1:50.000 in northeast Jordan and through exploration project. These deposits covered large areas and characterized by rich content, lateral and vertical homogenous distribution of the zeolite minerals. The zeolites are an abundant constituent in these deposits, which form more than 50%

K. Tarawneh

198

Surface water management tool for arid lands of Jordan using GIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Jordan as well as most of the developing countries located in the and regions, water is a priority issue at national and individual levels. Several programs and management practices are in place to conserve the water resources and implement new water supplies to meet the demand of various sectors of the water users. With very high demand on the

Saad Mohammed Alayyash

2002-01-01

199

Hierarchically Consistent Test Problems for Genetic Algorithms Richard A. Watson Jordan B. Pollack  

E-print Network

amiss [Forrest & Mitchell 1993b]. The functions were intended to exemplify the class of problems on from the work of Forrest and Mitchell [1993b], we address the question, "What makes a hierarchicallyHierarchically Consistent Test Problems for Genetic Algorithms Richard A. Watson Jordan B. Pollack

Pollack, Jordan B.

200

Assessing the High School Teachers' Emotional Intelligence in Karak District of Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main aim of the current study was to assess the level of the emotional intelligence (EI) of high school teachers in Karak district of Jordan. A sample of 222 teachers was randomly selected and filtered on the basis of an inconsistency index. A scale of 55 items measuring empathy, emotions regulation, interpersonal management, self management,…

Alnabhan, Mousa

2008-01-01

201

Subsidence and Sinkhole Hazard Assessment in the Southern Dead Sea Area, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Dead Sea area is increasingly facing serious subsidence and sinkhole hazards. On March 22, 2000, the dyke of a two-month old major salt evaporation pond, located along the shore of the Lisan Peninsula (Jordan), collapsed over almost two kilometers. The pond was set up over unstable new lands that have been progressively emerging during the last three decades. In

Damien Closson; Najib Abou Karaki; Yann Klinger; Musa Jad Hussein

2005-01-01

202

A class of Hermitian generalized Jordan triple systems and Chern-Simons gauge theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We find a class of Hermitian generalized Jordan triple systems (HGJTSs) and Hermitian (?, ?)-Freudenthal-Kantor triple systems (HFKTSs). We apply one of the most simple HGJTSs which we find to a field theory and obtain a typical u(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory with a fundamental matter.

Kamiya, Noriaki; Sato, Matsuo

2014-09-01

203

10 Evolutionary Genomics of Gene Expression I. King Jordan and Leonardo Mari~no-Ramirez  

E-print Network

- pression divergence and explores the relationship between those two aspects of the evolutionary processDRAFT 10 Evolutionary Genomics of Gene Expression I. King Jordan and Leonardo Mari accumulated to the levels needed for sys- tematic evolutionary studies. This has been due to the application

Jordan, King

204

Assessment of potential shale-oil and shale-gas resources in Silurian shales of Jordan, 2014  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 11 million barrels of potential shale-oil and 320 billion cubic feet of shale-gas resources in Silurian shales of Jordan.

Schenk, Christopher J.

2014-01-01

205

Building community in low-income areas : designing a new architectural language for community centers in Jordan  

E-print Network

The aim of this thesis is to develop a vocabulary of principles to be used in the design of future community centers in Jordan. Community centers provide the stage for bringing members of the community together to meet and ...

Ali, Dalia Osama

1997-01-01

206

I3.-LIST OF THE FISHES INHABITING CLEAR LAKE, CAUFORNIA. By DAVID S. JORDAN AND CHARLES H, GILBERT.  

E-print Network

. Parrish; not seen by us. Takes the hook. 6. PtychocheiluB oregonensis (Richardson). Chappaul. or Shappau in another. 7. Ptychocheilus harfordi Jordan & Gilbert. Not seen by us. Occasionally taken, according to MI

207

A fixed point method for perturbation of bimultipliers and Jordan bimultipliers in C?-ternary algebras  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Let A be a C?-ternary algebra. A C-bilinear T :A×A?A is called a C?-ternary algebra bi-multiplier, if it satisfies T([abc],d)=[T(a,b)cd], T(a,[bcd])=[abT(c,d)] for all a,b,c,d?A. Also, the mapping T :A×A?A is a called C?-ternary algebra Jordan bimultiplier, if it satisfies T([aaa],a)=[T(a,a)aa], T(a,[aaa])=[aaT(a,a)] for all a ?A. Using the fixed point method, we investigate the generalized Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability of bimultipliers and Jordan bimultipliers in C?-ternary algebras. The concept of Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability originated from the Th.M. Rassias' stability theorem that appeared in his paper: [Th. M. Rassias, Proc. Am. Math. Soc. 72, 297 (1978)].

Ebadian, A.; Ghobadipour, N.; Eshaghi Gordji, M.

2010-10-01

208

Prevalence of overweight and obesity among adolescents in Irbid governorate, Jordan.  

PubMed

Overweight and obesity is an escalating health problem in both developed and developing countries. This descriptive cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among adolescents aged 13-16 years in Irbid governorate, Jordan, and to compare the prevalence by sex, residential area and socioeconomic status. In a cluster random sample of 1355 school students the prevalence of overweight and obesity (body mass index > or = 85th percentile) was 24.4% (15.7% overweight and 8.7% obese) and was significantly higher among female students, students who lived in urban areas and those with working parents. This high prevalence of overweight is a serious concern for public health in Jordan. PMID:20799595

Abu Baker, N N; Daradkeh, S M

2010-06-01

209

Attitudes of Men and Women Towards Wife Beating: Findings From Palestinian Refugee Camps in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to investigate the factors associated with the acceptance of wife beating among currently married\\u000a men and women living in disadvantaged Palestinian refugee camps in Jordan. The study uses data from a cross-sectional survey\\u000a of 3,100 households from 12 refugee camps, conducted in 1999, with a sub-sample of 395 married women and men selected for

Marwan Khawaja; Natalia Linos; Zeina El-Roueiheb

2008-01-01

210

Prevalence and risk factors associated with bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in dairy herds in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence and to identify risk factors associated with bovine\\u000a viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection in 62 non-vaccinated dairy herds (671 cows) in Jordan between January and June 2007.\\u000a Information regarding herd management was recorded through a personal interview with farmers. Antibodies against BVDV were\\u000a detected using an indirect ELISA test. Chi-square

A. Q. Talafha; S. M. Hirche; M. M. Ababneh; A. M. Al-Majali

2009-01-01

211

A Study of Some Blood Genetic Characteristics of Bedouin and Non-Bedouin Arabs of Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blood genetic markers were investigated in a sample of 111 Bedouin and 412 non-Bedouin male Arabs of Jordan. The frequencies of the ABO alleles were similar in these two groups, with a relatively high frequency of the·gene (0.63; 0.61). The frequencies of Rh genes were slightly different in these two groups, with a higher Ro, and a lower r in

N. Saha; B. Banerjee

1986-01-01

212

Expert computer knowledge-based methodology using fuzzy sets for evaluating water conservation programs in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   This paper aims to devise a new methodology for evaluating water conservation programs based on expert computer knowledge-based\\u000a systems and fuzzy set analyses. Computer-programmed surveys were carried out on a random sample of water users in Amman City,\\u000a Jordan, before and after they received water educational material. Relative weights were given for each response and a cumulative\\u000a grade was

Odeh Al-Jayyousi; Rustom Mamlook

2003-01-01

213

Economic Value of Tree Fruit Production in Jordan Valley from a Virtual Water Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The continuous high demand of water resources for agricultural uses in Jordan is leading to a water crisis. A possible partial\\u000a solution may be to import food which requires large amounts of water to grow instead of cultivating high water consuming crops.\\u000a Crops such as banana and citrus cause a huge virtual water loss, which can be reduced by cultivating

Khaldoon Abdalah Mourad; Hartmut Gaese; Amer S. Jabarin

2010-01-01

214

Notes on biogenic tufas associated with the Zerqa-Ma’in hot springs of Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents petrographic and geochemical data from a Quaternary tufa deposit and associated hot-spring water from\\u000a the Zerqa-Ma’in area of the eastern side of Jordan Rift Valley. The Zerqa-Ma’in phytoherm tufa is formed by encrustration\\u000a of mosses and algae in which the rate of calcite precipitation is probably controlled by water turbulence. Calcite precipitates\\u000a mainly as fibrous crystals containing

Khalid M. Banat; Osamha M. Obeidat

1996-01-01

215

Evidence for Jericho earthquakes from slumped sediments of the Jordan River delta in the Dead Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seismic-reflection data and historical accounts suggest that a large submarine slump in the Dead Sea was produced by the most recent large earthquake along the Dead Sea-Jordan transform plate boundary, the ML 6.25 Jericho earthquake of July 11, 1927. The correlation supports the use of seismically triggered slump, landslide, and other sediment failures in lakes to infer the timing of

Tina M. Niemi; Zvi Ben-Avraham

1994-01-01

216

Etiology and incidence of maxillofacial fractures in the north of Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The objective of this investigation was to determine the causes and incidence of maxillofacial fractures in the country of Jordan.Design. A retrospective review of patient records and radiographs for the 5-year period from 1992 to 1997 was conducted. Data regarding age, gender, cause of fracture, anatomic site, and treatment modalities were reviewed.Results. During the 5-year period, 563 patients with

Anwar B Bataineh

1998-01-01

217

A Unique Human-Fox Burial from a Pre-Natufian Cemetery in the Levant (Jordan)  

Microsoft Academic Search

New human burials from northern Jordan provide important insights into the appearance of cemeteries and the nature of human-animal relationships within mortuary contexts during the Epipalaeolithic period (c. 23,000–11,600 cal BP) in the Levant, reinforcing a socio-ideological relationship that goes beyond predator-prey. Previous work suggests that archaeological features indicative of social complexity occur suddenly during the latest Epipalaeolithic phase, the

Lisa A. Maher; Jay T. Stock; Sarah Finney; James J. N. Heywood; Preston T. Miracle; Edward B. Banning; Michael Petraglia

2011-01-01

218

Public support and consent preference for biomedical research and biobanking in Jordan  

PubMed Central

The success of any biobank depends on a number of factors including public's view of research and the extent to which it is willing to participate in research. As a prototype of surrounding countries, public interest in research and biobanking in addition to the influence and type of informed consent for biobanking were investigated in Jordan. Data were collected as part of a national survey of 3196 individuals representing the Jordanian population. The majority of respondents (88.6%) had a positive perception of the level of research in Jordan and they overwhelmingly (98.2%) agreed to the concept of investing as a country in research. When respondents were asked if the presence of an informed consent would influence their decision to participate in biobanking, more individuals (19.8%) considered having an informed consent mechanism as a positive factor than those who considered it to have negative connotations (13.1%). However, a substantial portion (65%) did not feel it affected their decision. The majority of survey participants (64%) expressed willingness to participate in biobanking and over 90% of them preferred an opt-in consent form whether general (75.2%) or specific for disease or treatment (16.9%). These results indicate a promising ground for research and biobanking in Jordan. Educational programs or mass awareness campaigns to promote participation in biobanking and increase awareness about informed consent and individual rights in research will benefit both the scientific community as well as the public. PMID:22968133

Ahram, Mamoun; Othman, Areej; Shahrouri, Manal

2013-01-01

219

Eric Hardisty, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Modeling Perspective using Adaptor Grammars. Em-pirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, 2010.  

E-print Network

Eric Hardisty, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Modeling Perspective using Adaptor Grammars. Em- pirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, 2010. @inproceedings{Hardisty:Boyd-Graber:Resnik-2010, Author = {Eric Hardisty and Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik}, Booktitle = {Empirical Methods

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

220

Viet-An Nguyen, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Lexical and Hierarchical Topic Regression. Neural Information Processing Systems, 2013.  

E-print Network

Viet-An Nguyen, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Lexical and Hierarchical Topic Regression. Neural Information Processing Systems, 2013. @inproceedings{Nguyen:Boyd-Graber:Resnik-2013, Title = {Viet-An Nguyen and Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik}, Year = {2013}, Location = {Lake Tahoe, Nevada

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

221

Vladimir Eidelman, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Topic Models for Dynamic Translation Model Adaptation. Association for Computational Linguistics, 2012.  

E-print Network

Vladimir Eidelman, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Topic Models for Dynamic Translation Model Adaptation. Association for Computational Linguistics, 2012. @inproceedings{Eidelman:Boyd-Graber:Resnik-2012, Author = {Vladimir Eidelman and Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik}, Booktitle = {Association

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

222

Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik. Holistic Sentiment Analysis Across Languages: Multilingual Super-vised Latent Dirichlet Allocation. Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, 2010.  

E-print Network

Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik. Holistic Sentiment Analysis Across Languages: Multilingual. @inproceedings{Boyd-Graber:Resnik-2010, Author = {Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik}, Booktitle = {Empirical-Graber UMD iSchool and UMIACS University of Maryland College Park, MD jbg@umiacs.umd.edu Philip Resnik

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

223

Mohit Iyyer, Peter Enns, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Political Ideology Detection Using Recursive Neural Networks. Association for Computational Linguistics, 2014.  

E-print Network

Mohit Iyyer, Peter Enns, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Political Ideology Detection Using Recursive Neural Networks. Association for Computational Linguistics, 2014. @inproceedings{Iyyer:Enns:Boyd-Graber:Resnik for Computational Linguistics}, Author = {Mohit Iyyer and Peter Enns and Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik}, Year

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

224

Sustainable energy and environmental impact: role of renewables as clean and secure source of energy for the 21st century in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, present and future energy consumption, electricity demand, potential of renewable energy sources and national energy policy in Jordan are presented. The related environmental impacts are discussed from the sustainable development point of view, including the future role of renewable energy sources. Jordan is a net energy importing country, with almost 96% of its annual needs relying on

J. O. Jaber; O. O. Badran; N. Abu-Shikhah

2004-01-01

225

Evolutionary Bioinformatics 2006: 2 295300 295 Correspondence: I. King Jordan, School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 310 Ferst Drive, Atlanta,  

E-print Network

evolutionary rates and function. We performed a genome-scale evaluation of the relationship betweenEvolutionary Bioinformatics 2006: 2 295­300 295 Correspondence: I. King Jordan, School of Biology: king.jordan@biology.gatech.edu ORIGINAL RESEARCH Co-evolutionary Rates of Functionally Related Yeast

Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

226

DNA before Watson & Crick-The Pioneering Studies of J. M. Gulland and D. O. Jordan at Nottingham  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A description placed in a historical context, of the physico-chemical investigations of DNA carried out in the period 1940-1950 by a group at University College, Nottingham led by J.M.Gulland and D.O.Jordan. The isolation of a pure sample of DNA from calf thymus was followed by its analysis by potentiometric titrations and by measurements at variable pH of viscosity and streaming birefringence. Unlike the phosphoric acid groups, the primary amino and enolic hydroxyl groups could only be titrated after prior treatment with strong acid or strong base. The conclusion of Gulland and Jordan, that extremes of pH caused liberation of amino and enolic hydoxyl groups by disruption of hydrogen bonds between neighbouring polynucleotide chains, proved to be of considerable importance. The article includes life histories of Gulland and Jordan, and reference to Linus Pauling's remarkable foresight during his Sir Jesse Boot Foundation Lecture delivered at Nottingham in 1948.

Booth, Harold; Hey, Michael J.

1996-10-01

227

Wood remains from the Late Triassic (Carnian) of Jordan and their paleoenvironmental implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During field work in the Triassic of Jordan fossil wood remains have been discovered at five horizons (S-1AR-S-5AR) of the Late Triassic (Carnian) Abu Ruweis Formation in NW Jordan. In most horizons wood remains are too badly preserved to allow for a detailed xylotomic investigation. Only two horizons provided material which exhibited anatomical details: (1) in horizon S-1AR we found rare and rather small fragments of woody charcoal exhibiting cellular details (representing the first macroscopic evidence of paleo-wildfires from the Late Triassic of the Middle East), and (2) in horizon S-5AR surfaces of partly compressed (gagatized) and partly permineralized wood fragments exhibited anatomical details that could be investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. All wood remains that allow for a detailed investigation show features typical of gymnosperms, but at the moment nothing can be said about a more specific taxonomic affinity of most of the woods, although wood from horizon S-5AR exhibits characteristics of protopinoid wood. Our data provide evidence that gymnospermous woody vegetation cover has existed in the source areas of the sediments deposited in the Abu Ruweis Formation in Jordan and that this woody vegetation occasionally experienced wildfires. This, together with lithological data, provides evidence for a seasonally dry (maybe even arid) climate during deposition of the Abu Ruweis Formation. On a larger scale our findings contribute to the very scarce current knowledge about Late Triassic wildfires on the entire continent Gondwana, from where so far only three records of macro-charcoals, as undisputed evidence of paleo-wildfires, have been published from this period.

Abu Hamad, Abdalla M. B.; Jasper, André; Uhl, Dieter

2014-07-01

228

Client-centered counseling improves client satisfaction with family planning visits: evidence from Irbid, Jordan  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Background: High levels of unmet need for family planning and high contraceptive discontinuation rates persist in Jordan, prompting the Jordan Health Communication Partnership (JHCP) to initiate a client-centered family planning service program called “Consult and Choose” (CC), together with community-based activities to encourage women with unmet need to visit health centers. Methods: We held exit interviews with 461 family planning clients between November–December 2011 to assess, from the clients' perspective, whether trained providers followed the CC protocol and used the CC tools, as well as to measure client satisfaction. We also tracked referral card information from community-based activities to health centers and examined service statistics to explore trends in family planning use. Results: On average, clients reported that providers performed 5.6 of the 7 steps outlined in the CC protocol. Nearly 83% of respondents were very satisfied with their clinic visits. Logistic regression analysis found that the odds of being “very satisfied” increases by 20% with each additional counseling protocol step performed and by 70% with each increase in the number of CC materials used. Between June 2011 and August 2012, 14,490 referral cards from community-based activities were collected in health centers, 59% of which were for family planning services. Service statistic trends indicate an increase in the number of new family planning users and in couple-years of protection after starting the CC program. Conclusions: Implementation of the CC program at health centers nationally, in tandem with community-based interventions, could play a key role in attaining Jordan's goal of reducing its total fertility rate to 2.1 by 2030. Although this initiative would likely be replicated most readily in other middle-income countries, lower-resource countries could also adapt the tested CC approach.

Kamhawi, Sarah; Underwood, Carol; Murad, Huda; Jabre, Bushra

2013-01-01

229

Management approaches to integrated solid waste in industrialized zones in Jordan: a case of Zarqa City.  

PubMed

There is a need to recognize the difficulties experienced in managing waste and to understand the reasons for those difficulties, especially in developing countries such as Jordan. Zarqa is a Governorate located in central Jordan, which has 2874 registered industries, making up more than 52% of the total industries in the country. Zarqa Governorate suffers from serious solid waste problems. These problems arise from an absence of adequate policies, facilitating legislation, and an environmentally enthused public, which therefore have a negative impact on the environment and health. Solid waste generation in Zarqa Governorate has increased exponentially and has polluted natural resources and the environment. A significant change in municipal solid waste generation was evident between the years 1994 and 2000. The Zarqa Governorate generated 482 tons/day in 2002 with a per capita rate of 0.44 kg/cap-day [Consulting Engineers, 2002, Feasibility study for the treatment of industrial wastewater in Zarqa Governorate. A project funded by METAP and Zarqa Chamber of Industry. Unpublished report]. This manuscript assesses the current operational and management practices of solid waste in the Zarqa Governorate; and evaluates the associated issues of solid waste collection, storage, transport, disposal and recycling in developing countries. The lack of techniques, financial funds and awareness among public and private sectors form an obstacle for achieving a successful environmental program. Several options are proposed to address management goals. Although Jordan became the first country in the Middle East to adopt a national environmental strategy; waste disposal is still largely uncontrolled and large quantities of waste go uncollected. Ensuring proper management of solid wastes, enforcing regulations, and implementing proper environmental awareness programs that will enhance the public understanding and achieve greater efficiency, are the findings of this study. PMID:16112562

Mrayyan, Bassam; Hamdi, Moshrik R

2006-01-01

230

Adaptation measures to reduce the impact of climate variability on crop production in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jordan has limited natural resources such as water and agricultural land. It is classified as an arid and semi arid country. The average annual precipitation ranges between 200 and 500 mm. Although a small country, Jordan has many different climatic regions; including sub tropical, Mediterranean, steppe and desert regions. Temperature and rain differences between these regions are wide, beside fluctuation in climate from one year to another. Climate change will add more stress on the natural renewable resources, especially on water and agriculture. In spite that most of agricultural areas in Jordan are rain-fed, the agriculture sector utilizes about two-thirds of the available water resources. The purpose of the study is to identify adaptation measures that would reduce climate change and water scarcity impacts on agricultural productivity and on crop production in particular. Adaptation measures were proposed based on results from assessment of climate change impacts on agricultural production. The adaptation for rainfed agriculture included the improvement of soil water storage to maximize the plant water availability; the application of conservation agriculture to reduce soil degradation; the improvement of soil fertility; the management of crop residue and tillage practices to conserve soil moisture; the modification of planting and harvesting dates for field crops and the selection of drought-tolerant crop varieties; the expansion of rainwater harvesting and management schemes; encouraging the farmers to adopt and apply the in-situ water harvesting systems (micro-catchment); developing strategies and plans for climate change adaptation and capacity building; and the improvement of extension services and technology transfer. Proposed autonomous adaptation measures included the enhancement of adaptive capacity of farmers to be more involved in decision-making and diversification of farmers' sources of income to minimize vulnerability to climate change. Keywords: Climate Change, Adaptation, Mediterranean, Agriculture

Khresat, S. A.

2012-04-01

231

Reconnaissance of toxic substances in the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A reconnaissance of toxic substances in the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah, was made during July, 1980 to October, 1982 as part of a larger study of the river that included studies of sanitary quality, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity. Samples for toxic substances were collected at five sites on the Jordan River, at three major tributaries, and at six storm drains. The toxic substance that most frequently exceeded State standards was total mercury. About 78 percent of the 138 samples for total mercury exceeded the State standard of 0.05 microgram per liter. Other toxic substances that exceeded State standards were: Ammonia-18 percent of the samples analyzed, cadmium--9 percent, copper-9 percent, zinc--6 percent, and lead--2 percent. One sample for cyanide and one for iron also exceeded State standards. The diversity of toxic substances with concentrations large enough to cause them to be problems increased from the upstream sampling site at the Jordan Narrows to the next two downstream sites at 9000 South and 5800 South Streets. Concentrations of trace elements in stream-bottom materials also increased in a downstream direction. Substantial increases first were observed at 5800 South Street, and they were sustained throughout the downstream study area. Iron is transported in the greatest quantity of all the trace elements studied, with a mean load of 110 pounds per day. Notable loads of barium, boron, lead , and zinc also are transported by the river. DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, heptachlor, methoxychlor, PCB, and 2,4-D were detected in bottom materials; and DDE, Silvex, and 2,4-D were detected in water samples. Of 112 organic compounds in the Environmental Protection Agency 's priority pollutant list, only chloroform was detected in the storm drains that empty into the Joran River. Several metals and phenol also were detected in the samples for priority pollutants. (USGS)

Thompson, Kendall R.

1984-01-01

232

Attitudes of graduating medical doctors toward using sex selection techniques in Jordan in 2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The aim of this study was to describe the attitude of graduating medical doctors toward the use of sex selection techniques\\u000a in Jordan in 2009.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods (Design)  A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess attitude toward using sex selection. Demographic variables, gender preference\\u000a of future children, and score on attitude toward using technology scale were used as independent variables.

Mohammad Khassawneh; Nemeh Al-Akour; Yousef Khader; Faheem Zayed

2011-01-01

233

The Influence of Secondhand Smoke Exposure on Birth Outcomes in Jordan  

PubMed Central

This study investigates how secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure influences neonatal birth weight in Jordan, a country with high smoking prevalence. The findings revealed that as the average number of SHS exposure hours per week increased in the second trimester, the neonatal birth weight decreased while holding all covariates constant. Women who reported a higher average number of SHS exposure hours per week from work in the second trimester, home in the third trimester, and outside in the third trimester were at greater risk for having a low birth weight neonate than women who reported a lower average number of SHS exposure hours. PMID:20616994

Abu-Baker, Nesrin N.; Haddad, Linda; Savage, Christine

2010-01-01

234

The influence of secondhand smoke exposure on birth outcomes in Jordan.  

PubMed

This study investigates how secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure influences neonatal birth weight in Jordan, a country with high smoking prevalence. The findings revealed that as the average number of SHS exposure hours per week increased in the second trimester, the neonatal birth weight decreased while holding all covariates constant. Women who reported a higher average number of SHS exposure hours per week from work in the second trimester, home in the third trimester, and outside in the third trimester were at greater risk for having a low birth weight neonate than women who reported a lower average number of SHS exposure hours. PMID:20616994

Abu-Baker, Nesrin N; Haddad, Linda; Savage, Christine

2010-02-01

235

The microbiology of the Maqarin site, Jordan -- A natural analogue for cementitious radioactive waste repositories  

SciTech Connect

The Maqarin site, Jordan is being studied as a natural analogue of a cementitious radioactive waste repository. The microbiology has been studied and diverse microbial populations capable of tolerating alkaline pH were detected at all sampling localities. Dissolved organic carbon was identified as the potentially most important reductant with sulfate identified as the main oxidant, both supply energy for microbial life. Calculations on upper limits of microbial numbers were made with a microbiology code (MGSE) using existing information but the results are overestimates when compared with field observations. This indicates that the model is very conservative and that more information on, for example, carbon sources is required.

West, J.M.; Coombs, P.; Gardner, S.J.; Rochelle, C.A. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom). Fluid Processes Group

1995-12-31

236

Geophysical analysis of the recent sinkhole trend at Ghor-Haditha (Dead Sea, Jordan)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For essentially the last 30 year the water level of the Dead Sea has highly dropped. One of the major associated facts is sinkhole occurrences along the shoreline both in Jordan and Israel. As the principal invoked mechanism, many studies have concluded that sinkhole formation results from the dissolution of a previously immersed salt layer, progressively in contact with fresh to brackish water. In Jordan, the triggering of this phenomenon could also be the result of particular tectonic settings, associated with the Jordan-Dead Sea transform fault system. At Ghor Haditha (south-est Jordan), the consequences have been dramatic for farmers with the shrinking of temporary available lands and industry with the closing of at least one factory. The shallow material in this area is heterogeneous and composed of intercalated sand and clay layers of alluvial-colluvial origin, over a salty substratum, whose precise depth and thickness are yet partially hypothesized. Between 2005 and 2008, a multi-method high-resolution geophysical survey was performed, approximately over a 1 km2 area at Ghor Haditha, associating mainly electromagnetic soundings, magnetic resonance soundings (MRS), and seismic profiling, ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography. At the same time, this specific area was the location of a dramatic evolution of sinkhole occurences, regularly followed by geodetic measurements. Over the 3 years period, about 120 TEM (Transient ElectroMagnetic) soundings allow to map precisely the depth of the conductive layers below the resistive overburden. Two conductive layer are then revealed, the latter showing the lowest resistivity below 1 Ohm.m corresponding to the saline substratum. Several MRS (3 in 2005, repeated in 2007 and 12 additional soundings) show an east-west hydraulic gradient towards the Dead. However, the main sinkhole trend coincides with both: - a clear low transmissivity axis determined from MRS measurements; - the western side of a depression into the top of the most conductive layer. This shows so clearly a correlation between the recent sinkhole phenomenon and the current water circulations, but paleo-topography below the Pleistocene deposits mays equally be a clue in the sinkhole hazard.

Camerlynck, Christian; Bodet, Ludovic; Galibert, Pierre-Yves; Boucher, Marie; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah

2013-04-01

237

Proposed water balance equation for municipal solid waste landfills in Jordan.  

PubMed

This article presents a water balance equation for predicting leachate generation in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills located in semi-arid areas, using the Akaider landfill in Jordan as an example. HYDRUS-2D/3D software was used to model the effect of co-disposal of wastewater into the landfill on the leachate production rates and for comparison with the results of the simulation of the proposed water balance equation parameters. A series of simulations was carried out for a 30-year period. The suggested water balance equation predicted that leachate will percolate to a depth of 50 m in the simulated period. The result indicates that the co-disposed wastewater plays a major role in controlling the rate and magnitude of the contaminants that percolate from the MSW leachate. As the initial water content of the waste increases, there is greater mobilisation of salts. The concentration of chloride at a given location increased and the time required for the chloride to reach this location decreased as a consequence. However, eliminating the co-disposed wastewater will significantly minimise leachate generation and decrease possible groundwater contamination. This equation is applicable to areas that have geological and hydrological properties similar to Jordan. PMID:23797298

Aljaradin, Mohammad; Persson, Kenneth M

2013-10-01

238

Gravitational wave astronomy: the definitive test for the "Einstein frame versus Jordan frame" controversy  

E-print Network

The potential realization of a gravitational wave (GW) astronomy in next years is a great challenge for the scientific community. By giving a significant amount of new information, GWs will be a cornerstone for a better understanding of the universe and of the gravitational physics. In this paper the author shows that the GW astronomy will permit to solve a captivating issue of gravitation as it will be the definitive test for the famous "Einstein frame versus Jordan frame" controversy. In fact, we show that the motion of the test masses, i.e. the beam splitter and the mirror in the case of an interferometer, which is due to the scalar component of a GW, is different in the two frames. Thus, if a consistent GW astronomy will be realized, an eventual detection of signals of scalar GWs will permit to discriminate among the two frames. In this way, a direct evidence from observations will solve in an ultimate way the famous and long history of the "Einstein frame versus Jordan frame" controversy.

Christian Corda

2010-10-11

239

Qualitative content analysis of complementary topical therapies used to manage diabetic foot in Jordan.  

PubMed

In order to alleviate diabetic foot problems, patients sometimes seek complementary therapies outside the professional context. This paper describes the use of complementary remedies as a topical treatment for diabetic foot ulcers among Jordanians. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse written responses of 68 patients with diabetes who have used complementary therapies to treat diabetic foot problems. These 68 persons represented a subgroup of the study population surveyed using a questionnaire, to the effect of investigating diabetic foot treatments provided in Jordan. Informants were recruited from eight healthcare facilities established in the southern part of Jordan plus from one hospital established in the Jordanian capital. The study was approved by the Boards of Ethics of the participating healthcare facilities. Content analysis yielded the category "Complementary Therapies Used", which included a range of household items (olive oil, sesame oil, honey, and vinegar), and also some indigenous Jordanian herbs (Wormwood, Myrrh, Caper, and Henna among others). The remedies were used either as a monotherapy or as mixtures, to the common goal of treating diabetic foot problems. Other interventions like Al-cowy were also sought from traditional healers. Educational campaigns are required to increase the awareness of patients and their families on possible hazards of unwise complementary therapy use. The decisions on the use of such therapies should be made in agreement with the attending healthcare professionals. PMID:23983379

Abu-Qamar, Ma'en Zaid; Wilson, Anne

2012-01-01

240

Medical conditions among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine the range and burden of health services utilization among Iraqi refugees receiving health assistance in Jordan, a country of first asylum. Methods Medical conditions, diagnosed in accordance with the tenth revision of the International classification of diseases, were actively monitored from 1January to 31December 2010 using a pilot centralized database in Jordan called the Refugee Assistance Information System. Findings There were 27?166 medical visits by 7642 Iraqi refugees (mean age: 37.4 years; 49% male; 70% from Baghdad; 6% disabled; 3% with a history of torture). Chronic diseases were common, including essential hypertension (22% of refugees), visual disturbances (12%), joint disorders (11%) and type II diabetes mellitus (11%). The most common reasons for seeking acute care were upper respiratory tract infection (11%), supervision of normal pregnancy (4%) and urinary disorders (3%). The conditions requiring the highest number of visits per refugee were cerebrovascular disease (1.46 visits), senile cataract (1.46) and glaucoma (1.44). Sponsored care included 31?747 referrals or consultations to a specialty service, 18?432 drug dispensations, 2307 laboratory studies and 1090 X-rays. The specialties most commonly required were ophthalmology, dentistry, gynaecology and orthopaedic surgery. Conclusion Iraqi refugees in countries of first asylum and resettlement require targeted health services, health education and sustainable prevention and control strategies for predominantly chronic diseases. PMID:22690034

Carone, Marco; Al-Saedy, Huda; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Black, Robert E

2012-01-01

241

Evolving fluvial—transitional—marine deposition through the Cambrian sequence of Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cambrian sequence in Jordan crops out in a belt-like pattern extending over more than 300 km from the Arabian-Nubian Shield source rock in the south, located on a stable shelf platform, to the invading southern (Baltic) side of the Tethys seaway. The analysis of the lithofacies association, ichnofossil content, together with the architecture of fluvial and paralic sandstone bodies reveals the development of the depositional environments of the Cambrian deposits of Jordan. The depositional environment evolved from proximal alluvial fans into major sand flats of braided rivers or directly into distal braidplains dominated by 3-D megaripples. In the following depositional phase, various marine environments prevailed including platform carbonates, clastic-, carbonate- and mixed-tidal flats and supratidal sabkhas, and less common lagoons. All these marine, or marine-influenced environments changed back into distal braidplains or sand flats of braided streams. The latter persisted through the remaining period of the Cambrian. The study has revealed that shales containing Cruziana interbedded within the fluviatile sandstone sequence are time markers that can be used for correlation, and could be deposited in a braidplain, if the detrital influx was very low. It is the latter that enabled the Cruziana-producing trilobites to migrate from the sea through river mouths to reach distal braidplains and lagoons.

