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Sample records for joule heating

  1. Reduced Joule heating in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léonard, François

    2011-03-01

    The temperature distribution in nanowires due to Joule heating is studied analytically using a continuum model and a Green's function approach. We show that the temperatures reached in nanowires can be much lower than that predicted by bulk models of Joule heating, due to heat loss at the nanowire surface that is important at nanoscopic dimensions, even when the thermal conductivity of the environment is relatively low. In addition, we find that the maximum temperature in the nanowire scales weakly with length, in contrast to the bulk system. A simple criterion is presented to assess the importance of these effects. The results have implications for the experimental measurements of nanowire thermal properties, for thermoelectric applications, and for controlling thermal effects in nanowire electronic devices.

  2. Joule-Thomson expander and heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The Joule-Thomson Expander and Heat Exchanger Program was initiated to develop an assembly (JTX) which consists of an inlet filter, counterflow heat exchanger, Joule-Thomson expansion device, and a low pressure jacket. The program objective was to develop a JTX which, when coupled to an open cycle supercritical helium refrigerating system (storage vessel), would supply superfluid helium (He II) at 2 K or less for cooling infrared detectors.

  3. Remote Joule heating by a carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloch, Kamal H.; Voskanian, Norvik; Bronsgeest, Merijntje; Cumings, John

    2012-05-01

    Minimizing Joule heating remains an important goal in the design of electronic devices. The prevailing model of Joule heating relies on a simple semiclassical picture in which electrons collide with the atoms of a conductor, generating heat locally and only in regions of non-zero current density, and this model has been supported by most experiments. Recently, however, it has been predicted that electric currents in graphene and carbon nanotubes can couple to the vibrational modes of a neighbouring material, heating it remotely. Here, we use in situ electron thermal microscopy to detect the remote Joule heating of a silicon nitride substrate by a single multiwalled carbon nanotube. At least 84% of the electrical power supplied to the nanotube is dissipated directly into the substrate, rather than in the nanotube itself. Although it has different physical origins, this phenomenon is reminiscent of induction heating or microwave dielectric heating. Such an ability to dissipate waste energy remotely could lead to improved thermal management in electronic devices.

  4. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-07-05

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  5. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  6. An Analytical Model of Joule Heating in Piezoresistive Microcantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohd Zahid; Cho, Chongdu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates Joule heating in piezoresistive microcantilever sensors. Joule heating and thermal deflections are a major source of noise in such sensors. This work uses analytical and numerical techniques to characterise the Joule heating in 4-layer piezoresistive microcantilevers made of silicon and silicon dioxide substrates but with the same U-shaped silicon piezoresistor. A theoretical model for predicting the temperature generated due to Joule heating is developed. The commercial finite element software ANSYS Multiphysics was used to study the effect of electrical potential on temperature and deflection produced in the cantilevers. The effect of piezoresistor width on Joule heating is also studied. Results show that Joule heating strongly depends on the applied potential and width of piezoresistor and that a silicon substrate cantilever has better thermal characteristics than a silicon dioxide cantilever. PMID:22163433

  7. Observations of joule and particle heating in the auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Observational data from the Chatanika, Alaska incoherent scatter radar have been used to deduce atmospheric heating rates associated with particle precipitation and joule dissipation. During periods when Chatanika is in the vicinity of the auroral oval the height-integrated heat input to the lower thermosphere can be as large as 100 ergs per sq cm per sec with joule and particle heating rates of comparable magnitude. Altitude profiles of these heat inputs are also obtained, showing that the energy liberated by joule dissipation tends to peak at a substantially higher altitude (about 130 km) than that due to particles (100-120 km). As a consequence, it follows that joule heating can be expected to provide a rapid means for creating thermospheric disturbances. It is also pointed out that joule and particle heating are permanent features of the auroral oval and polar cap. As such, expansion of the auroral oval leads to an increase in the total global heating and, hence, to the close relationship between magnetic disturbances and thermospheric perturbation.

  8. Global and local Joule heating effects seen by DE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Coley, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    In the altitude region between 350 and 550 km, variations in the ion temperature principally reflect similar variations in the local frictional heating produced by a velocity difference between the ions and the neutrals. Here, the distribution of the ion temperature in this altitude region is shown, and its attributes in relation to previous work on local Joule heating rates are discussed. In addition to the ion temperature, instrumentation on the DE 2 satellite also provides a measure of the ion velocity vector representative of the total electric field. From this information, the local Joule heating rate is derived. From an estimate of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity it is also possible to estimate the global (height-integrated) Joule heating rate. Here, the differences and relationships between these various parameters are described.

  9. Electroosmotic flow and Joule heating in preparative continuous annular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, René; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2015-09-01

    An openFOAM "computational fluid dynamic" simulation model was developed for the description of local interaction of hydrodynamics and Joule heating in annular electrochromatography. A local decline of electrical conductivity of the background eluent is caused by an electrokinetic migration of ions resulting in higher Joule heat generation. The model equations consider the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids, the energy equation for stationary temperature fields, and the mass transfer equation for the electrokinetic flow. The simulations were embedded in commercial ANSYS Fluent software and in open-source environment openFOAM. The annular gap (1 mm width) contained an inorganic C8 reverse-phase monolith as stationary phase prepared by an in situ sol-gel process. The process temperature generated by Joule heating was determined by thermal camera system. The local hydrodynamics in the prototype was detected by a gravimetric contact-free measurement method and experimental and simulated values matched quite well. PMID:25997390

  10. Joule heating effects on peak broadening in capillary zone electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Xiangchun; Li, Dongqing

    2004-08-01

    Based on Taylor-Aris dispersion theory, a general analytical formula was derived for the theoretical plate height in capillary zone electrophoresis with the consideration of Joule heating effects. During the electrophoresis, the Joule heating causes a temperature rise and temperature gradients in the buffer solution. The temperature variations can affect the molecular diffusion, electroosmotic flow and electrophoretic flow via the temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient, dynamic viscosity and electrical conductivity. All these factors contribute to the peak broadening and are considered simultaneously in the present general model. The general formula derived in this paper is employed to discuss quantitatively the peak broadening in the presence of Joule heating effects. This formula can be easily extended to capillary zone electrophoresis with higher zeta potentials, if an approximate solution to Poisson-Boltzmann equation is employed.

  11. Nonlinear phenomena in multiferroic nanocapacitor: Joule heating and electromechanical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yunseok; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach for probing nonlinear electromechanical responses in BiFeO3 thin film nanocapacitors using half-harmonic band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Nonlinear PFM images of nanocapacitor arrays show clearly visible clusters of capacitors associated with variations of local leakage current through the BiFeO3 film. Strain spectroscopy measurements and finite element modeling point to significance of the Joule heating and show that the thermal effects caused by the Joule heating can provide nontrivial contributions to the nonlinear electromechanical responses in ferroic nanostructures. This approach can be further extended to unambiguous mapping of electrostatic signal contributions to PFM and related techniques.

  12. Characterization of Joule heating in structured electric field environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David N.; Amatucci, William E.; Ganguli, Gurudas I.

    2001-02-01

    We have recently performed a detailed characterization of ion Joule heating perpendicular to an axial magnetic field in the laboratory in a simulated ionospheric plasma environment which contains localized electric field structuring. Since Joule heating is often regarded as an important mechanism contributing to energization of outflowing heavy ions observed by higher-altitude auroral satellites, this work has particular relevance to space physics issues, and, to our knowledge, has not been investigated systematically in a controlled environment. Since transverse (to B) ionospheric electric fields are often spatially and temporally structured, with scale lengths often as small as an ion gyroradius, the ability to systematically vary the spatial extent and magnitude of an electric field region and to observe the effect on ion energy is important. The experiment makes use of a concentric set of separately biasable ring anodes which generate a radial electric field with controllable scale length perpendicular to an ambient axial magnetic field. Joule heating results from ion-neutral collisions occurring within this transverse, dc electric field. Until there is sufficient neutral pressure to raise the ion-neutral collision frequency (vin) to an observable Joule heating threshold, ion cyclotron wave heating, which is induced by shear in E×B rotation, can be the primary channel for ion energization. We have discussed in earlier papers the conditions under which this occurs, and we have treated the transition between the two forms of ion heating. We concentrate primarily in this work on constructing the fields themselves and on the relationship between the subsequent collisional heating and the Pedersen conductivity as an initial indication of the validity of the measurement results. We are able to demonstrate that measurable heating is produced by even relatively small scale structures of the order of the ion gyroradius. In addition, we show that measured heating is consistent with predictions of Joule heating as a function of ion-neutral collisions. Finally, this work can have major implications for ionospheric studies where large-scale electric fields are often assumed in the calculation of Joule heating.

  13. Electrical and Joule heating relationship investigation using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, S. K.; Munisamy, K. M.

    2015-09-01

    The finite element method is vastly used in material strength analysis. The nature of the finite element solver, which solves the Fourier equation of stress and strain analysis, made it possible to apply for conduction heat transfer Fourier Equation. Similarly the Current and voltage equation is also liner Fourier equation. The nature of the governing equation makes it possible to numerical investigate the electrical joule heating phenomena in electronic component. This paper highlights the Finite Element Method (FEM) application onto semiconductor interconnects to determine the specific contact resistance (SCR). Metal and semiconductor interconnects is used as model. The result confirms the possibility and validity of FEM utilization to investigate the Joule heating due electrical resistance.

  14. Joule Heating Effects on Electrokinetic Flow Instabilities in Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumme, Christian; Shaw, Ryan; Zhou, Yilong; Prabhakaran, Rama; Xuan, Xiangchun

    We have demonstrated in our earlier work that the application of a tangential electric field can draw fluid instabilities at the interface of a ferrofluid/water co-flow. These electrokinetic flow instabilities are produced primarily by the mismatch of electric conductivities of the two fluids. We demonstrate in this talk that the Joule heating induced fluid temperature rises and gradients can significantly suppress the electrokinetic flow instabilities. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model to predict the fluid temperature, flow and concentration fields in the two-fluid system with the goal to understand the Joule heating effects on electric field-driven ferrofluid flow instabilities. This work was supported by the Honors and Creative Inquiry programs at Clemson University.

  15. Miniature Joule - Thomson liquefier with sintered heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugeniusz, Bodio; Maciej, Chorowski; Marta, Wilczek; Arkadiusz, Bozek

    Conventional Joule-Thomson refrigerators are made with finned, capillary tubing for the heat exchanger and a throttling valve for reducing the pressure [1]. A new kind of recuperative miniature heat-exchanger can be developed if a powder metallurgy technology is used. A high pressure capillary tube is sintered with metal powder. The grains of metal should be ball shaped or similar. In result of sintering process a good thermal contact between an outside tube surface and powder grains is achieved. The heat exchange surface is well developed and a porous sinter acts as a low pressure gas canal.

  16. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  17. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Skarda, R.J.; Crowder, R.S. III; Trent, D.S.; Reid, C.R.; Lessor, D.L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable. 14 refs., 79 figs., 17 tabs.

  18. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, L. L.; Skarda, R. J.; Crowder, R. S., III; Trent, D. S.; Reid, C. R.; Lessor, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable.

  19. Maximum Joule heat by tubular susceptor with critical thickness on induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Taniguchi, S.; Park, Y. J.

    2009-02-01

    A conductive susceptor has frequently been introduced in an electrical induction furnace to heat materials effectively. In this case, susceptor characteristics have a strong influence on furnace performance, e.g. input power, Joule heat, energy efficiency, etc. This study particularly focused on improving its energy efficiency through an investigation of the Joule heat generated in the susceptor. The Joule heat was obtained numerically by the mutual inductance model, experimentally by a water calorimeter and theoretically by an approximate equation. A thin tubular stainless-steel susceptor (d50 mm × h80 mm, t/δ ~ 0.1, d the outer diameter, h the height, t the tubular thickness and δ the skin depth) had an extremely high Joule heat value (5.3 × 10-2 W A-2) at 30 kHz alternating current, which was 3.6 times higher than the value generated in a cylindrical susceptor. The tubular thickness where the maximum Joule heat occurs was defined as a critical thickness (tc). For the tubular susceptor with r/δ > 5 where r is the outer radius, the critical thickness was found to be δ2/r by the approximate equation. Furthermore, the maximum Joule heat at the critical thickness depended not on the material properties of the susceptor but only on the geometry of the susceptor. Ultimately, the energy efficiency could be improved up to approximately 84% by the tubular susceptor using the critical thickness.

  20. Super-Joule heating in graphene and silver nanowire network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maize, Kerry; Das, Suprem R.; Sadeque, Sajia; Mohammed, Amr M. S.; Shakouri, Ali; Janes, David B.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2015-04-01

    Transistors, sensors, and transparent conductors based on randomly assembled nanowire networks rely on multi-component percolation for unique and distinctive applications in flexible electronics, biochemical sensing, and solar cells. While conduction models for 1-D and 1-D/2-D networks have been developed, typically assuming linear electronic transport and self-heating, the model has not been validated by direct high-resolution characterization of coupled electronic pathways and thermal response. In this letter, we show the occurrence of nonlinear "super-Joule" self-heating at the transport bottlenecks in networks of silver nanowires and silver nanowire/single layer graphene hybrid using high resolution thermoreflectance (TR) imaging. TR images at the microscopic self-heating hotspots within nanowire network and nanowire/graphene hybrid network devices with submicron spatial resolution are used to infer electrical current pathways. The results encourage a fundamental reevaluation of transport models for network-based percolating conductors.

  1. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okulov, I. V.; Soldatov, I. V.; Sarmanova, M. F.; Kaban, I.; Gemming, T.; Edström, K.; Eckert, J.

    2015-07-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8+/-0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties.

  2. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Okulov, I. V.; Soldatov, I. V.; Sarmanova, M. F.; Kaban, I.; Gemming, T.; Edström, K.; Eckert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8±0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties. PMID:26219864

  3. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Okulov, I V; Soldatov, I V; Sarmanova, M F; Kaban, I; Gemming, T; Edström, K; Eckert, J

    2015-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8±0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties. PMID:26219864

  4. Marangoni mixed convection flow with Joule heating and nonlinear radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shaheen, Uzma; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Asghar, Saleem

    2015-07-01

    Marangoni mixed convective flow of Casson fluid in a thermally stratified medium is addressed. Flow analysis has been carried out in presence of inclined magnetic field. Heat transfer analysis is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and nonlinear thermal radiation. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are first converted into ordinary differential systems and then developed the convergent series solutions. Flow pattern with the influence of pertinent parameters namely the magnetic parameter, Casson fluid parameter, temperature ratio parameter, stratification parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and radiation parameter is investigated. Expression of local Nusselt number is computed and analyzed. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases by increasing magnetic parameter, temperature ratio parameter, angle of inclination and stratification parameter. Moreover the effect of buoyancy parameter on the velocity distribution is opposite in both the opposing and assisting flow phenomena. Thermal field and associated layer thickness are enhanced for larger radiation parameter.

  5. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  6. Refractory electrodes for joule heating and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Lamar, D.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Elliott, M.L.

    1998-05-12

    A certain group of electrically conductive refractory materials presently known for use in high temperature applications as throat constructions, melter sidewalls, forehearth, stacks, port sills, hot face lining for slagging coal gasifiers, slag runners, and linings for nuclear waste encapsulation furnaces may be used as electrodes permitting joule heating at temperatures in excess of 1,200 C in excess of about 4400 hours even in the presence of transition group element(s). More specifically, the invention is an electrode for melting earthen materials, wherein the electrode is made from an electrically conductive refractory material, specifically at least one metal oxide wherein the metal is selected from the group consisting of chrome, ruthenium, rhodium, tin and combinations thereof. 2 figs.

  7. Refractory electrodes for joule heating and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Lamar, David A.; Chapman, Chris C.; Elliott, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    A certain group of electrically conductive refractory materials presently known for use in high temperature applications as throat constructions, melter sidewalls, forehearth, stacks, port sills, hot face lining for slagging coal gasifiers, slag runners, and linings for nuclear waste encapsulation furnaces may be used as electrodes permitting joule heating at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. in excess of about 4400 hours even in the presence of transition group element(s). More specifically, the invention is an electrode for melting earthen materials, wherein the electrode is made from an electrically conductive refractory material, specifically at least one metal oxide wherein the metal is selected from the group consisting of chrome, ruthenium, rhodium, tin and combinations thereof.

  8. Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1989-01-01

    The hard and soft x ray and microwave emissions from a solar flare (May 14, 1980) were analyzed and interpreted in terms of Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in one or more current sheets. It is found that all three emissions can be generated with sub-Dreicer electric fields. The soft x ray emitting plasma can only be heated by a single current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is well above the classical, collisional resistivity of 10(exp 7) K, 10(exp 11)/cu cm plasma. If the hard x ray emission is from thermal electrons, anomalous resistivity or densities exceeding 3 x 10(exp 12)/cu cm are required. If the hard x ray emission is from nonthermal electrons, the emissions can be produced with classical resistivity in the current sheets if the heating rate is approximately 4 times greater than that deduced from the soft x ray data (with a density of 10(exp 10)/cu cm in the soft x ray emitting region), if there are at least 10(exp 4) current sheets, and if the plasma properties in the sheets are characteristic of the superhot plasma observed in some flares by Lin et al., and with Hinotori. Most of the released energy goes directly into bulk heating, rather than accelerated particles.

  9. Joule heating in ferromagnetic nanostripes with a notch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; López, Cristina; Akerman, Johanna; Muñoz, Manuel; Prieto, José L.

    2015-06-01

    The temperature in a ferromagnetic nanostripe with a notch subject to Joule heating has been studied in detail. We first performed an experimental real-time calibration of the temperature versus time as a 100 ns current pulse was injected into a Permalloy nanostripe. This calibration was repeated for different pulse amplitudes and stripe dimensions and the set of experimental curves were fitted with a computer simulation using the Fourier thermal conduction equation. The best fit of these experimental curves was obtained by including the temperature-dependent behavior of the electrical resistivity of the Permalloy and of the thermal conductivity of the substrate (Si O2 ). Notably, a nonzero interface thermal resistance between the metallic nanostripe and the substrate was also necessary to fit the experimental curves. We found this parameter pivotal to understand our results and the results from previous works. The higher current density in the notch, together with the interface thermal resistance, allows a considerable increase of the temperature in the notch, creating a large horizontal thermal gradient. This gradient, together with the high temperature in the notch and the larger current density close to the edges of the notch, can be very influential in experiments studying the current assisted domain wall motion.

  10. Toward reversing Joule heating with a phonon-absorbing heterobarrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungha; Kaviany, Massoud

    2015-02-01

    Using a graded heterobarrier placed along an electron channel, phonons emitted in Joule heating are recycled in situ by increasing the entropy of phonon-absorbing electrons. The asymmetric electric potential distribution created by alloy grading separates the phonon absorption and emission regions, and emission in the larger effective-mass region causes momentum relaxation with smaller electron kinetic energy loss. These lead to smaller overall phonon emission and simultaneous potential-gain and self-cooling effects. Larger potential is gained with lower current and higher optical-phonon temperature. The self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations complying with the lateral momentum conservation combined with the entropy analysis are applied to a GaAs:Al electron channel with a graded heterobarrier, and under ideal lateral thermal isolation from surroundings, the phonon recycling efficiency reaches 25% of the reversible limit at 350 K, and it increases with temperature. The lateral momentum contributes to the transmission across the barrier, so partially nonconserving lateral momentum electron scattering (rough interface) can improve efficiency.

  11. Coherent radar estimates of average high-latitude ionospheric Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, M. J.; Nielsen, E.

    1995-07-01

    The Scandinavian Twin Auroral Radar Experiment (STARE) and Sweden and Britain Radar Experiment (SABRE) bistatic coherent radar systems have been employed to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of the ionospheric Joule heating in the combined geographic latitude range 63.8 deg - 72.6 deg (corrected geomagnetic latitude 61.5 deg - 69.3 deg) over Scandinavia. The 173 days of good observations with all four radars have been analyzed during the period 1982 to 1986 to estimate the average ionospheric electric field versus time and latitude. The AE dependent empirical model of ionospheric Pedersen conductivity of Spiro et al. (1982) has been used to calculate the Joule heating. The latitudinal and diurnal variation of Joule heating as well as the estimated mean hemispherical heating of 1.7 x 10(exp 11) W are in good agreement with earlier results. Average Joule heating was found to vary linearly with the AE, AU, and AL indices and as a second-order power law with Kp. The average Joule heating was also examined as a function of the direction and magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field. It has been shown for the first time that the ionospheric electric field magnitude as well as the Joule heating increase with increasingly negative (southward) Bz.

  12. Heat, work and subtle fluids: a commentary on Joule (1850) 'On the mechanical equivalent of heat'.

    PubMed

    Young, John

    2015-04-13

    James Joule played the major role in establishing the conservation of energy, or the first law of thermodynamics, as a universal, all-pervasive principle of physics. He was an experimentalist par excellence and his place in the development of thermodynamics is unarguable. This article discusses Joule's life and scientific work culminating in the 1850 paper, where he presented his detailed measurements of the mechanical equivalent of heat using his famous paddle-wheel apparatus. Joule's long series of experiments in the 1840s leading to his realisation that the conservation of energy was probably of universal validity is discussed in context with the work of other pioneers, notably Sadi Carnot, who effectively formulated the principle of the second law of thermodynamics a quarter of a century before the first law was accepted. The story of Joule's work is a story of an uphill struggle against a critical scientific establishment unwilling to accept the mounting evidence until it was impossible to ignore. His difficulties in attracting funding and publishing in reputable journals despite the quality of his work will resonate with many young scientists and engineers of the present day. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750152

  13. Decoupling electrocaloric effect from Joule heating in a solid state cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, M.; Ghivelder, L.; Gomez-Marlasca, F.; Parisi, F.

    2011-12-01

    We report a heat dynamics analysis of the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in commercial multilayer capacitors based on BaTiO3 dielectric, a promising candidate for applications as a solid state cooling device. Direct measurements of the time evolution of the sample's temperature changes under different applied voltages allow us to decouple the contributions from Joule heating and from the ECE. Heat balance equations were used to model the thermal coupling between different parts of the system. Fingerprints of Joule heating and the ECE could be resolved at different time scales. We argue that Joule heating and the thermal coupling of the device to the environment must be carefully taken in to account in future developments of refrigeration technologies employing the ECE.

  14. Hybrid joule heating/electro-osmosis process for extracting contaminants from soil layers

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    2003-06-10

    Joule (ohmic) heating and electro-osmosis are combined in a hybrid process for removal of both water-soluble contaminants and non-aqueous phase liquids from contaminated, low-permeability soil formations that are saturated. Central to this hybrid process is the partial desaturation of the formation or layer using electro-osmosis to remove a portion of the pore fluids by induction of a ground water flow to extraction wells. Joule heating is then performed on a partially desaturated formation. The joule heating and electro-osmosis operations can be carried out simultaneously or sequentially if the desaturation by electro-osmosis occurs initially. Joule heating of the desaturated formation results in a very effective transfer or partitioning of liquid state contaminants to the vapor phase. The heating also substantially increases the vapor phase pressure in the porous formation. As a result, the contaminant laden vapor phase is forced out into soil layers of a higher permeability where other conventional removal processes, such as steam stripping or ground water extraction can be used to capture the contaminants. This hybrid process is more energy efficient than joule heating or steam stripping for cleaning low permeability formations and can share electrodes to minimize facility costs.

  15. Calculating Hemispheric Power and Joule Heating using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F13 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M.; Emery, B. A.; Maute, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) simulates the thermosphere-ionosphere with self consistent electrodynamics. The Weimer 2005 ion convection model can be used with a parameterized model of the aurora based on the electron auroral hemispheric power. The spatial location and radius of the auroral model is adjusted with respect to the Weimer 2005 boundary for zero electric potential, but the resulting Joule heating may be an under or over estimation of the real magnetosphere-ionosphere energy transfer. To improve the auroral model so that the resulting Joule heating is relatively realistic is the ultimate aim of this project. To this end, we achieve a number of sub-goals using data from the DMSP-F13, which is in a dawn-dusk orbit. We use data from the Ion Drift Meter (IDM) to quantify the relative positions of the convection reversal boundary (CRB), the cross-track ion drift (Vy) sunward peaks, and the equatorward boundary of zero velocities (or zero electric potential) and compare them to Weimer 2005 positions for the same orbits. The electric field is estimated only from the cross-track ion velocity Vy in the dawn-dusk orbits, while the along-track ion velocity Vx is ignored. We also calculate auroral Pederson conductance using the auroral electron energy flux and mean electron energy measurements from the DMSP Special Sensor Precipitating Electron and Ion Spectrometer (SSJ/4). The hemispheric power is estimated from the electron energy flux. The Joule heating is approximately the product of the Pedersen conductance and the square of the electric field, where we include Pedersen conductance from EUV and from the aurora to estimate EUV Joule heating and particle Joule heating. Our results for a range of Bz Interplanetary Magnetic Fields (IMF Bz) values show that the hemispheric power is largest in the morning sector where the aurora is widest. The aurora mostly lies in the sunward ion flow region and thus the integrated particle Joule heating in the sunward ion flow region is higher than in the anti-sunward ion flow located in the polar cap. Thus, for the TIEGCM, the poleward edge of the aurora should be placed close to the Weimer CRB. However, the integrated total Joule heating is higher for anti-sunward ion flow in the polar cap compared to the integrated total Joule heating for the equatorward sunward ion flow, which points out the relative importance of the anti-sunward ion drifts. As for the spatially integrated total Joule heating, the values are approximately the same in the dawn and dusk regions.

  16. Strongly coupled radiative transfer and Joule heating in the cathode of an arc heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgapal, P.; Palmer, Grant E.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation and Joule heating in the electrode region of an arc heater are discussed. Radiative transport equations for a true axisymmetric geometry are used. A subsonic code is developed to numerically solve the fluid equations with strongly coupled radiation and Joule heating representative of a high pressure and high current arc heater. Analytic expression for the divergence of radiative heat flux derived previously is used. Jacobians of the radiation term are derived. The Joule heating term is computed using a previously developed code. The equilibrium gas model consists of seven species. The fluxes are differenced using Van Leer flux splitting. Using this code, the effects of radiative cooling on the thermodynamic parameters of the arc core are discussed.

  17. Diffusion, Fluxes, Friction Forces, and Joule Heating in Two-Temperature Multicomponent Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between Joule heating, diffusion fluxes, and friction forces has been studied for both total and electron thermal energy equations, using general expressions for multicomponent diffusion in two-temperature plasmas with the velocity dependent Lorentz force acting on charged species in a magnetic field. It is shown that the derivation of Joule heating terms requires both diffusion fluxes and friction between species which represents the resistance experienced by the species moving at different relative velocities. It is also shown that the familiar Joule heating term in the electron thermal energy equation includes artificial effects produced by switching the convective velocity from the species velocity to the mass-weighted velocity, and thus should not be ignored even when there is no net energy dissipation.

  18. Radiative Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Nanofluid with Slip Conditions and Joule Heating.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafique, Maryam; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with compliant walls is addressed here. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Whole analysis is performed for velocity, thermal and concentration slip conditions. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating and slip parameters are explored in detail. Clearly temperature is a decreasing function of Hartman number and radiation parameter. PMID:26886919

  19. Radiative Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Nanofluid with Slip Conditions and Joule Heating

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafique, Maryam; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with compliant walls is addressed here. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Whole analysis is performed for velocity, thermal and concentration slip conditions. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating and slip parameters are explored in detail. Clearly temperature is a decreasing function of Hartman number and radiation parameter. PMID:26886919

  20. Small-scale fluctuations in barium drifts at high latitudes and associated Joule heating effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, L. D.; Larsen, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Most previous estimates of Joule heating rates, especially the contribution of small-scale structure in the high-latitude ionosphere, have been based on incoherent scatter or coherent scatter radar measurements. An alternative estimate can be found from the plasma drifts obtained from ionized barium clouds released from sounding rockets. We have used barium drift data from three experiments to estimate Joule heating rates in the high-latitude E region for different magnetic activity levels. In particular, we are interested in the contribution of small-scale plasma drift fluctuations, corresponding to equivalent electric field fluctuations, to the local Joule heating rate on scales smaller than those typically resolved by radar or other measurements. Since Joule heating is a Lagrangian quantity, the inherently Lagrangian estimates provided by the chemical tracer measurements are a full description of the effects of electric field variance and neutral winds on the heating, differing from the Eulerian estimates of the type provided by ground-based measurements. Results suggest that the small-scale contributions to the heating can be more than a factor of 2 greater than the mean field contribution regardless of geomagnetic conditions, and at times the small-scale contribution is even larger. The high-resolution barium drift measurements, moreover, show that the fine structure in the electric field can be more variable than previous studies have reported for similar conditions. The neutral winds also affect the heating, altering the height-integrated Joule heating rates by as much as 12%, for the cases studied here, and modifying the height distribution of the heating profile as well.

  1. Controlled Formation of Zigzag and Armchair Edges in Graphene Nanoribbons by Joule Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Meunier, Vincent; Romo Herrera, Jose M; Jia, Xiaoting; Hofmann, Mario; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Reina, Alfonso; Kong, Jing; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Son, Hyungbin

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate and monitor an efficient edge reconstruction process, at the atomic scale, for graphite nanoribbons by Joule heating inside an integrated transmission electron microscope equipped with a scanning tunneling stage STM (TEM-STM system). During Joule annealing, sharp edges and step-edge arrays are formed, mostly with either zigzag or armchair edge configurations. Their formation is driven by both thermal and electric field related mechanisms. Model calculations show that the dominant annealing mechanisms involve point defect annealing and edge reconstruction. Joule heating is thus shown to provide an effective way to produce clean zigzag and armchair edges, which could be useful for both fundamental studies of edge reactivity, magnetism, and could provide a route for increasing carrier mobility and for the development of future electronics applications.

  2. Effect of Joule heating on isoelectric focusing of proteins in a microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kisoo; Shim, Jaesool; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-01-01

    Electric field-driven separation and purification techniques, such as isoelectric focusing (IEF) and isotachophoresis, generate heat in the system that can affect the performance of the separation process. In this study, a new mathematical model is presented for IEF that considers the temperature rise due to Joule heating. We used the model to study focusing phenomena and separation performance in a microchannel. A finite volume-based numerical technique is developed to study temperature-dependent IEF. Numerical simulation for narrow range IEF (6 < pH < 10) is performed in a straight microchannel for 100 ampholytes and two model proteins: staphylococcal nuclease and pancreatic ribonuclease. Separation results of the two proteins are obtained with and without considering the temperature rise due to Joule heating in the system for a nominal electric field of 100 V/cm. For the no Joule heating case, constant properties are used, while for the Joule heating case, temperature-dependent titration curves and thermo-physical properties are used. Our numerical results show that the temperature change due to Joule heating has a significant impact on the final focusing points of proteins, which can lower the separation performance considerably. In the absence of advection and any active cooling mechanism, the temperature increase is the highest at the mid-section of a microchannel. We also found that the maximum temperature in the system is a strong function of the ΔpK  value of the carrier ampholytes. Simulation results are also obtained for different values of applied electric fields in order to find the optimum working range considering the simulation time and buffer temperature. Moreover, the model is extended to study IEF in a straight microchip where pH is formed by supplying H+ and OH−, and the thermal analysis shows that the heat generation is negligible in ion supplied IEF. PMID:25553199

  3. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-03-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  4. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  5. Investigation of Neutral Wind Effects on the Global Joule Heating Rate Using MHD and TI Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafatoglu, E.; Kaymaz, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Precise calculation of global Joule heating rate is a long standing question in thermosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The absence of the complete and direct, in-situ measurements of the parameters involved in the calculation of Joule heating such as the conductivity of the medium, small-scale variations of electric fields, and neutral winds at the ionospheric heights poses a great uncertainty in its determination. In this work, we study the effects of the neutral wind on the global Joule heating rate. Most of the time, owing to above mentioned difficulties the effects of the neutral wind have been neglected in the calculations. We investigate their effects using BATSRUS MHD model, TIEGCM and GITM. Using horizontal current density, Cowling conductivity, and Pedersen conductivities from the MHD model, we calculate the joule heating rate with and without the neutral wind contribution. We apply the procedure for March 2008 magnetospheric substorm events and quantify the differences to show the neutral wind contribution. We compare the results with those obtained using neutral wind velocities from TIEGCM and GITM models. This way while we compare and demonstrate the discrepancies between the models, we also provide an assessment for the integration of thermospheric and magnetospheric models.

  6. Local temperature redistribution and structural transition during joule-heating-driven conductance switching in VO2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Pickett, Matthew D; Strachan, John Paul; Gibson, Gary; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2013-11-13

    Joule-heating induced conductance-switching is studied in VO2 , a Mott insulator. Complementary in situ techniques including optical characterization, blackbody microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and numerical simulations are used. Abrupt redistribution in local temperature is shown to occur upon conductance-switching along with a structural phase transition, at the same current. PMID:23868142

  7. A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY SE

    2011-04-07

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  8. Off-gas characteristics of liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goles, R. W.; Sevigny, G. J.

    1982-06-01

    The off gas characteristics of liquid fed joule heated ceramic meters were investigated as a function of melter operational condition and simulated waste feed composition. The identity and behavior patterns of gaseous emissions, the characteristics of melter generated aerosols, the nature and magnitude of melter effluent losses and the factors affecting melter operational performance were established.

  9. GEM-CEDAR challenge: Poynting flux at DMSP and modeled Joule heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastätter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Kilcommons, Liam M.; Knipp, Delores J.; Codrescu, Mihail; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Emery, Barbara; Weimer, Daniel R.; Cosgrove, Russell; Wiltberger, Michael; Raeder, Joachim; Li, Wenhui; Tóth, Gábor; Welling, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Poynting flux into the ionosphere measures the electromagnetic energy coming from the magnetosphere. This energy flux can vary greatly between quiet times and geomagnetic active times. As part of the Geospace Environment Modeling-coupling energetics and dynamics of atmospheric regions modeling challenge, physics-based models of the 3-D ionosphere and ionospheric electrodynamics solvers of magnetosphere models that specify Joule heat and empirical models specifying Poynting flux were run for six geomagnetic storm events of varying intensity. We compared model results with Poynting flux values along the DMSP-15 satellite track computed from ion drift meter and magnetic field observations. Although being a different quantity, Joule heat can in practice be correlated to incoming Poynting flux because the energy is dissipated primarily in high latitudes where Poynting flux is being deposited. Within the physics-based model group, we find mixed results with some models overestimating Joule heat and some models agreeing better with observed Poynting flux rates as integrated over auroral passes. In contrast, empirical models tend to underestimate integrated Poynting flux values. Modeled Joule heat or Poynting flux patterns often resemble the observed Poynting flux patterns on a large scale, but amplitudes can differ by a factor of 2 or larger due to the highly localized nature of observed Poynting flux deposition that is not captured by the models. In addition, the positioning of modeled patterns appear to be randomly shifted against the observed Poynting flux energy input. This study is the first to compare Poynting flux and Joule heat in a large variety of models of the ionosphere.

  10. Joule heat generation in thermionic cathodes of high-pressure arc discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, M. S.; Cunha, M. D.

    2013-02-14

    The nonlinear surface heating model of plasma-cathode interaction in high-pressure arcs is extended to take into account the Joule effect inside the cathode body. Calculation results are given for different modes of current transfer to tungsten cathodes of different configurations in argon plasmas of atmospheric or higher pressures. Special attention is paid to analysis of energy balances of the cathode and the near-cathode plasma layer. In all the cases, the variation of potential inside the cathode is much smaller than the near-cathode voltage drop. However, this variation can be comparable to the volt equivalent of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode and then the Joule effect is essential. Such is the case of the diffuse and mixed modes on rod cathodes at high currents, where the Joule heating causes a dramatic change of thermal and electrical regimes of the cathode. The Joule heating has virtually no effect over characteristics of spots on rod and infinite planar cathodes.

  11. Modeling Joule Heating Effect on Lunar O2 Generation via Electrolytic Reduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus; Poizeau, Sophie; Sibille, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is leading research work on lunar O2 generation via electrolytic reduction of regolith; the metal oxide present in the regolith is dissociated in oxygen anions and metal cations leading to the generation of gaseous oxygen at the anode and liquid metal at the cathode. Electrical resistance of molten regolith is high, leading to heating of the melt when electrical current is applied between the electrodes (Joule heating). The authors have developed a 3D model using a rigorous approach for two coupled physics (thermal and electrical potential) to not only study the effect of Joule heating on temperature distribution throughout the molten regolith but also to evaluate and optimize the design of the electrolytic cells. This paper presents the results of the thermal analysis performed on the model and used to validate the design of the electrolytic cell.

  12. Micro-scale heat-exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling.

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Andrew John

    2014-01-01

    This project focused on developing a micro-scale counter flow heat exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling with the potential for both chip and wafer scale integration. This project is differentiated from previous work by focusing on planar, thin film micromachining instead of bulk materials. A process will be developed for fabricating all the devices mentioned above, allowing for highly integrated micro heat exchangers. The use of thin film dielectrics provides thermal isolation, increasing efficiency of the coolers compared to designs based on bulk materials, and it will allow for wafer-scale fabrication and integration. The process is intended to implement a CFHX as part of a Joule-Thomson cooling system for applications with heat loads less than 1mW. This report presents simulation results and investigation of a fabrication process for such devices.

  13. Implantable polymer/metal thin film structures for the localized treatment of cancer by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Theriault, Christian; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an implantable polymer/metal alloy thin film structure for localized post-operative treatment of breast cancer. A combination of experiments and models is used to study the temperature changes due to Joule heating by patterned metallic thin films embedded in poly-dimethylsiloxane. The heat conduction within the device and the surrounding normal/cancerous breast tissue is modeled with three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The FEM simulations are used to explore the potential effects of device geometry and Joule heating on the temperature distribution and lesion (thermal dose). The FEM model is validated using a gel model that mimics biological media. The predictions are also compared to prior results from in vitro studies and relevant in vivo studies in the literature. The implications of the results are discussed for the potential application of polymer/metal thin film structures in hyperthermic treatment of cancer.

  14. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.-E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D. J. D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-09-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer dielectric. Uncured polymer is then rinsed away, leaving a patterned dielectric layer that conforms to the shape of the grid lines. To enhance the accuracy of the alignment, heat conduction into the substrate and the transparent electrode is limited by using short current pulses instead of a constant current. Excellent alignment accuracy of the dielectric layer on printed metal grid lines has been achieved, with a typical 4-μm dielectric overhang. In addition to good accuracy, pulsed Joule heating significantly cuts down process time and energy consumption compared to heating with a constant current. The feasibility of using a printed current distribution grid and Joule heating was demonstrated in an OLED device.

  15. Super-Joule heating in graphene and silver nanowire network

    SciTech Connect

    Maize, Kerry; Das, Suprem R.; Sadeque, Sajia; Mohammed, Amr M. S.; Shakouri, Ali E-mail: alam@purdue.edu; Janes, David B.; Alam, Muhammad A. E-mail: alam@purdue.edu

    2015-04-06

    Transistors, sensors, and transparent conductors based on randomly assembled nanowire networks rely on multi-component percolation for unique and distinctive applications in flexible electronics, biochemical sensing, and solar cells. While conduction models for 1-D and 1-D/2-D networks have been developed, typically assuming linear electronic transport and self-heating, the model has not been validated by direct high-resolution characterization of coupled electronic pathways and thermal response. In this letter, we show the occurrence of nonlinear “super-Joule” self-heating at the transport bottlenecks in networks of silver nanowires and silver nanowire/single layer graphene hybrid using high resolution thermoreflectance (TR) imaging. TR images at the microscopic self-heating hotspots within nanowire network and nanowire/graphene hybrid network devices with submicron spatial resolution are used to infer electrical current pathways. The results encourage a fundamental reevaluation of transport models for network-based percolating conductors.

  16. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; J. Il. Waite, Jr.; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter s upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 x 10(exp -4) nbar (including aurora/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for greater than or equal to40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from approx.1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo AS1 data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  17. Incorporating Cold Cap Behavior in a Joule-heated Waste Glass Melter Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an overview of Joule-heated waste glass melters used in the vitrification of high level waste (HLW) is presented, with a focus on the cold cap region. This region, in which feed-to-glass conversion reactions occur, is critical in determining the melting properties of any given glass melter. An existing 1D computer model of the cold cap, implemented in MATLAB, is described in detail. This model is a standalone model that calculates cold cap properties based on boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the cold cap. Efforts to couple this cold cap model with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of a Joule-heated melter are then described. The coupling is being implemented in ModelCenter, a software integration tool. The ultimate goal of this model is to guide the specification of melter parameters that optimize glass quality and production rate.

  18. Joule heating effects on particle immobilization in insulator-based dielectrophoretic devices

    PubMed Central

    Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C.; Sano, Michael B.; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the temperature effects due to Joule heating obtained by application of a DC electric potential were investigated for a microchannel with cylindrical insulating posts employed for insulator based dielectrophoresis (iDEP). The conductivity of the suspending medium, the local electric field, and the gradient of the squared electric field, which directly affect the magnitude of the dielectrophoretic force exerted on particles, were computationally simulated employing COMSOL Multiphysics. It was observed that a temperature gradient is formed along the microchannel which redistributes the conductivity of the suspending medium leading to an increase of the dielectrophoretic force towards the inlet of the channel while decreasing towards the outlet. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulations on the particle trapping zones anticipated. This study demonstrates the importance of considering Joule heating effects when designing iDEP systems. PMID:24002905

  19. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structures in Joule heating

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Yusuke; Yoshida, Hideto; Takeda, Seiji; Kohno, Hideo

    2014-08-25

    Collapse of a carbon nanotube results in the formation of a nanoribbon, and a switching of the collapse direction yields a nanotetrahedron in the middle of a nanoribbon. Here, we report in-situ transmission electron microscopy observations of the behavior of carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structures during Joule heating to reveal their thermal stability. In addition, we propose that the observed process is related to the formation process of the structure.

  20. Restrictions on linear heat capacities from Joule-Brayton maximum-work cycle efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo-Brown, F.; Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L. A.

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using the Joule-Brayton cycle to determine the accessible value range for the coefficients a and b of the heat capacity at constant pressure Cp, expressed as Cp=a+bT (with T the absolute temperature) by using the Carnot theorem. This is made for several gases which operate as the working fluids. Moreover, the landmark role of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency for this type of cycle is established.

  1. Solar Wind Effect on Joule Heating in the High-Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A. T.; Nygren, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) carried by solar wind affects strongly several key parameters in the high-latitude ionosphere. In this study, the solar wind effect on those parameters especially on Joule heating is conducted statistically based on the simultaneous measurements by the EISCAT radars in Tromsø (TRO, 66.6° cgmLat, mainly within the auroral oval on the nightside), and on Svalbard (ESR, 75.4º cgmLat, mostly within the polar cap). The most important findings are as follows: (i) At TRO, the decrease in Joule heating in the afternoon-evening sector due to neutral winds reported by Aikio et al. [2012] requires southward IMF conditions and a sufficiently high solar wind electric field. The increase in the morning sector takes place for all IMF directions within a region where the upper-E neutral wind has a large equatorward component and the F-region plasma flow is directed eastward. (ii) At ESR, an afternoon hot spot of joule heating centred typically at 14-15 MLT is observed during all IMF conditions. Enhanced Pedersen conductances within the hot spot region are observed only for the IMF Bz+/By- conditions, and the corresponding convection electric field values within the hot spot are smaller than during the other IMF conditions. Hence, the hot spot represents a region of persistent magnetopsheric electromagnetic energy input. (iii) For the southward IMF conditions, the MLT-integrated Joule heating rate without neutral winds for By- is twice the value for By+ at TRO. This can plausibly be explained by the higher average solar wind electric field values for By-.

  2. Improved Ionospheric Electrodynamic Models and Application to Calculating Joule Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    Improved techniques have been developed for empirical modeling of the high-latitude electric potentials and magnetic field aligned currents (FAC) as a function of the solar wind parameters. The FAC model is constructed using scalar magnetic Euler potentials, and functions as a twin to the electric potential model. The improved models have more accurate field values as well as more accurate boundary locations. Non-linear saturation effects in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling are also better reproduced. The models are constructed using a hybrid technique, which has spherical harmonic functions only within a small area at the pole. At lower latitudes the potentials are constructed from multiple Fourier series functions of longitude, at discrete latitudinal steps. It is shown that the two models can be used together in order to calculate the total Poynting flux and Joule heating in the ionosphere. An additional model of the ionospheric conductivity is not required in order to obtain the ionospheric currents and Joule heating, as the conductivity variations as a function of the solar inclination are implicitly contained within the FAC model's data. The models outputs are shown for various input conditions, as well as compared with satellite measurements. The calculations of the total Joule heating are compared with results obtained by the inversion of ground-based magnetometer measurements. Like their predecessors, these empirical models should continue to be a useful research and forecast tools.

  3. Literature review of arc/plasma, combustion, and joule-heated melter vitrification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, C.J.; Abrigo, G.P.; Shafer, P.J.; Merrill, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides reviews of papers and reports for three basic categories of melters: arc/plasma-heated melters, combustion-heated melters, and joule-heated melters. The literature reviewed here represents those publications which may lend insight to phase I testing of low-level waste vitrification being performed at the Hanford Site in FY 1995. For each melter category, information from those papers and reports containing enough information to determine steady-state mass balance data is tabulated at the end of each section. The tables show the composition of the feed processed, the off-gas measured via decontamination factors, gross energy consumptions, and processing rates, among other data.

  4. Testing of a scanning adiabatic calorimeter with Joule effect heating of the sample.

    PubMed

    Barreiro-Rodríguez, G; Yáñez-Limón, J M; Contreras-Servin, C A; Herrera-Gomez, A

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a scanning adiabatic resistive calorimeter (SARC) developed to measure the specific enthalpy of viscous and gel-type materials. The sample is heated employing the Joule effect. The cell is constituted by a cylindrical jacket and two pistons, and the sample is contained inside the jacket between the two pistons. The upper piston can slide to allow for thermal expansion and to keep the pressure constant. The pistons also function as electrodes for the sample. While the sample is heated through the Joule effect, the electrodes and the jacket are independently heated to the same temperature of the sample using automatic control. This minimizes the heat transport between the sample and its surroundings. The energy to the sample is supplied by applying to the electrodes an ac voltage in the kilohertz range, establishing a current in the sample and inducing electric dissipation. This energy can be measured with enough exactitude to determine the heat capacity. This apparatus also allows for the quantification of the thermal conductivity by reproducing the evolution of the temperature as heat is introduced only to one of the pistons. To this end, the system was modeled using finite element calculations. This dual capability proved to be very valuable for correction in the determination of the specific enthalpy. The performance of the SARC was evaluated by comparing the heat capacity results to those obtained by differential scanning calorimetry measurements using a commercial apparatus. The analyzed samples were zeolite, bauxite, hematite, bentonite, rice flour, corn flour, and potato starch. PMID:18248058

  5. Testing of a scanning adiabatic calorimeter with Joule effect heating of the sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro-Rodríguez, G.; Yáñez-Limón, J. M.; Contreras-Servin, C. A.; Herrera-Gomez, A.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a scanning adiabatic resistive calorimeter (SARC) developed to measure the specific enthalpy of viscous and gel-type materials. The sample is heated employing the Joule effect. The cell is constituted by a cylindrical jacket and two pistons, and the sample is contained inside the jacket between the two pistons. The upper piston can slide to allow for thermal expansion and to keep the pressure constant. The pistons also function as electrodes for the sample. While the sample is heated through the Joule effect, the electrodes and the jacket are independently heated to the same temperature of the sample using automatic control. This minimizes the heat transport between the sample and its surroundings. The energy to the sample is supplied by applying to the electrodes an ac voltage in the kilohertz range, establishing a current in the sample and inducing electric dissipation. This energy can be measured with enough exactitude to determine the heat capacity. This apparatus also allows for the quantification of the thermal conductivity by reproducing the evolution of the temperature as heat is introduced only to one of the pistons. To this end, the system was modeled using finite element calculations. This dual capability proved to be very valuable for correction in the determination of the specific enthalpy. The performance of the SARC was evaluated by comparing the heat capacity results to those obtained by differential scanning calorimetry measurements using a commercial apparatus. The analyzed samples were zeolite, bauxite, hematite, bentonite, rice flour, corn flour, and potato starch.

