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Sample records for jrrd releases volume

  1. Release of magmatic water on Mars: Estimated timing and volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1987-01-01

    By estimating the total amount of water released by volcanic processes on Mars, the abundance of H2O at 10 m was estimated. This value was based on mapping volcanic units, estimating thicknesses and volumes, and using a 10 wt. percent value H2O from terrestrial analogs. By combining such estimates with crater count ages, it is also possible to estimate the timing of water release through Martian history.

  2. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, VOLUME 2: POST-RELEASE MITIGATION MEASURES FOR CONTROLLING ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume discusses prevention and protection measures for controlling accidental releases of air toxics. The probability of accidental releases depends on the extent to which deviations (in magnitude and duration) in the process can be tolerated before a loss of chemical contai...

  3. Flight set 360L007 (STS-33) insulation component. Volume 3: Final release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicken, Steve

    1990-01-01

    Volume 3 of this postfire report deals with the insulation component of the RSRM. The report is released twice for each flight set. The interim release contract date is on or before 60 days after the last field joint or nozzle to case joint is disassembled at KSC and contain the results of the KSC visual evaluation. The data contained in Volume 3 interim release supersedes the insulation data presented in the KSC 10 day report. The final release contract data is on or before 60 days after the last factory joint is disassembled at the Clearfield H-7 facility and contains the results of all visual evaluations and a thermal safety factor analysis. The data contained in the Volume 3 final release supersedes the interim release and the insulation data presented in the Clearfield 10 day report.

  4. Nonsynaptic Communication Through ATP Release from Volume-Activated Anion Channels in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Fields, R. Douglas; Ni, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    The release of neuronal messengers outside synapses has broad biological implications, particularly with regard to communication between axons and glia. We identify a mechanism for nonsynaptic, nonvesicular release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from axons through volume-activated anion channels (VAACs) activated by microscopic axon swelling during action potential firing. We used a combination of single-photon imaging of ATP release, together with imaging for intrinsic optical signals, intracellular calcium ions (Ca2+), time-lapse video, and confocal microscopy, to investigate action potential–induced nonsynaptic release of this neurotransmitter. ATP release from cultured embryonic dorsal root ganglion axons persisted when bafilomycin or botulinum toxin was used to block vesicular release, whereas pharmacological inhibition of VAACs or prevention of action potential–induced axon swelling inhibited ATP release and disrupted activity-dependent signaling between axons and astrocytes. This nonvesicular, nonsynaptic communication could mediate various activity-dependent interactions between axons and nervous system cells in normal conditions, development, and disease. PMID:20923934

  5. Oxytocin mediates atrial natriuretic peptide release and natriuresis after volume expansion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Haanwinckel, M A; Elias, L K; Favaretto, A L; Gutkowska, J; McCann, S M; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    1995-08-15

    Our previous studies have shown that stimulation of the anterior ventral third ventricular region increases atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release, whereas lesions of this structure, the median eminence, or removal of the neural lobe of the pituitary block ANP release induced by blood volume expansion (BVE). These results indicate that participation of the central nervous system is crucial in these responses, possibly through mediation by neurohypophysial hormones. In the present research we investigated the possible role of oxytocin, one of the two principal neurohypophysial hormones, in the mediation of ANP release. Oxytocin (1-10 nmol) injected i.p. caused significant, dose-dependent increases in urinary osmolality, natriuresis, and kaliuresis. A delayed antidiuretic effect was also observed. Plasma ANP concentrations increased nearly 4-fold (P < 0.01) 20 min after i.p. oxytocin (10 nmol), but there was no change in plasma ANP values in control rats. When oxytocin (1 or 10 nmol) was injected i.v., it also induced a dose-related increase in plasma ANP at 5 min (P < 0.001). BVE by intra-atrial injection of isotonic saline induced a rapid (5 min postinjection) increase in plasma oxytocin and ANP concentrations and a concomitant decrease in plasma arginine vasopressin concentration. Results were similar with hypertonic volume expansion, except that this induced a transient (5 min) increase in plasma arginine vasopressin. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that baroreceptor activation of the central nervous system by BVE stimulates the release of oxytocin from the neurohypophysis. This oxytocin then circulates to the right atrium to induce release of ANP, which circulates to the kidney and induces natriuresis and diuresis, which restore body fluid volume to normal levels. PMID:7644511

  6. CoreSVM: a generalized high-order spectral volume method bearing Conservative Order RElease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouroux, Raphael; Gressier, Jeremie; Joly, Laurent; Grondin, Gilles

    2014-11-01

    The spectral volume method (SVM) introduced by Wang in 2002 is based on a compact polynomial reconstruction where the interpolation's degree is driven by the partition of the spectral volumes. We propose a generalization of the SVM which releases the polynomial degree from this constraint and more importantly that allows to resort to any polynomial order inferior to the regular stencil order without changing the original spectral volume partition. Using one-dimensional advection and Burgers equation, we prove that the proposed extended method exhibits versatile high-order convergence together with conservativity properties. This new method is thus named the CoreSVM for Conservative Order-REleased SVM and we therefore explore its potential towards the numerical simulation of stiff problems. It is stressed that CoreSVM is indeed particularly suited to handle discontinuities, as the order-reduction serves to damp the numerical oscillations due to Runge's phenomenon. To ensure computational stability, local p-coarsening is used to obtain the highest adequate polynomial degree. It is advocated finally that, since the CoreSVM sets the polynomial order adaptation free from any stencil changes, these features do not come at the expense of any extra remeshing or data adaptation cost. Part of this research was funded by the French DGA.

  7. Phasic acetylcholine release and the volume transmission hypothesis: time to move on

    PubMed Central

    Sarter, Martin; Parikh, Vinay; Howe, W. Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Traditional descriptions of the cortical cholinergic input system focused on the diffuse organization of cholinergic projections and the hypothesis that slowly changing levels of extracellular acetylcholine (ACh) mediate different arousal states. The ability of ACh to reach the extrasynaptic space (volume neurotransmission), as opposed to remaining confined to the synaptic cleft (wired neurotransmission), has been considered an integral component of this conceptualization. Recent studies demonstrated that phasic release of ACh, at the scale of seconds, mediates precisely defined cognitive operations. This characteristic of cholinergic neurotransmission is proposed to be of primary importance for understanding cholinergic function and developing treatments for cognitive disorders that result from abnormal cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:19377503

  8. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES. VOLUME 1. PREVENTION AND PROTECTION TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTROLLING ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume discusses prevention and protection measures for controlling accidental releases of air toxics. The probability of accidental releases depends on the extent to which deviations (in magnitude and duration) in the process can be tolerated before a loss of chemical contai...

  9. Retro-Nasal Aroma Release Is Correlated with Variations in the In-Mouth Air Cavity Volume after Empty Deglutition

    PubMed Central

    Mishellany-Dutour, Anne; Woda, Alain; Labouré, Hélène; Bourdiol, Pierre; Lachaze, Pauline; Guichard, Elisabeth; Feron, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that interindividual differences in motor activities during chewing and/or swallowing were determining factors for the transfer of volatile aroma from the in-mouth air cavity (IMAC) toward the olfactory mucosa. In our first experiment, we looked for changes in IMAC volume after saliva deglutition in 12 healthy subjects. The mean IMAC volume was measured after empty deglutition using an acoustic pharyngometer device. Based on the time course of the IMAC volume after swallowing, we discerned two groups of subjects. The first group displayed a small, constant IMAC volume (2.26 mL ±0.62) that corresponded to a high tongue position. The second group displayed a progressive increase in IMAC (from 6.82 mL ±2.37 to 22.82 mL ±3.04) that corresponded to a progressive lowering of the tongue to its resting position. In our second experiment, we investigated the relationship between IMAC volume changes after deglutition and the level of aroma release at the nostril. For this purpose, the release of menthone was measured at the nostril level in 25 subjects who consumed similar amounts of a mint tablet. The subjects were separated into two groups corresponding to two levels of menthone release: high (H) and low (L). The mean volume of IMAC was measured during and after empty deglutition. Group H displayed a small, constant amplitude of IMAC volume change after deglutition, while Group L displayed a progressive increase in IMAC. It is likely that Group H continuously released the aroma through the veloglossal isthmus as the mint was consumed, while Group L trapped the aroma in the oral cavity and then released it into the nasal cavity upon swallowing. These results show that the in vivo aroma release profile in humans depends closely on the different motor patterns at work during empty deglutition. PMID:22815986

  10. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947. Volume 2, Data: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.

    1993-03-01

    Detailed results of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction project (HEDR) iodine-131 release reconstruction are presented in this volume. Included are daily data on B, D, and F Plant, reactor operations from the P-Department Daily Reports (General Electric Company 1947). Tables of B and T Plant material processed from the three principal sources on separations plant operations: The Jaech report (Jaech undated), the 200 Area Report (Acken and Bird 1945; Bird and Donihee 1945), and the Metal History Reports (General Electric Company 1946). A transcription of the Jaech report is also provided because it is computer-generated and is not readily readable in its original format. The iodine-131 release data are from the STRM model. Cut-by-cut release estimates are provided, along with daily, monthly, and yearly summations. These summations are based on the hourly release estimates. The hourly data are contained in a 28 megabyte electronic file. Interested individuals may request a copy.

  11. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOLUME 9. CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual discusses reducing the risk associated with an accidental release of chlorine. It identifies examples of potential causes of accidental releases that apply to processes that use chlorine, as well as measures that may be taken to reduce the accidental release risk. Such...

  12. Work Release: Toward an Understanding of the Law, Policy, and Operation of Community-Based State Corrections, Volume I. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Richard M.

    The document reports the results of the Work Release-Manpower Study in two volumes. Volume I describes the efforts to develop a framework on which to conceptualize the understanding of work release and the variables that influence the effectiveness of the operation of community corrections. The framework was used to assess this influence in 50…

  13. Closure report for CAU No. 450: Historical UST release sites, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the closure of 11 historical underground storage tank (UST) release sites within various areas of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of each hydrocarbon release has not been documented, therefore, this report addresses the remedial activities completed for each release site. The hydrocarbon release associated with each tank site within CAU 450 was remediated by excavating the impacted soil. Clean closure of the release was verified through soil sample analysis by an off-site laboratory. All release closure activities were completed following standard environmental and regulatory guidelines. Based upon site observations during the remedial activities and the soil sample analytical results, which indicated that soil concentrations were below the Nevada Administrative code (NAC) Action Level of 100 mg/kg, it is anticipated that each of the release CASs be closed without further action.

  14. Toxic chemical release inventory risk screening guide (Version 1. 0). Volume 1. The process. Volume 2. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klauder, D.; Saunders, L.

    1989-07-01

    The guide describes some of the challenges raised by the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data and to suggest ways of approaching them. The guide suggests steps that can be taken to answer two key issues of concern: setting risk-based priorities for followup investigation of the TRI facilities and chemicals within geographic area of interest, and identifying data needs and approaches for collecting information necessary to respond to health and ecological questions from the public. The guide is directed at those individuals who are involved in interpreting and explaining environmental pollution, exposures, and health risks to the general public, especially at the local or sub-State level. Many users of the guide will already be well versed in evaluating risk and/or in helping members of the public understand and deal with toxic chemicals, but Title 111 - particularly, the Section 313 release data - presents new challenges for everyone.