Amireh, Belal S.; Schneider, Werner; Abed, Abdulkader M.

1994-02-01

242

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/8: Cooperative Border Security for Jordan: Assessment and Options  

SciTech Connect

This document is an analysis of options for unilateral and cooperative action to improve the security of Jordan's borders. Sections describe the current political, economic, and social interactions along Jordan's borders. Next, the document discusses border security strategy for cooperation among neighboring countries and the adoption of confidence-building measures. A practical cooperative monitoring system would consist of hardware for early warning, command and control, communications, and transportation. Technical solutions can expand opportunities for the detection and identification of intruders. Sensors (such as seismic, break-wire, pressure-sensing, etc.) can warn border security forces of intrusion and contribute to the identification of the intrusion and help formulate the response. This document describes conceptual options for cooperation, offering three scenarios that relate to three hypothetical levels (low, medium, and high) of cooperation. Potential cooperative efforts under a low cooperation scenario could include information exchanges on military equipment and schedules to prevent misunderstandings and the establishment of protocols for handling emergency situations or unusual circumstances. Measures under a medium cooperation scenario could include establishing joint monitoring groups for better communications, with hot lines and scheduled meetings. The high cooperation scenario describes coordinated responses, joint border patrols, and sharing border intrusion information. Finally, the document lists recommendations for organizational, technical, and operational initiatives that could be applicable to the current situation.

Qojas, M.

1999-03-01

243

Internet political discussions in the Arab world: A look at online forums from Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This content analysis examines postings on four Internet political discussion forums based in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Egypt. The study of Arabic-language sites concludes that the discussions cover a variety of topics and offer vibrant and complex conversations on political issues in the Arab world. Unlike in the US and European countries, the study found that social issues were

Eisa Al Nashmi; Johanna Cleary; Juan-Carlos Molleda; Melinda McAdams

2010-01-01

244

CMPE 310 Layout Editor Tutorial Jordan Bisasky (This tutorial is a continuation of the Capture CIS Tutorial)  

E-print Network

CMPE 310 Layout Editor Tutorial Jordan Bisasky (This tutorial is a continuation of the Capture CIS Tutorial) Allegro PCB Design Allegro PCB Design is a circuit board layout tool that accepts a layout fabrication. This tutorial is the second part of the PCB project tutorial. Before starting with PCB Design

Patel, Chintan

245

The James constant, the Jordan-von Neumann constant, weak orthogonality, and fixed points for multivalued mappings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We give some sufficient conditions for the Domínguez-Lorenzo condition in terms of the James constant, the Jordan-von Neumann constant, and the coefficient of weak orthogonality. As a consequence, we obtain fixed point theorems for multivalued nonexpansive mappings.

Kaewkhao, Attapol

2007-09-01

246

SIF: A SOLID INTERCHANGE FORMAT FOR RAPID PROTOTYPING Sara A. McMains, Carlo H. S equin, Jordan P. Smith  

E-print Network

SIF: A SOLID INTERCHANGE FORMAT FOR RAPID PROTOTYPING Sara A. McMains, Carlo H. Sâ?? equin, Jordan P Solid Interchange Format, Networked CAD/CAM, Designer/Fabricator Interface, Rapid Prototyping ABSTRACT Inspired by the success of the CIF format in mak­ ing rapid VLSI prototyping available to the naive

McMains, Sara

247

Passive smoking as a risk factor of anemia in young children aged 0–35 months in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Passive smoking unfavorably affects pregnancy, child birth and child health. Passive smoking associates with still-birth, premature birth as well as acute respiratory infection, asthma, disorder in red blood cell metabolism in children. This study examined the effects of passive smoking on anemia in young children in Jordan. METHODS: The analysis based on the information from 740 children aged 0–35

Rathavuth Hong; Jose A Betancourt; Martin Ruiz-Beltran

2007-01-01

248

Situation Report--Bahrain, Central African Republic, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Syria, Yemen Arab Republic.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data relating to population and family planning in twelve foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Bahrain, Central African Republic, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. Information is provided, where appropriate and available, under two…

International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

249

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Ring Expansion of Cyclopropanols and Cyclobutanols Jordan P. Markham, Steven T. Staben, and F. Dean Toste*  

E-print Network

Gold(I)-Catalyzed Ring Expansion of Cyclopropanols and Cyclobutanols Jordan P. Markham, Steven T of heteroatom4 nucleophiles or -bonds5 to gold(I)-activated alkynes have recently been described. We hy- pothesized that related cationic gold(I) complexes might be capable of catalyzing ring expansion6 reactions

Toste, Dean

250

Educational Attainment and Attitudes towards War in Muslim Countries Contemplating War: The Cases of Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study addresses the little understood relationship between educational attainment and public attitudes towards war in four predominantly Muslim countries contemplating war: Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Turkey. The multivariate analysis using public opinion data suggests that the educational attainment of respondents has no statistically…

Shafiq, M. Najeeb; Ross, Karen

2009-01-01

251

The Change in Mathematics Teachers' Perceptions of Critical Thinking after 15 Years of Educational Reform in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates how mathematics secondary schools' teachers in Jordan perceive critical thinking and compares teachers' perceptions before and after educational reform. Data were collected from 12 schools twice: in 1988 and in 2004 by interviewing 47 Mathematics teachers. The interview included questions related to teachers' understanding…

Innabi, Hanan; El Sheikh, Omar

2007-01-01

252

Facing Water Scarcity in Jordan Reuse, Demand Reduction, Energy, and Transboundary Approaches to Assure Future Water Supplies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan is extremely water-scarce with just 167 m3 per capita per year to meet domestic, industrial, agricultural, tourism, and environmental demands. The heavy exploitation of water resources has contributed to declines in the levels of aquifers and the Dead Sea. Rapid growth in demand, particu- larly for higher quality water for domestic, industrial, and tourism uses, is significantly increasing pressure

Christopher A. Scott; Hazim El-Naser; Ross E. Hagan; Amal Hijazi

253

The standard clinical smell testing protocol of the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics in Amman, Jordan: JOR test  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe aim of this study was the development of a simple clinical smell test that can be applied in Jordan and its validation against one of the standard tests, the University of Pennsylvania Smell Test (UPSIT, Sensonics Inc, Haddon Heights, NJ).

Azmi T. Ahmad; Mousa Abu Jbara; Dana Hiyasat; Anwar Bateiha; Kamel M. Ajlouni

2007-01-01

254

Uncertainty-Enabled Design of a Rocket Sled Track Switch Drs. Jordan E. Massad and Matthew R. Brake  

E-print Network

Uncertainty-Enabled Design of a Rocket Sled Track Switch Drs. Jordan E. Massad and Matthew R. Brake Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Rocket sled tracks provide a dynamically rich environment encountered with a rocket sled track experiment, highly accurate, high-fidelity instrumentation is critical

255

A model-based assessment of the effects of projected climate change on the water resources of Jordan.  

PubMed

This paper is concerned with the quantification of the likely effect of anthropogenic climate change on the water resources of Jordan by the end of the twenty-first century. Specifically, a suite of hydrological models are used in conjunction with modelled outcomes from a regional climate model, HadRM3, and a weather generator to determine how future flows in the upper River Jordan and in the Wadi Faynan may change. The results indicate that groundwater will play an important role in the water security of the country as irrigation demands increase. Given future projections of reduced winter rainfall and increased near-surface air temperatures, the already low groundwater recharge will decrease further. Interestingly, the modelled discharge at the Wadi Faynan indicates that extreme flood flows will increase in magnitude, despite a decrease in the mean annual rainfall. Simulations projected no increase in flood magnitude in the upper River Jordan. Discussion focuses on the utility of the modelling framework, the problems of making quantitative forecasts and the implications of reduced water availability in Jordan. PMID:20956366

Wade, A J; Black, E; Brayshaw, D J; El-Bastawesy, M; Holmes, P A C; Butterfield, D; Nuimat, S; Jamjoum, K

2010-11-28

256

Small ruminant lentiviruses in Jordan: evaluation of sheep and goat serological response using recombinant and peptide antigens.  

PubMed

Small ruminant lentiviruses infect sheep and goats worldwide, causing chronic progressive diseases and relevant economic losses. Disease eradication and prevention is mostly based on serological testing. The goal of this research was to investigate the presence of the small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) in Jordan and to characterize the serological response in sheep and goat populations. A panel of sera were collected from flocks located in Northern Jordan and Jordan Valley. The samples were tested using three ELISA assays: a commercially available ELISA based on p25 recombinant protein and transmembrane peptide derived from British maedi-visna virus (MVV) EV1 strain, an ELISA based on P16-P25 recombinant protein derived from two Italian strains representative of MVV- and caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV)-like SRLVs, and an ELISA based on SU5 peptide from the same two Italian isolates. The results indicate that both MVV- and CAEV-like strains are present in Jordan and that the majority of the viruses circulating among sheep and goat populations belong to the MVV-like genotype. PMID:23392953

Tolari, Francesco; Al-Ramadneh, Wafa'a; Mazzei, Maurizio; Carrozza, Maria Luisa; Forzan, Mario; Bandecchi, Patrizia; Grego, Elena; Rosati, Sergio

2013-08-01

257

Irrigation and water scarcity in the Zerqa Triangle, Jordan or why archaeology is relevant for understanding current practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scarcity of water resources for development is a recurrent and important issue, and has been for thousands of years. Based on the case of the Jordan Valley, this contribution will argue that our understanding of current issues can be improved by studying ancient contexts. At the same time, archeology can benefit from analysis and models applied in the engineering domain.

M. W. Ertsen; E. Kaptijn

2009-01-01

258

"Taking It to the Mic": Pedagogy of June Jordan's Poetry for the People and Partnership with an Urban High School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

June Jordan, a prolific and most-published African American essayist and poet and a professor in the African American Studies department at the University of California, Berkeley, ventured to challenge the institutionalized Ivory Tower traditions and subsequently established a university program called Poetry for the People (P4P) in 1991. Such…

Jocson, Korina M.

2005-01-01

259

JORDAN TYPE OF A k[Z/pZ/p]-MODULE MODULO Jp SEMRA OZTURK KAPTANO GLU  

E-print Network

JORDAN TYPE OF A k[Z/p�Z/p]-MODULE MODULO Jp SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU Abstract. Let M be a finite times. 1 #12;2 SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU an x, k[ 1 + x ] = k[Cp] = k[x]/(xp ) is a subalgebra of k

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

260

The Influence of Historical and Political Events on the Development of Social Studies Education in Jordan's Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports the results of a study about the factors that affect social studies development in Jordan's secondary schools. An evaluation of data obtained within the limitations of this study relative to the development of social studies education, in particular, and education, in general, indicates that the principle of the Great Arab…

Alazzi, Khaled

2008-01-01

261

Jordan-3: measuring visual reversals in children as symptoms of learning disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research was to establish new norms for the Jordan-3 for children ages 5 to 18 years. The research also investigated the frequency of visual reversals in children previously identified as having reading disability, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and broader learning disabilities. Participants were regular education students, ages 5 through 18 years, and special education students previously diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, reading disability, or broader learning disability. Jordan-3 Accuracy and Error raw scores were compared to assess if there was a significant difference between the two groups. Mean Accuracy and Error scores were compared for males and females. Children with learning disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder had higher reversals when compared to regular education children, which lends continued support to the Jordan-3 as a valid and reliable measure of visual reversals in children and adolescents. This study illustrates the utility of the Jordan-3 when assessing children who may require remediation to reach their academic potential. PMID:23409590

Jordan, Brian T; Martin, Nancy; Austin, J Sue

2012-12-01

262

Estimation of animal and olive solid wastes in Jordan and their potential as a supplementary energy source: An overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomass is a potential source of energy that can reduce our dependency on oil as the main source of energy. In addition to municipal solid waste, animal and olive wastes are the main sources of organic waste in Jordan. In 2005, there were more than 2.4 million heads of sheep, about 72 thousand cows, and 40 million hens being raised

Jamal Abu-Ashour; Hani Abu Qdais; Mohammad Al-Widyan

2010-01-01

263

Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources: The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan industrial-energy-efficiency program. A report of the Office of Energy. Final report  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant potential for energy savings in the small and medium-size industrial segment in Jordan. In order to achieve these savings, the Government of Jordan must take a more aggressive and coordinated role in promoting energy conservation through awareness and training programs. At the same time, the local market for C/E firms to provide energy conservation services can and should be developed. USAID and/or other donor agencies should assist the Government of Jordan through the funding of a medium-term technical assistance program, to help establish an autonomous or semi-autonomous energy conservation agency.

Not Available

1991-01-01

264

Hydrogeochemical investigation of groundwater in Jericho area in the Jordan Valley, West Bank, Palestine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resources in the Middle East, particularly in Palestine, are extremely scarce and costly. The Jordan Valley is a fertile productive region, described as the food basket of Palestine. Groundwater originating from the Quaternary Aquifer System forms the main water resource in the Jordan Valley. However, the quality of this groundwater is threatened mainly by the high chloride concentration. The most representative area of the Jordan Valley is Jericho area, which was chosen to be the study area. The study area (65 km2) is almost a flat area with a gentle decline towards the east. It is the lowest land on earth with ground levels reaching 400 meters below sea level (mbsl) near the Dead Sea shores. The Quaternary Aquifer System in the study area could be divided into an upper alluvial layer with thickness varying from 40 to 150 m and a lower low-permeable Lisan layer, which crops out in the eastern part of the study area with thickness over 200 m. Hydrogeochemical investigation reveals that the water is generally earth alkaline with higher content of earth alkalis and prevailing chloride. According to Stuyfzand (1986) and Piper's (1944) classification systems, water type in the Alluvial Aquifer varies from fresh hard CaMgHCO3 or MgCaHCO3 water in the west and northwest to brackish very-hard MgNaCl or NaMgCl in the middle. In the east, the water becomes brackish-salt extremely-hard MgNaCl or NaCl. Groundwater quality is deteriorating (increase in salinity) spatially towards the east and vertically with increasing depth (when nearing the Lisan Formation). As an indication of groundwater salinity, total dissolved solids show some variability with time over the last 21 years (1983-2004). In short-time scale, there are high seasonal and yearly fluctuations with regard to salinity, specifically in Cl- and SO42- contents. Spring water from the Upper Cenomanian Aquifer (CaHCO3) represents the fresh end member, while Rift Valley Brines (RVB-CaNaCl) and Dead Sea Brines (DSB-MgNaCl) represent the saline end members. Existing water types are mixtures of the 3 end members. There is a consistency in results and analysis of geological, hydrogeological, hydrochemical and geophysical data. There are three probable sources of increase in groundwater salinity: mixing with saline end members (RVB/DSB); dissolution of minerals of the Lisan Formation (calcite, dolomite, gypsum and halite); and to some extent, agricultural effluent pollution.

Da'as, Ammar; Walraevens, Kristine

2013-06-01

265

A study of some blood genetic characteristics of Bedouin and non-Bedouin Arabs of Jordan.  

PubMed

Blood genetic markers were investigated in a sample of 111 Bedouin and 412 non-Bedouin male Arabs of Jordan. The frequencies of the ABO alleles were similar in these two groups, with a relatively high frequency of the O gene (0.63; 0.61). The frequencies of Rh genes were slightly different in these two groups, with a higher Ro and a lower r in the Bedouins. A sub-sample of a smaller size was investigated for the distribution of haptoglobin types, Tf subtypes and red-cell G6PD (glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) phenotypes. There was no significant difference in any of the systems between the two populations. No haemoglobin variant was detected. The study confirms the Arab characteristics of Jordanians with a small degree of African admixture. PMID:3759104

Saha, N; Banerjee, B

1986-01-01

266

Pharmacological and Phytochemical Appraisal of Selected Medicinal Plants from Jordan with Claimed Antidiabetic Activities  

PubMed Central

Plant species have long been regarded as possessing the principal ingredients used in widely disseminated ethnomedical practices. Different surveys showed that medicinal plant species used by the inhabitants of Jordan for the traditional treatment of diabetes are inadequately screened for their therapeutic/preventive potential and phytochemical findings. In this review, traditional herbal medicine pursued indigenously with its methods of preparation and its active constituents are listed. Studies of random screening for selective antidiabetic bioactivity and plausible mechanisms of action of local species, domesticated greens, or wild plants are briefly discussed. Recommended future directives incurring the design and conduct of comprehensive trials are pointed out to validate the usefulness of these active plants or bioactive secondary metabolites either alone or in combination with existing conventional therapies. PMID:24482764

Afifi, Fatma U.; Kasabri, Violet

2013-01-01

267

Familial Mediterranean fever in children: a single centre experience in Jordan.  

PubMed

Familial Mediterranean fever is quite prevalent among Arabs. We reviewed the files of 56 patients diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever and followed up at King Hussein Medical Centre in Jordan over 4 years for their clinical profile, course, genotype, treatment and complications. There were 30 males and 26 females with a mean age at onset of 5.2 years. Abdominal pain (79%) was the commonest manifestation, followed by arthritis (13%) and chest pain (4%). Family history was positive in 50% of patients. Regarding treatment, 97% of patients responded well to colchicine, and amyloidosis was not documented in any patients after 5 years follow-up. The commonest genotype was M694 (64%), followed by heterozygous M694V-V726A (23%) and E148Q (8%). PMID:17333828

Al-Wahadneh, A M; Dahabreh, M M

2006-11-01

268

Laboratory measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An effort to investigate the potential of remote sensing for monitoring nonpoint source pollution was conducted. Spectral reflectance characteristics for four types of soil sediments were measured for mixture concentrations between 4 and 173 ppm. For measurements at a spectral resolution of 32 mm, the spectral reflectances of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments were distinctly different over the wavelength range from 400 to 980 nm at each concentration tested. At high concentrations, spectral differences between the various sediments could be detected by measurements with a spectral resolution of 160 nm. At a low concentration, only small differences were observed between the various sediments when measurements were made with 160 nm spectral resolution. Radiance levels generally varied in a nonlinear manner with sediment concentration; linearity occurred in special cases, depending on sediment type, concentration range, and wavelength.

Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.

1977-01-01

269

Atmospheric heavy metal pollution in Aqaba city, Jordan, using Phoenix dactylifera L. leaves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The leaves of date palms ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) were evaluated as biomonitors of heavy metal contamination in the city of Aqaba, Jordan. The concentrations of iron (Fe), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and chromium (Cr) were determined using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Samples of unwashed leaves for testing were collected from different locations with different degrees of metal pollution (urban, suburban, industrial, highway, and rural sites). Separate leaves were taken from outside the city to be used as a control sample. Samples collected from industrial areas were found to have high contents of all metals except for nickel, copper, and lead, which were found at high concentrations in the samples collected from highway sites. Significant correlations between the heavy metal concentrations in date palm trees in unwashed leave samples were obtained. The principle component analysis (PCA) along with correlation analysis provide significant information about the origin of heavy metals in palm tree samples.

Al-Khlaifat, Abdelaziz L.; Al-Khashman, Omar A.

270

The Clinical Pattern of Knee Osteoarthritis in Jordan: A Hospital Based Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Different clinical profiles of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) have been reported in the literature. The aim of this investigation was to describe the clinical patterns of KOA in an ethnically distinct and homogenous population that has not been widely reported. Patients with KOA were seen in outpatient rehabilitation and orthopedic clinic of Jordan University Hospital (JUH), to determine any possible association between age, BMI, radiographic severity, and pain severity. Methods: Patients diagnosed with KOA attending an outpatient rehabilitation clinic at JUH were studied to describe their clinical characteristics. They were included based on criteria developed by the American College of Rheumatology. Detailed histories, clinical examinations and X-rays, and anthropometric data were obtained. Data analysis focused on descriptive statistics and correlations among demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: The study included 214 patients with a mean age of 55.3 years (range = 30-84 years). The mean BMI was 29.5± 5.6. We found a significant moderate positive correlation between age and radiographic severity of KOA (0.435; p <. 001) and pain severity (0.383; p. <. 001). There was also a significant weak positive correlation between BMI, radiographic severity of KOA (0.242, p <. 05), and pain severity (0.266, p. <. 01). Conclusions: We concluded that in this hospital-based cohort study in Jordan, the clinical pattern of KOA is comparable to Western cultures. However, the combination of BMI and mechanical loading during everyday activities that include different religious and cultural habits and may help explain the high level of radiographic severity in our sample. PMID:23630445

M.Hawamdeh, Ziad; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.

2013-01-01

271

Mound measurements - quantifying medium-term soil erosion under olive trees in Northern Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last few decades many quantitative erosion studies have revealed that olive orchard expansion and increased mechanization in southern European countries have led to increased soil erosion under olive trees. Consequently, these studies have suggested different methods of mitigation. In light of the 2014 European trading zone expansion to countries east and south of the Mediterranean, a further intensification of olive plantations is postulated to meet market demands. To attain first medium-term estimates of erosion in Northern Jordan and its driving factors, a new method measuring olive mounds was implemented. Seven fields with clearly erosive structures were chosen throughout the Wadi Al-Arab catchment in Northern Jordan. Topographic measurements were used to reconstruct the historical and recent surface level and calculate the volume eroded since the planting of the trees. A total of 81 bulk density measurements and 14 tree cores allowed the estimation of the soil loss in tons per hectare. The combination of modified land use map and slope information helped to identify similar olive fields with high erosive potential. Results show that the method provides medium-term quantitative estimates for averaged soil loss consistent with some existing results from similar research areas in the Mediterranean. They clearly indicate the significant potential for erosion in olive orchards with around 95 ± 8 t ha- 1 yr- 1. Tillage practice and water erosion were identified as critical erosion processes, both depending on tillage characteristics, tillage timing, and soil parent material. The investigated fields represent about 19% of the catchment's surface area and are likely to contribute to the measured yearly sediment yield that fills up the Wadi Al-Arab reservoir with sediments.

Kraushaar, S.; Herrmann, N.; Ollesch, G.; Vogel, H.-J.; Siebert, C.

2014-05-01

272

Endolithic cyanobacteria in soil gypsum: Occurrences in Atacama (Chile), Mojave (United States), and Al-Jafr Basin (Jordan) Deserts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil sulfates are present in arid and hyperarid environments on Earth and have been found to be abundant in soils on Mars. Examination of soil gypsum from the Atacama Desert, Chile, the Mojave Desert, United States, and Al-Jafr Basin, Jordan, revealed endolithic cyanobacteria communities just below the surface of soil gypsum samples. Optical and scanning electron microscope observations of the colonized layers indicated that the unicellular Chroococcidiopsis is the dominant cyanobacterium in all studied communities. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that in addition to Chroococcidiopsis, a few other cyanobacteria are present. Heterotrophic bacteria are also abundant in the colonized zones of the fine-grained gypsum from the Atacama and Mojave Desert, but insignificant in the fibrous gypsum from the Jordan Desert. Endolithic life forms similar to these described here may exist or have existed on Mars and should be targeted by the Mars Science Laboratory and future in situ missions.

Dong, Hailiang; Rech, Jason A.; Jiang, Hongchen; Sun, Henry; Buck, Brenda J.

2007-06-01

273

Syrian refugees, between rocky crisis in Syria and hard inaccessibility to healthcare services in Lebanon and Jordan  

PubMed Central

Around 3% of the world’s population (n?=?214 million people) has crossed international borders for various reasons. Since March 2011, Syria has been going through state of political crisis and instability resulting in an exodus of Syrians to neighbouring countries. More than 1 million Syrian refugees are residents of Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Egypt and North Africa. The international community must step up efforts to support Syrian refugees and their host governments. PMID:24004474

2013-01-01

274

Techno-economic analysis of combined concentrating solar power and desalination plant configurations in Israel and Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combined concentrating solar power (CSP) and desalination plants represent a realistic future option for the production of electricity and fresh water for countries of the world’s sunbelt. In this paper, parabolic trough power plants for electricity production have been analysed in combination with multi-effect distillation (MED) and ultrafiltration\\/reverse osmosis (RO) desalination plants for two sites in Israel (Ashdod) and Jordan

Ralf Olwig; Tobias Hirsch; Christian Sattler; Heike Glade; Louisa Schmeken; Stefan Will; Andrea Ghermandi; Rami Messalem

2012-01-01

275

Cross-National Study of Attitudes Towards Seeking Professional Help: Jordan, United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Arabs in Israel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Help-seeking processes provide critical links between the onset of mental health problems and the provision of professional care. But little is known about these processes in the Arab world, and still less in transnational, comparative terms. This is the first study to compare help-seeking processes among Muslim Arab female students in Jordan, the United Arab Emirates and Israel.Aims: The

Alean Al-Krenawi; John R. Graham; Yasmin Z. Dean; Nada Eltaiba

2004-01-01

276

Study of water quality of springs in Petra region, Jordan: A three-year follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Petra region area was located in south part of Jordan has grown and urbanized rapidly. This area depends on the groundwater\\u000a as a water resources. This study was undertaken to assess the physical, chemical quality of spring water of Petra region during\\u000a a 36-months survey (September 2002 to September 2005). The samples were analyzed for temperature, conductivity, dissolved\\u000a oxygen, pH,

Omar Ali Al-Khashman

2007-01-01

277

Identity in old clothes: the socio-cultural dynamics of second-hand clothing in Irbid, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the socio-cultural dynamics underlying the consumption of second-hand clothing (al-Balih) in Irbid city, northern Jordan. It primarily examines the various images and meanings that consumers attach to used clothes imported primarily from the West. Al-Balih is conceived of as a social space where multiple imaginations and images meet and interact. Put another way, it tends to blur

M. M. Naamneh; A. K. Al Husban

2012-01-01

278

Economic evaluation of a small RO unit powered by PV installed in the village of Hartha, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A PV-powered desalination system has been successfully designed, installed and tested at the Hartha Charitable Society in northern Jordan as part of Autonomous Desalination In Rural Areas (ADIRA) with renewable energies—Potentials, technologies, field experience, socio-technical and socioeconomic impact) project installations, partially supported by the European Commission. The system is composed of photovoltaic (PV) panels (433 Wp), a commercially available small

Fawzi Banat; Hazim Qiblaweya; Qais Al-Nasser

2009-01-01

279

Ozone Levels in the North and South of Jordan: Effects of Transboundary Air Pollution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first phase of this work sought to assess the causes of air quality deterioration in the south of the region over the Red Sea near the resort areas of Eilat and Aqaba. Accordingly, a coordinated Jordanian-Israeli study was performed during the month of November 2007 along the boarder of the two countries. The Jordanian measurements were made at a fixed monitoring location in the city of Aqaba, while the Israeli measurements were made using a mobile laboratory at kibbutz Eilot some 3 km north of the coastal city of Eilat. The results indicated that pollution episodes are highly dependent on wind direction, where southerly winds carry local transportation (i.e., ship, trucks) and possibly some industrial emissions towards the north end of the Red Sea, while northerly winds are associated with the transport of regional O 3. The results revealed that under the prevailing (˜90% of the time) northerly wind flows, the quality of the air is relatively good for all primary pollutants but O3 was elevated, indicative of the downwind regional transport of this secondary species from the Mediterranean coast. However, during days with southerly air flow the air quality was significantly deteriorated with elevated levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The second phase of this work, which also involved Jordanian and Israeli scientists, was undertaken in the northern part of the region for a two-week period in May/June 2009. This part of the research was aimed at examining previous modeling results that indicated that elevated O3 levels should occur in Northern Jordan from emissions in Northern Israel that are transported a distance of more than 100 km. Ozone and other pollutants were monitored at five sites in Israel (Haifa, Neve Shanan, Kiryat Tivon, Afula, and Maoz Haim) and two in Jordan (Taiba and Irbid). The sites were located along the prevailing wind direction that presumably moves air-masses eastward from the Mediterranean coast, over the Israel Valley toward the Jordan Valley, and then into Northern Jordan. Results confirmed the previous modeling results, suggesting that peak O3 values are observed at later hours as a function of distance from the Mediterranean coast and that maximum O 3 levels are found over northern Jordan. Based on the findings of the first phase that showed elevated O 3 and NOx levels over the Gulf of Aqaba, more investigation was required to assess air quality in the city of Aqaba. Accordingly, long term air quality monitoring study conducted by Jordanian scientists was undertaken during the years 2008-2009. The study was conducted using a fixed air quality station located in the city. Results of this study indicated that topography of the city, with mountains surrounding the city from the east, played a major role in the air masses recirculation and hence the transport of primary pollutants, including NOx from the southern industrial area and the transportation emissions into the northern part of the city. However, high O3 episodes were found to be associated with northern wind in the absence of air masses recirculation indicating the role of long range transport in causing these elevated levels. Thus, based on the results of these studies and in order to reduce the potential health impacts of O3 and its precursors in downwind areas, strategies to control these pollutants should be developed. These strategies should be based on better energy, traffic and industrial management since these are the three main pollution sources. The strategies should include more efficient use of raw materials and energy, better combustion and production technologies that utilize less fuel and emit less pollutant. Measures should include controlling precursors' emissions at the sources located along the east Mediterranean coast, mainly power generation facilities, oil refineries, ports activities, and traffic. In addition, local emissions in the region such as emissions in the Gulf of Aqaba should be reduced by adopting strategies that include the use of cleaner fuel (industry, ships, and vehicles), e

Alsawair, Jihad Khalaf

280

The Arabic culture of Jordan and its impacts on a wider Jordanian adoption of business continuity management.  

PubMed

Culture is important to individuals and societies, as well as organisations. Failing to address cultural aspects will hinder the wider adoption and development of business continuity management (BCM) and will subsequently increase the vulnerabilities of organisations to crises, disasters and business interruptions. Three main issues are discussed in this paper. The first is the background to culture and the characteristics of the Jordanian culture. Secondly, the influence of the Arab culture on the wider adoption and development of BCM in Jordan is considered. Thirdly, the paper looks at potential factors that underpin the role of culture in the BCM process in Jordan. These issues are significant, as they represent the characteristics and influence of the Arab culture. This paper contributes to the understanding of the significance of culture in the adoption and development of BCM for organisations operating in Jordan and in the Arab world more generally. It also highlights current cultural changes and trends taking place in the Arab world in a time of huge political instability in the Middle East and Arab countries. PMID:22948108

Sawalha, Ihab H; Meaton, Julia

2012-01-01

281

Analysis of clinical records of dental patients attending Jordan University Hospital: Documentation of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze clinical records of dental patients attending the Dental Department at the University of Jordan Hospital: a teaching hospital in Jordan. Analysis aimed at determining whether dental specialists properly documented the drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections given to their patients. Methods: Dental records of the Dental Department at the Jordan University Hospital were reviewed during the period from April 3rd until April 26th 2007 along with the issued prescriptions during that period. Results: A total of 1000 records were reviewed with a total of 53 prescriptions issued during that period. Thirty records documented the prescription by stating the category of the prescribed drug. Only 13 records stated the generic or the trade names of the prescribed drugs. Of these, 5 records contained the full elements of a prescription. As for local anesthetic injections, the term “LA used” was found in 22 records while the names and quantities of the local anesthetics used were documented in only 13 records. Only 5 records documented the full elements of a local anesthetic injection. Conclusion: The essential data of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections were poorly documented by the investigated group of dental specialists. It is recommended that the administration of the hospital and the dental department implement clear and firm guidelines for dental practitioners in particular to do the required documentation procedure. PMID:19209291

Dar-Odeh, Najla; Ryalat, Soukaina; Shayyab, Mohammad; Abu-Hammad, Osama

2008-01-01

282

Human and animal brucellosis in Jordan between 1996 and 1998: a study.  