  6. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominques, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The maturation of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) as a viable technology for oxygen and metals production on explored planets relies on the realization of the self-heating mode for the reactor. Joule heat generated during regolith electrolysis creates thermal energy that should be able to maintain the molten phase (similar to electrolytic Hall-Heroult process for aluminum production). Self-heating via Joule heating offers many advantages: (1) The regolith itself is the crucible material, it protects the vessel walls (2) Simplifies the engineering of the reactor (3) Reduces power consumption (no external heating) (4) Extends the longevity of the reactor. Predictive modeling is a tool chosen to perform dimensional analysis of a self-heating reactor: (1) Multiphysics modeling (COMSOL) was selected for Joule heat generation and heat transfer (2) Objective is to identify critical dimensions for first reactor prototype.

  7. A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Song, A.; Li, X. D.; Lu, Y.; Yan, R.; Xu, B.; Li, X.

    2014-10-01

    A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect by deconvolution is proposed for noninvasive imaging of biological tissue. Compared with ultrasound current source density imaging, ultrasound Joule heat density tomography doesn't require any priori knowledge of conductivity distribution and lead fields, so it can gain better imaging result, more adaptive to environment and with wider application scope. For a general 3D volume conductor with broadly distributed current density field, in the AE equation the ultrasound pressure can't simply be separated from the 3D integration, so it is not a common modulation and basebanding (heterodyning) method is no longer suitable to separate Joule heat density from the AE signals. In the proposed method the measurement signal is viewed as the output of Joule heat density convolving with ultrasound wave. As a result, the internal 3D Joule heat density can be reconstructed by means of Wiener deconvolution. A series of computer simulations set for breast cancer imaging applications, with consideration of ultrasound beam diameter, noise level, conductivity contrast, position dependency and size of simulated tumors, have been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed reconstruction method. The computer simulation results demonstrate that high spatial resolution 3D ultrasound Joule heat density imaging is feasible using the proposed method, and it has potential applications to breast cancer detection and imaging of other organs.

  8. On the failure of graphene devices by Joule heating under current stressing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkan, Colm; Xiao, Zhuocong

    2015-12-01

    The behaviour of single layer graphene sections under current-stressing conditions is presented. Graphene devices are stressed to the point of failure, and it is seen that they exhibit Joule heating. Using a simple 1-D model for heat generation, we demonstrate how to extract values for the resistivity and thermal coefficient of resistance of graphene devices from their current-voltage characteristics. We also show that graphene flakes with a large number of ripples and folds have higher resistance and fail along a connected pathway of folds.

  9. Magnetospheric Structure and Atmospheric Joule Heating of Habitable Planets Orbiting M-dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Glocer, A.; Garraffo, C.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Bell, J. M.; Ridley, A. J.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-07-01

    We study the magnetospheric structure and the ionospheric Joule Heating of planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone using a set of magnetohydrodynamic models. The stellar wind solution is used to drive a model for the planetary magnetosphere, which is coupled with a model for the planetary ionosphere. Our simulations reveal that the space environment around close-in habitable planets is extreme, and the stellar wind plasma conditions change from sub- to super-Alfvénic along the planetary orbit. As a result, the magnetospheric structure changes dramatically with a bow shock forming in the super-Alfvénic sectors, while no bow shock forms in the sub-Alfvénic sectors. The planets reside most of the time in the sub-Alfvénic sectors with poor atmospheric protection. A significant amount of Joule Heating is provided at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the intense stellar wind. For the steady-state solution, the heating is about 0.1%-3% of the total incoming stellar irradiation, and it is enhanced by 50% for the time-dependent case. The significant Joule Heating obtained here should be considered in models for the atmospheres of habitable planets in terms of the thickness of the atmosphere, the top-side temperature and density, the boundary conditions for the atmospheric pressure, and particle radiation and transport. Here we assume constant ionospheric Pedersen conductance similar to that of the Earth. The conductance could be greater due to the intense EUV radiation leading to smaller heating rates. We plan to quantify the ionospheric conductance in future study.

  10. Magnetospheric structure and atmospheric Joule heating of habitable planets orbiting M-dwarf stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Glocer, A.; Ridley, A. J.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-07-20

    We study the magnetospheric structure and the ionospheric Joule Heating of planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone using a set of magnetohydrodynamic models. The stellar wind solution is used to drive a model for the planetary magnetosphere, which is coupled with a model for the planetary ionosphere. Our simulations reveal that the space environment around close-in habitable planets is extreme, and the stellar wind plasma conditions change from sub- to super-Alfvénic along the planetary orbit. As a result, the magnetospheric structure changes dramatically with a bow shock forming in the super-Alfvénic sectors, while no bow shock forms in the sub-Alfvénic sectors. The planets reside most of the time in the sub-Alfvénic sectors with poor atmospheric protection. A significant amount of Joule Heating is provided at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the intense stellar wind. For the steady-state solution, the heating is about 0.1%-3% of the total incoming stellar irradiation, and it is enhanced by 50% for the time-dependent case. The significant Joule Heating obtained here should be considered in models for the atmospheres of habitable planets in terms of the thickness of the atmosphere, the top-side temperature and density, the boundary conditions for the atmospheric pressure, and particle radiation and transport. Here we assume constant ionospheric Pedersen conductance similar to that of the Earth. The conductance could be greater due to the intense EUV radiation leading to smaller heating rates. We plan to quantify the ionospheric conductance in future study.

  11. Simple and strong: twisted silver painted nylon artificial muscle actuated by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirvakili, Seyed M.; Rafie Ravandi, Ali; Hunter, Ian W.; Haines, Carter S.; Li, Na; Foroughi, Javad; Naficy, Sina; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Baughman, Ray H.; Madden, John D. W.

    2014-03-01

    Highly oriented nylon and polyethylene fibres shrink in length when heated and expand in diameter. By twisting and then coiling monofilaments of these materials to form helical springs, the anisotropic thermal expansion has recently been shown to enable tensile actuation of up to 49% upon heating. Joule heating, by passing a current through a conductive coating on the surface of the filament, is a convenient method of controlling actuation. In previously reported work this has been done using highly flexible carbon nanotube sheets or commercially available silver coated fibres. In this work silver paint is used as the Joule heating element at the surface of the muscle. Up to 29% linear actuation is observed with energy and power densities reaching 840 kJ m-3 (528 J kg-1) and 1.1 kW kg-1 (operating at 0.1 Hz, 4% strain, 1.4 kg load). This simple coating method is readily accessible and can be applied to any polymer filament. Effective use of this technique relies on uniform coating to avoid temperature gradients.

  12. Solar wind effect on Joule heating in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A. T.; Nygrén, T.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of solar wind on several electrodynamic parameters, measured simultaneously by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radars in Tromsø (TRO, 66.6° cgmLat) and on Svalbard (ESR, 75.4° cgmLat), has been evaluated statistically. The main emphasis is on Joule heating rate QJ, which has been estimated by taking into account the neutral wind. In addition, a generally used proxy QE, which is the Pedersen conductance times the electric field squared, has been calculated. The most important findings are as follows. (i) The decrease in Joule heating in the afternoon-evening sector due to winds reported by Aikio et al. (2012) requires southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions and a sufficiently high solar wind electric field. The increase in the morning sector takes place for all IMF directions within a region where the upper E neutral wind has a large equatorward component and the F region plasma flow is directed eastward. (ii) At ESR, an afternoon hot spot of Joule heating centered typically at 14-15 magnetic local time (MLT) is observed during all IMF conditions. Enhanced Pedersen conductances within the hot spot region are observed only for the IMF Bz + /By- conditions, and the corresponding convection electric field values within the hot spot are smaller than during the other IMF conditions. Hence, the hot spot represents a region of persistent magnetospheric electromagnetic energy input, and the median value is about 3 mW/m2. (iii) For the southward IMF conditions, the MLT-integrated QE for By- is twice the value for By+ at TRO. This can plausibly be explained by the higher average solar wind electric field values for By-.

  13. A Model of Solar Radiation and Joule Heating in Flow of Third Grade Nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tariq; Hayat, Tasawar; Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Chen, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The flow problem resulting from the stretching of a surface with convective conditions in a magnetohydrodynamic nanofluid with solar radiation is examined. Both heat and nanoparticle mass transfer convective conditions are employed. An incompressible third grade fluid which exhibits shear thinning and shear thickening characteristics is used as a base fluid. Concept of convective nanoparticle mass condition is introduced. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis on magnetohydrodynamic flow of nanofluid are accounted in the presence of thermal radiation. Energy equation incorporates the features of Joule heating. The impact of physical parameters on the temperature and nanoparticle concentration has been pointed out. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient are presented and analysed. It is hoped that this present investigation serves as a stimulus for the next generation of solar film collectors, heat exchangers technology, material processing, geothermal energy storage, and all those processes which are highly affected by the heat enhancement concept.

  14. Impact of Magnetic Field on Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow of Water Based Nanofluids with Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2015-02-01

    Peristaltic transport of water-based nanofluids in the presence of applied magnetic field is studied. Two different types of nanofluids (silver-water and copper-water nanofluids) are used in the analysis. Effects of mixed convection, viscous dissipation, Joule heating, and heat generation/absorption are considered. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations are used in the mathematical modelling. Numerical solutions are obtained for the velocity, pressure gradient, pressure rise per wavelength, temperature, and heat transfer rate at the wall. Physical quantities of interest are studied through graphs and tables. Comparison of water, silver-water, and copper-water nanofluid is presented. Results show that velocity and temperature of ordinary water are larger than those of nanofluids. Maximum velocity, temperature, and heat transfer rate at the wall of silver-water nanofluid is relatively higher than the copper-water nanofluid.

  15. Restrictions on linear heat capacities from Joule-Brayton maximum-work cycle efficiency.

    PubMed

    Angulo-Brown, F; Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L A

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using the Joule-Brayton cycle to determine the accessible value range for the coefficients a and b of the heat capacity at constant pressure C(p), expressed as C(p) = a + bT (with T the absolute temperature) by using the Carnot theorem. This is made for several gases which operate as the working fluids. Moreover, the landmark role of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency for this type of cycle is established. PMID:25353449

  16. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Edlyn V.; Burns, Michael M.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics.

  17. The Role of Joule Heating and Defect Chemistry in Memristor Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Brian; Hjalmarson, Harold; McLain, Michael; Mamaluy, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Resistive switching in electroformed metal/metal-oxide/metal memristive devices involves the growth and dissolution of conductive filaments within the metal-oxide. These filaments are typically formed/dissolved by applying a voltage pulse of the appropriate polarity across the metal contacts. The induced electric field across the oxide causes Joule heating. This heating is a significant contributor to the migration of lattice defects such as charged oxygen vacancies, which modulate the time-evolution of the conductive filaments, and hence the device resistance. In this talk, continuum calculations are presented that model the temporal evolution of conductive filaments in tantalum oxide devices. The effects of Joule heating, chemical species migration and pulsed ionizing radiation from an external source are included in the model. Interface tunneling current is determined via a WKB model, in conjunction with a lattice defect generation scheme. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contractDE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow of Water Based Nanofluids with Joule Heating and Convective Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Sadaf; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Rafiq, Maimona

    2016-01-01

    Main objective of present study is to analyze the mixed convective peristaltic transport of water based nanofluids using five different nanoparticles i.e. (Al2O3, CuO, Cu, Ag and TiO2). Two thermal conductivity models namely the Maxwell's and Hamilton-Crosser's are used in this study. Hall and Joule heating effects are also given consideration. Convection boundary conditions are employed. Furthermore, viscous dissipation and heat generation/absorption are used to model the energy equation. Problem is simplified by employing lubrication approach. System of equations are solved numerically. Influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature are discussed. Also the heat transfer rate at the wall is observed for considered five nanofluids using the two phase models via graphs. PMID:27104596

  19. Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow of Water Based Nanofluids with Joule Heating and Convective Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Sadaf; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Rafiq, Maimona

    2016-01-01

    Main objective of present study is to analyze the mixed convective peristaltic transport of water based nanofluids using five different nanoparticles i.e. (Al2O3, CuO, Cu, Ag and TiO2). Two thermal conductivity models namely the Maxwell's and Hamilton-Crosser's are used in this study. Hall and Joule heating effects are also given consideration. Convection boundary conditions are employed. Furthermore, viscous dissipation and heat generation/absorption are used to model the energy equation. Problem is simplified by employing lubrication approach. System of equations are solved numerically. Influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature are discussed. Also the heat transfer rate at the wall is observed for considered five nanofluids using the two phase models via graphs. PMID:27104596

  20. 3D noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography based on acousto-electric effect using unipolar pulses: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Renhuan; Li, Xu; Song, Aiguo; He, Bin; Yan, Ruqiang

    2012-01-01

    Electrical properties of biological tissues are highly sensitive to their physiological and pathological status. Thus it is of importance to image electrical properties of biological tissues. However, spatial resolution of conventional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is generally poor. Recently, hybrid imaging modalities combining electric conductivity contrast and ultrasonic resolution based on acouto-electric effect has attracted considerable attention. In this study, we propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography (UJHT) approach based on acouto-electric effect using unipolar ultrasound pulses. As the Joule heat density distribution is highly dependent on the conductivity distribution, an accurate and high resolution mapping of the Joule heat density distribution is expected to give important information that is closely related to the conductivity contrast. The advantages of the proposed ultrasound Joule heat tomography using unipolar pulses include its simple inverse solution, better performance than UJHT using common bipolar pulses and its independence of any priori knowledge of the conductivity distribution of the imaging object. Computer simulation results show that using the proposed method, it is feasible to perform a high spatial resolution Joule heat imaging in an inhomogeneous conductive media. Application of this technique on tumor scanning is also investigated by a series of computer simulations. PMID:23123757

  1. Polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors fabricated by Joule-heating-induced crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Won-Eui; Ro, Jae-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Joule-heating-induced crystallization (JIC) of amorphous silicon (a-Si) films is carried out by applying an electric pulse to a conductive layer located beneath or above the films. Crystallization occurs across the whole substrate surface within few tens of microseconds. Arc instability, however, is observed during crystallization, and is attributed to dielectric breakdown in the conductor/insulator/transformed polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) sandwich structures at high temperatures during electrical pulsing for crystallization. In this study, we devised a method for the crystallization of a-Si films while preventing arc generation; this method consisted of pre-patterning an a-Si active layer into islands and then depositing a gate oxide and gate electrode. Electric pulsing was then applied to the gate electrode formed using a Mo layer. The Mo layer was used as a Joule-heat source for the crystallization of pre-patterned active islands of a-Si films. JIC-processed poly-Si thin-film transistors (TFTs) were fabricated successfully, and the proposed method was found to be compatible with the standard processing of coplanar top-gate poly-Si TFTs.

  2. Impact of Joule Heating and pH on Biosolids Electro-Dewatering.

    PubMed

    Navab-Daneshmand, Tala; Beton, Raphaël; Hill, Reghan J; Frigon, Dominic

    2015-05-01

    Electro-dewatering (ED) is a novel technology to reduce the overall costs of residual biosolids processing, transport, and disposal. In this study, we investigated Joule heating and pH as parameters controlling the dewaterability limit, dewatering rate, and energy efficiency. Temperature-controlled electrodes revealed that Joule heating enhances water removal by increasing evaporation and electro-osmotic flow. High temperatures increased the dewatering rate, but had little impact on the dewaterability limit and energy efficiency. Analysis of horizontal layers after 15-min ED suggests electro-osmotic flow reversal, as evidenced by a shifting of the point of minimum moisture content from the anode toward the cathode. This flow reversal was also confirmed by the pH at the anode being below the isoelectric point, as ascertained by pH titration. The important role of pH on ED was further studied by adding acid/base solutions to biosolids prior to ED. An acidic pH reduced the biosolids charge while simultaneously increasing the dewatering efficiency. Thus, process optimization depends on trade-offs between speed and efficiency, according to physicochemical properties of the biosolids microstructure. PMID:25494946

  3. Nanoscale Joule heating and electromigration enhanced ripening of silver nanowire contacts.

    PubMed

    Song, Tze-Bin; Chen, Yu; Chung, Choong-Heui; Yang, Yang Michael; Bob, Brion; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Li, Gang; Tu, King-Ning; Huang, Yu; Yang, Yang

    2014-03-25

    Solution-processed metallic nanowire thin film is a promising candidate to replace traditional indium tin oxide as the next-generation transparent and flexible electrode. To date however, the performance of these electrodes is limited by the high contact resistance between contacting nanowires; so improving the point contacts between these nanowires remains a major challenge. Existing methods for reducing the contact resistance require either a high processing power, long treatment time, or the addition of chemical reagents, which could lead to increased manufacturing cost and damage the underlying substrate or device. Here, a nanoscale point reaction process is introduced as a fast and low-power-consumption way to improve the electrical contact properties between metallic nanowires. This is achieved via current-assisted localized joule heating accompanied by electromigration. Localized joule heating effectively targets the high-resistance contact points between nanowires, leading to the automatic removal of surface ligands, welding of contacting nanowires, and the reshaping of the contact pathway between the nanowires to form a more desirable geometry of low resistance for interwire conduction. This result shows the interplay between thermal and electrical interactions at the highly reactive nanocontacts and highlights the control of the nanoscale reaction as a simple and effective way of turning individual metallic nanowires into a highly conductive interconnected nanowire network. The temperature of the adjacent device layers can be kept close to room temperature during the process, making this method especially suitable for use in devices containing thermally sensitive materials such as polymer solar cells. PMID:24517263

  4. Joule heating effect in nonpolar and bipolar resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenuma, Mutsunori; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2015-08-01

    The position of the conductive filament (CF) and the heating behaviour during a switching process in nonpolar and bipolar resistive random access memories (ReRAMs) were evaluated using thermal analysis. The position of the CF was clearly observed from Joule heating at the surface of the electrode on the CF. The position of the CF did not change during the switching cycle, except in the case of an unstable CF. In the nonpolar ReRAM, spike-shaped temperature increments were observed during both the forming and the set processes because of the overshoot current. However, the behaviour of the temperature increment in the bipolar ReRAM was virtually consistent with the profile of the electrical power.

  5. MHD Mixed Convective Peristaltic Motion of Nanofluid with Joule Heating and Thermophoresis Effects

    PubMed Central

    Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaadi, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of present investigation is to introduce the novel aspect of thermophoresis in the mixed convective peristaltic transport of viscous nanofluid. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into account. Problem is modeled using the lubrication approach. Resulting system of equations is solved numerically. Effects of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration of nanoparticles and heat and mass transfer rates at the wall are studied through graphs. It is noted that the concentration of nanoparticles near the boundaries is enhanced for larger thermophoresis parameter. However reverse situation is observed for an increase in the value of Brownian motion parameter. Further, the mass transfer rate at the wall significantly decreases when Brownian motion parameter is assigned higher values. PMID:25391147

  6. Effect of Al-trace degradation on Joule heating during electromigration in flip-chip solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S. W.; Chiu, S. H.; Chen, Chih

    2007-02-01

    This study investigates the mechanism for the abrupt increase in temperature at later stages of electromigration in flip-chip solder joints. It is found that electromigration also occurs in Al traces when stressed by 0.6A at 100C. Three-dimensional thermoelectrical simulation by finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the temperature distribution in solder joints with and without degradation of the Al trace. It is found that the degradation of the Al trace has substantial effect on the Joule heating of solder joints. This model can explain the serious Joule heating effect in the later stages of electromigration.

  7. Highly Stable and Conductive Microcapsules for Enhancement of Joule Heating Performance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoliang; Jin, Jidong; Xu, Guang-Kui; Zou, Jianli; Wais, Ulrike; Beckett, Alison; Heil, Tobias; Higgins, Sean; Guan, Lunhui; Wang, Ying; Shchukin, Dmitry

    2016-04-26

    Nanocarbons show great promise for establishing the next generation of Joule heating systems, but suffer from the limited maximum temperature due to precociously convective heat dissipation from electrothermal system to surrounding environment. Here we introduce a strategy to eliminate such convective heat transfer by inserting highly stable and conductive microcapsules into the electrothermal structures. The microcapsule is composed of encapsulated long-chain alkanes and graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids as core and shell material, respectively. Multiform carbon nanotubes in the microspheres stabilize the capsule shell to resist volume-change-induced rupture during repeated heating/cooling process, and meanwhile enhance the thermal conductance of encapsulated alkanes which facilitates an expeditious heat exchange. The resulting microcapsules can be homogeneously incorporated in the nanocarbon-based electrothermal structures. At a dopant of 5%, the working temperature can be enhanced by 30% even at a low voltage and moderate temperature, which indicates a great value in daily household applications. Therefore, the stable and conductive microcapsule may serve as a versatile and valuable dopant for varieties of heat generation systems. PMID:27002594

  8. Highly Stable and Conductive Microcapsules for Enhancement of Joule Heating Performance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarbons show great promise for establishing the next generation of Joule heating systems, but suffer from the limited maximum temperature due to precociously convective heat dissipation from electrothermal system to surrounding environment. Here we introduce a strategy to eliminate such convective heat transfer by inserting highly stable and conductive microcapsules into the electrothermal structures. The microcapsule is composed of encapsulated long-chain alkanes and graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids as core and shell material, respectively. Multiform carbon nanotubes in the microspheres stabilize the capsule shell to resist volume-change-induced rupture during repeated heating/cooling process, and meanwhile enhance the thermal conductance of encapsulated alkanes which facilitates an expeditious heat exchange. The resulting microcapsules can be homogeneously incorporated in the nanocarbon-based electrothermal structures. At a dopant of 5%, the working temperature can be enhanced by 30% even at a low voltage and moderate temperature, which indicates a great value in daily household applications. Therefore, the stable and conductive microcapsule may serve as a versatile and valuable dopant for varieties of heat generation systems. PMID:27002594

  9. Residual resistance of 2D and 3D structures and Joule heat release.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V L; Kozub, V I

    2011-06-22

    We consider a residual resistance and Joule heat release in 2D nanostructures as well as in ordinary 3D conductors. We assume that elastic scattering of conduction electrons by lattice defects is predominant. Within a rather intricate situation in such systems we discuss in detail two cases. (1) The elastic scattering alone (i.e. without regard of inelastic mechanisms of scattering) leads to a transition of the mechanical energy (stored by the electrons under the action of an electric field) into heat in a traditional way. This process can be described by the Boltzmann equation where it is possible to do the configuration averaging over defect positions in the electron-impurity collision term. The corresponding conditions are usually met in metals. (2) The elastic scattering can be considered with the help of the standard electron-impurity collision integral only in combination with some additional averaging procedure (possibly including inelastic scattering or some mechanisms of electron wavefunction phase destruction). This situation is typical for degenerate semiconductors with a high concentration of dopants and conduction electrons. Quite often, heat release can be observed via transfer of heat to the lattice, i.e. via inelastic processes of electron-phonon collisions and can take place at distances much larger than the size of the device. However, a direct heating of the electron system can be registered too by, for instance, local measurements of the current noise or direct measurement of an electron distribution function. PMID:21628783

  10. Origin of hysteresis in resistive switching in magnetite is Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursina, A. A.; Sofin, R. G. S.; Shvets, I. V.; Natelson, D.

    2009-06-01

    In many transition-metal oxides the electrical resistance is observed to undergo dramatic changes induced by large biases. In magnetite, Fe3O4 , below the Verwey temperature, an electric-field-driven transition to a state of lower resistance was recently found, with hysteretic current-voltage response. We report the results of pulsed electrical conduction measurements in epitaxial magnetite thin films. We show that while the high- to low-resistance transition is driven by electric field, the hysteresis observed in I-V curves results from Joule heating in the low-resistance state. The shape of the hysteresis loop depends on pulse parameters and reduces to a hysteresis-free “jump” of the current provided thermal relaxation is rapid compared to the time between voltage pulses. A simple relaxation-time thermal model is proposed that captures the essentials of the hysteresis mechanism.

  11. Composites of Graphene Nanoribbon Stacks and Epoxy for Joule Heating and Deicing of Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Varadhachary, Tanvi; Nan, Kewang; Wang, Tuo; Lin, Jian; Ji, Yongsung; Genorio, Bostjan; Zhu, Yu; Kittrell, Carter; Tour, James M

    2016-02-10

    A conductive composite of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) stacks and epoxy is fabricated. The epoxy is filled with the GNR stacks, which serve as a conductive additive. The GNR stacks are on average 30 nm thick, 250 nm wide, and 30 μm long. The GNR-filled epoxy composite exhibits a conductivity >100 S/m at 5 wt % GNR content. This permits application of the GNR-epoxy composite for deicing of surfaces through Joule (voltage-induced) heating generated by the voltage across the composite. A power density of 0.5 W/cm(2) was delivered to remove ∼1 cm-thick (14 g) monolith of ice from a static helicopter rotor blade surface in a -20 °C environment. PMID:26780972

  12. Modeling principles applied to the simulation of a joule-heated glass melter

    SciTech Connect

    Routt, K.R.

    1980-05-01

    Three-dimensional conservation equations applicable to the operation of a joule-heated glass melter were rigorously examined and used to develop scaling relationships for modeling purposes. By rigorous application of the conservation equations governing transfer of mass, momentum, energy, and electrical charge in three-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, scaling relationships were derived between a glass melter and a physical model for the following independent and dependent variables: geometrical size (scale), velocity, temperature, pressure, mass input rate, energy input rate, voltage, electrode current, electrode current flux, total power, and electrical resistance. The scaling relationships were then applied to the design and construction of a physical model of the semiworks glass melter for the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The design and construction of such a model using glycerine plus LiCl as a model fluid in a one-half-scale Plexiglas tank is described.

  13. Joule heating effects on electrokinetic focusing and trapping of particles in constriction microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junjie; Sridharan, Sriram; Hu, Guoqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2012-07-01

    Joule heating (JH) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in electrokinetic microfluidic devices. Its effects on fluid and ionic species transport in capillary and microchip electrophoresis have been well studied. However, JH effects on the electrokinetic motion of microparticles in microchannels have been nearly unexplored in the literature. This paper presents an experimental investigation of JH effects on electrokinetic particle transport and manipulation in constriction microchannels under both pure dc and dc-biased ac electric fields. It is found that the JH effects reduce the dielectrophoretic focusing and trapping of particles, especially significant when dc-biased ac electric fields are used. These results are expected to provide a useful guidance for future designs of electrokinetic particle handling microdevices that will avoid JH effects or take advantage of them.

  14. Numerical analysis of the electrical failure of a metallic nanowire mesh due to Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Tohmyoh, Hironori; Saka, Masumi

    2013-08-01

    To precisely examine the electrical failure behavior of a metallic nanowire mesh induced by Joule heating (i.e., melting), a previously developed numerical method was modified with regard to the maximum temperature in the mesh and the electrical resistivity of the nanowire. A sample case of an Ag nanowire mesh under specific working conditions was analyzed with highly accurate numerical results. By monitoring the temperature in the mesh, the current required to trigger the melting of a mesh segment (i.e., the melting current) could be obtained. The melting process of a mesh equipped with a current source during actual operation was predicted on the basis of the obtained relationship between the melting current and the corresponding melting voltage in the numerical melting process. Local unstable and stable melting could be precisely identified for both the current-controlled and voltage-controlled current sources in the present example.

  15. Nanoscale Dynamics of Joule heating and Bubble Nucleation in a Solid-State Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Edlyn V.; Burns, Michael M.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics. PACS numbers 47.55.dp, 47.55.db, 85.35.-p, 05.70Fh PMID:26871171

  16. Joule heating a palladium nanowire sensor for accelerated response and recovery to hydrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Taggart, David K; Penner, Reginald M

    2010-07-01

    The properties of a single heated palladium (Pd) nanowire for the detection of hydrogen gas (H(2)) are explored. In these experiments, a Pd nanowire, 48-98 microm in length, performs three functions in parallel: 1) Joule self-heating is used to elevate the nanowire temperature by up to 128 K, 2) the 4-contact wire resistance in the absence of H(2) is used to measure its temperature, and 3) the nanowire resistance in the presence of H(2) is correlated with its concentration, allowing it to function as a H(2) sensor. Compared with the room-temperature response of a Pd nanowire, the response of the heated nanowire to hydrogen is altered in two ways: First, the resistance change (DeltaR/R(0)) induced by H(2) exposure at any concentration is reduced by a factor of up to 30 and second, the rate of the resistance change - observed at the beginning ("response") and at the end ("recovery") of a pulse of H(2) - is increased by more than a factor of 50 at some H(2) concentrations. Heating nearly eliminates the retardation of response and recovery seen from 1-2% H(2), caused by the alpha --> beta phase transition of PdH(x), a pronounced effect for nanowires at room temperature. The activation energies associated with sensor response and recovery are measured and interpreted. PMID:20564483

  17. Influence of Newtonian Heating on Three Dimensional MHD Flow of Couple Stress Nanofluid with Viscous Dissipation and Joule Heating

    PubMed Central

    Ramzan, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The present exploration discusses the influence of Newtonian heating on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three dimensional couple stress nanofluid past a stretching surface. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating effects are also considered. Moreover, the nanofluid model includes the combined effects of thermophoresis and Brownian motion. Using an appropriate transformation, the governing non linear partial differential equations are converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Series solutions using Homotopy Analysis method (HAM) are computed. Plots are presented to portrait the arising parameters in the problem. It is seen that an increase in conjugate heating parameter results in considerable increase in the temperature profile of the stretching wall. Skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt and local Sherwood numbers tabulated and analyzed. Higher values of conjugate parameter, Thermophoresis parameter and Brownian motion parameter result in enhancement of temperature distribution. PMID:25874800

  18. Stabilization of the no-motion state of a horizontal fluid layer heated from below with Joule heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.; Bau, H.H.

    1995-05-01

    Using linear stability theory and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the critical Rayleigh number for bifurcation from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state in the Rayleigh-Benard problem of an infinite fluid layer heated from below with Joule heating and cooled from above can be significantly increased through the use of feedback control strategies effecting small perturbations in the boundary data. The bottom of the layer is heated by a network of heaters whose power supply is modulated in proportion to the deviations of the temperatures at various locations in the fluid from the conductive, no-motion temperatures. Similar control strategies can also be used to induce complicated, time-dependent flows at relatively low Rayleigh numbers. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  19. James Joule and meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David W.

    1989 was the hundredth anniversary of the death of James Prescott Joule, the Prescott being his mother's family name and the Joule, rhyming with cool, originating from the Derbyshire village of Youlgreave. Joule is rightly famous for his experimental efforts to establish the law of conservation of energy, and for the fact that J, the symbol known as the mechanical equivalent of heat, is named after him. Astronomically his "light has been hidden under a bushel". James Joule had a major influence on the physics of meteors.

  20. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow and Heat Transfer with Effects of Viscous Dissipation, Joule Heating and Partial Velocity Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    The steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow and heat transfer past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with effects of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and partial velocity slip in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated. The partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by shooting technique. Results indicate that the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase as magnetic parameter increases. It is found that for the stretching sheet the solution is unique while for the shrinking sheet there exist nonunique solutions (dual solutions) in certain range of parameters. The stability analysis shows that the upper branch solution is stable while the lower branch solution is unstable.

  1. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow and Heat Transfer with Effects of Viscous Dissipation, Joule Heating and Partial Velocity Slip

    PubMed Central

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow and heat transfer past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with effects of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and partial velocity slip in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated. The partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by shooting technique. Results indicate that the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase as magnetic parameter increases. It is found that for the stretching sheet the solution is unique while for the shrinking sheet there exist nonunique solutions (dual solutions) in certain range of parameters. The stability analysis shows that the upper branch solution is stable while the lower branch solution is unstable. PMID:26647651

  2. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow and Heat Transfer with Effects of Viscous Dissipation, Joule Heating and Partial Velocity Slip.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Mohd Hafizi Mat; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow and heat transfer past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with effects of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and partial velocity slip in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated. The partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by shooting technique. Results indicate that the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase as magnetic parameter increases. It is found that for the stretching sheet the solution is unique while for the shrinking sheet there exist nonunique solutions (dual solutions) in certain range of parameters. The stability analysis shows that the upper branch solution is stable while the lower branch solution is unstable. PMID:26647651

  3. Combating Frosting with Joule-Heated Liquid-Infused Superhydrophobic Coatings.

    PubMed

    Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Tortorella, Domenico; Kapatral, Shreyas; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2016-05-01

    Frost formation is omnipresent when suitable environmental conditions are met. A good portion of research on combating frost formation has revolved around the passive properties of superhydrophobic (SHPO) and slippery lubricant-impregnated porous (SLIP) surfaces. Despite much progress, the need for surfaces that can effectively combat frost formation over prolonged periods still remains. In this work, we report, for the first time, the use of electrically conductive SHPO/SLIP surfaces for active mitigation of frost formation. First, we demonstrate the failure of these surfaces to passively avert prolonged (several hours) frosting. Next, we make use of their electroconductive property for active Joule heating, which results in the removal of any formed frost. We study the role of the impregnating lubricant in the heat transfer across the interface, the surface, and the ambient. We show that, even though the thermal properties of the impregnating lubricant may vary drastically, the lubricant type does not noticeably affect the defrosting behavior of the surface. We attribute this outcome to the dominant thermal resistance of the thick frost layer formed on the cooled surface. We support this claim by drawing parallels between the present system and heat transfer through a one-dimensional (1D) composite medium, and solving the appropriate transient transport equations. Lastly, we propose periodic thermal defrosting for averting frost formation altogether. This methodology utilizes the coating's passive repellent capabilities, while eliminating the dominant effect of thick deposited frost layers. The periodic heating approach takes advantage of lubricants with higher thermal conductivities, which effectively enhance heat transfer through the porous multiphase surface that forms the first line of defense against frosting. PMID:27021948

  4. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominguez, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a Joule-heated (sometimes called 'self-heating') reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath. Solutions obtained by multiphysics modeling allow the identification of the critical dimensions of concept reactors.

  5. Effect of concurrent joule heat and charge trapping on RESET for NbAlO fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Ye, Li; Sun, Qing Qing; Wang, Peng Fei; Jiang, An Quan; Ding, Shi Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2013-02-01

    The RESET process of NbAlO-based resistive switching memory devices fabricated by atomic layer deposition is investigated at low temperatures from 80 to 200 K. We observed that the conduction mechanism of high resistance state changed from hopping conduction to Frenkel-Poole conduction with elevated temperature. It is found that the conductive filament rupture in RRAM RESET process can be attributed not only to the Joule heat generated by internal current flow through a filament but also to the charge trap/detrapping effect. The RESET current decreases upon heating. Meanwhile, the energy consumption also decreases exponentially. This phenomenon indicates the temperature-related charge trap/detrapping process which contributes to the RESET besides direct Joule heat.

  6. Effect of concurrent joule heat and charge trapping on RESET for NbAlO fabricated by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Ye, Li; Sun, Qing Qing; Wang, Peng Fei; Jiang, An Quan; Ding, Shi Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2013-01-01

    The RESET process of NbAlO-based resistive switching memory devices fabricated by atomic layer deposition is investigated at low temperatures from 80 to 200 K. We observed that the conduction mechanism of high resistance state changed from hopping conduction to Frenkel-Poole conduction with elevated temperature. It is found that the conductive filament rupture in RRAM RESET process can be attributed not only to the Joule heat generated by internal current flow through a filament but also to the charge trap/detrapping effect. The RESET current decreases upon heating. Meanwhile, the energy consumption also decreases exponentially. This phenomenon indicates the temperature-related charge trap/detrapping process which contributes to the RESET besides direct Joule heat. PMID:23421401

  7. Effect of concurrent joule heat and charge trapping on RESET for NbAlO fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The RESET process of NbAlO-based resistive switching memory devices fabricated by atomic layer deposition is investigated at low temperatures from 80 to 200 K. We observed that the conduction mechanism of high resistance state changed from hopping conduction to Frenkel-Poole conduction with elevated temperature. It is found that the conductive filament rupture in RRAM RESET process can be attributed not only to the Joule heat generated by internal current flow through a filament but also to the charge trap/detrapping effect. The RESET current decreases upon heating. Meanwhile, the energy consumption also decreases exponentially. This phenomenon indicates the temperature-related charge trap/detrapping process which contributes to the RESET besides direct Joule heat. PMID:23421401

  8. Consistent melting behavior induced by Joule heating between Ag microwire and nanowire meshes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The melting behavior of an Ag microwire mesh induced by Joule heating was numerically investigated and compared with that of the corresponding Ag nanowire mesh with the same structure but different geometrical and physical properties of the wire itself. According to the relationship of melting current and melting voltage during the melting process, a similar repetitive zigzag pattern in melting behavior was discovered in both meshes. On this basis, a dimensionless parameter defined as figure of merit was proposed to characterize the current-carrying ability of the mesh. The consistent feature of figure of merit in both meshes indicates that the melting behavior of the Ag nanowire mesh can be predicted from the present results of the corresponding Ag microwire mesh with the same structure but made from a different wire (e.g., different size, different material) through simple conversion. The present findings can provide fundamental insight into the reliability analysis on the metallic nanowire mesh-based transparent conductive electrode. PMID:24910578

  9. Heat, work and subtle fluids: a commentary on Joule (1850) ‘On the mechanical equivalent of heat’

    PubMed Central

    Young, John

    2015-01-01

    James Joule played the major role in establishing the conservation of energy, or the first law of thermodynamics, as a universal, all-pervasive principle of physics. He was an experimentalist par excellence and his place in the development of thermodynamics is unarguable. This article discusses Joule's life and scientific work culminating in the 1850 paper, where he presented his detailed measurements of the mechanical equivalent of heat using his famous paddle-wheel apparatus. Joule's long series of experiments in the 1840s leading to his realisation that the conservation of energy was probably of universal validity is discussed in context with the work of other pioneers, notably Sadi Carnot, who effectively formulated the principle of the second law of thermodynamics a quarter of a century before the first law was accepted. The story of Joule's work is a story of an uphill struggle against a critical scientific establishment unwilling to accept the mounting evidence until it was impossible to ignore. His difficulties in attracting funding and publishing in reputable journals despite the quality of his work will resonate with many young scientists and engineers of the present day. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750152

  10. Joule Heating-Induced Metal-Insulator Transition in Epitaxial VO2/TiO2 Devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Dasheng; Sharma, Abhishek A; Gala, Darshil K; Shukla, Nikhil; Paik, Hanjong; Datta, Suman; Schlom, Darrell G; Bain, James A; Skowronski, Marek

    2016-05-25

    DC and pulse voltage-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT) in epitaxial VO2 two terminal devices were measured at various stage temperatures. The power needed to switch the device to the ON-state decrease linearly with increasing stage temperature, which can be explained by the Joule heating effect. During transient voltage induced MIT measurement, the incubation time varied across 6 orders of magnitude. Both DC I-V characteristic and incubation times calculated from the electrothermal simulations show good agreement with measured values, indicating Joule heating effect is the cause of MIT with no evidence of electronic effects. The width of the metallic filament in the ON-state of the device was extracted and simulated within the thermal model. PMID:27136956

  11. Thermodynamic optimization of mixed refrigerant Joule- Thomson systems constrained by heat transfer considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, J. F.; Klein, S. A.; Nellis, G. F.

    2015-12-01

    Mixed refrigerant (MR) working fluids can significantly increase the cooling capacity of a Joule-Thomson (JT) cycle. The optimization of MRJT systems has been the subject of substantial research. However, most optimization techniques do not model the recuperator in sufficient detail. For example, the recuperator is usually assumed to have a heat transfer coefficient that does not vary with the mixture. Ongoing work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has shown that the heat transfer coefficients for two-phase flow are approximately three times greater than for a single phase mixture when the mixture quality is between 15% and 85%. As a result, a system that optimizes a MR without also requiring that the flow be in this quality range may require an extremely large recuperator or not achieve the performance predicted by the model. To ensure optimal performance of the JT cycle, the MR should be selected such that it is entirely two-phase within the recuperator. To determine the optimal MR composition, a parametric study was conducted assuming a thermodynamically ideal cycle. The results of the parametric study are graphically presented on a contour plot in the parameter space consisting of the extremes of the qualities that exist within the recuperator. The contours show constant values of the normalized refrigeration power. This ‘map’ shows the effect of MR composition on the cycle performance and it can be used to select the MR that provides a high cooling load while also constraining the recuperator to be two phase. The predicted best MR composition can be used as a starting point for experimentally determining the best MR.

  12. Rapid concentration of deoxyribonucleic acid via Joule heating induced temperature gradient focusing in poly-dimethylsiloxane microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhengwei; Wang, Wei; Yang, Chun

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports rapid microfluidic electrokinetic concentration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with the Joule heating induced temperature gradient focusing (TGF) by using our proposed combined AC and DC electric field technique. A peak of 480-fold concentration enhancement of DNA sample is achieved within 40s in a simple poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel of a sudden expansion in cross-section. Compared to a sole DC field, the introduction of an AC field can reduce DC field induced back-pressure and produce sufficient Joule heating effects, resulting in higher concentration enhancement. Within such microfluidic channel structure, negative charged DNA analytes can be concentrated at a location where the DNA electrophoretic motion is balanced with the bulk flow driven by DC electroosmosis under an appropriate temperature gradient field. A numerical model accounting for a combined AC and DC field and back-pressure driven flow effects is developed to describe the complex Joule heating induced TGF processes. The experimental observation of DNA concentration phenomena can be explained by the numerical model. PMID:25597807

  13. Relationship between the Northern Hemisphere Joule heating and geomagnetic activity in the southern polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballatore, P.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Lu, G.; Knipp, D. J.

    2000-12-01

    One of the most important effects from the coupling of the solar wind to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system is the Joule heating (JH) of the atmosphere that is produced by the energy dissipation of ionospheric currents and geomagnetic field-aligned precipitating particles. At present, the most commonly used technique to estimate the global JH rate is the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure. Here we describe a study of the relationship of the Northern Hemisphere JH and the Southern Hemisphere polar geomagnetic index AES-80 during a magnetic storm on October 18-23, 1995 (when both quantities are available). The purpose is to study the effects of the Northern-Southern Hemispherical asymmetry on the correlation between JH and geomagnetic indices. Our results confirm a higher contribution to JH from regions associated with eastward currents. Moreover, we find that the best correspondence between the northern JH and the AES-80 occurs during negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz and By conditions. We discuss how this result is in agreement with the magnetospheric-ionospheric model that considers, during negative IMF Bz and By, an increase of conductance in the regions associated with eastward currents in the Northern Hemisphere. Our observations related to the best estimation of Southern Hemisphere JH are in agreement with the same model too. We also find a ``saturation'' effect for large values of northern JH: the JH-AES-80 correlation breaks down for intervals with JH>190gigawatt (GW), during the highest geomagnetic perturbations, and a negative IMF Bz that exceeds -20 nT. This ``saturation'' is in part attributed to the onset of hemispherical asymmetry due to the solar wind pressure with respect to the Earth-dipole orientation under severe storm conditions.

  14. A comparison of the effect of joule heating vs thermal annealing on the morphology of typical hole transport layers in organic light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson-Hall, Tyler; Aziz, Hany

    2015-09-01

    It is well-known that hole transport layers (HTLs) in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are more sensitive to morphological changes than other organic layers due to the lower glass transition temperatures. A high operational temperature can alter the HTL morphology, severely impacting OLED performance and stability. Although joule heating is a known factor affecting OLED stability during operation, its effect in experimental studies is typically simulated through thermal annealing of the devices rather than applying current. In this work, a comparison of the effects of joule heating vs thermal annealing on the morphological stability of N,N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (NPB) and N,N'-Dicarbazolyl-4,4'-biphenyl (CBP) HTLs and the impact this has on OLED performance is investigated. While thermal annealing of an OLED can be used as an approximation of joule heating, the temperature distribution profile of the OLED is different under the two stress conditions and thus can impact the morphology of the HTL differently. However, joule heating introduces a confounding factor whereby the OLEDs experience intrinsic degradation by the flow of current, aside from thermal stress. Therefore, in this work, joule heating is studied in unipolar devices that comprise solely of the HTL. Device JVL and morphology as a function of temperature for both joule heating and thermal annealing are presented as a means to evaluate stability and performance.

  15. Auroral ionosphere Joule heating as a reason of the upper thermosphere overheating in the Jupiter and Saturn systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Igor; Belenkaya, Elena; Khodachenko, Maxim; Grigoryan, Maria

    All giant planets in the Solar System and particularly Saturn and Jupiter are known to have an upper neutral atmosphere far hotter than it is expected from solar extreme ultraviolet heating alone. While the measured exospheric temperatures on Saturn and Jupiter are close to 500 K and to 1100 K - 2000 K, respectively, the solar heating alone can provide an exospheric temperature only about 200 K. Two main energy deposition mechanisms are discussed in the literature to resolve this contradictions: (1) the gravitation wave dissipation in the upper atmosphere, and (2) the auroral thermosphere Joule heating by the Pedersen ionospheric currents. The ionospheric currents are associated with the field-aligned currents generated due to the magnetosphere-ionosphere slipping. Here we focus on the second mechanism. To improve the accuracy of the numerical estimations we derived the analytic formulas, which describe the dependence of the auroral energy flux on the planetary magnetic field strength, as well as on the solar wind plasma ram pressure, and on the breaking of magnetospheric plasma corotation. The last effect is essential for Jupiter, where the main oval is driven internally at Alvenic radius. We pay attention to the general physical phenomena, which may be only slightly influenced/modified by the specific atmospheric composition and photochemical ionospheric reactions. One of the most important energy inputs to the polar upper atmosphere is Joule heating by the ionospheric Pedersen currents. We estimate it to be ~3.0 TW for Saturn and about 1000 times more (3500 TW) for Jupiter. That represents a significant energy input to Saturn’s and Jupiter’s thermospheres. It is more than an order of magnitude larger as compared to the globally averaged solar input. Therefore, Joule heating may be reasonably appealed for the explanation of the observed high thermosphere temperatures by Saturn (~400-600 K) and Jupiter (1200 K).

  16. A self-heated silicon nanowire array: selective surface modification with catalytic nanoparticles by nanoscale Joule heating and its gas sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jeonghoon; Jin, Chun Yan; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Inkyu

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrated novel methods for selective surface modification of silicon nanowire (SiNW) devices with catalytic metal nanoparticles by nanoscale Joule heating and local chemical reaction. The Joule heating of a SiNW generated a localized heat along the SiNW and produced endothermic reactions such as hydrothermal synthesis of nanoparticles or thermal decomposition of polymer thin films. In the first method, palladium (Pd) nanoparticles could be selectively synthesized and directly coated on a SiNW by the reduction of the Pd precursor via Joule heating of the SiNW. In the second method, a sequential process composed of thermal decomposition of a polymer, evaporation of a Pd thin film, and a lift-off process was utilized. The selective decoration of Pd nanoparticles on SiNW was successfully accomplished by using both methods. Finally, we demonstrated the applications of SiNWs decorated with Pd nanoparticles as hydrogen detectors. We also investigated the effect of self-heating of the SiNW sensor on its sensing performance. PMID:23770994

  17. Numerical analysis of the two-phase heat transfer in the heat exchanger of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, R. M.; Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The recuperative heat exchanger is the most critical component of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler. The heat transfer process in such a heat exchanger takes place under two-phase conditions due to simultaneous boiling of the cold stream and condensation of the hot stream. This results in higher heat transfer coefficients as compared to single phase heat exchange. Moreover, depending on the composition of non-azeotropic mixtures, the boiling and condensation take place over a range of temperatures. In this work, the two-phase heat transfer in the recuperative heat exchanger of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler is studied. A numerical model is developed to simulate the heat transfer in a helically coiled tube-in-tube heat exchanger with nitrogen-hydrocarbons mixtures. The heat transfer coefficients for the two-phase flow under boiling and condensation are evaluated with the correlations available in the literature. The physical properties of the mixtures are evaluated at local conditions of temperature and pressure. The numerical results obtained with the developed model are compared with the experimental data reported in the literature. Additionally, the model predictions are also compared with new experimental data reported in the present work.