  15. Role of cardiac volume receptors in the control of ADH release during acute simulated weightlessness in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Sandler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes, designed to induce central blood volume shifts in ten cardiac and one heart-lung transplant recipients, to assess the contribution of cardiac volume receptors in the control of ADH release during the initial acute phase of exposure to weightlessness. Each subject underwent 15 min of a sitting-control period (C) followed by 30 min of 6 deg headdown tilt (T) and 30 min of resumed sitting (S). Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions were taken at 0 and 15 min of C; 5, 15, and 30 min of T; and 5, 15, and 30 min of S. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded every two min. Plasma osmolality was not altered by posture changes. Mean left ventricular end-diastolic volume increased (P less than 0.05) from 90 ml in C to 106 ml in T and returned to 87 ml in S. Plasma ADH was reduced by 20 percent (P less than 0.05) with T, and returned to control levels with S. These responses were similar in six normal cardiac-innervated control subjects. These data may suggest that cardiac volume receptors are not the primary mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute central volume shifts in man.

  16. Prevention reference manual: chemical specific. Volume 9. Control of accidental releases of chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.S.; DeWolf, G.B.; Quass, J.D.; Wert, K.P.

    1987-08-01

    The manual discusses reducing the risk associated with an accidental release of chlorine. It identifies examples of potential causes of accidental releases that apply to processes that use chlorine, as well as measures that may be taken to reduce the accidental release risk. Such measures include recommendations on plant design practices; prevention, protection, and mitigation technologies; and operation and maintenance practices. It provides conceptual cost estimates of possible prevention, protection, and mitigation measures. Chlorine has an IDLH (immediately dangerous to life and health) concentration, making it a substantial acute toxic hazard.

  17. Factors Controlling Water Volumes and Release Rates in Martian Outflow Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Head, J. W.; Leask, H. J.; Ghatan, G.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss estimates of water fluxes on Mars and suggest that many are overestimates. Even so, we can only explain very high martian outflow rates by either unusually permeable aquifer systems or sudden release of shallow concentrations of water.

  18. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1991, Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, J.; Doty, K.; Congemi, J.

    1994-05-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1991 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1991 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data Covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  19. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Volume 11: Annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, J.; Doty, K.; Congemi, J.

    1993-10-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1990 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1990 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  20. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1989: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1992-09-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1989 have been compiled and reported. The summary data for the years 1970 through 1988 are included for comparison. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1989 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  1. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC, VOLUME 13: CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF METHYL ISOCYANATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is one of a series of manuals addressing accidental releases of toxic chemicals. Methyl isocyanite (MIC) has an Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) concentration of 20 ppm, making it a substantially acute toxic hazard. Reducing the risk associated with an acciden...

  2. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC, VOLUME 14: CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF PHOSGENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, discussing phosgene, is one of a series addressing the prevention of accidental releases of toxic chemicals. Phosgene, a highly reactive and corrosive liquid that boils at room temperature has an Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (lDLH) conctntration of 2 ppm, ...

  3. Changing paradigms: Manufacturing vs. fabricating a high volume Hold Down and Release Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Daryl; Monick, Doug

    1995-01-01

    A detailed description of the Hold Down and Release Mechanisms designed for a 70+ constellation of spacecraft is presented. The design is reviewed to understand the practical implications of severely constraining cost. Strategies for adapting the traditional aerospace design paradigm to a more commercial, cost driven paradigm are discussed and practical examples are cited.

  4. Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 2, dose assessment supporting data

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The second volume of the Grand Junction Office Action Program Technical Basis for Radiological Release of Grand Junction Office Building 2 report includes the data quality objectives (DQO), sampling plan, collected data, and analysis used to model future radiation doses to members of the public occupying Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site. This volume was assembled by extracting relevant components of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 Public Dose Evaluation (DOE 1996) and inserting recent additional data that was gathered and dose pathway modeling that was performed. The intent of this document is to provide all derived guidance decisions, assumptions, measured data, testing results, and pathway modeling software input and output data that supports the discussion and determinations presented in Volume 1 of this report. For constructive employment of this document, the reader is encouraged to closely follow Volume 1 for proper association with the segment of information being examined.

  5. Closure report for CAU No. 450: Historical UST release sites, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the closure of 11 historical underground storage tank release sites within various areas of the Nevada Test Site. This report contains remedial verification of the soil sample analytical results for the following: Area 11 Tweezer facility; Area 12 boiler house; Area 12 service station; Area 23 bypass yard; Area 23 service station; Area 25 power house; Area 25 tech. services building; Area 25 tech. operations building; Area 26 power house; and Area 27 boiler house.

  6. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1982. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1982. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 51 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 30 person-rem to a low of 0.007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 130 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 6 x 10/sup -7/ mrem to a high of 0.06 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  7. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1988. Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1988. Fifty-year commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 71 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 16 person-rem to a low of 0.0011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 75 person-rem for the 150 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year).

  8. Radionuclide release calculations for selected severe accident scenarios. Volume 3. PWR, subatmospheric containment design

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, R.S.; Gieseke, J.A.; Cybulskis, P.; Lee, K.W.; Jordan, H.; Curtis, L.A.; Kelly, R.F.; Kogan, V.; Schumacher, P.M.

    1986-07-01

    This report presents results of analyses of the enviromental releases of fission products (source terms) for severe accident scenarios in a pressurized water reactor with a subatmospheric containment design. The analyses were performed to support the Severe Accident Risk Reduction/Risk Rebaselining Program (SARRP) which is being undertaken for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Sandia National Laboratories. In the SARRP program, risk estimates are being generated for a number of reference plant designs. the Surry plant has been used in this study as the reference plant for a subatmospheric design.

  9. TMI-2 core debris-cesium release/settling test. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D W; Johnson, D A

    1984-12-01

    Cesium release, turbidity and airborne potential tests were conducted on 50 grams of TMI-2 core debris materials. The tests were performed on the debris in two conditions: on the as-received core debris specimen, and after crushing the debris to alter the particle size distribution. The crushing was intended to simulate the breakup of TMI-2 core material that may occur during reactor defueling. These tests are intended to assist GPU Nuclear in predicting the effect of defueling on the reactor environment.

  10. Flight Set 360T004 (STS-30) Insulation Component, Interim Release, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passman, James A.

    1989-01-01

    The insulation component of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) is discussed. The results of all visual evaluations and a thermal safety factor analysis are given. The data contained here supersedes the interim release and the insulation data presented in the Clearfield 10 day report. The objective is to document the postflight condition of the internal and external insulation of nozzle to case joints, the case field joints, the igniter to case joints, and the acreage insulation which made up RSRM-4A and RSRM-4B.

  11. Hazard ranking system evaluation of CERCLA inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 3: Unplanned-release sites (HISS data base)

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.; Stenner, R.D; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to formally document the assessment activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that address the Comprehensive Environmental Response, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program for the cleanup of inactive waste sites. The DOE orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. This methodology includes:PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation or remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the Hazard Ranking System methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 13 figs.

  12. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1992. Volume 14

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1992. Fifty-year dose commitments for a 1-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager, and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses, which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I, design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 3.7 person-rem to a low of 0.0015 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 0.66 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 47 person-rem for the 130-million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the 10 CFR 50, Appendix I, design objectives.

  13. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1981. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1981. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways from 48 sites ranged from a high of 20 person-rem to a low of 0.008 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 160 person-rem for the 98 million people considered at risk.

  14. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1989. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1989. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 14 person-rem to a low of 0.005 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 84 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix I design objectives.

  15. Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 1, dose assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.; Warga, J.; Thorne, D.

    1997-07-01

    Building 2 on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site is part of the GJO Remedial Action Program (GJORAP). During evaluation of Building 2 for determination of radiological release disposition, some inaccessible surface contamination measurements were detected to be greater than the generic surface contamination guidelines of DOE Order 5400.5 (which are functionally equivalent to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] Regulatory Guide 1.86). Although the building is nominal in size, it houses the site telecommunications system, that is critical to continued GJO operations, and demolition is estimated at $1.9 million. Because unrestricted release under generic surface contamination guidelines is cost-prohibitive, supplemental standards consistent with DOE Order 5400.5 are being pursued. This report describes measurements and dose analysis modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might occupy or demolish Building 2, a 2,480 square-foot (ft) building constructed in 1944. The north portion of the building was used as a shower facility for Manhattan Project uranium-processing mill workers and the south portion was a warehouse. Many originally exposed surfaces are no longer accessible for contamination surveys because expensive telecommunications equipment have been installed on the floors and mounted on panels covering the walls. These inaccessible surfaces are contaminated above generic contamination limits.

  16. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1991. Volume 13

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1995-04-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1991. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1 design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 22 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 88 person-rem for the 130 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix 1 design objectives.

  17. EVALUATION OF THE EXTRACT-RELEASE VOLUME PHENOMENON AS A RAPID TEST FOR DETECTING SPOILAGE IN BEEF.

    PubMed

    JAY, J M; KONTOU, K S

    1964-07-01

    Ground beef of several grades, obtained fresh and held refrigerated until spoiled, was presented to a test panel for scoring on color, odor, and tactile response (tackiness) as to degree of acceptance. Panel scores were correlated with total bacterial counts, ninhydrin-reactive substances, and ERV (extract-release volume) on the same meat. ERV correlated highest with bacterial counts the largest number of times; tackiness, odor, ninhydrin, and color followed in that order. Correlation between bacterial numbers and organoleptic qualities was best, with tackiness followed closely by odor, and then by color. Correlation between tackiness and odor was high. The degree of correlation between bacterial numbers, tackiness, and ERV was high enough to warrant the use of the ERV phenomenon as a rapid test of microbial quality of beef. An ERV value of 25 under the conditions of the test was supported as a divider between acceptable and unacceptable ground beef. PMID:14201094

  18. To what extent do long-duration high-volume dam releases influence river-aquifer interactions? A case study in New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, P. W.; Andersen, M. S.; McCabe, M. F.; Ajami, H.; Baker, A.; Acworth, I.

    2015-03-01

    Long-duration high-volume dam releases are unique anthropogenic events with no naturally occurring equivalents. The impact from such dam releases on a downstream Quaternary alluvial aquifer in New South Wales, Australia, is assessed. It is observed that long-duration (>26 days), high-volume dam releases (>8,000 ML/day average) result in significant variations in river-aquifer interactions. These variations include a flux from the river to the aquifer up to 6.3 m3/day per metre of bank (at distances of up to 330 m from the river bank), increased extent and volume of recharge/bank storage, and a long-term (>100 days) reversal of river-aquifer fluxes. In contrast, during lower-volume events (<2,000 ML/day average) the flux was directed from the aquifer to the river at rates of up to 1.6 m3/day per metre of bank. A groundwater-head prediction model was constructed and river-aquifer fluxes were calculated; however, predicted fluxes from this method showed poor correlation to fluxes calculated using actual groundwater heads. Long-duration high-volume dam releases have the potential to skew estimates of long-term aquifer resources and detrimentally alter the chemical and physical properties of phreatic aquifers flanking the river. The findings have ramifications for improved integrated management of dam systems and downstream aquifers.

  19. Response of the Extract-Release Volume and Water-Holding Capacity Phenomena to Microbiologically Spoiled Beef and Aged Beef

    PubMed Central

    Jay, James M.