PubMed

Between 1996 and 1998, a total of 2,494 samples of blood from humans and animals were collected and tested for brucellosis. This total included 1,594 samples of animal blood, collected from 1,050 sheep from 20 flocks, and 544 goats from eight herds. The serum samples were tested using the Rose Bengal test, the tube agglutination test, the complement fixation test and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, a complete history was compiled from each flock/herd. The rate of abortions in sheep due to brucellosis ranged from 0.5% to 56%, with a mean of 33.2%. The goats had a higher abortion rate. Thirty-four aborted sheep foetuses collected from these 20 flocks were bacteriologically and pathologically examined. A pure culture of Brucella melitensis biotype 3 was isolated from 21 of the aborted foetuses. The human blood samples were collected from two groups: first, from 800 apparently healthy people who were reporting to community hospitals for routine health checks and secondly, from 100 people from groups with a high-risk of contracting brucellosis, such as veterinarians, sheep-herders and laboratory technicians. The Brucella antibody titres for the 900 human serum samples were obtained using the microtitre agglutination test. The cumulative percentage of the serum samples showing a titre reading greater than 1:80 was higher in the at-risk group than among the normal population (7% compared to 4.1%). Although these results were not statistically significant, the higher percentage of positive reactors among the high-risk group may indicate an increased risk factor among professional agricultural and veterinary personnel in Jordan. It was concluded that brucellosis is common in sheep and goats in Jordan, subjecting the human population to high risks. Brucella melitensis Rev. 1 vaccination has been internationally recognised as the key to successfully controlling the disease. All animals in Jordan were repeatedly vaccinated between 1996 and 1998 on a trial basis, using a reduced dose of 1 x 10(5) colony-forming units (CFU). Cumulative data on the annual rate of human cases of brucellosis indicate that fewer people are affected each year. The same is true for the rate of abortions in animals. Such evidence strongly suggests that the vaccination programme has been successful. However, as wild strains of Brucella have also been isolated from vaccinated animals, the authors recommend increasing the amount of vaccine to a full dose of 1 to 2 x 10(9) CFU and vaccinating young female animals between the ages of three and eight months. To avoid brucellosis in humans, people should be educated about the dangers of contact with infected animals and the consumption of raw milk and milk products. PMID:15861878

Al-Ani, F K; El-Qaderi, S; Hailat, N Q; Razziq, R; Al-Darraji, A M

2004-12-01

283

Anthropogenic Influence On Groundwater Quality In Jericho and And Adjoining Wadis (Lower Jordan Valley, Palestine)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lower Jordan Valley is part of the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift. The graben is filled by sedmiments of limnological and marine origin. Towards the Dead Sea, the occurance of gipseous and salty sediments on the valley floor increase. The southern part of the Lower Jordan Valley, where the city of Jericho is situated, is an arid area (<150 mm precipitation/year), with less amount of exploitable fresh groundwater or surface water. Jericho was founded on an alluvial fan, closely to the western mountain range in front of mouth of Wadi Qilt. The fan serves as reservoir for infiltrating water from wadi runoff and groundwater from the crataceous aquifers of the western shoulder. The fan is surrounded by unsuitable aquifers of the graben, which are filled with saline water. The aim of this study, which takes place inside the multilateral SMART-project, is to understand the vulnerability of the Jericho groundwater aquifers in connection with lowering the groundwater table by overexploitation and the intensively use of pesticides Jericho and its vicinity are of most importance for the Palestinians. However, beside the about 25,000 residents, the tourism industry and the vital agriculture depend on sufficient and expoitable fresh water resources. Because the demand of water is increasing, overexpoitaion takes place. Due to over extraction of groundwater a huge depression cone is evolving during the dry season which is filled up again according to the groundwater recharge in the rainy season. Concomitantly, depression cone in the fresh water aquifers leads to an infiltration of the surrounding saltwater. The amount of saltwater which infiltrates into the freshwater resource was calculated by different stable isotope methods (d2H, d18O) and hydrochemical analyses of wellwater. The agriculture is main consumer of groundwater - over 60% of the pumped water is used for inefficient irrigation. Additionally, an intensive use of pesticides in concentrated liquid and gaseous forms for vegetable gardening hold the danger to pollute the groundwater via irrigation return flow. This return flow most probably endangers the quality of the water resource, because shallow wells nearby extract it directly from the underground. However, one result of the first screening campaign concerning pesticide remnants in the groundwater wells of Jericho, just traces have been detected. Thus, the higher amount of chemicals is retained by the soil during infiltration of irrigated water. The detected low concentrations in groundwater of the fan may be the result of outleaching from agricultural areas from the mountain range. The flood water of Wadi Qilt infiltrates partly in the fluviatil sediments. The ongoing investigations in the Wadi Qilt-Jericho area include an approach of combined hydrochemical and hydraulic studies to simulate the complex groundwater system at the edge of the graben and to prepare a sustainable groundwater management strategy for the area of Jericho.

Geyer, S.; Khayat, S.; Roediger, T.; Siebert, C.

2008-12-01

284

Quantifying selected morphometric characteristics for Jordanian side of the Jordan river basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Jordanian part of the Jordan river basin is almost 3679.692 km2. The river flows within the Jordan Rift Valley, a structurally complicated region which is cover almost by Upper Cretaceous chalky marls, bituminous limestone and nodular limestone, while the Quaternary sediments are mainly fluvitile deposits and Lisan marls. Other deposits are Tertiary and Jurassic. The present study includes the selected drainage basin characteristics, part of these characteristics refer as primary characteristics measurements and the others are found and concluded from the primary drainage basin characteristics and name as calculated basin characteristics. The drainage pattern is mainly dendritic but in some part is shows parallel pattern but not very mature. To simplify the study more and based on the detailed analysis of the drainage selected characteristics of the study area using various techniques and both topographic and geologic maps, the Jordan river basin is furtherly divided into 10 sub basin. Keywords: Jordan side of Jordan River Basin, Drainage Basin Morphology (Primary Basin Characteristics measurements, Calculated Basin Characteristics), Jordan. Table (1): Combined (Primary + Calculated) Basin Characteristics, Based on Toposheets 1:50,000 and Equations. Code Name of Catchment Area TDA (km2) 1 NCDA (km2) 2 BL (km2) 3 BP (km2) Total 4 BS (m) area 5 BR (m) 6 CDA (km2) 7 BW (km2) 8 SF 9 A Wadi Arab 413.905 302.02 239.3 27.8 34.4 636 ?111. 0.467 512.42 B Wadi Zeglab 130.039 95.23 95 15.7 25 966 32.81 0.37 256.26 C Wadi Jurum 84.62 50.28 61.6 22.4 36.36 400 34.34 ?1.7 34.4 D Wadi Yabis 208.02 150.930 122.1 25.2 46.29 400 57.09 0.47 259.78 E Wadi Kufanga 214.564 189.953 120.9 19.3 41.66 123 26.61 0.22 549.55 F Wadi Rajib 405.6 374.23 118.5 29.5 37.33 1285 31.37 0.27 438.88 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 476.293 394.83 258.1 29 28.56 1277 81.46 0.32 806.56 H Wadi el Mallaha 554.251 485.1 ?385 ?35 ?48.25 ?1435 69.25 0.18 ?2142.7 I Wadi Nimrin ?601.9 ?520.3 282.5 30 32.75 1032 81.6 0.29 974.13 J Wadi el Tarfa 590.5 507.40 277.9 27.9 40.33 1050 75.52 0.27 1029.25 Code Name of Catchment areaER 10 RB 11 CR 12 RR m/km 13 MCL (km) 14 TSL (km) 15 MCS (m/km) 16MCSR 17 A Wadi Arab 0.0499 402.25 0.742 22.88 33.4 157.8 52.78 0.139 B Wadi Zeglab 0.071 201.55 0.751 ?61.53 25.1 15.9 31.87 0.167 C Wadi Jurum ?0.193 27.00 1.078 17.86 15.3 61.6 26.14 ?0.248 D Wadi Yabis 0.070 203.92 0.941 15.87 23.7 122.1 39.38 0.194 E Wadi Kufanga 0.048 431.42 1.055 6.37 24.8 120.9 64.52 0.205 F Wadi Rajib 0.054 344.52 ?1.486 43.53 27.35 118.5 16.09 0.232 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 0.0398 633.15 0.906 44.35 ?43.7 258.1 26.64 0.169 H Wadi el Mallaha 0.024 ?1681. 1.186 41 23.5 ?285.7 ?68.48 0.061 I Wadi Nimrin 0.036 764.69 0.937 34.4 31.5 282.5 25.82 0.111 J Wadi el Tarfa 0.031 807.96 1.38 37.63 26.2 277.9 48.35 0.094. Code Name of Catchment AreaSD km2 18 CCM km2/km 19 MCSP 20 SR 21 RN m/km 22 FOS 23 DF 24 A Wadi Arab 1.411 0.71 4.59 1.53 897.4 57 0.51 B Wadi Zeglab 0.457 ?2.188 4.45 1.27 441.46 25 0.72 C Wadi Jurum 1.793 0.558 2.99 0.72 717.2 23 0.67 D Wadi Yabis 2.139 0.468 3.78 0.58 855.6 21 0.37 E Wadi Kufanga 4.543 0.220 3.09 ?1.55 558.8 20 0.75 F Wadi Rajib 3.778 0.265 6.85 0.43 4850.95 42 1.34 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 3.168 0.316 ?8.47 0.93 4045.53 73 0.896 H Wadi el Mallaha ?5.569 0.179 2.84 1.42 ?7991.51 ?159 2.26 I Wadi Nimrin 3.462 0.289 6.20 0.79 3572.8 60 0.74 J Wadi el Tarfa 3.679 0.271 3.77 1.2 3862.95 72 ?4.64 Continue to Table (1), Legend of Combined (Primary + Calculated) Basin Characteristics Lowest value . ? Highest value. Primary drainage Basin Characteristics TDA Total drainage Area NCDA Non-contributing drainage area BL Basin length BP Basin perimeter BS Average basin slope BR Basin relief MCL Main channel length TSL Total stream length MCS Main channel slope FOS No. of first order stream Calculated Basin Characteristics CDA Contributing drainage area BW Effective basin width SF Slope Factor ER Elongation ratio RB Rotundity of basin CR Compactness ratio RR Relative Relief MCSR Main Channel sinuosity ratio SD Stream

Abu Rukah, Y.

2009-04-01

285

Surface water management tool for arid lands of Jordan using GIS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Jordan as well as most of the developing countries located in the and regions, water is a priority issue at national and individual levels. Several programs and management practices are in place to conserve the water resources and implement new water supplies to meet the demand of various sectors of the water users. With very high demand on the ground water resources, the limited surface water becomes a promising option as a new and innovative water source. The limited rainfall amounts that fall over wide areas of the and lands of Jordan (called the Badia) are of significant quantity and due to lack of proper management, the water is lost due to high evaporation rate. Wadi Salma catchment is 95.63 km2 located in the northeast part of the study area was selected to establish rainfall-runoff records. Also field experiments were performed at various parts of the study area to define the hydrologic response. Rainfall-runoff records showed a runoff coefficient of 14--24% for Wadi Salma Catchment. Rainfall simulations tests were used to estimate Curve Numbers (CN); high values (93.4--95.5) were estimated for different land surfaces. Also infiltration tests showed higher initial infiltration rate (fo) of 2.5 mm/min--3.7 mm/min for the channel beds and nearly the same final infiltration rate ( fc) of 0.2 mm/min--0.6 mm/min for all parts. A GIS based simulation tool was developed to simulate the runoff for the study area and two storms were used to test the model. Using initial abstraction (Ia) as 42% of the potential soil storage (S') was found to be the best estimation for rainfall losses calculation. Using the Muskingum routing method, a traveling parameter (K) equal to the traveling time and weighting parameter (x) of 0.18 were estimated for the study area. The simulation tool calculated the peak discharge and runoff volume with acceptable accuracy for the whole catchment; the difference in peak discharge estimation was 4% --6% and in runoff volume is 7% for the first storm and 10% for the second storm.

Alayyash, Saad Mohammed

286

Measurements, Fingerprint, Modeling - Compiling a sediment budget in a data scarce catchment in NW Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In regard to the quantitative and qualitative water problems in Jordan the soil layer and its physical integrity is important to slow down runoff, guarantee infiltration, and a sensible parameter in terms of hydrologic modeling. Erosion harms this potential and needs to be better understood and quantified in the region. Therefore, a multiple response approach was implemented to compile a sediment budget for the research area Wadi Al-Arab in the NW of Jordan (263,5km2). The climate is Mediterranean to semi-arid with <300 to 550mm of rain in winter. Mainly marl and limestone of the Upper Cretaceous and the Paleocene make up the catchment's geology. The area is characterized by an agricultural basin in the east and an increase in relief energy to the west and south. Different field measurements were implemented on relevant sediment sources, such as olive orchards, agricultural fields, natural vegetated slopes and exposed rock with patchy vegetation as well as the Wadi Al Arab Dam Lake as the final sink. The focus involved the quantification of the yearly sediment yields and the deposition in the lake, respectively. In a second step a multiple sediment fingerprint was applied including the geochemical differentiation of the sources with inorganic elements and radio nuclides. The relative importance of each source could be calculated on the basis of lake sediment samples. Results of these two approaches cover different spatial scales and only partly integrate the transport way. Hence, they cannot be directly compared but consider the problem from different perspectives and are used in the final step to calibrate and validate the setup of the SedNet model (Wilkinson et al. 2008) for the catchment. The model offers the possibility to incorporate additional raster information, includes additional sources such as gully and bank erosion, and takes account for different areas of deposition according to the measured and regionalized discharge in the region. Its' implementation helped to test the field findings to their limits and provides a more holistic sediment budget for Wadi Al-Arab. Reference: Wilkinson, S., Henderson, A., Chen, Y., Sherman, B. (2008): SedNet User Guide. Client Report, CSIRO Land and Water; Canberra.

Kraushaar, Sabine; Schumann, Thomas; Wilkinson, Scott; Ollesch, Gregor; Siebert, Christian; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

2013-04-01

287

Higgs Gravitational Interaction, Weak Boson Scattering, and Higgs Inflation in Jordan and Einstein Frames  

E-print Network

We study gravitational interaction of Higgs boson through the unique dimension-4 operator $\\xi H^\\dag H R$, with $H$ the Higgs doublet and $R$ the Ricci scalar curvature. We analyze the effect of this dimensionless nonminimal coupling $\\xi$ on weak gauge boson scattering in both Jordan and Einstein frames. We explicitly establish the longitudinal-Goldstone boson equivalence theorem with nonzero $\\xi$ coupling in both frames, and analyze the unitarity constraints. We study the $\\xi$-induced weak boson scattering cross sections at O(1-30)TeV scales, and propose to probe the Higgs-gravity coupling via weak boson scattering experiments at the LHC(14TeV) and the next generation pp colliders (50-100TeV). We further extend our study to Higgs inflation, and quantitatively derive the perturbative unitarity bounds via coupled channel analysis, under large field background at the inflation scale. We analyze the unitarity constraints on the parameter space in both the conventional Higgs inflation and the improved models in light of the recent BICEP2 data.

Jing Ren; Zhong-Zhi Xianyu; Hong-Jian He

2014-04-17

288

Behaviours and attitudes related to smoking among a Bedouin population in rural Jordan.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT There is limited research about tobacco-related behaviours and attitudes among rural populations in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. The aim of this study was to determine smoking behaviours and attitudes among the nomadic Bedouin in rural southern Jordan. Patients visiting a village clinic over 2 months of 2009 were invited by the attending physician to participate in the survey, which was adapted from the California Tobacco Survey. The smoking prevalence among the 92 participants was 46.7%. Most smokers were men who smoked heavily (> 1 pack/day) (90.7%). There was general low self-efficacy to quit among smokers, yet 81.4% acknowledged that smoking was harming their health. Although 79.1% of smokers and 89.1% of non-smokers believed second-hand smoke was harmful to non-smokers, most of them had no restrictions on smoking for residents and guests (66.3%) and most had children at home (73.9%). These data demonstrate contradictions between attitudes and behaviours about smoking of this rural population. PMID:24975179

Eggert, J; Al-Delaimy, W K

2013-06-01

289

A new marine gobiid species of the genus Clariger Jordan & Snyder (Gobiidae, Teleostei) from Taiwan.  

PubMed

A new species of Clariger Jordan & Snyder, 1901 was collected from northern Taiwan. The genus was previously known only from Japanese waters. This discovery is the first formal and southernmost record of these marine gobies from the waters of subtropical Taiwan. The new species, Clariger taiwanensissp. n., is distinguished from its congeners by a unique combination of features: (1) fin rays: dorsal-fin rays III, I/8; anal-fin rays modally I/8; and pectoral-fin rays modally 19 (2+16+1); (2) longitudinal dermal ridge on head with 6 barbels; and (3) specific coloration pattern: head and trunk dark brown with scattered pale spots and blotches; cheek, ventral portion of head sometimes pale with deep brown spots; pectoral-fin base with a dark brown band; and caudal fin mostly dark brown proximally and with alternating and irregular dark brown and pale bands distally. A diagnostic key to all nominal species from Japan and Taiwan is provided. PMID:22711994

Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong; Gong, You-Hai; Chen, I-Shiung

2012-01-01

290

Effect of gender on performance of undergraduate dental students at the University of Jordan, Amman.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to see if gender-based differences exist in the performance of dental students at the University of Jordan (UJ), Amman. The retrospective analysis included data from two groups of students: 413 fourth-year dental students (178 males and 275 females) from four consecutive years (2005 through 2008) and 357 fifth-year students (128 males and 229 females) who graduated in the years 2005 to 2008. The influence of gender on the results of the fourth-year students in six theoretical and six clinical courses and the cumulative GPAs of the fifth-year students were studied. In both theoretical and clinical fourth-year courses, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed significant main differences in raw scores between the two gender groups. Female students were significantly better in five theoretical courses. In clinical courses, female students outscored male students in pediatric dentistry and prosthodontics, male students outperformed female students in conservative dentistry and orthodontics, and no significant gender differences were seen in oral surgery and fixed prosthodontics. The cumulative GPAs of the female graduated students were significantly higher than those of the male students. The results showed a significant relationship between gender and academic performance of dental students for these classes. The reasons for these findings should be further investigated. PMID:19910481

Sawair, Faleh A; Baqain, Zaid H; Al-Omari, Iyad Kh; Wahab, Fouad K; Rajab, Lamis D

2009-11-01

291

Low-temperature geothermal assessment of the Jordan Valley Salt Lake County, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Two known low-temperature areas (Warm Springs fault and Crystal Hot Springs) are located in the Jordan Valley, but the primary purpose of this report is to locate other low-temperature resources not previously identified. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques utilized in this study include a temperature survey and chemical analysis of wells and springs, and temperature-depth measurements in holes of opportunity. Also, further site specific gravity modelling for the Warm Springs fault geothermal area and initial modelling for the entire valley were also conducted. Areas identified as having potential low-temperature geothermal resources at depth are: (1) the north-central valley area; (2) an east-west portion of the central valley; and (3) a north-south oriented area extending from Draper to Midvale. Each of these areas exhibits ground-water temperatures 20/sup 0/C or greater. Each area has thermal wells with common ion characteristics similar to both Crystal Hot Springs and the Warm Springs fault geothermal systems. Significant concentrations of Sr, Li, B, and F are present in many of these wells.

Klauk, R.H.

1984-07-01

292

Byzantine maritime trade in southern Jordan: The evidence from Port of Aila ('Aqaba).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eusebius of Caesarea, in (Onomasticon) said that: "Ailath (Aila) is situated at the extremity of Palestine between the southern desert and the Red Sea where cargo was transported by ship from both Egypt and India". There is no doubt that port of Aila- 'Aqaba was important for the sea trade during the Byzantine Period and ancient times. Aila acquired significance in the Byzantine Empire commerce and seafaring according to the information derived from the Byzantine historians, documents and pilgrim's archaeological excavations. This paper focuses on Byzantine Maritime Trade in port of Aila during the period between the fourth and seventh centuries A.D, its importance in the flourishing of trade of southern Jordan, and its relations with other major trade centers such as Gaza, Alexandria and Ethiopia. It appears that port of Aila played a major role in the economy of Byzantine Empire and international trade as attested in the accounts of historians, pilgrims who visited the area during this period, and archaeological excavations which revealed that Aila was at least a transit point and perhaps even a production site for fish sauce or related products in the Byzantine period.

Al-Nasarat, Mohammed

293

Enteropathogens associated with cases of gastroenteritis in a rural population in Jordan.  

PubMed

Stool specimens were collected from 180 patients belonging to a population of recently settled Bedouins in Jordan who presented with acute or persistent diarrhoea and other symptoms, and from 100 non-diarrhoeal controls. All samples were examined for parasites and bacterial pathogens by culture and PCR. Bacterial isolates were tested for their susceptibility to common antimicrobial agents. Pathogens and potential enteropathogens were identified from 140 (77.8%) of the patients, with more than one pathogen being recovered from 67 (37.2%) patients. Potentially pathogenic parasites were observed in 90 (50%) patients; those that were associated significantly with diarrhoea were Giardia lamblia, Blastocystis hominis, Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba histolytica and Cyclospora cayetanensis. Pathogenic bacteria were isolated from 72 (40%) patients, and, of these, 62.5% were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 30.6% of these were multiresistant. Diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli strains were found in 14.3% of the patients and 2.9% of the control subjects (not statistically significant). The most common enteropathogenic bacteria found were Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Yersinia enterocolitica. Unusual bacterial species were the predominant organisms recovered in a few cases and could represent a possible cause of diarrhoea. Overall, there was a high endemicity of diarrhoeal disease in the area studied. Risk factors that correlated significantly with contracting diarrhoea were socio-economic status, education, use of unchlorinated well or tank water, and a low level of personal hygiene. PMID:15214876

Nimri, L F; Meqdam, M

2004-07-01

294

An artistic and mythological study of a Nabatean female Sphinx from Petra, Jordan.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1967 the Group of Sculptures was discovered in Petra during clearance works organized by the Department of Antiquities in Jordan in the Temenos of Qasr el Bint around the Temenos Gate. One of these sculptures was a high relief statue of a female sphinx. Due to the paucity of information about this statue, this paper has been written to answer a number of questions: What was its original site or monument? When was it made? Who was the deity or deities it represented? Could there be another interpretation of its existence? The answers to the above provide enlightenment of Nabataean styles of carvings and an insight into their religious thoughts. Rgarding the interpretation of the Female Sphinx. Three ideas have been suggested. First, it can be the main Nabataean goddess Allat, "the mother of the gods". Second, it is an image of Petra as a goddess. Third, it is carved on the Temenos Gate as a guardian of Petra city in general and its holy monuments like temples and tombs in particular.

Almasri, Eyad R.; Al-Ajlouny, Fardous K.; Alghazawi, Raed Y.

295

Industrial apiculture in the Jordan valley during Biblical times with Anatolian honeybees  

PubMed Central

Although texts and wall paintings suggest that bees were kept in the Ancient Near East for the production of precious wax and honey, archaeological evidence for beekeeping has never been found. The Biblical term “honey” commonly was interpreted as the sweet product of fruits, such as dates and figs. The recent discovery of unfired clay cylinders similar to traditional hives still used in the Near East at the site of Tel Reov in the Jordan valley in northern Israel suggests that a large-scale apiary was located inside the town, dating to the 10th–early 9th centuries B.C.E. This paper reports the discovery of remains of honeybee workers, drones, pupae, and larvae inside these hives. The exceptional preservation of these remains provides unequivocal identification of the clay cylinders as the most ancient beehives yet found. Morphometric analyses indicate that these bees differ from the local subspecies Apis mellifera syriaca and from all subspecies other than A. m. anatoliaca, which presently resides in parts of Turkey. This finding suggests either that the Western honeybee subspecies distribution has undergone rapid change during the last 3,000 years or that the ancient inhabitants of Tel Reov imported bees superior to the local bees in terms of their milder temper and improved honey yield. PMID:20534519

Bloch, Guy; Francoy, Tiago M.; Wachtel, Ido; Panitz-Cohen, Nava; Fuchs, Stefan; Mazar, Amihai

2010-01-01

296

Industrial apiculture in the Jordan valley during Biblical times with Anatolian honeybees.  

PubMed

Although texts and wall paintings suggest that bees were kept in the Ancient Near East for the production of precious wax and honey, archaeological evidence for beekeeping has never been found. The Biblical term "honey" commonly was interpreted as the sweet product of fruits, such as dates and figs. The recent discovery of unfired clay cylinders similar to traditional hives still used in the Near East at the site of Tel Re ov in the Jordan valley in northern Israel suggests that a large-scale apiary was located inside the town, dating to the 10th-early 9th centuries B.C.E. This paper reports the discovery of remains of honeybee workers, drones, pupae, and larvae inside these hives. The exceptional preservation of these remains provides unequivocal identification of the clay cylinders as the most ancient beehives yet found. Morphometric analyses indicate that these bees differ from the local subspecies Apis mellifera syriaca and from all subspecies other than A. m. anatoliaca, which presently resides in parts of Turkey. This finding suggests either that the Western honeybee subspecies distribution has undergone rapid change during the last 3,000 years or that the ancient inhabitants of Tel Re ov imported bees superior to the local bees in terms of their milder temper and improved honey yield. PMID:20534519

Bloch, Guy; Francoy, Tiago M; Wachtel, Ido; Panitz-Cohen, Nava; Fuchs, Stefan; Mazar, Amihai

2010-06-22

297

A Unique Human-Fox Burial from a Pre-Natufian Cemetery in the Levant (Jordan)  

PubMed Central

New human burials from northern Jordan provide important insights into the appearance of cemeteries and the nature of human-animal relationships within mortuary contexts during the Epipalaeolithic period (c. 23,000–11,600 cal BP) in the Levant, reinforcing a socio-ideological relationship that goes beyond predator-prey. Previous work suggests that archaeological features indicative of social complexity occur suddenly during the latest Epipalaeolithic phase, the Natufian (c. 14,500–11,600 cal BP). These features include sedentism, cemeteries, architecture, food production, including animal domestication, and burials with elaborate mortuary treatments. Our findings from the pre-Natufian (Middle Epipalaeolithic) cemetery of ‘Uyun al-Hammam demonstrate that joint human-animal mortuary practices appear earlier in the Epipalaeolithic. We describe the earliest human-fox burial in the Near East, where the remains of dogs have been found associated with human burials at a number of Natufian sites. This is the first time that a fox has been documented in association with human interments pre-dating the Natufian and with a particular suite of grave goods. Analysis of the human and animal bones and their associated artefacts provides critical data on the nature and timing of these newly-developing relationships between people and animals prior to the appearance of domesticated dogs in the Natufian. PMID:21298094

Maher, Lisa A.; Stock, Jay T.; Finney, Sarah; Heywood, James J. N.; Miracle, Preston T.; Banning, Edward B.

2011-01-01

298

A unique human-fox burial from a pre-Natufian cemetery in the Levant (Jordan).  

PubMed

New human burials from northern Jordan provide important insights into the appearance of cemeteries and the nature of human-animal relationships within mortuary contexts during the Epipalaeolithic period (c. 23,000-11,600 cal BP) in the Levant, reinforcing a socio-ideological relationship that goes beyond predator-prey. Previous work suggests that archaeological features indicative of social complexity occur suddenly during the latest Epipalaeolithic phase, the Natufian (c. 14,500-11,600 cal BP). These features include sedentism, cemeteries, architecture, food production, including animal domestication, and burials with elaborate mortuary treatments. Our findings from the pre-Natufian (Middle Epipalaeolithic) cemetery of 'Uyun al-Hammam demonstrate that joint human-animal mortuary practices appear earlier in the Epipalaeolithic. We describe the earliest human-fox burial in the Near East, where the remains of dogs have been found associated with human burials at a number of Natufian sites. This is the first time that a fox has been documented in association with human interments pre-dating the Natufian and with a particular suite of grave goods. Analysis of the human and animal bones and their associated artefacts provides critical data on the nature and timing of these newly-developing relationships between people and animals prior to the appearance of domesticated dogs in the Natufian. PMID:21298094

Maher, Lisa A; Stock, Jay T; Finney, Sarah; Heywood, James J N; Miracle, Preston T; Banning, Edward B

2011-01-01

299

The Psychosocial Experience of Adolescents with Haematological Malignancies in Jordan: An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis Study  

PubMed Central

The qualitative research method of interpretive phenomenological analysis was used to explore the lived experience of 14 Jordanian adolescents with haematological malignancies. They were admitted to two hospitals in Jordan and were interviewed for this study twice during the first six months after receiving their diagnosis. The results of this study revealed three themes: (1) Being in hospital, (2) The changing self, and (3) Fearing the unknown. When the participants were hospitalised due to their illness they were removed from their families and friends and prevented from engaging in their normal daily routine. Participants also reported receiving limited emotional and psychological support from health team members during hospitalisation. From the onset of cancer treatments, the bio-psychosocial side effects of the chemotherapy became one of the most distressing factors for participants affecting all aspects of their life and generated uncertainty about their future. The findings add to existing understanding of the lived experiences of cancer patients and in particular Jordanian adolescents. They provide a valuable insight for clinicians into improvements in service delivery to this group of patients. PMID:24550700

2014-01-01

300

Removal of paraquat from synthetic wastewater using phillipsite-faujasite tuff from Jordan.  

PubMed

A phillipsite-faujasite tuff (faujasite) from Jordan has been activated and characterized to evaluate its efficiency in removing paraquat from synthetic wastewater and to specify optimum conditions with maximum efficiency of the faujasite tuff. Noticed variation in CEC is indicated and explained by selectivity of the faujasite to K(+) and Na(+). Removal of paraquat by using faujasite directly gave average removal efficiency equal to 59%. Thermal activation of the samples enhances their performance. The higher is the temperature of activation the higher the efficiency. Treatment of paraquat effluent using faujasite is a good alternative. Na- or K-loading of the original sample give better results. Loading with Ca and Mg however is not recommended because they always exhibit lower efficiency, which might be related to their lower CEC value. Removal of paraquat from wastewater using charcoal and the non-activated faujasite increased efficiency to about 82%. Thermal activated faujasite at 200 degrees C and 300 degrees C increased the uptake up to about 93% and 99.5%, respectively. Therefore thermal activation of faujasite is necessary to improve its uptake performance. PMID:18676084

Ibrahim, Khalil M; Jbara, Haneen A

2009-04-15

301

Social and behavioural HIV/AIDS research in Jordan: a systematic review.  