  18. Three-dimensional noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography based on the acousto-electric effect using unipolar pulses: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Renhuan; Li, Xu; Song, Aiguo; He, Bin; Yan, Ruqiang

    2012-11-01

    Electrical properties of biological tissues are highly sensitive to their physiological and pathological status. Thus it is of importance to image electrical properties of biological tissues. However, spatial resolution of conventional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is generally poor. Recently, hybrid imaging modalities combining electric conductivity contrast and ultrasonic resolution based on the acousto-electric effect has attracted considerable attention. In this study, we propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography (UJHT) approach based on the acousto-electric effect using unipolar ultrasound pulses. As the Joule heat density distribution is highly dependent on the conductivity distribution, an accurate and high-resolution mapping of the Joule heat density distribution is expected to give important information that is closely related to the conductivity contrast. The advantages of the proposed ultrasound Joule heat tomography using unipolar pulses include its simple inverse solution, better performance than UJHT using common bipolar pulses and its independence of a priori knowledge of the conductivity distribution of the imaging object. Computer simulation results show that using the proposed method, it is feasible to perform a high spatial resolution Joule heat imaging in an inhomogeneous conductive media. Application of this technique on tumor scanning is also investigated by a series of computer simulations.

  19. Short Time-Scale Enhancements to the Global Thermosphere Temperature and Nitric Oxide Content Resulting From Ionospheric Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, D. R.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Sutton, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    The total Joule heating in the polar ionosphere can be derived from an empirical model of the electric fields and currents, using input measurements of the solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In the thermosphere, measurements of the neutral density from accelerometers on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites are used to derive exospheric temperatures, showing that enhanced ionospheric energy dissipation produces elevated temperatures with little delay.Using the total ionospheric heating, changes in the global mean exosphere temperature as a function of time can be calculated with a simple differential equation. The results compare very well with the CHAMP and GRACE measurement. A critical part of the calculation is the rate at which the thermosphere cools after the ionospheric heating is reduced. It had been noted previously that events with significant levels of heating subsequently cool at a faster rate, and this cooling was attributed to enhanced nitric oxide emissions. This correlation with nitric oxide has been confirmed with very high correlations with measurements of nitric oxide emissions in the thermosphere, from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. These measurements were used in a recent improvement in the equations that calculate the thermosphere temperature. The global nitric oxide cooling rates are included in this calculation, and the predicted levels of nitric oxide, derived from the ionosphere heating model, match the SABER measurements very well, having correlation coefficients on the order of 0.9.These calculations are used to govern the sorting of measurements CHAMP and GRACE measurements, on the basis of the global temperature enhancements due to Joule heating, as well as various solar indices, and season. Global maps of the exospheric temperature are produced from these sorted data.

  20. Measurement and simulation of Joule heating during treatment of B-16 melanoma tumors in mice with nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Pliquett, Uwe; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Experimental evidence shows that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) trigger apoptosis in skin tumors. We have postulated that the energy delivered by nsPEF is insufficient to impart significant heating to the treated tissue. Here we use both direct measurements and theoretical modeling of the Joule heating in order to validate this assumption. For the temperature measurement, thermo-sensitive liquid crystals (TLC) were used to determine the surface temperature while a micro-thermocouple (made from 30 μm wires) was used for measuring the temperature inside the tissue. The calculation of the temperature distribution used an asymptotic approach with the repeated calculation of the electric field, Joule heating and heat transfer, and the subsequent readjustment of the electrical tissue conductivity. This yields a temperature distribution both in space and time. It can be shown that for the measured increase in temperature an unexpectedly high electrical conductivity of the tissue would be required, which was indeed found by using voltage and current monitoring during the experiment. Using impedance measurements within t(after)=50 μs after the pulse revealed a fast decline of the high conductivity state when the electric field ceases. The experimentally measured high conductance of a skin fold (mouse) between plate electrodes was about 5 times higher than those of the maximally expected conductance due to fully electroporated membrane structures (G(max)/G(electroporated))≈5. Fully electroporated membrane structure assumes that 100% of the membranes are conductive which is estimated from an impedance measurement at 10 MHz where membranes are capacitively shorted. Since the temperature rise in B-16 mouse melanoma tumors due to equally spaced (Δt=2 s) 300 ns-pulses with E=40 kV/cm usually does not exceed ΔΤ=3 K at all parts of the skin fold between the electrodes, a hyperthermic effect on the tissue can be excluded. PMID:24680133

  1. Prediction of two-phase pressure drop in heat exchanger for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The overall efficiency of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocooler is governed by the performance of the recuperative heat exchanger. In the heat exchanger, the hot stream of the mixed refrigerant undergoes condensation at high pressure while the cold stream gets evaporated at low pressure. The pressure drop in the low pressure stream is crucial since it directly influences the achievable refrigeration temperature. However, experimental and theoretical studies related to two-phase pressure drop in mixtures at cryogenic temperatures, are limited. Therefore, the design of an efficient MR J-T cryocooler is a challenging task due to the lack of predictive tools. In the present work, the existing empirical correlations, which are commonly used for the prediction of pressure drop in the case of pure refrigerants, evaporating at near ambient conditions, are assessed for the mixed refrigerants. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop in the evaporating cold stream of the tube-in-tube helically coiled heat exchanger. The predicted frictional pressure drop in the heat exchanger is compared with the experimental data. The suggested empirical correlations can be used to predict the hydraulic performance of the heat exchanger.

  2. Joule Thomson refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Chung K. (Inventor); Gatewood, John R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A bi-directional Joule Thomson refrigerator is described, which is of simple construction at the cold end of the refrigerator. Compressed gas flowing in either direction through the Joule Thomson expander valve and becoming liquid, is captured in a container in direct continuous contact with the heat load. The Joule Thomson valve is responsive to the temperature of the working fluid near the valve, to vary the flow resistance through the valve so as to maintain a generally constant flow mass between the time that the refrigerator is first turned on and the fluid is warm, and the time when the refrigerator is near its coldest temperature and the fluid is cold. The valve is operated by differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of materials to squeeze and release a small tube which acts as the expander valve.

  3. Evaluation of a Novel Temperature Sensing Probe for Monitoring and Controlling Glass Temperature in a Joule-Heated Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    A. D. Watkins; C. A. Musick; C. Cannon; N. M. Carlson; P. D. Mullenix; R. D. Tillotson

    1999-04-29

    A self-verifying temperature sensor that employs advanced contact thermocouple probe technology was tested in a laboratory-scale, joule-heated, refractory-lined glass melter used for radioactive waste vitrification. The novel temperature probe monitors melt temperature at any given level of the melt chamber. The data acquisition system provides the real-time temperature for molten glass. Test results indicate that the self-verifying sensor is more accurate and reliable than classic platinum/rhodium thermocouple and sheath assemblies. The results of this test are reported as well as enhancements being made to the temperature probe. To obtain more reliable temperature measurements of the molten glass for improving production efficiency and ensuring consistent glass properties, optical sensing was reviewed for application in a high temperature environment.

  4. Heat treatment of whole milk by the direct joule effect--experimental and numerical approaches to fouling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fillaudeau, L; Winterton, P; Leuliet, J C; Tissier, J P; Maury, V; Semet, F; Debreyne, P; Berthou, M; Chopard, F

    2006-12-01

    The development of alternative technologies such as the direct Joule effect to pasteurize and sterilize food products is of great scientific and industrial interest. Our objective was 1) to gain insight into the ability to ensure ultra-high-temperature treatment of milk and 2) to investigate the links among thermal, hydraulic, and electrical phenomena in relation to fouling in a direct Joule effect heater. The ohmic heater [OH; E perpendicular to v (where E is the electrical field and v is the velocity); P (power) = 15 kW] was composed of 5 flat rectangular cells [e (space between the plate and electrode) = 15 mm, w (wall) = 76 mm, and L (length of the plate in plate heat exchanger or electrode) = 246 mm]--3 active cells to ensure heating and 2 (at the extremities) for electrical insulation and the recovery of leakage currents. In the first step, the thermal performance of the OH was investigated vs. the flow regimen [50 < Re (Reynolds number) < 5,000], supplied power (0 < P < 15 kW), and electrical conductivity of fluids (0.1 < sigma(20 degrees C) < 2 S/m) under clean conditions with model fluids. This protocol enabled a global thermal approach (thermal and electrical balance, modeling of the temperature profile of a fluid) and local analysis of the wall temperature of the electrode. An empirical correlation was established to estimate the temperature gradient, T(w)-T(b) (where T(w) is the wall temperature and T(b) is the product temperature) under clean conditions (without fouling) and was used to define operating conditions for pure-volume and direct-resistance heating. In the second step, the ability of OH to ensure the ultra-high-temperature treatment of whole milk was investigated and compared with a plate heat exchanger. Special care was taken to investigate the heat transfer phenomena occurring over a range of temperatures from 105 to 138 degrees C. This temperature range corresponds to the part of the process made critical by protein and mineral fouling. The objectives were 1) to demonstrate the ability of an OH to ensure heat treatment of milk, 2) to study the thermal and hydraulic performance with an increasing power and temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of the OH, 3) to define and validate a criterion to follow heat dissipation efficiency, and 4) to compare the fouling propensity with the different configurations. A heat dissipation coefficient, Rh(CO), was defined and validated to monitor the fouling propensity through global electrical and thermal parameters. Finally, a numerical simulation was developed to analyze heat profiles (wall, deposit, bulk). Because of an increasing Joule effect in the static deposit, the simulation showed how wall overheating would definitively cause fouling to spiral out of control. PMID:17106078

  5. Cycling Joule Thomson refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A symmetrical adsorption pump/compressor system having a pair of mirror image legs and a Joule Thomson expander, or valve, interposed between the legs thereof for providing a, efficient refrigeration cycle is described. The system further includes a plurality of gas operational heat switches adapted selectively to transfer heat from a thermal load and to transfer or discharge heat through a heat projector, such as a radiator or the like. The heat switches comprise heat pressurizable chambers adapted for alternate pressurization in response to adsorption and desorption of a pressurizing gas confined therein.

  6. Coupled molecular dynamics/continuum simulations of Joule heating and melting of isolated copper aluminum asperity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, D. L.; Padgett, C. W.; Brenner, D. W.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic-level dynamics of Joule heating, melting and plastic dynamics at loaded nanometer-scale Cu and Al asperity contacts are modeled using an ad hoc coupling between a numerical solution to a heat transport equation, a virtual resistor network for describing electric current flow and a molecular dynamics simulation using the embedded atom method. Under constant voltage conditions the simulations demonstrate the formation of an Al melt that removes faceting from a Cu asperity via surface disordering at the melt-solid interface. Constant current simulations demonstrate initial disordering of both copper and aluminum at the interface. Flow from the aluminum melt increases the contact area, which lowers the resistance and drops the voltage to below that needed for melting. For the system with a loaded copper asperity, the interface recrystallizes and the dynamics transition from molten flow to plastic damage via dislocation emission. For an aluminum asperity, the asperity remains disordered after the voltage drop and no dislocation emission occurs into the copper or aluminum substrate.

  7. Calorimetry at high-pressure using high-frequency Joule-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, Zachary; Struzhkin, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    Calorimetric measurements of materials at 1 to 100 GPa of pressure would provide intriguing tests of condensed matter theories, sensitive probes of chemical reactions during high-pressure synthesis, and useful inputs for models of the Earth's interior. We present the design and first results of quantitative heat capacity measurements at >10 GPa of pressure. High-frequency AC voltage heats a small metal strip pressed between diamond anvils, creating temperature oscillations whose amplitudes are determined from the higher harmonics of voltage. Thermal models show that frequencies >100 kHz are required to contain heat in the ng-mass samples, while electrical models show that frequencies >100 MHz are not practical. Our experimental results show that the heat capacity of iron and nickel can indeed be measured at high frequencies in diamond anvil cells, paving the way for studies of the energetics of a wide-variety of entropy-driven phase changes at high pressure.

  8. Role of Joule Heating on Current Saturation and Transient Behavior of Graphene Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Sharnali; Li, Zuanyi; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Bae, Myung-Ho; Pop, Eric

    2013-02-01

    We use simulations to examine current saturation in sub-micron graphene transistors on SiO2/Si. We find self-heating is partly responsible for current saturation (lower output conductance), but degrades current densities >1 mA/um by up to 15%. Heating effects are reduced if the supporting insulator is thinned, or in shorter channel devices by partial heat sinking at the contacts. The transient behavior of such devices has thermal time constants of ~30-300 ns, dominated by the thickness of the supporting insulator and that of device capping layers (a behavior also expected in ultrathin body SOI transistors). The results shed important physical insight into the high-field and transient behavior of graphene transistors.

  9. Hall effect on MHD flow and heat transfer of nanofluids over a stretching wedge in the presence of velocity slip and Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaohong; Zheng, Liancun

    2013-12-01

    This paper deals with the boundary layer flow and heat transfer of nanofluids over a stretching wedge with velocity-slip boundary conditions. In this analysis, Hall effect and Joule heating are taken into consideration. Four different types of water-base nanofluids containing copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3), and titania (TiO2) nanoparticles are analyzed. The partial differential equations governing the flow and temperature fields are converted into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation. The resulting similarity equations are then solved by using the shooting technique along with the fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The effects of types of nanoparticles, the volume fraction of nanoparticles, the magnetic parameter, the Hall parameter, the wedge angle parameter, and the velocityslip parameter on the velocity and temperature fields are discussed and presented graphically, respectively.

  10. Global effect of auroral particle and Joule heating in the undisturbed thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, B. B.

    1978-01-01

    From the compositional variations observed with the neutral atmosphere composition experiment on OGO 6 and a simplified model of thermospheric dynamics, global average values of non-EUV heating are deduced. These are 0.19-0.25 mW/sq m for quiet days and 0.44-0.58 mW/sq m for ordinary days.

  11. Joule heating effects on quartz particle melting in high-temperature silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V.; Volokitin, G.; Skripnikova, N.; Volokitin, O.; Shekhovtsov, V.

    2015-10-01

    This work is mostly focused on the melting process model simulation of quartz particles having the radius within the range of 10-6-10-3 m. The melting process is simulated accounting for the heat generation at an electric current passage through a quartz particle.

  12. Joule heating-induced coexisted spin Seebeck effect and spin Hall magnetoresistance in the platinum/Y3Fe5O12 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.; Wang, S. H.; Zou, L. K.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, Z. G.; Sun, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) are observed simultaneously in the Pt/Y3Fe5O12 hybrid structure when thermal gradient is produced by Joule heating. According to their dependences on applied current, these two effects can be separated. Their dependence on heating power and magnetic field is systematically studied. With the increase of heating power, the SSE enhances linearly, whereas the SMR decreases slowly. The origin of the spin currents is further analyzed. The heating power dependences of the spin currents associated with the SSE and the SMR are found to be different.

  13. Joule heating-induced coexisted spin Seebeck effect and spin Hall magnetoresistance in the platinum/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Wang, S. H.; Zou, L. K.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, J. R. E-mail: sun-zg@whut.edu.cn; Sun, Z. G.

    2014-11-03

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) are observed simultaneously in the Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} hybrid structure when thermal gradient is produced by Joule heating. According to their dependences on applied current, these two effects can be separated. Their dependence on heating power and magnetic field is systematically studied. With the increase of heating power, the SSE enhances linearly, whereas the SMR decreases slowly. The origin of the spin currents is further analyzed. The heating power dependences of the spin currents associated with the SSE and the SMR are found to be different.

  14. Performances of the mixed-gases Joule-Thomson refrigeration cycles for cooling fixed-temperature heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Luo, E. G.

    2004-12-01

    Numerous mixed-gases refrigeration cycle configurations based on Joule-Thomson effects were developed in the past several decades. In this paper, comprehensive thermodynamic analyses were made on two typical cycle configurations to learn their performance for cooling fixed-temperature heat loads. One is the single-stage cycle without phase separators; the other is the auto-cascade refrigeration cycle which has at least one phase separator. An exergy model was developed to analyze the thermodynamic performance of those refrigeration cycles. Comprehensive comparisons were made on the performance of the recuperative throttling cycles using multicomponent mixture as refrigerant, including extensive simulations and optimizations of mixtures and cycle configurations. The results show that the auto-cascade cycle can improve thermodynamic performance in the case of using mixtures with increased fraction of high-boiling components, however, degrade the performance when using mixtures with increased fraction of low-boiling components. The results also show that the mixed refrigerant is the most important designing parameter in the design of such mixed-gases refrigeration system. Different cycle configuration has different optimal mixture composition. When using optimal mixtures, both cycles (separation and non-separation) can provide approximately equal performance.

  15. Polypyrrole/silver coaxial nanowire aero-sponges for temperature-independent stress sensing and stress-triggered Joule heating.

    PubMed

    He, Weina; Li, Guangyong; Zhang, Shangquan; Wei, Yong; Wang, Jin; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Xuetong

    2015-04-28

    To obtain ideal sensing materials with nearly zero temperature coefficient resistance (TCR) for self-temperature-compensated pressure sensors, we proposed an Incipient Network Conformal Growth (INCG) technology to prepare hybrid and elastic porous materials: the nanoparticles (NPs) are first dispersed in solvent to form an incipient network, another component is then introduced to coat the incipient network conformally via wet chemical route. The conformal coatings not only endow NPs with high stability but also offer them additional structural elasticity, meeting requirements for future generations of portable, compressive and flexible devices. The resultant polypyrrole/silver coaxial nanowire hybrid aero-sponges prepared via INCG technology have been processed into a piezoresistive sensor with highly sensing stability (low TCR 0.86 × 10(-3)/°C), sensitivity (0.33 kPa(-1)), short response time (1 ms), minimum detectable pressure (4.93 Pa) after suffering repeated stimuli, temperature change and electric heating. Moreover, a stress-triggered Joule heater can be also fabricated mainly by the PPy-Ag NW hybrid aero-sponges with nearly zero temperature coefficient. PMID:25811954

  16. Weak localization, electron-electron interactions, and Joule heating in the presence of a microwave electric field in thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Giordano, N.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the electrical behavior of thin AuPd, AuFe, and Au films at low temperatures, through measurements of the resistance with special attention to the effect of a microwave electric field. Using these results in combination with the theory, we have attempted to separate the effects of weak localization, electron-electron interactions, and Joule heating. The results of this analysis yield consistent results for AuPd films with high values of the sheet resistance. However, for low-sheet-resistance films of AuPd, AuFe, and Au, the analysis suggests either that Joule heating is suppressed at microwave frequencies (as compared with that found for the same field strength at lower frequencies), or that a microwave field enhances the contribution of electron-electron interactions to the resistance. Either of these results would be at odds with current theories.

  17. Effect of Al-trace dimension on Joule heating and current crowding in flip-chip solder joints under accelerated electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S. W.; Chang, Y. W.; Chen, Chih

    2006-04-01

    Three-dimensional thermoelectrical simulation was conducted to investigate the influence of Al-trace dimension on Joule heating and current crowding in flip-chip solder joints. It is found that the dimension of the Al-trace effects significantly on the Joule heating, and thus directly determines the mean time to failure (MTTF). Simulated at a stressing current of 0.6A at 70C, we estimate that the MTTF of the joints with Al traces in 100?m width was 6.1 times longer than that of joints with Al traces in 34?m width. Lower current crowding effect and reduced hot-spot temperature are responsible for the improved MTTF.

  18. Effect of Joule Heating and Thermal Radiation in Flow of Third Grade Fluid over Radiative Surface

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the boundary layer flow and heat transfer in third grade fluid over an unsteady permeable stretching sheet. The transverse magnetic and electric fields in the momentum equations are considered. Thermal boundary layer equation includes both viscous and Ohmic dissipations. The related nonlinear partial differential system is reduced first into ordinary differential system and then solved for the series solutions. The dependence of velocity and temperature profiles on the various parameters are shown and discussed by sketching graphs. Expressions of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are calculated and analyzed. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are tabulated and examined. It is observed that both velocity and temperature increases in presence of electric field. Further the temperature is increased due to the radiation parameter. Thermal boundary layer thickness increases by increasing Eckert number. PMID:24454694

  19. Effect of current crowding and Joule heating on electromigration-induced failure in flip chip composite solder joints tested at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nah, J.W.; Suh, J.O.; Tu, K.N.

    2005-07-01

    The electromigration of flip chip solder joints consisting of 97Pb-3Sn and 37Pb-63Sn composite solders was studied under high current densities at room temperature. The mean time to failure and failure modes were found to be strongly dependent on the change in current density. The composite solder joints did not fail after 1 month stressed at 4.07x10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2}, but failed after just 10 h of current stressing at 4.58x10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2}. At a slightly higher current stressing of 5.00x10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2}, the composite solder joints failed after only 0.6 h due to melting. Precipitation and growth of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} at the cathode caused the Cu under bump metallurgy to be quickly consumed and resulted in void formation at the contact area. The void reduced the contact area and displaced the electrical path, affecting the current crowding and Joule heating inside the solder bump. Significant Joule heating inside solder bumps can cause melting of the solder and quick failure. The effect of void propagation on current crowding and Joule heating was confirmed by simulation.

  20. Iron Phosphate Glass for Vitrifying Hanford AZ102 LAW in Joule Heated and Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E.; Brow, R. K.; Ray, C. S.; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Reis, Signo T.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Johnson, Fabienne; Hansen, E. K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Soelberg, Nicolas R.; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao

    2012-01-05

    An iron phosphate composition for vitrifying a high sulfate (~17 wt%) and high alkali (~80 wt%) low activity Hanford waste, known as AZ102 LAW, has been developed for processing in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) or a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). This composition produced a glass waste form, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, with a waste loading of 26 wt% of the AZ102 which corresponded to a total alkali and sulfate (SO3) content of 21 and 4.2 wt%, respectively. A slurry (7M Na) of MS26AZ102F-2 simulant was melted continuously at temperatures between 1030 and 1090°C for 10 days in a small JHM at PNNL and for 7 days in a CCIM at INL. The as-cast glasses produced in both melters and in trial laboratory experiments along with their CCC-treated counterparts met the DOE LAW requirements for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). These glass waste forms retained up to 77 % of the SO3 (3.3 wt%), 100% of the Cesium, and 33 to 44% of the rhenium, surrogate for Tc-99, all of which either exceeded or were comparable to the retention limit for these species in borosilicate glass nuclear waste form. Analyses of commercial K-3 refractory lining and the Inconel 693 metal electrodes used in JHM indicated only minimum corrosion of these components by the iron phosphate glass. This is the first time that an iron phosphate composition (slurry feed) was melted continuously in the JHM and CCIM, thereby, demonstrating that iron phosphate glasses can be used as alternative hosts for vitrifying nuclear waste.

  1. Application of High-Speed Infrared Imaging to Study Transient Joule Heating in Station Class Zinc Oxide Surge Arresters

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Wang, H.; Johnnerfelt, B.

    2004-03-15

    Zinc Oxide based surge arresters are widely used to safeguard and improve reliability of the electrical power delivering and transmission systems. The primary application of surge arresters is to protect valuable components such as transformers from lightning strikes and switching transients in the transmission lines. Metal-oxide-varistor blocks (MOV, e.g. ZnO) are used in surge arrester assemblies. ORNL has developed an advanced infrared imaging technique to monitor the joule heating during transient heating of small varistors. In a recent short-term R&D effort, researchers from ABB and ORNL have expanded the use of IR imaging to larger station-class arrester blocks. An on-site visit to the ABB facility demonstrated that the use of IR imaging is not only feasible but also has the potential to improve arrester quality and reliability. The ASEA Brown Bower (ABB) Power and Technology & Development Company located at Greensburg PA having benefited from collaborative R&D cooperation with ORNL. ABB has decided a follow-on CRADA project is very important. While the previous efforts to study surge arresters included broader studies of IR imaging and computer modeling, ABB has recognized the potential of IR imaging, decided to focus on this particular area. ABB plans to use this technique to systematically study the possible defects in the arrester fabrication process. ORNL will improve the real-time monitoring capability and provide analysis of the infrared images. More importantly, the IR images will help us understand transient heating in a ceramic material from the scientific standpoint. With the improved IR imaging ABB and ORNL will employ the IR system to visualize manufacturing defects that could not be detected otherwise. The proposed on-site tests at ABB Power Technology & Development processing facility will identify the defects and also allow quick adjustments to be made since the resulting products can be inspected immediately. ABB matched the DOE $50K funding with $50K funds-in to ORNL. ABB also provided about $75K in-kind effort for on-site testing, and R&D to improve the fabrication process.

  2. Dynamically tracking the joule heating effect on the voltage induced metal-insulator transition in VO2 crystal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. M.; Chen, S.; Fan, L. L.; Chen, Y. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Ren, H.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zou, C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Insulator to metal phase transitions driven by external electric field are one of the hottest topics in correlated oxide study. While this electric triggered phenomena always mixes the electric field switching effect and joule thermal effect together, which are difficult to clarify the intrinsic mechanism. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical process of voltage-triggered metal-insulator transition (MIT) in a VO2 crystal film and observe the temperature dependence of the threshold voltages and switching delay times, which can be explained quite well based on a straightforward joule thermal model. By conducting the voltage controlled infrared transmittance measurement, the delayed infrared transmission change is also observed, further confirming the homogeneous switching process for a large-size film. All of these results show strong evidences that joule thermal effect plays a dominated role in electric-field-induced switching of VO2 crystal.

  3. Numerical calculation and experimental research on crack arrest by detour effect and joule heating of high pulsed current in remanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Zhang, Hongchao; Deng, Dewei; Hao, Shengzhi; Iqbal, Asif

    2014-07-01

    The remanufacturing blanks with cracks were considered as irreparable. With utilization of detour effect and Joule heating of pulsed current, a technique to arrest the crack in martensitic stainless steel FV520B is developed. According to finite element theory, the finite element(FE) model of the cracked rectangular specimen is established firstly. Then, based on electro-thermo-structure coupled theory, the distributions of current density, temperature field, and stress field are calculated for the instant of energizing. Furthermore, the simulation results are verified by some corresponding experiments performed on high pulsed current discharge device of type HCPD-I. Morphology and microstructure around the crack tip before and after electro pulsing treatment are observed by optical microscope(OM) and scanning electron microscope(SEM), and then the diameters of fusion zone and heat affected zone(HAZ) are measured in order to contrast with numerical calculation results. Element distribution, nano-indentation hardness and residual stress in the vicinity of the crack tip are surveyed by energy dispersive spectrometer(EDS), scanning probe microscopy(SPM) and X-ray stress gauge, respectively. The results show that the obvious partition and refined grain around the crack tip can be observed due to the violent temperature change. The contents of carbon and oxygen in fusion zone and HAZ are higher than those in matrix, and however the hardness around the crack tip decreases. Large residual compressive stress is induced in the vicinity of the crack tip and it has the same order of magnitude for measured results and numerical calculation results that is 100 MPa. The relational curves between discharge energies and diameters of the fusion zone and HAZ are obtained by experiments. The difference of diameter of fusion zone between measured and calculated results is less than 18.3%. Numerical calculation is very useful to define the experimental parameters. An effective method to prevent further extension of the crack is presented and can provide a reference for the compressor rotor blade remanufacturing.

  4. Effects of partial slip, viscous dissipation and Joule heating on Von Kármán flow and heat transfer of an electrically conducting non-Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Bikash

    2009-07-01

    The steady Von Kármán flow and heat transfer of an electrically conducting non-Newtonian fluid is extended to the case where the disk surface admits partial slip. The fluid is subjected to an external uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the disk. The constitutive equation of the non-Newtonian fluid is modeled by that for a Reiner-Rivlin fluid. The momentum equations give rise to highly non-linear boundary value problem. Numerical solutions for the governing non-linear equations are obtained over the entire range of the physical parameters. The effects of slip, magnetic parameter and non-Newtonian fluid characteristics on the velocity and temperature fields are discussed in detail and shown graphically. Emphasis has been laid to study the effects of viscous dissipation and Joule heating on the thermal boundary layer. It is interesting to find that the non-Newtonian cross-viscous parameter has an opposite effect to that of the slip and the magnetic parameter on the velocity and the temperature fields.

  5. Iron Phosphate Glass for Vitrifying Hanford AZ102 LAW in Joule Heated and Cold Crucible Induction Melters - 12240

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.; Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Vienna, John D.; Sevigny, Gary; Peeler, David; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Hansen, Eric K.; Soelberg, Nick; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao

    2012-07-01

    An iron phosphate composition for vitrifying a high sulfate (∼17 wt%) and high alkali (∼80 wt%) Hanford low activity waste (LAW), known as AZ-102 LAW, has been developed for processing in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) or a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). This composition produced a glass waste form, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, with a waste loading of 26 wt% of the AZ-102 which corresponded to a total alkali and sulfate (represented as SO{sub 3}) content of 21 and 4.4 wt%, respectively. A slurry (7 M Na{sup +}) of MS26AZ102F-2 simulant was melted continuously at temperatures between 1030 and 1090 deg. C for 10 days in a small JHM at PNNL and for 70 hours in a CCIM at INL. The as-cast glasses produced in both melters and in trial laboratory experiments along with their canister centerline cooled (CCC) counterparts met the requirements for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT) responses in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract. These glass waste forms retained up to 77 % of the SO{sub 3} (3.3 wt%), 100% of the Cesium, and 33 to 44% of the rhenium (used as a surrogate for Tc) all of which either exceeded or were comparable to the retention limit for these species in borosilicate glass nuclear waste form. Analyses of commercial K-3 refractory lining and the Inconel 693 metal electrodes used in JHM indicated only minimum corrosion of these components by the iron phosphate glass. This is the first time that an iron phosphate composition was melted continuously in a slurry fed JHM and in the US, thereby, demonstrating that iron phosphate glasses can be used as alternative hosts for vitrifying nuclear waste. The following conclusions are drawn from the results of the present work. (1) An iron phosphate composition, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, containing 26 wt% of the simulated high sulfate (17 wt%), high alkali (80 wt%) Hanford AZ-102 LAW meets all the criteria for processing in a JHM and CCIM. This composition produces a homogeneous glass with a density of 2.80 ± 0.04 g/cm{sup 3} after melting between 1000 and 1050 deg. C for 3 to 5 h. (2) This is the first time that an iron phosphate glass was melted in the JHM continuously for 10 days achieving a specific melting rate of 1010 kg/m2/day and in the CCIM for 70 hrs with a melting rate of 664 kg/m{sup 2}/day. (3) The analyzed (ICP-AES) compositions for all the glasses prepared under several melting conditions are in excellent agreement with the target composition. The variation of melting conditions include: (i) use of small scale/short melting time to large scale/long melting time (300 g to 80 kg, 4 h to 10 days) operations including melting in the JHM and CCIM, (ii) use of dry or wet (slurry) melter feed, (iii) addition of reductant (sugar) in the batch, and (iv) bubbling the melt with air. (4) The chemical durability as measured by PCT and VHT for the quenched and CCC-treated waste forms prepared from laboratory, JHM or CCIM melting exceeds the DOE requirements for LAW. (5) Depending upon the melting time (4 h to 10 days), the average concentration of SO{sub 3} in the MS26AZ102F-2 iron phosphate glass waste form varies from about 1.78 (RSM) to 3.74 (laboratory melt) wt% which corresponds to an SO{sub 3} retention of 41 to 86% when melted between 1030 at 1050 deg. C in air. (6) The retention of SO{sub 3} in the glass was reduced when a reductant (sugar) was added to the slurry. (7) The retention of other problem components like Cesium and Rhenium/Tc-99 is also high; from 92 to 100% for Cs{sub 2}O under different melting conditions, and from 66 to 33% for Re{sub 2}O{sub 7} for melts processed from 3 to 5 hours and up to 10 days. (8) Corrosion tests on Inconel 693 and K-3 refractory at temperatures between 1000 and 1050 deg. C indicate that both materials should be suitable for melting iron phosphate glasses. (9) The viscosity and electrical conductivity of the MS26AZ102F-2 melt are within the acceptable limits for RSM and CCIM processing. (10)This work has shown that iron phosphate compositions are a potential alternative to borosilicate glasses for vitrifying problematic wastes such as Hanford AZ-102 LAW that contains high amounts sulfate and alkali oxides, and that iron phosphate melts such as MS26AZ102F-2 can be processed in the JHM or CCIM. (authors)

  6. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic Hartmann-Couette flow and heat transfer in a Darcian channel with Hall current, ionslip, viscous and Joule heating effects: Network numerical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bég, O. Anwar; Zueco, Joaquín; Takhar, H. S.

    2009-04-01

    A theoretical study of unsteady magnetohydrodynamic viscous Hartmann-Couette laminar flow and heat transfer in a Darcian porous medium intercalated between parallel plates, under a constant pressure gradient is presented. Viscous dissipation, Joule heating, Hall current and ionslip current effects are included as is lateral mass flux at both plates. The dimensionless conservation equations for the primary (x∗-direction), secondary (z∗-direction) momentum and also energy conservation equation are derived and solved using a computational technique known as Network Simulation Methodology (NSM). Velocity distributions (u∗, w∗) and temperature distribution (T∗) at the channel centre (y∗ = 0) over time (t∗) are studied graphically for the effects of Darcy number (Da), Hartmann number (Ha), transpiration (Nt), Hall current parameter (Be), ionslip parameter (Bi), pressure gradient parameter (dP/dx∗) with Prandtl number prescribed at 7.0 (electrically conducting water), Eckert number held constant at 0.25 (heat convection from the plates to the fluid) and Reynolds number (Re) fixed at 5.0 (for Re < 10, Darcian model is generally valid). Increasing Darcy number causes an increase in temperature, T∗; values are however significantly reduced for the higher Hartmann number case (Ha = 10). For the case of low transpiration (i.e. Nt = 1 which corresponds to weak suction at the upper plate and weak injection at the lower plate), both primary velocity (u∗) and secondary velocity (w∗) are increased with a rise in Darcy number (owing to a simultaneous decrease in Darcian porous drag); temperature T∗ is also increased considerably with increasing Da. However, for stronger transpiration (Nt = 10), magnitudes of u∗, w∗ and T∗ are significantly reduced and also significant overshoots are detected prior to the establishment of steady state flow. With increasing Hall current parameter, Be, (for the purely fluid regime i.e. Da → ∞), primary velocity is considerably increased, whereas secondary velocity is reduced; temperatures are decreased in the early stages of flow but effectively increased in the steady state with increasing Be. With strong Darcian drag present (Da = 0.01 i.e. very low permeability), magnitudes of u∗, w∗ and T∗ are considerably reduced and temperatures are found to be reduced for all t∗, with increasing Hall current effect (Be). Increasing ionslip current parameter (Bi) increases primary velocity (u∗), decreases secondary velocity (w∗) and also temperature (T∗) for all time (t∗), in the infinite permeability case (Da → ∞). For weakly Darcian flow, ionslip parameter (Bi) has a much reduced effect on the velocity distributions. Temperature, T∗ is strongly increased with a rise in pressure gradient parameter, dP∗/dx∗, as is primary velocity (u∗); however, secondary velocity (w∗) is reduced. The present study has applications in hybrid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy generators, materials processing, geophysical hydromagnetics, etc.

  7. The joule balance in NIM of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhonghua, Zhang; Qing, He; Zhengkun, Li; Bing, Han; Yunfeng, Lu; Jiang, Lan; Chen, Li; Shisong, Li; Jinxin, Xu; Nong, Wang; Gang, Wang; Hongzhi, Gong

    2014-04-01

    The advantage of the joule balance over the classic watt balance is that the dynamic measurement in the watt balance is replaced by a static measurement, which makes the whole measurement procedure easier. The main problems in the joule balance are the precise measurement of mutual inductance and coil heating. These problems and recent progress in the development of the joule balance are described and discussed in this paper. The whole system is at the stage of being adjusted and improved. The principle of the joule balance has been demonstrated by a measurement of the Planck constant, h = 6.626 104(59) × 10-34 J s with an 8.9 ppm measurement uncertainty.

  8. The Mayer-Joule Principle: The Foundation of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Ronald; Leff, Harvey S.

    2011-11-01

    To most students today the mechanical equivalent of heat, called the Mayer-Joule principle, is simply a way to convert from calories to joules and vice versa. However, in linking work and heat—once thought to be disjointed concepts—it goes far beyond unit conversion. Heat had eluded understanding for two centuries after Galileo Galilei constructed an early thermometer. Independently, Julius Robert Mayer and James Prescott Joule found the connection between heat and work, the Mayer-Joule principle.

  9. Domain structure in Joule-heated CoFeSiB glass-covered amorphous microwires probed by magnetoimpedance and ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, R. B.; Carara, M.; de Andrade, A. M. H.; Severino, A. M.; Sommer, R. L.

    2003-10-01

    Impedance spectra (100 kHz⩽f⩽1.8 GHz) were measured at different magnetic fields, and magnetoimpedance and magnetization measurements were performed in as-produced and Joule-heated Co70.4Fe4.6Si10B15 glass-covered amorphous microwires. From the magnetization curves and ferromagnetic resonance features obtained from the impedance spectra, it was possible to propose a domain structure in the as-produced microwires, as well as to follow its evolution with the annealing current. The inner core and outer shell domain structure were observed. The outer shell domains evolve from a circumferential, in the as-cast sample, to a helical structure in the case of the annealed samples. On the other hand, the inner core evolves from a domain structure typical of a radial anisotropy to a longitudinal one. This domain structure evolution is explained in terms of the combined effects of the stress, promoted by the annealing temperature, and the magnetic field caused by the annealing current.

  10. Influence of surface displacement on solid state flow induced by horizontally heterogeneous Joule heating in the inner core of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehiro, Shin-ichi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the influence of surface displacement on fluid motions induced by horizontally heterogeneous Joule heating in the inner core. The difference between the governing equations and those of Takehiro (2011) is the boundary conditions at the inner core boundary (ICB). The temperature disturbance at the ICB coincides with the melting temperature, which varies depending on the surface displacement. The normal component of stress equalizes with the buoyancy induced by the surface displacement. The toroidal magnetic field and surface displacement with the horizontal structure of Y 2 0 spherical harmonics is given. The flow fields are calculated numerically for various amplitudes of surface displacement with the expected values of the parameters of the core. Further, by considering the heat balance at the ICB, the surface displacement amplitude is related to the turbulent velocity amplitude in the outer core, near the ICB. The results show that when the turbulent velocity is on the order of 10-1 -10-2 m/s, the flow and stress fields are similar to those of Takehiro (2011), where the surface displacement vanishes. As the amplitude of the turbulent velocity decreases, the amplitude of the surface displacement increases, and counter flows from the polar to equatorial regions emerge around the ICB, while flow in the inner regions is directed from the equatorial to polar regions, and the non-zero radial component of velocity at the ICB remains. When the turbulent velocity is on the order of 10-4 -10-5 m/s, the radial component of velocity at the ICB vanishes, the surface counter flows become stronger than the flow in the inner region, and the amplitude of the stress field near the ICB dominates the inner region, which might be unsuitable for explaining the elastic anisotropy in the inner core.

  11. The miniature Joule-Thomson refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulin, Eugeny; Shevich, Jury; Danilenko, Tatiana; Solovov, Nikolay; Veselov, Valentin

    Some models of planar cryogenic miniature refrigerator realizing simple Joule-Thomson cycle were worked out. The construction base is heat exchanger consisting of several thin metallic plates (stainless steel) connected by diffusion welding in vacuum. The channels are produced by means of modern technologies of photolythographie with electrochemical etching. The thermostatic temperature of 100 K was obtained by operating of refrigerator models on air and nitrogen gas, starting period duration is about 50 s.

  12. Joule-Thomson Expander Without Check Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooling effected by bidirectional, reciprocating flow of gas. Type of Joule-Thomson (J-T) expander for cryogenic cooling requires no check valves to prevent reverse flow of coolant. More reliable than conventional J-T expander, containing network of check valves, each potential source of failure. Gas flows alternately from left to right and right to left. Heat load cooled by evaporation of liquid from left or right compartment, whichever at lower pressure.

  13. Memoir of James Prescott Joule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Osborne

    2011-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Parentage and early life; 3. Joule's first research; 4. Second research; 5. Third research; 6. Efforts to convince the scientific world; 7. The year 1847; 8. Joule's views accepted by Thomson, Rankine, and Clausius; 9. Middle life; 10. Later life; Appendix to page 18; Note A to page 88; Index.

  14. The Mayer-Joule Principle: The Foundation of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald; Leff, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    To most students today the mechanical equivalent of heat, called the Mayer-Joule principle, is simply a way to convert from calories to joules and vice versa. However, in linking work and heat--once thought to be disjointed concepts--it goes far beyond unit conversion. Heat had eluded understanding for two centuries after Galileo Galilei…

  15. The Mayer-Joule Principle: The Foundation of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald; Leff, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    To most students today the mechanical equivalent of heat, called the Mayer-Joule principle, is simply a way to convert from calories to joules and vice versa. However, in linking work and heat--once thought to be disjointed concepts--it goes far beyond unit conversion. Heat had eluded understanding for two centuries after Galileo Galilei

  16. Watt and joule balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian A.

    2014-04-01

    The time is fast approaching when the SI unit of mass will cease to be based on a single material artefact and will instead be based upon the defined value of a fundamental constant—the Planck constant—h . This change requires that techniques exist both to determine the appropriate value to be assigned to the constant, and to measure mass in terms of the redefined unit. It is important to ensure that these techniques are accurate and reliable to allow full advantage to be taken of the stability and universality provided by the new definition and to guarantee the continuity of the world's mass measurements, which can affect the measurement of many other quantities such as energy and force. Up to now, efforts to provide the basis for such a redefinition of the kilogram were mainly concerned with resolving the discrepancies between individual implementations of the two principal techniques: the x-ray crystal density (XRCD) method [1] and the watt and joule balance methods which are the subject of this special issue. The first three papers report results from the NRC and NIST watt balance groups and the NIM joule balance group. The result from the NRC (formerly the NPL Mk II) watt balance is the first to be reported with a relative standard uncertainty below 2 × 10-8 and the NIST result has a relative standard uncertainty below 5 × 10-8. Both results are shown in figure 1 along with some previous results; the result from the NIM group is not shown on the plot but has a relative uncertainty of 8.9 × 10-6 and is consistent with all the results shown. The Consultative Committee for Mass and Related Quantities (CCM) in its meeting in 2013 produced a resolution [2] which set out the requirements for the number, type and quality of results intended to support the redefinition of the kilogram and required that there should be agreement between them. These results from NRC, NIST and the IAC may be considered to meet these requirements and are likely to be widely debated prior to a decision on redefinition. The CCM had already recognized that agreement was close and has set in place a process whereby redefinition can take place by 2018. The final decision will be in the hands of the Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures (CGPM) but the results reported here should aid a positive decision. Figure 1. Figure 1. Results from recent measurements of the Planck constant. The reference for the results h 90 is derived from the conventional values of the Josephson constant K J-90 and the von Klitzing constant R K-90. The factor of ten improvement in uncertainty of the NRC watt balance result, over that achieved by the same apparatus at NPL a few years earlier, can be understood as a factor of five improvement arising from the elimination of an effect discovered at NPL that could not be eliminated before shipment to Canada and a factor of two arising from the considerable improvements made by NRC. Once the kilogram has been redefined, the watt and joule balances will complete their transitions from instruments that are primarily of interest to the electrical community for determining the SI electrical units from the mechanical units, to the principal methods by which an individual National Measurement Institute (NMI) can make an independent determination of the SI unit of mass and thereby contribute to the maintenance of national and international mass scales. This special issue gives an introduction to the diversity of techniques which are required for the operation of watt and joule balances. However it does not contain a review of existing balances; this was a deliberate decision, as a number of such review papers have been published in the past five years [3-7] and it was felt that it was not yet time for another. The first technique considered is that of gravimetry; the watt balance measures the weight Mg of a mass M , and to convert the measured weight into a mass, the value of the acceleration due to gravity g must be known, at the time of the weighing and at the centre of gravity of the mass. The paper by Liard and his co-authors at NRC describes how they have made this essential measurement. The accuracy of the watt balance may also depend on the alignment of the apparatus. Two papers deal with this important issue. The first, by Sanchez and his co-authors at NRC, shows that their balance is insensitive to a range of alignments and concentrates on the essential alignments that contribute directly to the overall uncertainty of the apparatus. Thomas and his co-authors at LNE describe their technique for reducing uncertainties in their watt balance by aligning its coil in the field of the magnet to minimize both horizontal forces and torques about horizontal axes. The search for discrepancies between the results from watt balances has encouraged researchers to consider possible error mechanisms arising from the secondary electrical interactions between the coil of a watt balance and other parts of the apparatus. Researchers from INRIM have two such papers: one considering magnetic interactions and the other considering electrostatic interactions. It is essential that such investigations are carried out: both to prove that the problems are understood and for the guidance of those building the next generation of watt and joule balances. The next four papers describe aspects of the construction of watt balances. The BIPM watt balance group describe the principles behind their simultaneous measurement scheme for a watt balance. The balance that they are constructing can also be used in the conventional two-phase mode and their paper describes the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two modes of operation. In a watt balance there are some advantages to precise vertical movement of the coil. The METAS group describe the two mechanisms that they have tested to achieve such motion and give the reasons for the choice of mechanism for use in the balance that they are constructing. The KRISS watt balance group are in the initial phases of the design and construction of a watt balance and their paper provides valuable information on the design that they are building. The design of the main magnet of a watt balance is critical to its successful operation, and an important assumption of watt balance operation is that the field of the magnet in moving mode is equivalent to that in weighing mode. Sutton and Clarkson from MSL describe a novel magnet which is designed to address this issue. The international prototype of the kilogram is kept in air but, after redefinition, the best realizations of the mass unit will be in vacuum. In their paper Berry and Davidson from NPL describe progress in techniques which relate mass measured in vacuum to that measured in air. Such techniques will be essential for making the results of watt and joule balance measurements available to science and industry. Both the NIST and NPL Mark II (NRC) watt balances use knife edges to act as the pivots for the beam. Knife edges suffer from hysteresis which can produce systematic offsets during weighing. In their paper Choi (KRISS) and Robinson (NPL) describe the analysis of this problem using both finite element (FEM) techniques and a stand-alone balance designed for testing knife edges. The last two papers deal with the possible future of the watt balance technique. The BIPM simultaneous measurement scheme for the watt balance was originally conceived for operation at cryogenic temperatures with a superconducting coil. In their paper de Mirandes and her co-authors describe initial work on the principles of this superconducting variant of the BIPM watt balance and concentrate on the characteristics of the superconducting coil in comparison with those of a normal coil. The final paper is a good example of serendipity in which Kibble (Independent Consultant) was designing novel watt balances based on seismometer suspensions and Robinson (NPL) had derived a set of general expressions, which are required for a watt balance to be immune to a range of common misalignments but also lead to the design of watt balances with a range of coil motions. The combination of these techniques has led to the novel watt balance designs which are described. Finally I would like to thank: the editor of Metrologia and the editorial staff of IOP Publishing, the referees who have responded rapidly to requests and have kept the issue on schedule, and the authors who have taken the time to provide a range of papers showing the breadth of the work required to build and operate watt or joule balances. References [1] Andreas B et al 2011 Determination of the Avogadro constant by counting the atoms in a 28Si crystal Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 030801 [2] BIPM 2013 Report of the 14th Meeting of the CCM Sèvres pp 34-7 [3] Steiner R 2013 History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant Rep. Prog. Phys. 76 016101 [4] Stock M 2013 Watt balance experiments for the determination of the Planck constant and the redefinition of the kilogram Metrologia 50 R1-16 [5] Li S, Han B, Li Z and Lan J 2012 Precisely measuring the Planck constant by electromechanical balances Measurement 45 1-13 [6] Eichenberger A, Genevès G and Gournay P 2009 Determination of the Planck constant by means of a watt balance Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 172 363-83 [7] Robinson I A 2009 Toward the redefinition of the kilogram: measurements of Planck's constant using watt balances IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 58 942-8

  17. Chem Gems & Joules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Diana S.

    2002-09-01

    Learn about the chemistry (and some physics) of optical discs such as CDs, CD-ROMs, and DVDs from David Birkett (p 1081). Beginning on p 1088, Johnson and Yalkowsky present some neat models (commercial or build-yourself) that assemble of their own accord into appropriate structures for liquid and solid water. Do you need a low-cost, small-scale heating device? How about adapting a soldering iron as described on p 1109? If you are interested in cooperative learning, the comparison with lecturing that begins on p 1131 will provide useful information. The latest in our series commemorating the centenary of the Nobel Prizes begins on p 1055. The many interconnections among the research of prizewinners described in this series provides interesting tidbits to humanize chemical kinetics. Do you have hydrogen peroxide, sulfur, or potassium chromate in your lab or chemical storage area? Learn about hazards of these substances from the letter to the editor on p 1070 and the CLIPs on p 1063, p 1064, and p 1065. Finally, keep up with chemical education news at the ACS and the NSF by reading the statements of candidates for the ACS presidency (p 1036 and p 1037) and the commentary by Ellis on p 1034.