    1966-01-01

    The aging of ground beef was effected by storing in gas-impermeable, sterile plastic bags with incubation at 7 and 15 C. Control meat from the same preparations was wrapped in aluminum foil and stored at the same temperature. In three experiments where control meat was tested, aged meat did not attain a log bacterial number of ca. 8.4 per gram until an average of 6 days after this level was reached in control meats. This degree of difference was shown in values for both extract-release volume (ERV) and water-holding capacity. The previously reported ERV value of around 25, which was found to correspond to an average log bacterial number of ca. 8.5 per gram for ground beef allowed to spoil in aluminum foil and freezer paper, was approximated for aged meats, which required an average of 9.7 days to attain this number compared with 4.1 days for unaged meats. Plate count methods indicated the predominant flora of aged beef to be gram-negative, facultatively psychrophilic rods. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:5927019

  20. Concentration of extracellular L-glutamate released from cultured nerve cells measured with a small-volume online sensor.

    PubMed

    Niwa, O; Torimitsu, K; Morita, M; Osborne, P; Yamamoto, K

    1996-06-01

    An online sensor with a low detection limit for L-glutamate was developed in order to monitor the change in the extracellular L-glutamate concentration as a result of stimulated release from cultured nerve cells. The sensor consisted of a microdialysis (MD) probe fixed at the manipulator, a small-volume L-glutamate oxidase enzymatic reactor (0.75 mm i.d. and 2.5 cm long), and an electrochemical detector in a thin-layer radial flow cell with an active volume of 70-340 nL. Glassy carbon bulk or carbon film ring-disk electrodes were used as detectors by modifying them with Os poly(vinylpyridine) mediator containing horseradish peroxidase. The overall efficiency of L-glutamate detection with the sensor is 94% under optimum conditions, due to an efficient enzymatic reaction in the reactor and a high conversion efficiency in the radial flow cell. As a result, we achieved a sensitivity of 24.3 nA/muM and a detection limit of 7.2 nM (S/N = 3). The effect of interferents such as L-ascorbic acid can be minimized effectively by applying a low potential to the electrode for hydrogen peroxide detection (O mV) and via the ring-disk electrode geometry by using the disk for preoxidation. In the in vitro experiment, an MD probe for sampling was connected to a manipulator that controls distance between the probe and the stimulated cells. The cells were stimulated by KCl in a glass capillary or electrically with microarray film electrodes fabricated on a substrate. By using the sensor, we can monitor L-glutamate concentration changes at the submicromolar level caused by KCl stimulation of a single nerve cell and micromolar L-glutamate concentration increases caused by electrical stimulation of a brain slice. An increase in L-glutamate concentration can also be measured by positioning the probe near the cell that is connected synaptically to the stimulated cell. PMID:8686911

  1. Total flammable mass and volume within a vapor cloud produced by a continuous fuel-gas or volatile liquid-fuel release.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Michael; Fauske, Hans K

    2007-08-25

    The top-hat jet/plume model has recently been employed to obtain simple closed-form expressions for the mass of fuel in the flammable region of a vapor "cloud" produced by an axisymmetric (round) continuous-turbulent jet having positive or negative buoyancy [1]. The fuel release may be a gas or a volatile liquid. In this paper, the top-hat analysis is extended to obtain closed-form approximate expressions for the total mass (fuel+entrained air) and volume of the flammable region of a release cloud produced by either a round or a plane (two-dimensional) buoyant jet. These expressions lead to predicted average fuel concentrations in the flammable regions of the release clouds which, when compared with the stoichiometric concentration, serve as indicators of the potential severity of release cloud explosions. For a fixed release mass, the combustion overpressure following ignition of a hydrogen/air cloud is anticipated to be significantly lower than that due to ignition of a hydrocarbon/air cloud. The predicted average hydrogen concentration within the flammable region of the release cloud is below the lower detonability limit. The facility with which the expressions can be used for predictions of combustion overpressures is illustrated for propane releases and deflagrations in a closed compartment. PMID:17363152

  2. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOLUME 2. CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF CHLORINE (SCAQMD) (SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual discusses reducing the risk associated with an accidental release of chlorine. It identifies some of the potential causes of accidental releases that apply to the processes that use chlorine. It also identifies examples of potential causes, as well as measures that may...

  3. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947. Volume 1, Text: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.

    1992-10-01

    Releases of fission product iodine-131 from separation plants at the Hanford reservation are calculated for the 1944 through 1947 period. Releases to the atmosphere were from the ventilation stacks of T and B separation plants. A reconstruction of daily separation plant operations forms the basis of the releases. The reconstruction traces the iodine-131 content of each fuel discharge from the B, D, and F Reactors to the dissolving step in the separation plants. Statistical computer modeling techniques are used to estimate hourly release histories based on sampling mathematical distribution functions that express the uncertainties in the source data and timing. The reported daily, monthly, and yearly estimates are averages and uncertainty ranges are based on 100 independent Monte Carlo ``realizations`` of the hourly release histories.

  4. Mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with mesopore size and pore volume influence hMSC behaviors by load and sustained release of rhBMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenhua; Li, Xiangde; Qian, Jun; Lv, Guoyu; Yan, Yonggang; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with a pore size of 15 nm (MCS-15) and pore volume of 1.43 cm3/g were synthesized by using 1,3,5-mesitylene (TMB) as the pore-expanding agent. The MCS-15 exhibited good degradability with the weight loss of 50 wt% after soaking in Tris-HCl solution for 56 days, which was higher than the 30 wt% loss shown by mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with a pore size of 4 nm (MCS-4). The pore size and pore volume of MCS-15 had significant influences on load and release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The MCS-15 had a higher capacity to encapsulate a large amount of rhBMP-2; it could adsorb 45 mg/g of rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered saline after 24 hours, which was more than twice that with MCS-4 (20 mg/g). Moreover, the MCS-15 system exhibited sustained release of rhBMP-2 as compared with MCS-4 system (showing a burst release). The MCS-15/rhBMP-2 system could promote the proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, showing good cytocompatibility and bioactivity. The results indicated that MCS-15, with larger mesopore size and higher pore volume, might be a promising carrier for loading and sustained release of rhBMP-2, which could be used as bone repair material with built-in osteoinduction function in bone reconstruction. PMID:25784801

  5. Activation of microglia with zymosan promotes excitatory amino acid release via volume-regulated anion channels: the role of NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, Timothy J.; Abdullaev, Iskandar F.; Jourd'heuil, David; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the CNS, which are important for preserving neural tissue functions, but may also contribute to neurodegeneration. Activation of these cells in infection, inflammation, or trauma leads to the release of various toxic molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the excitatory amino acid glutamate. In this study we used an electrophysiological approach and a D-[3H]aspartate (glutamate) release assay to explore the ROS-dependent regulation of glutamate-permeable volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs). Exposure of rat microglia to hypoosmotic media stimulated Cl− currents and D-[3H]aspartate release, both of which were inhibited by the selective VRAC blocker DCPIB. Exogenously applied H2O2 potently increased swelling-activated glutamate release. Stimulation of microglia with zymosan triggered production of endogenous ROS and strongly enhanced glutamate release via VRAC in swollen cells. The effects of zymosan were attenuated by the ROS scavenger MnTMPyP, and by two inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (NOX) diphenyliodonium and thioridazine. However, zymosan-stimulated glutamate release was insensitive to other NOX blockers, apocynin and AEBSF. This pharmacological profile pointed to the potential involvement of apocynin-insensitive NOX4. Using RT-PCR we confirmed that NOX4 is expressed in rat microglial cells, along with NOX1 and NOX2. To check for potential involvement of phagocytic NOX2 we stimulated this isoform using protein kinase C (PKC) activator PMA, or inhibited it with the broad spectrum PKC blocker Gö6983. Both agents potently modulated endogenous ROS production by NOX2, but not VRAC activity. Taken together, these data suggest that the anion channel VRAC may contribute to microglial glutamate release, and that its activity is regulated by endogenous ROS originating from NOX4. PMID:18624925

  6. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed

  7. Effects of surface area to volume ratio of PLGA scaffolds with different architectures on scaffold degradation characteristics and drug release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chew, Sue Anne; Arriaga, Marco A; Hinojosa, Victor A

    2016-05-01

    In this work, PLGA scaffolds with different architectures were fabricated to investigate the effects of surface area to volume ratio (SVR) (which resulted from the different architectures) on scaffold degradation characteristics and drug release kinetics with minocycline as the model drug. It was hypothesized that the thin strand scaffolds, which had the highest SVR, would degrade faster than the thick strand and globular scaffolds as the increase in surface area will allow more contact between water molecules and degradable ester groups in the polymer. However, it was found that globular scaffolds, which had the lowest SVR, resulted in the fastest degradation which demonstrated that the amount of degradation of the scaffolds does not only depend on the SVR but also on other factors such as the retention of acidic degradation byproducts in the scaffold and scaffold porosity. PLGA 50 : 50 globular scaffolds resulted in a biphasic release profile, with a burst release in the beginning and the middle of the release study which may be beneficial for some drug delivery applications. A clear correlation between SVR and release rates was not observed, indicating that besides the availability of more surface area for drug to diffuse out of the polymer matrix, other factors such as amount of scaffold degradation and scaffold porosity may play a role in determining drug release kinetics. Further studies, such as scanning electron microscopy, need to be performed in the future to further evaluate the porosity, morphology and structure of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1202-1211, 2016. PMID:26780154

  8. Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Development of model evaluation criteria. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the usefulness and effectiveness of currently existing models that simulate the release of uranium hexafluoride from UF{sub 6}-handling facilities, subsequent reactions of UF{sub 6} with atmospheric moisture, and the dispersion of UF{sub 6} and reaction products in the atmosphere. The study evaluates screening-level and detailed public-domain models that were specifically developed for UF{sub 6} and models that were originally developed for the treatment of dense gases but are applicable to UF{sub 6} release, reaction, and dispersion. The model evaluation process is divided into three specific tasks: model-component evaluation; applicability evaluation; and user interface and quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) evaluation. Within the model-component evaluation process, a model`s treatment of source term, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion are considered and model predictions are compared with actual observations. Within the applicability evaluation process, a model`s applicability to Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis, and to site-specific considerations are assessed. Finally, within the user interface and QA/QC evaluation process, a model`s user-friendliness, presence and clarity of documentation, ease of use, etc. are assessed, along with its handling of QA/QC. This document presents the complete methodology used in the evaluation process.

  9. Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Model evaluation report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Radonjic, Z.R.; Coutts, P.T.; Lewis, C.J.; Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1997-11-01

    Three uranium hexafluoride-(UF{sub 6}-) specific models--HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6}, Science Application International Corporation, and RTM-96; three dense-gas models--DEGADIS, SLAB, and the Chlorine Institute methodology; and one toxic chemical model--AFTOX--are evaluated on their capabilities to simulate the chemical reactions, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion of UF{sub 6} released from accidents at nuclear fuel-cycle facilities, to support Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis. These models are also evaluated for user-friendliness and for quality assurance and quality control features, to ensure the validity and credibility of the results. Model performance evaluations are conducted for the three UF{sub 6}-specific models, using field data on releases of UF{sub 6} and other heavy gases. Predictions from the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} and SAIC models are within an order of magnitude of the field data, but the SAIC model overpredicts beyond an order of magnitude for a few UF{sub 6}-specific data points. The RTM-96 model provides overpredictions within a factor of 3 for all data points beyond 400 m from the source. For one data set, however, the RTM-96 model severely underpredicts the observations within 200 m of the source. Outputs of the models are most sensitive to the meteorological parameters at large distances from the source and to certain source-specific and meteorological parameters at distances close to the source. Specific recommendations are being made to improve the applicability and usefulness of the three models and to choose a specific model to support the intended analyses. Guidance is also provided on the choice of input parameters for initial dilution, building wake effects, and distance to completion of UF{sub 6} reaction with water.