PubMed

This systematic review evaluated the extent of HIV/AIDS research conducted in Jordan related to behavioural and/or social outcomes. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and OVID (1980-2009) were searched as well as the International AIDS Society abstract archives (2000-2009). Existing reviews and primary studies were cross-referenced for further citations, and unpublished literature and ongoing trials were searched by contacting experts and active researchers in the field. Google Scholar was used to search in peer-reviewed local or regional journals not included in the above-mentioned databases. Searches were also conducted of Arabic literature. Only 8 relevant studies were identified; all were descriptive cross-sectional studies, either quantitative or qualitative. Convenience samples were used in the majority of the studies, severely limiting the generalizability of the findings. The studies focused on HIV/AIDs knowledge and attitudes in the general population and among health professionals; at-risk populations were not assessed. PMID:22764436

Alkhasawneh, E; Ismayilova, L; Olimat, H; El-Bassel, N

2012-05-01

302

Chemical and Mineralogical study of Nabataean painted pottery from Petra, Jordan.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nabataean pottery is distinguished by the thinness of its walls, which were sometimes only 1.5 mm thick. It was a pinkish/red color, often decorated by hand with dark brown flower and leaf designs. The typical (egg-shell) shallow open bowls productions were very difficult to make on the potter's wheel, demonstrating how skilled their craftsmen were Nabataean painted pottery from Petra Jordan were examined in order to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the raw pigment materials used for their production and to elucidate the ceramic manufacturing technologies employed. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) were the analytical techniques used. The initial examination of the ceramic shreds in optical microscopy showed all samples to be identical in their paint and paste textures. The mineralogical composition of the paste (unpainted outer surface) is typical of a clay poor in calcium and fired at moderate-high temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere. The paste is composed of quartz, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, hematite, dolomite, and calcite. The latter two phases might be attributed to post-depositional contamination, since examination with both optical and scanning electron microscopes show fine carbonate particles deposited in the pores and cracks of the shred. The paint on the inner surface of the vessel, on the other hand is composed of hematite as a major phase with only some quartz and plagioclase.

Alawneh, Firas; Bala'awi, Fadi

303

Reported incidence, causes, and reporting of medication errors in teaching hospitals in Jordan: a comparative study.  

PubMed

This research assessed the reported incidence, causes and reporting of medication errors in intensive care units (ICUs) and wards of Jordanian teaching hospitals. There are few studies about medication errors in Jordan. This survey was conducted in 2010 using a convenience sample of 212 nurses from four teaching hospitals. The response rate was 70.6% (212/300). The mean of the reported incidence of medication errors for the whole sample was 35%; 36.4% in ICUs and 33.8% in wards. An inaccurate rate of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was the scenario most commonly classified as a drug error; for this nurses would notify the physician, and complete an incident report. Poor quality or damaged medication labels were the most commonly reported causes of errors. Nurses failed to report medication errors because they were afraid that they might be subjected to disciplinary actions. There were some significant differences between ICUs and wards in assessment of clinical scenarios, causes of medication errors as well as their reporting. Reporting of medication errors should be encouraged. Immediate interventions should be initiated by all healthcare professionals in all clinical settings, especially in wards. PMID:22800388

Mrayyan, Majd T

2012-06-01

304

Job stressors and social support behaviors: comparing intensive care units to wards in Jordan.  

PubMed

Studies about nurses' stressors and social support behaviors are limited. This study explored differences between Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and wards in regard to Jordanian nurses' job stressors and social support behaviors as well as predictors of the two concepts. A quantitative research design using a survey method was used. The Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) (Gray-Toft & Anderson 1981) and the Inventory of Social Supportive Behaviors (ISSB) (Barrera, Sandler & Ramsay 1981) were used to collect data from a convenience sample of 228 nurses who were working in 12 ICUs and 235 nurses who were working in nine wards of 13 hospitals, with a total response rate of 66.2%. Stressors in ICUs were higher than those in wards. The ICUs scored higher than wards in 'conflict with physicians' subscale of NSS. The ICUs scored higher than wards in 'emotional support' and 'tangible assistance' subscales of ISSB. Shift worked, model of nursing care, and level of education predicted nurses' job stressors in ICUs and wards. 'Model of nursing care' was a shared predictor of social support behaviors in ICUs and wards. High job stressors and low social support behaviors were evidenced in Jordan. Job stressors were higher in ICUs than those in wards, thus more social support behaviors should be provided to nurses in ICUs. Nurses' stressors should be assessed and managed. In all settings in general and in ICUs in particular, nurse managers should use various social support behaviors to buffer the influence of job stressors on nurses. PMID:19379118

Mrayyan, Majd T

2009-02-01

305

Design of stand-alone brackish water desalination wind energy system for Jordan  

SciTech Connect

More than 100 underground water wells drilled in Jordan are known to have brackish water with total desolved solids (TDS) over 1500 ppm but not greater than 4000 ppm. The world standard for potable water limits the TDS count to 500 ppm in addition to being free from live microorganisms or dangerous mineral and organic substances. A reverse osmosis desalination scheme powered by a stand-alone wind energy converter (WEC) is proposed to produce fresh water water from wells located in potentially high-wind sites. The purpose of this study if to present the main design parameters and economic estimates of a wind-assisted RO system using a diesel engine as the baseline energy source and an electric wind turbine for the wind energy source. It is found that brackish water pumping and desalinating using WECs costs 0.67 to 1.16 JD/m[sup 3] (JD = Jordanian Dinar, 1US$ = 0.68 JD), which is less than using conventional diesel engines especially in remote areas. In addition, the wind-reverse osmosis system becomes more economically feasible for higher annual production rates or in good wind regimes.

Habali, S.M.; Saleh, I.A.

1994-06-01

306

Perceptions and expectations of Baccalaureate-prepared nurses in Jordan: community survey.  

PubMed

The overall purpose of this paper is to describe the process of utilizing community participation for curriculum design to develop a new school of nursing. A brief Community Needs Assessment Survey was carried out in order to explore community perceptions and expectations of Baccalaureate-prepared nurses in Jordan. The sample consisted of 152 participants who were staff nurses, nurse administrators, nurse supervisors, nurse educators, physicians, pharmacists and consumers of services. Data were collected through a self-administered survey form using open-ended questions. Participants were asked to describe their perceptions of nursing and nurses, the desired professional skills and personal characteristics of the Baccalaureate-prepared nurse, important curriculum contents and to provide suggestions or comments for improving the preparation of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) nurses. The findings indicated that nursing was viewed as a caring profession where nurses care for the person both in sickness and health. Several professional skills and personal characteristics emerged as being important for the BSN nurse, including clinical competence, the desire to continue learning, communication skills, ethical and moral character, critical thinking, assessment skills, and computer and English-language skills. The participants provided the desired curriculum contents and suggestions related to the expected skills. Implications for nursing education were discussed. PMID:11811434

Petro-Nustas, W; Mikhail, B I; Baker, O G

2001-10-01

307

Subsidence and Sinkhole Hazard Assessment in the Southern Dead Sea Area, Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dead Sea area is increasingly facing serious subsidence and sinkhole hazards. On March 22, 2000, the dyke of a two-month old major salt evaporation pond, located along the shore of the Lisan Peninsula (Jordan), collapsed over almost two kilometers. The pond was set up over unstable new lands that have been progressively emerging during the last three decades. In one hour, 56 millions m3 of brine poured out into the northern, natural part of the Sea. Here, we present data suggesting that the drop of the water level, in conjunction with the particular tectonic setting of this area, is at least one of the factors that led to the disaster. We focused our study over the northern part of the Lisan Peninsula and Ghor Al Haditha which are two places undergoing the most intense deformations along the Jordanian Dead Sea coast. We used the results of a static high precision gravimetric survey to detect subsurface cavities in Ghor Al Haditha. We analyzed a interferometric digital terrain model of the recent emerged platform of the Lisan peninsula and interpreted radar differential interferograms contemporary with gravity measurements for the peninsula. We discuss the possibilities to detect, assess and monitor areas prone to collapse on the Jordanian side of the southern Dead Sea coast.

Closson, Damien; Karaki, Najib Abou; Klinger, Yann; Hussein, Musa Jad

2005-02-01

308

High-precision radiocarbon dating and historical biblical archaeology in southern Jordan  

PubMed Central

Recent excavations and high-precision radiocarbon dating from the largest Iron Age (IA, ca. 1200–500 BCE) copper production center in the southern Levant demonstrate major smelting activities in the region of biblical Edom (southern Jordan) during the 10th and 9th centuries BCE. Stratified radiocarbon samples and artifacts were recorded with precise digital surveying tools linked to a geographic information system developed to control on-site spatial analyses of archaeological finds and model data with innovative visualization tools. The new radiocarbon dates push back by 2 centuries the accepted IA chronology of Edom. Data from Khirbat en-Nahas, and the nearby site of Rujm Hamra Ifdan, demonstrate the centrality of industrial-scale metal production during those centuries traditionally linked closely to political events in Edom's 10th century BCE neighbor ancient Israel. Consequently, the rise of IA Edom is linked to the power vacuum created by the collapse of Late Bronze Age (LB, ca. 1300 BCE) civilizations and the disintegration of the LB Cypriot copper monopoly that dominated the eastern Mediterranean. The methodologies applied to the historical IA archaeology of the Levant have implications for other parts of the world where sacred and historical texts interface with the material record. PMID:18955702

Levy, Thomas E.; Higham, Thomas; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Smith, Neil G.; Ben-Yosef, Erez; Robinson, Mark; Munger, Stefan; Knabb, Kyle; Schulze, Jurgen P.; Najjar, Mohammad; Tauxe, Lisa

2008-01-01

309

An isotopic perspective on the transport of Byzantine mining camp laborers into southwestern Jordan.  

PubMed

The Byzantine Empire managed a complex administrative network that controlled the mining and processing of natural resources from within its boundaries. Scholars relying upon archeological and textual evidence debate the level of imperial involvement in these ventures, particularly in the provinces. Ancient sources note that many mining camps, for instance, purportedly contained criminal laborers and elite administrators transported from distant locales, indicating significant organization and expenditures by the imperial administration to run the mines. This analysis explores the presence of these nonlocal individuals in a cemetery associated with the third to seventh century A.D. mining camp of Phaeno (Faynan), located in modern Jordan. Strontium isotope analysis of 31 burials indicates that most spent their childhood in a similar geological region as Phaeno, implying that they were locally born. The delta(18)O results mirror the homogeneous (87)Sr/(86)Sr values, confirming a local origin for most of the sample. Isotopic evidence therefore suggests that the Phaeno mining camp was largely a local operation, contrary to the picture presented in textual sources, although the profits surely padded imperial coffers. PMID:19425090

Perry, Megan A; Coleman, Drew S; Dettman, David L; al-Shiyab, Abdel Halim

2009-11-01

310

Viet-An Nguyen, Yuening Hu, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Argviz: Interactive Visualization of Topic Dynamics in Multi-party Conversations. North American Association for Computational Linguistics, 2013.  

E-print Network

Viet-An Nguyen, Yuening Hu, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. Argviz: Interactive Linguistics, 2013. @inproceedings{Nguyen:Hu:Boyd-Graber:Resnik-2013, Author = {Viet-An Nguyen and Yuening Hu and Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik}, Booktitle = {North American Association for Computational

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

311

Viet-An Nguyen, Jordan Boyd-Graber, Philip Resnik, Deborah Cai, Jennifer Midberry, and Yuanxin Wang. Modeling Topic Control to Detect Influence in Conversations using Nonparametric Topic Models. Machine Learning, 2013.  

E-print Network

Viet-An Nguyen, Jordan Boyd-Graber, Philip Resnik, Deborah Cai, Jennifer Midberry, and Yuanxin Wang Learning, 2013. @article{Nguyen:Boyd-Graber:Resnik:Cai:Midberry:Wang-2013, Publisher = {Springer}, Author = {Viet-An Nguyen and Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik and Deborah Cai and Jennifer Midberry and Yua

Resnik, Philip

312

Viet-An Nguyen, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. SITS: A Hierarchical Nonparametric Model using Speaker Identity for Topic Segmentation in Multiparty Conversations. Association for Computational Linguistics,  

E-print Network

Viet-An Nguyen, Jordan Boyd-Graber, and Philip Resnik. SITS: A Hierarchical Nonparametric Model Linguistics, 2012. @inproceedings{Nguyen:Boyd-Graber:Resnik-2012, Author = {Viet-An Nguyen and Jordan Boyd-Graber and Philip Resnik}, Booktitle = {Association for Computational Linguistics}, Year = {2012}, Location = {Jeju

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

313

External Mill Monitoring of Wheat Flour Fortification Programs: An Approach for Program Managers Using Experiences from Jordan  

PubMed Central

The fortification of wheat flour with micronutrients is a common strategy to increase vitamin and mineral intake. While wheat flour mills are often inspected by agencies affiliated with national ministries to ensure compliance with national fortification standards, few countries use data derived from these inspections to construct an external monitoring system for use in program management and evaluation. The primary objective of this paper is to assess the performance of the external monitoring system utilized in Jordan according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Updated Guidelines for Evaluating Public Health Surveillance Systems. A secondary objective is to present mill monitoring results from 2009 to 2010 in order to demonstrate the data generated by the system. The review concludes that the data required for the system is representative, simple to collect, and can be collected in a flexible manner. The external monitoring system is acceptable to participating agencies and millers and is stable due to mandatory fortification legislation which provides the legal framework for external monitoring. Data on production of fortified flour and utilization of premix can be provided in a timely manner, but on-site mill monitoring and flour sample collection are more challenging due to resource constraints. The frequent collection of a small number of indicators can provide fortification program managers with timely information with which to base decisions. Jordan’s external monitoring system successfully documented the performance of each mill and the entire flour fortification program, and can serve as a model for other national fortification programs considering external monitoring approaches. PMID:24284616

Wirth, James P.; Nichols, Erin; Mas'd, Hanan; Barham, Rawhieh; Johnson, Quentin W.; Serdula, Mary

2013-01-01

314

Complementary and alternative medicine utilization by a sample of infertile couples in Jordan for infertility treatment: clinics-based survey  

PubMed Central

Background Although there is little information available to quantify the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), growing evidence suggests that CAM prevalence among patients seeking infertility treatment is increasing worldwide. There are many products available on the market and many infertile patients demand information about CAM from their health care providers. This paper investigates the prevalence of CAM use among infertile couples in Jordan. Additionally, trends and factors contributing to CAM use for infertility treatment among these couples have been evaluated. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information, use of CAM for medical conditions, in general, and types of CAM used for infertility treatment, in specific, was completed by one thousand twenty one infertile patients attending at two types of facilities; in vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers at both public and private hospitals and infertility private clinics. Both types of facilities were distributed in different areas of Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The study was conducted between May and August 2012. Results Our results show that CAM therapies for infertility treatment were encountered in 44.7% of the study sample. The vast majority of CAM users were females. The most commonly used CAM therapies were herbs and spiritual healing. A clear correlation between the use of CAM for infertility versus the use of CAM for other chronic medical conditions has been found. Conclusions The prevalence of CAM use for infertility treatment in Jordan is relatively high, particularly among young females, well educated and with a low income, in consistence with the studies reported elsewhere. Herbs and spiritual healing are widely used among patients in adjunct to conventional medical interventions. As CAM use is prevalent among patients, there is a clear need for health providers to become more aware of this phenomenon and for further research in this field. PMID:23414246

2013-01-01

315

Condom use and HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Introduction To identify sociocultural determinants of self-reported condom use and HIV testing and examine variables related to accessibility, motivation and obstacles among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jordan. Design Cross-sectional study among MSM who were identified through services of a local non-governmental organization (NGO). Methods Respondents were studied with a semi-structured interview based on the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC) framework. The vignette-based EMIC interview considered locally relevant HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, risk perception and perceived causes, as well as awareness of services and sources of support. Results Of the 97 respondents, 27% reported that they used a condom at last intercourse; 38% had been tested at least once for HIV. Positive determinants of condom use were higher education level, acknowledging MSM as a high-risk group, seeking advice from a medical doctor and the perceived causes “sex with prostitutes” and “sex with animals.” Awareness of available treatment was a positive determinant of HIV testing. Blood transfusion as a perceived cause and asking advice from friends were negative determinants. Conclusions Jordanian MSM seem to be aware of the risk of HIV infection and effective prevention methods, and they are willing to be tested for HIV. Our findings addressed the importance of the sexual meaning of HIV/AIDS on the control of HIV/AIDS among MSM. More effective engagement of NGOs and MSM in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS is needed, enlisting the support of medical doctors and community health workers. Peer education should be strategically strengthened. Political commitment is needed to mitigate social stigma. PMID:24695243

Alkaiyat, Abdulsalam; Schaetti, Christian; Liswi, Mohammad; Weiss, Mitchell G

2014-01-01

316

Addressing drought conditions under current and future climates in the Jordan River region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Standardized Precipitation-Evaporation Index (SPEI) was applied in order to address the drought conditions under current and future climates in the Jordan River region located in the southeastern Mediterranean area. In the first step, the SPEI was derived from spatially interpolated monthly precipitation and temperature data at multiple timescales: accumulated precipitation and monthly mean temperature were considered over a number of timescales - for example 1, 3, and 6 months. To investigate the performance of the drought index, correlation analyses were conducted with simulated soil moisture and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) obtained from remote sensing. A comparison with the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), i.e., a drought index that does not incorporate temperature, was also conducted. The results show that the 6-month SPEI has the highest correlation with simulated soil moisture and best explains the interannual variation of the monthly NDVI. Hence, a timescale of 6 months is the most appropriate when addressing vegetation growth in the semi-arid region. In the second step, the 6-month SPEI was derived from three climate projections based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emission scenario A1B. When comparing the period 2031-2060 with 1961-1990, it is shown that the percentage of time with moderate, severe and extreme drought conditions is projected to increase strongly. To address the impact of drought on the agricultural sector, the irrigation water demand during certain drought years was thereafter simulated with a hydrological model on a spatial resolution of 1 km. A large increase in the demand for irrigation water was simulated, showing that the agricultural sector is expected to become even more vulnerable to drought in the future.

Törnros, T.; Menzel, L.

2014-01-01

317

Ophthalmology residency training in Jordan: an evaluation of quality and comparison with international standards  

PubMed Central

AIM To evaluate Jordanian ophthalmology residency programs in achieving competencies outlined by the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) and residents' satisfaction with available training programs in Jordan, and to highlight weakness points that may be improved and strengthened. METHODS A closed-ended questionnaire was circulated to all ophthalmologists who completed their training in Jordanian institutions between 2006 and 2011, to measure the quality of residency training and satisfaction level with regards to clinical conferences, journal clubs, scientific lectures, wet lab sessions, simulations, outpatient clinics and operating room training. Barriers to a successful board exam were cited. All ophthalmologists had official residency training in Jordanian Hospitals; this includes military, university, governmental and private sector hospitals. RESULTS Sixty-one questionnaires completed out of 69 circulated. Males (75.4%) were more than females. Mean age was 32.5±3.27y. A total 21 (34.4%) responders expressed an overall satisfaction, 38 (62.3%) were dissatisfied and 2 (3.3%) were equivocal. Respondents reported insufficient exposure to low-vision rehabilitation 57 (93.4%), or refraction and glasses prescription 34 (55.7%). Regarding operative experiences, the mean cataract extraction per-resident was 43 cataracts; the number of phacoemulsification surgery was 2.96 per-resident, 46 (75.4%) of responders never did a single phacoemulsification during residency. Nine (14.8%) had training in refractive surgery, and 15 (24.6%) assisted orbital surgery. Forty-four (72.1%) never assisted in vitreoretinal surgery. Among The graduates surveyed, 14 (23.0%) passed Jordanian licensing board exam at the first attempt, and felt that their residency programs adequately prepared them for the examinations. CONCLUSION Around two thirds (62.3%) of ophthalmologists expressed dissatisfaction with residency training at Jordanian programs, further study is required to assess each program separately and evaluate the system of accreditation in Jordanian residency programs. PMID:25349813

Al-Salem, Khalil M.; Al-Sarayra, Fawwaz A.; Abu Al-Dabaat, Mohammad; Shihadeh, Wisam; Al-Salem, Mohammad M.; Al-Salem, Mahmoud K.; Schaal, Shlomit

2014-01-01

318

Rainfall estimation over the Wadi Dhuliel arid catchment, Jordan from GSMaP_MVK+  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GSMaP_MVK+ (Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation) dataset was used to evaluate the precipitation rates over the Wadi Dhuliel arid catchment in Northeast Jordan for the period of January 2003 to March 2008. The scarcity of the ground rain gauge network alone did not adequately show the detailed structure of the rainfall distribution, independent form interpolation techniques used. This study combines GSMaP_MVK+ and ground rain gauges to produce accurate, high-resolution datasets. Three meteorological stations and six rain gauges were used to adjust and compare GSMaP_MVK+ estimates. Comparisons between GSMaP_MVK+ measurements and ground rain gauges records showed distinct regions where they correlate, as well as areas where GSMaP_MVK+ systematically over- and underestimated ground rain gauge records. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model was used to derive the relationship between rainfall and GSMaP_MVK+ in conjunction with temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. The MLR equations were defined for the three meteorological stations. The "best" fit of MLR model for each station was chosen and used to interpolate a multiscale temporal and spatial distribution. Results show that the rainfall distribution over the Wadi Dhuliel is characterized by clear west-east and north-south gradients. Estimates from the monthly MLR model were more reasonable than estimates obtained using daily data. The adjusted GSMaP_MVK+ performed well in capturing the spatial patterns of the rainfall at monthly and annual time scales while daily estimation showed some weakness in light and moderate storms.

Abushandi, E.; Merkel, B.

2011-02-01

319

Stability of n-Lie homomorphisms and Jordan n-Lie homomorphisms on n-Lie algebras  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The motivation of this paper is to apply the Hypers-Ulam stability problems of some kinds of functional equations to the classes of n-Lie homomorphisms and n-Lie algebras by using the structures of n-Lie homomorphisms and n-Lie algebras. In this paper, the generalized Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability of n-Lie homomorphisms and Jordan n-Lie homomorphisms on n-Lie algebras associated to the generalized Cauchy-Jensen-Rassias additive functional equation are investigated using the fixed point methods.

Kim, Seong Sik; Rassias, John Michael; Cho, Yeol Je; Kim, Soo Hawn

2013-05-01

320

Chemical evolution of saline waters in the Jordan-Dead Sea transform and in adjoining areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ca Mg relationship in groundwaters strongly points to the overall dolomitization and local albitization. The Mg/Ca ratios reveal two trends by which saline waters develop: increase of Mg/Ca ratio by evaporation and decreasing Mg/Ca ratios due to dolomitization and albitization. Br/Cl vs. Na/Cl ratios demonstrate that albitization does not play a major role which leaves dolomitization to be the main source for decreasing Mg/Ca ratios in saline waters. In the eastern and southern Region of Lake Kinneret, salinization occurs by mixing with a Ca/Mg molar ratio <1 brine (Ha’On type). Along the western shoreline of the Lake, a Ca/Mg > 1 dominates, which developed by the albitization of plagioclase in abundant mafic volcanics and the dolomitization of limestones. The most saline groundwater of the Tabgha-, Fuliya-, and Tiberias clusters could be regional derivatives of at least two mother brines: in diluted form one is represented by Ha’On water, the other is a Na-rich brine of the Zemah type. Additionally, a deep-seated Ca-dominant brine may ascend along the fractures on the western side of Lake Kinneret, which is absent on the eastern side. Groundwaters of the Lower Jordan Valley are chemically different on both sides of the Jordan River, indicating that the exchange of water is insignificant. All saline waters from the Dead Sea and its surroundings represent a complex mixture of brines, and precipitation and local dissolution of halite and gypsum. Many wells of the Arava/Araba Valley pump groundwater from the Upper Cretaceous limestone aquifer, the origin of the water is actually from the Lower Cretaceous Kurnub Group sandstones. Groundwater drawn from the Quaternary alluvial fill either originates from Kurnub Group sandstones (Eilat 108, Yaalon 117) or from altered limestones of the Judea Group. The origin of these waters is from floods flowing through wadis incised into calcareous formations of the Judea Group. On the other hand, as a result of step-faulting, hydraulic contact is locally established between the Kurnub- and the Judea Groups aquifers facilitating the inter-aquifer flow of the confined Kurnub paleowater into the karstic formations of the Judea Group. Two periods of Neogene brine formation are considered: the post-Messinan inland lagoon resulting in drying up of the Sdom Sea and the evaporation of the Pleistocene Samra Lake, which went further through the stage of Lake Lisan to the present Dead Sea. For the first period, major element hydrochemistry suggests that the saline waters and brines in the Jordan-Dead Sea Arava Valley transform evolved from the gradual evaporation of an accumulating mixture of sea-, ground-, and surface water. Due to the precipitation of carbonates, gypsum, and halite, such an evaporating primary water body was strongly enriched in Mg, Br, and B and shows high molar ratios of Br/Cl, B/Cl, and Mg/Ca but low Na/Cl ratios. The development of the Br/Cl ratio is chemically modelled, showing that indeed brine development is explicable that way. Along with the evaporation brine, evaporites formed which are leached by infiltrating fresh water yielding secondary brines with Na/Cl ratios of 1. When primary brines infiltrated the sub-surface, they were subjected to Mg Ca exchange in limestones (dolomitization) and to chloritization and albitization in basic igneous rocks turning them into Ca-Cl brines. These tertiary brines are omnipresent in the Rift. The brines of the late Lisan and Dead Sea were generated by evaporating drainage waters, which leached halite, gypsum, and carbonates from the soil and from the sub-surface. All these brines are still being flushed out by meteoric water, resulting in saline groundwaters. This flushing is regionally enhanced by intensive groundwater exploitation. In variable proportions, the Neogene and late Lisan Lake and Recent Dead Sea brines have to be considered as the most serious sources of salinization of groundwaters in the Rift. Deep-seated pre-Sdom brines cannot strictly be excluded, but if active they play a negligible role only.

Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Geyer, Stefan; Flexer, Akiva

2007-06-01

321

Voice restoration following total laryngectomy by tracheoesophageal prosthesis: Effect on patients' quality of life and voice handicap in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Background Little has been reported about the impact of tracheoesophageal (TE) speech on individuals in the Middle East where the procedure has been gaining in popularity. After total laryngectomy, individuals in Europe and North America have rated their quality of life as being lower than non-laryngectomized individuals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in quality of life and degree of voice handicap reported by laryngectomized speakers from Jordan before and after establishment of TE speech. Methods Twelve male Jordanian laryngectomees completed the University of Michigan Head & Neck Quality of Life instrument and the Voice Handicap Index pre- and post-TE puncture. Results All subjects showed significant improvements in their quality of life following successful prosthetic voice restoration. In addition, voice handicap scores were significantly reduced from pre- to post-TE puncture. Conclusion Tracheoesophageal speech significantly improved the quality of life and limited the voice handicap imposed by total laryngectomy. This method of voice restoration has been used for a number of years in other countries and now appears to be a viable alternative within Jordan. PMID:18373867

Attieh, Abdelrahim Y; Searl, Jeff; Shahaltough, Nada H; Wreikat, Mahmoud M; Lundy, Donna S

2008-01-01

322

Standards of teeth preparations for anterior resin bonded all-ceramic crowns in private dental practice in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Objectives To investigate if general dental practitioners (GDPs) in private practice in Jordan follow universal guidelines for preparation of anterior teeth for resin bonded all-ceramic crowns (RBCs). Material and Methods A sample (n=100) of laboratory models containing 208 tooth preparations for IPS Empress and In Ceram, featuring work from different GDPs, was obtained from 8 commercial dental laboratories. Aspects of preparations were quantified and compared with accepted criteria defined following a review of the literature and recommendations of the manufactures' guidelines. Results Subgingival margins on the buccal aspect were noticed in 36% of the preparations, 54% demonstrated overpreparation with a tendency to overprepare the teeth on the mesiodistal plane more than buccolingual plane. Twenty percent of samples presented a shoulder finish line while a chamfer margin design was noticed in 39%. Twenty-nine percent and 12% of samples had either a feathered or no clear margin design respectively. Incisal under preparation was observed in 18% of dies of each type. Only 17% of all preparations were found to follow the recommended anatomical labial preparations while 29% of the RBC preparations were found to have the recommended axial convergence angle. In total, 43% of preparations were found to have the recommended depth of the finish line. Conclusions It was found that relevant guidelines for RBC preparations were not being fully adhered to in private practice in Jordan. PMID:21710098

AL-DWAIRI, Ziad Nawaf; AL-HIYASAT, Ahmad Saleh; ABOUD, Haitham

2011-01-01

323

Screening for anxiety symptoms and social desirability in children and adolescents living with chronic illnesses in Jordan.  

PubMed

This research aims to investigate the rate and nature of anxiety symptoms in a group of children and adolescents living with chronic illnesses in Jordan, and their relation to social desirability in a cultural sample not previously researched. Using the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (R-CMAS), anxiety and social desirability data were obtained from 114 children diagnosed with chronic illnesses and 162 healthy control participants. Based on children's self-report, participants were categorized according to their adaptive style paradigm as either high anxious, low anxious, or repressor. It was proposed that children who score high on social desirability and low on anxiety are repressors. The prevalence of these categories was compared across the two groups. Anxiety was reported in 9.64 percent of the chronic illnesses and 12.34 percent of the healthy peers. Using the data obtained in the present study, the rate and nature of anxiety in children with chronic illnesses were lower for children in Jordan when compared to previous studies. However, social desirability values were similar to those established in Western societies suggesting a significantly higher percentage of children identified as repressors in children with long-term illnesses. These results supported the hypothesis regarding the relationship between social desirability and expressed anxiety symptoms. PMID:23242812

Arabiat, Diana H; Al Jabery, Mohammad; Wardam, Lina

2012-12-12

324

Alternative and antioxidant therapies used by a sample of infertile males in Jordan: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used in the Middle East, especially to treat chronic diseases such as infertility. We aimed to examine the prevalence, characteristics, and determinants of CAM use, particularly herbs and antioxidant therapies, among infertile males presenting for infertility evaluation in Jordan. Methods Demographic information, use of alternative and antioxidant therapies for infertility treatment, and patients’ belief in efficacy and safety of the therapies used were collected using a face-to-face questionnaire. Data were collected from 428 infertile male patients presenting at infertility clinics in Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The study was conducted between April 2013 and September 2013. Results Of the 428 men who completed the questionnaire, 184 (43%) used at least one of the alternative and antioxidant therapies specified in the questionnaire. Nutritional regime; vitamins, such as vitamins C and E; and medicinal herbs, such as ginger, saw palmetto, and ginseng were the most commonly used therapies reported. A correlation between the use of alternative and antioxidant therapies versus infertility duration was found. Additionally, the majority of males using CAM did not inform their health care providers about their usage. Conclusions The high prevalence of CAM use among infertile male patients underscores the urge to assimilate CAM into the education and training of health professionals, as well as to improve infertile patients’ knowledge of the safe use of CAM modalities. PMID:25026980

2014-01-01

325

Jordan-Schwinger map, 3D harmonic oscillator constants of motion, and classical and quantum parameters characterizing electromagnetic wave polarization  

E-print Network

In this work we introduce a generalization of the Jauch and Rohrlich quantum Stokes operators when the arrival direction from the source is unknown {\\it a priori}. We define the generalized Stokes operators as the Jordan-Schwinger map of a triplet of harmonic oscillators with the Gell-Mann and Ne'eman SU(3) symmetry group matrices. We show that the elements of the Jordan-Schwinger map are the constants of motion of the three-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator. Also, we show that generalized Stokes Operators together with the Gell-Mann and Ne'eman matrices may be used to expand the polarization density matrix. By taking the expectation value of the Stokes operators in a three-mode coherent state of the electromagnetic field, we obtain the corresponding generalized classical Stokes parameters. Finally, by means of the constants of motion of the classical three-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator we describe the geometric properties of the polarization ellipse

R. D. Mota; M. A. Xicotencatl; V. D. Granados

2008-01-30

326

Chemical characteristics of rainwater collected at a western site of Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comprehensive study on the chemical composition of rainwater was carried out from October 2006 to May 2007 in Ghore El-Safi area western side of Jordan nearby the Dead Sea. Rainwater samples were analyzed for major ions (Ca 2+, Mg 2+, K +, Na +, NH 4+, HCO 3-, Cl -, NO 3- and SO 42-) and trace metals (Fe, Al, Zn, Pb, Cu, and Cd). The highest concentration of elements is observed at the beginning of the rainfall season when large amounts of dust accumulated in the atmosphere scavenged by rain. The majority of rainwater had a neutral or alkaline character as a result of neutralization caused by the alkaline local dusts which contain large amount of CaCO 3. The pH ranged from 4.8 to 8.2 with a mean value of 6.9 ± 0.65 which was in alkaline range considering 5.6 as the neutral pH of cloud water with atmospheric CO 2 equilibrium. In the total 35 rain events, only three events were observed in acidic range (< 5.6) which occurred after continuous rains. The equivalent concentration of components followed the order: Ca 2+ > HCO 3- > Cl - > Mg 2+ > NO 3- > SO 42- > NH 4+ > Na + > K +. Rainwater chemistry was analyzed using Factor Component Analysis to find the possible sources of the measured species. Three components that accounted for 84% of the total variance were extracted sea salts spray (Na+, Cl - and Mg 2+), and soil particles (natural origin), (Mg 2+, Ca 2+ and HCO 3-) and biomass burning (NH 4+). The results obtained in this study are compared with those other studies conducted at different sites in the world. In general, the results of this study suggested that rainwater chemistry is strongly influenced by local anthropogenic sources (potash factory and agricultural activities in Ghore El-Safi area) rather than natural and marine sources. The pollutants in rainwater samples were mainly derived from long distance transport, local industry and traffic sources.