  18. Multicomponent gas sorption Joule-Thomson refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Bard, Steven (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cryogenic Joule-Thomson refrigeration capable of pumping multicomponent gases with a single stage sorption compressor system. Alternative methods of pumping a multicomponent gas with a single stage compressor are disclosed. In a first embodiment, the sorbent geometry is such that a void is defined near the output of the sorption compressor. When the sorbent is cooled, the sorbent primarily adsorbs the higher boiling point gas such that the lower boiling point gas passes through the sorbent to occupy the void. When the sorbent is heated, the higher boiling point gas is desorbed at high temperature and pressure and thereafter propels the lower boiling point gas out of the sorption compressor. A mixing chamber is provided to remix the constituent gases prior to expansion of the gas through a Joule-Thomson valve. Other methods of pumping a multicomponent gas are disclosed. For example, where the sorbent is porous and the low boiling point gas does not adsorb very well, the pores of the sorbent will act as a void space for the lower boiling point gas. Alternatively, a mixed sorbent may be used where a first sorbent component physically adsorbs the high boiling point gas and where the second sorbent component chemically absorbs the low boiling point gas.

  19. Multicomponent gas sorption Joule-Thomson refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Petrick, S. Walter; Bard, Steven

    1991-11-01

    The present invention relates to a cryogenic Joule-Thomson refrigeration capable of pumping multicomponent gases with a single stage sorption compressor system. Alternative methods of pumping a multicomponent gas with a single stage compressor are disclosed. In a first embodiment, the sorbent geometry is such that a void is defined near the output of the sorption compressor. When the sorbent is cooled, the sorbent primarily adsorbs the higher boiling point gas such that the lower boiling point gas passes through the sorbent to occupy the void. When the sorbent is heated, the higher boiling point gas is desorbed at high temperature and pressure and thereafter propels the lower boiling point gas out of the sorption compressor. A mixing chamber is provided to remix the constituent gases prior to expansion of the gas through a Joule-Thomson valve. Other methods of pumping a multicomponent gas are disclosed. For example, where the sorbent is porous and the low boiling point gas does not adsorb very well, the pores of the sorbent will act as a void space for the lower boiling point gas. Alternatively, a mixed sorbent may be used where a first sorbent component physically adsorbs the high boiling point gas and where the second sorbent component chemically absorbs the low boiling point gas.

  20. From Joule to Caratheodory and Born: A Conceptual Evolution of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    In the years after Joule's experiment on the equivalence of heat and work, it was taken for granted that heat and work could be independently defined and that the change in energy for a change of state is the sum of the heat and the work. Only with the work of Caratheodory and Born did it become clear that heat cannot be measured independently,

  1. A Virial Treatment of the Joule and Joule-Thomson Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybolt, Thomas R.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background information designed to aid a physical chemistry student in using the virial equation of state in deriving expressions for other thermodynamic properties, such as writing the Joule and Joule-Thomson coefficients in terms of virial expansions. (CS)

  2. Electroosmotic Entry Flow with Joule Heating Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, Rama; Kale, Akshay; Xuan, Xiangchun

    Electrokinetic flow, which transports liquids by electroosmosis and samples by electrophoresis, is the transport method of choice in microfluidic chips over traditional pressure-driven flows. Studies on electrokinetic flows have so far been almost entirely limited to inside microchannels. Very little work has been done on the electroosmotic fluid entry from a reservoir to a microchannel, which is the origin of all fluid and sample motions in microchips. We demonstrate in this talk that strong vortices of opposite circulating directions can be generated in electroosmotic entry flows. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model of the entire microchip to predict and understand the fluid temperature and flow fields at the reservoir-microchannel junction.

  3. From Joule to Caratheodory and Born: A Conceptual Evolution of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    In the years after Joule's experiment on the equivalence of heat and work, it was taken for granted that heat and work could be independently defined and that the change in energy for a change of state is the sum of the heat and the work. Only with the work of Caratheodory and Born did it become clear that heat cannot be measured independently,…

  4. Direct observation of nanometer-scale Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Xiong, Feng; Hong, Sungduk; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2013-05-01

    We measure power dissipation in phase change memory (PCM) devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM) with ˜50 nm spatial and 0.2 K temperature resolution. The temperature rise in the Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is dominated by Joule heating, but at the GST-TiW contacts it is a combination of Peltier and current crowding effects. Comparison of SJEM and electrical measurements with simulations of the PCM devices uncovers a thermopower of ˜350 μV K-1 and a contact resistance of ˜2.0 × 10-8 Ω m2 (to TiW) for 25 nm thick films of face centered-cubic crystalline GST. Knowledge of such nanometer-scale Joule, Peltier, and current crowding effects is essential for energy-efficient design of future PCM technology.

  5. Manganese Nitride Sorption Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed sorption refrigeration system of increased power efficiency combines MnxNy sorption refrigeration stage with systems described in "Regenerative Sorption Refrigerator" (NPO-17630). Measured pressure-vs-composition isotherms for reversible chemisorption of N2 in MnxNy suggest feasibility to incorporate MnxNy chemisorption stage in Joule-Thomson cryogenic system. Discovery represents first known reversible nitrogen chemisorption compression system. Has potential in nitrogen-isotope separation, nitrogen purification, or contamination-free nitrogen compression.

  6. Spring-Loaded Joule-Thomson Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Britcliffe, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Improved design reduces clogging and maintains constant pressure drop as flow rate varies. Spring-Loaded Joule-Thomson Valve pressure drop regulated by spring pushing stainless-steel ball against soft brass seat. Pressure drop remains nearly constant, regardless of helium flow rate and of any gas contaminants frozen on valve seat. Because springloaded J-T valve maintains constant pressure drop, upstream roomtemperature throttle valve adjusts flow rate precisely for any given upstream pressure. In addition, new valve relatively invulnerable to frozen gas contaminants, which clog fixed-orifice J-T valves.

  7. Joule-Thomson Cooling - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubon, C. R.; Powell, W. J. A.

    1988-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the use of Joule-Thomson refrigerators in infrared detection systems such as thermal imagers, missile seekers, and guidance systems. Although the principle behind the minicooler is simple there exists a range of designs, either simple or complex, which cover many requirements from one-shot fast cool systems for missile guidance to systems requiring the minimum of logistic support and reliability for remote thermal imaging applications. The first step in examining the use of J-T minicoolers is to look at the applications and how each relates to the cryogenic system used.

  8. Improving Control in a Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borders, James; Pearson, David; Prina, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    A report discusses a modified design of a Joule-Thomson (JT) refrigerator under development to be incorporated into scientific instrumentation aboard a spacecraft. In most other JT refrigerators (including common household refrigerators), the temperature of the evaporator (the cold stage) is kept within a desired narrow range by turning a compressor on and off as needed. This mode of control is inadequate for the present refrigerator because a JT-refrigerator compressor performs poorly when the flow from its evaporator varies substantially, and this refrigerator is required to maintain adequate cooling power. The proposed design modifications include changes in the arrangement of heat exchangers, addition of a clamp that would afford a controlled heat leak from a warmer to a cooler stage to smooth out temperature fluctuations in the cooler stage, and incorporation of a proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control system that would regulate the heat leak to maintain the temperature of the evaporator within a desired narrow range while keeping the amount of liquid in the evaporator within a very narrow range in order to optimize the performance of the compressor. Novelty lies in combining the temperature- and cooling-power-regulating controls into a single control system.

  9. Ultra-high temperature stability Joule-Thomson cooler with capability to accomodate pressure variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven (Inventor); Wu, Jiunn-Jeng (Inventor); Trimble, Curtis A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system capable of achieving high temperature stabilities in the presence of varying temperature, atmospheric pressure, and heat load is provided. The Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system includes a demand flow Joule-Thomson expansion valve disposed in a cryostat of the refrigeration system. The expansion valve has an adjustable orifice that controls the flow of compressed gas therethrough and induces cooling and partial liquefaction of the gas. A recuperative heat exchanger is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the expansion valve. A thermostatically self-regulating mechanism is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the J-T expansion valve. The thermostatically self-regulating mechanism automatically adjusts the cross sectional area of the adjustable valve orifice in response to environmental temperature changes and changes in power dissipated at a cold head. A temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism is coupled to a cold head for adjusting the temperature of the cold head in response to the change in heat flow in the cold head. The temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism comprises a temperature sensitive diode, a wound wire heater, and an electrical feedback control circuit coupling the diode to the heater. An absolute pressure relief valve is interposed between the output of the cryostat and an exhaust port for maintaining a constant exhaust temperature in the refrigerating system, independent of the changes in atmospheric pressure.

  10. Ultra-high temperature stability Joule-Thomson cooler with capability to accomodate pressure variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Steven; Wu, Jiunn-Jeng; Trimble, Curtis A.

    1992-06-01

    A Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system capable of achieving high temperature stabilities in the presence of varying temperature, atmospheric pressure, and heat load is provided. The Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system includes a demand flow Joule-Thomson expansion valve disposed in a cryostat of the refrigeration system. The expansion valve has an adjustable orifice that controls the flow of compressed gas therethrough and induces cooling and partial liquefaction of the gas. A recuperative heat exchanger is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the expansion valve. A thermostatically self-regulating mechanism is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the J-T expansion valve. The thermostatically self-regulating mechanism automatically adjusts the cross sectional area of the adjustable valve orifice in response to environmental temperature changes and changes in power dissipated at a cold head. A temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism is coupled to a cold head for adjusting the temperature of the cold head in response to the change in heat flow in the cold head. The temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism comprises a temperature sensitive diode, a wound wire heater, and an electrical feedback control circuit coupling the diode to the heater. An absolute pressure relief valve is interposed between the output of the cryostat and an exhaust port for maintaining a constant exhaust temperature in the refrigerating system, independent of the changes in atmospheric pressure.

  11. Advances in Joule-Thomson cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, W. A.

    The Joule-Thomson (J-T) cooling effect from the expansion of a nonideal gas, is one of the oldest methods known for the generation of cryogenic temperatures. It is the simplest to use, but, in many circumstances, is one of the least efficient. However, recent developments of J-T coolers using more complex cycles, multi-stage construction, special gas mixtures, and novel methods of fabrication have greatly improved the attainable efficiency of this type of cooler. These developments have made the J-T refrigerator competitive in many situations with other refrigerators which use superficially more efficient cooling cycles. In addition, the absence of mechanical noise or vibration, their innate simplicity, their small size, and low mass give these J-T refrigerators a number of additional advantages over Stirling and other such refrigerators. These developments and the underlying reasons for these improvements are discussed.

  12. Analysis of two-stage Joule-Thomson expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasaki, Katsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    To cool far infrared detectors for infrared observation or superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers for atmospheric observation, 1 K-class and 4 K-class coolers have been developed. These coolers consist of a two-stage Stirling cooler for pre-cooling and a Joule-Thomson (JT) cooler with a single JT valve. This paper presents descriptions of theoretical analyses based on enthalpy balance to elucidate the benefits of a two-stage JT valve type compared with those of a single JT valve type in a JT cooler. First, relational expressions for heat balance analysis of enthalpy for single-stage JT expansion are introduced. Then similar relational expressions for two-stage JT expansion are introduced under some assumptions. Results of heat balance analyses using several parameters demonstrated that, using two-stage JT expansion, the cooling capacity for a 1 K-class cooler is improved by 100%; that of a 4 K-class cooler is improved by about 30%.

  13. Performance optimization of a miniature Joule-Thomson cryocooler using numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-09-01

    The performance of a miniature Joule-Thomson cryocooler depends on the effectiveness of the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger used in such cryocooler is Hampson-type recuperative heat exchanger. The design of the efficient heat exchanger is crucial for the optimum performance of the cryocooler. In the present work, the heat exchanger is numerically simulated for the steady state conditions and the results are validated against the experimental data available from the literature. The area correction factor is identified for the calculation of effective heat transfer area which takes into account the effect of helical geometry. In order to get an optimum performance of the cryocoolers, operating parameters like mass flow rate, pressure and design parameters like heat exchanger length, helical diameter of coil, fin dimensions, fin density have to be identified. The present work systematically addresses this aspect of design for miniature J-T cryocooler.

  14. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Kyle L; Pop, Eric; King, William P

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K(-1). This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale. PMID:25273761

  15. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K{sup −1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  16. A determination of the Planck constant by the generalized joule balance method with a permanent-magnet system at NIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinxin; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Zhengkun; Bai, Yang; Wang, Gang; Li, Shisong; Zeng, Tao; Li, Chen; Lu, Yunfeng; Han, Bing; Wang, Nong; Zhou, Kunli

    2016-02-01

    The joule balance experiment has been carried out at the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM) since 2007. By the end of 2013 the first generation of the joule balance (NIM-1) achieved a measurement uncertainty of 7.2  ×  10-6 (k  =  1). To reduce the measurement uncertainty further, the next generation of the joule balance apparatus (NIM-2) system is under construction. A new coil system using ferromagnetic material is being adopted in NIM-2 to reduce self-heating in the coils. However, the effects on the measurement of the mutual inductance from the nonlinearity and hysteresis of the ferromagnetic material will bring a considerable measurement uncertainty. Inspired by the watt balance, the measurement of the mutual inductance is replaced by an equivalent measurement of the magnetic flux linkage difference. The nonlinearity and hysteresis will not be a problem in the measurement of the magnetic flux linkage difference. This technique comes from the watt balance method. It is called the generalized joule balance method, which is actually a modification of the watt balance method. However, it still represents a valid change that can reduce the difficulty of dynamic measurement experienced using the watt balance. Permanent magnets can also be adopted in the generalized joule balance. To check the feasibility of the generalized joule balance method, some preliminary experiments have been performed on NIM-1. A yokeless permanent magnet system has been designed and used to replace the exciting coils in NIM-1. In this paper, the structure of the yokeless permanent magnet system is introduced. Furthermore, a determination of the Planck constant with the permanent magnet system is presented. The value of the Planck constant h we obtained is 6.626 069(17)  ×  10-34 J s with a relative standard uncertainty of 2.6  ×  10-6.

  17. a Numerical Study on the Performance of the Miniature Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Y. J.; Park, S. J.; Choi, Y. D.

    2010-04-01

    Miniature Joule-Thomson refrigerators have been widely used for rapid cooling of infrared detectors, probes of cryosurgery, thermal cameras, and missile homing head and guidance systems, due to their special features of simple configuration, compact structure and rapid cool-down characteristics. The cool-down time, the temperature at the cold end, the running time and the gas consumption are the important indicators of the performance of the Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In this study, a simplified one-dimensional model of momentum and energy transport for the recuperative heat exchanger was adopted to predict the thermodynamic behaviors of the refrigerator. In the analysis, to consider the thermal interactions of the each component of the refrigerator, the momentum and energy equations for the high pressure gas, the low pressure gas, the tube, the Dewar, and the mandrel were simultaneously solved. The thermodynamic properties from the REFPROP were used to account the real gas effects of the gas. The results show the effects of the supply pressure of gas on the transient behaviors of the temperature at the cold end and the thermal performance of the recuperative heat exchanger.

  18. Nanofocus of tenth of joules and a portable plasma focus of few joules for field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Tarifeno, Ariel; Pedreros, Jose; Altamirano, Luis

    2009-01-21

    A repetitive pinch plasma focus that works with stored energy less than 1 J per shot has be developed at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. The main features of this device, repetitive Nanofocus, are 5 nF of capacity, 5 nH of inductance, 5-10 kV charging voltage, 60-250 mJ stored energy, 5-10 kA current peak, per shot. The device has been operated at 20 Hz in hydrogen and deuterium. X-ray radiographs of materials of different thickness were obtained. Neutrons were detected using a system based upon {sup 3}He proportional counter in chare integrated mode. However, the reproducibility of this miniaturized device is low and several technological subjects have to be previously solved in order to produce neutrons for periods greater than minutes. Further studies in the Nanofocus are being carried out. In addition, a device with a stored energy of a few joules is being explored. A preliminary compact, low weight (3 kg), portable PF device (25 cmx5 cmx5 cm) for field applications has been designed. This device was designed to operate with few kilovolts (10 kV or less) with a stored energy of 2 J and a repetition rate of 10 Hz without cooling. A neutron flux of the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} n/s is expected.

  19. James Prescott Joule and the idea of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardwell, Donald

    1989-05-01

    To commemorate the centenary of Joule's death, this article offers a brief account of the origins and development of his ideas and their incorporation into mainstream physics. The scientific, technological and social importance of his work is explained and he is shown to be a quintessential physicist.

  20. The similarity law for the Joule-Thomson inversion line.

    PubMed

    Apfelbaum, E M; Vorob'ev, V S

    2014-10-23

    We show that the expression for the Joule-Thomson inversion temperature following from the van der Waals equation and recorded in a form reduced to the Boyle values has a universal character and can be applied to many real substances and model systems. PMID:25271782

  1. Mixed-Gas Sorption Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Petrick, S. Walter; Bard, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Proposed mixed-gas sorption Joule-Thomson refrigerator provides cooling down to temperature of 70 K. Includes only one stage and no mechanical compressor. Simpler, operates without vibrating, and consumes less power in producing same amount of cooling. Same sorption principle of operation applicable in compressor that chemisorbs oxygen or hydrogen from mixture with helium, neon, and/or other nonreactive gases.

  2. Compact laser through improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 16-joule-pulse laser has been developed in which a boron nitride heat-conductor enclosure is used to remove heat from the elements. Enclosure is smaller and lighter than systems in which cooling fluids are used.

  3. Low-cost Joule Thomson coolers: single-flow flat cooler and two-flow cylindrical cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottereau, Alain

    1998-10-01

    Regardless improvements of Stirling and Pulse Tube coolers performances, Joule Thomson coolers are still interested for systems which require very fast cool down, compactness and high reliability. AIR LIQUIDE-DTA- believes that most of the future applications for Joule Thomson coolers would required devices such as single flow or dual flow coolers if manufacturers are able to increase significantly the performances and decrease the cost of such coolers. AIR LIQUIDE-DTA- has developed recently new technologies in order to match this challenge and to widen its range of low cost coolers. Previous developments such as memory shape valve and flat cooler were improved and adapted for cylindrical coolers. Original heat exchanger was also realized for flat cooler applications. Prototypes and results are presented in this paper for coolers with a target price which shall not exceed 200 USD.

  4. Final results of the EU JOULE projects dynamic inflow

    SciTech Connect

    Schepers, J.G.; Snel, H.

    1996-10-01

    Within the European Union JOULE 1 and JOULE 2 programs, two joint research projects were carried out concerning dynamic inflow effects. These effects describe the wake induced unsteadiness and non-uniformity of the flow in the rotorplane. The aim of the project was the definition and implementation of engineering models within the current state-of-the-art computer codes for dynamic load calculations. These models have been qualified by means of comparison with both existing sophisticated models (dynamic vortex wake calculations) and experiments on turbines with a large range of rotor diameters. Important dynamic inflow effects were found at fast pitching transients and at yawed flow conditions. The effects were predicted well with the newly developed engineering methods.

  5. Design of a valved moving magnet type linear compressor for a Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. W.; Wang, L. Y.; Gan, Z. H.

    2014-01-01

    For temperatures around 4-6 K, Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocoolers can achieve a higher efficiency than Stirling or pulse tube cryocoolers thus have been widely used in space. It is crucial for a J-T compressor to obtain a relatively high pressure ratio. With this concept, a valved moving magnet type linear compressor has been designed. This paper describes the design method and component structure of the linear compressor in detail. The electromagnetic force of linear motor, stiffness and stress distribution of flexure springs were calculated based on finite element method (FEM). System resonance was specially considered to achieve a high efficiency, and system vibration and heat dissipation problems were discussed. The design goal of the linear compressor is to achieve an efficiency of 80% and a lifetime longer than 5 years.

  6. Gifford-McMahon/Joule-Thomson Refrigerator Cools to 2.5 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, Michael; Fernandez, Jose; Hanson, Theodore

    2005-01-01

    A compact refrigerator designed specifically for cooling a microwave maser low-noise amplifier is capable of removing heat at a continuous rate of 180 mW at a temperature of 2.5 K. This refrigerator is a combination of (1) a commercial Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerator nominally rated for cooling to 4 K and (2) a Joule-Thomson (J-T) circuit. The GM refrigerator pre-cools the J-T circuit, which provides the final stage of cooling. The refrigerator is compact and capable of operating in any orientation. Moreover, in comparison with a typical refrigerator heretofore used to cool a maser to 4.5 K, this refrigerator is simpler and can be built at less than half the cost.

  7. Second-Law Analysis of a Cascade Joule-Thomson Microcooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razani, A.; Fraser, T.; Dodson, C.; Martin, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Cascade Joule-Thomson Microcoolers have been proposed in literature in which different compressors with low values of pressure ratio of order four using different working fluids are anticipated to drive the microcooler. A cascade of five stages is expected to provide cooling at a load temperature of 150 K. In this study a second-law analysis of such a microcooler is performed to quantify the effect of important design parameters representing the basic components and processes of the microcooler on its performance. The effects of several important design parameters including the effectiveness of all heat exchangers as well as the effect of possible pressure drop in the recuperative heat exchanger on cooling power and the exergetic efficiency of the microcooler are obtained. The inefficiency of the compressors is included using an exergetic efficiency parameter for the compressors. The heat transfer from each stage to other stages is modelled using an effectiveness parameter for the heat exchangers that can be varied to investigate their influence on cooling power and the efficiency of the microcooler.

  8. Ionospheric Heating Rates Associated with Solar Wind Forcing: Ejecta flow, High Speed Flow and Slow Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Kasprzak, B.; Richardson, I.; Paige, T.; Evans, D.

    2001-12-01

    We present estimates of global ionospheric Joule and particle heating as a function of solar wind flow types over solar cycles 21, 22 and the first half of solar cycle 23. Richardson et al., [JGR, 2000] used a variety of techniques to categorize the solar wind flow as ejecta, high-speed stream or slow flow. Their work provides the basis for our catigorization of heating by flow type. The estimates of Joule heating are based on output of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure, and fits to the Polar Cap Index [Chun et al., GRL, 1999]. Estimates of particle heating are derived from polar orbiting satellites. Although ejecta only account for 19% of the solar wind flow, they account for 27% of the Joule heating. High-speed stream flow accounts for 47% of the flow occurrence and 44% of the Joule heating. We will show similar comparisons for particle heating. Our solar cycle statistics indicate that Joule heating produces a yearly average hemispheric heating rate of 53 GW while particles produce a hemispheric heating rate of 38 GW. Joule heating exhibits more variability than particle heating. During solar cycle maximum years Joule heating accounts for twice the heating associated with particles heating.

  9. Development of a low-noise 10 K J-T (Joule-Thomson) refrigeration system. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Little, W.A.

    1987-06-15

    This report summarizes work done on the development of a low-noise Joule-Thomson, microminiature refrigeration system designed for 10 K operation. Topics discussed include: calculation of phase diagram of mixtures of certain hydrocarbon gases with nitrogen using the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state; the setup of a magnetron-enhanced sputtering system to allow sputtering a layer of adhesive on the glass substrates with a much-better-defined thickness than can be laid down using the older screen printing method; redesign of H/sub 2/ refrigerator test stage, redesign of mixed-gas heat exchanger, refrigerator fabrication, and gas cleaner.

  10. Sensitivity of Micromachined Joule-Thomson Cooler to Clogging Due to Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H. S.; Vanapalli, S.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    A major issue in long-term operation of micromachined Joule-Thomson coolers is the clogging of the microchannels and/or the restriction due to the deposition of water molecules present in the working fluid. In this study, we present the performance of a microcooler operated with nitrogen gas with different moisture levels. Relatively low-purity nitrogen gas (5.0) is supplied from a gas bottle and led through a filter to control the moisture level. The filter consists of a tube-in-tube counter flow heat exchanger (CFHX) and a heat exchanger that is stabilized at a certain temperature by using a Stirling cooler. The set-point temperature determines the moisture level at the exit of the heat exchanger. It is found that the moisture level has influence on the mass-flow rate during the cool down. Once the microcooler reaches the set cold-end temperature, the main deposition area shifts into the CFHX and the moisture level at the restriction is almost independent on the inlet moisture level of the microcooler. The moisture level at the restriction increases with the increasing cold-end temperature when the cold-end temperature is lower than the saturation temperature of the water in the nitrogen gas. Higher cold-end temperature results in higher clogging rate.

  11. On the possible cycles via the unified perspective of cryocoolers. Part A: The Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Maytal, Ben-Zion; Pfotenhauer, John M.

    2014-01-29

    Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers possess a self adjusting effect, which preserves the state of the returning stream from the evaporator as a saturated vapor. The heat load can be entirely absorbed at constant temperature by evaporation even for different sized heat exchangers. It is not possible for the steady state flow resulting from a gradual cool down to penetrate 'deeper' into the two-phase dome, and produce a two phase return flow even with a heat exchanger of unlimited size. Such behavior was implicitly taken for granted in the literature but never clearly stated nor questioned and therefore never systematically proven. The discussion provided below provides such a proof via the unified model of cryocoolers. This model portrays all cryocoolers as magnifiers of their respective elementary temperature reducing mechanism through the process of 'interchanging'.

  12. Ohm's Law, Fick's Law, Joule's Law, and Ground Water Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    1999-02-01

    Starting from the contributions of Ohm, Fick and Joule during the nineteenth century, an integral expression is derived for a steady-state groundwater flow system. In general, this integral statement gives expression to the fact that the steady-state groundwater system is characterized by two dependent variables, namely, flow geometry and fluid potential. As a consequence, solving the steady-state flow problem implies the finding of optimal conditions under which flow geometry and the distribution of potentials are compatible with each other, subject to the constraint of least action. With the availability of the digital computer and powerful graphics software, this perspective opens up possibilities of understanding the groundwater flow process without resorting to the traditional differential equation. Conceptual difficulties arise in extending the integral expression to a transient groundwater flow system. These difficulties suggest that the foundations of groundwater hydraulics deserve to be reexamined.

  13. Joule-Thomson cryogenic cooler with extremely high thermal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven; Wu, J. J.; Trimble, Curt

    1991-01-01

    An 80-K Joule-Thomson (J-T) cooling system designed for the Probe Infrared Laser Spectrometer (PIRLS) proposed for the Huygens Titan Probe of the Cassini Saturn orbiter mission is presented. The cryogenic cooling requirements of the PIRLS instrument are listed, and the cooler system design including details of a J-T cryostat, cold head, and dewar design is described along with the results of a thermal modeling effort and lab cooler performance testing. It is shown that by using active feedback temperature control of the cold head in combination with the self-regulating action of the J-T cryostat, a temperature stability of less than 0.1 mK/min is achieved by the cooler weighting 1.8 kg.

  14. JouleLabs Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00301

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, D.

    2010-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Joule Labs Inc. (Joule Labs) will collaborate on creating a software platform for the development and distribution of renewable energy and energy efficiency analysis tools.

  15. Joule-Thomson Cooling Due to CO2 Injection into Natural GasReservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-04-21

    Depleted natural gas reservoirs are a promising target for Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR). The focus of this study is on evaluating the importance of Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 injection into depleted natural gas reservoirs. Joule-Thomson cooling is the adiabatic cooling that accompanies the expansion of a real gas. If Joule-Thomson cooling were extreme, injectivity and formation permeability could be altered by the freezing of residual water,formation of hydrates, and fracturing due to thermal stresses. The TOUGH2/EOS7C module for CO2-CH4-H2O mixtures is used as the simulation analysis tool. For verification of EOS7C, the classic Joule-Thomson expansion experiment is modeled for pure CO2 resulting in Joule-Thomson coefficients in agreement with standard references to within 5-7 percent. For demonstration purposes, CO2 injection at constant pressure and with a large pressure drop ({approx}50 bars) is presented in order to show that cooling by more than 20 C can occur by this effect. Two more-realistic constant-rate injection cases show that for typical systems in the Sacramento Valley, California, the Joule-Thomson cooling effect is minimal. This simulation study shows that for constant-rate injections into high-permeability reservoirs, the Joule-Thomson cooling effect is not expected to create significant problems for CSEGR.

  16. Miniature Piezoelectric Compressor for Joule-Thomson Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Sergey; Tzabar, Nir; Grossman, Gershon

    Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers operate with a continuous flow of the working fluid that enters the cooler at a high pressure and leaves it at a lower pressure. Ideally, the temperature of the outgoing fluid equals the temperature of the entering fluid. JT cryocoolers that operate with pure refrigerants require high pressure of a few tens of MPa where the low pressure is usually around 0.1 MPa. Circulation of the working fluid in such cases requires high pressure ratio compressors that evidently have large dimensions. JT cryocoolers can operate with much lower pressure ratios by using mixed-refrigerants. Cooling from 300 K to about 80 K in a single stage cryocooler normally requires a pressure ratio of about 1:25. In the present research a miniature compressor driven by piezoelectric elements is developed in collaboration between Rafael and the Technion. This type of compressor has the advantage of improved long life compared to other mechanical compressors, very low vibrations, and silent operation. In the current case, the design goal of the intake and discharge pressures has been 0.1 and 2.5 MPa, respectively, with a flow rate of 0.06 g/s. The compressor has two compression stages; 1:5 and 5:25. Several configurations have been considered, fabricated, and tested. The performance of the last configuration approaches the desired specification and is presented in the current paper together with the design concept.

  17. Mixed-refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR JT) mini-cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, Nir

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the progress in our ongoing research on Mixed-Refrigerant (MR) Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers. The research begun by exploring different MRs and testing various compressors: oil-lubricated and oil-free, reciprocating and linear, custom-made and commercial. Closed-cycle JT cryocoolers benefit from the fact that the compressor might be located far from the cold-end and thus there are no moving parts, no vibrations, and no heat emission near the cold-end. As a consequence, the compressor may be located where there are no severe size limitations, its heat can be conveniently removed, and it can be easily maintained. However, in some applications there is still a demand for a small compressor to drive a JT cryocooler although it is located far from the cooled device. Recently, we have developed a miniature oil-free compressor for MR JT cryocoolers that weighs about 700 g and its volume equals about 300 cc. The cryocooler operates with a MR that contains Ne, N2, and Hydrocarbons. This MR has been widely investigated with different compressors and varying operating conditions and proved to be stable. The current research investigates the performances of MR JT mini-cryocooler operating with the MR mentioned above, driven with our miniature compressor, and a cold-finger prototype. A Dewar with heat load of about 230 mW is cooled to about 80 K at ambient temperatures between 0°C and 40°C. The experimental results obtained are stable and demonstrate the ability to control the cooling temperature by changing the rotation speed of the compressor.

  18. Clogging of Joule-Thomson Devices in Liquid Hydrogen-Lunar Lander Descent Stage Operating Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurns, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) devices have been identified as critical components for future space exploration missions. The NASA Constellation Program lunar architecture considers LOX/LH2 propulsion for the lunar lander descent stage main engine an enabling technology, ensuring the cryogenic propellants are available at the correct conditions for engine operation. This cryogenic storage system may utilize a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) that includes J-T devices to maintain tank fluid pressure and temperature. Previous experimental investigations have indicated that J-T devices may become clogged when flowing LH2 while operating at a temperature range from 20.5 K to 24.4 K. It has been proposed that clogging is due to a trace amount of metastable, supercooled liquid neon in the regular LH2 supply. In time, flow blockage occurs from accretion of solid neon on the orifice. This clogging poses a realistic threat to spacecraft propulsion systems utilizing J-T devices in cryogenic pressure control systems. TVS failure due to J-T clogging would prevent removal of environmental heat from the propellant and potential loss of mission. This report describes J-T clogging tests performed with LH2. Tests were performed in the expected Lunar Lander operating regime, and several methods were evaluated to determine the optimum approach to mitigating the potential risk of J-T clogging.

  19. Uncertainty evaluation for ordinary least-square fitting with arbitrary order polynomial in joule balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Qiang; Xu, JinXin; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    The ordinary least-square fitting with polynomial is used in both the dynamic phase of the watt balance method and the weighting phase of joule balance method but few researches have been conducted to evaluate the uncertainty of the fitting data in the electrical balance methods. In this paper, a matrix-calculation method for evaluating the uncertainty of the polynomial fitting data is derived and the properties of this method are studied by simulation. Based on this, another two derived methods are proposed. One is used to find the optimal fitting order for the watt or joule balance methods. Accuracy and effective factors of this method are experimented with simulations. The other is used to evaluate the uncertainty of the integral of the fitting data for joule balance, which is demonstrated with an experiment from the NIM-1 joule balance.

  20. Clogging of Joule-Thomson Devices in Liquid Hydrogen Handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; Lekki, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center indicate that Joule-Thomson devices become clogged when transferring liquid hydrogen (LH2), operating at a temperature range from 20.5 to 24.4 K. Blockage does not exist under all test conditions but is found to be sensitive to the inlet temperature of the LH2. At a subcooled inlet temperature of 20.5 K blockage consistently appears but is dissipated when the fluid temperature is raised above 24.5 K. Clogging steadily reduced flow rate through the orifices, eventually resulting in complete blockage. This tendency poses a threat to spacecraft cryogenic propulsion systems that would utilize passive thermal control systems. We propose that this clogging is due to trace amounts of neon in the regular LH2 supply. Neon freezes at 24.5 K at one atmosphere pressure. It is postulated that between 20.5 and 24.5 K, neon remains in a meta-stable, supercooled liquid state. When impacting the face of an orifice, liquid neon droplets solidify and accumulate, blocking flow over time. The purpose of this test program was to definitively quantify the phenomena experimentally by obtaining direct visual evidence of orifice clogging by accretion from neon contaminates in the LH2 flow stream, utilizing state of the art imaging technology. Tests were conducted with LH2 flowing in the temperature range of 20.5 to 24.4 K. Additional imaging was also done at LH2 temperatures with no flow to verify clear view through the orifice.

  1. Characteristics of Subcooled Liquid Methane During Passage Through a Spray-Bar Joule-Thompson Thermodynamic Vent System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, L. J.; Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Schnell, A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted liquid methane (LCH4) testing in November 2006 using the multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) outfitted with a spray-bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). The basic objective was to identify any unusual or unique thermodynamic characteristics associated with subcooled LCH4 that should be considered in the design of space-based TVSs. Thirteen days of testing were performed with total tank heat loads ranging from 720 W to 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. During an updated evaluation of the data, it was noted that as the fluid passed through the Joule Thompson expansion, thermodynamic conditions consistent with the pervasive presence of metastability were indicated. This paper describes the observed thermodynamic conditions that correspond with metastability and effects on TVS performance.

  2. Simulation of Convective Heat Exchange in the Electrically Conducting Liquid in a Spherical Cavity. Algorithm of Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov‧ev, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    An algorithm is proposed for calculating the convective heat exchange in a spherical cavity modeling the liquid core of the Earth with account for the internal heat sources and the Joule dissipation in the electrically conducting liquid in it.

  3. Performance analysis of a miniature Joule-Thomson cryocooler with and without the distributed J-T effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Rashmin; Atrey, Milind

    2015-12-01

    Cryogenic temperatures are obtained with Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocoolers in an easier way as compared to other cooling techniques. Miniature J-T cryocoolers are often employed for cooling of infrared sensors, cryoprobes, biological samples, etc. A typical miniature J-T cryocooler consists of a storage reservoir/compressor providing the high pressure gas, a finned tube recuperative heat exchanger, an expansion valve/orifice, and the cold end. The recuperative heat exchanger is indispensable for attaining cryogenic temperatures. The geometrical parameters and the operating conditions of the heat exchanger drastically affect the cryocooler performance in terms of cool down time and cooling effect. In the literature, the numerical models for the finned recuperative heat exchanger have neglected the distributed J-T effect. The distributed J-T effect accounts for the changes in enthalpy of the fluid due to changes of pressure in addition to those due to changes of temperature. The objective of this work is to explore the distributed J-T effect and study the performance of a miniature J-T cryocooler with and without the distributed J-T effect. A one dimensional transient model is employed for the numerical analysis of the cryocooler. Cases with different operating conditions are worked out with argon and nitrogen as working fluids.

  4. Effects of environmental temperature on performance of the Joule-Thomson refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong-Ju; Kim, Hyobong; Park, Seong-Je

    2012-06-01

    Miniature Joule-Thomson refrigerators have been widely used for rapid cooling of infrared detectors, probes of cryosurgery, thermal cameras, missile homing head and guidance system, due to their special features of simple configuration, compact structure and rapid cool-down characteristics. Typical performance factors of the Joule-Thomson refrigerator are cool-down time, temperature of the cold end, running time and gas consumption. Those depend on operating conditions such as the pressure of the gas, thermal environment and etc.. In this study, experimental study of a miniature Joule- Thomson refrigerator with the gas pressure up to 12 MPa were performed to investigate the effects of the thermal environment (-40 ~ 50 °C). In experiments, to obtain the information of cool-down time, gas consumption and etc., the temperature of the cold end, mass flow rate and pressure of the argon gas are simultaneously measured. The Joule-Thomson refrigerator in cold thermal environment has rapid cool-down characteristics and small gas consumption. In the cold environmental condition, the Joule-Thomson refrigerator has high mass flow rate during cool-down process and in steady state.

  5. The Scientific Papers of James Prescott Joule 2 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott Joule, James

    2011-03-01

    Volume 1: Description of an electro-magnetic engine; Description of an electro-magnetic engine, with experiments; On the use of electro-magnets made of iron wire for the electro-magnetic engine; Investigations in magnetism and electro-magnetism; Investigations in magnetism and electro-magnetism; Description of an electro-magnetic engine; On electro-magnetic forces; On electro-magnetic forces; On electro-magnetic forces; Description of a new electro-magnet; On a new class of magnetic forces; On voltaic apparatus; On the production of heat by voltaic electricity; On the heat evolved by metallic conductors of electricity, and in the cells of a battery during electrolysis; On the electric origin of the heat of combustion; On the electrical origin of chemical heat; On Sir G. C. Haughton's experiments; On the heat evolved during the electrolysis of water; On the calorific effects of magneto-electricity, and on the mechanical value of heat; On the intermittent character of the voltaic current in certain cases of electrolysis; and on the intensities of various voltaic arrangements; On the changes of temperature produced by the rarefaction and condensation of air; On specific heat; On a new method for ascertaining the specific heat of bodies; Note on the employment of electrical currents for ascertaining the specific heat of bodies; On the mechanical equivalent of heat; On the existence of an equivalent relation between heat and the ordinary forms of mechanical power; On the heat disengaged in chemical combinations; On the effects of magnetism upon the dimensions of iron and steel bars; On matter, living force, and heat; On the mechanical equivalent of heat, as determined from the heat evolved by the function of fluids; On the theoretical velocity of sound; Expériences sur l'identité entre le calorique et la force méchanique. Détermination de l'équivalent par la chaleur dégagée pendant la friction du mercure; On shooting-stars; On the mechanical equivalent of heat, and on the constitution of elastic fluids; Some remarks on heat and the constitution of elastic fluids; On the mechanical equivalent of heat; On a remarkable appearance of lightning; On some amalgams; On the air-engine; Account of experiments with a powerful electro-magnet; On the economical production of mechanical effect from chemical forces; An account of some experiments with a large electro-magnet; Introductory research on the induction of magnetism by electric currents; On the fusion of metals by voltaic electricity; Note on Dalton's determination of the expansion of air by heat; On the utilization of the sewage of London and other large towns; Notice of experiments on the heat developed by friction in air; On the intensity of light during the recent solar eclipse; On an improved galvanometer; On the thermo-electricity of ferruginous metals, and on the thermal effects of stretching solid bodies; On the thermal effects of longitudinal compression of solids, with an investigation on the alterations of temperature accompanying changes of pressure in fluids; On some thermo-dynamic properties of solids; On the thermal effects of compressing fluids; On a method of testing the strength of steam-boilers; Experiments on the total heat of steam; Experiments on the passage of air through pipes and apertures in thin plates; On some amalgams; On the probable cause of electric storms; On the surface-condensation of steam; Notice of a compressing air-pump; Note on a mirage at Douglas; On a sensitive barometer; On a sensitive thermometer; Note on the meteor of February 6th, 1818; On a method of hardening steel wires for magnetic needles; On an instrument for showing rapid changes in magnetic declination; Determination of the dynamical equivalent of heat from the thermal effects of electric currents; Observations on the alteration of the freezing-point in thermometers; On a new

  6. Closed-Cycle Joule Thomson Cryocooler for Resistance Thermometer Calibration down to 0.65K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, T.; Toyoda, K.; Oota, A.; Nozato, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, O.

    2008-02-01

    A closed-cycle Joule Thomson cryocooler for resistance thermometer calibration has been developed. It consists of a Gifford McMahon mechanical refrigerator and a closed-cycle 3He Joule Thomson expansion circuit that utilizes the isenthalpic expansion of 3He for cooling. The developed cryocooler can reach temperatures as low as 0.6K and can operate for months with a simple procedure. The typical cooling power of the cryocooler is 1mW at 0.65K with a molar flow rate of 160μmol ·s-1 through the 3He Joule Thomson circuit. The possible mechanical vibration level experienced by the resistance thermometers was measured with a laser vibrometer. It was confirmed that the maximum acceleration level is 0.1m· s-2 and will not cause a problem for thermometer calibration.

  7. Heat management in aluminum/air batteries: Sources of heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, R. S. M.; Ganesh, S.; Ashok, G.; Ganesan, M.; Kapali, V.

    1994-07-01

    One of the problems with the aluminum/air battery is the generation of heat, during both idle and discharge periods. The main sources of heat are: (1) corrosion of the aluminum anode during the idle period; (2) inefficient, or less efficient, dissolution of anode during discharge; (3) Joule heat during discharge, and (4) non-uniform mass transfer during both discharge and idle periods. These components of heat act in a cumulative way because they are all interconnected. This paper addresses the basic reasons for the origin of these sources of heat. Suitable and practical remedial measures for the effective removal of such heat in the aluminum/air battery are suggested.

  8. Integrated Heat Switch/Oxide Sorption Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Thermally-driven, nonmechanical compressor uses container filled with compressed praseodymium cerium oxide powder (PrCeOx) to provide high-pressure flow of oxygen gas for driving closed-cycle Joule-Thomson-expansion refrigeration unit. Integrated heat switch/oxide sorption compressor has no moving parts except check valves, which control flow of oxygen gas between compressor and closed-cycle Joule-Thomson refrigeration system. Oxygen expelled from sorbent at high pressure by evacuating heat-switch gap and turning on heater.

  9. Impact of DC Joule anneal treatment on the high-frequency magnetoimpedance response of Fe-rich FeCo ribbons with varying glass former content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Tatiana; Leary, Alex; McHenry, Michael; Skorvanek, Ivan; Srikanth, Hariharan; Phan, Manh-Huong

    The Magnetoimpedance (MI) effect in 2 mm wide (Fe65Co35)83.5- x B13NbxSi2Cu1.5 rapidly quenched ribbons with varying glass former content(x = 0 and x = 4) has been studied in the frequency range of 1-1000 MHz. Two measurement techniques were used: auto-balancing bridge method in the frequency range of 1-110 MHz and transmission line technique for 20-1000 MHz. The impact of DC Joule heating treatments of varying current amplitude and annealing time on the MI effect of the amorphous ribbons was evaluated by examining the field and frequency dependence on the resistive and reactive components of the MI. To interpret the MI behavior, the domain structure of the ribbons in their as-quenched state and after heating treatment was imaged by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. A significant improvement in the MI response from the as-quenched state was found for both compositions of ribbon with a 3 hour-500 mA Joule anneal treatment. The improvement is attributed to the development of a low anisotropy domain structure longitudinally and at an oblique angle between the longitudinal and transverse directions for the 0% and 4% Nb content, respectively.

  10. Binary mixed-refrigerants for steady cooling temperatures between 80 K and 150 K with Joule-Thomson cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.

    2014-11-01

    Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers operating with pure gases attain vapor-liquid equilibrium in the evaporator and yield a steady cooling temperature which depends solely on the pressure. Mixed gases often substitute the pure gases as the working fluid in order to allow lower pressure ratios and improved coefficient of performance; however, mixed refrigerants are known for their cooling temperature dependence on the ambient temperature and heat load. It is possible to control the cooling temperature via the compressor operating parameters, heating device at the evaporator, bypass ports for the fluid, and more. The present research aims to achieve a steady cooling temperature with mixed refrigerants in a manner similar to pure refrigerants; meaning, having enough phases to leave a single degree of freedom of the fluid thermodynamic state. Thus, by stabilizing the pressure a stable temperature is attained. The current study focuses on binary mixtures since they can be analytically investigated in a more convenient manner relative to multi-component mixtures. Nitrogen-ethane and nitrogen-propane mixtures are considered based on former research conclusions. The present research includes an analytical method for calculating the cooling temperature, a numerical method for calculating the cooling power of the JT cryocooler in order to evaluate whether the cooling temperature is feasible, and experimental data are presented to verify some of the calculated results.

  11. Multiphase, multi-electrode Joule heat computations for glass melter and in situ vitrification simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1991-02-01

    Waste glass melter and in situ vitrification (ISV) processes represent the combination of electrical thermal, and fluid flow phenomena to produce a stable waste-from product. Computational modeling of the thermal and fluid flow aspects of these processes provides a useful tool for assessing the potential performance of proposed system designs. These computations can be performed at a fraction of the cost of experiment. Consequently, computational modeling of vitrification systems can also provide and economical means for assessing the suitability of a proposed process application. The computational model described in this paper employs finite difference representations of the basic continuum conservation laws governing the thermal, fluid flow, and electrical aspects of the vitrification process -- i.e., conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and electrical charge. The resulting code is a member of the TEMPEST family of codes developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy). This paper provides an overview of the numerical approach employed in TEMPEST. In addition, results from several TEMPEST simulations of sample waste glass melter and ISV processes are provided to illustrate the insights to be gained from computational modeling of these processes. 3 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Joule-Thomson inversion curves and related coefficients for several simple fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Peller, I. C.; Baron, A. K.

    1972-01-01

    The equations of state (PVT relations) for methane, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, neon, hydrogen, and helium were used to establish Joule-Thomson inversion curves for each fluid. The principle of corresponding states was applied to the inversion curves, and a generalized inversion curve for fluids with small acentric factors was developed. The quantum fluids (neon, hydrogen, and helium) were excluded from the generalization, but available data for the fluids xenon and krypton were included. The critical isenthalpic Joule-Thomson coefficient mu sub c was determined; and a simplified approximation mu sub c approximates T sub c divided by 6P sub c was found adequate, where T sub c and P sub c are the temperature and pressure at the thermodynamic critical point. The maximum inversion temperatures were obtained from the second virial coefficient (maximum (B/T)).