  10. Quantitation of fluoride ion released sarin in red blood cell samples by gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry using isotope dilution and large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, E M; McGuire, J M; Evans, R A; Edwards, J L; Hulet, S W; Benton, B J; Forster, J S; Burnett, D C; Muse, W T; Matson, K; Crouse, C L; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A

    2004-01-01

    A new method for measuring fluoride ion released isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) in the red blood cell fraction was developed that utilizes an autoinjector, a large-volume injector port (LVI), positive ion ammonia chemical ionization detection in the SIM mode, and a deuterated stable isotope internal standard. This method was applied to red blood cell (RBC) and plasma ethyl acetate extracts from spiked human and animal whole blood samples and from whole blood of minipigs, guinea pigs, and rats exposed by whole-body sarin inhalation. Evidence of nerve agent exposure was detected in plasma and red blood cells at low levels of exposure. The linear method range of quantitation was 10-1000 pg on-column with a detection limit of approximately 2-pg on-column. In the course of method development, several conditions were optimized for the LVI, including type of injector insert, injection volume, initial temperature, pressure, and flow rate. RBC fractions had advantages over the plasma with respect to assessing nerve agent exposure using the fluoride ion method especially in samples with low serum butyrylcholinesterase activity. PMID:15239856

  11. Protolichesterinic Acid, Isolated from the Lichen Cetraria islandica, Reduces LRRC8A Expression and Volume-Sensitive Release of Organic Osmolytes in Human Lung Epithelial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur Arna; Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2016-01-01

    We have tested the effect of protolichesterinic acid (PA) on the activity of the volume-sensitive release pathway for the organic osmolyte taurine (VSOAC) and the expression of the leucine-rich-repeat-channel 8A (LRRC8A) protein, which constitutes an essential VSOAC component. Exposing human lung cancer cells (A549) to PA (20 µg/mL, 24 h) reduces LRRC8A protein expression by 25% and taurine release following osmotic cell swelling (320 → 200 mOsm) by 60%. C75 (20 µg/mL, 24 h), a γ-lactone with a C8 carbon fatty acid chain, reduces VSOAC activity by 30%, i.e. less than PA. Stearic acid (20 µg/mL, 24 h) has no effect on VSOAC. Hence, length of PA's fatty acid chain adds to γ-lactone's inhibitory action. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) activity is essential for swelling-induced activation of VSOAC. PA has no effect on cellular concentration of leukotrienes (5-HETE/LTB4 ) under hypotonic conditions, excluding that PA mediated inhibition of VSOAC involves 5-LO inhibition. A549 cells exposed to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin (10 μM, 24 h) reveal signs of apoptosis, i.e. 25% reduction in cell viability as well as 1.3-, 1.5- and 3.3-fold increase in the expression of LRRC8A, Bax (regulator of apoptosis) and p21 (regulator of cell cycle progression), respectively. PA reduces cell viability by 30% but has no effect on p21/Bax expression. This excludes PA as a pro-apoptotic drug in A549 cells. PMID:26549524

  12. The Issue of Calculating the Final Temperature of the Products of Rapid Exothermic Chemical Reactions with Significant Energy Release in a Closed Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarev, V.; Geidmanis, D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical problem solved in this article is the calculation of thermodynamic parameters such as final temperature, distribution of the liquid and dry saturated vapour phases of the substance that are considered to be in thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure of the system of several reaction products after adding to the system a certain amount of heat or the thermal effect released during rapid exothermic reaction in a closed volume that occurs so fast that it can be considered to be adiabatic, and when the volume of liquid reagents is several orders of magnitude less than the volume of the reactor. The general multi-substance problem is reduced to a theoretical problem for one substance of calculation thermodynamic parameters of system after adding a certain amount of heat that gives theoretically rigorous isochoric calculation. In this article, we substantiate our view that isochoric pass of calculation is more robust compared to seemingly more natural isobaric pass of calculation, if the later involves quite not trivial calculation of the adiabatic compression of a two-phase system (liquid - dry saturated vapour) that can pass itself into another kind of state (liquid - wet saturated vapour), which requires, apparently, more complex descriptions compared with isochoric calculation because the specific heat capacity of wet saturated vapour can be negative. The solved theoretical problem relates to a practical problem that has been a driver for our research as part of a design of the reactor of the titanium reduction from magnesium and titanium tetrachloride supplied into atmosphere of the reactor at high temperatures when both reagents are in gaseous state. The reaction is known to be exothermic with a high thermal effect, and estimate of the final temperature and pressure of the products of reaction, for instance, designing the reactor allows eliminating the possibility of the reaction products to penetrate backwards into supply tracts of the reagents

  13. Spatial patterns of rockfall in recently deglaciated high-alpine rock faces: Analysing rockfall release zones and volumes based on a multiannual LiDAR time series, Kitzsteinhorn, Austria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmeyer, Ingo; Keuschnig, Markus; Delleske, Robert; Wichmann, Volker; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schrott, Lothar

    2015-04-01

    Rock instabilities in high-alpine areas represent a considerable risk factor for man and infrastructure. In the Alps numerous, mainly visual, observations suggest an increasing occurrence of rockfall events potentially associated to climate warming. However, unbiased high-precision information on the location of rockfall release zones and the size of event volumes is scarce. Thus, frequency/magnitude patterns of high-alpine rockfall often remain elusive. The presented study addresses the need for systematically acquired, objective field data by presenting an extensive, multiannual LiDAR time series from a high-alpine (peri)glacial environment. The study area is located in the summit region of the Kitzsteinhorn (3.203 m), Hohe Tauern Range, Austria. The beginning of the terrestrial laserscanning (TLS) monitoring campaign dates back to July 2011. Since then six rock faces have been scanned repeatedly at an interval of 1-2 months during the snow-free summer season (June to October). The investigated rock faces predominantly consist of calcareous mica-schist and differ in terms of height, slope, aspect, and discontinuity orientation. The rock faces are partially underlain by permafrost, their combined surface area is approx. 1.3 km². They are located directly adjacent to the Schmiedingerkees cirque glacier, which has retreated and thinned significantly in recent decades (downwasting rate ~1.5 m/a). TLS data acquisition was performed using a Riegl LMS-Z620i. During data acquisition no permanently fixed installations and no artificial reflective markers were used. This is in line with the requirement to develop a quick, flexible methodology that can be applied not only at the Kitzsteinhorn, but also in other, similar environments. For data post-processing a new analysis procedure has been developed which allows (i) point cloud alignment by surface geometry matching, (ii) objective, automated discrimination between measurement errors und real surface changes, and (iii

  14. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOLUME 1. CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE (SCAQMD) (SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual summarizes technical information that will assist in identifying and controlling hydrogen fluoride release hazards specific to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) of southern California. The SCAQMD has considered a strategy for reducing the risk of...

  15. Prevention reference manual: chemical specific. Volume 2. Control of accidental releases of chlorine (SCAQMD) (South Coast Air Quality Management District). Final report, May 1986-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.S.; DeWolf, G.B.; Quass, J.D.; Wert, K.P.

    1987-07-01

    This manual discusses reducing the risk associated with an accidental release of chlorine. It identifies some of the potential causes of accidental releases that apply to the processes that use chlorine. It also identifies examples of potential causes, as well as measures that may be taken to reduce the accidental release risk. Such measures include recommendations on: plant design practices; prevention, protection, and mitigation technologies; and operation and maintenance practices. It provides conceptual cost estimates of possible prevention, protection, and mitigation measures. Chlorine is a highly reactive and corrosive liquid that boils at room temperature. It has an IDLH (immediately dangerous to life and health) concentration of 25 ppm, which makes it a substantial acute toxic hazard. Accidental releases of toxic chemicals at Bhopal and Chernobyl have increased public awareness of toxic-release problems. As a result of other, perhaps less-dramatic incidents in the past, portions of the chemical industry were aware of this problem long before these events. These same portions of the industry have made advances in the area.

  16. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOLUME 3. CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE (SCAQMD) (SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a strategy (being considered by the South Coast Air Quality Management District--SCAQMD--of Southern California) for reducing the risk of a major accidental air release of toxic chemicals. The strategy, intended to guide both industry and communities, consist...

  17. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer- APPENDICES Appendices-Volume 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    This report consists of all the appendices for the report described below: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values as appendices. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest

  18. Estimation of the release and migration of lead through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E.; Teel, S.S.; Cantrell, K.J.; Serne, R.J.; Smoot, J.L.; Kincaid, C.T.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1992-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential for transport of lead from the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground to the surrounding surface- and groundwater. Burial of metal components containing nickel alloy steel and lead at this location may eventually result in release of lead to the subsurface environment, including groundwater aquifers that may be used for domestic and agricultural purposes in the future and, ultimately, to the Columbia River. The rate at which lead is transported to downgradient locations depends on a complex set of factors, such as climate, soil and groundwater chemistry, and the geologic and hydrologic configuration of the subsurface region between the burial ground and a potential receptor location. The groundwater transport analysis was conducted using a one-dimensional screening model with a relatively conservative matrix of parameters obtained from the hydrogeologic and geochemical studies.

  19. Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River. Volume 1, Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Brothers, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project (PNL 1991a, PNL 1991b) to meet the project objectives. A number of options were analyzed. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations.

  20. Literature: Released Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    This volume contains 1970-71 Literature assessment exercises (all in the public domain) which have been selected for release at this time by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Information furnished for each exercise includes: the literature objective it was designed to measure, the theme (section) in which it appears, relevant…

  1. Energy Information Administration new releases. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This publication of the National Energy Information Center contains news items and information sources related primarily to electricity generation. News items reported on in this issue include utility compliance costs for the Clean Air Act, 1995 profits for major energy companies, and competition issues in the electric power and natural gas industries. A summary report on crude oil prices is also presented. Other information provided includes a listing of 1996 publications from the center, electronic information services, and energy data information contacts.

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of rock fall in a (peri)glacial environment: a LiDAR-based, multi-year investigation of rock fall release zones and volumes, Kitzsteinhorn, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delleske, Robert; Hartmeyer, Ingo; Keuschnig, Markus; Götz, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    October). All scans (n = 41) were conducted using a RIEGL LMS-Z620. The resulting spatial resolution varies between 0.1 and 0.5 m and object distance (i.e. distance between scanner and rock face) ranges from 250 to 500 m. Post-processing of TLS data enabled to precisely identify rock fall release zones, rock fall volumes and surface changes of the Schmiedingerkees glacier (lowering rate of approximately 1.5 m per year). Since 2011 a total number of nine rock fall events with a volume exceeding 100 m³ have been recorded - with the largest reaching a volume of approx. 500 m³. All were triggered from areas that have been exposed by the retreating Schmiedingerkees glacier over the last 1-2 decades. Thus, glacial debuttressing and subsequent exposure to atmospheric influences might be considered as the dominant destabilizing factors. Temporal clustering of rock fall events over the first three seasons (2011 to 2013) tentatively indicates a bimodal occurrence pattern with a first maximum during snowmelt (May/June) and a second distinct peak during the warmest period of the year (August).