Al-Khashman, Omar Ali.

2009-01-01

327

Anatomy of landslides along the Dead Sea Transform Fault System in NW Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the mountainous region north of Amman, Jordan, Cenomanian calcareous rocks are being monitored constantly for their mass wasting processes which occasionally cause severe damage to the Amman-Irbid Highway. Satellite remote sensing data (Landsat TM, ASTER, and SRTM) and ground measurements are applied to investigate the anatomy of landslides along the Dead Sea Transform Fault System (DSTFS), a prominent strike-slip fault. The joints and faults pertinent to the DSTFS match the architectural elements identified in landslides of different size. This similarity attests to a close genetic relation between the tectonic setting of one of the most prominent fault zones on the earth and modern geomorphologic processes. Six indicators stand out in particular: 1) The fractures developing in N-S and splay faults represent the N-S lateral movement of the DSTFS. They governed the position of the landslides. 2) Cracks and faults aligned in NE-SW to NNW-SSW were caused by compressional strength. They were subsequently reactivated during extensional processes and used in some cases as slip planes during mass wasting. 3) Minor landslides with NE-SW straight scarps were derived from compressional features which were turned into slip planes during the incipient stages of mass wasting. They occur mainly along the slopes in small wadis or where a wide wadi narrows upstream. 4) Major landslides with curved instead of straight scarps and rotational slides are representative of a more advanced level of mass wasting. These areas have to be marked in the maps and during land management projects as high-risk area mainly and may be encountered in large wadis with steep slopes or longitudinal slopes undercut by road construction works. 5) The spatial relation between minor faults and slope angle is crucial as to the vulnerability of the areas in terms of mass wasting. 6) Springs lined up along faults cause serious problems to engineering geology in that they step up the behavior of marly interbeds to accelerate sliding during mass wasting. The most vulnerable areas prone to slope instabilities are those with compressional tectonics followed by extensional movements, with fault bound springs and smectite-bearing marly layers interbedded with pure massive limestones. The semi-arid to arid climate with periodic rainfalls combined with subsurface water circulation along the joints and faults can trigger mass wasting.

Dill, H. G.; Hahne, K.; Shaqour, F.

2012-03-01

328

Application of geoelectrical methods in the DS sinkhole problem, Israel and Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a new approach to use the geoelectric methods for studying the both uppermost part of section and salt layer conditions in the sinkhole development sites. The Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is used here to detect shallow deformations in subsurface sediments. Resistivity prospecting yields information about both lateral and vertical distribution of resistivity through the geological section and can therefore be used in both qualitative and quantitative ways for the identification of structure and features at shallow depths. As it follows from the modified Archie's Law, resistivity of the unsaturated sediments is determined by their porosity. The higher the porosity, the higher is the resistivity. It will also depend on volume of the electrolyte in pores and resistivity of the fluid . Note that after mechanical models available the higher porosity in sinkhole development sites is caused by the void presence at depth. 2D and 3D mapping was carried out in the Mineral Beach area in Israel and in the Ghor Al-Haditha site in Jordan. ERT method shown high resistivity anomaly of some thousands Ohm-m located along the salt edge. The Transient Electromagnetic Method (TEM) also referred to as the Time Domain Electromagnetic Method (TDEM) is sensitive to the bulk resistivity (conductivity) of the studied medium, especially in the low-resistivity range. Transient Electromagnetic (TEM) method in its FAST modification was used for studying the salt layer conditions (salt porosity, depth of the salt top and thickness of the salt layer) and distribution of bulk resistivity in vicinity of the salt border (to resolve the problem of water salinity). The methodology includes numerous measurements through the sinkhole development areas. Earlier the TEM method was used extensively worldwide for locating the fresh-saline water interface in coastal areas and for estimating groundwater salinity. In our study we have mapped salt layer geometrical parameters (e.g. depth to salt top, salt layer thickness) as well as salt resistivity that is measure of salt porosity. New methodology permits also 2D and 3D presentation of the acquired results in spite methodology itself of the data acquisition is of 1D in its origin. Acknowledgements This study has been supported by the USAID MERC Program M27-050

Levi, E.; Abueladas, A.-R.; Al-Zoubi, A.; Akkawi, E.; Ezersky, M.

2012-04-01

329

Plasma Levels of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone and Cortisol in People Living in an Environment Below Sea Level (Jordan Valley) during Fasting in the Month of Ramadan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To investigate the effects of Ramdan fasting on plasma levels of ACTH and cortisol in athletic students living in the Jordan Valley (JV) and compare them to those living at above sea level in Ramtha City (RC). Methods: Sample collection and measurements were done in November 1998 from non-fasting and in December 1998 from fasting people. Results: ACTH levels

Fayig El-Migdadi; Zeyad El-Akawi; Rola Abudheese; Nabil Bashir

2002-01-01

330

Seasonal variation in essential oil yield and composition from Thymus vulgaris L. during different growth stages in the south of Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of plant space and time of harvesting on yield and quality of Thymus vulgaris was evaluated in Jordan. Thyme was cultivated in rows of 50?cm apart with inter-row spacing of 15, 30 or 45?cm and was grown at various development stages. Plants were harvested during different growth stages including vegetation, beginning of blooming, full blooming and fruit maturation.

Mohammad S. Abu-Darwish; Muhammad H. Alu’datt; Abdel Rahman Al-Tawaha; Khalil Ereifej; Ali Almajwal; Nidal Odat; Wesam Al Khateeb

2011-01-01

331

Seasonal variation in essential oil yield and composition from Thymus vulgaris L. during different growth stages in the south of Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of plant space and time of harvesting on yield and quality of Thymus vulgaris was evaluated in Jordan. Thyme was cultivated in rows of 50?cm apart with inter-row spacing of 15, 30 or 45?cm and was grown at various development stages. Plants were harvested during different growth stages including vegetation, beginning of blooming, full blooming and fruit maturation.

Mohammad S. Abu-Darwish; Muhammad H. Alu’datt; Abdel Rahman Al-Tawaha; Khalil Ereifej; Ali Almajwal; Nidal Odat; Wesam Al Khateeb

2012-01-01

332

The in vitro effect of six antimicrobials against Mycoplasma putrefaciens , Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum isolated from sheep and goats in jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Respiratory disease in sheep and goats is a major problem in Jordan and is often associated with Mycoplasma species. Without effective vaccines, control is mainly by chemotherapy, but the uncontrolled use of antimicrobials has led\\u000a to concerns about the potential development of antimicrobial resistance. The in vitro effect of chloramphenicol, florfenicol, enrofloxacin, tylosin, erythromycin and oxytetracycline was determined against 32

W. Al-Momani; E. Abu-Basha; R. D. Ayling; R. A. J. Nicholas; S. Janakat

2006-01-01

333

Evidence for ground-rupturing earthquakes on the Northern Wadi Araba fault at the archaeological site of Qasr Tilah, Dead Sea Transform fault system, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The archaeological site of Qasr Tilah, in the Wadi Araba, Jordan is located on the northern Wadi Araba fault segment of the Dead Sea Transform. The site contains a Roman-period fort, a late Byzantine Early Umayyad birkeh (water reservoir) and aqueduct, and agricultural fields. The birkeh and aqueduct are left-laterally offset by coseismic slip across the northern Wadi Araba fault.

Jeremy M. Haynes; Tina M. Niemi; Mohammad Atallah

2006-01-01

334

A Free Energy Model for Thinfilm Shape Memory Alloys Jordan E. Massad *1 , Ralph C. Smith 1 and Greg P. Carman 2  

E-print Network

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Dept., UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 ABSTRACT Thin­film shape memory alloysA Free Energy Model for Thin­film Shape Memory Alloys Jordan E. Massad *1 , Ralph C. Smith 1 comparison with thin­film NiTi superelastic hysteresis data. Keywords: Shape memory alloy model; thin film

335

Beliefs about Chemistry Teaching and Learning--A Comparison of Teachers' and Student Teachers' Beliefs from Jordan, Turkey and Germany  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses beliefs about teaching and learning chemistry. The sample includes chemistry student teachers and in-service teachers from Jordan, Turkey, and Germany. Two test instruments were used to investigate (student) teachers' beliefs. A qualitative instrument was used to explore Beliefs about Classroom Organization, Beliefs about…

Al-Amoush, Siham; Markic, Silvija; Usak, Muhammet; Erdogan, Mehmet; Eilks, Ingo

2014-01-01

336

Quantifying sand storage capacity of large woody debris on beaches using LiDAR Jordan B.R. Eamer, Ian J. Walker  

E-print Network

Quantifying sand storage capacity of large woody debris on beaches using LiDAR Jordan B.R. Eamer December 2009 Accepted 7 December 2009 Available online 16 December 2009 Keywords: Large woody debris (LWD. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The sedimentological role of large woody debris

337

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Adrian Lee, Christan Hajen, Fangqing Chen, Jonathan Wong, Jordan Miller, Linus Yau  

E-print Network

Hajen, Fangqing Chen, Jonathan Wong, Jordan Miller, Linus Yau Re-envisioning the UBC Botanical Garden-envisioning the UBC Botanical Garden, as part of the CIVL 445 course deliverables. The purpose of this report is to present a conceptual design for redeveloping the UBC Botanical Garden with a justification and in

338

Burials from Wadi Mudayfa'at and Wadi Abu Khasharif, Southern Jordan - Results of a Survey and Salvage Excavations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the preliminary results of a survey and excavation conducted in 2006 on small cemeteries at Wadi Mudayfa'at and Wadi Abu Khasharif, which are located c. 30 km southeast of the village of al-Hussayniah on the Desert Highway in southern Jordan. In total five graves were excavated. Preservation was excellent including human and other organic materials (hair, leather, textiles). Preliminary scientific dating points to the period between the second and fourth centuries AD. The research questions discussed are: - the date, the relationship between the cemeteries and surrounding sites, the significance of this area, the identity of the groups buried, the burial techniques and practices adopted and what influenced them and the funerary gifts included with the dead.

Salameen, Zeyad al; Falahat, Hani

339

Structural geometry and evolution of the Dead Sea-Jordan rift system as deduced from new subsurface data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analysis of deep drilling data and seismic reflection surveys obtained in recent years permit establishment of a tectonic model of the Dead Sea-Jordan rift system that is in part conformable with some of the many, often controversial, theories on this subject, but which also introduces new information negating some concepts that are widely accepted in the literature. The Dead Sea-Jordan rift system is not a tensional graben between two parallel sets of faults, but instead can be best defined as a sinistral transform connecting an incipient oceanic ridge—the Red Sea—with an upthrusted collision zone, the Taurus range. The shear is caused by the opening of the Red Sea and the motion of the Arabian sub-plate away from the African plate. The shearing occurs along a largely south-north trending, slightly arcuate Une, consisting of a series of en echelon left-stepping left-lateral strike-slip master faults of varying lengths. These faults characteristically die out to the north by bending outward (northeast), and the movement is taken up by the strike-slip faults to the left (i.e. to the west). Where overlap of the two faults occurs, very narrow and very deep grabens have evolved, in places the width being equal to the depth. The narrowness of these grabens is dictated by the closeness of the overlapping segments of the successive strike-slip faults. This feature points to the probability that the en echelon strike-slip faults have a common root zone at great depth. These grabens are not typical "leaky" pull-aparts in that they have no gravimetric, magnetic or heat flow anomalies; nor are they closed on all four sides by large faults. Their northern ends are characterized by gradually rising graben floors without major diagonal cross faults. The Dead Sea-Jordan rift system sensu stricto extends over a distance of 420 km, from the northern shore of the Gulf of Elat to the northern margin of the Hula Valley. Southward, it is connected with the Red Sea along the Gulf of Elat transition zone, which has elements of strike-slip as well as tensional opening. A northern transition zone exists between the Hula Valley and the Taurus arc where diminishing strike-slip movement is compensated by several underthrust belts. The time of the beginning of the movement along the rift can be established as pre-middle Miocene, because mid-Miocene sediments overlie an Upper Cretaceous graben floor. Rifting has continued intermittently to the present. Volcanism in the northern fifth of the rift is genetically associated with the seismically active, tensional Golan-Hauran-Jebel Drouz-Wadi Sirhan tectonic trend, which has a north west-southeast orientation and not with the north-south trending Dead Sea-Jordan rift.

Kashai, E. L.; Croker, P. F.

1987-09-01

340

Programmable unknown quantum-state discriminators with multiple copies of program and data: A Jordan basis approach  

E-print Network

The discrimination of any pair of unknown quantum states is performed by devices processing three parts of inputs: copies of the pair of unknown states we want to discriminate are respectively stored in two program systems and copies of data, which is guaranteed to be one of the unknown states, in a third system. We study the efficiency of such programmable devices with the inputs prepared with $n$ and $m$ copies of unknown qubits used as programs and data, respectively. By finding a symmetry in the average inputs, we apply the Jordan basis method to derive their optimal unambiguous discrimination and the minimum-error discrimination schemes. The dependence of the optimal solutions on the a prior probabilities of the mean input states is also demonstrated.

Bing He; János A. Bergou

2006-10-26

341

Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered 3D tissues Jordan S. Miller, Kelly R. Stevens, Michael T. Yang, Brendon M. Baker, Duc-Huy T. Nguyen,  

E-print Network

Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered 3D tissues Jordan S. Miller with isoflorane and the portal vein was cannulated. The liver was perfused and digested 1 Rapid casting

Bhatia, Sangeeta

342

Irrigation and water scarcity in the Zerqa Triangle, Jordan or why archaeology is relevant for understanding current practices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scarcity of water resources for development is a recurrent and important issue, and has been for thousands of years. Based on the case of the Jordan Valley, this contribution will argue that our understanding of current issues can be improved by studying ancient contexts. At the same time, archeology can benefit from analysis and models applied in the engineering domain. In the Zerqa triangle in the Jordan Valley, irrigation would have been an important instrument to deal with the arid climate and its associated uncertainties concerning rainfall for societies in different periods. Before irrigation modernization efforts were started in the 1960's, the people of the Zerqa area used the known ethnohistorical irrigation system, which dates back to the Mamluk period. This system consisted of a number of sub-systems tapping water from the Zerqa river and transporting water to the fields through open canals under gravity. The settlement pattern of the Iron Age points to an irrigation system of similar type being in use during this period. The location of Early Bronze Age settlements along natural watercourses suggests that a form of flood irrigation was practiced, without a dedicated canal system. Each of these settings will have had its specific uncertainties in terms of water availability to deal with, which will be discussed. In other words, each setting provided specific materially structuring conditions for societies to develop responses in terms of agriculture, institutions and power relations. This contribution discusses these uncertainties and responses for the different periods. In the discussion, insights from both archaeology and irrigation engineering will be integrated.

Ertsen, M. W.; Kaptijn, E.

2009-04-01

343

External mill monitoring of wheat flour fortification programs: an approach for program managers using experiences from Jordan.  

PubMed

The fortification of wheat flour with micronutrients is a common strategy to increase vitamin and mineral intake. While wheat flour mills are often inspected by agencies affiliated with national ministries to ensure compliance with national fortification standards, few countries use data derived from these inspections to construct an external monitoring system for use in program management and evaluation. The primary objective of this paper is to assess the performance of the external monitoring system utilized in Jordan according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Updated Guidelines for Evaluating Public Health Surveillance Systems. A secondary objective is to present mill monitoring results from 2009 to 2010 in order to demonstrate the data generated by the system. The review concludes that the data required for the system is representative, simple to collect, and can be collected in a flexible manner. The external monitoring system is acceptable to participating agencies and millers and is stable due to mandatory fortification legislation which provides the legal framework for external monitoring. Data on production of fortified flour and utilization of premix can be provided in a timely manner, but on-site mill monitoring and flour sample collection are more challenging due to resource constraints. The frequent collection of a small number of indicators can provide fortification program managers with timely information with which to base decisions. Jordan's external monitoring system successfully documented the performance of each mill and the entire flour fortification program, and can serve as a model for other national fortification programs considering external monitoring approaches. PMID:24284616

Wirth, James P; Nichols, Erin; Mas'd, Hanan; Barham, Rawhieh; Johnson, Quentin W; Serdula, Mary

2013-11-01

344

Using environmental isotopes in the study of the recharge-discharge mechanisms of the Yarmouk catchment area in Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recharge sources, the flow mechanisms and discharge areas of the different groundwater bodies underlying the Yarmouk River catchment area in Jordan, have, until now, not been adequately explained, although a wide range of hydrological, hydrogeological, and hydrochemical studies have been done. Along the Jordanian part of the catchment area of the Yarmouk River, groundwater issues from different aquifers with a variety of chemistries and types within the same aquifer and in between the different aquifers. Conventional recharge/discharge mechanisms, water balances and chemical analyses did not adequately explain the chemical variations and the different water types found in the area. Applying environmental isotopic tools combined with their altitude effects due to topographic variations (250-1,300 m a.s.l. within a distance of 20 km), and taking into consideration re-evaporation effects on the isotopic depletion and enrichment of rainwater, has greatly helped in understanding the recharge discharge mechanisms of the different aquifers. Precipitation along the highlands of an average of 600 mm/year is found to be depleted in its isotopic content of ?O18 = -7.0 to -7.26 and ?D = -32.2 to -33.28, whereas that of the Jordan Valley of 350 mm/year is highly enriched in isotopes with ?O18 = -4.06 and ?D = -14.5. The groundwater recharged along the highlands is depleted in isotopes (?O18 = -6, ?D = -30), groundwater at the intermediate elevations is enriched (?O18 = -5, ?D = -23) and that of the Jordan Valley aquifers containing meteoric water is highly enriched (?O18 -3.8, ?D = -18). The deep aquifers in the Jordan Valley foothills are depleted in isotopes (?O18 -18 = -6, ?D = -30) and resemble those of the highland aquifers. Only through using isotopes as a tool, were the sources of the different groundwater bodies and recharge and discharge mechanisms unambiguously explained. It was found that recharge takes place all over the study area and produces groundwater, which, from the highlands towards the Jordan Valley, shows increasing enrichment in isotopes. The highlands aquifer, with its groundwater depleted in isotopes, becomes confined towards the Jordan Valley; and, due to its confining pressure, leaks water upwards into the overlying aquifers causing their water to become less enriched in isotopes. Water depleted in its isotopic composition also seeps upward to the ground surface at the mountain foothills through faults and fissures. Les zones de recharge, les mécanismes d'écoulement et les zones de décharges des différentes masses d'eau souterraine sous le bassin versant de la rivière Yarmouk en Jordanie, étaient expliquées de manière ambiguë par les seuls outils isotopiques. Le long de la parti Jordanienne du bassin versant de la rivière Yarmouk l'eau souterraine provient de différents aquifères et se distinguent par leur type et leur composition chimique, selon que l'eau provient du même ou des différents aquifères. Les mécanismes conventionnels de recharge et de décharge, bilan hydrologique ne donnaient pas d'explications satisfaisantes concernant les variations chimiques et les différents types d'eau. En appliquant les isotopes environnementaux combinés aux effets de l'altitude sur les variations des teneurs isotopiques (l'altitude varie de 250 à 1,300 m sur une distance de 20 km.) et en prenant en considération les effets de ré-évaporation sur l'appauvrissement et l'enrichissement isotopique des eaux pluviales ont fortement contribués à une meilleure compréhension des mécanismes de recharge des différents aquifères. Les précipitations annuelles sont comprises entre 600 mm dans les zones en altitude et 350 mm dans la vallée de la Jordanie. Les écoulements de l'eau souterraine sont dirigés des zones en altitude vers la vallée de la Jordanie. Les eaux souterraines des zones en altitude sont isotopiquement appauvries (?O18 = -6, ?D = -30), les eaux souterraines des zones de moyenne altitude sont enrichies (?O18 = -5, ?D = -23) et les eaux de la vallée très enrichies (

Salameh, Elias

345

Structural control of groundwater flow regimes and groundwater chemistry along the lower reaches of the Zerka River, West Jordan, using remote sensing, GIS, and field methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hydrogeological study was completed within a sub-catchment of the Zerka River drainage basin, in western Jordan. The system\\u000a is characterized by anticlinal bending with an axis trending SSW–NNE and plunging a few degrees in the SSW direction. The\\u000a anticlinal structure diverts groundwater flow towards the SSW while the strike-slipe faults cause the groundwater to diverge\\u000a where the fault is

Taleb Odeh; Elias Salameh; Mario Schirmer; Gerhard Strauch

2009-01-01

346

Assessment of Fe, Zn, Cd, Hg, and Pb in the Jordan and Yarmouk River Sediments in Relation to Their Physicochemical Properties and Sequential Extraction Characterization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-six surface sediment samples taken along the beds of boththe Jordan and Yarmouk Rivers were analysed for Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe andHg by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Extraction techniqueswere used to establish the association of the total concentrations of Pb, Cd, Zn and Fe in the sediment samples withtheir contents in the exchangeable, carbonate, Fe\\/Mn oxides, organic and residual fractions.In the

F. M. Howari; K. M. Banat

2001-01-01

347

NCTS Colloquium: Jordan Theory and Analysis 2010 9:30-10:15am W Kaup I Shestakov W Kaup I Shestakov M Neal  

E-print Network

Shestakov W Kaup I Shestakov M Neal Chair I Shestakov G Roos I Shestakov G Roos CH Chu Tea/coffee/snacks 10 Chu TK Lee Chair JS Chen TK Lee M Neal PH Lee Tea/coffee/snacks 4:00-4:45 CH Chu CH Chu PY Wu Chair M) Applications of Jordan theory in analysis and geometry, 1/4 (page 6) tea/coffee/snacks 10:30 ­ 11:15 Jein

Wong, Ngai-Ching

348

Evidence for ground-rupturing earthquakes on the Northern Wadi Araba fault at the archaeological site of Qasr Tilah, Dead Sea Transform fault system, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The archaeological site of Qasr Tilah, in the Wadi Araba, Jordan is located on the northern Wadi Araba fault segment of the Dead Sea Transform. The site contains a Roman-period fort, a late Byzantine–Early Umayyad birkeh (water reservoir) and aqueduct, and agricultural fields. The birkeh and aqueduct are left-laterally offset by coseismic slip across the northern Wadi Araba fault. Using

Jeremy M. Haynes; Tina M. Niemi; Mohammad Atallah

2006-01-01

349

Essential oil composition of the aerial parts of fresh and air-dried Salvia palaestina Benth. (Lamiaceae) growing wild in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The composition of the essential oil of fresh and air-dried Salvia palaestina Benth. (Lamiaceae) growing wild in Jordan has been studied using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. The essential oils of fresh and air-dried S. palaestina were mainly composed of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (52.66% and 65.98%, respectively). The major component detected in the oils of fresh and dry S. palaestina was germacrene

Hala I. Al-Jaber; Mahmoud A. Al-Qudah; Lina M. Barhoumi; Ismail F. Abaza; Fatma U. Afifi

2012-01-01

350

Essential oil composition of the aerial parts of fresh and air-dried Salvia palaestina Benth. (Lamiaceae) growing wild in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The composition of the essential oil of fresh and air-dried Salvia palaestina Benth. (Lamiaceae) growing wild in Jordan has been studied using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. The essential oils of fresh and air-dried S. palaestina were mainly composed of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (52.66% and 65.98%, respectively). The major component detected in the oils of fresh and dry S. palaestina was germacrene

Hala I. Al-Jaber; Mahmoud A. Al-Qudah; Lina M. Barhoumi; Ismail F. Abaza; Fatma U. Afifi

2011-01-01

351

Proliferation of Antibiotic-Producing Bacteria and Concomitant Antibiotic Production as the Basis for the Antibiotic Activity of Jordan's Red Soils?  

PubMed Central

Anecdotes, both historical and recent, recount the curing of skin infections, including diaper rash, by using red soils from the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Following inoculation of red soils isolated from geographically separate areas of Jordan, Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus were rapidly killed. Over the 3-week incubation period, the number of specific types of antibiotic-producing bacteria increased, and high antimicrobial activity (MIC, ?10 ?g/ml) was observed in methanol extracts of the inoculated red soils. Antibiotic-producing microorganisms whose numbers increased during incubation included actinomycetes, Lysobacter spp., and Bacillus spp. The actinomycetes produced actinomycin C2 and actinomycin C3. No myxobacteria or lytic bacteriophages with activity against either M. luteus or S. aureus were detected in either soil before or after inoculation and incubation. Although protozoa and amoebae were detected in the soils, the numbers were low and did not increase over the incubation period. These results suggest that the antibiotic activity of Jordan's red soils is due to the proliferation of antibiotic-producing bacteria. PMID:19286796

Falkinham, Joseph O.; Wall, Thomas E.; Tanner, Justin R.; Tawaha, Khaled; Alali, Feras Q.; Li, Chen; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

2009-01-01

352

Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns in Outpatient Emergency Clinics at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children's Hospital, Jordan, 2013  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate antibiotics prescribing patterns in the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children’s Hospital at Royal Medical Services in Amman, Jordan. Methods The data was collected from the emergency pharmacy over the period of a -five consecutive months. The methodology recommended by the World Health Organization for investigating drug use in a health facility was followed. The study measures the percentage of encounter with a prescribed antibiotic and the percentage share of each antibiotic category. The distribution of diagnostic categories that accounted for all antibiotics being prescribed and the distribution of each antibiotic being prescribed for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) were also measured. Results Antibiotic prescribing was frequent during pediatric visits to the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic resulting in a high percentage of encounters (85%) when compared to appropriate. Emergency physicians continue to frequently prescribe broad spectrum antibiotics which accounted for approximately (60%) of the total prescribed antibiotics and (83%) of prescribed antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections and macrolides (primarily azithromycin) were the leading class among them. Conclusion Our results showed high consumption of antibiotics by emergency department pediatricians which highlight the importance for interventions to promote rational and judicious prescribing. An insight into factors influencing antibiotics prescribing patterns by military prescribers is required. PMID:25170404

Al-Niemat, Sahar I.; Aljbouri, Tareq M.; Goussous, Lana S.; Efaishat, Rania A.; Salah, Rehab K.

2014-01-01

353

Cancer in refugees in Jordan and Syria between 2009 and 2012: challenges and the way forward in humanitarian emergencies.  

PubMed

Treatment of non-communicable diseases such as cancer in refugees is neglected in low-income and middle-income countries, but is of increasing importance because the number of refugees is growing. The UNHCR, through exceptional care committees (ECCs), has developed standard operating procedures to address expensive medical treatment for refugees in host countries, to decide on eligibility and amount of payment. We present data from funding applications for cancer treatments for refugees in Jordan between 2010 and 2012, and in Syria between 2009 and 2011. Cancer in refugees causes a substantial burden on the health systems of the host countries. Recommendations to improve prevention and treatment include improvement of health systems through standard operating procedures and innovative financing schemes, balance of primary and emergency care with expensive referral care, development of electronic cancer registries, and securement of sustainable funding sources. Analysis of cancer care in low-income refugee settings, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, is needed to inform future responses. PMID:24872112

Spiegel, Paul; Khalifa, Adam; Mateen, Farrah J

2014-06-01

354

Ephedra alte (Joint Pine): An Invasive, Problematic Weedy Species in Forestry and Fruit Tree Orchards in Jordan  

PubMed Central

A field survey was carried out to record plant species climbed by Ephedra alte in certain parts of Jordan during 2008–2010. Forty species of shrubs, ornamental, fruit, and forest trees belonging to 24 plant families suffered from the climbing habit of E. alte. Growth of host plants was adversely affected by E. alte growth that extended over their vegetation. In addition to its possible competition for water and nutrients, the extensive growth it forms over host species prevents photosynthesis, smothers growth and makes plants die underneath the extensive cover. However, E. alte did not climb all plant species, indicating a host preference range. Damaged fruit trees included Amygdalus communis, Citrus aurantifolia, Ficus carica, Olea europaea, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Punica granatum. Forestry species that were adversely affected included Acacia cyanophylla, Ceratonia siliqua, Crataegus azarolus, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia palaestina, Quercus coccifera, Quercus infectoria, Retama raetam, Rhamnus palaestina, Rhus tripartita, and Zizyphus spina-christi. Woody ornamentals attacked were Ailanthus altissima, Hedera helix, Jasminum fruticans, Jasminum grandiflorum, Nerium oleander, and Pyracantha coccinea. Results indicated that E. alte is a strong competitive for light and can completely smother plants supporting its growth. A. communis, F. carica, R. palaestina, and C. azarolus were most frequently attacked. PMID:22645486

Qasem, Jamal R.

2012-01-01

355

Salt karst and tectonics: sinkholes development along tension cracks between parallel strike-slip faults, Dead Sea, Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work deals with the tectonic interpretation of an alignment of more than 300 sinkholes stretching along the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea, Ghor Al Haditha area. Its dimensions are six kilometers long and six hundred meters width. Sinkholes appeared during the last decades as a consequence of the very rapid lake level lowering. The linear shape was inferred from ground collapses inventories carried out between 1991 and 2008. The lineament is replaced and analyzed in its structural setting at regional and local scales. Its direction (N 24 E) is sub-parallel to the ones displayed by many focal mechanisms, especially the one associated to the 23rd April 1979 earthquake (Mb = 5.1; N 20 E +- 5 deg), which is representative of all focal mechanisms calculated on a fault plane compatible with the direction of the Jordan - Dead Sea Transform fault system for the east coast of the Dead Sea. The alignment of sinkholes is constituted by thirteen minor linear segments separated by so many empty spaces. Their geometric organization suggests the existence of a rotational effect caused by stress between two parallel strike-slip faults. Four minor linear units present an en-echelon arrangement from which one can deduce the presence of a local extensional stress field. In this context, sinkholes locations provide information of subsurface discontinuities interpreted as hidden fractures. In a close future, such results could support the work of engineers in the development of new tourist resorts.

Closson, Dr; Eng Abou Karaki, Dr

2009-04-01

356

Cleaning Strategies Of Pottery Objects Excavated From Khirbet Edh-Dharih And Hayyan Al-Mushref, Jordan: Four Case Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Any cleaning process for pottery objects has to consider not only the effectiveness of the treatment but also the potential damage for the art object. Cleaning is one of the most common of the treatment processes used on pottery conservation. A variety of mechanical and chemical methods is currently used in restoration practice. Unfortunately, pottery objects are subjected to various deterioration factors, starting in manufacturing process and passing through burial and excavation stages. This study aims to present and explain an application of already established cleaning methods to four pottery pots excavated from the archaeological sites of Khirbet edh-Dharih and Hayyan al-Mushref in Jordan. It also tackles the decision making problems about which methods should be applied to which pots, according to the conservation state and the technological features. Addition to the visual examination, SEM was used to investigate the surface morphology of each object. XRD was used to determine accurately the mineralogical composition of pottery objects as well as the different kinds of dirt which deposited on their surfaces. It could be concluded that the selected pottery objects were very dirty and covered with dust, soil particles, soot and calcareous crusts. The selected pottery objects were cleaned using refiring, mechanical, wet and chemical cleaning methods according to the type of dirt and nature of each object. Finally, objects were consolidated and strengthened to ensure their safety in the condition of storage or display, and to prevent them against the various environmental conditions.

Abd-Allah, R.; al-Muheisen, Z.; al-Howadi, S.