  13. Quantum Joule-Thomson effect in a saturated homogeneous Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Schmidutz, Tobias F; Gotlibovych, Igor; Gaunt, Alexander L; Smith, Robert P; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2014-01-31

    We study the thermodynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation in a weakly interacting quasihomogeneous atomic gas, prepared in an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for condensation and observe saturation of the thermal component in a partially condensed cloud, in agreement with Einstein's textbook picture of a purely statistical phase transition. Finally, we observe the quantum Joule-Thomson effect, namely isoenthalpic cooling of an (essentially) ideal gas. In our experiments this cooling occurs spontaneously, due to energy-independent collisions with the background gas in the vacuum chamber. We extract a Joule-Thomson coefficient μJT>10(9)  K/bar, about 10 orders of magnitude larger than observed in classical gases. PMID:24580421

  14. Acquisition and correlation of cryogenic nitrogen mass flow data through a multiple orifice Joule-Thomson device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. Stephen; Saiyed, Naseem H.; Nyland, Ted W.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen mass flow rate, pressure drop, and temperature drop data were obtained for a series of multiple orifice Joule-Thomson devices, known as Visco Jets, over a wide range of flow resistance. The test rig used to acquire the data was designed to minimize heat transfer so that fluid expansion through the Visco Jets would be isenthalpic. The data include a range of fluid inlet pressures from 30 to 60 psia, fluid inlet temperatures from 118 to 164 R, outlet pressures from 2.8 to 55.8 psia, outlet temperatures from 117 to 162 R and flow rate from 0.04 to 4.0 lbm/hr of nitrogen. A flow rate equation supplied by the manufacturer was found to accurately predict single-phase (noncavitating) liquid nitrogen flow through the Visco Jets. For cavitating flow, the manufacturer's equation was found to be inaccurate. Greatly improved results were achieved with a modified version of the single-phase equation. The modification consists of a multiplication factor to the manufacturer's equation equal to one minus the downstream quality on an isenthalpic expansion of the fluid across the Visco Jet. For a range of flow resistances represented by Visco Jet Lohm ratings between 17,600 and 80,000, 100 percent of the single-phase data and 85 percent of the two-phase data fall within + or - 10 percent of predicted values.

  15. Investigation of neon-nitrogen mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler operating below 70 K with precooling at 100 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jisung; Oh, Haejin; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-05-01

    There has been two-stage mixed refrigerant (MR) Joule-Thomson (JT) refrigeration cycle suggested for cooling high temperature superconductor (HTS) electric power cable below 70 K. As the continuation effort of realizing the actual system, we fabricated and tested a small scale neon and nitrogen MR JT cryocooler to investigate the refrigeration characteristics and performance. The compression system of the refrigeration circuit was accomplished by modifying commercially available air-conditioning rotary compressors. Compressors stably operated at the maximum compression ratio of 31 when the suction pressure was 77 kPa. The achieved lowest temperature was 63.6 K when the heating load was 35.9 W. The measured Carnot efficiency of the present system was 6.5% which was lower than that of the designed goal of 17.4%. The low efficiency of compressor (34.5%), and the pressure drop at the compressor suction were the main reasons for this efficiency degradation. The feasibility and usefulness of neon and nitrogen MR JT refrigeration cycle was validated that the achieved minimum temperature was 63.6 K even though the pressure after the expansion was maintained by 130 kPa. The comparison between the measurement and calculation showed that each stream temperature of refrigeration cycle were predictable within 3% error by Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS).

  16. Hampsons type cryocoolers with distributed Joule-Thomson effect for mixed refrigerants closed cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion

    2014-05-01

    Most previous studies on Joule-Thomson cryocoolers of mixed refrigerants in a closed cycle focus on the Linde kind recuperator. The present study focuses on four constructions of Hampsons kind miniature Joule-Thomson cryocoolers based on finned capillary tubes. The frictional pressure drop along the tubes plays the role of distributed Joule-Thomson expansion so that an additional orifice or any throttle at the cold end is eliminated. The high pressure tube is a throttle and a channel of recuperation at the same time. These coolers are tested within two closed cycle systems of different compressors and different compositions of mixed coolants. All tests were driven by the same level of discharge pressure (2.9 MPa) while the associated suction pressures and the associated reached temperatures are dependent on each particular cryocooler and on the closed cycle system. The mixture of higher specific cooling capacity cannot reach temperatures below 80 K when driven by the smaller compressor. The other mixture of lower specific cooling capacity driven by the larger compressor reaches lower temperatures. The examined parameters are the cooldown period and the reachable temperatures by each cryocooler.

  17. One-Joule-per-Pulse Q-Switched 2-micron Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Modlin, Ed A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Pual J.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    Q-switched output of 1.1 J per pulse at 2-micron wavelength has been achieved in a diode pumped Ho:Tm:LuLF laser using a side-pumped rod configuration in a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) architecture. This is the first time that a 2-micron laser has broken the Joule per pulse barrier for Q-switched operation. The total system efficiency reaches 5% and 6.2% for single and double pulse operation, respectively. The system produces excellent 1.4 times of transform limited beam quality.

  18. Development of a sorption-based Joule-Thomson cooler for the METIS instrument on E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Vermeer, C. H.; Holland, H. J.; Benthem, B.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    METIS, the Mid-infrared E-ELT Imager and Spectrograph, is one of the proposed instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) that will cover the thermal/mid-infrared wavelength range from 3-14 m. Its detectors and optics require cryogenic cooling at four temperature levels, 8 K for the N-band detectors, 25 K for the N-band imager, 40 K for the L/M-band detectors and 70 K for the optics. To provide cooling below 70 K, a vibration-free cooling technology based on sorption coolers is developed at the University of Twente in collaboration with Airbus Defence and Space Netherlands B.V. (former Dutch Space B.V.). We propose a sorption-based cooler with three cascaded Joule-Thomson (JT) coolers of which the sorption compressors are all heat sunk at the 70 K platform. A helium-operated cooler is used to obtain the 8 K level with a cooling power of 0.4 W. Here, three pre-cooling stages are used at 40 K, 25 K and 15 K. The latter two levels are provided by a hydrogen-based cooler, whereas the 40 K level is realized by a neon-based sorption cooler. To validate the designs, three demonstrators were built and tested: 1. Full-scale 8 K helium JT cold stage; 2. Scaled helium sorption compressor; 3. Scaled 40 K neon sorption JT cooler. In this paper, we present the design of these demos. We discuss the experiment results obtained so far, the lessons that were learned from these demos and the future development towards a real METIS cooler.

  19. Measurements of Plasma Density in a Fast and Compact Plasma Focus Operating at Hundreds of Joules

    SciTech Connect

    Pavez, Cristian; Silva, Patricio; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo

    2006-12-04

    It is known that there are plasma parameters that remain relatively constant for plasma focus facilities operating in a wide range of de energy, from 1kJ to 1MJ, such as: electron density, temperature and plasma energy density. Particularly the electron density is of the order of 1025m-3. Recently the experimental studies in plasma focus has been extended to devices operating under 1kJ, in the range of hundreds and tens of joules. In this work an optical refractive system was implemented in order to measure the electron density in a plasma focus devices of hundred of joules, PF-400J (880 nF, 30 kV, 120 kA, 400 J, 300 ns time to peak current, dI/dt{approx}4x1011 A/s. The plasma discharge was synchronized with a pulsed Nd-YAG laser ({approx}6ns FWHM at 532nm) in order to obtain optical diagnostics as interferometry and Schlieren. An electron density of (0.9{+-}0.25)x1025m-3 was obtained at the axis of the plasma column close to the pinch time. This value is of the same order that the obtained in devices oparating in the energy range of 1kJ to 1MJ.

  20. GEM-CEDAR Study of Ionospheric Energy Input and Joule Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastaetter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Shim, Jasoon

    2012-01-01

    We are studying ionospheric model performance for six events selected for the GEM-CEDAR modeling challenge. DMSP measurements of electric and magnetic fields are converted into Poynting Flux values that estimate the energy input into the ionosphere. Models generate rates of ionospheric Joule dissipation that are compared to the energy influx. Models include the ionosphere models CTIPe and Weimer and the ionospheric electrodynamic outputs of global magnetosphere models SWMF, LFM, and OpenGGCM. This study evaluates the model performance in terms of overall balance between energy influx and dissipation and tests the assumption that Joule dissipation occurs locally where electromagnetic energy flux enters the ionosphere. We present results in terms of skill scores now commonly used in metrics and validation studies and we can measure the agreement in terms of temporal and spatial distribution of dissipation (i.e, location of auroral activity) along passes of the DMSP satellite with the passes' proximity to the magnetic pole and solar wind activity level.

  1. Heterogeneous nanometer-scale Joule and Peltier effects in sub-25 nm thin phase change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Pop, Eric; King, William P.

    2014-09-01

    We measure heterogeneous power dissipation in phase change memory (PCM) films of 11 and 22 nm thin Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) by scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM), with sub-50 nm spatial and ˜0.2 K temperature resolution. The heterogeneous Joule and Peltier effects are explained using a finite element analysis (FEA) model with a mixture of hexagonal close-packed and face-centered cubic GST phases. Transfer length method measurements and effective media theory calculations yield the GST resistivity, GST-TiW contact resistivity, and crystal fraction of the GST films at different annealing temperatures. Further comparison of SJEM measurements and FEA modeling also predicts the thermopower of thin GST films. These measurements of nanometer-scale Joule, thermoelectric, and interface effects in PCM films could lead to energy-efficient designs of highly scaled PCM technology.

  2. Development of 1K-class Joule-Thomson cryocooler for next-generation astronomical mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoichi; Sawada, Kenichiro; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Nakagawa, Takao; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Ootsuka, Kiyomi; Narasaki, Katsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports on the development of a 1K-class Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler in Japan for application to upcoming next-generation astronomy missions. In this development, engineering models (EMs) were designed and manufactured for verification tests. The survival of the models in the mechanical and thermal vacuum environment tests of the JT compressors was proven to be possible with stable compression performance. In addition, the electromagnetic noise and disturbance force associated with the JT compressors were evaluated. Gas analysis showed that the estimated total amount of CO2 gas contaminant was less than the getter capacity for the required lifetime. A nominal cooling power of 10 mW at 1.7 K was verified using the EM test units.

  3. X-ray calibration facility for plasma diagnostics of the MégaJoule laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, S.; Prévot, V.

    2013-11-01

    The Laser MégaJoule (LMJ) located at CEA-CESTA will be equipped with x-ray plasma diagnostics using different kinds of x-ray components such as filters, mirrors, crystals, detectors and cameras. To guarantee LMJ measurements, detectors such as x-ray cameras need to be regularly calibrated. An x-ray laboratory is devoted to this task and performs absolute x-ray calibrations for similar x-ray cameras running on Laser Integration Line (LIL). This paper presents the x-ray calibration bench with its x-ray tube based High Energy x-ray Source (HEXS) and some calibration results. By mean of an ingenious transposition system under vacuum absolute x-ray calibration of x-ray cameras, like streak and stripline ones, can be carried out. Coupled to a new collimation system with micrometric accuracy on aperture sensitivity quantum efficiency measurements can be achieved with reduced uncertainties.

  4. 200 Hz repetition frequency joule-level high beam quality Nd:YAG nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jisi; Tang, Xiongxin; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Haocheng

    2016-06-01

    A joule-level Nd:YAG nanosecond laser of high repetition frequency and high beam quality is developed out. The laser is designed as a MOPA system mainly including single longitudinal mode seed, pre-amplifier unit an d power amplifier unit. In order to obtain the high-quality laser beam output, phase conjugation is adopted to compensate the laser beam distortion. Under the condition of 200 Hz high repetition frequency and 8.19 μJ single pulse energy injected by the single longitudinal mode seed, 1.53 J output energy is gained. The output laser beam is of 9 mm diameter, 7.41 ns pulse width, the far field beam spot 1.32 times the value of the diffraction limit, 1.2% energy stability (RMS) and less than 13 μrad far field beam spot angle shift.

  5. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect

    Trosseille, C. Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C.; Beck, T.; Gazave, J.

    2014-11-15

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  6. Numerical simulation of flare energy build-up and release via Joule dissipation. [solar MHD model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Bao, J. J.; Wang, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    A new numerical MHD model is developed to study the evolution of an active region due to photospheric converging motion, which leads to magnetic-energy buildup in the form of electric current. Because this new MHD model has incorporated finite conductivity, the energy conversion occurs from magnetic mode to thermal mode through Joule dissipation. In order to test the causality relationship between the occurrence of flare and photospheric motion, a multiple-pole configuration with neutral point is used. Using these results it is found that in addition to the converging motion, the initial magnetic-field configuration and the redistribution of the magnetic flux at photospheric level enhance the possibility for the development of a flare.

  7. Soft X-Ray Emission and Charged Particles Beams from a Plasma Focus of Hundreds Joules

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Patricio; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Arancibia, Jaime

    2006-12-04

    In a new stage of characterization of our plasma focus devices of hundred and tens of joules (PF-400J and PF-50J), preliminary series of measurements on soft X-ray and ion beams have been performed in the device PF-400J (176-539 J, 880 nF, T/4 {approx}300 ns). The device was operated in hydrogen to 7 mbar of pressure . The temporal and spatial X-ray characteristics are investigated by means filtered PIN diodes and a multipinhole camera. Graphite collectors, operating in the bias ion collector mode, are used to estimate the characteristic ion energy using the time flight across the probe array. The time of the ion beam emission to be correlated with plasma emission events associated with the soft X-ray pulses detected by the probes. Temporal correlations between soft X-ray signals and ion beams are performed.

  8. Investigation of two-phase heat transfer coefficients of argon-freon cryogenic mixed refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-11-01

    Mixed refrigerant Joule Thomson refrigerators are widely used in various kinds of cryogenic systems these days. Although heat transfer coefficient estimation for a multi-phase and multi-component fluid in the cryogenic temperature range is necessarily required in the heat exchanger design of mixed refrigerant Joule Thomson refrigerators, it has been rarely discussed so far. In this paper, condensation and evaporation heat transfer coefficients of argon-freon mixed refrigerant are measured in a microchannel heat exchanger. A Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) with 340 μm hydraulic diameter has been developed as a compact microchannel heat exchanger and utilized in the experiment. Several two-phase heat transfer coefficient correlations are examined to discuss the experimental measurement results. The result of this paper shows that cryogenic two-phase mixed refrigerant heat transfer coefficients can be estimated by conventional two-phase heat transfer coefficient correlations.

  9. Insights into heat transfer mechanisms of biased CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskanian, Norvik; Olsson, Eva; Cumings, John

    There has been considerable interest in studying carbon nanotubes for thermal management applications and as components of electronic devices. For typical conductors, the electrical current results in temperature increase, but for the case of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported on SiN membranes, it has been shown that the traditional joule heating mechanisms are supplemented by remote heating of the substrate. Using a thermal imaging technique based on Transmission Electron Microscopy, we demonstrate further evidence of this remote heating mechanism which suggests a non-equilibrium state between the electron temperature and phonon temperature of the CNT. We quantify the amount of remote heating as a ratio, β, between the power dissipation directly in the SiN divide by the total power applied. We find that initially β is high, but at higher applied voltage bias, β decreases, presumably because more hot electrons are available to scatter off carbon optical phonons, producing an increasing amount of traditional Joule heating.

  10. Fast Ignition Realization Experiment with High-Contrast Kilo-Joule Peta-Watt Laser ``LFEX'' and Strong External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    We report on progresses of the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) project that has been curried out at the Institute of Laser Engineering to assess the feasibility of high density core heating with a high-power, short-pulse laser including the construction of the Kilo-Joule, Petawatt class LFEX laser system. Our recent studies identify three scientific challenges to achieve high heating efficiency in the fast ignition (FI) scheme with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser systems: (i) control of energy distribution of relativistic electron beam (REB), (ii) guiding and focusing of REB to a fuel core, and (iii) formation of a high areal-density core. The control of the electron energy distribution has been experimentally confirmed by improving the intensity contrast of the LFEX laser up to >109 and an ultra-high contrast of 1011 with a plasma mirror. After the contrast improvement, 50% of the total REB energy is carried by a low energy component of the REB, which slope temperature is close to the ponderomotive scaling value (~ 1 MeV). To guide the electron beam, we apply strong external magnetic field to the REB transport region. Guiding of the REB by 0.6 kT field in a planar geometry has already been demonstrated at LULI 2000 laser facility in a collaborative experiment lead by CELIA-Univ. Bordeaux. Considering more realistic FI scenario, we have performed a similar experiment using the Kilo-Joule LFEX laser to study the effect of guiding and magnetic mirror on the electron beam. A high density core of a laser-imploded 200 μm-diameter solid CD ball was radiographed with picosecond LFEX-produced K-alpha backlighter. Comparisons of the experimental results and integrated simulations using hydrodynamic and electron transport codes suggest that 10% of the efficiency can be achievable with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser system with the success of the above challenges. This work is supported by NIFS (Japan), MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI (Japan), JSPS Fellowship (Japan), ANR (France) and COST (Europe).

  11. Two-Phase Cryogenic Heat Exchanger for the Thermodynamic Vent System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A two-phase cryogenic heat exchanger for a thermodynamic vent system was designed and analyzed, and the predicted performance was compared with test results. A method for determining the required size of the Joule-Thomson device was also developed. Numerous sensitivity studies were performed to show that the design was robust and possessed a comfortable capacity margin. The comparison with the test results showed very similar heat extraction performance for similar inlet conditions. It was also shown that estimates for Joule- Thomson device flow rates and exit quality can vary significantly and these need to be accommodated for with a robust system design.

  12. A cryogenic heat exchanger with bypass and throttling and its thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Liu, D. L.; Wang, L. Y.; Shen, J.; Gan, Z. H.

    2015-12-01

    A precooled Joule-Thomson (J-T) cooler refrigerates at liquid helium temperature. Its third stage heat exchanger works below 20 K. Hot fluid cannot be sufficiently cooled due to nonidealism of the heat exchanger and helium-4 properties. In a J-T cycle of low pressure ratio, the heat exchanger with bypass and throttling improves the refrigeration capacity. Bypass and throttling reduces the temperature difference and entropy generation within the heat exchanger.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Phenomena and Heat Transfer Near a Rotating Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, V. D.; Potanin, E. P.

    2015-11-01

    We propose an approach that permits constructing an analytical solution of the problem of flow and heat transfer in a viscous compressible conducting medium near an infinite dielectric disk rotating in a homogeneous magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the process of heat transfer near the disk surface has been investigated. It has been shown that Joule energy dissipation prevails over viscous dissipation at moderate magnetic fields.

  14. Visco Jet Joule-Thomson Device Characterization Tests in Liquid Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) devices have been identified as critical components for Thermodynamic Vent Systems (TVS) planned for future space exploration missions. Lee Visco Jets (The Lee Company) (Ref. 4) are one type of J-T device that may be used for LCH4 propellant systems. Visco Jets have been previously tested and characterized in LN2 and LH2 (Refs. 6 and 7), but have not been characterized in LOX or LCH4. Previous Visco Jet tests with LH2 resulted in clogging of the Visco Jet orifice under certain conditions. It has been postulated that this clogging was due to the presence of neon impurities in the LH2 that solidified in the orifices. Visco Jets therefore require testing in LCH4 to verify that they will not clog under normal operating conditions. This report describes a series of tests that were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to determine if Visco Jets would clog under normal operating conditions with LCH4 propellant. Test results from this program indicate that no decrease in flow rate was observed for the Visco Jets tested, and that current equation used for predicting flow rate appears to under-predict actual flow at high Lohm ratings.

  15. Statistical spatio-temporal properties of the Laser MegaJoule speckle

    SciTech Connect

    Le Cain, A.; Sajer, J. M.; Riazuelo, G.

    2012-10-15

    This paper investigates a statistical model to describe the spatial and temporal properties of hot spots generated by the superimposition of multiple laser beams. In the context of the Laser MegaJoule design, we introduce the formula for contrasts, trajectories and velocities of the speckle pattern. Single bundle of four beams, two-cones and three-cones configurations are considered. Statistical properties of the speckle in the zone where all the beams overlap are studied with different configurations of polarizations. These properties are shown to be very different from the case of one single bundle of four beams. The configuration of polarization has only a slight effect in the two-cones or three cones configuration. Indeed, the impact of the double polarization smoothing is reduced in the area in which all the beams overlap, while it is much more significant when they split. Moreover, the size of the hot-spots decreases as the number of laser beams increases, but we show that their velocity decreases. As a matter of fact, the maximal velocity of hot spots is found to be only about 10{sup -5} of the velocity of light and the integrated contrast is about 15% when the beams overlap.

  16. Numerical analysis of the direct drive illumination uniformity for the Laser MegaJoule facility

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2014-01-15

    The illumination uniformity provided during the initial imprinting phase of the laser foot pulse in a direct drive scenario at the Laser MegaJoule facility has been analyzed. This study analyzes the quality of the illumination of a spherical capsule and concerns the uniformity of the first shock generate in the absorber of an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule. Four configurations making use of all or some of the 80 laser beams organized in the 20 quads of the cones at 49° and 131° with respect to the polar axis have been considered in order to assemble the foot pulse. Elliptical and circular super-gaussian laser intensity profiles taking into account beam-to-beam power imbalance (10%), pointing error (50 μm), and target positioning (20 μm) have been considered. It has been found that the use of the Polar Direct Drive technique can in some cases reduce the irradiation non-uniformity by a factor as high as 50%. In all cases, elliptical profile provides better results in comparison with the circular one and it is shown that the minimum of the non-uniformity is also a function of the capsule radius.

  17. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  18. Preliminary Studies of Ions Emission in a Small Plasma Focus Device of Hundreds of Joules

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Jose; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo; Tarifeno, Ariel; Reymond, Piotr; Verschueren, Nicolas; Ariza, Pablo

    2009-01-21

    Ion beam emission in plasma focus (PF) discharges was originally investigated to explain the strong forward anisotropy observed in the neutron. Several properties of PF emitted deuteron beams have been measured, including their angular distributions and energy spectra in devices operating with energies from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. At present there is a growing interest in the development of very small PF devices operating under 1 kJ. As part of the characterization program of the very low energy PF devices (<1 kJ) developed at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, the charges particle emission in hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and mixture (H{sub 2}+%Ar) are being studied. In order to obtain an estimation of the ions energy spectrum and ionization grade, by using time of flight method, a graphite collector system operating in the bias ion collector mode was constructed and it is being used. Preliminary results of the ion beams measurements in different experimental conditions, at a plasma focus device of 400 joules (PF-400 J) are presented.

  19. Transient simulation of a miniature Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocooler with and without the distributed J-T effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, R. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a transient program for the simulation of a miniature Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocooler to predict its cool-down characteristics. A one dimensional transient model is formulated for the fluid streams and the solid elements of the recuperative heat exchanger. Variation of physical properties due to pressure and temperature is considered. In addition to the J-T expansion at the end of the finned tube, the distributed J-T effect along its length is also considered. It is observed that the distributed J-T effect leads to additional cooling of the gas in the finned tube and that it cannot be neglected when the pressure drop along the length of the finned tube is large. The mathematical model, method of resolution and the global transient algorithm, within a modular object-oriented framework, are detailed in this paper. As a part of verification and validation of the developed model, cases available in the literature are simulated and the results are compared with the corresponding numerical and experimental data.

  20. X-ray characterization of high energy density plasmas produced in mega-joule laser experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2010-03-01

    With completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory the quest for producing a burning fusion plasma has begun. The goal of these experiments is to compress matter to densities and temperatures higher than the interior of the sun to initiate nuclear fusion and burn of hydrogen isotopes. In the first indirect-drive hohlraum experiments on NIF, we have demonstrated symmetric capsule implosions at unprecedented conditions of mega-joule laser energies. 192 simultaneously fired laser beams heat ignition hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 3.3 million Kelvin compressing 2-millimeter capsules by the soft x rays produced inside the hohlraum. In these experiments, symmetry and velocity of the implosion are measured by imaging the 9 keV capsule x-ray emission on a temporally resolving 2-D detector. In addition, x-ray radiography and scattering techniques are being developed for measuring the density and temperature of the implosion. The experiments indicate conditions suitable for compressing deuterium-tritium filled capsules with the goal to produce burning fusion plasmas in the laboratory.

  1. FY 2009 Annual Report of Joule Software Metric SC GG 3.1/2.5.2, Improve Computational Science Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Douglas B; Roche, Kenneth J; Kendall, Ricky A

    2010-01-01

    The Joule Software Metric for Computational Effectiveness is established by Public Authorizations PL 95-91, Department of Energy Organization Act, and PL 103-62, Government Performance and Results Act. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversees the preparation and administration of the President s budget; evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs, policies, and procedures; assesses competing funding demands across agencies; and sets the funding priorities for the federal government. The OMB has the power of audit and exercises this right annually for each federal agency. According to the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), federal agencies are required to develop three planning and performance documents: 1.Strategic Plan: a broad, 3 year outlook; 2.Annual Performance Plan: a focused, 1 year outlook of annual goals and objectives that is reflected in the annual budget request (What results can the agency deliver as part of its public funding?); and 3.Performance and Accountability Report: an annual report that details the previous fiscal year performance (What results did the agency produce in return for its public funding?). OMB uses its Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) to perform evaluations. PART has seven worksheets for seven types of agency functions. The function of Research and Development (R&D) programs is included. R&D programs are assessed on the following criteria: Does the R&D program perform a clear role? Has the program set valid long term and annual goals? Is the program well managed? Is the program achieving the results set forth in its GPRA documents? In Fiscal Year (FY) 2003, the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE SC-1) worked directly with OMB to come to a consensus on an appropriate set of performance measures consistent with PART requirements. The scientific performance expectations of these requirements reach the scope of work conducted at the DOE national laboratories. The Joule system emerged from this interaction. Joule enables the chief financial officer and senior DOE management to track annual performance on a quarterly basis. Joule scores are reported as success, goal met (green light in PART), mixed results, goal partially met (yellow light in PART), and unsatisfactory, goal not met (red light in PART). Joule links the DOE strategic plan to the underlying base program targets.

  2. An Essential Mechanism of Heat Dissipation in Nanocarbon Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.; Petrov, Alexey G.

    2013-03-01

    Nanocarbon materials were proposed and have been already used for fabricating electronic devices. These nanocarbon devices are not unlike other semiconductor devices and are subject to Joule losses. However the physics of heat dissipation in those materials is unlike the classical thermal physics. This talk focuses on near-field radiative heat dissipation mechanism in nanocarbon materials, the associated component of the heat transport across the interface with the substrate and remote Joule losses. Analytical theory was derived which allows one to trace the origin of anomalously large strength of the effect and predict dependence on the materials parameters. It was predicted to be very substantial and for certain surface morphology dominate over other mechanisms, as it was recently shown experimentally. SVR acknowledges support by DoD (AFOSR FA9550-11-1-0185).

  3. Heat transfer in GTA welding arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huft, Nathan J.

    Heat transfer characteristics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) arcs with arc currents of 50 to 125 A and arc lengths of 3 to 11 mm were measured experimentally through wet calorimetry. The data collected were used to calculate how much heat reported to the cathode and anode and how much was lost from the arc column. A Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) macro was written to further analyze the data and account for Joule heating within the electrodes and radiation and convection losses from the arc, providing a detailed account of how heat was generated and dissipated within the system. These values were then used to calculate arc efficiencies, arc column voltages, and anode and cathode fall voltages. Trends were noted for variances in the arc column voltage, power dissipated from the arc column, and the total power dissipated by the system with changing arc length. Trends for variances in the anode and cathode fall voltages, total power dissipated, Joule heating within the torches and electrodes with changing arc current were also noted. In addition, the power distribution between the anode and cathode for each combination of arc length and arc current was examined. Keywords: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, GTAW, anode fall, cathode fall, heat transfer, wet calorimetry

  4. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  5. Investigating the performance of simplified neutral-ion collisional heating rate in a global IT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    The Joule heating rate has usually been used as an approximate form of the neutral-ion collisional heating rate in the thermospheric energy equation in global thermosphere-ionosphere models. This means that the energy coupling has ignored the energy gained by the ions from collisions with electrons. It was found that the globally averaged thermospheric temperature (Tn) was underestimated in simulations using the Joule heating rate, by about 11% when F10.7=110 solar flux unit (sfu, 1 sfu = 10-22 W m-2 Hz-1) in a quiet geomagnetic condition. The underestimation of Tn was higher at low latitudes than high latitudes, and higher at F region altitudes than at E region altitudes. It was found that adding additional neutral photoelectron heating in a global IT model compensated for the underestimation of Tn using the Joule heating approximation. Adding direct photoelectron heating to the neutrals compensated for the indirect path for the energy that flows from the electrons to the ions then to the neutrals naturally and therefore was an adequate compensation over the dayside. There was a slight dependence of the underestimation of Tn on F10.7, such that larger activity levels resulted in a need for more compensation in direct photoelectron heating to the neutrals to make up for the neglected indirect heating through ions and electrons.

  6. Tension responses to joule temperature jump in skinned rabbit muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K

    1992-02-01

    1. Joule temperature jumps (T-jumps) from 5-9 degrees C up to 40 degrees C were used to study the cross-bridge kinetics and thermodynamics in skinned rabbit muscle fibres. To produce a T-jump, an alternating current pulse was passed through a fibre 5 s after removing the activating solution (pCa congruent to 4.5) from the experimental trough. The pulse frequency was congruent to 30 kHz, amplitude less than or equal to 3 kV, and duration 0.2 ms. The pulse energy liberated in the fibre was calculated using a special analog circuit and then used for estimation of the T-jump amplitude. 2. The T-jump induced a tri-exponential tension transient. Phases 1 and 2 had rate constants k1 = 450-1750 s-1 and k2 = 60-250 s-1 respectively, characterizing the tension rise, whereas phase 3 had a rate constant k3 = 5-10 s-1 representing tension recovery due to the fibre cooling. 3. An increase from 13 to 40 degrees C for the final temperature achieved by the T-jump led to an increase in the amplitudes of phases 1 and 2. After T-jumps to 30-40 degrees C during phase 1, tension increased by 50-80%. During phase 2 an approximately 2-fold tension increase continued. Rate constants k1 and k2 increased with temperature and temperature coefficients (Q10) were 1.6 and 1.7, respectively. 4. To study which processes in the cross-bridges are involved in phases 1 and 2, a series of experiments were made where step length changes of -9 to +3 nm (hs)-1 (nanometres per half-sarcomere length) were applied to the fibre 4 ms before the T-jump. 5. After the step shortening, the rate constant of phase 1 increased, whereas its amplitude decreased compared to those without a length change. This indicates that phase 1 is determined by some force-generating process in the cross-bridges attached to the thin filaments. This process is, most probably, the same as that producing the early tension recovery following the length change. The enthalpy change (delta H) associated with the reaction controlling this process was estimated to be positive (15-30 kJ mol-1). 6. Both the rate constant k2 and the maximal tension achieved at the end of phase 2 were practically independent of the preceding length changes. This means that phase 2 is accompanied by the cross-bridge detachment and reattachment to new sites on the thin filaments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1593453

  7. Tension responses to joule temperature jump in skinned rabbit muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K

    1992-01-01

    1. Joule temperature jumps (T-jumps) from 5-9 degrees C up to 40 degrees C were used to study the cross-bridge kinetics and thermodynamics in skinned rabbit muscle fibres. To produce a T-jump, an alternating current pulse was passed through a fibre 5 s after removing the activating solution (pCa congruent to 4.5) from the experimental trough. The pulse frequency was congruent to 30 kHz, amplitude less than or equal to 3 kV, and duration 0.2 ms. The pulse energy liberated in the fibre was calculated using a special analog circuit and then used for estimation of the T-jump amplitude. 2. The T-jump induced a tri-exponential tension transient. Phases 1 and 2 had rate constants k1 = 450-1750 s-1 and k2 = 60-250 s-1 respectively, characterizing the tension rise, whereas phase 3 had a rate constant k3 = 5-10 s-1 representing tension recovery due to the fibre cooling. 3. An increase from 13 to 40 degrees C for the final temperature achieved by the T-jump led to an increase in the amplitudes of phases 1 and 2. After T-jumps to 30-40 degrees C during phase 1, tension increased by 50-80%. During phase 2 an approximately 2-fold tension increase continued. Rate constants k1 and k2 increased with temperature and temperature coefficients (Q10) were 1.6 and 1.7, respectively. 4. To study which processes in the cross-bridges are involved in phases 1 and 2, a series of experiments were made where step length changes of -9 to +3 nm (hs)-1 (nanometres per half-sarcomere length) were applied to the fibre 4 ms before the T-jump. 5. After the step shortening, the rate constant of phase 1 increased, whereas its amplitude decreased compared to those without a length change. This indicates that phase 1 is determined by some force-generating process in the cross-bridges attached to the thin filaments. This process is, most probably, the same as that producing the early tension recovery following the length change. The enthalpy change (delta H) associated with the reaction controlling this process was estimated to be positive (15-30 kJ mol-1). 6. Both the rate constant k2 and the maximal tension achieved at the end of phase 2 were practically independent of the preceding length changes. This means that phase 2 is accompanied by the cross-bridge detachment and reattachment to new sites on the thin filaments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 9 PMID:1593453

  8. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Analysis and finite element simulation of electromagnetic heating in the nitride MOCVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Ming; Hao, Yue; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Xu, Sheng-Rui; Ni, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Xiao-Wei

    2009-11-01

    Electromagnetic field distribution in the vertical metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) reactor is simulated by using the finite element method (FEM). The effects of alternating current frequency, intensity, coil turn number and the distance between the coil turns on the distribution of the Joule heat are analysed separately, and their relations to the value of Joule heat are also investigated. The temperature distribution on the susceptor is also obtained. It is observed that the results of the simulation are in good agreement with previous measurements.

  9. Radiatively heated high voltage pyroelectric crystal pulser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolak, A. J.; Chen, A. X.; Leung, K.-N.; Morse, D. H.; Raber, T. N.

    2014-01-01

    Thin lithium tantalate pyroelectric crystals in a multi-stage pulser were heated by quartz lamps during their charging phase to generate high voltage pulses. The charging voltage was determined empirically based on the measured breakdown voltage in air and verified by the induced breakdown voltage of an external high voltage power supply. A four-stage pyroelectric crystal device generated pulse discharges of up to 86 kV using both quartz lamps (radiative) and thermoelectric (conductive) heating. Approximately 50 mJ of electrical energy was harvested from the crystals when radiatively heated in air, and up to 720 mJ was produced when the crystals were submerged in a dielectric fluid. It is anticipated that joule-level pulse discharges could be obtained by employing additional stages and optimizing the heating configuration.

  10. Mechanisms of heat transport across a nano-scale gap in heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares different mechanisms of heat transport across nano-scale gaps and discusses the role of electromagnetic phenomena in heat transport in general nano-scale layered structures. The results of the analysis suggest that heat transfer across sub-5 nm gaps like that appearing in prototypes of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) systems is dominated by direct intermolecular interactions between the separated bodies and is little affected by electromagnetic radiation. The analysis further suggests that local heating for HAMR with sub-5 nm spacing can be more efficiently achieved by a Joule heater that is simpler to fabricate than laser-based optical systems and is less destructive for the nano-scale transducers than laser radiation, which may lead to their structural damage and short duration life of nanoscale transducers.

  11. Analytical solution for Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 geo-sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, S.A.; Gluyas, J.G.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2010-05-21

    Mathematical tools are needed to screen out sites where Joule-Thomson cooling is a prohibitive factor for CO{sub 2} geo-sequestration and to design approaches to mitigate the effect. In this paper, a simple analytical solution is developed by invoking steady-state flow and constant thermophysical properties. The analytical solution allows fast evaluation of spatiotemporal temperature fields, resulting from constant-rate CO{sub 2} injection. The applicability of the analytical solution is demonstrated by comparison with non-isothermal simulation results from the reservoir simulator TOUGH2. Analysis confirms that for an injection rate of 3 kg s{sup -1} (0.1 MT yr{sup -1}) into moderately warm (>40 C) and permeable formations (>10{sup -14} m{sup 2} (10 mD)), JTC is unlikely to be a problem for initial reservoir pressures as low as 2 MPa (290 psi).

  12. RLCYC 75?:?a 2 kW electrically calibrated laser calorimeter designed for Laser MegaJoule diagnostics calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespy, C.; Villate, D.; Soscia, M.; Coste, F.; Andre, R.

    2013-02-01

    RLCYC 75 is a new electrically calibrated laser calorimeter specially manufactured by Laser Metrology to calibrate energy diagnostics within the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility. It consists of an optical cavity cooled by a hydraulic system. The system is designed to provide 1 m wavelength power laser measurements with uncertainty less than 1% at 2 kW and traceability to the International System of Units (SI). In this paper, the accuracy of RLCYC 75 measurements is studied. More precisely, three points are detailed: instrumentation uncertainty estimation, equivalence between optical and electrical supply and light absorption. To this end, electrical calibration campaigns and power laser measurement campaigns are conducted. Moreover, thermal and optical models are developed. Results show that RLCYC 75 design and instrumentation are efficient enough to reach the goal of relative uncertainty of about 1% at 2 kW. RLCYC 75 will become the 2 kW laser power primary standard for LMJ applications.

  13. Scaling, stability, and fusion mechanisms. Studies using plasma focus devices from tens of kilojoules to tenth of joules

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Cardenas, Miguel; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2009-01-21

    Fusion studies using plasma focus devices from tens of kilojoules to less than one joule performed at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission are presented. The similarity of the physical behavior and the scaling observed in these machines are emphasized. Experiments on actual devices show that scaling holds at least through six order of magnitude. In particular all of these devices, from the largest to the smallest, keep the same quantity of energy per particle. Therefore, fusion reactions are possible to be obtained in ultraminiature devices (driven by generators of 0.1 J), as they are in the bigger devices (driven by generators of 1 MJ). However, the stability of the plasma depends on the size and energy of the device.

  14. Technology, applications and modelling of ohmic heating: a review.

    PubMed

    Varghese, K Shiby; Pandey, M C; Radhakrishna, K; Bawa, A S

    2014-10-01

    Ohmic heating or Joule heating has immense potential for achieving rapid and uniform heating in foods, providing microbiologically safe and high quality foods. This review discusses the technology behind ohmic heating, the current applications and thermal modeling of the process. The success of ohmic heating depends on the rate of heat generation in the system, the electrical conductivity of the food, electrical field strength, residence time and the method by which the food flows through the system. Ohmic heating is appropriate for processing of particulate and protein rich foods. A vast amount of work is still necessary to understand food properties in order to refine system design and maximize performance of this technology in the field of packaged foods and space food product development. Various economic studies will also play an important role in understanding the overall cost and viability of commercial application of this technology in food processing. Some of the demerits of the technology are also discussed. PMID:25328171

  15. Ionospheric heating with oblique HF waves

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.C.; Bloom, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents calculations of ionospheric electron density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produced by intense oblique high-frequency (HF) transmitters. Our analysis takes into account radio field focusing at caustics, the consequent joule-heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes--these being the effects of a powerful oblique modifying, wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. We then seek effects on a secondary 'test wave that is propagated along the same path as the first. Our calculations predict ground-level field-strength reductions of several dB in the test wave for modifying waves having ERP in the 85-to-90 dBW range. These field-strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. Our results are sensitive to the the model ionosphere assumed, so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An effective power of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, results in substantial rather than small signal changes. Our conclusions are based solely on joule-heating and subsequent defocusing of waves passing through caustic regions.

  16. Ionospheric heating with oblique HF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Edward C., Jr.; Bloom, Ron M.

    1990-10-01

    Calculations of ionospheric electron density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produce by intense oblique high frequency (HF) transmitters are presented. This analysis considers radio field focusing at caustics, the consequent joule-heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes: these being the effects of a powerful oblique 'modifying' wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. Then effects on a secondary 'test' wave that is propagated along the same path as the first are investigated. Calculations predict ground-level field-strength reductions of several dB in the test wave for modifying waves having ERP in the 85 to 90 dBW range. These field-strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. The results are sensitive to the model ionosphere assumed, so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An effective power of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, results in substantial rather than small signal changes. The conclusions are based solely on joule-heating and subsequent defocusing of waves passing through caustic regions.

  17. Application of OEDGE to Transport Coefficient Extraction in DIII-D Joule Milestone Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, J. D.; Stangeby, P. C.; Lasnier, C. J.; Makowski, M. A.; Boedo, J. A.; Brooks, N. H.; Leonard, A. W.; Watkins, J. G.

    2010-11-01

    The OEDGE modeling code is used to extract estimates of radial transport coefficients from a series of DIII-D experiments designed to assess the divertor heat flux dependence on operational parameters. OEDGE is being used to analyse five ELMy H-mode discharges in which the plasma current was varied from 0.5 MA to 1.48 MA while other parameters were held constant. Estimates of the effective experimental χ and D in the outer SOL for these discharges are determined. This process requires using experimental diagnostic data and onion-skin models (OSM) to reconstruct a plasma solution. Langmuir probe measurements of ne and Te and infrared measurements of target heat flux were used to determine input profiles of ne, Te and Ti to be used in the plasma reconstruction. At the 5 mm outer midplane surface, typical extracted D values are 0.05 m^2/s while χ is 0.15 m^2/s. All discharges showed an increase of extracted χ with radius.

  18. Time-resolved study of the extreme-ultraviolet emission and plasma dynamics of a sub-Joule, fast capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we discuss experimental observations on the dynamics of a fast, low energy capillary discharge when operated in argon and its properties as an intense source of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. The discharge pre-ionization and self-triggering were accomplished by the use of the hollow cathode effect. This allowed a compact size and low inductance discharge with multi-kA current level and a quarter-period of 10 ns at sub-Joule energy level. We used the novel moir and schlieren diagnostics with a 12 ps laser to obtain the time evolution of the line electron density and to study the plasma dynamics. EUV spectroscopy and filtered diodes were also implemented to estimate the plasma temperature and density throughout the evolution of the discharge. EUV source size was measured by using a filtered slit-wire camera. We observed that EUV emission starts from a compressed plasma on axis during the second quarter-period of the current and continues until the fifth quarter-period. Ionization levels from Ar VII to X were observed. By comparing the EUV emission spectra with synthetic spectra, we found that at the onset of emission (7 ns), the plasma is well fitted by a single Maxwellian electron distribution function with Te 12 eV and ne 1017 cm-3. Close to peak emission (13 ns), plasma temperature and density increase to 20 eV and ne 1018 cm-3, respectively. However, in order to successfully match the experimental data, a two component electron distribution function was necessary. Later in time, a smaller fraction in the high energy component and higher temperature suggests homogenization of the plasma. The moir and schlieren diagnostics showed multiple radial compression-waves merging on axis throughout the discharge; they are an important heating mechanism that leads to a period of severe turbulence at peak EUV emission. It was also observed that emission ceases when the axial maximum of the electron density collapses.

  19. Energy and Exergy Analysis of an Annular Thermoelectric Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, S. C.; Manikandan, S.; Hans, Ranjana

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the concept of an annular thermoelectric heat pump (ATEHP) has been introduced. An exoreversible thermodynamic model of the ATEHP considering the Thomson effect in conjunction with Peltier, Joule and Fourier heat conduction has been investigated using exergy analysis. New expressions for dimensionless heating power, optimum current at the maximum energy, exergy efficiency conditions and dimensionless irreversibilities in the ATEHP are derived. The results show that the heating power, energy and exergy efficiency of the ATEHP are lower than the flat-plate thermoelectric heat pump. The effects of annular shape parameter (S r = r 2 /r 1), dimensionless temperature ratio (θ = T h /T c) and the electrical contact resistances on the heating power, energy/exergy efficiency of an ATEHP have been studied. This study will help in the designing of actual ATEHP systems.

  20. An Application of Space-Based Gas Mixtures for Joule-Thompson Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, V. T.; Yevdokimova, O. V.; Lobko, M. P.; Yakuba, V. V.

    An extension of deepspace research, specifically, the work done on Alpha program, will inevitably require new and different cryostating systems. The primary differences will be in the areas of cooling power and temperature. One variant which can be used with J-T cryocoolers is the application of diverse gas mixtures which can work over a large temperature range. We have found that the J-T cycle is an efficient application of mixed gas working fluids, being very similar to a vapor-compression cycle utilized in household refrigerants. The simplicity and viability of a J-T design and the associated minimal heat losses compensate for theoretical efficiency ratio of Stirling-type machines. Simultaneously, the J-T machines are never restricted in terms of output power and contain no moving parts in the cold zone resulting in minimal vibration during operation. The effective cooling of these systems allows parallel cooling of multiple objects. Finally in long-life system designs these cryocooler systems are feasibly coupled with phase-transition thermal storage accumulators. The application of such J-T systems is especially efficient under space conditions, due to the fact that there is an option to use at low temperatures a radiation release unit for the outlet of compression heat and for preliminary cooling of the system. This is not possible for terrestrial applications. Particularly, obtaining the -10 to 100 (C temperature range is feasible through the use of low As/(( - coefficient coatings; shade screens; or radiator unit orientations. Computational and experimental research has provided us high efficiency gas-mixture J-T cryocooler results between 60 to 100K cooling temperatures. We have actual space systems which were tested and operated for 80-90 K with efficiencies of 20 to 25 W/W. The authors of this research have studied various gas mixtures as candidates for use with simple J-T single contour J-T systems. We have seen resultant reduction of energy consumption by 2-3 times and decreases in temperatures from the 30-60( C range to -10 to 10( C range. We have also seen a dramatic reduction in the working pressure and the P/P pressure ratios within the cycle. We have gradually evolved into the application of simpler and more reliable working mixtures and employed more reliable single-stage compressors. In addition, the use of J-T contour gas mixtures for pre-cooling down to 35-40 K temperatures results in higher efficiency 2-stage J-T cryocoolers with similar overall results to the single stage systems.

  1. Micro-joule pico-second range Yb3+-doped fibre laser for medical applications in acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.; Rivera-Manrique, S. I.; Jacques, S. L.

    2011-08-01

    The work described here is based on the optical design, simulation and on-going implementation of a pulsed (Q-switch) Yb3+-doped, 1-um diffraction-limited fibre laser with pico-second, 10 micro-Joule-range energy pulses for producing the right energy pulses which could be of benefit for patients who suffer chronic headache, photophobia, and even nausea which could is sometimes triggered by a series of factors. The specific therapeutic effect known as acupunctural analgesia is the main objective of this medium-term project. It is a simple design on which commercially available software was employed for laser cavity design. Monte Carlo technique for skin light-transport, thermal diffusion and the possible thermal de-naturalization optical study and prediction will also be included in the presentation. Full optical characterization will be included and a complete set of recent results on the laser-skin interaction and the so called moxi-bustion from the laser design will be extensively described.

  2. Study of organic contamination induced by outgassing materials. Application to the Laser MégaJoule optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrat, O.; Mangote, B.; Tovena-Pécault, I.; Néauport, J.

    2014-02-01

    Organic contamination may decrease the targeted performances of coated surfaces. To study the contamination induced by surrounding materials, a method using a thermal extractor is presented in the first part of this work. Besides its normal operation (analyses of outgassing compounds from a material), this device is used in an original way to contaminate and decontaminate samples. Efficiency of contamination and decontamination protocols are assessed by automated thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and by secondary ion mass spectrometry coupled with a time of flight mass analyzer. This enables to study the contamination induced by a bulk material outgassing and to take in consideration the possible competition between outgassed species. This method is then applied to investigate contamination of Laser MégaJoule sol-gel coated optics by a retractable sheath. The impact of the temperature on the outgassing of the sheath has been highlighted. Increasing temperature from 30 to 50 °C enables the outgassing of organophosphorous compounds and increases the outgassing of oxygenated compounds and phthalates. Chemical analyses of contaminated optics have highlighted affinities between the sol-gel coating and phthalates and organophosphorous, and low affinities with aromatics and terpens. Finally, samples with increasing levels of contamination have been realized. However a saturation phenomenon is observed at 90 ng cm-2.

  3. X-ray characterization of a hundred joules plasma focus to study its effects on cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Jalaj; Moreno, Jose; Avaria, Gonzalo; Pavez, Cristian; Bora, Biswajit; Inestrosa-Izurieta, Maria Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Diez, Daniela; Alvarez, Oscar; Tapia, Julio; Marcelain, Katherine; Armisen, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    With the aim to study the effects of pulsed x-rays radiation on biological cells, in particular cancer cells, the total doses of x-ray pulses and the temporal duration of the pulse has been characterized in a hundred joules plasma focus device (PF-400 J, 130 kA achieved in 300 ns). TLD dosimeters were located outside of the discharge chamber, at 96 mm from the anode top. In addition, two photomultipliers with plastic scintillator were located in axial and radial directions. Several sequences of accumulative shots were obtained (260, 380, 980 shots). From the statistical analysis of the TLD and photomultiplier signals was possible to estimate that a single shot have a total dose in the order of 30 +/- 15 micro Sv with a duration of the order of 12 +/- 3.6 ns at FWHM. Preliminary experiments using MCF7, a breast cancer cell line, were performed. Cells were irradiated at 96 mm from the anode top with 260, 380 and 980 cumulative x-ray shots and cell survival was evaluated at 24, 48 and 72 hours later. The effects are compared with cells irradiated by a continuous x-ray source. Supported by CONICYT Grant ACT-1115.