  3. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas Joseph (Inventor); Yang, Robert Alexander (Inventor); Brown, Christopher William (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a pyrotechnic actuated release mechanism which is mechanically two fault tolerant for effecting release. It is particularly well suited for releasably connecting structures to be used in the space environment or in other aerospace applications. The device comprises a fastener plate and fastener body, each attachable to either one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate and the body are fastenable by a toggle supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end, which is received in a central opening in the fastener body and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein, the toggle is restrained by three retractable latching pins. Each pin is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge. While retraction of all three pins releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt is mounted on the fastener plate as a support for the socket mounting of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for pre-loading the toggle.

  4. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Yang, Robert A. (Inventor); Brown, Christopher W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device 10 which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device 10 comprises a fastener plate 11 and fastener body 12, each attachable to a different one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate 11 and body 12 are fastenable by a toggle 13 supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end which is received in a central opening in the fastener body 12 and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein the toggle 13 is restrained by three retractable latching pins 61 symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle 13 and positionable in latching engagement with an end fitting on the toggle. Each pin 61 is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge 77, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face 67 on the latch pin 61 to effect its retraction from the toggle. While retraction of all three pins 62 releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt 18 is mounted on the fastener plate 11 as a support for the socket mounting 30, 37 of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for preloading the toggle.

  5. Measure your septa release ratios: pheromone release ratio variability affected by rubber septa and solvent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The type of solvent and volume of the solvent used to load pheromone/volatile components onto rubber septa had significant effects on release ratios, the variability of those release ratios, and the recoverability of the volatile components during subsequent extraction with hexane. Volatile release ...

  6. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 3: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences on the Release of Contaminants to the Subsurface Environment from Waste Source Terms at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul L. Wichlacz

    2003-09-01

    This source-term summary document is intended to describe the current understanding of contaminant source terms and the conceptual model for potential source-term release to the environment at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), as presented in published INEEL reports. The document presents a generalized conceptual model of the sources of contamination and describes the general categories of source terms, primary waste forms, and factors that affect the release of contaminants from the waste form into the vadose zone and Snake River Plain Aquifer. Where the information has previously been published and is readily available, summaries of the inventory of contaminants are also included. Uncertainties that affect the estimation of the source term release are also discussed where they have been identified by the Source Term Technical Advisory Group. Areas in which additional information are needed (i.e., research needs) are also identified.

  7. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume VIII; New Model for Estimating Survival Probabilities and Residualization from a Release-Recapture Study of Fall Chinook Salmon Smolts in the Snake River, 1995 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lowther, Alan B.; Skalski, John R.

    1997-09-01

    Standard release-recapture analysis using Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models to estimate survival probabilities between hydroelectric facilities for Snake River fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) ignore the possibility of individual fish residualizing and completing their migration in the year following tagging.

  8. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  9. Controlled Drug Release from Pharmaceutical Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinhyun Hannah; Yeo, Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Nanocarriers providing spatiotemporal control of drug release contribute to reducing toxicity and improving therapeutic efficacy of a drug. On the other hand, nanocarriers face unique challenges in controlling drug release kinetics, due to the large surface area per volume ratio and the short diffusion distance. To develop nanocarriers with desirable release kinetics for target applications, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which a carrier retains and releases a drug, the effects of composition and morphology of the carrier on the drug release kinetics, and current techniques for preparation and modification of nanocarriers. This review provides an overview of drug release mechanisms and various nanocarriers with a specific emphasis on approaches to control the drug release kinetics. PMID:25684779

  10. The Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVII : Effects of Ocean Covariates and Release Timing on First Ocean-Year Survival of Fall Chinook Salmon from Oregon and Washington Coastal Hatcheries.

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

    2001-05-01

    Effects of oceanographic conditions, as well as effects of release-timing and release-size, on first ocean-year survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon were investigated by analyzing CWT release and recovery data from Oregon and Washington coastal hatcheries. Age-class strength was estimated using a multinomial probability likelihood which estimated first-year survival as a proportional hazards regression against ocean and release covariates. Weight-at-release and release-month were found to significantly effect first year survival (p < 0.05) and ocean effects were therefore estimated after adjusting for weight-at-release. Negative survival trend was modeled for sea surface temperature (SST) during 11 months of the year over the study period (1970-1992). Statistically significant negative survival trends (p < 0.05) were found for SST during April, June, November and December. Strong pairwise correlations (r > 0.6) between SST in April/June, April/November and April/December suggest the significant relationships were due to one underlying process. At higher latitudes (45{sup o} and 48{sup o}N), summer upwelling (June-August) showed positive survival trend with survival and fall (September-November) downwelling showed positive trend with survival, indicating early fall transition improved survival. At 45{sup o} and 48{sup o}, during spring, alternating survival trends with upwelling were observed between March and May, with negative trend occurring in March and May, and positive trend with survival occurring in April. In January, two distinct scenarios of improved survival were linked to upwelling conditions, indicated by (1) a significant linear model effect (p < 0.05) showing improved survival with increasing upwelling, and (2) significant bowl-shaped curvature (p < 0.05) of survival with upwelling. The interpretation of the effects is that there was (1) significantly improved survival when downwelling conditions shifted to upwelling conditions in January (i

  11. The illustris simulation: Public data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D.; Pillepich, A.; Genel, S.; Vogelsberger, M.; Springel, V.; Torrey, P.; Rodriguez-Gomez, V.; Sijacki, D.; Snyder, G. F.; Griffen, B.; Marinacci, F.; Blecha, L.; Sales, L.; Xu, D.; Hernquist, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present the full public release of all data from the Illustris simulation project. Illustris is a suite of large volume, cosmological hydrodynamical simulations run with the moving-mesh code AREPO and including a comprehensive set of physical models critical for following the formation and evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. Each simulates a volume of (106.5 Mpc)3 and self-consistently evolves five different types of resolution elements from a starting redshift of z = 127 to the present day, z = 0. These components are: dark matter particles, gas cells, passive gas tracers, stars and stellar wind particles, and supermassive black holes. This data release includes the snapshots at all 136 available redshifts, halo and subhalo catalogs at each snapshot, and two distinct merger trees. Six primary realizations of the Illustris volume are released, including the flagship Illustris-1 run. These include three resolution levels with the fiducial "full" baryonic physics model, and a dark matter only analog for each. In addition, we provide four distinct, high time resolution, smaller volume "subboxes". The total data volume is ∼265 TB, including ∼800 full volume snapshots and ∼30,000 subbox snapshots. We describe the released data products as well as tools we have developed for their analysis. All data may be directly downloaded in its native HDF5 format. Additionally, we release a comprehensive, web-based API which allows programmatic access to search and data processing tasks. In both cases we provide example scripts and a getting-started guide in several languages: currently, IDL, Python, and Matlab. This paper addresses scientific issues relevant for the interpretation of the simulations, serves as a pointer to published and on-line documentation of the project, describes planned future additional data releases, and discusses technical aspects of the release.

  12. Chain Release Behavior of Gellan Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Khandker S.; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    The chain release behavior from gellan gels was studied by immersing the gel into water and monitoring the mass loss as a function of time. Concentration of released gellan in the external solution was determined for gels of different sizes using phenol-sulfuric acid method. The chain release process became faster with increasing total surface area and volume. However the concentration of released chain normalized by surface area and volume suggests that the chain release itself is governed not only by the ionic effect and the amount of unassociated chains in gel but other factors such as osmotic pressure may play an important role on the chain release from the gels. The diffusion coefficient was estimated from the chain release process which is in the same order of magnitude reported for an isolated gellan chain by light scattering. Rheological measurements also suggest that the unassociated gellan chains are released out when immersed in pure water while unassociated chains are restricted to release out when immersed in salt solution due to the intrusion of cations which is responsible for further association of the unassociated gellan chains being in agreement with the previously published results. The elastic modulus of gels was increased by immersion of gels in water and in salt solutions, which can be attributed as the stiffening of network chains due to gel swelling and the conversion from free and unassociated chains into network chains, respectively, leading to an increase in elastic modulus with time.

  13. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 40; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Assessment Report for the Beta-Release L4_SM Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public beta release scheduled for 30 October 2015. The primary objective of the beta release is to allow users to familiarize themselves with the data product before the validated product becomes available. The beta release also allows users to conduct their own assessment of the data and to provide feedback to the L4_SM science data product team. The assessment of the L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to upscaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 1 validation and supports the beta release of the data. The validation against

  14. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 42; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Calibration and Validation for the L4_C Beta-Release Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima (Editor); Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch Cal/Val Phase of SMAP there are two objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements according to the Cal/Val timeline. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product specifically for the beta release. The beta-release version of the SMAP L4_C algorithms utilizes a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily NEE and component carbon fluxes, particularly vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (<10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape FT controls on GPP and Reco (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and underlying freeze/thaw and soil moisture constraints to these processes, 2) documenting primary connections between terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, and 3) improving understanding of terrestrial carbon sink activity in northern ecosystems.

  15. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part C, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 5: A summary of information concerning historical locations and activities of populations potentially affected by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    DaMassa, C.L.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    A significant number of information sources have been identified that are relevant to historical locations and activities of populations potentially affected by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information that has been reviewed as part of this Task 5 investigation has shown that numerous residences and farms have historically been present near the ORR boundary and that a variety of land uses and recreational activities have been practiced. Based on this information alone, it would appear that many routes of off-site exposure could have been plausible. Most of the available published information addresses demographic and land use data on a regional or county-wide basis over fairly broad time periods. The information sources that are most readily available do not support direct evaluation of potential exposure pathways at specific geographic locations near the Oak Ridge facilities at specific points in time. A number of information sources have been identified that can provide demography and land use information more specific to locations and time periods that are identified to be of interest. Examples of data sources in this category include individual USGS topographic maps, aerial photographs, lowest-level census tract data, and interviews with long-time local residents. However, specific release events and periods of interest should be identified prior to attempts to collect more specific demographic or land use information for actual dose reconstruction.

  16. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2, Part B, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 3 and 4, Identification of important environmental pathways for materials released from the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Brorby, G.P.; Bruce, G.M.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    While each of the three different screening comparisons made in this report (i.e., within-medium evaluation, between-media evaluation and relative importance grouping) individually provides information potentially of value in focusing future studies, each one is subject to a variety of limitations, the most important being associated with the absence or variable quality of environmental data for a number of the contaminants and media. These screening exercises are intended to provide an initial framework for approaching the study of an extremely complex site. Other approaches could very well yield somewhat different priorities, and the identification or reinterpretation of data in subsequent detailed studies are likely to invalidate some of the results of these screening exercises. However, these evaluations provide a logical approach to defining initial off- site health impact study priorities for the ORR. Therefore, while care must be taken in attempting to make any broad generalizations or greatly simplifying assumptions with regard to the potential health hazards posed by the complex releases from the Reservation, Table 6-1 represents an attempt to summarize a set of recommendations that are derived from the screening exercises presented in this report. Table 6-1 identifies the facilities, processes and contaminants believed to have the highest potential for resulting in off-site health impacts. Table 6-2 identifies contaminants for which no ranking could be performed as part of this feasibility study, because of the absence of any appropriate data for any environmental medium.