357

Molecular and isotopic insights into particulate organic carbon sources and dynamics in Jordan Basin, Gulf of Maine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The carbon isotope and lipid biomarker composition of suspended particles and surface sediment was measured to examine the impact of sediment supply, redistribution and post-depositional alteration processes on organic matter cycling in the Gulf of Maine, a semi-enclosed shelf sea in the northwest Atlantic. A beam attenuation profile revealed a >50 m-thick benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) in the Jordan Basin at the time of sampling (April 2006). The relatively low radiocarbon content of suspended particulate organic carbon (POC) in the BNL indicates that up to 82% of the POC in this layer was supplied from resuspension of sediment. The concentration of alkenones normalized to POC increased with increasing depth in the water column and was highest in the surface sediment. In contrast to these markers of surface ocean photoautotrophy, the vertical profiles for the concentration and composition of short-chain (C14-C18) n-alkanoic acids provided evidence for enhanced heterotrophic processes near the top of the BNL. Suspended POC samples from two depths within the BNL exhibited marked differences in radiocarbon content and fatty acid composition, suggesting that biological activity and associated processes within the BNL are vertically heterogeneous.

Hwang, Jeomshik; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Pilskaln, Cynthia H.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

2013-10-01

358

A 12-case outbreak of pharyngeal plague following the consumption of camel meat, in north-eastern Jordan.  

PubMed

Between late January and early February 1997, an outbreak of plague, associated with cervical lymphadenopathy and fever, occurred in the Jordanian village of Azraq ad-Druze, which lies about 50 km west of the border with Saudi Arabia. The 12 cases who presented at hospital were initially assumed to have tularaemia, and all were successfully treated with gentamicin. When, however, their sera were tested for evidence of Yersinia pestis or Francisella tularensis infection (using haemagglutination, enzyme immuno-assays for specific IgM or the F1 antigen of Y. pestis, and micro-agglutination tests), all 12 were found to have anti-Y. pestis IgM. Three dogs shot near the Saudi Arabian border were also found seropositive for antibodies against Y. pestis. Eleven of the 12 patients reported that, 2-4 days before their symptoms appeared, they had eaten the meat cut from the carcass of the same camel, either raw (10 cases) or cooked (one case). All 12 patients were diagnosed as cases of pharyngeal plague (the first cases of plague reported in Jordan for more than 80 years), caused by Y. pestis that most had acquired when they ate raw meat from a camel that was infected with the pathogen. PMID:16297292

Arbaji, A; Kharabsheh, S; Al-Azab, S; Al-Kayed, M; Amr, Z S; Abu Baker, M; Chu, M C

2005-12-01

359

Ephedra alte (joint pine): an invasive, problematic weedy species in forestry and fruit tree orchards in Jordan.  

PubMed

A field survey was carried out to record plant species climbed by Ephedra alte in certain parts of Jordan during 2008-2010. Forty species of shrubs, ornamental, fruit, and forest trees belonging to 24 plant families suffered from the climbing habit of E. alte. Growth of host plants was adversely affected by E. alte growth that extended over their vegetation. In addition to its possible competition for water and nutrients, the extensive growth it forms over host species prevents photosynthesis, smothers growth and makes plants die underneath the extensive cover. However, E. alte did not climb all plant species, indicating a host preference range. Damaged fruit trees included Amygdalus communis, Citrus aurantifolia, Ficus carica, Olea europaea, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Punica granatum. Forestry species that were adversely affected included Acacia cyanophylla, Ceratonia siliqua, Crataegus azarolus, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia palaestina, Quercus coccifera, Quercus infectoria, Retama raetam, Rhamnus palaestina, Rhus tripartita, and Zizyphus spina-christi. Woody ornamentals attacked were Ailanthus altissima, Hedera helix, Jasminum fruticans, Jasminum grandiflorum, Nerium oleander, and Pyracantha coccinea. Results indicated that E. alte is a strong competitive for light and can completely smother plants supporting its growth. A. communis, F. carica, R. palaestina, and C. azarolus were most frequently attacked. PMID:22645486

Qasem, Jamal R

2012-01-01

360

Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior in Avoiding Secondhand Smoke Exposure Among Non-Smoking Employed Women with Higher Education in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is a serious public health threat worldwide; in the developing world there are less serious efforts towards controlling women’s and children’s exposure to SHS. Knowledge, attitudes and avoidance practices among Jordanian women have never been thoroughly studied. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and avoidance behavior towards SHS exposure among employed Jordanian women with higher education. Methods A survey was conducted among employed Jordanian women at two universities. A total of 209 women were included in the analysis. Two questionnaires regarding SHS exposure were used to measure knowledge, attitudes and avoidance practices. Results Most respondents were regularly exposed to SHS in various locations during daily life, even though they were very knowledgeable about the dangers of SHS exposure for women and children. However, the subject’s attitudes and avoidance behavior did not reflect the level of knowledge about SHS risks. The results suggests there is a large discrepancy between SHS exposure, knowledge, attitudes and avoidance behavior among highly educated Jordanian women that is likely influenced by culture and traditional gender roles. Public health initiatives are needed in Jordan to address public policy, institutional practices and to empowerment of women to reduce SHS exposure. PMID:22163203

Gharaibeh, Huda; Haddad, Linda; Alzyoud, Sukaina; El-Shahawy, Omar; Baker, Nesrin Abu; Umlauf, Mary

2011-01-01

361

Water-quality characteristics of inflow to and outflow from B Everett Jordan Lake, North Carolina, 1982-86  

USGS Publications Warehouse

B. Everett Jordan Lake, a 13,900-acre reservoir in the north-central Piedmont of North Carolina, was completed in February 1982. Hydrologic data were collected at four inflow sites and one outflow site to define water-quality characteristics. Data include streamflow data and 56 physical and chemical characteristics of streamwater. Concentrations of some constituents at inflow sites were as much as 83-times greater than background concentrations in streams relatively unaffected by man. At the outflow site, however, some of these constituents were only as much as 6-times greater. The minimum dissolved-oxygen concentration measured at an inflow site was 1.0 mg/L, whereas the minimum concentration measured at the outflow site was 4.9 mg/L. Significant differences in other physical characteristics between inflow and outflow sites include a reduction in maximum concentration of suspended sediment from 2,360 mg/L in an inflow sample to 130 mg/L at the outflow site and a reduction of maximum specific conductance values from more than 1,100 microsiemens/centimeter in an inflow sample to 301 microsiemens/centimeter in outflow. The maximum concentration of total nitrogen at inflow sites was 27.0 mg/L compared with 3.2 mg/L at the outflow site. The maximum total phosphorus concentration at inflow sites was 13.0 mg/L compared with 0.6 mg/L at the outflow site. Average annual loads of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in the outflow were as much as 67% and 40% of inflow loads, respectively. Maximum yields at an inflow site were 5.8 t/sq mi (tons per square mile) for nitrogen and 1.4 t/sq mi for phosphorus. Yields of these constituents at the outflow site were 1.5 and 0.2 t/mi, respectively.

Garrett, R. G.

1990-01-01

362

Olive Mounds, Roman cisterns, erosion pins - potential to characterize erosion in a Mediterranean catchment in north Jordan.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the framework of a three years' time period of a PhD thesis it is luck to catch the "right" rain events for good general erosion approximations. Methods that (i) cover longer time periods, (ii) are not confined to constructed boundaries, and finally (iii) include all possible erosion processes are crucial for good average estimates of sediment yields from different landscapes. The aim of the study was to get a first understanding of erosion processes and sediment yields in a Mediterranean to semi-arid catchment in NW Jordan, wherefore different measurement methods were tested in the predominant landscape units: olive orchards (27%), fields (14%) and natural shrubs on steep slopes (~30%). One of the applied methods was the measurement of topographic olive mounds within 7 orchards with an average size of 800 m2 in synergy with tree-coring and age estimation of the orchards. Furthermore the OSL dating of deposited sediments in two roman cisterns adjacent to fields was conducted and the 9 erosion pin fields, each about 200m2 large, were installed on steep slopes with natural vegetation. The methods cover different time scales from 560 years for the fields, an average of 32 years for the olive orchards and up to two rainy seasons for the erosion pin fields. Results show that olive orchards on steep slopes (>10%) have the highest erosion potential in the region with 95±8 t ha-1year-1 followed by natural vegetated slopes with 37±4 t ha-1year-1 of dislocated material and fields with 1.22±0.06 t ha-1year-1 sediment yield. These spatially constrained outcomes are supported by geochemical sediment fingerprint results of lake sediments from the catchment and will be discussed in regard to the basic assumption that underlie the principle of measurement and the limitations of the methods.

Kraushaar, Sabine; Ollesch, Gregor; Siebert, Christian; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

2013-04-01

363

“Voices of Fear and Safety” Women’s ambivalence towards breast cancer and breast health: a qualitative study from Jordan  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among Jordanian women. Breast malignancies are detected at late stages as a result of deferred breast health-seeking behaviour. The aim of this study was to explore Jordanian women’s views and perceptions about breast cancer and breast health. Methods We performed an explorative qualitative study with purposive sampling. Ten focus groups were conducted consisting of 64 women (aged 20 to 65?years) with no previous history and no symptoms of breast cancer from four governorates in Jordan. The transcribed data was analysed using latent content analysis. Results Three themes were constructed from the group discussions: a) Ambivalence in prioritizing own health; b) Feeling fear of breast cancer; and c) Feeling safe from breast cancer. The first theme was seen in women’s prioritizing children and family needs and in their experiencing family and social support towards seeking breast health care. The second theme was building on women’s perception of breast cancer as an incurable disease associated with suffering and death, their fear of the risk of diminished femininity, husband’s rejection and social stigmatization, adding to their apprehensions about breast health examinations. The third theme emerged from the women’s perceiving themselves as not being in the risk zone for breast cancer and in their accepting breast cancer as a test from God. In contrast, women also experienced comfort in acquiring breast health knowledge that soothed their fears and motivated them to seek early detection examinations. Conclusions Women’s ambivalence in prioritizing their own health and feelings of fear and safety could be better addressed by designing breast health interventions that emphasize the good prognosis for breast cancer when detected early, involve breast cancer survivors in breast health awareness campaigns and catalyse family support to encourage women to seek breast health care. PMID:22834874

2012-01-01

364

Radar Interferometric Mapping and Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence along the Dead Sea Shores, Israel and Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last decade, sinkholes and wide shallow subsidence features have become major problems along the Dead Sea shores in Israel and Jordan. Sinkholes are readily observed in the field, but their locations and timing are unpredictable. Wide shallow subsidence features are often difficult to observe in the field. However, once identified, they delineate zones of instability and increasing hazard. In this study we apply interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements to map and calculate rates of vertical displacement phenomena in the Dead Sea basin. We analyze 27 SAR scenes acquired during the years 1992 to 2001 by the ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites. The interferograms span periods of 2 to 103 months. Wide shallow subsidence features include circular and elongate coastal depressions (a few hundred meters to a few kilometers in length), depressions in ancient alluvial fans, and depressions along salt diapir margins. Phase differences measured in our interferograms correspond to subsidence rates generally in the range of 0-20 mm/year, with exceptional high rates that exceed 60 mm/year in two specific regions. During the study period, the level of the Dead Sea and of the associated groundwater has dropped by about 8 meters. This water level drop within an aquifer composed of fine-grained material has caused aquifer system compaction resulting in gradual subsidence. Calculation of the expected compaction and comparison with the InSAR observations suggest that the observed subsidence along the Dead Sea shores occurred where the total thickness of the fine-grained marl layers is between 5 m and 20 m in the upper 30 m below the surface. Our observations also show that in certain locations subsidence appears to be structurally controlled by faults and salt domes. The temporal relationships between wide shallow subsidence features and sinkholes are still not fully resolved, excluding the use of gradual subsidence as a precursor to sinkholes.

Baer, G.; Schattner, U.; Wachs, D.; Sandwell, D.; Wdowinski, S.; Frydman, S.

2001-12-01

365

Comparative analysis of virulence and resistance profiles of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from poultry meat and foodborne outbreaks in northern Jordan.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to isolate Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry samples and compare their virulence and antibiotic resistance profiles to S. Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks in northern Jordan. Two hundred presumptive isolates were obtained from 302 raw poultry samples and were subjected to further analysis and confirmation. A phylogenic tree based on 16S rRNA sequencing was constructed and selected isolates representing each cluster were further studied for their virulence in normal adult Swiss white mice. The most virulent strains were isolated from poultry samples and had an LD 50 of 1.55 × 10 (5) CFU, while some of the outbreak isolates were avirulent in mice. Antibiotic resistance profiling revealed that the isolates were resistant to seven of eight antibiotics screened with each isolate resistant to multiple antibiotics (from two to six). Of the poultry isolates, 100%, 88.9%, 77.8%, 66.7%, and 50% showed resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and cefoperazone, respectively. Two outbreak isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, while 71.4% were resistant to cefoperazone and only 28.6% showed resistance to nalidixic acid. Salmonella outbreak isolates were genetically related to poultry isolates as inferred from the 16S rRNA sequencing, yet were phenotypically different. Although outbreak strains were similar to poultry isolates, when tested in the mouse model, some of the outbreak isolates were highly virulent while others were avirulent. This might be due to a variation in susceptibility of the mouse to different S. Enteritidis isolates. PMID:24780883

Jaradat, Ziad W; Abedel Hafiz, Leena; Ababneh, Mustafa M; Ababneh, Qotaibah O; Al Mousa, Waseem; Al-Nabulsi, Anas; Osaili, Tareq M; Holley, Richard

2014-07-01

366

Uplift and denudation history of the eastern Dead Sea rift flank, SW Jordan: Evidence from apatite fission track thermochronometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dead Sea rift (DSR), developed along the Dead Sea transform plate boundary, is characterized by salient flanks and morphotectonic asymmetry. Apatite fission track thermochronology (AFT) along ~1200 m high vertical profiles in Neoproterozoic basement and overlying Cambrian sandstone in southwestern Jordan is used to reconstruct timing, magnitude, and rate of uplift and denudation of the eastern DSR flank and examine its relationship to rift development and its flank landscape. Time-temperature models based on AFT data suggest three major Phanerozoic heating and cooling episodes, Late Paleozoic, Early Cretaceous, and Oligocene. The latest episode, on which this study focuses, indicates uplift of ~3.8±0.3 km under a moderate paleogeothermal gradient. About 40% of the uplift was tectonically driven with the remainder attributed to isostatic rebound in response to denudation and erosion. Models suggest that uplift commenced in the Oligocene with a considerable part occurring prior to development of the DSR, despite being ~200 km from the Red Sea-Gulf of Suez rift margin. Uplift is probably part of a regional rearrangement along the western Arabian platform margin occurring at the time of Red Sea rift initiation. Transition from primarily sedimentary layer stripping, most likely by scarp retreat, to one of dominantly incision of the underlying crystalline basement occurred in Late Miocene-Pliocene time following enhanced subsidence and development of a low base level in the DSR. Consequently, the magnitude of uplift by isostatic rebound due to incision exceeded lowering by surface truncation and increased summit elevation and riftward flexing of the flank.

Feinstein, S.; Eyal, M.; Kohn, B. P.; Steckler, M. S.; Ibrahim, K. M.; Moh'd, B. K.; Tian, Y.

2013-09-01

367

The occurrence of lithium in the environment of the Jordan Valley and its transfer into the food chain.  

PubMed

Lithium is found in trace amounts in all soils. It is also found in plants and in nearly all the organs of the human body. Low Li intake can cause behavioral defects. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the concentration and distribution of water-soluble Li in soils of the Jordan Valley and its concentration in citrus trees and some important food crops in view of the significant implications of Li for human health. The concentration of soluble Li was measured in 180 soil samples collected at two depths (0-20 and 20-40 cm) whereas its content was determined in fully expanded leaves collected from citrus and different vegetable crops. Concentrations of soluble Li in soils vary from 0.95 to 1.04 mg l(-1) in topsoil and from 1.06 to 2.68 mg l(-1) in subsoil, while Li concentration in leaves ranged from 2 to 27 mg kg(-1) DM. Lithium concentrations in leaves of crops of the same family or different families vary with location in the valley; i.e., they decreased from north to south. It is concluded that soluble Li in soils and the plant family did not solely affect Li transfer in the food chain. In addition, soil EC, Ca, Mg, and Cl, which increased from north to south, might adversely affect plant Li uptake. The current study also showed that consuming 250-300 g FW of spinach day(-1) per person is recommended to provide consumers with their daily Li requirement necessary for significant health and societal benefits. PMID:20872235

Ammari, Tarek G; Al-Zu'bi, Yasin; Abu-Baker, Samih; Dababneh, Basem; Gnemat, Wafa'; Tahboub, Alaeddin

2011-10-01

368

Earliest Evidence for Social Endogamy in the 9,000-Year-Old-Population of Basta, Jordan  

PubMed Central

The transition from mobile to sedentary life was one of the greatest social challenges of the human past. Yet little is known about the impact of this fundamental change on social interactions amongst early Neolithic communities, which are best recorded in the Near East. The importance of social processes associated with these economic and ecological changes has long been underestimated. However, ethnographic observations demonstrate that generalized reciprocity – such as open access to resources and land – had to be reduced to a circumscribed group before regular farming and herding could be successfully established. Our aim was thus to investigate the role of familial relationships as one possible factor within this process of segregation as recorded directly in the skeletal remains, rather than based on hypothetical correlations such as house types and social units. Here we present the revealing results of the systematically recorded epigenetic characteristics of teeth and skulls of the late Pre-Pottery Neolithic community of Basta in Southern Jordan (Figure S1). Additionally, mobility was reconstructed via a systematic strontium (Sr) isotope analysis of tooth enamel of the Basta individuals. The frequency of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors in the 9,000-year-old community of Basta is exceptionally high (35.7%). Genetic studies and a worldwide comparison of the general rate of this dental anomaly in modern and historic populations show that the enhanced frequency can only be explained by close familial relationships akin to endogamy. This is supported by strontium isotope analyses of teeth, indicating a local origin of almost all investigated individuals. Yet, the accompanying archaeological finds document far-reaching economic exchange with neighboring groups and a population density hitherto unparalleled. We thus conclude that endogamy in the early Neolithic village of Basta was not due to geographic isolation or a lack of exogamous mating partners but a socio-cultural choice. PMID:23776517

Muller, Wolfgang; Berner, Margit E.; Schultz, Michael; Schmidt-Schultz, Tyede H.; Knipper, Corina; Gebel, Hans-Georg K.; Nissen, Hans J.; Vach, Werner

2013-01-01

369

Head shape and size of adult males as possible indicators of childhood stress in northern Jordan (1900-1978): a study in human biology and political economy.  

PubMed

Stature, sitting height, stature by weight, and head circumference change with varying economic conditions during early childhood. Our hypothesis is that adult head shape, as well as head size, is influenced by changes in childhood nutrition. When economic conditions are bad, nutrition and health suffer, and the result is dolichocephaly. To test this hypothesis, we measured the head length, width, and circumference of 398 adult males in Jordan. Fifty-six percent are ethnic Jordanians, and 44% are ethnic Palestinians. We divided the modern history of Jordan and the West Bank into four periods developed from historical economic data. The results of the study show that the cephalic index (CI) among Jordanians increased significantly with economic improvement but decreased slightly during the best economic period, whereas CI remained stable across all periods among Palestinians. The pattern among Jordanians can be explained in terms of maternal environment and early childhood nutrition. The lack of pattern in Palestinians may be due to changing nursing practices, bottle feeding, or sleeping position. When economic conditions were bad, Jordanian mothers and infants suffered from malnutrition and deficits in health care services during pre- and postnatal periods. Infants were born with very low birth weight and longer heads. However, the highest mean value of head size, circumference, among Jordanians and Palestinians is obtained from individuals who were children during the bad economic period, an unexpected result. No significant linear or quadratic trend was found for either Palestinians' or Jordanians' head circumference over time. PMID:19317596

Abu Dalou, Ahmad Y; Al-Shiyab, Abdel-Halim; Benfer, Robert A

2008-08-01

370

Telecardiology Application in Jordan: Its Impact on Diagnosis and Disease Management, Patients' Quality of Life, and Time- and Cost-Savings  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To assess the impact of live interactive telecardiology on diagnosis and disease management, patients' quality of life, and time- and cost-savings. Methods. All consecutive patients who attended or were referred to the teleclinics for suspected cardiac problems in two hospitals in remote areas of Jordan during the study period were included in the study. Patients were interviewed for relevant information and their quality of life was assessed during the first visit and 8 weeks after the last visit. Results. A total of 76 patients were included in this study. Final diagnosis and treatment plan were established as part of the telecardiology consultations in 71.1% and 77.3% of patients, respectively. Patients' travel was avoided for 38 (50.0%) who were managed locally. The majority of patients perceived that the visit to the telecardiology clinic results in less travel time (96.1%), less waiting time (98.1%), and lower cost (100.0%). Telecardiology consultations resulted in an improvement in the quality of life after two months of the first visit. Conclusions. Telecardiology care in remote areas of Jordan would improve the access to health care, help to reach proper diagnosis and establish the treatment plan, and improve the quality of life. PMID:25400661

Khader, Yousef Saleh; Jarrah, Mohamad Ismail; Al-Shudifat, Abde-Ellah M.; Shdaifat, Amjad; Aljanabi, Husham; Al-Fakeh, Shadwan Ismeil; Turk, Elias Emil; Zayed, Khaled Ali; Al Quran, Hanadi A.; Ellauzi, Ziad Mohd; Al Tahan, Mohammad

2014-01-01

371

All The Work Of Artisans: Reconstructing society at Tell Deir ‘All? through the study of ceramic traditions: Studies of Late Bronze Age Faience vessels and Iron IIc-III ceramics from Tell Deir ‘All?, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

For already 50 years the site of Tell Deir ‘All? in the Eastern Central Jordan Valley has been the focus of Dutch research. Despite the amount of research many aspects of the regional cultures in which the inhabitants of the subsequent occupational phases of this site were incorporated, remain obscure. Especially those cultures during the Late Bronze Age (± 1550-1180

N. C. F. Groot

2011-01-01

372

Kenneth R. Fleischmann, Clay Templeton, Jordan Boyd-Graber, An-Shou Cheng, Douglas W. Oard, Emi Ishita, Jes A. Koepfler, and William A. Wallace. Explaining Sentiment Polarity: Automatic Detection of Human Values in  

E-print Network

Ishita, Jes A. Koepfler, and William A. Wallace. Explaining Sentiment Polarity: Automatic Detection of Human Values in Texts. In Preparation. @article{Fleischmann:Templeton:Boyd-Graber:Cheng:Oard:Ishita:Koepfler:Wallace · Jordan Boyd-Graber · An-Shou Cheng · Douglas W. Oard · Emi Ishita · Jes A. Koepfler · William A. Wallace

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

373

Transposable Elements and Eukaryotic Complexity 65Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. (2002) 4: 65-76. *For correspondence. Email jordan@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; Tel. 301-594-5714;  

E-print Network

Transposable Elements and Eukaryotic Complexity 65Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. (2002) 4: 65-76. *For Press Transposable Elements and the Evolution of Eukaryotic Complexity Nathan J. Bowen1 and I. King Jordan2* 1Section on Eukaryotic Transposable Elements, Laboratory of Eukaryotic Gene Regulation, National

Jordan, King

374

Jordan Boyd-Graber, Kimberly Glasgow, and Jackie Sauter Zajac. Spoiler Alert: Machine Learning Approaches to Detect Social Media Posts with Revelatory Information. ASIST 2013: The 76th Annual Meeting of the American  

E-print Network

for the television show Lost, adopted an extensive spoiler policy, banning spoilers from all portions of the wikiJordan Boyd-Graber, Kimberly Glasgow, and Jackie Sauter Zajac. Spoiler Alert: Machine Learning{Boyd-Graber:Glasgow:Zajac-2013, Title = {Spoiler Alert: Machine Learning Approaches to Detect Social Media Posts with Revelatory

Boyd-Graber, Jordan

375

Strontium isotopes in Melanopsis sp. as indicators of variation in hydrology and climate in the Upper Jordan Valley during the Early-Middle Pleistocene, and wider implications.  

PubMed

Aquifers dominated by Pleistocene basalts and Jurassic to Cretaceous calcareous rocks feed the Hula basin which is drained by the Jordan River into Lake Kinneret. The sedimentary sequence of Lower-Middle Pleistocene Benot Ya'akov Formation (BYF) exposed by excavations of the 0.78 Ma lake-side site of Gesher Benot Ya'aqov (GBY) consists of six cycles representing ca. 100 ka history of the Hula basin. This study characterizes the types of water sources in the catchment, tests the use of the Strontium (Sr) isotopes in the common extant snail Melanopsis sp. as a tracer for water in its habitat, and uses this tracer in the fossil specimens from GBY to investigate the palaeohydrology of the Hula paleolake during the corresponding period. The Sr isotope composition ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) of extant Melanopsis shells in the Hula catchment range widely (0.7046-0.7079). These analyses define distinct groups of water sources and aquifers, while the Jordan River at the GBY site has values around 0.70685. The values for fossil Melanopsis from GBY vary along stratigraphy; they are highest around 0.70710 in Cycles 1 and 2, decrease to around 0.70685 in Cycle 3, and exhibit upward trending fluctuations in the subsequent cycles to 0.70703 in Cycle 6. This trend reveals the dominance of the Hermon Jurassic aquifer during the earlier, colder periods before the Matuyama-Brunhes Boundary (MBB) and enhanced influence of the Golan basaltic aquifers, in subsequent warmer periods, indicating that the MBB coincides with climate warming as supported by other indicators. Hence, this global geochronological indicator of 0.78 Ma is also potentially a global palaeoclimatic marker. The similarity between the Sr isotope composition of the Jordan River waters and Melanopsis and those from Cycle 3 suggests that the current climate corresponds to that of the warmest period within the record of GBY, clarifying the comparative interpretation of this 100 k.yr. climate record. PMID:21036385

Spiro, Baruch; Ashkenazi, Shoshana; Starinsky, Abraham; Katz, Amitai

2011-04-01

376

Midwifery in Jordan.  

PubMed

Jordanian midwives, particularly those working in the public sector, are the major health care providers for mothers and their young children. Many women, however, do not receive early prenatal care, and some receive no prenatal care at all. Because of persistent high rates of maternal and early childhood morbidity and mortality, the Minister of Health has identified advanced preparation in primary health care nursing as a priority for some midwives, who will then be expected to function as leaders in the movement toward universal primary health care. PMID:7931696

Adams, C J

1994-01-01

377

Aspen Jordan Final Paper  

E-print Network

) Introduction In a day and age where "Green" is the new buzzword, many organizations are searching for ways experienced food-cost reductions at Driscoll dining hall, which has been tray-free for a year. Williams to explore the financial and environmental benefits of tray-free dining as they have been proven both at peer

Aalberts, Daniel P.

378

Multicomponent reactive transport in discrete fractures. II: Infiltration of hyperalkaline groundwater at Maqarin, Jordan, a natural analogue site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical multicomponent reactive transport model described fully in Steefel and Lichtner (1998)[Steefel, C.I., Lichtner, P.C., 1998. Multicomponent reactive transport in discrete fractures, I. Controls on reaction front geometry. J. Hydrol. (in press)] is used to simulate the infiltration of hyperalkaline groundwater along discrete fractures at Maqarin, Jordan, a site considered as a natural analogue to cement-bearing nuclear waste repositories. In the Eastern Springs area at Maqarin, two prominent sets of sub-parallel fractures trending NW-SE are approximately perpendicular to the local water table contours, with the slope of the water table indicating north-westward flow. Extensive mineralogic investigations [Alexander W.R. (Ed.), 1992. A natural analogue study of cement-buffered, hyperalkaline groundwaters and their interaction with a sedimentary host rock. NAgrA Technical Report (NTB 91-10), Wettingen, Switzerland; Milodowski, A.E., Hyslop, E.K., Pearce, J.M., Wetton, P.D., Kemp, S.J., Longworth, G., Hodginson, E., and Hughes, C.R., 1998. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the western springs area. In: Smellie, J.A.T. (ed.), 1998: Maqarin Natural Analogue Study: Phase III. SKB Technical Report TR98-04, Stockholm, Sweden] indicate that the width of intense rock alteration zone bordering the fractures changes from about 4 mm at one locality (the M1 sampling site) to approximately 1 mm 100 m to the north-west in the flow direction (the M2 site), suggesting a lessening of alteration intensity in that direction. Using this information, the dimensionless parameter ? v/? D' (?=porosity, D'=effective diffusion coefficient in rock matrix, ?=fracture aperture, and v=fluid velocity in the fracture) and measurements of the local hydraulic head gradient and effective diffusion coefficient in the rock matrix, a mean fracture aperture of 0.194 mm is calculated assuming the cubic law applies. This information, in combination with measured groundwater compositions at the Maqarin site, is used as input for numerical simulations of the hyperalkaline groundwater infiltration along fractures. The width of the alteration zones in the rock matrix bordering fractures is also used to constrain mineral dissolution rates in the field. The simulations predict that ettringite [Ca 6Al 2(SO 4) 3(OH) 12·26H 2O] with lesser amounts of hillebrandite and tobermorite (hydrated calcium silicates or CSH phases) will be the dominant alteration products forming at the expense of the primary silicates in the rock matrix and fracture, in agreement with observations at the Maqarin site. The simulations also come close to matching the pH of water samples collected along fractures at the M1 and M2 sites, with a fracture aperture of 0.22 mm giving the closest match with the pH data (within 13% of the value indicated by the rock matrix alteration widths). The simulations suggest two possible scenarios for the time evolution of the fracture-rock matrix system. Where rate constants for secondary mineral precipitation reactions are the same in both the rock matrix and fracture, the rock matrix tends to become completely cemented before the fracture. This results in a downstream migration of the hyperalkaline plume. In contrast, if rates are as little as one order of magnitude higher in the fracture than in the rock matrix, it is possible to seal the fracture first, thus causing the mineral zones to collapse upstream as a result of the reduction in fracture permeability. Sealing of fractures is observed at Maqarin and the simulations predict a mineral paragenesis in the fracture resulting from this scenario which is broadly compatible with field observations.

Steefel, C. I.; Lichtner, P. C.

1998-08-01

379

STEM Education in Jordan Applicable to Developing Future Geophysicists: An Example Combining Electrical Engineering and Medical Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students in developing countries interested in STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering & math) often choose majors that will improve their job opportunities in their home country when they graduate, e.g. engineering or medicine. Geoscience might be chosen as a sub-discipline of civil engineering, but rarely as a primary major unless there are local economic natural resources. The Institute of International Education administers the ExxonMobil Middle East and North Africa region scholars program designed to develop skilled students with a focus on geoscience and to build relationships with academic leaders by offering select faculty the opportunity to participation in the AGU fall meeting. At the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST), research in electrical engineering applied to medicine has potential links to geosciences. In geophysics, neural wavelet analysis (NWA) is commonly used to process complex seismic signals, e.g. for interpreting lithology or identifying hydrocarbons. In this study, NWA was used to characterize cardiac arrhythmias. A classification scheme was developed in which a neural network is used to identify three types of arrhythmia by distinct frequency bands. The performance of this scheme was tested using patient records from two electrocardiography (ECG) databases. These records contain normal ECG signals, as well as abnormal signals from atrial fibrillation (AF), ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) arrhythmias. The continuous wavelet transform is applied over frequencies of 0-50 Hz for times of 0-2s. For a normal ECG, the results show that the strongest signal is in a frequency range of 4-10 Hz. For AF, a low frequency ECG signal in the range of 0-5 Hz extends over the whole time domain. For VT, the low frequency spectrum is in the range of 2-10 Hz, appearing as three distinct bands. For VF, a continuous band in the range of 2-10 Hz extends over the whole time domain. The classification of the three arrhythmias used a Back-propagation neural network whose input is the energy level calculated from the wavelet transform. The network was trained using 13 different patterns (3 for AF, 5 for VT and 5 for VF) and blind tested on 25 records. The classification scheme correctly identified all 9 VF records, 5 of 6 VT records, and 9 of 10 AF records. Manual interpretation of time-frequency seismic data is computationally intensive because large volumes of data are generated during the time-frequency analysis process. The proposed NWA method has the potential to partially automate the interpretation of seismic data. Also, a relatively straight-forward adaptation of the proposed NWA-based classification scheme may help identify hydrocarbon-laden reservoirs, which have been observed to contain enhanced low-frequency content in the time-frequency domain (Castagna, Sun, & Siegfried, 2003).

Fraiwan, A.; Khadra, L.; Shahab, W.; Olgaard, D. L.