  4. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  5. Aerothermal Heating Predictions for Mars Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; DiFulvio, M.; Horvath, T. J.; Braun, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    A combination of computational predictions and experimental measurements of the aerothermal heating expected on the two Mars Microprobes during their entry to Mars are presented. The maximum, non-ablating, heating rate at the vehicle's stagnation point (at alpha = 0 degrees) is predicted for an undershoot trajectory to be 194 Watts per square centimeters with associated stagnation point pressure of 0.064 atm. Maximum stagnation point pressure occurs later during the undershoot trajectory and is 0.094 atm. From computations at seven overshoot-trajectory points, the maximum heat load expected at the stagnation point is near 8800 Joules per square centimeter. Heat rates and heat loads on the vehicle's afterbody are much lower than the forebody. At zero degree angle-of-attack, heating over much of the hemi-spherical afterbody is predicted to be less than 2 percent of the stagnation point value. Good qualitative agreement is demonstrated for forebody and afterbody heating between CFD calculations at Mars entry conditions and experimental thermographic phosphor measurements from the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. A novel approach which incorporates six degree-of-freedom trajectory simulations to perform a statistical estimate of the effect of angle-of-attack, and other off-nominal conditions, on heating is included.

  6. A single-atom heat engine.

    PubMed

    Roßnagel, Johannes; Dawkins, Samuel T; Tolazzi, Karl N; Abah, Obinna; Lutz, Eric; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Singer, Kilian

    2016-04-15

    Heat engines convert thermal energy into mechanical work and generally involve a large number of particles. We report the experimental realization of a single-atom heat engine. An ion is confined in a linear Paul trap with tapered geometry and driven thermally by coupling it alternately to hot and cold reservoirs. The output power of the engine is used to drive a harmonic oscillation. From direct measurements of the ion dynamics, we were able to determine the thermodynamic cycles for various temperature differences of the reservoirs. We then used these cycles to evaluate the power P and efficiency η of the engine, obtaining values up to P = 3.4 × 10(-22)joules per second and η = 0.28%, consistent with analytical estimations. Our results demonstrate that thermal machines can be reduced to the limit of single atoms. PMID:27081067

  7. Highly lead-loaded red plastic scintillators as an X-ray imaging system for the Laser Mega Joule

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, M.; Normand, S.; Turk, G.; Darbon, S.

    2011-07-01

    The scope of this project intends to record spatially resolved images of core shape and size of a DT micro-balloon during Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at Laser Mega Joule facility (LMJ). We need to develop an X-ray imaging system which can operate in the radiative background generated by an ignition shot of ICF. The scintillator is a part of the imaging system and has to gather a compromise of scintillating properties (scintillating efficiency, decay time, emission wavelength) so as to both operate in the hard radiative environment and to allow the acquisition of spatially resolved images. Inorganic scintillators cannot be used because no compromise can be found regarding the expected scintillating properties, most of them are not fast enough and emit blue light. Organic scintillators are generally fast, but present low X-ray absorption in the 10 to 40 keV range, that does not permit the acquisition of spatially resolved images. To this aim, we have developed highly lead-loaded and red-fluorescent fast plastic scintillators. Such a combination is not currently available via scintillator suppliers, since they propose only blue-fluorescent plastic scintillators doped with up to 12%w Pb. Thus, incorporation ratio up to 27%w Pb has been reached in our laboratory, which can afford a plastic scintillator with an outstanding Z{sub eff} close to 50. X-rays in the 10 to 40 keV range can thus be detected with a higher probability of photoelectric effect than for classic organic scintillators, such as NE102. The strong orange-red fluorescence can be filtered, so that we can eliminate residual Cerenkov light, generated by {gamma}-ray absorption in glass parts of the imaging system. Decay times of our scintillators evaluated under UV excitation were estimated to be in the range 10 to 13 ns. (authors)

  8. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  9. Numerical Studies of Fluid Leakage from a Geologic DisposalReservoir for CO2 Show Self-Limiting Feedback between Fluid Flow and HeatTransfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2005-03-22

    Leakage of CO2 from a hypothetical geologic storage reservoir along an idealized fault zone has been simulated, including transitions between supercritical, liquid, and gaseous CO2. We find strong non-isothermal effects due to boiling and Joule-Thomson cooling of expanding CO2. Leakage fluxes are limited by limitations in conductive heat transfer to the fault zone. The interplay between multiphase flow and heat transfer effects produces non-monotonic leakage behavior.

  10. Self-heating in normal metals and superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1987-10-01

    This review is devoted to the physics of current-carrying superconductors and normal metals having two or more stable states sustained by Joule self-heating. The creation, propagation, and localization of electrothermal domains and switching waves leading to the transition from one stable state to another in uniform and nonuniform samples are treated in detail. The connection between thermal bistability and hysteresis, dropping and stepped current-voltage characteristics, self-induced oscillations of current and voltage, self-replication of electrothermal domains, and the formation of periodic and stochastic resistive structures are considered.

  11. A heat engine model of a reversible computation

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, D.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Using the tools of information theory and thermodynamics, reversible computation at the binary level is modeled as a heat engine operating in a Carnot cycle. The model defines an information-theoretic temperature for a binary system, and predicts that reversible computation can be accomplished without the dissipation of energy. However, in the worst case limit, kT log 2 joules of stored energy per operation per bit are required. Furthermore, T is not the ambient temperature, but the information-theoretic temperature, which for this case is infinite.

  12. Numerical Examination of the Performance of a Thermoelectric Cooler with Peltier Heating and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Nyung; Kim, Jeongho

    2015-10-01

    There has recently been much progress in the development of materials with higher thermoelectric performance, leading to the design of thermoelectric devices for generation of electricity and for heating or cooling. Local heating can be achieved by current flow through an electric resistance, and local heating and cooling can be performed by Peltier heating and cooling. In this study, we developed computer software that can be used to predict the Seebeck and Peltier effects for thermoelectric devices. The temperature, electric potential, heat flow, electric current, and coefficient of performance were determined, with the objective of investigating the Peltier effect in a thermoelectric device. In addition to Peltier heating and cooling, Joule and Thomson heating were quantitatively evaluated for the thermoelectric device.

  13. Multi-meter fiber-delivery and pulse self-compression of milli-Joule femtosecond laser and fiber-aided laser-micromachining.

    PubMed

    Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Vincetti, L; Husakou, A; Fourcade-Dutin, C; Hoenninger, C; Mottay, E; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2014-05-01

    We report on damage-free fiber-guidance of milli-Joule energy-level and 600-femtosecond laser pulses into hypocycloid core-contour Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. Up to 10 meter-long fibers were used to successfully deliver Yb-laser pulses in robustly single-mode fashion. Different pulse propagation regimes were demonstrated by simply changing the fiber dispersion and gas. Self-compression to ~50 fs, and intensity-level nearing petawatt/cm(2) were achieved. Finally, free focusing-optics laser-micromachining was also demonstrated on different materials. PMID:24921775

  14. Ionospheric heating with oblique high-frequency waves

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.C. Jr.; Bloom, R.M. ); Kossey, P.A. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper presents calculations of ionospheric electron temperature and density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produced by intense oblique high-frequency (HF) radio waves. The analysis takes into account focusing at caustics, the consequent Joule heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes, these being the effects of a powerful oblique modifying wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. The authors then seek effects on a secondary test wave that is propagated along the same path as the first. The calculations predict ground-level field strength reductions of several decibels in the test wave for modifying waves having effective radiated power (ERP) in the 85- to 90-dBW range. These field strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. The location of the signal change is sensitive to the frequency and the model ionosphere assumed; so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An ERP of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, might result in substantial rather than small signal changes. The conclusions are based solely on Joule heating and subsequent refraction of waves passing through caustic regions.

  15. Heat emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    Heat emergencies or illnesses are caused by exposure to extreme heat and sun. Heat illnesses can be prevented by ... to regulate the temperature, and make a heat emergency more likely: Drinking alcohol before or during exposure ...

  16. Heat dissipation property of cover glasses with heat sink films for transparent organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. W.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the thermal property of cover glasses with heat sink films and provide useful design guidelines of heat sinks for transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). To this end, we inquire into the thermal effect of the thickness of cover glasses, Cu sheet or Cu strip lines attached to cover glasses, transparent metal meshes and polymer composite films fabricated on cover glasses, and their position (i.e., inner or outer surface of the cover glass). It is found that the heat sink property varies depending sensitively on the heat sink position and cover glass thickness. To enhance the heat transfer (sink) property, it is preferred to attach the heat sink to the inner surface of the cover glass without any air involved. If no heat sink is used, then thicker cover glasses are required to dissipate the Joule heat effectively. With high-transparency (>80%) metal meshes, we have achieved about 7% heat dissipation. The polymer composite films (poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) binder mixed with cubic-boron nitride (c-BN) filler) show poor heat sink property due to difficulty in establishing an enough heat transfer pathway using a small amount of fillers.

  17. Mathematical model of non-stationary temperature distribution in the metal body produced by induction heating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Josef

    2016-03-01

    An induction heating problem can be described by a parabolic differential equation. For this equation, specific Joule looses must be computed. It can be done by solving the Fredholm Integral Equation of the second kind for the eddy current of density. When we use the Nyström method with the singularity subtraction, the computation time is rapidly reduced. This paper shows the method for finding non-stationary temperature distribution in the metal body with illustrative examples.

  18. Use of Optical and Imaging Techniques for Inspection of Off-Line Joule-Heated Melter at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Plodinec, M. J.; Jang, P-R; Long, Z.; Monts, D. L.; Philip, T.; Su, Y.

    2003-02-25

    The West Valley melter has been taken out of service. Its design is the direct ancestor of the current melter design for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Over its eight years of service, the West Valley melter has endured many of the same challenges that the Hanford melter will encounter with feeds that are similar to many of the Hanford double shell tank wastes. Thus, inspection of the West Valley melter prior to its disposal could provide valuable--even crucial--information to the designers of the melters to be used at the Hanford Site, particularly if quantitative information can be obtained. The objective of Mississippi State University's Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory's (DIAL) efforts is to develop, fabricate, and deploy inspection tools for the West Valley melter that will (i) be remotely operable in the West Valley process cell; (ii) provide quantitative information on melter refractory wear and deposits on the refractory; and (iii) indicate areas of heterogeneity (e.g., deposits) requiring more detailed characterization. A collaborative arrangement has been established with the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) to inspect their melter.

  19. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  20. Uncertainty estimation of non-ideal analog switches using programmable Josephson voltage standards for mutual inductance measurement in the joule balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Zhengkun; Xu, Jinxin; You, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of the mutual inductance is one of the key techniques in the joule balance to determine the Planck constant h, where a standard-square-wave compensation method was proposed to accurately measure the dc value of the mutual inductance. With this method, analog switches are used to compose an analog-switch signal generator to synthesize the excitation and compensation voltages. However, the accuracy of the compensation voltage is influenced by the non-ideal behaviors of analog-switches. In this paper, the effect from these non-ideal switches is analyzed in detail and evaluated with the equivalent circuits. A programmable Josephson voltage standard (PJVS) is used to generate a reference compensation voltage to measure the time integration of the voltage waveform generated by the analog-switch signal generator. Moreover, the effect is also evaluated experimentally by comparing the difference between the mutual inductance measured with the analog-switch signal generator and the value determined by the PJVS-analog-switch generator alternately in the same mutual inductance measurement system. The result shows that the impact of analog switches is 1.97  ×  10-7 with an uncertainty of 1.83  ×  10-7 (k  =  1) and confirms that the analog switch method can be used regularly instead of the PJVS in the mutual inductance measurement for the joule balance experiment.

  1. Convective heat and mass transfer on MHD peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid with the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discussed the peristaltic MHD flow of an incompressible and electrically conducting Williamson fluid in a symmetric planar channel with heat and mass transfer under the effect of inclined magnetic field. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into consideration. Mathematical model is presented by using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The differential equations governing the flow are highly nonlinear and thus perturbation solution for small Weissenberg number (We < 1) is presented. Effects of the heat and mass transfer on the longitudinal velocity, temperature and concentration are studied in detail. Main observations are presented in the concluding section. The streamlines pattern is also given due attention.

  2. Hydrogen evolution in nickel-water heat pipes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made of the evolution of hydrogen gas in nickel-water heat pipes for the purpose of investigating methods of accelerated life testing. The data were analyzed in terms of a phenomenological corrosion model of heat pipe degradation which incorporates corrosion and oxidation theory and contains parameters which can be determined by experiment. The gas was evolved with a linear time dependence and an exponential temperature dependence with an activation energy of 1.03 x 10 to the minus 19th joules. A flow-rate dependence of the gas evolution was found in the form of a threshold. The results were used to predict usable lifetimes of heat pipes operated at normal operating conditions from results taken under accelerated operating conditions.

  3. Impulsive chromospheric heating of two-ribbon flares by the fast reconnection mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, M.

    2008-03-15

    Chromospheric heating of two-ribbon flares is quantitatively studied for different values of R{sub 0}, the ratio of the chromospheric plasma density to the coronal one, on the basis of the spontaneous fast reconnection model. In general, occurrence of impulsive chromospheric joule heating is delayed for the larger R{sub 0} because of more Alfven traveling time in the chromosphere. Once the chromospheric heating occurs, the temperature becomes more than 30 times its initial value for the case of R{sub 0}=400 in a pair of layers of deep chromosphere, and the region of high temperature shifts upward and becomes broader with time, since the chromospheric thin layer of joule heating shifts upward according to a pileup of reconnected field lines in the flare loop; then, chromospheric evaporation grows and extends outward, and its velocity becomes comparable with the coronal downflow velocity inside the loop boundary. The impulsive chromospheric heating is caused by drastic evolution of the flare current wedge, through which some part of the coronal sheet current suddenly turns its direction to be concentrated into the chromospheric thin layer; simultaneously, a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator arises ahead of the flare loop top to provide a new current circuit inside the large-scale flare current wedge. Hence, it is concluded that the powerful MHD generator, sustained by the fast reconnection jet, drives the flare current wedge to evolve, leading to the impulsive chromospheric heating.

  4. Heating of the solar chromosphere and corona. I - Generalized inhomogeneous wave equation for magnetoacoustic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, S. P. S.

    1976-01-01

    The generalized inhomogeneous wave equation that governs magnetoacoustic, vortical, and thermal motions in compressible fluids and that is applicable to the problem of heating of the solar chromosphere and corona is obtained. The effects of kinematic and bulk viscosity, heat conduction, Joule dissipation, and magnetic diffusivity are included. Under the usual assumptions, the generalized wave equation reduces to the well-known equations of Lighthill, Kulsrud, Phillips, and others. The major problems encountered in applying Lighthill's (1952) mechanism to sound generation in turbulent media are reviewed for both the subsonic and supersonic cases.

  5. The Role of Layer-Controlled Graphene for Tunable Microwave Heating and Its Applications to the Synthesis of Inorganic Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Cho, Kyeong Min; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Seon Joon; Choi, Jaeho; Bae, Sang Jin; Park, Sounghee; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present the first method for precisely controlling the heat generated by microwave heating by tuning the number of graphene layers grown by chemical vapor deposition. The conductivity of the graphene increases linearly with the number of graphene layers, indicating that Joule heating plays a primary role in the temperature control of the graphene layer. In this method, we successfully synthesize TiO2 and MoS2 thin films, which do not interact well with microwaves, on a layer-controlled graphene substrate for a very short time (3 min) through microwave heating. PMID:26836443

  6. Heat Without Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubkin, Elihu

    1997-04-01

    Logic of the Second Law of Thermodynamics demands acquisition of naked entropy. Accordingly, the leanest liaison between systems is not a diathermic membrane, it is a purely informational tickler, leaking no appreciable energy. The subsystem here is a thermodynamic universe, which gets `heated' entropically, yet without gaining calories. Quantum Mechanics graciously supports that(Lubkin, E. and Lubkin, T., International Journal of Theoretical Physics,32), 933-943 (1993) (at a cost of about 1 bit) through entanglement---across this least permeable of membranes---with what is beyond that universe. Heat without heat(Also v. forthcoming Proceedings of the 4th Drexel University Conference of September 1994) is the aspirin for Boltzmann's headache, conserving entropy in mechanical isolation, even while increasing entropy in thermodynamic isolation.

  7. Heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, P. V.

    1982-11-01

    Heat pumps for residential/commercial space heating and hot tap water make use of free energy of direct or indirect solar heat and save from about 40 to about 70 percent of energy if compared to a conventional heating system with the same energy basis. In addition, the electrically driven compressor heat pump is able to substitute between 40% (bivalent alternative operation) to 100% (monovalent operation) of the fuel oil of an oilfired heating furnace. For average Central European conditions, solar space heating systems with high solar coverage factor show the following sequence of increasing cost effectiveness: pure solar systems (without heat pumps); heat pump assisted solar systems; solar assisted heat pump systems; subsoil/water heat pumps; air/water heat pumps; air/air heat pumps.

  8. Heat Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction, function, and applications of heat pipes. Suggests using the heat pipe to teach principles related to heat transfer and gives sources for obtaining instructional kits for this purpose. (GS)

  9. Simultaneous measurements of the specific heat and thermal conductivity of suspended thin samples by transient electrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Ma, Weigang; Li, Zhixin; Zhang, Xing

    2009-06-01

    The electrothermal technique is developed to simultaneously measure the specific heat and thermal conductivity of individual thin samples suspended across two heat sinks, resorting to pulsed direct currents with or without a dc offset. The temperature evolution due to Joule self-heating is recorded and compared with the numerical solutions of transient heat conduction equations using the finite volume method. The thermal conductivity is determined by the steady temperature level and the specific heat by the transient temperature rise or relaxation. This technique is applied to a 10 microm thick platinum wire and the thermal conductivity and specific heat are in good agreement with the literature values. In addition, the influences of thermal radiation and thermal boundary resistance between the sample and heat sinks on the experimental results are discussed. PMID:19566218

  10. Simultaneous measurements of the specific heat and thermal conductivity of suspended thin samples by transient electrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Ma, Weigang; Li, Zhixin; Zhang, Xing

    2009-06-01

    The electrothermal technique is developed to simultaneously measure the specific heat and thermal conductivity of individual thin samples suspended across two heat sinks, resorting to pulsed direct currents with or without a dc offset. The temperature evolution due to Joule self-heating is recorded and compared with the numerical solutions of transient heat conduction equations using the finite volume method. The thermal conductivity is determined by the steady temperature level and the specific heat by the transient temperature rise or relaxation. This technique is applied to a 10 μm thick platinum wire and the thermal conductivity and specific heat are in good agreement with the literature values. In addition, the influences of thermal radiation and thermal boundary resistance between the sample and heat sinks on the experimental results are discussed.

  11. Approaching the limits of two-phase boiling heat transfer: High heat flux and low superheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palko, J. W.; Zhang, C.; Wilbur, J. D.; Dusseault, T. J.; Asheghi, M.; Goodson, K. E.; Santiago, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate capillary fed porous copper structures capable of dissipating over 1200 W cm-2 in boiling with water as the working fluid. Demonstrated superheats for this structure are dramatically lower than those previously reported at these high heat fluxes and are extremely insensitive to heat input. We show superheats of less than 10 K at maximum dissipation and varying less than 5 K over input heat flux ranges of 1000 W cm-2. Fabrication of the porous copper layers using electrodeposition around a sacrificial template allows fine control of both microstructure and bulk geometry, producing structures less than 40 μm thick with active region lateral dimensions of 2 mm × 0.3 mm. The active region is volumetrically Joule heated by passing an electric current through the porous copper bulk material. We analyze the heat transfer performance of the structures and suggest a strong influence of pore size on superheat. We compare performance of the current structure to existing wick structures.

  12. A compact low cost "master-slave" double crystal monochromator for x-ray cameras calibration of the Laser MgaJoule Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, S.; Prvot, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA-CESTA, France) built a specific double crystal monochromator (DCM) to perform calibration of x-ray cameras (CCD, streak and gated cameras) by means of a multiple anode diode type x-ray source for the MgaJoule Laser Facility. This DCM, based on pantograph geometry, was specifically modeled to respond to relevant engineering constraints and requirements. The major benefits are mechanical drive of the second crystal on the first one, through a single drive motor, as well as compactness of the entire device. Designed for flat beryl or Ge crystals, this DCM covers the 0.9-10 keV range of our High Energy X-ray Source. In this paper we present the mechanical design of the DCM, its features quantitatively measured and its calibration to finally provide monochromatized spectra displaying spectral purities better than 98%.

  13. Performance evaluation of heat exchanger for mixed refrigerant J-T cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-09-01

    In mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler, a multi-component mixture of nitrogen-hydrocarbons undergoes evaporation and condensation process in a helical coiled heat exchanger simultaneously at different pressures. Experimental data and empirical correlations for predicting heat transfer coefficients of evaporating and condensing streams of multi-component mixtures at cryogenic temperatures are unavailable. As a result, design of these heat exchangers is a challenging task. The present work aims to address this challenge. It assesses the existing condensation correlations against the calculated data obtained during experimentation. Experiments are conducted to determine overall heat transfer coefficients along the length of the heat exchanger for various mixtures. The paper studies the applicability of these correlations to the multi-component mixtures at cryogenic temperatures.

  14. Plate fin heat exchanger model with axial conduction and variable properites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Benjamin Jacob; White, Michael Joseph; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2012-06-01

    Future superconduction radio frequency (SRF) cavities, as part of Project X at Fermilab,will be cooled to superfluid helium temperatures by a cryogenic distribution system supplying cold supercritical helium. To reduce vapor fraction during the final Joule Thomson (J-T) expansion into the superfluid helium cooling bath, counter-flow, plate-fin heat exchanger are an effective option. However, at liquid helium temperatures requires consideration of axial heat conduction along the direction of flow, in addition to variable fluid properties. Here we present a numberical model that includes the effects of axial guide design decisions on heat exhanger material choice and geometry. In addition, the J-T expansion process is modeled with the heat exchanger to analyze the effect of heat load and cryogenic supply parameters.

  15. Electrical heating of soils using high efficiency electrode patterns and power phases

    DOEpatents

    Buettner, Harley M.

    1999-01-01

    Powerline-frequency electrical (joule) heating of soils using a high efficiency electrode configuration and power phase arrangement. The electrode configuration consists of several heating or current injection electrodes around the periphery of a volume of soil to be heated, all electrodes being connected to one phase of a multi-phase or a single-phase power system, and a return or extraction electrode or electrodes located inside the volume to be heated being connected to the remaining phases of the multi-phase power system or to the neutral side of the single-phase power source. This electrode configuration and power phase arrangement can be utilized anywhere where powerline frequency soil heating is applicable and thus has many potential uses including removal of volatile organic compounds such as gasoline and tricholorethylene (TCE) from contaminated areas.

  16. A note on convective heat transfer of an MHD Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Jawad; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood; Ali, Ramzan

    2015-11-01

    This article focuses on the exact solution regarding convective heat transfer of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet. The effects of joule and viscous dissipation, internal heat source/sink and thermal radiation on the heat transfer characteristics are taken in account in the presence of a transverse magnetic field for two types of boundary heating process namely prescribed power law surface temperature (PST) and prescribed heat flux (PHF). Similarity transformations are used to reduce the governing non-linear momentum and thermal boundary layer equations into a set of ordinary differential equations. The exact solutions of the reduced ordinary differential equations are developed in the form of confluent hypergeometric function. The influence of the pertinent parameters on the temperature profile is examined. In addition the results for the wall temperature gradient are also discussed in detail.

  17. Instability heating of a solid fiber Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.; Scudder, D.; Shlachter, J.; Lovberg, R.

    1996-04-01

    A dense Z-pinch formed by the electrical breakdown of solid CD{sub 2} fibers in an 800 kA, 100 ns risetime pulse generator has been studied with optical and radiation diagnostics. It has been found that, contrary to calculations based on classical joule heating of the plasma that predict approximate dynamic equilibrium, the pinch always expands explosively while displaying intense {ital m}=0 hydromagnetic instability activity. Excellent agreement with the observed expansion rate as well as with measured electron temperatures and neutron yield has been obtained by including in a simulation code the direct heating of ions by turbulence arising from instability growth. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. The effects of Ohmic heating and stable radiation on magnetic tearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachi, T.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of a temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity on the planar tearing mode. The local evolution of the temperature is described by an energy equation which includes Joule heating and optically thin radiation. The resulting system of coupled linear magnetohydrodynamic equations is solved numerically, and eigenfunctions and growth rates are obtained. In the absence of radiation, there are two distinct solutions above a critical value of the magnetic Reynolds number S, a tearing-like mode and a Joule-heating mode. Below this point, the growth rates coalesce into a conjugate-complex pair. When stable radiation (dR/dT greater than 0) is added, the heating mode disappears and a modified tearing excitation exists to much lower values of S before its growth is cut off by Ohmic heating. Examples are given for solar coronal parameters, and for those characteristic of fusion-research devices. The introduction of an effective value for the resistivity, in the presence of energy transport, allows a simple qualitative discussion of the different modes.

  19. Nanowire heating by optical electromagnetic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Roder, Paden B; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Davis, E James

    2012-11-20

    The dissipative absorption of electromagnetic energy by 1D nanoscale structures at optical frequencies is applicable to several important phenomena, including biomedical photothermal theranostics, nanoscale photovoltaic materials, atmospheric aerosols, and integrated photonic devices. Closed-form analytical calculations are presented for the temperature rise within infinite circular cylinders with nanometer-scale diameters (nanowires) that are irradiated at right angles by a continuous-wave laser source polarized along the nanowire's axis. Solutions for the heat source are compared to both numerical finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations and well-known Mie scattering cross sections for infinite cylinders. The analysis predicts that the maximum temperature increase is affected not only by the cylinder's composition and porosity but also by morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) that lead to significant spikes in the local temperature at particular diameters. Furthermore, silicon nanowires with high thermal conductivities are observed to exhibit extremely uniform internal temperatures during electromagnetic heating to 1 part in 10(6), including cases where there are substantial fluctuations of the internal electric-field source term that generates the Joule heating. For a highly absorbing material such as carbon, much higher temperatures are predicted, the internal temperature distribution is nonuniform, and MDRs are not encountered. PMID:23061375

  20. Heating Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... from heating equipment, such as the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable heater. • Only use heating equipment ... into the room and burn only dry, seasoned wood. Allow ashes to cool before disposing in a ...

  1. Self-heating induced instability of oxide thin film transistors under dynamic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kise, Kahori; Fujii, Mami N.; Urakawa, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Haruka; Kawashima, Emi; Tomai, Shigekazu; Yano, Koki; Wang, Dapeng; Furuta, Mamoru; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    Degradation caused by Joule heating of transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) is an important issue for display technology. Deep understanding of the mechanism of self-heating degradation generated by driving pulse voltage will pave the way for the development of highly reliable flexible displays. In this work, by using a pseudo interval measurement method, we examined the relationship of the highest and the lowest heating temperature in pulse 1 cycle and frequency. These self-heating converged to a constant temperature under pulse voltage applied at 1 kHz. Moreover, the long-term reliability under positive-bias stress voltage at 1 kHz of low converged temperature condition was improved relative to that of the stress voltage at 10 Hz of dynamic temperature change condition. We discussed the degradation mechanism of oxide TFTs generated by pulse voltage, and clarified that the degradation was accelerated by thermionic emission which occurred at low frequency.

  2. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  3. Heat transfer in microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei

    Heat transfer is considered as one of the most critical issues for design and implement of large-scale microwave heating systems, in which improvement of the microwave absorption of materials and suppression of uneven temperature distribution are the two main objectives. The present work focuses on the analysis of heat transfer in microwave heating for achieving highly efficient microwave assisted steelmaking through the investigations on the following aspects: (1) characterization of microwave dissipation using the derived equations, (2) quantification of magnetic loss, (3) determination of microwave absorption properties of materials, (4) modeling of microwave propagation, (5) simulation of heat transfer, and (6) improvement of microwave absorption and heating uniformity. Microwave heating is attributed to the heat generation in materials, which depends on the microwave dissipation. To theoretically characterize microwave heating, simplified equations for determining the transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) power penetration depth, microwave field attenuation length, and half-power depth of microwaves in materials having both magnetic and dielectric responses were derived. It was followed by developing a simplified equation for quantifying magnetic loss in materials under microwave irradiation to demonstrate the importance of magnetic loss in microwave heating. The permittivity and permeability measurements of various materials, namely, hematite, magnetite concentrate, wstite, and coal were performed. Microwave loss calculations for these materials were carried out. It is suggested that magnetic loss can play a major role in the heating of magnetic dielectrics. Microwave propagation in various media was predicted using the finite-difference time-domain method. For lossy magnetic dielectrics, the dissipation of microwaves in the medium is ascribed to the decay of both electric and magnetic fields. The heat transfer process in microwave heating of magnetite, which is a typical magnetic dielectric, was simulated by using an explicit finite-difference approach. It is demonstrated that the heat generation due to microwave irradiation dominates the initial temperature rise in the heating and the heat radiation heavily affects the temperature distribution, giving rise to a hot spot in the predicted temperature profile. Microwave heating at 915 MHz exhibits better heating homogeneity than that at 2450 MHz due to larger microwave penetration depth. To minimize/avoid temperature nonuniformity during microwave heating the optimization of object dimension should be considered. The calculated reflection loss over the temperature range of heating is found to be useful for obtaining a rapid optimization of absorber dimension, which increases microwave absorption and achieves relatively uniform heating. To further improve the heating effectiveness, a function for evaluating absorber impedance matching in microwave heating was proposed. It is found that the maximum absorption is associated with perfect impedance matching, which can be achieved by either selecting a reasonable sample dimension or modifying the microwave parameters of the sample.

  4. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Phoenix Refrigeration Systems, Inc.'s heat pipe addition to the Phoenix 2000, a supermarket rooftop refrigeration/air conditioning system, resulted from the company's participation in a field test of heat pipes. Originally developed by NASA to control temperatures in space electronic systems, the heat pipe is a simple, effective, heat transfer system. It has been used successfully in candy storage facilities where it has provided significant energy savings. Additional data is expected to fully quantify the impact of the heat pipes on supermarket air conditioning systems.

  5. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Heat Pipes were originally developed by NASA and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the 1960s to dissipate excessive heat build- up in critical areas of spacecraft and maintain even temperatures of satellites. Heat pipes are tubular devices where a working fluid alternately evaporates and condenses, transferring heat from one region of the tube to another. KONA Corporation refined and applied the same technology to solve complex heating requirements of hot runner systems in injection molds. KONA Hot Runner Systems are used throughout the plastics industry for products ranging in size from tiny medical devices to large single cavity automobile bumpers and instrument panels.

  6. Vacuum vessel heating system for ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.; Neilson, G.H.; Alban, A.M.; Slaughter, E.; Sumner, J.N.; White, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    An 80-kW system for heating the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) stainless steel vacuum vessel to 150/sup 0/C, the design limit of the vessel, has been designed. The system's primary purpose is to accelerate the outgassing of the vessel walls during the initial pumpdown following an opening to atmospheric pressure. It will also measure the thermal time constant of the vessel. These measurements are important for assessing the vessel's power-handling capability. The main body of the vessel is induction heated by applying 440-V, 60-Hz power directly to the main torsatron windings. The eddy currents that this power induces in the vessel produce an estimated 50 kW of Joule heating. The vacuum vessel temperature is measured with an array of thermocouples. A programmable logic controller regulates the temperature and provides interlock and overheating protection. A system of 60 heating tapes, each rated at 520 W, is installed on the ports and ducts attached to the vessel. This system, in conjunction with the induction heating systems, is planned to provide temperature uniformity. The total heating power and rates of rise and fall of the vessel temperature have been calculated using a model of the vacuum vessel. The results are given.

  7. Vacuum vessel heating system for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.; Neilson, G.H.; Alban, A.M.; Slaughter, E.; Sumner, J.N.; White, J.A.

    1988-05-01

    An 80-kW system for heating the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) stainless-steel vacuum vessel to 150 /sup 0/C, the design limit of the vessel, has been designed. The system's primary purpose is to accelerate the outgassing of the vessel walls during the initial pumpdown following an opening to atmospheric pressure. It will also measure the thermal time constant of the vessel. These measurements are important for assessing the vessel's power-handling capability. The main body of the vessel is induction heated by applying 440-V, 60-Hz power directly to the main torsatron windings. The eddy currents that this power induces in the vessel produce an estimated 50 kW of joule heating. The vacuum vessel temperature is measured with an array of thermocouples. A programmable logic controller regulates the temperature and provides interlock and overheating protection. A system of 60 heating tapes, each rated at 520 W, is installed on the ports and ducts attached to the vessel. This system, in conjunction with the induction heating system, is planned to provide temperature uniformity. The total heating power and rates of rise and fall of the vessel temperature have been calculated using a model of the vacuum vessel. The results are given.

  8. Pathways to thermospheric heating via cusp electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Varney, R. H.; Lotko, W.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wang, W.; Lei, J.; Lyon, J.; Schmitt, P.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of precipitating soft electrons on the thermospheric mass density in the dayside cusp region are investigated using the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere thermosphere model (CMIT). Simulation results show that while soft electrons have relatively minor effects on the interaction between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, they can significantly modify the mass density of the thermosphere in the dayside cusp region. Event simulations show that the CMIT model is capable of reproducing the mass density enhancement measured by the CHAMP and GRACE satellite at 400 km. The efficiencies of the direct and indirect thermospheric heating processes associated with precipitating soft electrons are investigated using ideal and event-based CMIT simulations. Preliminary results show that direct heating from soft electrons to thermospheric neutrals only has little effect on the neutral temperature and density, and indirect heating is the dominant process in the thermospheric neutral density enhancement. In the indirect heating process, precipitating soft electrons enhance the altitude profile of F-region Pedersen conductivity, which modifies the altitude distribution of the Joule heating in the cusp region and causes the enhancement of neutral temperature and density more efficiently than the direct heating process.

  9. An electrical-heating and self-sensing shape memory polymer composite incorporated with carbon fiber felt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaobo; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) have the ability to adjust their stiffness, lock a temporary shape, and recover the permanent shape upon imposing an appropriate stimulus. They have found their way into the field of morphing structures. The electrically Joule resistive heating of the conductive composite can be a desirable stimulus to activate the shape memory effect of SMPs without external heating equipment. Electro-induced SMP composites incorporated with carbon fiber felt (CFF) were explored in this work. The CFF is an excellent conductive filler which can easily spread throughout the composite. It has a huge advantage in terms of low cost, simple manufacturing process, and uniform and tunable temperature distribution while heating. A continuous and compact conductive network made of carbon fibers and the overlap joints among them was observed from the microscopy images, and this network contributes to the high conductive properties of the CFF/SMP composites. The CFF/SMP composites can be electrical-heated rapidly and uniformly, and its’ shape recovery effect can be actuated by the electrical resistance Joule heating of the CFF without an external heater. The CFF/SMP composite get higher modulus and higher strength than the pure SMP without losing any strain recovery property. The high dependence of temperature and strain on the electrical resistance also make the composite a good self-sensing material. In general, the CFF/SMP composite shows great prospects as a potential material for the future morphing structures.

  10. Analysis of self-heating and trapping in organic semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Evelyne; Ruhstaller, Beat

    2015-09-01

    So far self-heating has only been of concern in large-area devices where the resistive transparent anode leads to a potential drop over the device resulting in inhomogeneous current, brightness and temperature distributions. In this work, we show that even small lab devices suffer from self-heating effects originating from the organic semiconductor layer. In admittance spectroscopy of organic semiconductor devices, negative capacitance values often arise at low frequency and high voltages. In this study we demonstrate the influence of self-heating on organic semiconductor devices with the aid of a numerical 1D drift-diffusion model that is extended by Joule heating and heat conduction. Furthermore the impact of trap states on the capacitance in combination with self-heating is demonstrated. The typical signature of self-heating might be overshadowed depending on the trapping dynamics. In a next step, we compare the negative capacitance vs. frequency for uni- and bipolar devices to quantify the different processes. We emphasize the impact of self-heating and trapping on OLEDs and organic solar cells. To ease the interpretation of the results we investigate simulations in the time domain as well as in the frequency domain. We have provided clear evidence of self-heating of organic semiconductor devices and conclude that a comprehensive model requires the inclusion of heat conduction and heat generation in the drift-diffusion model.

  11. Effect of Anode Change on Heat Transfer and Magneto-hydrodynamic Flow in Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Baokuan; Fafard, Mario

    2016-02-01

    In order to explore the impact of anode replacement on heat transfer and magneto-hydrodynamic flow in aluminum smelting cells, a transient three-dimensional coupled mathematical model has been developed. With a steady state magnetic field, an electrical potential approach was used to obtain electromagnetic fields. Joule heating and Lorentz force, which were the source terms in the energy and momentum equations, were updated at each iteration. The phase change of molten electrolyte (bath) was modeled by an enthalpy-based technique in which the mushy zone was treated as a porous medium with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. A reasonable agreement between the test data and simulated results was achieved. Under normal conditions, the bath at the middle of the cell is hotter, while becoming colder at the four corners. Due to the heat extracted from the bath, the temperature of the new cold anode increases over time. The temperature of the bath under the new cold anode therefore quickly drops, resulting in a decrease of the electrical conductivity. More Joule effect is created. In addition, the bath under the new cold anode gradually freezes and flows more slowly. The temperature of the new anode located at the middle of the cell rises faster because of the warmer bath. It is easier to eliminate the effect of anode change when it occurs in the middle of the cell.

  12. Applicability of the Joule-Thomson Cryocooler Coupled with Membrane-Based Purification System for Liquefaction of Natural Gas in Small Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska, A.; Chorowski, M.

    2008-03-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocoolers using gas mixture have been studied theoretically and experimentally for a variety of applications. Gas separation technology using polymer membrane is emerging. In this paper the concept of coupling the J-T cooler with a hollow fiber membranes is presented. The apparatus can be used in many applications, like compressed natural gas (CNG) purification and condensation into LNG or separation and liquefaction of nitrogen from air. The paper describes the system and experimental dependence of the separated nitrogen purity on the membrane inlet air pressure. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is used to optimize the composition of the mixture for natural gas cooling and liquefaction. Possible applications of the system depend on membrane material. Membranes used in separation of N2/air or CO2/CH4 are now commercially available [2,6]. The combination of the J-T cooler with N2/air membrane enables the construction of the liquid nitrogen production system aimed at cryosurgical applications. Similarly, J-T cooler coupled with CO2/CH4 membrane can be used for purification and liquefaction of natural gas in small quantities e.g. satisfying future car refueling system needs.

  13. Preplasma conditions for the operation of 10-Hz sub-Joule fs-laser-pumped nickel-like x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, Riccardo; Eidmann, Klaus; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Fill, Ernst E.

    2003-12-01

    We present measurements of electron densities of plasmas with fs resolution. The plasmas are generated by laser pulses with different intensities at different time delays. Such plasmas are of great interest as preplasmas for transient, collisionally excited X-ray lasers. The prepulse is generated by stretching part of a 130-fs laser pulse of the ATLAS titanium-sapphire laser of our institute. Focusing this radiation to a line on molybdenum and silver targets generates preplasmas highly interesting to research directed towards a 10 Hz sub-Joule soft X-ray laser. The electron density is measured as a function of distance from the target by interferometry using a Wollaston prism. The ultrashort probe pulse allows one to obtain data as close as 10 - 20 μm from the target surface. Experimental data are compared with simulations using the MULTI hydrocode. The results allow optimization of prepulse-main pulse delay times and compare ablation from a hard (Mo) and a soft (Ag) material.

  14. Heating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, C.G.

    1991-07-30

    This patent describes a heating apparatus. It comprises a housing, means for introducing water to a plurality of water conduits of the housing, a fireplace compartment disposed within the housing, the fireplace compartment being provided with a burner, a fin coil member disposed in the upper portion of the housing and communicating with the room environment for heat emitting, the fin coil member containing a serpentine configured fin coils disposed therein for absorbing heat from the water disposed in the water conduits, a heat chamber containing the water conduits, the heat chamber connected at one end to the fireplace compartment and at the other end to a chimney disposed at the middle of the the fireplace compartment for circulating hot combustion gases therethrough and for heating the water disposed in the water conduits, the combustion gases being vented from the chimney, and at least four turbo fans communicating with the heat chamber for blowing air across the fin coil member so as to heat the air and discharge it to the room environment, and reduce noise pollution of the heating apparatus.

  15. Extreme Heat

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Be a Preparedness Leader Volunteer Opportunities National Preparedness Month (NPM) Calendar & Social Media Toolkits About Us Social ... Heat Floods Home Fires Hurricanes Landslides & Debris Flow Pandemic Severe ...

  16. Ionosphere/thermosphere heating determined from dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul; Vasyliūnas, Vytenis M.

    2011-09-01

    Ionosphere/thermosphere heating driven by magnetospheric convection is investigated through a three-fluid inductive (including Faraday's law) approach to describing magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling, for a 1-D stratified ionosphere/thermosphere in this initial study. It is shown that the response of the ionosphere/thermosphere and thus the heating is dynamic and height-dependent. The heating is essentially frictional in nature rather than Joule heating as commonly assumed. The heating rate reaches a quasi-steady state after about 25 Alfvén travel times. During the dynamic period, the heating can be enhanced and displays peaks at multiple times due to wave reflections. The dynamic heating rate can be more than twice greater than the quasi-steady state value. The heating is strongest in the E-layer but the heating rate per unit mass is concentrated around the F-layer peak height. This implies a potential mechanism of driving O+ upflow from O+ rich F-layer. It is shown that the ionosphere/thermosphere heating caused by the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling can be simply evaluated through the relative velocity between the plasma and neutrals without invoking field-aligned currents, ionospheric conductance, and electric field. The present study provides understanding of the dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling from the ionospheric/thermospheric view in addition to magnetospheric perspectives.

  17. Heat dissipation at a graphene-substrate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiping; Buehler, Markus J.

    2012-11-01

    The development of nanoelectronics faces severe challenges from Joule heating, leading to high power density and spatial localization of heat, which nucleates thermal hot spots, limits the maximum current density and potentially causes catastrophic materials failure. Weak interfacial coupling with the substrate is a major route for effective heat mitigation in low-dimensional materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes. Here we investigate the molecular-scale physics of this process by performing molecular dynamics simulations, and find that significant heating in graphene supported by a silicon carbide substrate cannot be avoided when the areal power density exceeds PG = 0.5 GW m-2. A steady state will be established within 200 ps with a significant temperature difference built up across the interface, and the interfacial thermal conductivity κc increases at higher power densities from 10 to 50 MW m-2 K-1. These observations are explained by a two-resistor model, where strong phonon scattering at the interface may perturb the ballistic heat transport and lead to a diffusive mechanism. Nanoengineering the interfacial thermal coupling by intercalating guest atoms shows potential for designing thermally transparent but electronically insulating interfaces, which paves the way for simultaneously optimizing thermal management and charge carrier mobility in nanoelectronics.

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Magneto Pulsatile Blood Flow Through a Porous Medium with a Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, B. K.; Sharma, M.; Gaur, R. K.; Mishra, A.

    2015-05-01

    In the present study a mathematical model for the hydro-magnetic non-Newtonian blood flow in the non-Darcy porous medium with a heat source and Joule effect is proposed. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular to the porous surface. The governing non-linear partial differential equations have been solved numerically by applying the explicit finite difference Method (FDM). The effects of various parameters such as the Reynolds number, hydro-magnetic parameter, Forchheimer parameter, Darcian parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number, heat source parameter, Schmidt number on the velocity, temperature and concentration have been examined with the help of graphs. The present study finds its applications in surgical operations, industrial material processing and various heat transfer operations.

  19. Testing of a 4 K to 2 K heat exchanger with an intermediate pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.

    2015-12-01

    Most large sub-atmospheric helium refrigeration systems incorporate a heat exchanger at the load, or in the distribution system, to counter-flow the sub-atmospheric return with the super-critical or liquid supply. A significant process improvement is theoretically obtainable by handling the exergy loss across the Joule-Thompson throttling valve supplying the flow to the load in a simple but different manner. As briefly outlined in previous publications, the exergy loss can be minimized by allowing the supply flow pressure to decrease to a sub-atmospheric pressure concurrent with heat exchange flow from the load. One practical implementation is to sub-divide the supply flow pressure drop between two heat exchanger sections, incorporating an intermediate pressure drop. Such a test is being performed at Jefferson Lab's Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). This paper will briefly discuss the theory, practical implementation and test results and analysis obtained to date.

  20. Application of Flame-Sprayed Coatings as Heating Elements for Polymer-Based Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopera-Valle, Adrián; McDonald, André

    2015-10-01

    Flame-sprayed nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) and nickel-chromium (NiCr) coatings were deposited on fiber-reinforced polymer composites for use as heating elements of structures that were exposed to cold environments. Electrical current was applied to the coatings to increase the surface temperature by way of Joule heating. The surface temperature profiles of the coatings were measured under free and forced convection conditions at different ambient temperatures, ranging from -25 to 23 °C. It was found that at ambient air temperatures below 0 °C, the surface temperature of the coating remained above 0 °C for both the forced and free convection conditions, and there was a nearly homogeneous temperature distribution over the coating surface. This suggests that flame-sprayed coatings could be used as heating elements to mitigate ice accretion on structures, without the presence of areas of localized high temperature.

  1. OLEDs: light-emitting thin film thermistors revealing advanced self-heating effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Axel; Koprucki, Thomas; Glitzky, Annegret; Liero, Matthias; Gärtner, Klaus; Hauptmann, Jacqueline; Reineke, Sebastian; Kasemann, Daniel; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl; Scholz, Reinhard

    2015-09-01

    Large area OLEDs show pronounced Joule self-heating at high brightness. This heating induces brightness inhomogeneities, drastically increasing beyond a certain current level. We discuss this behavior considering 'S'-shaped negative differential resistance upon self-heating, even allowing for 'switched-back' regions where the luminance finally decreases (Fischer et al., Adv. Funct. Mater. 2014, 24, 3367). By using a multi-physics simulation the device characteristics can be modeled, resulting in a comprehensive understanding of the problem. Here, we present results for an OLED lighting panel considered for commercial application. It turns out that the strong electrothermal feedback in OLEDs prevents high luminance combined with a high degree of homogeneity unless new optimization strategies are considered.

  2. Heat Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Heat problems and heat cramps related to jogging can be caused by fluid imbalances, medications, dietary insufficiency, vomiting or diarrhea, among other factors. If the condition keeps reoccurring, the advice of a physician should be sought. Some preventive measures that can be taken include: (1) running during the cooler hours of the day; (2)…

  3. Heat Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Heat problems and heat cramps related to jogging can be caused by fluid imbalances, medications, dietary insufficiency, vomiting or diarrhea, among other factors. If the condition keeps reoccurring, the advice of a physician should be sought. Some preventive measures that can be taken include: (1) running during the cooler hours of the day; (2)

  4. Multiphysics Modeling for Dimensional Analysis of a Self-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus; Sibille, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a self-heating reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath.

  5. Heat collector

    DOEpatents

    Merrigan, Michael A.

    1984-01-01

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  6. Heat collector

    DOEpatents

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1981-06-29

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  7. Studies of heat source driven natural convection. Ph.D. Thesis. Technical Report, Jul. 1974 - Aug. 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Emara, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid was measured for Rayleigh numbers from 1890 to 2.17 x 10 to the 12th power. The fluid layer is bounded below by a rigid zero-heat-flux surface and above by a rigid constant-temperature surface. Joule heating by an alternating current passing horizontally through the layer provides the uniform volumetric energy source. The overall steady-state heat transfer coefficient at the upper surface was determined by measuring the temperature difference across the layer and power input to the fluid. The correlation between the Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for the data of the present study and the data of the Kulacki study is given.