  17. Quantum volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum systems in a mechanical embedding, the breathing mode of a small particles, optomechanical system, etc. are far not the full list of examples in which the volume exhibits quantum behavior. Traditional consideration suggests strain in small systems as a result of a collective movement of particles, rather than the dynamics of the volume as an independent variable. The aim of this work is to show that some problem here might be essentially simplified by introducing periodic boundary conditions. At this case, the volume is considered as the independent dynamical variable driven by the internal pressure. For this purpose, the concept of quantum volume based on Schrödinger’s equation in 𝕋3 manifold is proposed. It is used to explore several 1D model systems: An ensemble of free particles under external pressure, quantum manometer and a quantum breathing mode. In particular, the influence of the pressure of free particle on quantum oscillator is determined. It is shown also that correction to the spectrum of the breathing mode due to internal degrees of freedom is determined by the off-diagonal matrix elements of the quantum stress. The new treatment not using the “force” theorem is proposed for the quantum stress tensor. In the general case of flexible quantum 3D dynamics, quantum deformations of different type might be introduced similarly to monopole mode.

  18. Chemical release module facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical release module provides the capability to conduct: (1) thermite based metal vapor releases; (2) pressurized gas releases; (3) dispersed liquid releases; (4) shaped charge releases from ejected submodules; and (5) diagnostic measurements with pi supplied instruments. It also provides a basic R-F and electrical system for: (1) receiving and executing commands; (2) telemetering housekeeping data; (3) tracking; (4) monitoring housekeeping and control units; and (5) ultrasafe disarming and control monitoring.

  19. Somatodendritic dopamine release: recent mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Rice, Margaret E; Patel, Jyoti C

    2015-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key transmitter in motor, reward and cogitative pathways, with DA dysfunction implicated in disorders including Parkinson's disease and addiction. Located in midbrain, DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta project via the medial forebrain bundle to the dorsal striatum (caudate putamen), and DA neurons in the adjacent ventral tegmental area project to the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) and prefrontal cortex. In addition to classical vesicular release from axons, midbrain DA neurons exhibit DA release from their cell bodies and dendrites. Somatodendritic DA release leads to activation of D2 DA autoreceptors on DA neurons that inhibit their firing via G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels. This helps determine patterns of DA signalling at distant axonal release sites. Somatodendritically released DA also acts via volume transmission to extrasynaptic receptors that modulate local transmitter release and neuronal activity in the midbrain. Thus, somatodendritic release is a pivotal intrinsic feature of DA neurons that must be well defined in order to fully understand the physiology and pathophysiology of DA pathways. Here, we review recent mechanistic aspects of somatodendritic DA release, with particular emphasis on the Ca(2+) dependence of release and the potential role of exocytotic proteins. PMID:26009764

  20. Delayed simultaneous release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, X. W.; Webb, J. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The disclosed appendage release mechanism is particularly adapted for use with spacecraft operating with despin mechanisms and releasable appendages. It includes a flexible loop and a number of appendage releasing devices which are attached to the flexible loop. The appendage releasing devices are made up of piston-cams and ball latches which hold the appendages as long as the flexible loop is maintained in a taut condition, but which release the appendages upon relaxation of the flexible loop. The flexible loop remains taut as long as the despin weights remain attached, but relaxes when the despin weights are released.

  1. TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY (TRI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) site is designed to provide information on toxic chemical releases including collected data, guidance documents, program planning, background, history, and, program contacts, among other things. The data included in this homepage have been submi...

  2. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, VOL. 2. POST-RELEASE MITIGATION MEASURES FOR CONTROLLING ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume discusses prevention and protection measures for controlling accidental releases of air toxics. The probability of accidental releases depends on the extent to which deviations (in magnitude and duration) in the process can be tolerated before a loss of chemical contai...

  3. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  4. Direct Volume Rendering of Curvilinear Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Wilhelms, J.; Challinger, J.; Alper, N.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Direct volume rendering can visualize sampled 3D scalar data as a continuous medium, or extract features. However, it is generally slow. Furthermore, most algorithms for direct volume rendering have assumed rectilinear gridded data. This paper discusses methods for using direct volume rendering when the original volume is curvilinear, i.e. is divided into six-sided cells which are not necessarily equilateral hexahedra. One approach is to ray-cast such volumes directly. An alternative approach is to interpolate the sample volumes to a rectilinear grid, and use this regular volume for rendering. Advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches in terms of speed and image quality are explored.

  5. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  6. Mechanism For Guided Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kull, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed mechanism retains protective shield until no longer needed, then releases shield and guides it away for safe ejection from vehicle (spacecraft, according to original concept). Intended for use with shield like one described in article "Crash-Resistant Shield" (NPO-17616). Mechanism for guided release separates shield from base and from supporting truss on command. Band holding shield on base released by explosive separator.

  7. Release the Body, Release the Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Martha Goff

    1998-01-01

    A college English teacher describes the anxiety and resentment of students during in-class writing assignments and the successful classroom use of meditation and body movement. Movement seemed to relax the students, change their attitudes, and release their creative impulses to write. Implications related to the body-mind connection are pondered.…

  8. Patient release criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy implants.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Dale E; Sheetz, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    A lack of consensus regarding a model governing the release of patients following sealed source brachytherapy has led to a set of patient release policies that vary from institution to institution. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued regulatory guidance on patient release in NUREG 1556, Volume 9, Rev. 2, Appendix U, which allows calculation of release limits following implant brachytherapy. While the formalism presented in NUREG is meaningful for the calculation of release limits in the context of relatively high energy gamma emitters, it does not estimate accurately the effective dose equivalent for the common low dose rate brachytherapy sources Cs, I, and Pd. NUREG 1556 states that patient release may be based on patient-specific calculations as long as the calculation is documented. This work is intended to provide a format for patient-specific calculations to be used for the consideration of patients' release following the implantation of certain low dose rate brachytherapy isotopes. PMID:23439145

  9. Weapon container catalog. Volumes 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.A.; Higuera, M.C.

    1998-02-01

    The Weapon Container Catalog describes H-gear (shipping and storage containers, bomb hand trucks and the ancillary equipment required for loading) used for weapon programs and for special use containers. When completed, the catalog will contain five volumes. Volume 1 for enduring stockpile programs (B53, B61, B83, W62, W76, W78, W80, W84, W87, and W88) and Volume 2, Special Use Containers, are being released. The catalog is intended as a source of information for weapon program engineers and also provides historical information. The catalog also will be published on the SNL Internal Web and will undergo periodic updates.

  10. Large scientific releases

    SciTech Connect

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics.

  11. Large scientific releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics.

  12. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  13. Modeling controlled nutrient release from polymer coated fertilizers: diffusion release from single granules.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi; Raban, Smadar; Zaidel, Elina

    2003-05-15

    A comprehensive model describing the complex and "non-Fickian" (mathematically nonlinear) nature of the release from single granules of membrane coated, controlled release fertilizers (CRFs) is proposed consisting of three stages: i. a lag period during which water penetrates the coating of the granule dissolving part of the solid fertilizer in it ii. a period of linear release during which water penetration into and release out occur concomitantly while the total volume of the granules remains practically constant; and iii. a period of "decaying release", starting as the concentration inside the granule starts to decrease. A mathematical model was developed based on vapor and nutrient diffusion equations. The model predicts the release stages in terms of measurable geometrical and chemophysical parameters such as the following: the product of granule radius and coating thickness, water and solute permeability, saturation concentration of the fertilizer, and its density. The model successfully predicts the complex and "sigmoidal" pattern of release that is essential for matching plant temporal demand to ensure high agronomic and environmental effectiveness. It also lends itself to more complex statistical formulations which account for the large variability within large populations of coated CRFs and can serve for further improving CRF production and performance. PMID:12785532

  14. Rad-Release

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

  15. Rad-Release

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

  16. Local Affinity Release.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Obermeyer, Jaclyn; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-07-26

    The use of hydrogels for therapeutic delivery is a burgeoning area of investigation. These water-swollen polymer matrices are ideal platforms for localized drug delivery that can be further combined with specific ligands or nanotechnologies to advance the controlled release of small-molecule drugs and proteins. Due to the advantage of hydrophobic, electrostatic, or specific extracellular matrix interactions, affinity-based strategies can overcome burst release and challenges associated with encapsulation. Future studies will provide innovative binding tools, truly stimuli-responsive systems, and original combinations of emerging technologies to control the release of therapeutics spatially and temporally. Local drug delivery can be achieved by directly injecting a therapeutic to its site of action and is advantageous because off-target effects associated with systemic delivery can be minimized. For prolonged benefit, a vehicle that provides sustained drug release is required. Hydrogels are versatile platforms for localized drug release, owing to the large library of biocompatible building blocks from which they can be formed. Injectable hydrogel formulations that gel quickly in situ and provide sustained release of therapeutics are particularly advantageous to minimize invasiveness. The incorporation of polymers, ligands or nanoparticles that have an affinity for the therapeutic of interest improve control over the release of small-molecule drugs and proteins from hydrogels, enabling spatial and temporal control over the delivery. Such affinity-based strategies can overcome drug burst release and challenges associated with protein instability, allowing more effective therapeutic molecule delivery for a range of applications from therapeutic contact lenses to ischemic tissue regeneration. PMID:27403513

  17. Advanced release technologies program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, Bill

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the ARTS program was to develop lighter and less expensive spacecraft ordnance and release systems that answer to the requirements of a wide variety of spacecraft applications. These improvements were to be evaluated at the spacecraft system level, as it was determined that there were substantial system-level costs associated with the present ordnance and release subsystems. New, better devices were to be developed, then flight qualified, then integrated into a flight experiment in order to prove the reliability required for their subsequent use on high-reliability spacecraft. The secondary goal of the program was to quantify the system-level benefits of these new subsystems based upon the development program results. Three non-explosive release mechanisms and one laser-diode-based ordnance system were qualified under the program. The release devices being developed were required to release high preloads because it is easier to scale down a release mechanism than to scale it up. The laser initiator developed was required to be a direct replacement for NASA Standard Initiators, since these are the most common initiator in use presently. The program began in October, 1991, with completion of the flight experiment scheduled for February, 1994. This paper provides an overview of the ARTS program, discusses the benefits of using the ARTS components, introduces the new components, compares them with conventional systems and each other, and provides recommendations on how best to implement them.

  18. Environmental Releases for Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    DYEKMAN, D L

    2002-08-01

    This report fulfills the annual reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. The report contains tabular data summaries on air emissions and liquid effluents released to the environment as well as nonroutine releases during calendar year (CY) 2001. These releases, bearing radioactive and hazardous substances, were from Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), and Fluor Hanford (FH) managed facilities and activities. These data were obtained from direct sampling and analysis and from estimates based upon approved release factors. This report further serves as a supplemental resource to the Hanford Site Environmental Report (HSER PNNL-13910), published by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. HSER includes a yearly accounting of the impacts on the surrounding populace and environment from major activities at the Hanford Site. HSER also summarizes the regulatory compliance status of the Hanford Site. Tables ES-1 through ES-5 display comprehensive data summaries of CY2001 air emission and liquid effluent releases. The data displayed in these tables compiles the following: Radionuclide air emissions; Nonradioactive air emissions; Radionuclides in liquid effluents discharged to ground; Total volumes and flow rates of radioactive liquid effluents discharged to ground; and Radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River.