2010-12-01

380

The Prey Pathway: A Regional History of Cattle (Bos taurus) and Pig (Sus scrofa) Domestication in the Northern Jordan Valley, Israel  

PubMed Central

The faunal assemblage from the 9th-8th millennium BP site at Sha'ar Hagolan, Israel, is used to study human interaction with wild suids and cattle in a time period just before the appearance of domesticated animals of these species in the Jordan Valley. Our results, based on demographic and osteometric data, indicate that full domestication of both cattle and suids occurred at the site during the 8th millennium. Importantly, domestication was preceded in both taxa by demographic and metric population parameters indicating severe overhunting. The possible role of overhunting in shaping the characteristics of domesticated animals and the social infrastructure to ownership of herds is then explored. PMID:23405240

Marom, Nimrod; Bar-Oz, Guy

2013-01-01

381

Two new species of Eimeria Schneider 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the broad-toothed field mouse, Apodemus mystacinus Danford and Alston 1877 (Rodentia: Muridae) from Jordan.  

PubMed

Coprological examination of 40 Apodemus mystacinus Danford and Alston 1877 from Jordan revealed oocysts of three species of genus Eimeria. Two species are described as new. Eimeria zuhairamri sp. n. has broadly ellipsoidal oocysts 29.6 (27.0-34.0) x 23.3 (22.0-25.0) mum with distinctly granulated wall and oocyst residuum. Endogenous development occurs in jejunum and ileum. Eimeria alorani sp. n. has oocysts 26.9 (23.0-29.0) x 19.3 (18.0-22.0) mum with smooth wall and absent residuum. Endogenous development is confined to the caecum. The third species, developing in jejunum, has oocysts morphologically indistinguishable from Eimeria uptoni. The identity of E. uptoni and the taxonomy of Eimeria of Apodemus are discussed. PMID:15952044

H?rková, Lada; Baker, Mohammad Abu; Jirk?, Miloslav; Modrý, David

2005-08-01

382

Modelling surface runoff and water productivity in small dryland watersheds with water-harvesting interventions, an application from Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vast areas of the rangelands (badia) of West Asia and North Africa are severely degraded due to over-grazing, cutting of shrubs and ploughing. Because of the scarce vegetation cover and the often dense soil surface crust, a large part of the limited rainfall runs off to wadis or evaporates back to the atmosphere with little local benefit. To develop and evaluate techniques for rehabilitation of the degraded lands an integrated research project was implemented with two communities in the badia of Jordan. The average annual rainfall in the research area is approximately 150 mm/yr. The project tested different micro-catchment water-harvesting techniques (earthen dikes planted with fodder shrubs) to capture the runoff and improve plant survival and growth in the watersheds. To estimate the long-term benefits of these water-harvesting systems and to assist with watershed-level planning and design a model is needed. However, current models can not capture the spatially variable runoff and water-harvesting processes in these environments. The objective of the research was to develop a model for estimating the runoff and biomass production of small badia watersheds with and without water-harvesting interventions. The basic spatial unit of the model is a square grid cell. Each cell is assigned to a specific land use unit, based on the characteristics of the soil and surface that affect the runoff, infiltration, and biomass production potential of the land. The model computes infiltration and runoff for each cell from daily rainfall with a curvilinear equation, based on data from plot studies. The runoff is routed using a 10-m digital elevation model and can infiltrate in downstream cells. The water infiltrated in each cell is summed for the August-September hydrologic year; and the annual biomass production is computed based on the water productivity potential of the cell. The model was applied to a 119-ha watershed, where 11 ha of micro-catchments were implemented, using a 32-year rainfall record. The slopes in the watershed vary between 0 and 12% with the majority of the land ranging between 2 and 6%. The soils are generally shallow (less than 0.5 m) and on the stony hilltops the bedrock is sometimes exposed. However, deep alluvial soils are found in local depressions and along the main wadi. The majority of the land is ploughed for barley, with alternate fallow years. During fallow years, some natural vegetation grows in the land. Due to the limited and often poorly distributed rain the barley produces none or little grain, and is usually grazed by flocks of sheep and goats in spring. Highly degraded natural rangeland vegetation is found on the stony upper-slopes, but the deep soils along the main wadi turn green after good rainfall. Model simulations, using best parameter estimates, indicated that the water-harvesting interventions reduced the average runoff out of the watershed by 3%. Because the micro-catchments are established in the gently sloping lands, there may be an option to combine these micro-catchment systems with small dams or reservoirs to capture the runoff from more rocky upstream areas. The average biomass production of the water-harvesting intervention area increased from 0.44 ton/ha under the original farmer management to 0.56 ton/ha per year under water-harvesting. Even more importantly, the water harvesting resulted in much more stable biomass production, with a coefficient of variation of 0.42, as compared to 0.89 for the original farmer treatment. Field observations also indicated that the micro-catchments and the year-round cover of shrubs in the water-harvesting area reduced erosion and provided a micro-environment that improved the biodiversity of the site. The model has helped us to better understand the system and to compute the economics of these interventions. Data collection is on-going to improve the parameterization of the model, including the erosion component.

Bruggeman, A.; Akroush, S.; Mudabber, M.; Ziadat, F.; Oweis, T.

2009-04-01

383

Evaluation of seismic hazard, local site effect, liquefaction potential, and dynamic performance of a world example of an embankment dam characterized by very complex and unique foundations conditions: Karameh dam in the Jordan Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geologic structures associated with the site of a 55·106 m3 Karameh embankment dam (under construction in Jordan Valley) and the tectonic effects on dam foundation and reservoir margins\\u000a were reviewed. The regional seismicity and history of events were analyzed and a design earthquake was established.\\u000a \\u000a At Karameh dam site, the geotechnical conditions for the foundations formations (including liquefiable sands)

Azm S. Al-Homoud

1995-01-01

384

Rising cesarean deliveries among apparently low-risk mothers at university teaching hospitals in Jordan: analysis of population survey data, 2002-2012  

PubMed Central

Background: Cesarean delivery conducted without medical indication places mothers and infants at risk for adverse outcomes. This study assessed changes in trends of, and factors associated with, cesarean deliveries in Jordan, from 2002 to 2012. Methods: Data for ever-married women ages 15–49 years from the 2002, 2007, and 2012 Jordan Population and Family Health Surveys were used. Analyses were restricted to mothers who responded to a question regarding the hospital-based mode of delivery for their last birth occurring within the 5 years preceding each survey (2002, N?=?3,450; 2007, N?=?6,307; 2012, N?=?6,365). Normal birth weight infants and singleton births were used as markers for births that were potentially low risk for cesarean delivery, because low/high birth weight and multiple births are among the main obstetric variables that have been documented to increase risk of cesareans. Weighted descriptive and multivariate analyses were conducted using 4 logistic regression models: (1) among all mothers; and among mothers stratified (2) by place of delivery; (3) by birth weight of infants; and (4) by singleton vs. multiple births. Results: The cesarean delivery rate increased significantly over time, from 18.2% in 2002, to 20.1% in 2007, to 30.3% in 2012. Place of delivery, birth weight, and birth multiplicity were significantly associated with cesarean delivery after adjusting for confounding factors. Between 2002 and 2012, the rate increased by 99% in public hospitals vs. 70% in private hospitals; by 93% among normal birth weight infants vs. 73% among low/high birth weight infants; and by 92% among singleton births vs. 29% among multiple births. The changes were significant across all categories except among multiple births. Further stratification revealed that the cesarean delivery rate was 2.29 times higher in university teaching hospitals (UTHs) than in private hospitals (P< .001), and 2.31 times higher than in government hospitals (P< .001). Moreover, in UTHs, the rate was higher among normal birth weight infants (adjusted OR?=?2.15) and singleton births (adjusted OR?=?2.39). Conclusion: The rising cesarean delivery rate among births that may have been at low risk for cesarean delivery, particularly in UTHs, indicates that many cesarean deliveries may increasingly be performed without any medical indication. More vigilant monitoring of data from routine health information systems is needed to reduce unnecessary cesarean deliveries in apparently low-risk groups.

Rifai, Rami Al

2014-01-01

385

A Cross-Sectional Study to Examine Factors Associated with Primary Health Care Service Utilization among Older Adults in the Irbid Governorate of Jordan  

PubMed Central

Background. Recently, the percentage of older adults in developing countries has increased significantly. Objective. This study examined patterns and factors associated with primary health care services utilization in the past 1, 6, and 12 months. Method. A cross-sectional study design was used to collect data from 190 older adults in the Irbid governorate of Jordan. Results. Primary health care services were used by less than half of the participants in the past 1 month, by 68.4% in the past 6 months, and by 73.8% in the past 12 months. Primary health care (PHC) services use was associated with age, education level, tobacco use, chronic illnesses, perceived general health status today, a physical component summary score, employment, and perceived general health status in the past 6 and 12 months. The primary predictor of PHC services use at 1, 6, and 12 months was chronic illnesses (OR = 13.32), (OR = 19.63), and (OR = 17.91), respectively. Conclusion. Although many factors were associated with PHC service utilization, the strongest predictor of PHC service utilization was chronic illnesses.

Alkhawaldeh, Abdullah; Holm, Margo B.; Qaddumi, Jamal; Petro, Wasileh; Jaghbir, Madi

2014-01-01

386

The health profile and chronic diseases comorbidities of US-bound Iraqi refugees screened by the International Organization for Migration in Jordan: 2007-2009.  

PubMed

More than 63,000 Iraqi refugees were resettled in the United States from 1994 to 2010. We analyzed data for all US-bound Iraqi refugees screened in International Organization for Migration clinics in Jordan during June 2007-September 2009 (n = 18,990), to describe their health profile before arrival in the United States. Of 14,077 US-bound Iraqi refugees ? 15 years of age, one had active TB, 251 had latent TB infection, and 14 had syphilis. No HIV infections were reported. Chronic diseases comorbidities accounted for a large burden of disease in this population: 35% (n = 4,105) of screened Iraqi refugees had at least one of three chronic medical conditions; hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or obesity. State health departments and clinicians who screen refugees need to be aware of the high prevalence of chronic diseases among Iraqi refugees resettled in the United States. These results will help public health specialists develop policies to reduce morbidity and mortality among US-bound Iraqi refugees. PMID:22307545

Yanni, Emad A; Naoum, Marwan; Odeh, Nedal; Han, Pauline; Coleman, Margaret; Burke, Heather

2013-02-01

387

Essential Oil of Common Sage (Salvia officinalis L.) from Jordan: Assessment of Safety in Mammalian Cells and Its Antifungal and Anti-Inflammatory Potential  

PubMed Central

Salvia officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) is a Mediterranean species, naturalized in many countries. In Jordan, it is used in traditional medicine as antiseptic, antiscabies, antisyphilitic, and anti-inflammatory, being frequently used against skin diseases. This study aimed the assessment of the antifungal and anti-inflammatory potential of its essential oils, and their cytotoxicity on macrophages and keratinocytes. The oils were investigated by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the antifungal activity was evaluated against yeasts, dermatophyte and Aspergillus strains. Assessment of cell viability was made by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and the in vitro anti-inflammatory potential was evaluated by measuring nitric oxide production using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophages. The main compounds of S. officinalis oils were 1,8-cineole (39.5–50.3%) and camphor (8.8–25.0%). The oils revealed antifungal activity against dermatophyte strains and significantly inhibited NO production stimulated by LPS in macrophages, without affecting cell viability, in concentrations up to 0.64??L/mL. This is the first report addressing the in vitro anti-inflammatory potential of S. officinalis oil. These findings demonstrated that bioactive concentrations of S. officinalis oils do not affect mammalian macrophages and keratinocytes viability making them suitable to be incorporated in skin care formulations for cosmetic and pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:24224168

Abu-Darwish, M. S.; Cabral, C.; Ferreira, I. V.; Gonçalves, M. J.; Cavaleiro, C.; Cruz, M. T.; Al-bdour, T. H.; Salgueiro, L.

2013-01-01

388

Prevalence, patterns and correlates of cigarette smoking in male adolescents in northern Jordan, and the influence of waterpipe use and asthma diagnosis: a descriptive cross-sectional study.  

PubMed

Our study investigates the prevalence, patterns and predictors of tobacco smoking among early adolescent males in Northern Jordan and whether asthma diagnosis affects smoking patterns. A descriptive cross sectional design was used. Males in grades 7 and 8 from four randomly selected high schools in the city of Irbid were enrolled. Data on waterpipe (WP) use and cigarette smoking patterns were obtained (n = 815) using a survey in Arabic language. The overall prevalence of ever having smoked a cigarette was 35.6%, with 86.2% of this group smoking currently. Almost half of the sample reported WP use. The most common age in which adolescents started to experiment with cigarettes was 11-12 years old (49.1%), although 10 years was also common (25.3%). Significant predictors of male cigarette smoking were WP use (OR = 4.15, 95% CI = 2.99-5.76), asthma diagnosis (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.46-3.78), grade 8 (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.10-2.11), and having a sibling who smokes (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.53-3.24). However, this cross-sectional study cannot establish causality, thus longitudinal studies are needed. Public health programs and school-based anti-tobacco smoking interventions that target children in early years at high schools are warranted to prevent the uptake of tobacco use among this vulnerable age group. High school students with asthma should be specifically targeted. PMID:25257355

Al-Sheyab, Nihaya; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Shah, Smita; Gallagher, Patrick; Gallagher, Robyn

2014-09-01

389

Prevalence, Patterns and Correlates of Cigarette Smoking in Male Adolescents in Northern Jordan, and the Influence of Waterpipe Use and Asthma Diagnosis: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study  

PubMed Central

Our study investigates the prevalence, patterns and predictors of tobacco smoking among early adolescent males in Northern Jordan and whether asthma diagnosis affects smoking patterns. A descriptive cross sectional design was used. Males in grades 7 and 8 from four randomly selected high schools in the city of Irbid were enrolled. Data on waterpipe (WP) use and cigarette smoking patterns were obtained (n = 815) using a survey in Arabic language. The overall prevalence of ever having smoked a cigarette was 35.6%, with 86.2% of this group smoking currently. Almost half of the sample reported WP use. The most common age in which adolescents started to experiment with cigarettes was 11–12 years old (49.1%), although 10 years was also common (25.3%). Significant predictors of male cigarette smoking were WP use (OR = 4.15, 95% CI = 2.99–5.76), asthma diagnosis (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.46–3.78), grade 8 (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.10–2.11), and having a sibling who smokes (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.53–3.24). However, this cross-sectional study cannot establish causality, thus longitudinal studies are needed. Public health programs and school-based anti-tobacco smoking interventions that target children in early years at high schools are warranted to prevent the uptake of tobacco use among this vulnerable age group. High school students with asthma should be specifically targeted. PMID:25257355

Al-Sheyab, Nihaya; Alomari, Mahmoud A.; Shah, Smita; Gallagher, Patrick; Gallagher, Robyn

2014-01-01

390

Review of the enigmatic Eocene shark genus Xiphodolamia (Chondrichthyes, Lamniformes) and description of a new species recovered from Angola, Iran and Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Little is known about the extinct Xiphodolamia, a peculiar lamnid shark which inhabited the Eocene seas. The reexamination of a large set of fossilized teeth specimens from the Ypresian of Kazakhstan has enabled the reconstitution of the tooth series of this enigmatic taxa of lamnid shark. Five distinct tooth morphologies seem to occur in X. ensis Leidy [Leidy, J., 1877. Description of vertebrate remains, chiefly from the phosphate beds of South Carolina. Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 8, 209-261] species revealing a weak ontogenetic variation. Such specific variation in tooth shape means that the other described species may be their junior synonyms. Dental morphology perfectly conforms with a Lamniforme but does not prove the current attribution to the Lamnidae family due to some inconsistent dental features observed, such as the presence of symphysial teeth. This genus could be regarded as an old lineage branched from the stem group of Lamnidae, close to the Isuroids sharks. Several Xiphodolamia teeth, originating both from old collections and new acquisitions, are reported and illustrated in order to provide information about a new species described here: Xiphodolamia serrata nov. sp. This species, currently limited to deposits in Angola, Jordan and Iran and dated at the Late Eocene, is easily distinguishable from the Early-Middle Eocene material belonging to the genus by the presence of serrated cutting edges. Adding to the type species considered here as the only valid taxa during the Early-Middle Eocene period, the temporal range of this genus extends to the Late Eocene, thus setting its upper stratigraphic limit prior to its disappearance as enigmatic as its appearance in the Early Eocene was.

Adnet, S.; Hosseinzadeh, R.; Antunes, M. T.; Balbino, A. C.; Kozlov, V. A.; Cappetta, H.

2009-10-01

391

Copper-bearing encrustations: a tool for age dating and constraining the physical-chemical regime during the late Quaternary in the Wadi Araba, southern Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The alluvial-fluvial drainage system in the Wadi Araba, southern Jordan, incised into Cambrian clastic sedimentary and felsic igneous rocks giving rise to a disseminated Cu-(Mn) mineralization of diagenetic and epigenetic origin along the southern branch of the Dead Sea Transform Fault (=DSTF). During the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, the primary Cu sulfides were replaced by secondary minerals giving rise to hypogene to supergene encrustations, bearing Cu silicates, Cu carbonates, Cu oxychlorides and cupriferous vanadates. They occur in fissures, coat walls and developed even-rim/meniscus and blocky cements in the arenites near the surface. The first generation cement has been interpreted in terms of freshwater vadose hydraulic conditions, while the second-generation blocky cement of chrysocolla and malachite evolved as late cement. The Cu-Si-C fluid system within the Wadi Araba drainage system is the on-shore or subaerial facies of a regressive lacustrine regime called the "Lake Lisan Stage", a precursor of the present-day Dead Sea. Radiocarbon dating (younger than 27,740 ± 1,570 years), oxygen-isotope-based temperature determination (hot brine-related mineralization at 60-80 °C, climate-driven mineralization at 25-30 °C) and thermodynamical calculations let to the subdivision of this secondary Cu mineralization into four stages, whose chemical and mineralogical composition was controlled by the variation of the anion complexes of silica and carbonate and the chlorine contents. The acidity of the pore water positively correlates with the degree of oxidation. The highest aridity and most intensive evaporation deduced from the thermodynamical calculations were achieved during stage 3, which is coeval with late Lake Lisan. Geogene processes causing Cu-enriched encrustations overlap with man-made manganiferous slags. The smelter feed has been derived mainly from Cu ore which developed during Late Pleistocene in the region.

Dill, H. G.; Techmer, A.; Botz, R.

2013-07-01

392

Levels of lead, cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc in deciduous teeth of children living in Irbid, Jordan by ICP-OES: some factors affecting their concentrations.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to measure the concentrations of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) in deciduous teeth from children living in Jordan and to investigate the affecting factors. Deciduous teeth samples (n = 320, without fillings) were collected from 5- to 12-year-old children and analyzed for Pb, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Zn using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. A questionnaire was used to gather information on each child, such as sex, age, tooth type (incisors, canines, and molars), tooth position within the mouth (upper or lower jaw), caries status, presence of amalgam fillings inside the mouth, type of drinking water (tap water, home purified water, and plant purified water), and zone of residence (close to or far from heavy traffic roads). The mean concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Zn were 30.26, 0.55, 6.23, 34.72, and 128.21 ?g/g, respectively. Our results indicate that there is a clear relation between the concentrations of the metals analyzed in this study and tooth type, tooth position within the mouth, caries status, presence of amalgam fillings inside the mouth, and type of drinking water. No significant differences in the concentrations of the five metals analyzed were observed due to sex. Our results also show that no significant difference among Pb, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Zn concentrations and age among the ages of 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, and 11-12, except for Pb, which decreases at age 11-12. PMID:22851195

Alomary, A; Al-Momani, I F; Obeidat, S M; Massadeh, A M

2013-04-01

393

Using multi-component hydrochemical pattern for water balance calculations of intricate water resources in semi-arid regions - a case study in Wadi Al Arab, Jordan.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater harvesting in the semi-arid Wadi al Arab, located in the NW most corner of the Kingdom of Jordan, is supposed to be sustainable. However, since implementation of intense well fields, which take water from the Cretaceous A7/B2 aquifer, springs along the wadi course dried out and groundwater table dropped locally tremendous. To overcome the uncertainties in qualitatively and quantitatively characterising that water resource, a multi-component hydrochemical study was carried out within the SMART-project, which was also used to provide reliable boundary conditions to build up a transient numerical flow model. Wadi Al Arab represents a multi-aquifer system, with unknown interactions between the Cenozoic and Cretaceous aquifers. The exact identification and qualitatively characterization of the different groundwater bodies, the definition of their flow regimes and the recharge rate is a necessary step to calculate a reliable water balance and a rational policy of water management. Inter-aquifer flow prevents the benchmark treatment of the groundwater bodies and its detection by classical methods is an almost impossible task. In order to overcome these difficulties, the main known components of the multi-aquifer system were analysed for REY (REE+ Yttrium) abundance, major elements and for stable isotopes of water (?18O and ?D). The different waters in the area were than classified considering these parameters. This enabled identifying their respective replenishment areas and to elucidate the mixing processes controlled by structural features. This study shows that REY patterns are a powerful tool to decipher the lithology of the catchment area and the intricate patterns of flow paths of the aquifer systems. These information allow the correct definition of boundary conditions for a successful hydraulic modelling.

Siebert, Christian; Rödiger, Tino; Geyer, Stefan; Subah, Ali; Guttman, Yossi

2013-04-01

394

JORDAN S. ELLENBERG Contact Information  

E-print Network

. Kowalski, arXiv 10098.3675, Duke Math J. 161 (7), pp. 1233­1275 (2012) "Arithmetic Veech sublattices of SL approaches," (with C. Elsholtz, C. Hall, and E. Kowalski,) J. Lond. Math. Soc. (2) 80, no.1, 135­154 (2009

395

JORDAN S. ELLENBERG Contact Information  

E-print Network

," with C. Hall and E. Kowalski, arXiv 10098.3675, Duke Math J. 161 (7), pp. 1233�1275 (2012) "Arithmetic and analytic approaches," (with C. Elsholtz, C. Hall, and E. Kowalski,) J. Lond. Math. Soc. (2) 80, no.1, 135

396

JORDAN S. ELLENBERG Contact Information  

E-print Network

," with C. Hall and E. Kowalski, arXiv 10098.3675, Duke Math J. 161 (7), pp. 1233­1275 (2012) "Arithmetic and analytic approaches," (with C. Elsholtz, C. Hall, and E. Kowalski,) J. Lond. Math. Soc. (2) 80, no.1, 135

397

JORDAN S. ELLENBERG Contact Information  

E-print Network

of Galois representations," with C. Hall and E. Kowalski, arXiv 10098.3675, Duke Math J. 161 (7), pp. 1233: geometric and analytic approaches," (with C. Elsholtz, C. Hall, and E. Kowalski,) J. Lond. Math. Soc. (2) 80

398

CONFORMAL WELDING OF JORDAN CURVES  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper gives an alternative description of Lehto's results on homeomorphisms which admit conformal welding (6). A normal families argument is controlled by the action of the homeomorphism as a composition operator on weighted Dirichlet spaces. This point of view admits a discussion of uniqueness.

Gavin L. Jones

399

Graphical Models Michael I. Jordan  

E-print Network

have viewed graphical models as a general Bayesian "inference engine"(Cowell et al., 1999). What encourages the exploration of extensions of classical methods. Before turning to these examples, however, we

Behnke, Sven

400

Graphical Models Michael I. Jordan  

E-print Network

have viewed graphical models as a general Bayesian ``inference engine''(Cowell et al., 1999). What encourages the exploration of extensions of classical methods. Before turning to these examples, however, we

Jordan, Michael I.

401

Evaluation of the impact of a psycho-educational intervention on knowledge levels and psychological outcomes for people diagnosed with Schizophrenia and their caregivers in Jordan: a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Schizophrenia is one of the most serious forms of mental illness among people being treated in psychiatric clinics in developing and developed countries. Providing care for people diagnosed with schizophrenia can be stressful for their caregivers. Psycho-educational interventions may improve patients’ and primary caregivers’ knowledge of schizophrenia and impact positively on patients’ physical and psychological outcomes and primary caregivers’ burden of care and quality of life. Studies thus far have shown that these interventions may improve patients’ and caregivers’ outcomes, but the quality of included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is poor and it is difficult to draw firm conclusions as to the effectiveness of such interventions on patients and primary caregivers’ outcomes, hence the current study. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial in four outpatient mental health clinics in Jordan comparing psycho-educational interventions in the form of six booklets every fortnight, with treatment as usual in people diagnosed with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers. The primary outcome for participants is knowledge of Schizophrenia; secondary outcomes for patients are positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and relapse rate, while secondary outcomes for primary caregivers are burden of care and quality of life. All measures are assessed at baseline, immediately post-intervention and at three months follow-up. Discussion This randomized control trial, conducted in Jordan among people living with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers, will assess the effect of psycho-educational interventions on knowledge of Schizophrenia, patients’ positive and negative symptoms and quality of life, and caregivers’ burden of care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN78084871 PMID:24450608

2014-01-01

402

A multi-isotope (radium, boron,strontium, sulfur, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen) investigation of fossil groundwater from the Disi Aquifer in southern Jordan: tracing water sources, water-rock interactions, and residence time (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rise in population, consecutive droughts induced from climate change, and associated increased water demands in the Middle East have placed an increasing pressure on available water resources, which in turn has accelerated the rates of their depletion and contamination. In addition to desalination and recycling waste water, exploitation of non-renewable (“fossil”) groundwater has become an alternative water source. Most of the fossil groundwater in the Middle East and Northern Africa occupies confined sandstone aquifers and is typically characterized by high water quality. Recent findings have shown, however, that fossil groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone aquifers in southern Jordan and Israel has high levels of naturally occurring and carcinogenic radium isotopes that largely exceed the international drinking water standards, and poses a health risk upon long-term utilization. Here we present the results of a multi-isotope study of low-saline (TDS=250-450 mg/L) groundwater from the Cambro-Ordovician Disi-Mudawarra sandstone aquifer systems in southern Jordan. The ?18O, ?2H, and 14C variations show at least three recharge phases into the confined and unconfined zones of the aquifer. High ?11B values (34-47‰) and B/Cl ratios (>>seawater ratio) suggests that the recharge water originated from rainwater of an early stage of air mass evolution, with negligible water-rock interaction in the aquifer. This meteoric composition is consistent with 87Sr/86Sr (70804 to 0.70860) and ?34S (9-16‰) values, and infers minimum dissolution of diagenetic carbonates that could have contributed depleted 11B, high 87Sr/86Sr, and dead carbon. The uncorrected 14C ages point to three major recharge episodes to the northwestern Arabian Peninsula: (1) >30 ka (Khrein aquifer); (2) 15-29 ka (confined Disi aquifer); and (3) 8-12 ka (unconfined Disi aquifer), in which the latter coincide with the “pluvial maximum” of Early Holocene. The stable isotope composition of the Disi groundwater (?18O -6.4 to -5.5‰) is significantly different from the depleted 18O and 2H composition recorded in fossil groundwater of the same age in other sandstone aquifers in Northern Africa and suggests origin from marine moisture sources of the initial stage of condensation with minimal rainout fractionation, possibly by northern migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ).

Vengosh, A.; Rimawi, O.; Al-Zoubi, A.; Marie, A.; Ganor, J.

2010-12-01

403

Generic Jordan Polynomials Kevin McCrimmon  

E-print Network

system J (algebra, triple, or pair) encodes information about its linear actions ­ all of its possible). In this paper we study all possible actions, linear and nonlinear, on larger systems. This is encoded actions by linear trans- formations on bimodules M (equivalently, on all larger split null extensions J M

404

CV (K. Jordan) 1 CURRICULM VITAE  

E-print Network

. (2011). Juvenile transfer and deterrence: Re-examining the effectiveness of a `get tough' policy. Crime; 2003-2005 Community Guidance Center, Indiana, PA Teaching Experience/Classes Taught Juvenile Delinquency/Juvenile Justice Criminological Theory Offender Treatment Corrections Diversity

Wu, Shin-Tson

405

CV (K. Jordan) 1 CURRICULM VITAE  

E-print Network

Juvenile Delinquency/Juvenile Justice Criminological Theory Offender Treatment Corrections Diversity/Multiculturalism in Criminal Justice Research Methods (Graduate and Undergraduate) Minorities and Crime (Graduate Martin: A test of the racial gradient thesis. Journal of Crime and Justice. DOI: 10.1080/0735648X.2013

Van Stryland, Eric

406

Book review: A Taste of Jordan Algebras  

E-print Network

algebras would have found their place in everyday-life of mathematics and physics, just like, say, Hilbert spaces, spectral theory or Lie algebras. However, this is not the way things developed. So what went a mathematical text but also an outstanding mathematician's account of his life's work (from the Introduction, p

Bertram, Wolfgang - Institut de Mathématiques �lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

407

Outcomes of the Boston Keratoprosthesis in Jordan  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To report the indications, outcomes, and complications of the Boston type I keratoprosthesis (KPro) from the first Jordanian study on the subject. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on 20 eyes of 19 consecutive patients who had Boston type I KPro implantation at King Abdullah University Hospital. Surgeries were performed by the same surgeon (WS) from November 2007 to March 2010. Data collected included age, sex, primary indication, number of previous grafts, preoperative comorbidities, visual acuity before and after surgery, and complications. Results: The mean age of the participants was 51.7±19.9 years (range: 10–80 years). The mean follow-up was 18.1±9.5 months (range: 3–6 months). The most common primary corneal pathology was vascularized corneal opacity (40%). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improved significantly in 85% of eyes; 65% had a BCVA of 20/200 or better and 25% had a BCVA of 20/50 or better. The most frequent complication was retroprosthesis membrane (RPM) formation, which occurred in 45% of eyes. Two eyes (10%) had implant extrusion and required further surgery. Conclusion: Boston Kpro offers a reasonably safe and effective solution for patients with corneal blindness in whom the prognosis for natural corneal grafting is poor. PMID:22346122

Shihadeh, Wisam A.; Mohidat, Hasan M.

2012-01-01

408

AHMAD AL JAYOUSI Kitim, Irbid, Jordan  

E-print Network

SQL] http://www.arabentrepreneur.com [PHP & MySQL] Research Papers 1. Censorship of the Internet. 2 programming Using PL/SQL and Oracle, Internet Applications. OBJECTIVE To learn and gain the required months (From December 2004 until April 2005), Database Programming, C Programming, and Internet

409

JORDAN GROUPS AND AUTOMORPHISM GROUPS OF  

E-print Network

Higher School of Economics 20, Myasnitskaya Ulitsa, Moscow 101000, Russia popovvl@mi.ras.ru Abstract Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences Gubkina 8, Moscow 119991, Russia and National Research University

410

JORDAN GROUPS AND AUTOMORPHISM GROUPS OF  

E-print Network

Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences Gubkina 8, Moscow 119991, Russia and National Research University Higher School of Economics 20, Myasnitskaya Ulitsa, Moscow 101000, Russia popovvl@mi.ras.ru Abstract. The first section

411

Hypogene and supergene alteration of the zeolite-bearing pyroclastic deposits at Tell Rimah, Jordan, and rift-related processes along the Dead-Sea-Transform Fault System during the Quaternary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The boundary between the Arabian and African plates, is marked in the Middle East by one of the most prominent deep-seated lineamentary structures, called the Dead-Sea-Transform Fault System (DSTFS). Structural and mineralogical processes related to the DSTFS were correlated with equivalent processes leading to the alteration of pyroclastic deposits of alkali-olivine basaltic to nepheline basaltic composition which formed during a time span of less than 0.5 Ma. The large deposit of Tell Rimah, Jordan, is operated for the exploitation of zeolites, tuffs, and as pozzolana raw material. Four discrete stages of mineralizations have been distinguished from each other within these volcanic-hosted mineral deposits. (1) Hypogene syneruptive alteration of pyroclastic rocks produced siliceous gels ("allophane"), smectite, analcime, and phillipsite in vesicles when the groundwater level was low in the rift basin of the DSTFS. The lake-level lowstand caused the fluid system in the pyroclastic cone to become self-sufficient and it has been considered as a closed hydrothermal system. (2) Periods of tectonic and magmatic quiescence grinded the detrital sedimentation in the rift basin to a halt, while triggering a supergene alteration in the eruptive cones on the adjacent Arabian Plate. (3) Epigenetic alteration affected the pyroclastic rocks in the distal part of the DSTFS as a result of a rising water level. The water gradually filled the pore space of the permeable pyroclastic deposits almost to completeness and caused meniscus and blocky cements of calcite, phillipsite and chabazite to develop. In the rift basin, contemporaneously with the alteration of the pyroclastic rocks, freshwater limestones formed on calcareous bedrocks. Ba and Mn minerals in these freshwater limestones were supplied by subaquatic brines. Subsequently, a drastic lowering of the lake water level in the DSTFS converted the system of subaquatic freshwater limestones into subaerial tufa and travertine. As long as the basal parts of the pyroclastic units at Tell Rimah were in the reaches of the saline groundwaters, calcite and faujasite developed in the pyroclastic host rocks. (4) Another lake level lowstand within the rift basin caused the pyroclastic host rocks to get emerged and forced zeolite-carbonate mineralization in the tuffs to a complete stillstand. Hypogene and supergene alteration in these phreatomagmatic-strombolian pyroclastic cones of the Pleistocene x were correlated with lake high- and lowstands in the adjacent rift basin along the DSTFS. The results obtained by current tectono-morphological studies of the rift-related alteration of pyroclastic rocks along the DSTFS may also be applied to basin-and-swell-topographies elsewhere in the world. The current studies involved microscopy supplemented by SEM-EDX, X-ray diffraction analysis, mid (MIR) and far (FIR) infrared spectroscopy. Major and trace elements were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). C- and O isotope analyses were conducted on carbonate minerals, which were also targeted on by radiocarbon dating.