  8. Helium isotopes in Icelandic geothermal systems: II. Helium-heat relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Poreda, R.J. ); Arnorsson, S. )

    1992-12-01

    A model has been developed that relates the [sup 3]He content of the reservoir fluid to the fluid enthalpy. In contrast to oceanic hydrothermal systems that display a uniform [sup 3]He/enthalpy ratio (0.4-14 [times] 10[sup 6] atoms of [sup 3]He/joule), Icelandic systems vary by [approx] 1000 (0.4-400 [times] 10[sup 6] atoms/joule). A process that preferentially extracts helium relative to heat from a cooling magma produces high [sup 3]He/enthalpy ratios for young systems (e.g., Krafla) and low [sup 3]He/enthalpy ratios for aging magmatic systems (e.g., Hveragaerdi). Using the highest [sup 3]He/heat ratios measured in the fluid, estimates of initial gas concentrations in the basalt are made for [sup 3]He (5 [times] 10[sup [minus]10] cc/g) and carbon (1200 ppm). Low temperature wells near Geysir in southwest Iceland appear to result from mixing of high temperature fluid (>200[degree]C) and cold groundwater along a curve of constant [sup 3]He/enthalpy.

  9. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  10. Hawaiian heat

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.

    2000-06-01

    Today, the island's people are still using the sun's energy in their daily tasks. In 1996, Maui Electric Company (MECO) and its sister companies (Hawaiian Electric on the island of Oahu, and Hawaii Electric Light on the island of Hawaii), implemented energy efficiency programs, including the largest solar water heating program in the US. The goal of these energy efficiency programs is to defer the need to build new power plants. With the expiration in 1985 of the Federal and State of Hawaii Energy Tax credits, the solar water heating industry in Hawaii went into a steady decline. During the industry's heyday in the early and mid-80's, approximately 5,000 solar system were being installed each year. Prior to the utilities' promotion of solar water heating in 1996, the number of solar water heaters installed dropped significantly to an average of about 1,200 systems per year. However, in the three years since the inception of the solar water heating program, Maui Electric and its sister companies have installed 10,000 solar water heating systems and have paid out over $10 million in cash incentives to island residents to install solar water heating systems. The utility support of the solar trade industry has also created nearly 400 jobs and generated about $14.9 million of investments within the state. The story behind these statistics is equally impressive.

  11. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  12. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  13. Numerical Investigation on the Impact of Anode Change on Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Aluminum Smelting Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gosselin, Louis; Fafard, Mario; Peng, Jianping; Li, Baokuan

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the impact of anode change on heat transfer and magnetohydrodynamic flow in aluminum smelting cells, a transient three-dimensional (3D) coupled mathematical model has been developed. The solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations were simultaneously implemented by the finite volume method with full coupling of the Joule heating and Lorentz force through solving the electrical potential equation. The volume of fluid approach was employed to describe the two-phase flow. The phase change of molten electrolyte (bath) as well as molten aluminum (metal) was modeled by an enthalpy-based technique, where the mushy zone is treated as a porous medium with a porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The effect of the new anode temperature on recovery time was also analyzed. A reasonable agreement between the test data and simulated results is obtained. The results indicate that the temperature of the bath under cold anodes first decreases reaching the minimal value and rises under the effect of increasing Joule heating, and finally returns to steady state. The colder bath decays the velocity, and the around ledge becomes thicker. The lowest temperature of the bath below new anodes increases from 1118 K to 1143 K (845 °C to 870 °C) with the new anode temperature ranging from 298 K to 498 K (25°C to 225°C), and the recovery time reduces from 22.5 to 20 hours.

  14. Numerical Investigation on the Impact of Anode Change on Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Aluminum Smelting Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gosselin, Louis; Fafard, Mario; Peng, Jianping; Li, Baokuan

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the impact of anode change on heat transfer and magnetohydrodynamic flow in aluminum smelting cells, a transient three-dimensional (3D) coupled mathematical model has been developed. The solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations were simultaneously implemented by the finite volume method with full coupling of the Joule heating and Lorentz force through solving the electrical potential equation. The volume of fluid approach was employed to describe the two-phase flow. The phase change of molten electrolyte (bath) as well as molten aluminum (metal) was modeled by an enthalpy-based technique, where the mushy zone is treated as a porous medium with a porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The effect of the new anode temperature on recovery time was also analyzed. A reasonable agreement between the test data and simulated results is obtained. The results indicate that the temperature of the bath under cold anodes first decreases reaching the minimal value and rises under the effect of increasing Joule heating, and finally returns to steady state. The colder bath decays the velocity, and the around ledge becomes thicker. The lowest temperature of the bath below new anodes increases from 1118 K to 1143 K (845 C to 870 C) with the new anode temperature ranging from 298 K to 498 K (25C to 225C), and the recovery time reduces from 22.5 to 20 hours.

  15. Heat Rash or Prickly Heat (Miliaria Rubra)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Heat Rash or Prickly Heat (Miliaria Rubra) A parent's guide to condition and ... red, itchy bumps in area of redness. Overview Heat rash (miliaria rubra), also known as prickly heat, ...

  16. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than $57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was $28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  17. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  18. Thermodynamical calculation of metal heating in nanosecond exploding wire and foil experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2007-04-15

    A method of thermodynamical calculation of thin metal wire heating during its electrical explosion is discussed. The technique is based on a calculation of Joule energy deposition taking into account the current wave form and the temperature dependence of the resistivity and heat capacity of the metal. Comparing the calculation to a set of exploding tungsten wire experiments demonstrates good agreement up to the time of melting. Good agreement is also demonstrated with resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulation. A similar thermodynamical calculation for Mo, Ti, Ni, Fe, Al, and Cu shows good agreement with experimental data. The thermodynamical technique is useful for verification of the voltage measurements in exploding wire experiments. This technique also shows good agreement with an exploding W foil experiment.

  19. Heating mechanisms in short-pulse laser-driven cone targets.

    PubMed

    Mason, R J

    2006-01-27

    The fast ignitor is a modern approach to laser fusion that uses a short-pulse laser to initiate thermonuclear burn. In its simplest form the laser launches relativistic electrons that carry its energy to a precompressed fusion target. Cones have been used to give the light access to the dense target core through the low-density ablative cloud surrounding it. Here the ANTHEM implicit hybrid simulation model shows that the peak ion temperatures measured in recent cone target experiments arose chiefly from return current joule heating, mildly supplemented by relativistic electron drag. Magnetic fields augment this heating only slightly, but capture hot electrons near the cone surface and force the hot electron stream into filaments. PMID:16486715

  20. Heating Mechanisms in Short-Pulse Laser-Driven Cone Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.

    2006-01-27

    The fast ignitor is a modern approach to laser fusion that uses a short-pulse laser to initiate thermonuclear burn. In its simplest form the laser launches relativistic electrons that carry its energy to a precompressed fusion target. Cones have been used to give the light access to the dense target core through the low-density ablative cloud surrounding it. Here the ANTHEM implicit hybrid simulation model shows that the peak ion temperatures measured in recent cone target experiments arose chiefly from return current joule heating, mildly supplemented by relativistic electron drag. Magnetic fields augment this heating only slightly, but capture hot electrons near the cone surface and force the hot electron stream into filaments.

  1. MHD Flow and Heat Transfer between Coaxial Rotating Stretchable Disks in a Thermally Stratified Medium.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sumaira; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the unsteady MHD flow of viscous fluid between two parallel rotating disks. Fluid fills the porous space. Energy equation has been constructed by taking Joule heating, thermal stratification and radiation effects into consideration. We convert system of partial differential equations into system of highly nonlinear ordinary differential equations after employing the suitable transformations. Convergent series solutions are obtained. Behavior of different involved parameters on velocity and temperature profiles is examined graphically. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and inspected. It is found that tangential velocity profile is increasing function of rotational parameter. Fluid temperature reduces for increasing values of thermal stratification parameter. At upper disk heat transfer rate enhances for larger values of Eckert and Prandtl numbers. PMID:27218651

  2. Evidence for ultra-fast heating in intense-laser irradiated reduced-mass targets

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Hochhaus, D. C.; Aurand, B.; Stoehlker, T.; Costa Fraga, R. A.; Kalinin, A.; Ecker, B.; Grisenti, R. E.; Kaluza, M. C.; Kuehl, T.; Polz, J.; Reuschl, R.; Winters, D.; Winters, N.; Yin, Z.

    2012-12-15

    We report on an experiment irradiating individual argon droplets of 20 {mu}m diameter with laser pulses of several Joule energy at intensities of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. K-shell emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the hot electron energy fraction and the time-integrated charge-state distribution. Spectral fitting indicates that bulk temperatures up to 160 eV are reached. Modelling of the hot-electron relaxation and generation of K-shell emission with collisional hot-electron stopping only is incompatible with the experimental results, and the data suggest an additional ultra-fast (sub-ps) heating contribution. For example, including resistive heating in the modelling yields a much better agreement with the observed final bulk temperature and qualitatively reproduces the observed charge state distribution.

  3. Scaling of high-field transport and localized heating in graphene transistors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Myung-Ho; Islam, Sharnali; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric

    2011-10-25

    We use infrared thermal imaging and electrothermal simulations to find that localized Joule heating in graphene field-effect transistors on SiO(2) is primarily governed by device electrostatics. Hot spots become more localized (i.e., sharper) as the underlying oxide thickness is reduced, such that the average and peak device temperatures scale differently, with significant long-term reliability implications. The average temperature is proportional to oxide thickness, but the peak temperature is minimized at an oxide thickness of ∼90 nm due to competing electrostatic and thermal effects. We also find that careful comparison of high-field transport models with thermal imaging can be used to shed light on velocity saturation effects. The results shed light on optimizing heat dissipation and reliability of graphene devices and interconnects. PMID:21913673

  4. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, Walter

    1976-01-06

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

  5. Infrared Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IR heating was first industrially used in the 1930s for automotive curing applications and rapidly became a widely applied technology in the manufacturing industry. Contrarily, a slower pace in the development of IR technologies for processing foods and agricultural products was observed, due to lim...

  6. Temperature Control at DBS Electrodes using Heat Sink: Experimentally Validated FEM Model of DBS lead Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Elwassif, Maged M.; Datta, Abhishek; Rahman, Asif; Bikson, Marom

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of Deep Brain Stimulation for the treatment of medically refractory movement disorders and other neurological and psychiatric conditions. The extent of temperature increases around DBS electrodes during normal operation (joule heating and increased metabolic activity) or coupling with an external source (e.g. MRI) remains poorly understood and methods to mitigate temperature increases are being actively investigated. We developed a heat transfer finite element method simulation of DBS incorporating the realistic architecture of Medtronic 3389 leads. The temperature changes were analyzed considering different electrode configurations, stimulation protocols, and tissue properties. The heat-transfer model results were then validated using micro-thermocouple measurements during DBS lead stimulation in a saline bath. FEM results indicate that lead design (materials and geometry) may have a central role in controlling temperature rise by conducting heat. We show how modifying lead design can effectively control temperature increases. The robustness of this heat-sink approach over complimentary heat-mitigation technologies follows from several features: 1) it is insensitive to the mechanisms of heating (e.g. nature of magnetic coupling); 2) does not interfere with device efficacy; and 3) can be practically implemented in a broad range of implanted devices without modifying the normal device operations or the implant procedure. PMID:22764359

  7. Dynamics of quantal heating in electron systems with discrete spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Scott; Mayer, William; Vitkalov, Sergey; Bykov, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    The temporal evolution of quantal Joule heating of two-dimensional (2D) electrons in a GaAs quantum well placed in quantizing magnetic fields is studied using a difference-frequency method. The method is based on measurements of the electron conductivity oscillating at the beat frequency f =f1-f2 between two microwaves applied to the 2D system at frequencies f1 and f2. The method provides direct access to the dynamical characteristics of the heating and yields the inelastic-scattering time τi n of 2D electrons. The obtained τi n is strongly temperature dependent, varying from 0.13 ns at 5.5 K to 1 ns at 2.4 K in magnetic field B =0.333 T . When the temperature T exceeds the Landau-level separation, the relaxation rate 1 /τi n is proportional to T2, indicating electron-electron interaction as the dominant mechanism limiting the quantal heating. At lower temperatures, the rate tends to be proportional to T3, indicating considerable contribution from electron-phonon scattering.

  8. Fluorescence Thermometry Characterization of Microchannel Cooling Performance with Sidewall Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Jin; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Microchannel cooling of complex circuitry in microelectronics and LOC systems is an area of continued research that is constantly evolving. As such, it is important to properly evaluate the heat removal efficiency of the microchannels in near wall heating configurations. In this talk we evaluate the cooling efficiency of microchannels with microheaters embedded on the sidewalls. The microchannels are fabricated using soft lithography and the embedded joule heaters are created by filling molten low melting temperature alloys in two satellite microchannels and solidifying them. In order to assess the thermal transport rate, fluorescent images of the fluid mixed with two temperature-sensitive dyes were captured and pre-conditioned with an image-distortion correction algorithm. By taking their ratiometric value versus temperature measurements, results show that the heat removal efficiency initially increases as a function of Re and then plateaus at about 50 percent once Re is greater than 20. This behavior is the result of a decreasing advective resistance with increasing flow rate, where the ratio of the substrate-environment resistance to the wall-fluid convective resistance determines the ultimate performance of the cooling microchannel.

  9. Bayonet heat exchangers in heat-assisted Stirling heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Yagyu, S.; Fukuyama, Y.; Morikawa, T.; Isshiki, N.; Satoh, I.; Corey, J.; Fellows, C.

    1998-07-01

    The Multi-Temperature Heat Supply System is a research project creating a city energy system with lower environmental load. This system consists of a gas-fueled internal combustion engine and a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump utilizing shaft power and thermal power in a combination of several cylinders. The heat pump is mainly driven by engine shaft power and is partially assisted by thermal power from engine exhaust heat source. Since this heat pump is operated by proportioning the two energy sources to match the characteristics of the driving engine, the system is expected to produce cooling and heating water at high COP. This paper describes heat exchanger development in the project to develop a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump. The heat pump employs the Bayonet type heat exchangers (BHX Type I) for supplying cold and hot water and (BHX Type II) for absorbing exhaust heat from the driving engine. The heat exchanger design concepts are presented and their heat transfer and flow loss characteristics in oscillating gas flow are investigated. The main concern in the BHX Type I is an improvement of gas side heat transfer and the spirally finned tubes were applied to gas side of the heat exchanger. For the BHX Type II, internal heat transfer characteristics are the main concern. Shell-and-tube type heat exchangers are widely used in Stirling machines. However, since brazing is applied to the many tubes for their manufacturing processes, it is very difficult to change flow passages to optimize heat transfer and loss characteristics once they have been made. The challenge was to enhance heat transfer on the gas side to make a highly efficient heat exchanger with fewer parts. It is shown that the Bayonet type heat exchanger can have good performance comparable to conventional heat exchangers.

  10. Heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lilley, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    Analytical and numerical methods, including both finite difference and finite element techniques, are presented with applications to heat conduction problems. Numerical and analytical methods are integrated throughout the text and a variety of complexities are thoroughly treated with many problems, solutions and computer programs. This book is presented as a fundamental course suitable for senior undergraduate and first year graduate students, with end-of-chapter problems and answers included. Sample case studies and suggested projects are included.

  11. Heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, A.J.

    1982-11-30

    A single working fluid heat pump system having a turbocompressor with a first fluid input for the turbine and a second fluid input for the compressor, and a single output volute or mixing chamber for combining the working fluid output flows of the turbine and the compressor. The system provides for higher efficiency than single fluid systems whose turbine and compressor are provided with separate output volutes.

  12. Geothermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Aureille, M.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

  13. A General Coupled Mathematical Model of Electromagnetic Phenomena, Two-Phase Flow, and Heat Transfer in Electroslag Remelting Process Including Conducting in the Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; He, Zhu; Li, Baokuan; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-12-01

    A transient three-dimensional finite-volume mathematical model has been developed to investigate the coupled physical fields in the electroslag remelting (ESR) process. Through equations solved by the electrical potential method, the electric current, electromagnetic force (EMF), and Joule heating fields are demonstrated. The mold is assumed to be conductive rather than insulated. The volume of fluid approach is implemented for the two-phase flow. Moreover, the EMF and Joule heating, which are the source terms of the momentum and energy sources, are recalculated at each iteration as a function of the phase distribution. The solidification is modeled by an enthalpy-porosity formulation, in which the mushy zone is treated as a porous medium with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. An innovative marking method of the metal pool profile is proposed in the experiment. The effect of the applied current on the ESR process is understood by the model. Good agreement is obtained between the experiment and calculation. The electric current flows to the mold lateral wall especially in the slag layer. A large amount of Joule heating around the metal droplet varies as it falls. The hottest region appears under the outer radius of the electrode tip, close to the slag/metal interface instead of the electrode tip. The metal pool becomes deeper with more power. The maximal temperature increases from 1951 K to 2015 K (1678 °C to 1742 °C), and the maximum metal pool depth increases from 34.0 to 59.5 mm with the applied current ranging from 1000 to 2000 A.

  14. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  15. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  16. Study on a Miniature Mixed-gases Joule-Thomson Cooler Driven by an Oil-lubricated Mini-compressor for 120 K Temperature Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Yan, B.; Zou, X.; Zhuang, X. R.; Hu, Q. G.

    In this paper, a miniature J-T cooler using multicomponent mixtures was developed and tested, in which an oil-lubricated mini-compressor was used. Experimental tests on the performance of the miniature J-T cooler were carried out with two kinds of recuperative heat exchangers. One is a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, and the other is a plate-fin type recuperative heat exchanger with whereas a micro-channel configuration fabricated by the wire-electrode cutting method. The former one gave a no-load minimum temperature of 140 K, while the later one showsbetter performance. No-load minimum temperature of 110 K and about 4 W cooling capacity at 118 K were achieved with the plate-fin micro J-T cooler. Such miniature J-T coolers driven by oil-lubricated mini-compressors show good prospects in many applications.

  17. Heat-Exchanger/Heat-Pipe Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. J.; Van Hagan, T. H.

    1987-01-01

    Monolithic assembly reliable and light in weight. Heat exchanger and evaporator ends of heat pipes integrated in monolithic halves welded together. Interface assembly connects heat exchanger of furnace, reactor, or other power source with heat pipes carrying heat to radiator or power-consuming system. One of several concepts proposed for nuclear power supplies aboard spacecraft, interface useful on Earth in solar thermal power systems, heat engines, and lightweight cooling systems.

  18. Electron Heating and the Farley-Buneman Instability in the Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Stephan

    Convective motion in the solar chromosphere has generally more than enough energy to po-tentially explain observed heating, but the possible dissipation mechanisms disserve more con-sideration. When, driven by electric fields, neutrals and ions move at different fluid velocities, like it happens in the Earth's thermosphere, then ion-neutral collisions cause friction and Joule heating. Because of a relatively short neutral-ion collision time in the chromosphere, neutral motion is expected to follow the ions within less than a tenth of a second, canceling any elec-tric fields in the reference frame of the neutral gas. Thus only overshooting slip motion from Alfven waves with correspondigly high frequencies can cause frictional heating. In the Earth's lower thermosphere another mechanism, the Farley-Buneman instability, causes quite intense electron heating when the ExB velocity exceeds the ion-acoustic speed. Similar conditions can occur in the chromosphere as well, but again only due to overshooting motion. We have mod-eled electron heating from the Farley-Buneman instability in the chromosphere, assuming that the instability heats similar as in the Earth's ionosphere, but electrons are cooled by collisions with H atoms instead of atmospheric molecules. Then electron temperatures can become very high and the enhancements are eventually limited by radiative losses. Observed ubiquitous and persistent UV emission of the solar chromosphere could so be explained by the Farley-Buneman instability, if the emissions in reality are intermittent with time scales less than a second.

  19. Evaluation of the invasion heat for the HTS current lead using YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endoh, R.; Kato, H.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2003-10-01

    Current leads using high- TC superconductors (HTS current leads) are one of cryogenic key devices to assemble compact superconducting magnets such as applied for maglev trains etc. It is essential to evaluate effective thermal conductance through a HTS current lead package together with evaluating Joule heat and critical current for efficient design that has high current capacity and low heat invasion. We have designed the 500 A class HTS current lead package using a YBCO rod whose size is ∅ 3 × 30 mm, and developed an apparatus to measure its heat invasion. Temperature drop as a function of heat flow between the two ends of the package was measured by a conventional steady heat flow method. The quantity of heat invasion of the package under typical practical conditions, from 80 K hot end to 20 K cold end, was 163 mW. This value was simulated to the total value of 158 mW by counting contributions of all the component materials.

  20. Analysis on heat loss characteristics of a 10 kV HTS power substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yuping; Dai, Shaotao; Song, Naihao; Zhang, Jingye; Gao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Zhiqin; Zhou, Weiwei; Wei, Zhourong; Lin, Liangzhen; Xiao, Liye

    2014-09-01

    A 10 kV High Temperature Superconducting power substation (10 kV HTS substation), supported by Chinese State 863 projects, was developed and has been running to supply power for several factories for more than two years at an industrial park of Baiyin, Gansu province in Northwest China. The system of the 10 kV HTS substation compositions, including a HTS cable, a HTS transformer, a SFCL, and a SMES, are introduced. The SMES works at liquid helium temperature and the other three apparatus operates under liquid nitrogen condition. There are mainly four types of heat losses existing in each HTS apparatus of the 10 kV HTS substation, including AC loss, Joule heat loss, conductive heat, and leak-in heat from cryostat. A small quantity of AC loss still exists due to the harmonic component of the current when it carries DC for HTS apparatus. The principle and basis for analysis of the heat losses are introduced and the total heat loss of each apparatus are calculated or estimated, which agree well with the test result. The analysis and result presented are of importance for the design of the refrigeration system.

  1. Three-dimensional model of heat transport during In Situ Vitrification with melting and cool down

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.L.

    1993-07-01

    A potential technology for permanent remediation of buried wastes is the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable, glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. The magnitude of the resulting electrical resistance heating is sufficient to cause soil melting. As the molten region grows, surface heat losses cause the soil near the surface to re solidify. This paper presents numerical results obtained by considering heat transport and melting when solving the conservation of mass and energy equations using finite element methods. A local heat source is calculated by solving the electric field equation and calculating a Joule Heat source term. The model considered is a three-dimensional model of the electrodes and surrounding soil. Also included in the model is subsidence; where the surface of the melted soil subsides due to the change in density when the soil melts. A power vs. time profile is implemented for typical ISV experiments. The model agrees well with experimental data for melt volume and melt shape.

  2. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  3. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  4. Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U; Thekdi, Arvind; Keiser, James R; Storey, John Morse

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

  5. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Heat Transfer in Nanocomposite Thermoelectric Coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabari, Ronil; Mahmud, Shohel; Dutta, Animesh; Biglarbegian, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Thermoelectric coolers (TEC) can produce a cooling effect (in refrigerator mode) or a heating effect (in heat pump mode) using electrical energy input. Performance characteristics of typical TECs are poor when compared to the traditional cooling system (e.g., a vapor compression system). However, nanostructuring of thermoelectric (TE) materials can generate high-performance TE materials (e.g., high Seebeck coefficient, low thermal conductivity, and high electrical conductivity), and such materials show the promise to improve the performance of TEC. The main objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of nanocomposite TE materials and surface to surrounding convection heat transfer on the thermal performance of TEC. The mathematical model developed in this paper includes Fourier heat conduction, Joule heat, Seebeck effect, Peltier effect, and Thomson effect. This model also includes temperature-dependent transport properties. Governing transport equations are solved numerically using the finite element method to identify temperature and electrical potential distributions and to calculate heat absorbed and the coefficient of performance (COP). Heat absorbed and COP are also calculated using a simplified 1D analytical solution and compared with numerically obtained results. An optimum electric current is also calculated for maximum heat absorption rate and maximum COP for fixed geometric dimensions and variable convection heat transfer coefficients. An Increase in the convection heat transfer coefficient increases the optimum electric current required for maximum heat absorption rate and maximum COP. For the materials considered, the results show that COP of TEC can be increased by approximately 13 ± 1% if nanostructured TE materials are used instead of the conventional TE materials.

  6. On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hung-Wen; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-05-01

    Space heating is the largest energy end use, consuming more than 7 quintillion joules of site energy annually in the U.S. building sector. A few recent studies showed discrepancies in simulated space-heating energy use among different building energy modeling programs, and the simulated results are suspected to be underpredicting reality. While various uncertainties are associated with building simulations, especially when simulations are performed by different modelers using different simulation programs for buildings with different configurations, it is crucial to identify and evaluate key driving factors to space-heating energy use in order to support the design and operation of low-energy buildings. In this study, 10 design and operation parameters for space-heating systems of two prototypical office buildings in each of three U.S. heating climates are identified and evaluated, using building simulations with EnergyPlus, to determine the most influential parameters and their impacts on variations of space-heating energy use. The influence of annual weather change on space-heating energy is also investigated using 30-year actual weather data. The simulated space-heating energy use is further benchmarked against those from similar actual office buildings in two U.S. commercial-building databases to better understand the discrepancies between simulated and actual energy use. In summary, variations of both the simulated and actual space-heating energy use of office buildings in all three heating climates can be very large. However these variations are mostly driven by a few influential parameters related to building design and operation. The findings provide insights for building designers, owners, operators, and energy policy makers to make better decisions on energy-efficiency technologies to reduce space-heating energy use for both new and existing buildings.

  7. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  8. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  9. Dual source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  10. Heat recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Richarts, F.

    1985-04-16

    Heat is recovered by combining a heat transfer system including heat exchangers interconnected in a circulatory system, with a heat pump system. The heat pump system is preferably operated in accordance with the Lorenz-Principle. It is not necessary to divide the heat carrier circuit of the heat pump into two or three separate circulatory circuits. The heat carrier circuit of the heat pump can thus continue to operate unchanged even if the heat pump is switched off. For this purpose the warm heat carrier coming from a discharge fluid cooler, is heated further in a condenser of the heat pump and the cold heat carrier coming from a preheater or cooler group, is cooled further in an evaporator of the heat pump.

  11. Segmented heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  12. Improved heat dissipation in gallium nitride light-emitting diodes with embedded graphene oxide pattern.

    PubMed

    Han, Nam; Cuong, Tran Viet; Han, Min; Ryu, Beo Deul; Chandramohan, S; Park, Jong Bae; Kang, Ji Hye; Park, Young-Jae; Ko, Kang Bok; Kim, Hee Yun; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Jae Hyoung; Katharria, Y S; Choi, Chel-Jong; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The future of solid-state lighting relies on how the performance parameters will be improved further for developing high-brightness light-emitting diodes. Eventually, heat removal is becoming a crucial issue because the requirement of high brightness necessitates high-operating current densities that would trigger more joule heating. Here we demonstrate that the embedded graphene oxide in a gallium nitride light-emitting diode alleviates the self-heating issues by virtue of its heat-spreading ability and reducing the thermal boundary resistance. The fabrication process involves the generation of scalable graphene oxide microscale patterns on a sapphire substrate, followed by its thermal reduction and epitaxial lateral overgrowth of gallium nitride in a metal-organic chemical vapour deposition system under one-step process. The device with embedded graphene oxide outperforms its conventional counterpart by emitting bright light with relatively low-junction temperature and thermal resistance. This facile strategy may enable integration of large-scale graphene into practical devices for effective heat removal. PMID:23385596

  13. Single-phase ambient and cryogenic temperature heat transfer coefficients in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.; Bradley, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Micro-scaling cryogenic refrigerators, in particular the Joule-Thomson (JT) variety require very good information about heat transfer characteristics of the refrigerants flowing in the microchannels for optimal design and performance. The extremely low Reynolds flow is present in a micro JT cryocooler, the heat transfer characteristics at these conditions require investigation. There are numerous studies regarding heat transfer coefficient measurements of liquid flow in microchannels at/near ambient temperature and high Reynolds flow (Re>2000), that agree well with the conventional correlations. However, results from previous studies of gaseous flow in microchannels at low Reynolds flow (Re<1000) disagree with conventional theory. Moreover, the studies performed at cryogenic temperatures are quite limited in number. In this paper, the single-phase heat transfer coefficients and friction factors for nitrogen are measured at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. The hydraulic diameters for this study are 60, 110 and 180 ?m for circular microchannels. The Reynolds numbers varied from a very low value of 10 to 3000. The measured friction factors are comparable to those in macro-scale tubes. The experimental results of the heat transfer indicate that Nusselt numbers derived from measurements are significantly affected by axial conduction at low Reynolds flow (Re<500). The Nusselt numbers at high Reynolds flow (Re>1000) follow conventional theory. The detailed experiment, procedure, and measured results are presented in this paper and discussed regarding deviation from ideal theory at low Reynolds flow.

  14. A Review of Heating and Temperature Control in Microfluidic Systems: Techniques and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Miralles, Vincent; Huerre, Axel; Malloggi, Florent; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the different techniques developed over the last decade to regulate the temperature within microfluidic systems. A variety of different approaches has been adopted, from external heating sources to Joule heating, microwaves or the use of lasers to cite just a few examples. The scope of the technical solutions developed to date is impressive and encompasses for instance temperature ramp rates ranging from 0.1 to 2,000 °C/s leading to homogeneous temperatures from −3 °C to 120 °C, and constant gradients from 6 to 40 °C/mm with a fair degree of accuracy. We also examine some recent strategies developed for applications such as digital microfluidics, where integration of a heating source to generate a temperature gradient offers control of a key parameter, without necessarily requiring great accuracy. Conversely, Temperature Gradient Focusing requires high accuracy in order to control both the concentration and separation of charged species. In addition, the Polymerase Chain Reaction requires both accuracy (homogeneous temperature) and integration to carry out demanding heating cycles. The spectrum of applications requiring temperature regulation is growing rapidly with increasingly important implications for the physical, chemical and biotechnological sectors, depending on the relevant heating technique. PMID:26835667

  15. Heat production in the windings of the stators of electric machines under stationary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebouyeh Samami, Behzad; Pieper, Martin; Breitbach, Gerd; Hodapp, Josef

    2014-12-01

    In electric machines due to high currents and resistive losses (joule heating) heat is produced. To avoid damages by overheating the design of effective cooling systems is required. Therefore the knowledge of heat sources and heat transfer processes is necessary. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate a good and effective calculation method for the temperature analysis based on homogenization techniques. These methods have been applied for the stator windings in a slot of an electric machine consisting of copper wires and resin. The key quantity here is an effective thermal conductivity, which characterizes the heterogeneous wire resin-arrangement inside the stator slot. To illustrate the applicability of the method, the analysis of a simplified, homogenized model is compared with the detailed analysis of temperature behavior inside a slot of an electric machine according to the heat generation. We considered here only the stationary situation. The achieved numerical results are accurate and show that the applied homogenization technique works in practice. Finally the results of simulations for the two cases, the original model of the slot and the homogenized model chosen for the slot (unit cell), are compared to experimental results.

  16. A validated model for induction heating of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Robert N.; Boyd, James G.; Hartl, Darren J.; Brown, Jonathan K.; Calkins, Frederick T.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators deliver high forces while being compact and reliable, making them ideal for consideration in aerospace applications. One disadvantage of these thermally driven actuators is their slow cyclic time response compared to conventional actuators. Induction heating has recently been proposed to quickly heat SMA components. However efforts to date have been purely empirical. The present work approachs this problem in a computational manner by developing a finite element model of induction heating in which the time-harmonic electromagnetic equations are solved for the Joule heat power field, the energy equation is solved for the temperature field, and the linear momentum equations are solved to find the stress, displacement, and internal state variable fields. The combined model was implemented in Abaqus using a Python script approach and applied to SMA torque tube and beam actuators. The model has also been used to examine magnetic flux concentrators to improve the induction systems performance. Induction heating experiments were performed using the SMA torque tube, and the model agreed well with the experiments.

  17. Uniform and Non-uniform Thermoelement Subject to Lateral Heat Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Amar Hasan; Kafafy, Raed

    2013-03-01

    A general energy equation of quasi-one-dimensional heat flow in a longitudinal thermoelement (TE) of a curved side that is subjected to an electric field and convection heat transfer on the curved surface is developed. The energy equation is solved for the temperature distribution in two cases; uniform cross-section TE and non-uniform cross-section TE. Analytical solutions for a uniform cross-section TE with uniform electrical and thermophysical properties are obtained, whereas numerical solutions are provided for a non-uniform cross-section TE. Two parameters playing a vital role in the thermal performance of the TE are identified: the heat resistance ratio ( HRR) and the energy growing ratio ( EGR). The HRR represents the ratio of the longitudinal conduction maximum thermal resistance to the lateral convection maximum thermal resistance. The EGR represents the ratio of Joule's electrical heating to Fourier's heat conduction. The effects of varying these two parameters, as well as the TE geometry, have been thoroughly investigated.

  18. Improved heat dissipation in gallium nitride light-emitting diodes with embedded graphene oxide pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Nam; Viet Cuong, Tran; Han, Min; Deul Ryu, Beo; Chandramohan, S.; Bae Park, Jong; Hye Kang, Ji; Park, Young-Jae; Bok Ko, Kang; Yun Kim, Hee; Kyu Kim, Hyun; Hyoung Ryu, Jae; Katharria, Y. S.; Choi, Chel-Jong; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2013-02-01

    The future of solid-state lighting relies on how the performance parameters will be improved further for developing high-brightness light-emitting diodes. Eventually, heat removal is becoming a crucial issue because the requirement of high brightness necessitates high-operating current densities that would trigger more joule heating. Here we demonstrate that the embedded graphene oxide in a gallium nitride light-emitting diode alleviates the self-heating issues by virtue of its heat-spreading ability and reducing the thermal boundary resistance. The fabrication process involves the generation of scalable graphene oxide microscale patterns on a sapphire substrate, followed by its thermal reduction and epitaxial lateral overgrowth of gallium nitride in a metal-organic chemical vapour deposition system under one-step process. The device with embedded graphene oxide outperforms its conventional counterpart by emitting bright light with relatively low-junction temperature and thermal resistance. This facile strategy may enable integration of large-scale graphene into practical devices for effective heat removal.

  19. Nonlinear Radiation Heat Transfer Effects in the Natural Convective Boundary Layer Flow of Nanofluid Past a Vertical Plate: A Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter. PMID:25251242

  20. Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) System Development - Air-Source IHP Control Strategy and Specifications and Ground-Source IHP Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Richard W; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2007-05-01

    The integrated heat pump (IHP), as one appliance, can provide space cooling, heating, ventilation, and dehumidification while maintaining comfort and meeting domestic water heating needs in near-zero-energy home (NZEH) applications. In FY 2006 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed development of a control strategy and system specification for an air-source IHP. The conceptual design of a ground-source IHP was also completed. Testing and analysis confirm the potential of both IHP concepts to meet NZEH energy services needs while consuming 50% less energy than a suite of equipment that meets current minimum efficiency requirements. This report is in fulfillment of an FY06 DOE Building Technologies (BT) Joule Milestone.

  1. Solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.; Startevant, R.C.

    1985-01-22

    A solar heater has an outlet conduit above an inlet conduit intercoupling a solar heating chamber with the inside of a building through a window opening. In one form the solar collecting chamber is outside the building below the window and the outlet conduit and inlet conduit are contiguous and pass through the window opening between the windowsill and the lower sash. In another form of the invention the solar collecting chambers are located beside each side of the window and joined at the top by the outlet conduit that passes through an opening between the upper window sash and the top of the window frame and at the bottom by an inlet conduit that passes through an opening between the lower sash and the windowsill. The outlet conduit carries photoelectric cells that provide electrical energy for driving a squirrel-cage fan in the outlet conduit through a mercury switch seated on a damper actuated by a bimetallic coil that closes the damper when the temperature in the outlet conduit goes below a predetermined temperature.

  2. Multiscale model of heat dissipation mechanisms during field emission from carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahay, M.; Zhu, W.; Fairchild, S.; Murray, P. T.; Back, T. C.; Gruen, G. J.

    2016-01-01

    A multiscale model of field emission (FE) from carbon nanotube fibers (CNFs) is developed, which takes into account Joule heating within the fiber and radiative cooling and the Nottingham effect at the tip of the individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the array located at the fiber tip. The model predicts the fraction of CNTs being destroyed as a function of the applied external electric field and reproduces many experimental features observed in some recently investigated CNFs, such as order of magnitude of the emission current (mA range), low turn on electric field (fraction of V/μm), deviation from pure Fowler-Nordheim behavior at large applied electric field, hysteresis of the FE characteristics, and a spatial variation of the temperature along the CNF axis with a maximum close to its tip of a few hundred °C.

  3. Direct observation of resistive heating at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Estrada, David; Wood, Joshua D.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Eres, Gyula; Lyding, Joseph W.; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2014-10-01

    We directly measure the nanometer-scale temperature rise at wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs) in functioning graphene devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy with ˜50 nm spatial and ˜0.2 K temperature resolution. We observe a small temperature increase at select wrinkles and a large (˜100 K) temperature increase at GBs between coalesced hexagonal grains. Comparisons of measurements with device simulations estimate the GB resistivity (8-150 Ω μm) among the lowest reported for graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. An analytical model is developed, showing that GBs can experience highly localized resistive heating and temperature rise, most likely affecting the reliability of graphene devices. Our studies provide an unprecedented view of thermal effects surrounding nanoscale defects in nanomaterials such as graphene.

  4. Temperature control at DBS electrodes using a heat sink: experimentally validated FEM model of DBS lead architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwassif, Maged M.; Datta, Abhishek; Rahman, Asif; Bikson, Marom

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of medically refractory movement disorders and other neurological and psychiatric conditions. The extent of temperature increases around DBS electrodes during normal operation (joule heating and increased metabolic activity) or coupling with an external source (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging) remains poorly understood and methods to mitigate temperature increases are being actively investigated. We developed a heat transfer finite element method (FEM) simulation of DBS incorporating the realistic architecture of Medtronic 3389 leads. The temperature changes were analyzed considering different electrode configurations, stimulation protocols and tissue properties. The heat-transfer model results were then validated using micro-thermocouple measurements during DBS lead stimulation in a saline bath. FEM results indicate that lead design (materials and geometry) may have a central role in controlling temperature rise by conducting heat. We show how modifying lead design can effectively control temperature increases. The robustness of this heat-sink approach over complimentary heat-mitigation technologies follows from several features: (1) it is insensitive to the mechanisms of heating (e.g. nature of magnetic coupling); (2) it does not interfere with device efficacy; and (3) can be practically implemented in a broad range of implanted devices without modifying the normal device operations or the implant procedure.

  5. Handbook on heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhan, Pavel I.; Kanevets, Georgii E.; Seliverstov, Vladimir M.

    Essential data on heat exchange equipment used in ship, locomotive, automotive, and aircraft powerplants are presented in a systematic manner. The data cover the principal types and technical and performance characteristics of heat exchangers, fundamentals of the theory of heat exchange, calculation of heat transfer coefficients for different types of heat exchange apparatus, optimization of heat exchangers, computer-aided design of heat exchange equipment, testing techniques, and test result processing.

  6. Thulium-170 heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1992-01-21

    This patent describes an isotopic heat source. It comprises; at least one isotopic fuel stack, comprising alternating layers of: thulium oxide; and a low atomic weight diluent for thulium oxide; a heat block defining holes into which the fuel stacks can be placed; at least one heat pipe for heat removal, with the heat pipe being positioned in the heat block in thermal connection with the fuel stack; and a structural container surrounding the heat block.

  7. High heat flux single phase heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Izenson, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux, single-phase heat exchanger for spacecraft thermal management. The intended application is a net generation interface heat exchanger to couple the crew module water thermal bus to the two-phase ammonia main thermal bus in the Space Station Freedom. The large size of the interface heat exchanger is dictated by the relatively poor water-side heat transfer characteristics. The objective of this program is to develop a single-phase heat transfer approach which can achieve heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients comparable to those of the evaporation ammonia side. A new heat exchanger concept has been developed to meet these objecties. The main feature of this heat exchanger is that it can achieve very high heat fluxes with a pressure drop one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of previous microchannel or jet impingement high heat flux heat exchangers. This paper describes proof-of-concept experiments performed in air and water and presents analytical model of the heat exchanger.

  8. Multiple source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  9. Heat pipe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A bibliography of heat pipe technology to provide a summary of research projects conducted on heat pipes is presented. The subjects duscussed are: (1) heat pipe applications, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) design and fabrication, (4) testing and operation, (5) subject and author index, and (6) heat pipe related patents.

  10. Heated tool for autoclaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Vanucci, R. D.; Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Components made of composite materials are heated in autoclaves by employing electrical resistance heating blankets, thus avoiding need to heat entire autoclave volume. Method provides not only significant energy savings compared to heating entire pressure vessel but offers time savings in accelerated heat-up and cool-down cycles.

  11. Fast ignition realization experiment with high-contrast kilo-joule peta-watt LFEX laser and strong external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Kojima, Sadaoki; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sawada, Hiroshi; Lee, Seung Ho; Shiroto, Takashi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Morace, Alessio; Vaisseau, Xavier; Sakata, Shohei; Abe, Yuki; Matsuo, Kazuki; Farley Law, King Fai; Tosaki, Shota; Yogo, Akifumi; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Zhang, Zhe; Sunahara, Atsushi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yamanoi, Kohei; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Tokita, Shigeki; Nakata, Yoshiki; Kawanaka, Junji; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Kotaro; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Bellei, Claudio; Santos, João Jorge; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    A petawatt laser for fast ignition experiments (LFEX) laser system [N. Miyanaga et al., J. Phys. IV France 133, 81 (2006)], which is currently capable of delivering 2 kJ in a 1.5 ps pulse using 4 laser beams, has been constructed beside the GEKKO-XII laser facility for demonstrating efficient fast heating of a dense plasma up to the ignition temperature under the auspices of the Fast Ignition Realization EXperiment (FIREX) project [H. Azechi et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104024 (2009)]. In the FIREX experiment, a cone is attached to a spherical target containing a fuel to prevent a corona plasma from entering the path of the intense heating LFEX laser beams. The LFEX laser beams are focused at the tip of the cone to generate a relativistic electron beam (REB), which heats a dense fuel core generated by compression of a spherical deuterized plastic target induced by the GEKKO-XII laser beams. Recent studies indicate that the current heating efficiency is only 0.4%, and three requirements to achieve higher efficiency of the fast ignition (FI) scheme with the current GEKKO and LFEX systems have been identified: (i) reduction of the high energy tail of the REB; (ii) formation of a fuel core with high areal density using a limited number (twelve) of GEKKO-XII laser beams as well as a limited energy (4 kJ of 0.53-μm light in a 1.3 ns pulse); (iii) guiding and focusing of the REB to the fuel core. Laser-plasma interactions in a long-scale plasma generate electrons that are too energetic to efficiently heat the fuel core. Three actions were taken to meet the first requirement. First, the intensity contrast of the foot pulses to the main pulses of the LFEX was improved to >109. Second, a 5.5-mm-long cone was introduced to reduce pre-heating of the inner cone wall caused by illumination of the unconverted 1.053-μm light of implosion beam (GEKKO-XII). Third, the outside of the cone wall was coated with a 40-μm plastic layer to protect it from the pressure caused by imploding plasma. Following the above improvements, conversion of 13% of the LFEX laser energy to a low energy portion of the REB, whose slope temperature is 0.7 MeV, which is close to the ponderomotive scaling value, was achieved. To meet the second requirement, the compression of a solid spherical ball with a diameter of 200-μm to form a dense core with an areal density of ˜0.07 g/cm2 was induced by a laser-driven spherically converging shock wave. Converging shock compression is more hydrodynamically stable compared to shell implosion, while a hot spot cannot be generated with a solid ball target. Solid ball compression is preferable also for compressing an external magnetic field to collimate the REB to the fuel core, due to the relatively small magnetic Reynolds number of the shock compressed region. To meet the third requirement, we have generated a strong kilo-tesla magnetic field using a laser-driven capacitor-coil target. The strength and time history of the magnetic field were characterized with proton deflectometry and a B-dot probe. Guidance of the REB using a 0.6-kT field in a planar geometry has been demonstrated at the LULI 2000 laser facility. In a realistic FI scenario, a magnetic mirror is formed between the REB generation point and the fuel core. The effects of the strong magnetic field on not only REB transport but also plasma compression were studied using numerical simulations. According to the transport calculations, the heating efficiency can be improved from 0.4% to 4% by the GEKKO and LFEX laser system by meeting the three requirements described above. This efficiency is scalable to 10% of the heating efficiency by increasing the areal density of the fuel core.

  12. Enhancement of heat transfer in waste-heat heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The Fluidfire shallow fluidized bed heat transfer facility was modified during this program to give increased air flow capacity and to allow testing with different distributor plates and with two-stage heat exchangers. Tests were conducted using this heat transfer facility to investigate the effect of reduced distributor plate pressure loss and amount and type of bed material on the heat transfer performance of a single-stage fluidized bed heat exchanger. Elutriation from the bed was measured for different bed materials and distributor plates; alternate heat exchanger surfaces having different fin spacings were also tested. Two types of two-stage fluidized bed heat exchangers were tested: one having a baffle (having almost no pressure loss) located between the stages and which allowed bed material to recirculate between upper and lower beds; the second having two distributor plates in series with no recirculation of the bed material. The results obtained in the experimental program were used in conceptual design studies of multi-stage fluidized bed heat exchangers for waste heat recovery from diesel engine exhaust gases. Information was obtained from the literature and from diesel engine manufacturers to determine allowable diesel engine operating back pressures. The costs were estimated for two- and three-stage designs and were compared with costs obtained previously for single-stage fluidized bed and conventional heat exchanger designs.

  13. Heat Rash or Prickly Heat (Miliaria Rubra)

    MedlinePlus

    ... groin and armpits. Self-Care Guidelines Prevention and treatment of heat rash consist of controlling heat and humidity. Acetaminophen ... and apply cool compresses. Do not give fluids. ... bacterial skin infection related to the heat rash or otherwise, oral or topical antibiotics may ...

  14. Heat Rash (Miliaria or Prickly Heat)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes & Risk Factors What causes heat rash? Heat rash is most common in newborns and infants, but it can also affect adults. It is usually triggered by sweating too much, having a high body temperature, being overdressed or being in a very warm environment. Babies ... How can I treat heat rash? The ...

  15. Babies and heat rashes

    MedlinePlus

    Heat rashes and babies; Prickly heat rash; Red miliaria ... To avoid heat rash , keep your baby cool and dry during warm weather. Some helpful suggestions: During the hot season, dress your baby in lightweight, soft, cotton clothing. Cotton ...

  16. Heat Wave Safety Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat has caused more deaths than all other weather events, including floods. A heat wave is a ... care for heat- related emergencies … ❏ Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes. ❏ ...

  17. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  18. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  19. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  20. Operation of an ADR using helium exchange gas as a substitute for a failed heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-11-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 × 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer and Fluid Characteristics of Flowing Liquid Nitrogen in HTS Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, O.; Ohkuma, T.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable has heat intrusion from the termination including joule heat generation at the terminal joint and from the room temperature cable through the Cu current lead. According to the length of the HTS cable, this heat loss may become a considerable amount which cannot be ignored in the HTS cable system. In this study, referring to a high-voltage cable (HV cable) which was developed in M-PACC project, the effect of heat transfer at the interface between the terminal joint and LN2 in the terminal vessel (ho) on the temperature of the HTS cable were calculated and evaluated. The condition of flow in the terminal vessel was assumed to be natural convection, forced flow or static condition for evaluating this effect with various heat transfer condition. As a result, in the case of the natural convection, most of heats flow into the LN2 in the terminal vessel where the volumetric flow of the LN2 is large since ho becomes high. Accordingly, the temperature rise of the LN2 in the inner pipe of Cu former and the terminal vessel can be restricted. However, in the cases of the forced flow and the static condition, most of heats flow into the LN2 in the inner pipe where the volumetric flow of the LN2 is small since ho becomes small. Accordingly, the temperature rise of the LN2 in the inner pipe becomes high. This temperature rise of the LN2 in the inner pipe makes the temperature of the HTS conductor large resulting in remarkable increase of AC losses. Consequently, on the HV cable design, for restriction of the AC loss increase, it is expected that designing the HTS cable termination such as extending outer surface of the terminal joint for increasing of the heat inflow from the terminal joint to the LN2 in the vessel is effective.