  19. Altitude release mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Kulhanek, Frank C.

    1977-01-01

    An altitude release mechanism for releasing a radiosonde or other measuring instrument from a balloon carrying it up into the atmosphere includes a bottle partially filled with water, a tube sealed into the bottle having one end submerged in the water in the bottle and the free end extending above the top of the bottle and a strip of water-disintegrable paper held within the free end of the tube linking the balloon to the remainder of the package. As the balloon ascends, the lowered atmospheric air pressure causes the air in the bottle to expand, forcing the water in the bottle up the tubing to wet and disintegrate the paper, releasing the package from the balloon.

  20. [Sustained-release dextropropoxyphene.].

    PubMed

    Kurz-Müller, K; Zenz, M

    1991-12-01

    Dextropropoxyphene is a mild opioid analgesic whose analgesic potency corresponds to that of acetylsalicylic acid and paracetamol. It has a similar analgesic effect to codeine but also a considerably lower addiction and dependence potential. Dextropropoxyphene is a therapeutic alternative to other weak opioids such as codeine or dihydrocodeine. In the case of absolute intolerance of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, their analgesic effect can be replaced by that of dextropropoxyphene. In case of relative intolerance, i.e. occurrence of non-tolerable side-effects, the dose of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents can be kept low by additional administration of dextropropoxyphene, which simultaneously enhances analgesia. Analgesics are prescribed according to a definite time schedule for the long-term treatment of chronic pain. The oral route of administration is preferred since it enables the patient to be independent of the nursing staff. Sustained-release drugs with a duration of action of at least 8 h are used in preference to other preparations. Sustained-release dextropropoxyphene provides analgesia for 8-12 h. Sustained-release dextropropoxyphene clearly differs from non-sustained-release dextropropoxyphene in its pharmacokinetics. Repeated administration of the sustained-release form at the therapeutically recommended intervals does not lead to cumulation, and the risk of accidental overdosage is extremely low. Intoxication can only occur after simultaneous ingestion of alcohol or other centrally depressant substances or in the presence of hepatic and/or renal failure. Sustained-release dextropropoxyphene is a sensible and undeniable alternative for the second stage in the analgesic ladder of chronic pain therapy. PMID:18415177

  1. Barium release system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A chemical system is described for releasing a good yield of free barium neutral atoms and barium ions in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium. The barium is released in the vapor phase so that it can be ionized by solar radiation and also be excited to emit resonance radiation in the visible range. The ionized luminous cloud of barium becomes a visible indication of magnetic and electrical characteristics in space and allows determination of these properties over relatively large areas at a given time.

  2. Benzene release. status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.; Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-11-04

    Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB `DEMO` formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study.

  3. Multivariate volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  4. Carpal tunnel release: do we understand the biomechanical consequences?

    PubMed

    Morrell, Nathan T; Harris, Andrew; Skjong, Christian; Akelman, Edward

    2014-11-01

    Carpal tunnel release is a very common procedure performed in the United States. While the procedure is often curative, some patients experience postoperative scar sensitivity, pillar pain, grip weakness, or recurrent median nerve symptoms. Release of the carpal tunnel has an effect on carpal anatomy and biomechanics, including increases in carpal arch width and carpal tunnel volume and changes in muscle and tendon mechanics. Our understanding of how these biomechanical changes contribute to postoperative symptoms is still evolving. We review the relevant morphometric and biomechanical changes that occur following release of the transverse carpal ligament. PMID:25364635

  5. A fission gas release correlation for uranium nitride fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Davison, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    A model was developed to predict fission gas releases from UN fuel pins clad with various materials. The model was correlated with total release data obtained by different experimentors, over a range of fuel temperatures primarily between 1250 and 1660 K, and fuel burnups up to 4.6 percent. In the model, fission gas is transported by diffusion mechanisms to the grain boundaries where the volume grows and eventually interconnects with the outside surface of the fuel. The within grain diffusion coefficients are found from fission gas release rate data obtained using a sweep gas facility.

  6. A controlled biochemical release device with embedded nanofluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Hong, Wei; Dong, Liang

    2012-04-01

    A controlled release device is developed by embedding nanofluidic biomolecule reservoirs into a polymer network of a stimuli-responsive hydrogel. The reservoirs are made of liquid core-polymer shell nanofibers using co-electrospinning. The mechanism of controlled release is based on buckling instability of the polymer shell under combined axial and radial compression, caused by volume changes of hydrogel responding to a specific stimulus. The device decouples releasable biomolecules from a hydrogel polymer matrix, avoiding chemical interactions between biomolecules and hydrogel polymer chains, and thus, alleviating nontrivial chemical and biological engineering design of hydrogel formulations. Temperature-sensitive hydrogel is used as a model hydrogel.

  7. Release the Prisoners Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  8. Release of OLe peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OLe is a high oleic Spanish-type peanut that has excellent yield and enhanced Sclerotinia blight and pod rot resistance when compared to other high oleic Spanish cultivars. The purpose for releasing OLe is to provide peanut producers with a true Spanish peanut that is high oleic and has enhanced yi...

  9. Trabeculectomy with releasable sutures.

    PubMed Central

    Kolker, A E; Kass, M A; Rait, J L

    1993-01-01

    We attempted to reduce some of the postoperative complications of trabeculectomy by using releasable scleral flap sutures. This technique allows an initial tight closure of the scleral flap with the option to increase aqueous humor outflow in the early postoperative period. We reviewed our experience with trabeculectomy and releasable sutures in 146 eyes (134 patients) and compared these cases with a prior series of 128 eyes (124 patients) that underwent trabeculectomy with permanent scleral flap sutures. In the control group, 42 eyes (32.8%) had clinically detectable shallowing of the anterior chamber in the postoperative period. In contrast, shallow anterior chamber was noted in 21 eyes (14.4%) in the group with releasable sutures (P = .0003). Flat anterior chamber, defined as iridocorneal touch to the pupil margin, occurred in 11 control eyes (8.6%) but in only 2 eyes (1.4%) with releasable sutures (P = .0078). Surgical intervention to drain suprachoroidal fluid and re-form the anterior chamber was required in eight control eyes (6.2%) but in only one study eye (0.7%) (P = .014). At 1 year of follow-up, the two groups were similar in terms of mean intraocular pressure, the need for ocular hypotensive medications, and failure rate. PMID:8140688

  10. DSCOVR Public Release Statement

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-08-04

    ... Wednesday, July 20, 2016 The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is a NOAA/NASA mission located near the ... Control Book .    NOAA will release data from the space weather instruments on July 27 th . The data, as well as space weather ...

  11. Double swivel toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Guy L.; Schneider, William C.

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device is disclosed which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device comprises a fastener plate and fastener body each attachable to one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate and the fastener body are fastened by a dual swivel toggle member. The toggle member is supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. Its other end is received in a central opening in the fastener body, and has a universally mounted retainer ring member. The toggle member is restrained by three retractable latching pins symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle member and positionable in latching engagement with the retainer ring member on the toggle member. Each pin is retractable by a pyrotechnic charge, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face on the latch pins to effect retraction from the ring member. While retraction of all three pins releases the ring member, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the ring member and its dual pivotal movement ensures a release.

  12. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asbestos aerosolization (or releasability) is the potential for fibrous asbestos structures that are present in a material or on a solid surface to become airborne when the source is disturbed by human activities or natural forces. In turn, the magnitude of the airborne concentra...

  13. Elastic energy release in great earthquakes and eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2014-05-01

    The sizes of earthquakes are measured using well-defined, measurable quantities such as seismic moment and released (transformed) elastic energy. No similar measures exist for the sizes of volcanic eruptions, making it difficult to compare the energies released in earthquakes and eruptions. Here I provide a new measure of the elastic energy (the potential mechanical energy) associated with magma chamber rupture and contraction (shrinkage) during an eruption. For earthquakes and eruptions, elastic energy derives from two sources: (1) the strain energy stored in the volcano/fault zone before rupture, and (2) the external applied load (force, pressure, stress, displacement) on the volcano/fault zone. From thermodynamic considerations it follows that the elastic energy released or transformed (dU) during an eruption is directly proportional to the excess pressure (pe) in the magma chamber at the time of rupture multiplied by the volume decrease (-dVc) of the chamber, so that . This formula can be used as a basis for a new eruption magnitude scale, based on elastic energy released, which can be related to the moment-magnitude scale for earthquakes. For very large eruptions (>100 km3), the volume of the feeder-dike is negligible, so that the decrease in chamber volume during an eruption corresponds roughly to the associated volume of erupted materials , so that the elastic energy is . Using a typical excess pressures of 5 MPa, it is shown that the largest known eruptions on Earth, such as the explosive La Garita Caldera eruption (27-28 million years ago) and largest single (effusive) Colombia River basalt lava flows (15-16 million years ago), both of which have estimated volumes of about 5000 km3, released elastic energy of the order of 10EJ. For comparison, the seismic moment of the largest earthquake ever recorded, the M9.5 1960 Chile earthquake, is estimated at 100 ZJ and the associated elastic energy release at 10EJ.

  14. Application of controlled nutrient release to permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2016-03-15

    The application of controlled release nutrient (CRN) materials to permeable reactive barriers to promote biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was investigated. The longevity of release, influence of flow velocity and petroleum hydrocarbon concentration on nutrient release was assessed using soluble and ion exchange CRN materials; namely Polyon™ and Zeopro™. Both CRN materials, assessed at 4 °C and 23 °C, demonstrated continuing release of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (N-P-K) at 3500 bed volumes passing, with longer timeframes of N-P-K release at 4 °C. Zeopro™-activated carbon mixtures demonstrated depletion of N-P-K prior to 3500 bed volumes passing. Increased flow velocity was shown to lower nutrient concentrations in Polyon™ flow cells while nutrient release from Zeopro™ was largely unchanged. The presence of petroleum hydrocarbons, at 1.08 mmol/L and 3.25 mmol/L toluene, were not shown to alter nutrient release from Polyon™ and Zeopro™ across 14 days. These findings suggest that Polyon™ and Zeopro™ may be suitable CRN materials for application to PRBs in low nutrient environments. PMID:26735866

  15. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes

  16. Mechanisms of enhanced taurine release under Ca2+ depletion.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2005-10-01

    The sulfur-containing amino acid taurine is an inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain of mammals, as well as a key substance in the regulation of cell volumes. The effect of Ca(2+) on extracellular taurine concentrations is of special interest in the context of the regulatory mechanisms of taurine release. The aim of this study was to characterize the basal release of taurine in Ca(2+)-free medium using in vivo microdialysis of the striatum of anesthetized rats. Perfusion of Ca(2+)-free medium via a microdialysis probe evoked a sustained release of taurine (up to 180 % compared to the basal levels). The Ca(2+) chelator EGTA (1mM) potentiated Ca(2+) depletion-evoked taurine release. The substitution of CaCl(2) by choline chloride did not alter the observed effect. Ca(2+)-free solution did not significantly evoke release of taurine from tissue loaded with the competitive inhibitor of taurine transporter guanidinoethanesulfonate (1mM), suggesting that in Ca(2+) depletion taurine is released by the transporter operating in the outward direction. The volume-sensitive chloride channel blocker diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (1mM) did not attenuate the taurine release evoked by Ca(2+) depletion. The non-specific blocker of voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels NiCl(2) (0.65 mM) enhanced taurine release in the presence of Ca(2+). CdCl(2) (0.25 mM) had no effect under these conditions. However, both CdCl(2) and NiCl(2) attenuated the effect of Ca(2+)-free medium on the release of taurine. The data obtained imply the involvement of both decreased influx of Ca(2+) and increased non-specific influx of Na(+) through voltage-sensitive calcium channels in the regulation of transporter-mediated taurine release in Ca(2+) depletion. PMID:15982785

  17. Environmental releases for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.P.; Curn, B.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1993 from facilities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. As part of this executive summary, comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1993 are displayed in tables. These tables represent the following: radionuclide air emissions data; data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil; radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River; nonradioactive air emissions data; total volumes and flow rates of 200/600 area liquid effluents. Both summary and detailed presentations of these data are given. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  18. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

  19. Releasable locking mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq (Inventor); Wingate, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    In the aerospace field spacecraft components are held together by separation systems until a specific time when they must be separated or deployed. Customarily a threaded joining bolt engages one of the components to be joined, and a threaded nut is placed on that bolt against the other component so they can be drawn together by a releasable locking assembly. The releasable locking assembly herein includes a plunger having one end coupled to one end of a plunger bolt. The other end is flanged to abut and compress a coil spring when the plunger is advanced toward the interface plane between the two components. When the plunger is so advanced toward the interface plane, the end of the plunger bolt can be connected to the joining bolt. Thus during retraction the joining bolt is drawn to one side of the interface plane by the force of the expanding spring.