Dill, H. G.; Techmer, A.; Botz, R.; Dohrmann, R.; Kaufhold, S.

2012-09-01

412

Israel and Jordan, 1998. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad, 1998 (Israel and Jordan).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum project focuses on ancient civilizations, especially the various cultures that have inhabited the territory that is now Jerusalem, Israel. The project gives objectives for students to aim for and outlines the following 4-part procedure: (1) Background and Preparation; (2) Archaeology; (3) Group Research Project; and (4) Jerusalem…

Burpee, Mark

413

OPHTHALMIC EMERGENCIES DURING THE FESTIVE PERIOD IN AQABA - SOUTH JORDAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: A retrospective, hospital-based study was conducted in Princess Haya Military Hospital. The aim was to evaluate the emergency eye cases during the feast vacation in Aqaba. Methods: We chose four feast vacations during the years 2001 and 2002, counting 20 days, and compared the emergency cases during these days with those seen on other randomly chosen 20 days during

Rihab A. Ghanma; Abdullah M. Ghanma

414

Environmental study of the Amman-Zerqa Basin Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid population growth, urbanization expansion of rural settlements, industrial activity, intensively irrigated agriculture,\\u000a pesticides consumption, and continuous dumping of hazardous waste in the Amman-Zerqa Basin since 1967 are the major factors\\u000a threatening the quality of the environment. Thus, an environmental recommendation is proposed to protect the environment and\\u000a water resources in the study area. The chemical analysis of the springs

M. Awad

1997-01-01

415

The Constitution of Christian Communal Boundaries and Spheres in Jordan  

E-print Network

was established in 1921, the British mandatory authorities estimated the population of this newly created Sunni Muslim-majority country at 230,000 persons out of which a little less than 10 percent were Christians.1 had a history of social, political, and economic integration to the Muslim-majority society through

Boyer, Edmond

416

A Taste of Jordan Algebras Kevin McCrimmon  

E-print Network

's students) to get to know him as a warm human being. Future histories of mathematics should take and active thing: to see isomorphisms as cloning maps, isotopes as subtle rearrangements of an algebra

417

A Taste of Jordan Algebras Kevin McCrimmon  

E-print Network

-Mutter) for helping me (and all Jake's students) to get to know him as a warm human being. Future histories the mathematics as a living and active thing: to see isomorphisms as cloning maps, isotopes as subtle

418

Energy parameters of a solar car for Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

All parameters related to car energy were investigated in this work, and the power basics of a car design powered by solar energy are laid down. Year-round weather conditions, car weight, road roughness and road inclination were taken as variable parameters used to calculate the car speed and working hours (year round). Fixed parameters taken for the design were: a

M. Hammad; T. Khatib

1996-01-01

419

Grassmann Numbers and Clifford-Jordan-Wigner Representation of Supersymmetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The elementary particles of Physics are classified according to the behavior of the multi-particle states under exchange of identical particles: bosonic states are symmetric while fermionic states are antisymmetric. This manifests itself also in the commutation properties of the respective creation operators: bosonic creation operators commute while fermionic ones anticommute. It is natural therefore to study bosons using commuting entities (e.g. complex variables), whereas to describe fermions, anticommuting variables are more naturally suited. In this paper we introduce these anticommuting- and at first sight unfamiliar- variables (Grassmann numbers) and investigate their properties. In particular, we briefly discuss differential and integral calculus on Grassmann numbers. Work supported in part by DOE contracts No. DE-AC-0276-ER 03074 and 03075; NSF Grant No. DMS-8917754.

Catto, Sultan; Choun, Yoon S.; Gürcan, Yasemin; Khalfan, Amish; Kurt, Levent

2013-01-01

420

Kindergarten Teachers’ Beliefs Toward Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to examine the beliefs of Jordanian kindergarten teachers toward developmentally appropriate\\u000a practices (DAP). The sample consists of 285 (14.9%) randomly selected teachers working in public and private kindergartens.\\u000a A questionnaire with two parts, (1) general information and (2) teachers’ beliefs regarding DAP, was developed to answer the\\u000a research questions. The items were distributed into

Majed Abu-JaberAseel Al-Shawareb; Aseel Al-Shawareb; Eman Gheith

2010-01-01

421

Flexible Cognitive Strategies during Motor Learning Jordan A. Taylor1  

E-print Network

by National Research Service Award F32NS064749 from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders of the manuscript. Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. * E

Ivry, Rich

422

Speciality of Lie-Jordan algebras A. N. Grishkov  

E-print Network

+yx). Thus, we have the functors (.)- and (.)+ from the category Ass_of associative alge- bras left adjoint functors U : Lie_-! Ass_ ______________________________ *Supported by the FAPESP, Proc. 98/2162-6. 1 #12; and S : Jord_- ! Ass_, that is, for any L

423

Speciality of Lie-Jordan algebras A. N. Grishkov  

E-print Network

, +, , with the multiplication xy = 1 2 (xy+yx). Thus, we have the functors (.)- and (.)+ from the category Ass of associative that both functors have left adjoint functors U : Lie - Ass Supported by the FAPESP, Proc. 98/2162-6. 1 #12;and S : Jord - Ass, that is, for any L Lie, J Jord, A Ass there are bijections HomLie(L, A- ) - HomAss

424

To: CCSF Directors From: Terry Jordan and Drew Harvell  

E-print Network

, even disciplinary or "narrow" topics need additional research: 1) alternative fracking technologies, we need: 1) clear distinction between the genuine uncertainties and risks of the fracking and water

Angenent, Lars T.

425

Volcanotectonic evolution of central Jordan: Evidence from the Shihan Volcano  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The E-W Siwaqa transcurrent fault is the result of tectonic activity related to the opening of the Red Sea and sinistral movement along the Dead Sea Transform (DST). During the translation and anticlockwise rotation of the Arabian Plate, dextral motion occurred along the Siwaqa Fault that resulted in opening of the crust and allowed lava to erupt intermittently from the Shihan Volcano, producing the Shihan Basalt Group. The stress field that formed the Siwaqa Fault and its related volcanic group is characterized by N-S to NNW-SSE compression and E-W to ENE-WSW extension, which is compatible with that known in Middle Miocene - Recent and related to the DST tectonic activity. The temporal and spatial distribution of the different volcanic formations was possibly affected by stress fluctuations. The first volcanic stage occurred prior to the formation of Wadi Mujib during the Messinian age. The latest erupted during the middle Pleistocene after the formation of Wadi Mujib. The Shihan Basalt Group consists of alkali olivine basalt, basanite and hawaiite. The basalt is subdivided into a silica saturated unit and an undersaturated silica unit. Crustal contamination is evident; variations in the basalt composition are due to different degrees of partial melting and fractional crystallization.

Ibrahim, Khalil M.; Moh'd, Basem K.; Masri, Ahmad I.; Al-Taj, Masdouq M.; Musleh, Salem M.; Alzughoul, Khitam A.

2014-12-01

426

CONFORMAL WELDING OF JORDAN CURVES USING WEIGHTED DIRICHLET SPACES  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT. THIS PAPER GIVES AN ALTERNATIVE DESCRIPTION OF LEHTO'S RESULTS ON HOMEOMORPHISMS WHICH ADMIT CONFORMAL WELDING [6]. A NORMAL FAMILIES ARGUMENT IS CONTROLLED BY THE ACTION OF THE HOMEOMORPHISM AS A COMPOSITION OPERATOR ON WEIGHTED DIRICHLET SPACES. THIS POINT OF VIEW ADMITS A DISCUSSION OF UNIQUENESS.

Gavin L. Jones

427

Farmers' Attitudes and Skills of Farm Business Management in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to investigate farmers' attitudes and skills of farm management. Two scales were constructed as an instrument for data collection, based on a sample of 100 farm units. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.84 or higher, which indicated that the instrument scales were internally consistent. Non-parametric tests were used to analyze…

Al-Rimawi, Ahmad Sh.; Karablieh, Emad K.; Al-Qadi, Abdulfatah S.; Al-Qudah, Hussein F.

2006-01-01

428

Ethnopharmacological survey of wild medicinal plants in Showbak, Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two main research questions are framing this investigation: (1) the main taxa of the medicinal importance value altered the Showbak forest stand and species composition? (2) The most safe species and what are the toxic ones (unsafe). These two research questions are the vital ones to draw a clear image about the wild medicinal plants of this investigated area of

S. Al-Qura’n

2009-01-01

429

Vitamin D Status in Jordan: Dress Style and Gender Discrepancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent worldwide and has been linked to many diseases. The aims of the present study were to assess the vitamin D status of Jordanians at the national level and to identify groups of the population at high risk for vitamin D deficiency. Methods: Vitamin D status was assessed in a national sample of 5,640

A. Batieha; Y. Khader; H. Jaddou; D. Hyassat; Z. Batieha; M. Khateeb; A. Belbisi; K. Ajlouni

2011-01-01

430

La controverse de 1874 entre Camille Jordan et Leopold Kronecker.  

E-print Network

. Laboratoire de Mathématiques Lens (LML, EA2462). Fédération de Recherche Mathématique du Nord-Pas-de-Calais (CNRS, FR 2956). Université d'Artois (IUFM du Nord Pas de Calais). Faculté des Sciences Jean Perrin, rue

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

431

ICT Training Courses for Teacher Professional Development in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is increasingly having pervasive role and presence in the educational milieu as it continues to shape all aspects of our lives. Numerous reform projects have been in place aiming to infuse ICT across education systems. Teachers are widely believed to be the key agents of any educational change.…

Abuhmaid, Atef

2011-01-01

432

THEATREHOUSE JordanFriedman,MichaelTrzcinski,ProgramDirectors  

E-print Network

in living and learning. All you need is four people and a cool team name to compete) Theatre House Talent community will be where students from different places and backgrounds come together and share their love of theatre. By enrolling in this program, the students will learn about all different types of theatre

Hayden, Nancy J.

433

Benchmarking Modern Web Browsers Jordan Nielson Carey Williamson Martin Arlitt  

E-print Network

of tests considered, particularly in rendering speed and JavaScript string operation performance. I of computing device, operating system, software, and services purchased by end users. Given that most browsers pages can differ by a factor of 2-3 across browsers, JavaScript string operator performance can differ

Williamson, Carey

434

Containing the opposition : selective representation in Jordan and Turkey  

E-print Network

How does elite manipulation of election mechanisms affect the representation of political regime opponents? While the spread of elections has reached all the continents, the number of actual democracies has not increased ...

Wakeman, Raffaela Lisette

2009-01-01

435

Potential of Hybrid PV \\/ Wind Turbine System in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Renewable resources gained more attention during the last two decades because of the continues energy demand increasing parallel with fossil fuel resources decreases, additional to the environmental effect to the earth. In this article a feasibility of using the renewable resources for power generation was done by proposed a hybrid system (PV and Wind turbine) for grid connected applications for

Salwan S. Dihrab; M. A. Alghoul; K. Sopian; M. Y. Sulaiman

2009-01-01

436

Geometric networks based on Markov point Jonathan Jordan  

E-print Network

.e. we have a Poisson process). In the above framework, R = r1, is constant and (, ) = . We can now use) . Then the "acceptance" probability is max(1, ^nN -^nO ). 3 #12;Strauss process simulations The following simulations are for Strauss processes, conditioned on having n points, with the initial configuration being a Poisson process

437

Evaluation of residential rainfall harvesting systems in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field study was conducted to evaluate the potential of rooftop rainfall harvesting (RRH), determine the smallest tank volume and the potential contribution of RRH to the national water budget. The potential water volume from rooftops nationwide is 14.7 million cubic metres per year (MCM\\/year), which comprises 6% of the domestic national water budget. Public water supply rates decreased for

Majed Abu-Zreig; Ayat Hazaymeh; Muhammad Shatanawi

2012-01-01

438

MAS275 Probability Modelling Example 24: Dr Jonathan Jordan  

E-print Network

;Monopoly simplified Board game with 40 "squares", which we will number 0 to 39 (or 1 to 40). Most simplified Board game with 40 "squares", which we will number 0 to 39 (or 1 to 40). Most are labelled Board game with 40 "squares", which we will number 0 to 39 (or 1 to 40). Most are labelled with a street

Jordan, Jonathan

439

Kindergarten Teachers' Beliefs toward Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to examine the beliefs of Jordanian kindergarten teachers toward developmentally appropriate practices (DAP). The sample consists of 285 (14.9%) randomly selected teachers working in public and private kindergartens. A questionnaire with two parts, (1) general information and (2) teachers' beliefs regarding DAP, was…

Abu-Jaber, Majed; Al-Shawareb, Aseel; Gheith, Eman

2010-01-01

440

Alternate energy installations on the Jordan College Campus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The considered energy installations include a flat plate air system that stores its solar heat in rocks, a flat plate drain down solar system for space heating and domestic hot water that stores its heated liquid in tanks, and a drain down do-it-yourself domestic water system using flat plate collectors. Attention is also given to a do-it-yourself air system that

L. K. Coxon

1978-01-01

441

Psychological Loneliness among Arab Students at Irbid National University, Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to investigate the level of psychological loneliness among Arab students studying at Irbid National University, and to investigate the effect of year of study and gender of students on the level of psychological loneliness. The sample of the study consisted of 149 students, 133 males and 16 females from first, second,…

Al-Kadoumi, Khawla; Sawalha, Abdel Muhdi; Al Momani, Mohammad

2012-01-01

442

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT JORDAN HARVEY AT KNOWMAD ADVENTURES jordan.knowmad@gmail.com 1 877 616 8747 www.KnowmadAdventures.com  

E-print Network

techniques, and share a meal. · Lunch in a centuries-old hacienda while relaxing in the Sacred Valley high on a series of canopy walkways. · Do it in style! This luxurious adventure highlights carefully OF PERU AND THE AMAZON DAY 1- 2Lima DAY 3-5 Sacred Valley of the Inca DAY 6 Machu Picchu DAY 7-9 Cusco DAY

Netoff, Theoden

443

Study of galactic gamma ray sources with Milagro Jordan A. Goodman for the Milagro Collaboration  

E-print Network

. The diffuse gamma radiation arising from the interaction of cosmic ray particles with matter and radiation surface brightness sources such as the diffuse gamma radiation arising from interactions of cosmic in the Galaxy is one of the few probes available to study the origin of the cosmic rays. Milagro is a water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

444

Distribution and dynamics of mangrove forests of South Asiaq Chandra Giri a,*, Jordan Long b  

E-print Network

factors may be dominant in specific areas. Major causes of deforestation in South Asia include (i) con) to identify rates, patterns, and causes of change in greater spatial and thematic details compared to regional,135 ha of mangroves were deforested and 80,461 ha were reforested with a net loss of 11,673 ha. In all

Tomkins, Andrew

445

Psychosocial predictors of suicidal ideation in patients diagnosed with chronic illnesses in jordan.  

PubMed

Suicide ideation (SI) is considered a major psychiatric emergency in patients diagnosed with chronic illnesses. Suicide ideation is a multifaceted issue that involves bio- psychosocial and cultural factors that interfere with patients' abilities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychosocial predictors of SI among Jordanian patients with chronic illnesses. A cross-sectional design using self-administered questionnaires was used to collect data from 480 patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. The mean score of suicide ideation was 4.07 (SD  =  1.7) and almost 20% (n  =  85) of the participants found to be suicidal, the majority were suffering from moderate to severe depressive symptoms and low levels of life satisfaction. Also, the analysis showed that the patients had a high level of optimism and moderate perception of social support from family, friends, and significant other. Type of illness has a significant relation to the 'seriousness' component of SI (p  =  0.023). Depression (?  =  0.345, p<0.001) was a significant risk factor for 'thought' component of SI, and optimism (?  =  -0.008, p<0.05) a significant protective factor against the thought component of SI. Patients with chronic illnesses suffer serious psychological disturbances and are in need of psychological care, and periodic psychological screening to maintain their psychological wellbeing. PMID:25353299

Amer, Nuha Remon Yacoub; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M

2014-11-01

446

Gregory M. Saunders, Peter J. Angeline, and Jordan B. Pollack Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research  

E-print Network

and destructive algorithms, GNARL employs a popula- tion of networks and uses a fitness function's unsupervised, 1990; Hassibi & Stork, 1993; Omlin & Giles, 1993). But these constructive and destructive algorithms), these algorithms allow only limited structural change. Finally, constructive and destructive algorithms

Pollack, Jordan B.

447

Gregory M. Saunders, Peter J. Angeline, and Jordan B. Pollack Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research  

E-print Network

and destructive algorithms, GNARL employs a popula­ tion of networks and uses a fitness function's unsupervised, 1990; Hassibi & Stork, 1993; Omlin & Giles, 1993). But these constructive and destructive algorithms), these algorithms allow only limited structural change. Finally, constructive and destructive algorithms

Pollack, Jordan B.

448

Hydrochemistry of aquifers in the southern Dead Sea area, southern Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demand for water resources in the area south of the Dead Sea due to continued development, especially at the Arab Potash Company (APC) works necessitates that water quality in the area be monitored and evaluated based on the local geology and hydrogeology. The objective of this paper is to provide information on the past and present status of the main aquifers under exploitation or planned for future development. Two main aquifers are discussed: the Safi water field, presently being operated, and the Dhiraa water field, which is being developed. The aquifer developed in the Safi water field is shallow and fed by the Hasa fault system, which drains a significant portion of the Karak mountains. This aquifer seems to be well replenished within the core, where no obvious long-term degradation in water quality can be identified. However, in the low recharge areas within the distal portions of the alluvial fan, there has been a degradation in water quality with time. The degradation is caused by the dissolution of the Lisan Marl, which is present at the outskirts of the fan system, based on hydrochemistry of water in the wells. The Dhiraa field is a deep (800 950 m) aquifer drilled specifically for the extraction of brackish water present in the Kurnub aquifer. Available data indicate that there are at least three distinct water types within this field. These water types are variable in quality, and there may be potential for mixing of these waters, thus affecting the quality of the freshest waters presently available. Tritium and oxygen isotope analysis indicate that the water is old and possibly nonrenewable.

Abu-Jaber, N. S.; Wafa, N. A.

1996-12-01

449

Dynamics of Co-evolutionary Learning Hugues Juill e Jordan B. Pollack  

E-print Network

-evolution in predator/prey games [Reynolds, 1994, Miller & Cli, 1994]. Using competitive #12;tness in a massively of intertwined spi- rals, a very dicult classi#12;cation benchmark from the #12;eld of neural networks

Fernandez, Thomas

450

Dynamics of Coevolutionary Learning Hugues Juill'e Jordan B. Pollack  

E-print Network

/prey games [Reynolds, 1994, Miller & Cliff, 1994]. Using competitive fitness in a massively parallel imple­ mentation of the genetic programming (GP) paradigm [Koza, 1992] we solved the problem of intertwined spi

Pollack, Jordan B.

451

A Geographic Information System (GIS) to Define Indicators for Development and Planning in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The computerization and the creation of a digital data base is a must for the employment of many of the state of the art tools in the Optimal Planning process. This is easy made using Geographic Information System (GIS). GIS is an effective modern planning technique which gives the power to create maps, integrate information, visualize and solve problems, present

Balqies Sadoun; Bassam Saleh

2010-01-01

452

A Mixed Methods Study of Participant Reaction to Domestic Violence Research in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on domestic violence against women has increased considerably over the past few decades. Most participants in such studies find the exercise worthwhile and of greater benefit than emotional cost; however, systematic examination of participant reaction to research on violence is considerably lacking, especially in the Middle East region. This study begins to fill this gap by examining women’s reactions

Cari Jo Clark; Manal Shahrouri; Louma Halasa; Inaam Khalaf; Rachael Spencer; Susan Everson-Rose

2012-01-01

453

A Mixed Methods Study of Participant Reaction to Domestic Violence Research in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on domestic violence against women has increased considerably over the past few decades. Most participants in such studies find the exercise worthwhile and of greater benefit than emotional cost; however, systematic examination of participant reaction to research on violence is considerably lacking, especially in the Middle East region.…

Clark, Cari Jo; Shahrouri, Manal; Halasa, Louma; Khalaf, Inaam; Spencer, Rachael; Everson-Rose, Susan

2012-01-01

454

Pilot study: awareness of university students in Jordan of the positive health effects of garlic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  One of the most popular herbal remedies, garlic, is used for its many medicinal applications. These historically valuable\\u000a applications could be summarized by its cardiovascular, antineoplastic, and antimicrobial properties. However, public knowledge\\u000a of the health benefits of taking garlic is much better known than the adverse events that may result when garlic interacts\\u000a with other medications.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aim  This study aims to

Saafan A. AL-Safi; Lina Wahba; Ikbal N. Thuheerat; Imad A. Al-Doghim; Hala Al-Eid; Ahmad S. Alkofahi; Faisal H. Aboul-Enein

2009-01-01

455

An Undergraduate Mechatronics Project Class at Philadelphia University, Jordan: Methodology and Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mechatronics is a branch of engineering whose final product should involve mechanical movements controlled by smart electronics. The design and implementation of functional prototypes are an essential learning experience for the students in this field. In this paper, the guidelines for a successful mechatronics project class are presented,…

Tutunji, T. A.; Saleem, A.; Rabbo, S. A.

2009-01-01

456

Essential oil compositions of two populations of Salvia samuelssonii growing in different biogeographical regions of Jordan.  

PubMed

The composition of the essential oils of flowering aerial parts of Salvia samuelssonii Rech. fil. (Lamiaceae Section Aethiopis), collected in two different biogeographical regions, has been analyzed. Samplel, collected in a Mediterranean-like region, "As-Subayhi", contains mainly monoterpenes (54.2%), sesquiterpenes (27.6%) and phenylpropanoids (10.5%), while sample 2, collected in the Irano-Turanian region, "Al-Adasiyyah", contains mainly phenylpropanoids (30.6%), monoterpenes (24.9%) and sesquiterpenes (21.2%). In Samplel, the most representative constituents were sabinene (21.5%), cis-chrysanthenyl acetate (20.8%), germacrene D (9.3%) and myristicin (5.9%), while in sample 2, myristicin (24.1%), sclareoloxide (6.3%), and germacrene D (5.7%) were main constituents. The rate of oxygenated derivatives in the Irano-Turanian sample was higher than the Mediterranean sample. Myristicin is an unusual constituent of Salvia species. PMID:24660484

Bader, Ammar; Cioni, Pier Luigi; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Flamini, Guido

2014-01-01

457

Ethnopharmacological survey of medicinal herbs in Jordan, the Ajloun Heights region.  

PubMed

The study of local knowledge about natural resources is becoming increasingly important in defining strategies and actions for conservation of medicinal plants. This study therefore sought to collect information from local population concerning the use of Ajloun Heights region medicinal plants; identify the most important species used; determine the relative importance of the species surveyed and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) in relation to medicinal plant use. Data collection relied predominantly on qualitative tools to record the interviewee's personal information and topics related to the medicinal use of specific plants. Our results revealed that 46 plant species grown in the study region are still in use in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Achillea falcata, Matricaria aurea, Majorana syriaca, Allium sativum and Allium cepa. The use of moderately unsafe or toxic plants was noted to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the locals. These plants include Ecballium elaterium, Euphorbia hierosolymitana, Mandragora autumnalis and Citrullus colocynthis. Kidney problems scored the highest ICF while Crocus hyemalis was the plant of highest use value. Searching the literature evidenced some concordance with the solicited plant uses mentioned by the informants. PMID:17097250

Aburjai, Talal; Hudaib, Mohammad; Tayyem, Rabab; Yousef, Mohammed; Qishawi, Maher

2007-03-21

458

Hotspot Mitigation in the StarCAVE Jordan Rhee, Jurgen Schulze, Thomas A. DeFanti  

E-print Network

(UCSD) Abstract Rear-projected screens such as those in Digital Light Projection (DLP) televisions is a room-sized immersive virtual reality environment that projects 3D images in real-time. The cave is used of the cave shows a side view of one of the walls. The projectors are located behind the screens, so

Schulze, Jürgen P.

459

Potentially Destabilizing Effects of Islamic Fundamentalism on U.S. Aid to Jordan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1979 Islamic fundamentalist revolution in Iran resulted in the replacement of the pro-U.S. monarchy of the Shah with the theocracy of the Ayatollah Khomeini, which repudiated all Iranian/U.S. security agreements radically changing the equations of inf...

C. L. Strobbe

1984-01-01

460

Math 214:Numbers, equations, and proofs Instructor: Jordan Ellenberg, Fine 808, 8-6467  

E-print Network

the require- ments of the course. A: Complete mastery of the material and ability to communicate this mastery clearly and precisely. A- : Near-complete mastery of all aspects of the course, excellent ability

461

Working memory for patterned sequences of auditory objects in a songbird Jordan A. Comins a  

E-print Network

is inherently hierarchical. Ã? 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The capacity to remember sequences remain poorly understood, in part, because no suitably complex animal model has emerged. Here, we, Herrmann, & Langemann, 2008). 0010-0277/$ - see front matter Ã? 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi

Gentner, Timothy

462

To: SPU Students, Faculty, and Staff From: Jeffrey C. Jordan, Vice President for Student Life  

E-print Network

Brown, Director of Health Services Re: Influenza Prevention and Preparation Date: January 18, 2013 As we continue to hear concern about the local, state, and national outbreaks of influenza, Seattle Pacific as germs are easily spread this way. · Know the Signs and Symptoms: SPU's Health Center provides helpful

Nelson, Tim

463

Testimony Presented by Peter Grant Jordan, Ed.D. Interim Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs  

E-print Network

for students, faculty and staff who are experiencing influenza-like symptoms. And the staff members across our campuses are vulnerable to the H1N1 Influenza A pandemic sweeping the nation. #12;2 As you in these offices are responsible for tracking and following up with any individual who presents these symptoms

Brinkmann, Peter

464

"Canada's Most Notorious Bad Mother": the newspaper coverage of the Jordan Heikamp Inquest.  

PubMed

This article is an examination of the media coverage of the inquest into the 1997 starvation death of an infant in a homeless women's shelter in Toronto. It explores the usefulness of using the discourse of mothering, intersected with the individualization of responsibility, to understand why one interpretation of this case seized the imagination of the public and informed media accounts. Examining how the mother of this infant was constructed as a "bad" mother helps to understand how hegemonic notions of "good" mothering are reinforced and perpetuated. The invocation of the ideals of motherhood, however, prevents us from seeing the reality of others' experiences of motherhood and the fact that, for many, there are barriers and restrictions to the ideal of good mothering. PMID:16308921

Robson, Krista

2005-05-01

465

Philadelphia University P.O. Box (1) Philadelphia University 19392 Jordan  

E-print Network

-2-637-4440 Faculty of Information Technology Department of Applied Computer Science Mobile Number : +962-79-9714247 E Nationality : Jordanian Marital Status : Married Number of Children : Two Education 1992 Philosophy Doctorate Standards for different majors in Information Technology. Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific

466

Natasha Zoe Kirkham Address: Jordan Hall, Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305  

E-print Network

-switching in preschoolers (and adults), the role of memory and inhibitory control in task-switching Publications Richardson Science, 6, 449-467. Kirkham, N.Z., & Diamond, A. (2003). Sorting between theories of perseveration in Mind and Inhibit a Prepotent Response. Developmental Psychology, 38, 352-362. Kirkham, N.Z., Slemmer, J

Kirkham, Natasha Z.

467

Optimal Use of Irrigation Water in the Jordan Valley: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water shortage is a serious problem in most countries in theMiddle East. Irrigation water consumes about three-fourths of theavailable fresh water resources in Jordam and many othercountries in the region. This article presents a practical approachto manage and optimize the irrigation water use in the region.The ultimate objective is to minimize the outside water and tomanage the irrigation water use

Radwan A. Al-Weshah

2000-01-01

468

Sources of groundwater salinity along the flow path, Disi Dead Sea/Jordan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The groundwater along the eastern escarpment of the Dead Sea shows a variety of chemical compositions with EC values ranging between 500 and a few thousand ?S/cm. In this article the different groundwaters were correlated to the aquifers from where they originate and the water rock interactions were elaborated at. It was found that the start of intercalations of Permo-Triassic and Jurassic rocks in the area and the basaltic dykes and sills are the sources, which cause a drastic increase in the salinity of the water. These rocks contents of residual evaporites, contact metamorphism products, sills, dykes and secondary altered mineral assemblage of plagioclase-, pyroxenes- and Fe-, Mn- minerals cause also drastic changes in ionic ratios, saturation indices and groundwater types. Fresh groundwater flows entering the area become, gradually, after a few kilometres highly salinized and of earthalkali type with prevailing chloride and sulfate instead of being bicarbonate waters.

Salameh, Elias; Hammouri, Rania

2008-09-01

469

Modelling precipitation-streamflow processes in karst basin: The case of the Jordan River sources, Israel  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system approach, daily precipitation-streamflow model was developed for both the base and the surface flow components, of large-scale karst basins. Long-term streamflow data were separated to baseflow and surface flow using the ``recursive digital filter'' method, which provides time series for model calibration. The HYdrological Model for Karst Environment (HYMKE) includes attributes to large-scale preferential flow that recharge the

Alon Rimmer; Yigal Salingar

2006-01-01

470

Slip rate on the Dead Sea transform fault in northern Araba valley (Jordan)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Araba valley lies between the southern tip of the Dead Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba. This depression, blanketed with alluvial and lacustrine deposits, is cut along its entire length by the Dead Sea fault. In many places the fault is well defined by scarps, and evidence for left-lateral strike-slip faulting is abundant. The slip rate on the fault

Y. Klinger; J. P. Avouac; N. Abou Karaki; L. Dorbath; D. Bourles; J. L. Reyss

2000-01-01

471

Time Series Analysis Model for Rainfall Data in Jordan: Case Study for Using Time Series Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problem statement: Time series analysis and forecasting has become a major tool in different applications in hydrology and environment al management fields. Among the most effective approaches for analyzing time series data is the mo del introduced by Box and Jenkins, ARIMA (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average). Approach: In this study we used Box-Jenkins methodology to build ARIMA model for monthly

Naill M. Momani

2009-01-01

472

Compact methods for inverting matrices and solving simultaneous equations by use of Gauss-Jordan elimination  

E-print Network

) Adopt the superscripts to indicate the initial or zeroth step in a computational process to be described in detail in what follows. The n x n matrices (1) g (k) (a(k)) l~k~n calculated sequentially will have the following properties: (a) each ai... is an element of F; (k) (b) without exception the elements ai are formed. from the (k) (k-1) (k) elements a aud in such a way that a specific a' ' can i. J Pq (k-1) replace a' ' in the arr