  2. Operation of an ADR Using Helium Exchange Gas as a Substitute for a Failed Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  3. Development of Rapid Pipe Moulding Process for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics by Direct Resistance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuto; Harada, Ryuki; Uemura, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutao; Kuwahara, Hideyuki

    To deal with environmental issues, the gasoline mileage of passenger cars can be improved by reduction of the car weight. The use of car components made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) is increasing because of its superior mechanical properties and relatively low density. Many vehicle structural parts are pipe-shaped, such as suspension arms, torsion beams, door guard bars and impact beams. A reduction of the car weight is expected by using CFRP for these parts. Especially, when considering the recyclability and ease of production, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics are a prime candidate. On the other hand, the moulding process of CFRTP pipes for mass production has not been well established yet. For this pipe moulding process an induction heating method has been investigated already, however, this method requires a complicated coil system. To reduce the production cost, another system without such complicated equipment is to be developed. In this study, the pipe moulding process of CFRTP using direct resistance heating was developed. This heating method heats up the mould by Joule heating using skin effect of high-frequency current. The direct resistance heating method is desirable from a cost perspective, because this method can heat the mould directly without using any coils. Formerly developed Non-woven Stitched Multi-axial Cloth (NSMC) was used as semi-product material. NSMC is very suitable for the lamination process due to the fact that non-crimp stitched carbon fiber of [0°/+45°/90°/-45°] and polyamide 6 non-woven fabric are stitched to one sheet, resulting in a short production cycle time. The use of the pipe moulding process with the direct resistance heating method in combination with the NSMC, has resulted in the successful moulding of a CFRTP pipe of 300 mm in length, 40 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness.

  4. Transient heat transfer analysis of superconducting magnetic levitating flywheel rotor operating in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mochida, A.; Kudo, K.; Higasa, H.

    1999-07-01

    In the present study, transient temperature rise is analyzed in a flywheel type power storage system operated in vacuum environment. The flywheel rotor is levitated by high-temperature-superconducting magnetic bearing to reduce the bearing loss. Though the superconductor is cooled by liquid nitrogen, the temperature of the whole system rises due to Joule heating in the coils of the bearings and the motor during the operation. If the temperature should reach the critical temperature of the permanent magnet used for the magnetic bearings after long time operation, the magnetic bearings lose their effect. The heat generated in the levitated rotor diffuses within it by heat conduction and finally emitted to its surrounding solid materials by thermal radiation from the rotor surfaces across vacuum layer. Numerical simulation is carried out calculating the transient radiative-conductive heat transfer and time-dependent profiles of temperature within the rotor are obtained. The results are compared with the experimentally obtained temperatures by measured a test model of 1kWh power storage and the measured profiles of the temperature rise of the rotor fit very well with the calculated ones. Using this simulation tool, the effects of the surface emissivity of the materials of the rotor and the stator, the temperature of the surrounding casings and the thermal conductivity of the materials on the temperature profiles in the system are estimated.

  5. Numerical and experimental investigation of melting with internal heat generation within cylindrical enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Amber Shrivastava; Brian Williams; Ali S. Siahpush; Bruce Savage; John Crepeau

    2014-06-01

    There have been significant efforts by the heat transfer community to investigate the melting phenomenon of materials. These efforts have included the analytical development of equations to represent melting, numerical development of computer codes to assist in modeling the phenomena, and collection of experimental data. The understanding of the melting phenomenon has application in several areas of interest, for example, the melting of a Phase Change Material (PCM) used as a thermal storage medium as well as the melting of the fuel bundle in a nuclear power plant during an accident scenario. The objective of this research is two-fold. First a numerical investigation, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), of melting with internal heat generation for a vertical cylindrical geometry is presented. Second, to the best of authors knowledge, there are very limited number of engineering experimental results available for the case of melting with Internal Heat Generation (IHG). An experiment was performed to produce such data using resistive, or Joule, heating as the IHG mechanism. The numerical results are compared against the experimental results and showed favorable correlation. Uncertainties in the numerical and experimental analysis are discussed. Based on the numerical and experimental analysis, recommendations are made for future work.

  6. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  7. Comparison and analysis of the efficiency of heat exchange of copper rod and copper wires current lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Yu, T.; Li, Z. M.; Wei, B.; Qiu, M.; Zhang, H. J.

    2013-11-01

    Current leads are the key components that connect the low-temperature and high temperature parts of the cryogenic system. Owing to the wide range of temperatures, current leads are the main sources of heat leakage. Since the HTS tapes have no resistance and the generated Joule heat is almost zero, HTS binary current leads can reduce heat leakage compared to the conventional leads. However, heat will still be generated and conducted to the cryogenic system through the copper parts of the HTS current leads. In order to reduce heat leakage by the copper parts of the HTS current leads, this paper presents an optimized design of the copper parts of HTS binary current leads. Inside the leads, the copper wires were applied as an alternative to the copper rod without changing the overall dimensions. Firstly, the differential function of heat transfer was derived. By solving the function, the optimum number of the copper wires and the temperature distribution of two different current leads were gotten. Then the experiment of the temperature distribution was done, and the experimental results were basically the same with the calculative results. The simulation and related experiments proved that the copper wire can increase security margins and reduce maximum temperatures under the same shunt current.

  8. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiqul, M. I.; Ishak, M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  9. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  10. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Kirol, L.D.; Mills, J.I.

    1984-08-01

    Magnetic heat pumps use the magnetocaloric effect to produce entropy changes necessary for heat pumping. A rotary magnetic heat pump has been analyzed and computer models have been developed. The contribution of viscous heat to the regenerator heat balance has been found to significantly restrict performance. The contribution of viscous heating is at least as important as the temperature differences required for regenerator heat transfer. Multiple magnet coils on a single rotor reduce the viscous work per field change cycle and result in greatly improved performance. Operation at 80% of Carnot efficiency with a heat pumping rate of 10 kW per kilogram of magnetic material is predicted.

  11. Heating apparatus comprising a heat recovery apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Pibernat, T.

    1983-08-09

    A heating apparatus includes at least one combustion air inlet, a reverse-draft hearth having a grill positioned within a hearth plate, an ash receptacle for recovering combustion wastes, a fume outlet combustion chamber positoned under the reverse-draft hearth, and a heat recovery device. A heat transport and exchange fluid is adapted to be fed through the heat recovery device, and it circulates through the device in order to recover heat generated in the hearth. The heat recovery device also includes at least one casing positioned beneath the hearth, over the ash receptacle, and which is spaced from the walls of the heating apparatus. The rear portion of the casing is connected to the hearth plate so as to block combustion gases so that the combustion gases will pass over and thereafter under the casing prior to leaving the apparatus via the fume outlet.

  12. A Study of Alfven Wave Propagation and Heating the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, J.; Song, P.

    2013-12-01

    Alfven wave propagation, reflection and heating of the solar atmosphere are studied for a one-dimensional solar atmosphere by self-consistently solving plasma and neutral fluid equations and Maxwell's equations with incorporation of the Hall effect, strong electron-neutral, electron-ion, and ion-neutral collisions. The governing equations are very stiff because of the strong coupling between the charged and neutral fluids. We have developed a numerical model based on an implicit backward difference formula (BDF2) of second order accuracy both in time and space to overcome the stiffness. A non-reflecting boundary condition is applied to the top boundary of the simulation domain so that the wave reflection within the domain due to the density gradient can be unambiguously determined. It is shown that the Alfven waves are partially reflected throughout the chromosphere. The reflection is increasingly stronger at higher altitudes and the strongest reflection occurs at the transition region. The waves are damped in the lower chromosphere dominantly through Joule dissipation due to electron collisions with neutrals and ions. The heating resulting from the wave damping is strong enough to balance the radiation energy loss for the quiet chromosphere. The collisional dissipation of the Alfven waves in the weakly collisional corona is negligible. The heating rates are larger for weaker background magnetic fields. In addition, higher frequency waves are subject to heavier damping. There is an upper cutoff frequency, depending on the background magnetic field, above which the waves are completely damped. At the frequencies below which the waves are not strongly damped, the waves may be strongly reflected at the transition region. The reflected waves interacting with the upward propagating waves may produce power at their double frequencies, which leads to more damping. Due to the reflection and damping, the energy flux of the waves transmitted to the corona is one order of magnitude smaller than that of the driving source.

  13. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  14. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  15. REACH. Heating Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Carter; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized units in the area of heating. The instructional units focus on electric heating systems, gas heating systems, and oil burning systems. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit…

  16. Solar Heating Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Solar Unlimited, Inc.'s suncatcher line includes a variety of solar arrays, derived from NASA's satellite program: water heating only, partial home heating, or water and whole house central heating. Solar Unlimited developed a set of vigorous requirements to avoid problems common to solar heating technologies.

  17. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  18. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, Lance D.

    1988-01-01

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

  19. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  20. Plate Fin Heat Exchanger Model with Axial Conduction and Variable Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, B.J.; White, M.J.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-10

    Future superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, as part of Project X at Fermilab, will be cooled to superfluid helium temperatures by a cryogenic distribution system supplying cold supercritical helium. To reduce vapor fraction during the final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion into the superfluid helium cooling bath, counter-flow, plate-fin heat exchangers will be utilized. Due to their compact size and ease of fabrication, plate-fin heat exchangers are an effective option. However, the design of compact and high-effectiveness cryogenic heat exchangers operating at liquid helium temperatures requires consideration of axial heat conduction along the direction of flow, in addition to variable fluid properties. Here we present a numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger. The model is used to guide design decisions on heat exchanger material choice and geometry. In addition, the J-T expansion process is modeled with the heat exchanger to analyze the effect of heat load and cryogenic supply parameters. A numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger was developed and the effect of various design parameters on overall heat exchanger size was investigated. It was found that highly conductive metals should be avoided in the design of compact JT heat exchangers. For the geometry considered, the optimal conductivity is around 3.5 W/m-K and can range from 0.3-10 W/m-K without a large loss in performance. The model was implemented with an isenthalpic expansion process. Increasing the cold side inlet temperature from 2K to 2.2 K decreased the liquid fraction from 0.856 to 0.839 which corresponds to a 0.12 g/s increase in supercritical helium supply needed to maintain liquid level in the cooling bath. Lastly, it was found that the effectiveness increased when the heat load was below the design value. Therefore, the heat exchanger should be sized on the high end of the required heat load.

  1. Gravitational heating of planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horedt, G. P.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical estimates for three important and general planetary heating processes, excluding radioactive heating, are presented: accretional heating, adiabatic compression and core formation. The relative importance of these processes appears to be as follows. Accretional heating is important for almost all planets and satellites including asteroid-size bodies. Heating due to core formation becomes important for objects which are similar to, or larger than the terrestrial planets. Compressional heating is important only for the outer cores and the envelopes of the giant planets, provided that they are heated, before compression, up to about 1000 K.

  2. Heat Pipe Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, William B.; Simon, Justin I.; Webb, A. Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    When volcanism dominates heat transport, a terrestrial body enters a heat-pipe mode, in which hot magma moves through the lithosphere in narrow channels. Even at high heat flow, a heat-pipe planet develops a thick, cold, downwards-advecting lithosphere dominated by (ultra-)mafic flows and contractional deformation at the surface. Heat-pipes are an important feature of terrestrial planets at high heat flow, as illustrated by Io. Evidence for their operation early in Earth's history suggests that all terrestrial bodies should experience an episode of heat-pipe cooling early in their histories.

  3. Dual mode heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altoz, F. E.

    1985-12-01

    The invention comprises a compact, light weight, dual mode heat transfer device. The dual mode heat transfer device provides for air cooling of heat dissipating electronic components at moderate aircraft speeds and when available ambient air is below a preselected temperature. At elevated aircraft speeds when the ambient air temperature is above the preselected temperature a coolant liquid is converted to steam or vapor in order to cool the heat dissipating electronic components. A preferred embodiment of the invention includes a cold plate for conducting heat away from the heat dissipating components and radiator fins for dissipating cold plate heat to a air cooling flow.

  4. Thulium-170 heat source

    DOEpatents

    Walter, Carl E.; Van Konynenburg, Richard; VanSant, James H.

    1992-01-01

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  5. Heat Treating Apparatus

    DOEpatents

    De Saro, Robert; Bateman, Willis

    2002-09-10

    Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

  6. Thulium-170 heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

    1990-09-06

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  7. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  8. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.

  9. [Heat waves: health impacts].

    PubMed

    Marto, Natália

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, record high temperatures were reported across Europe, causing thousands of casualties. Heat waves are sporadic recurrent events, characterised by intense and prolonged heat, associated with excess mortality and morbidity. The most frequent cause of death directly attributable to heat is heat stroke but heat waves are known to cause increases in all-cause mortality, specially circulatory and respiratory mortality. Epidemiological studies demonstrate excess casualties cluster in specific risk groups. The elderly, those with chronic medical conditions and the socially isolated are particularly vulnerable. Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related disorders. Heat waves cause disease indirectly, by aggravating chronic disorders, and directly, by causing heat-related illnesses (HRI). Classic HRI include skin eruptions, heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat stroke is a medical emergency characterised by hyperthermia and central nervous system dysfunction. Treatment includes immediate cooling and support of organ-system function. Despite aggressive treatment, heat stroke is often fatal and permanent neurological damage is frequent in those who survive. Heat related illness and death are preventable through behavioural adaptations, such as use of air conditioning and increased fluid intake. Other adaptation measures include heat emergency warning systems and intervention plans and environmental heat stress reduction. Heat related mortality is expected to rise as a consequence of the increasing proportion of elderly persons, the growing urban population, and the anticipated increase in number and intensity of heat waves associated with global warming. Improvements in surveillance and response capability may limit the adverse health conditions of future heat waves. It is crucial that health professionals are prepared to recognise, prevent and treat HRI and learn to cooperate with local health agencies. PMID:16684487

  10. Thermoelectric heat exchange element

    DOEpatents

    Callas, James J.; Taher, Mahmoud A.

    2007-08-14

    A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

  11. Thermodynamics and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipnis, Nahum

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a three-part project "How the principle of energy conservation evolved between 1842 and 1870: the view of a participant". This paper aims at showing how the new ideas of Mayer and Joule were received, what constituted the new theory in the period under study, and how it was supported experimentally. A

  12. Thermodynamics and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipnis, Nahum

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a three-part project "How the principle of energy conservation evolved between 1842 and 1870: the view of a participant". This paper aims at showing how the new ideas of Mayer and Joule were received, what constituted the new theory in the period under study, and how it was supported experimentally. A…

  13. Waste Heat Recovery with Heat Pipe Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavinia, Nasim

    High grade energy, which is primarily derived from hydrocarbon fuels, is in short supply; therefore alternative energy sources such as renewable and recycled energy sources are gaining significant attention. Pyro-metallurgical processes are large consumers of energy. They in return generate large quantities of waste heat which goes un-recovered. The overall theme of this research is to capture, concentrate and convert some of this waste heat to a valuable form. The main objective is to characterize and develop heat pipe technology (some of which originated at McGill) to capture and concentrate low grade heat. Heat pipe employs boiling as the means to concentrate the energy contained in the waste heat and transfers it as higher quality energy. The distinct design features of this device (separate return line and flow modifiers in the evaporator) maximize its heat extraction capacity. During the testing the main limitations within the heat pipe were identified. Different test phases were designed throughout which the configuration of the system was modified to overcome these limitations and to increase the amount of extracted heat.

  14. Heat Pipe Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heat pipe, a sealed chamber whose walls are lined with a "wick," a thin capillary network containing a working fluid in liquid form was developed for a heat distribution system for non-rotating satellites. Use of the heat pipe provides a continuous heat transfer mechanism. "Heat tubes" that improve temperature control in plastics manufacturing equipment incorporated the heat pipe technology. James M. Stewart, an independent consultant, patented the heat tubes he developed and granted a license to Kona Corporation. The Kona Nozzle for heaterless injection molding gets heat for its operation from an external source and has no internal heating bands, reducing machine maintenance and also eliminating electrical hazards associated with heater bands. The nozzles are used by Eastman Kodak, Bic Pen Corporation, Polaroid, Tupperware, Ford Motor Company, RCA, and Western Electric in the molding of their products.

  15. Heat collection system

    SciTech Connect

    Ramlow, B.L.; Steele, R.R.

    1982-04-06

    A heat collection system is disclosed which is capable of collecting heat from an animal husbandry enclosures such as a dairy barn, and transferring the heat into a home. Animal husbandry enclosures, such as dairy barns, tend to have excess heat, even in winter, the excess heat normally being wasted. The heat is collected by a pair of evaporators located in the dairy barn, with the evaporators being oversized to limit the amount of cooling taking place in the barn. Fluid from the evaporators is compressed by compressors after which it passes through a condenser from which heat may be extracted into the home. Pressure regulating valves are provided to insure that the compressors are not overloaded and to insure that a maximum heating effect is achieved. A thermostatically controlled fan is provided to drive air across the condenser so that heat is introduced into the home.

  16. Heat Flow and Heat Production in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, H.; Hwang, S.; Koo, M.

    2007-12-01

    The mean heat flow in Korea estimated in 365 locations (mines, coal fields, groundwater, hot spring wells) is 60 11 mW/m2; mean geothermal gradients is 25.1 C/km. High heat flow values appear in the southeastern part, the central western part, and the northeastern part of Korea. In the tectonic provinces, heat flow is 66 mW/m2 for Gyeonggi Massif, 65 mW/m2 for Okcheon Fold Belt, 60 mW/m2 for Yeongnam Massif, 72 mW/m2 for Gyeongsang Basin, and 75 mW/m2 for Yeonil Basin. In the aspect of the lithology, heat flow is 71 2 mW/m2 for the sedimentary rock area, 68 2 mW/m2 for the sedimentary/volcanic rock area, 67 1 mW/m2 for the plutonic rock area, and 62 2 mW/m2 for the metamorphic rock area. In the geological time sequence, heat flow is 78 5 mW/m2 for the Cenozoic strata, 68 1 mW/m2 for Mesozoic, 65 3 mW/m2 for the Paleozoic strata, 67 8 mW/m2 for the Proterozoic strata, and 62 2 mW/m2 for the Archean strata. From the relationship between heat flow and Moho depth, we found that the shallow Moho depth area is likely to have higher heat flow values than the area of the thick crust. Heat production was measured by chemical analysis and gamma-ray logs on basement rocks (86 granite and 37 gneiss samples). The mean heat production is 2.15 ?W/m3 for granite, and 2.22 ?W/m3 for gneiss. The mean heat production is 2.52 ?W/m3 for Gyeonggi Massif, 2.16 ?W/m3 for Okcheon Fold Belt, 2.35 ?W/m3 for Yeongnam Massif, and 2.01 ?W/m3 for Gyeongsang Basin. The tectonic provinces with high mean heat flow tend to have low mean heat production. Therefore, heat production is unlikely to have a first-order importance in determining surface heat flow distribution in Korea. The analysis of 12 heat production and heat flow data sets from granite area in Gyeongsang Basin shows a linear relationship between heat production and surface heat flow, which is known as q=qr+AD, where q is surface heat flow, qr is reduced heat flow, A is heat production, and D is characteristic depth. We found q=47.06+12.29A for Gyeongsang Basin.

  17. Conditions for Aeronomic Applicability of the Classical Electron Heat Conduction Formula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, K. D.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1998-01-01

    Conditions for the applicability of the classical formula for heat conduction in the electrons in ionized gas are investigated. In a fully ionised gas ( V(sub en) much greater than V(sub ei)), when the mean free path for electron-electron (or electron-ion) collisions is much larger than the characteristic thermal scale length of the observed system, the conditions for applicability break down. In the case of the Venus ionosphere this breakdown is indicated for a large fraction of the electron temperature data from altitudes greater than 180 km, for electron densities less than 10(exp 4)/cc cm. In a partially ionised gas such that V(sub en) much greater than V(sub ei) there is breakdown of the formula not only when the mean free path of electrons greatly exceeds the thermal scale length, but also when the gradient of neutral particle density exceeds the electron thermal gradient. It is shown that electron heat conduction may be neglected in estimating the temperature of joule heated electrons by observed strong 100 Hz electric fields when the conduction flux is limited by the saturation flux. The results of this paper support our earlier aeronomical arguments against the hypothesis of planetary scale whistlers for the 100 Hz electric field signal. In turn this means that data from the 100 Hz signal may not be used to support the case for lightning on Venus.

  18. Improved heat exhaust and the characteristics of the high Tc superconducting terahertz emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Kitamura, T.; Asanuma, K.; Yasui, T.; Shibano, Y.; Watanabe, C.; Nakade, K.; Saiwai, Y.; Kubo, H.; Sakamoto, K.; Katsuragawa, T.; Tsujimoto, M.; Yoshizaki, R.; Minami, H.; Klemm, R. A.; Kadowaki, K.

    2015-03-01

    In our previous study it is known that THz emitting efficiency improves greatly when the stand-alone type of mesa structure is used for the THz emitting device. The principle reason for that lies in the heat removal from the mesa, in which a gigantic amount of heat is generated while the mesa is in the resistive state. Recently, we developed a new device structure based on the stand-alone type of mesa structure of Bi2212 single crystal in order to make high exhaust of Joule heating. The results show that although the power is comparable and is not significantly increased, very wide the radiation frequencies ranging from 0.3 to 1.6 THz were obtained. We will discuss the details of the radiation characteristics of this one. This study has been supported by CREST-JST. TK is also supported by the Matsuda grant and JST A-STEP. This work is in part performed in collaboration with Dr. Wai Kwok and his group in Argonne National Lab.

  19. STELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS AS A HEATING SOURCE FOR EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Buzasi, D.

    2013-03-10

    It has been observed that hot Jupiters located within 0.08 AU of their host stars commonly display radii in excess of those expected based on models. A number of theoretical explanations for this phenomenon have been suggested, but the ability of any one mechanism to account for the full range of observations remains to be rigorously proven. I identify an additional heating mechanism, arising from the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field and the planetary magnetosphere, and show that this is capable of providing enough energy to explain the observed planetary radii. Such a model predicts that the degree of heating should be dependent on the stellar magnetic field, for which stellar activity serves as a proxy. Accordingly, I examine populations of hot Jupiters from the Kepler database and confirm that stellar activity (determined using Kepler CDPP levels) is correlated with the presence of planetary radii inflated beyond the basal level of R = 0.87 R{sub J} identified by previous researchers. I propose that the primary mechanism for transferring energy from the magnetosphere to the planetary interior is Joule heating arising from global electric circuits analogous to those seen in solar system objects.

  20. Characteristics of the heat resistant FBG sensor under laser cladding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Terada, T.

    2014-02-01

    We have developed heat resistant strain sensors using laser processing techniques. The application is aimed at structural health monitoring for high temperature piping systems. This situation requires extraordinary durability such as radiation resistance and noise isolation due to adverse conditions caused by nuclear reactions or electro-magnetic pulses. We proposed that a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor made by femtosecond laser processing could be the best candidate. The combination of fabric reinforcement and a heatproof adhesive mold successfully protected the fragile optical fiber once the fiber was installed on the piping material's surface. To make the best use of the heat-resistant characteristic, we fixed the FBG sensor by metal mold. A groove was processed onto the surface of a SUS metal plate with a grindstone. We used a Quasi-CW laser to weld a filler wire onto the plate. The optical fiber was situated under the filler wire before was heated by laser pulses with 10 joule energy and a duration of 10 ms. A series of weld pool formed a sealing clad on the groove. The FBG sensor was buried at a depth of 1 mm over a length of 1 cm. No degradation in its reflection spectra was detected before and after the processing. The FBG sensor can detect the vibration of the plate caused by impact shocks. In this paper, the Bragg peak shift of the FBG sensor under laser cladding condition has been discussed.

  1. Mode-selected heat flow through a one-dimensional waveguide network

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, Christian Miechowski, Philipp; Buchholz, Sven S.; Chiatti, Olivio; Fischer, Saskia F.; Wieck, Andreas D.; Reuter, Dirk

    2015-02-23

    Cross-correlated measurements of thermal noise are performed to determine the electron temperature in nanopatterned channels of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure at 4.2 K. Two-dimensional (2D) electron reservoirs are connected via an extended one-dimensional (1D) electron waveguide network. Hot electrons are produced using a current I{sub h} in a source 2D reservoir, are transmitted through the ballistic 1D waveguide, and relax in a drain 2D reservoir. We find that the electron temperature increase, ΔT{sub e}, in the drain is proportional to the square of the heating current I{sub h}, as expected from Joule's law. No temperature increase is observed in the drain when the 1D waveguide does not transmit electrons. Therefore, we conclude that electron-phonon interaction is negligible for heat transport between 2D reservoirs at temperatures below 4.2 K. Furthermore, mode control of the 1D electron waveguide by application of a top-gate voltage reveals that ΔT{sub e} is not proportional to the number of populated subbands N, as previously observed in single 1D conductors. This can be explained with the splitting of the heat flow in the 1D waveguide network.

  2. Extreme degree of ionization in homogenous micro-capillary plasma columns heated by ultrafast current pulses.

    PubMed

    Avaria, G; Grisham, M; Li, J; Tomasel, F G; Shlyaptsev, V N; Busquet, M; Woolston, M; Rocca, J J

    2015-03-01

    Homogeneous plasma columns with ionization levels typical of megaampere discharges are created by rapidly heating gas-filled 520-μm-diameter channels with nanosecond rise time current pulses of 40 kA. Current densities of up to 0.3  GA cm^{-2} greatly increase Joule heating with respect to conventional capillary discharge Z pinches, reaching unprecedented degrees of ionization for a high-Z plasma column heated by a current pulse of remarkably low amplitude. Dense xenon plasmas are ionized to Xe^{28+}, while xenon impurities in hydrogen discharges reach Xe^{30+}. The unique characteristics of these hot, ∼300:1 length-to-diameter aspect ratio plasmas allow the observation of unexpected spectroscopic phenomena. Axial spectra show the unusual dominance of the intercombination line over the resonance line of He-like Al by nearly an order of magnitude, caused by differences in opacities in the axial and radial directions. These plasma columns could enable the development of sub-10-nm x-ray lasers. PMID:25793819

  3. Heat transfer device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, L. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved heat transfer device particularly suited for use as an evaporator plate in a diffusion cloud chamber. The device is characterized by a pair of mutually spaced heat transfer plates, each being of a planar configuration, having a pair of opposed surfaces defining therebetween a heat pipe chamber. Within the heat pipe chamber, in contiguous relation with the pair of opposed surfaces, there is disposed a pair of heat pipe wicks supported in a mutually spaced relationship by a foraminous spacer of a planar configuration. A wick including a foraminous layer is contiguously related to the external surfaces of the heat transfer plates for uniformly wetting these surfaces.

  4. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  5. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  6. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  7. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  8. High heat flux loop heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Mark T.; Sarraf, David B.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Maidanik, Yuri F.; Vershinin, Sergey

    1997-01-01

    Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs) can transport very large thermal power loads, over long distances, through flexible, small diameter tubes and against high gravitational heads. While recent LHPs have transported as much as 1500 W, the peak heat flux through a LHP's evaporator has been limited to about 0.07 MW/m2. This limitation is due to the arrangement of vapor passages next to the heat load which is one of the conditions necessary to ensure self priming of the device. This paper describes work aimed at raising this limit by threefold to tenfold. Two approaches were pursued. One optimized the vapor passage geometry for the high heat flux conditions. The geometry improved the heat flow into the wick and working fluid. This approach also employed a finer pored wick to support higher vapor flow losses. The second approach used a bidisperse wick material within the circumferential vapor passages. The bidisperse material increased the thermal conductivity and the evaporative surface area in the region of highest heat flux, while providing a flow path for the vapor. Proof-of-concept devices were fabricated and tested for each approach. Both devices operated as designed and both demonstrated operation at a heat flux of 0.70 MW/m2. This performance exceeded the known state of the art by a factor of more than six for both conventional heat pipes and for loop heat pipes using ammonia. In addition, the bidisperse-wick device demonstrated boiling heat transfer coefficients up to 100,000 W/m2.K, and the fine pored device demonstrated an orientation independence with its performance essentially unaffected by whether its evaporator was positioned above, below or level with the condenser.

  9. Heat exchanger optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ik-Sang

    A computer code was developed which would analyze a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, and it was used in conjunction with a computer code for numerical optimization program. The problem is to find the smallest shell-and-tube heat exchanger with the minimum number of exchangers in series and parallel which will satisfy the heat duty and pressure drop requirements within the constraints imposed. The MINOS (Modular In-core Nonlinear Optimization System) programming code was used in the optimization of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger. MINOS purpose is to optimize a user written objective function. For heat exchanger design, it is necessary to develop two FORTRAN subroutines in order to analyze a heat exchanger. To get the generalized optimal heat exchanger design, the calculation method and data in Process Heat Transfer by Kern, was used. All the data, including material specifications were given as typical. Three types of case studies were studied and are discussed.

  10. Composite wick heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogushi, T.; Sakurai, Y.

    This paper describes the performance of the composite wick heat pipe, which has two kinds of wicks, namely, circumferential grooves as a pumping wick and sintered stainless metal felt as a transport wick. The maximum heat transfer rate was obtained by varying the influential parameters; groove figure, porosity of felt, evaporator length and heat pipe tilt. And a theoretical model was developed to predict the maximum heat transfer rate of this type of the composite wick heat pipe. In this model, a liquid recession into the bottom of the groove due to the increased heat transfer rate, so called 'Leverett Effect', was considered. It was found that the composite wick could improve the heat pipe performance, and the predicted maximum heat transfer rate agreed well with the experimental data.

  11. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  12. Radial heat flux transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  13. Sizing plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Since their commercial debut in the 1930s, plate heat exchangers have found widespread use in the chemical process industries (CPI). Today, more than two dozen firms market this space-saving and highly efficient type of heat exchanger. One reason for the popularity of plate heat exchangers is that their overall heat-transfer coefficient (U) is superior to that of shell-and-tube heat exchangers [1,2,3,4]. In clean water-to-water service, for example, a shell-and-tube heat exchanger has a U value of 350 Btu/ft[sup 2]-h-F, much lower than the 1,000 of a plate design at the same pressure drop. However, the plate heat exchanger's much higher U values also mean that fouling factors have a much greater effect on calculations of exchanger surface area. The right fouling factor is the key to specifying plate heat exchanger areas correctly.

  14. Optimal thermodynamic heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Scenna, N.J. ); Aguirre, P.A. )

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents a set of heuristics useful for optimal design of heat-exchange networks and integrated heat and power systems. These heuristics consolidate other approaches reported in the literature in a formalism useful for design purposes.

  15. Geothermal District Heating Economics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-12

    GEOCITY is a large-scale simulation model which combines both engineering and economic submodels to systematically calculate the cost of geothermal district heating systems for space heating, hot-water heating, and process heating based upon hydrothermal geothermal resources. The GEOCITY program simulates the entire production, distribution, and waste disposal process for geothermal district heating systems, but does not include the cost of radiators, convectors, or other in-house heating systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating basedmore » on the climate, population, and heat demand of the district; characteristics of the geothermal resource and distance from the distribution center; well-drilling costs; design of the distribution system; tax rates; and financial conditions.« less

  16. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  17. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  18. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.; Hansen, Leif J.; Evans, David B.

    1985-01-01

    A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  19. Heat storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, T.; Yamamoto, R.; Yokotani, F.

    1985-12-31

    A heat storage material comprises a sodium acetate-water system containing at least 53-69% by weight sodium acetate (CH/sub 3/CO/sub 2/Na), wherein said heat storage material is mixed with a thickener comprising polyvinyl alcohol, paraffin and one or two components selected from the group consisting of formaldehyde and acetone, and has stable performance and little change of heat storage capacity even under repeated storage and release of heat.

  20. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  1. Heat exchangers for low grade waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, E.; Al-Witry, A.; Aroussi, A.; Hay, N.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes a user friendly computer program written for the design and optimization of roll bond aluminum heat exchangers and its validation against experimental test data. Test results for two different designs of heat exchanger panel, one serpentine and one dimple, are also given. The dimple design is shown to be superior to the serpentine one giving a 75% increase in heat transfer for a modest increase in pressure drop. Finally, a comparison of the economics of equivalent aluminum, stainless steel and titanium units for sea-water applications is presented.

  2. HEAT TRANSFER MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Wislicenus, G.F.

    1961-07-11

    A heat exchanger is adapted to unifomly cool a spherical surface. Equations for the design of a spherical heat exchanger hav~g tubes with a uniform center-to-center spining are given. The heat exchanger is illustrated in connection with a liquid-fueled reactor.

  3. Heat Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ball Metal's design of ducting and controls for series of roof top heat exchangers was inspired by Tech Briefs. Heat exchangers are installed on eight press and coating lines used to decorate sheet metal. The heat recovery system provides an estimated energy savings of more than $250,000 per year.

  4. Champagne Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2004-01-01

    The term champagne heat pump denotes a developmental heat pump that exploits a cycle of absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide in an alcohol or other organic liquid. Whereas most heat pumps in common use in the United States are energized by mechanical compression, the champagne heat pump is energized by heating. The concept of heat pumps based on other absorption cycles energized by heat has been understood for years, but some of these heat pumps are outlawed in many areas because of the potential hazards posed by leakage of working fluids. For example, in the case of the water/ammonia cycle, there are potential hazards of toxicity and flammability. The organic-liquid/carbon dioxide absorption/desorption cycle of the champagne heat pump is similar to the water/ammonia cycle, but carbon dioxide is nontoxic and environmentally benign, and one can choose an alcohol or other organic liquid that is also relatively nontoxic and environmentally benign. Two candidate nonalcohol organic liquids are isobutyl acetate and amyl acetate. Although alcohols and many other organic liquids are flammable, they present little or no flammability hazard in the champagne heat pump because only the nonflammable carbon dioxide component of the refrigerant mixture is circulated to the evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, which are the only components of the heat pump in direct contact with air in habitable spaces.

  5. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  6. Heat pipes. [technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development and use of heat pipes are described, including space requirements and contributions. Controllable heat pipes, and designs for automatically maintaining a selected constant temperature, are discussed which would add to the versatility and usefulness of heat pipes in industrial processing, manufacture of integrated circuits, and in temperature stabilization of electronics.

  7. Potential for domestic heat recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, K. T., Jr.; Tsai, G. J.

    1981-11-01

    The potential for reducing gas-fired heating costs by the use of waste heat is discussed. A heat recovery heat exchanger can be installed to recover waste heat from the hot exhaust gases going up the flue pipe from a furnace, water heater, or clothes dryer. Some specific designs are described for heat recovery equipment. Specific design and performance of the Hallofin heat exchanger and the heat pipe heat exchanger are evaluated.

  8. Metal-insulator transition upon heating and negative-differential-resistive-switching induced by self-heating in BaCo0.9Ni0.1S1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B.; Genossar, J.; Chashka, K. B.; Patlagan, L.; Reisner, G. M.

    2014-04-01

    The layered compound BaCo1-xNixS2-y (0.05 < x < 0.2 and 0.05 < y < 0.2) exhibits an unusual first-order structural and electronic phase transition from a low-T monoclinic paramagnetic metal to a high-T tetragonal antiferromagnetic insulator around 200 K with huge hysteresis (˜40 K) and large volume change (˜0.01). Here, we report on unusual voltage-controlled resistive switching followed by current-controlled resistive switching induced by self-heating in polycrystalline BaCo1-xNixS2-y (nominal x = 0.1 and y = 0.2). These were due to the steep metal to insulator transition upon heating followed by the activated behavior of the resistivity above the transition. The major role of Joule heating in switching is supported by the absence of nonlinearity in the current as function of voltage, I(V), obtained in pulsed measurements, in the range of electric fields relevant to d.c. measurements. The voltage-controlled negative differential resistance around the threshold for switching was explained by a simple model of self-heating. The main difficulty in modeling I(V) from the samples resistance as function of temperature R(T) was the progressive increase of R(T), and to a lesser extend the decrease of the resistance jumps at the transitions, caused by the damage induced by cycling through the transitions by heating or self-heating. This was dealt with by following systematically R(T) over many cycles and by using the data of R(T) in the heating cycle closest to that of the self-heating one.

  9. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1980-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  10. Heat exchanger with heat transfer control

    SciTech Connect

    Wiard, M.R.

    1986-11-18

    This patent describes a multi-sided plate and fin type heat exchanger core in which plate elements, intermediately positioning spacer elements and fin strips are stacked in a layered assembly providing fluid passages for different fluids to flow in a segregated heat transfer relation to one another. The core is characterized in that at certain locations in a stacked assembly layers include spacer elements substantially closing all sides of the heat exchangers to define between adjacent fluid passages layers of increased heat transfer resistance. The fin strips are sheet-like elements corrugated to forms specifically identifiable in terms of fins per inch, there being fin strips in at least certain resistance layers differing in terms of fins per inch from other strips in certain resistance layers.

  11. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Flexible heating head for induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An induction heating head includes a length of wire having first and second opposite ends and being wound in a flat spiral shape to form an induction coil, a capacitor connected to the first and second ends of the wire, the induction coil and capacitor defining a tank circuit, and a flexible, elastomeric body molded to encase the induction coil. When a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the body, and the tank circuit is powered, the susceptor is inductively heated.

  13. Heat pipe investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The OAO-C spacecraft has three circular heat pipes, each of a different internal design, located in the space between the spacecraft structural tube and the experiment tube, which are designed to isothermalize the structure. Two of the pipes are used to transport high heat loads, and the third is for low heat loads. The test problems deal with the charging of the pipes, modifications, the mobile tilt table, the position indicator, and the heat input mechanisms. The final results showed that the techniques used were adequate for thermal-vacuum testing of heat pipes.

  14. Urban heat island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hongsuk H.

    1991-01-01

    The phenomenon of urban heat island was investigated by the use of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data sets collected over the metropolitan area of Washington DC (U.S.). By combining the retrieved spectral albedos and temperatures, urban modification on radiation budgets of five surface categories were analyzed. The surface radiation budget imagery of the area show that urban heating is attributable to a large heat flux from the rapidly heating surfaces of asphalt, bare soil and short grass. In summer, symptoms of diurnal heating begin to appear by mid morning and can be about 10 degrees warmer than nearby woodlands in summer.

  15. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  16. Heat pump apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Horowitz, Jeffrey S.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus including a compact arrangement of individual tubular reactors containing hydride-dehydride beds in opposite end sections, each pair of beds in each reactor being operable by sequential and coordinated treatment with a plurality of heat transfer fluids in a plurality of processing stages, and first and second valves located adjacent the reactor end sections with rotatable members having multiple ports and associated portions for separating the hydride beds at each of the end sections into groups and for simultaneously directing a plurality of heat transfer fluids to the different groups. As heat is being generated by a group of beds, others are being regenerated so that heat is continuously available for space heating. As each of the processing stages is completed for a hydride bed or group of beds, each valve member is rotated causing the heat transfer fluid for the heat processing stage to be directed to that bed or group of beds. Each of the end sections are arranged to form a closed perimeter and the valve member may be rotated repeatedly about the perimeter to provide a continuous operation. Both valves are driven by a common motor to provide a coordinated treatment of beds in the same reactors. The heat pump apparatus is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  17. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  18. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  19. Miniature Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center to Thermacore Inc. have fostered the company work on devices tagged "heat pipes" for space application. To control the extreme temperature ranges in space, heat pipes are important to spacecraft. The problem was to maintain an 8-watt central processing unit (CPU) at less than 90 C in a notebook computer using no power, with very little space available and without using forced convection. Thermacore's answer was in the design of a powder metal wick that transfers CPU heat from a tightly confined spot to an area near available air flow. The heat pipe technology permits a notebook computer to be operated in any position without loss of performance. Miniature heat pipe technology has successfully been applied, such as in Pentium Processor notebook computers. The company expects its heat pipes to accommodate desktop computers as well. Cellular phones, camcorders, and other hand-held electronics are forsible applications for heat pipes.

  20. Nanofluid heat capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anne K.; Gomez, Judith C.; Wang, Jun; Pradhan, Sulolit; Glatzmaier, Greg C.

    2011-12-01

    Significant increases in the heat capacity of heat transfer fluids are needed not only to reduce the costs of liquid heating and cooling processes, but also to bring clean energy producing technologies like concentrating solar power (CSP) to price parity with conventional energy generation. It has been postulated that nanofluids could have higher heat capacities than conventional fluids. In this work, nano- and micron-sized particles were added to five base fluids (poly-α olefin, mineral oil, ethylene glycol, a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate), and the resulting heat capacities were measured and compared with those of the neat base fluids and the weighted average of the heat capacities of the components. The particles used were inert metals and metal oxides that did not undergo any phase transitions over the temperature range studied. In the nanofluids studied here, we found no increase in heat capacity upon the addition of the particles larger than the experimental error.

  1. Absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhtinen, M.; Heikkilae, M.; Andersson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of absorption heat pumps in Finland. The work was done as a case study: the technical and economic analyses have been carried out for six different cases, where in each the suitable size and type of the heat pump plant and the auxiliary components and connections were specified. The study also detailed the costs concerning the procurement, installation and test runs of the machinery, as well as the savings in energy costs incurred by the introduction of the plant. Conclusions were drawn of the economic viability of the applications studied. The following cases were analyzed: heat recovery from flue gases and productin of district heat in plants using peat, natural gas, and municipal wastes as a fuel. Heat recovery in the pulp and paper industry for the upgrading of pressure of secondary steam and for the heating of white liquor and combustion and drying the air. Heat recovery in a peat-fulled heat and power plant from flue gases that have been used for the drying of peat. According to the study, the absorption heat pump suits best to the production of district heat, when the heat source is the primary energy is steam produced by the boiler. Included in the flue as condensing is the purification of flue gases. Accordingly, benefit is gained on two levels in thick applications. In heat and power plants the use of absorption heat pumps is less economical, due to the fact that the steam used by the pump reduces the production of electricity, which is rated clearly higher than heat.

  2. Modelling Study to Compare the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Low-Power Hydrogen, Nitrogen and Argon Arc-Heated Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haixing; Chen, Xi; Pan, Wenxia; B. Murphy, A.; Geng, Jinyue; Jia, Shaoxia

    2010-12-01

    A modelling study is performed to compare the plasma flow and heat transfer characteristics of low-power arc-heated thrusters (arcjets) for three different propellants: hydrogen, nitrogen and argon. The all-speed SIMPLE algorithm is employed to solve the governing equations, which take into account the effects of compressibility, Lorentz force and Joule heating, as well as the temperature- and pressure-dependence of the gas properties. The temperature, velocity and Mach number distributions calculated within the thruster nozzle obtained with different propellant gases are compared for the same thruster structure, dimensions, inlet-gas stagnant pressure and arc currents. The temperature distributions in the solid region of the anode-nozzle wall are also given. It is found that the flow and energy conversion processes in the thruster nozzle show many similar features for all three propellants. For example, the propellant is heated mainly in the near-cathode and constrictor region, with the highest plasma temperature appearing near the cathode tip; the flow transition from the subsonic to supersonic regime occurs within the constrictor region; the highest axial velocity appears inside the nozzle; and most of the input propellant flows towards the thruster exit through the cooler gas region near the anode-nozzle wall. However, since the properties of hydrogen, nitrogen and argon, especially their molecular weights, specific enthalpies and thermal conductivities, are different, there are appreciable differences in arcjet performance. For example, compared to the other two propellants, the hydrogen arcjet thruster shows a higher plasma temperature in the arc region, and higher axial velocity but lower temperature at the thruster exit. Correspondingly, the hydrogen arcjet thruster has the highest specific impulse and arc voltage for the same inlet stagnant pressure and arc current. The predictions of the modelling are compared favourably with available experimental results.

  3. Heat pipe cooling system with sensible heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1988-01-01

    A heat pipe cooling system which employs a sensible heat sink is discussed. With this type of system, incident aerodynamic heat is transported via a heat pipe from the stagnation region to the heat sink and absorbed by raising the temperature of the heat sink material. The use of a sensible heat sink can be advantageous for situations where the total mission heat load is limited, as it is during re-entry, and a suitable radiation sink is not available.

  4. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined...

  6. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined...

  7. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-01-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  8. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  9. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1977-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  10. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-06-21

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  11. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  12. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better suited for the cooling of semiconductor devices.

  13. Plasma heat pump and heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2010-08-15

    A model system where cold charged particles are locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of volume V (V{sub P}<heat and vice versa. Two applications of this theory are, first we propose a pumping device which heats plasmas by an adiabatic/isothermal compression of fields. Heating power ranging from a few hundred watts to a few kilowatts is possible with the present day technology. Second, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an electrostatic heat engine which converts plasma heat into mechanical work via plasma electric fields. Effects of P{sub E} are shown to be observable in colloidal solutions.

  14. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Heating in a Flaring Magnetic Field Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meis, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Louvet, P.; Meyer, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma heating as well as Ion Cyclotron Resonance are successfully applied on the ERIC stable isotope separation device, in operation at CEN-Saclay. In this experiment, the plasma is created in the flaring magnetic field zone of a superconducting coil by ionizing the vapour issued from a sputtering plate (or a Joule oven), by electron cyclotron heating using 10, 18 or 29 GHz, 1.5 kW klystrons. A three-fluid model has been developed in order to describe the plasma source. In a first step, the values of the absorbed HF power, appearing in the equation of electrons energy conservation have to be determined. For this purpose, a ray tracing model is used. The preliminary results of the calculation are presented in this paper. The electron distribution function is assumed to be Maxwellian. The temperature effects are taken into account in the dielectric tensor. The polarization is also determined at any point of the wave propagation in the plasma.

  15. "Bottle-Brush" Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Heat exchanger consists of a metal tube with wires extending inward from wall. Conduction of heat along wires improves heat transfer to gas or other filling. Fluid is heated throughout the cross section of tube. Suggested applications are refrigerators, heat engines, thermal instrumentation, and heat switches.

  16. Heat pipe development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienart, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate analytically and experimentally the performance of heat pipes with composite wicks--specifically, those having pedestal arteries and screwthread circumferential grooves. An analytical model was developed to describe the effects of screwthreads and screen secondary wicks on the transport capability of the artery. The model describes the hydrodynamics of the circumferential flow in triangular grooves with azimuthally varying capillary menisci and liquid cross-sections. Normalized results were obtained which give the influence of evaporator heat flux on the axial heat transport capability of the arterial wick. In order to evaluate the priming behavior of composite wicks under actual load conditions, an 'inverted' glass heat pipe was designed and constructed. The results obtained from the analysis and from the tests with the glass heat pipe were applied to the OAO-C Level 5 heat pipe, and an improved correlation between predicted and measured evaporator and transport performance were obtained.

  17. Heat-pipe Earth.

    PubMed

    Moore, William B; Webb, A Alexander G

    2013-09-26

    The heat transport and lithospheric dynamics of early Earth are currently explained by plate tectonic and vertical tectonic models, but these do not offer a global synthesis consistent with the geologic record. Here we use numerical simulations and comparison with the geologic record to explore a heat-pipe model in which volcanism dominates surface heat transport. These simulations indicate that a cold and thick lithosphere developed as a result of frequent volcanic eruptions that advected surface materials downwards. Declining heat sources over time led to an abrupt transition to plate tectonics. Consistent with model predictions, the geologic record shows rapid volcanic resurfacing, contractional deformation, a low geothermal gradient across the bulk of the lithosphere and a rapid decrease in heat-pipe volcanism after initiation of plate tectonics. The heat-pipe Earth model therefore offers a coherent geodynamic framework in which to explore the evolution of our planet before the onset of plate tectonics. PMID:24067709

  18. Water-heating dehumidifier

    DOEpatents

    Tomlinson, John J.

    2006-04-18

    A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

  19. Saturn base heating handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Bender, R. L.; Bevill, R. L.; Reardon, J.; Hartley, L.

    1972-01-01

    A handbook containing a summary of model and flight test base heating data from the S-1, S-1B, S-4, S-1C, and S-2 stages is presented. A review of the available prediction methods is included. Experimental data are provided to make the handbook a single source of Saturn base heating data which can be used for preliminary base heating design predictions of launch vehicles.

  20. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-18

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.