  20. Releasable Locking Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq (Inventor); Wingate, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    In the aerospace field spacecraft components are held together by separation systems until a specific time when they must be separated or deployed. Customarily a threaded joining bolt engages one of the components to be joined, and a threaded nut is placed on that bolt against the other component so they can be drawn together by a releasable locking assembly. The releasable locking assembly herein includes a plunger having one end coupled to one end of a plunger bolt. The other end is flanged to abut and compress a coil spring when the plunger is advanced toward the interface plane between the two components. When the plunger is so advanced toward the interface plane, the end of the plunger bolt can be connected to the joining bolt. Thus during retraction the joining bolt is drawn to one side of the interface plane by the force of the expanding spring.

  1. SITE CHARACTERIZATION LIBRARY: VOLUMN 1 (RELEASE 2.5)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This CD-ROM, Volume 1, Release 2.5, of EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL - Las Vegas) Site Characterization Library, contains additional electronic documents and computer programs related to the characterization of hazardous waste sites. EPA has produced this libr...

  2. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    1992-10-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  3. EIA new releases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students.

  4. Cryogenic hydrogen release research.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFleur, Angela Christine

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this project was to devolop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. The necessary infrastructure has been specified and laboratory modifications are currently underway. Once complete, experiments from this platform will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  5. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  6. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, D. C. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  7. Initial parametric study of the flammability of plume releases in Hanford waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Recknagle, K.P.

    1997-08-01

    This study comprised systematic analyses of waste tank headspace flammability following a plume-type of gas release from the waste. First, critical parameters affecting plume flammability were selected, evaluated, and refined. As part of the evaluation the effect of ventilation (breathing) air inflow on the convective flow field inside the tank headspace was assessed, and the magnitude of the so-called {open_quotes}numerical diffusion{close_quotes} on numerical simulation accuracy was investigated. Both issues were concluded to be negligible influences on predicted flammable gas concentrations in the tank headspace. Previous validation of the TEMPEST code against experimental data is also discussed, with calculated results in good agreements with experimental data. Twelve plume release simulations were then run, using release volumes and flow rates that were thought to cover the range of actual release volumes and rates. The results indicate that most plume-type releases remain flammable only during the actual release ends. Only for very large releases representing a significant fraction of the volume necessary to make the entire mixed headspace flammable (many thousands of cubic feet) can flammable concentrations persist for several hours after the release ends. However, as in the smaller plumes, only a fraction of the total release volume is flammable at any one time. The transient evolution of several plume sizes is illustrated in a number of color contour plots that provide insight into plume mixing behavior.

  8. Mated Fingerprint Card Pairs (Volumes 1-5)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Mated Fingerprint Card Pairs (Volumes 1-5) (PC database for purchase)   The NIST database of mated fingerprint card pairs (Special Database 9) consists of multiple volumes. Currently five volumes have been released. Each volume will be a 3-disk set with each CD-ROM containing 90 mated card pairs of segmented 8-bit gray scale fingerprint images (900 fingerprint image pairs per CD-ROM). A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  9. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  10. Preload release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generoli, Robert M. (Inventor); Young, Harry J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a preload release mechanism comprising a preload spring assembly adapted to apply a preload to a first connector member which is mounted on a support structure and adapted for connection with a second connector member on an object. The assembly comprises telescoped bushings and a preload spring. A tubular shaft extends through the spring assembly and openings in the first connector member and support structure, on which it is clamped. A plunger rod in the shaft is provided with a tip end and a recess in the rod near the other end thereof. A retainer precludes passage of the rod through the shaft in one direction and an end cap closes the bore of the shaft at the other end and provides a shoulder which extends radially of the shaft. A plunger return spring biases the plunger rod against the plunger retainer with the plunger tip protruding from the shaft and a spring assembly return spring engages at its ends the shoulder of the end cap and one end of the spring assembly. Detents received in lateral openings in the tubular shaft are held captive by the plunger rod and one end of the spring assembly to lock the spring assembly on the tubular shaft and apply a preload to the first connector member. Upon completion of the connection, detents and spring assembly are released by plunger contact with the object to be connected, thereby releasing the preload while the connection is maintained.

  11. Effects of Globally Waste-Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W. ); Huckaby, James L. ); Meyer, Perry A. )

    2002-08-30

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single-shell and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a significant volume of retained gas. Analyses are presented for expected gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. Recommendations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are also given.

  12. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  13. Polymeric nanoparticles containing diazepam: preparation, optimization, characterization, in-vitro drug release and release kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrey, Sarvesh; Chourasiya, Vibha; Pandey, Archna

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles formulated from biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) are being extensively investigated as drug delivery systems due to their two important properties such as biocompatibility and controlled drug release characteristics. The aim of this work to formulated diazepam loaded PLGA nanoparticles by using emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is used as stabilizing agent. Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative drug, and widely used as an anticonvulsant in the treatment of various types of epilepsy, insomnia and anxiety. This work investigates the effects of some preparation variables on the size and shape of nanoparticles prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method. These nanoparticles were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Zeta potential study was also performed to understand the surface charge of nanoparticles. The drug release from drug loaded nanoparticles was studied by dialysis bag method and the in vitro drug release data was also studied by various kinetic models. The results show that sonication time, polymer content, surfactant concentration, ratio of organic to aqueous phase volume, and the amount of drug have an important effect on the size of nanoparticles. Hopefully we produced spherical shape Diazepam loaded PLGA nanoparticles with a size range under 250 nm with zeta potential -23.3 mV. The in vitro drug release analysis shows sustained release of drug from nanoparticles and follow Korsmeyer-Peppas model.

  14. Detection of the Urban Release of a Bacillus anthracis Simulant by Air Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Alexander G.; Van Cuyk, Sheila M.; Brown, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2005 and 2009, the Pentagon Force Protection Agency (PFPA) staged deliberate releases of a commercially available organic pesticide containing Bacillus amyloliquefaciens to evaluate PFPA's biothreat response protocols. In concert with, but independent of, these releases, the Department of Homeland Security sponsored experiments to evaluate the efficacy of commonly employed air and surface sampling techniques for detection of an aerosolized biological agent. High-volume air samplers were placed in the expected downwind plume, and samples were collected before, during, and after the releases. Environmental surface and personal air samples were collected in the vicinity of the high-volume air samplers hours after the plume had dispersed. The results indicate it is feasible to detect the release of a biological agent in an urban area both during and after the release of a biological agent using high-volume air and environmental sampling techniques. PMID:24697146

  15. Detection of the urban release of a bacillus anthracis simulant by air sampling.

    PubMed

    Garza, Alexander G; Van Cuyk, Sheila M; Brown, Michael J; Omberg, Kristin M

    2014-01-01

    In 2005 and 2009, the Pentagon Force Protection Agency (PFPA) staged deliberate releases of a commercially available organic pesticide containing Bacillus amyloliquefaciens to evaluate PFPA's biothreat response protocols. In concert with, but independent of, these releases, the Department of Homeland Security sponsored experiments to evaluate the efficacy of commonly employed air and surface sampling techniques for detection of an aerosolized biological agent. High-volume air samplers were placed in the expected downwind plume, and samples were collected before, during, and after the releases. Environmental surface and personal air samples were collected in the vicinity of the high-volume air samplers hours after the plume had dispersed. The results indicate it is feasible to detect the release of a biological agent in an urban area both during and after the release of a biological agent using high-volume air and environmental sampling techniques. PMID:24697146

  16. The design of wrinkled microcapsules for enhancement of release rate.

    PubMed

    Ina, Maria; Zhushma, Aleksandr P; Lebedeva, Natalia V; Vatankhah-Varnoosfaderani, Mohammad; Olson, Sean D; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2016-09-15

    Thermally expandable microcapsules (TEMs) with wrinkled shells are prepared by one-step suspension polymerization, allowing for encapsulation and controlled release of cargos. Wrinkling results from concurrent crosslinking of shell copolymers and vaporization of volatile reagents along with density increase upon polymerization. Through control of the vapor pressure of the reagents and systematic variation of the suspension composition, microcapsules with different degrees of wrinkling are prepared, ranging from locally dimpled to highly crumpled morphologies. The corresponding increase of the surface-to-volume ratio results in increasing release rate of encapsulated oil red dye as a model cargo. As such, in addition to shell thickness and radius, the wrinkleness provides an effective control parameter for adjusting the release rate. The wrinkled microcapsules with a large surface-to-volume ratio may find applications in drug delivery, chemicals scavenging, and self-healing materials. PMID:27309950

  17. Shock- and release-wave properties of MJ-2 grout

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Furnish, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    High pressure Hugoniot and release equation of state data are provided for a high-silica high-water content rock-simulating grout (Mini Jade Two grout) over a pressure range of approximately 1 to 70 GPa. High velocity gun impact shock wave techniques and velocity interferometry diagnostics were used to obtain the experimental data. New experimental methods and analysis techniques were developed to perform the tests and extract the Hugoniot and pressure-volume release properties of the grout. The data are appropriate for high pressure equation of state development through both computational simulation and direct comparison with Hugoniot and release isentrope behavior. Nonlinear deformation phenomena associated with material strength, pressure-induced phase transformation and pressure-volume hysteresis are identified within the experimental results and the underlying responsible physical issues are addressed. 29 refs., 68 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Pyrotechnic-actuated cable release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. W.

    1968-01-01

    Remote, unattended means has been designed and reduced to practice that retains and then releases an attached load by means of a restrained cable. The cable is released by an electrical impulse on signal.

  19. Release of contaminant U(VI) from soils

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin

    2003-08-20

    The retention, mobility, and bio-availability of U(VI) incontaminated soils depend strongly on release of U(VI). Laboratory batchexperiments were performed to evaluate the factors controlling therelease of U(VI) from contaminated soil at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. We foundthat the ionic strength of the extraction solution strongly affectsrelease of U(VI). Increase in ionic strength shows a strong effect onU(VI) release as indicated by the increase in release rates andassociated release of U(VI) concentrations. We also found that the ratioof solution volume to solid mass (V/M) has a significant impact on therelease of U(VI). Increase in the V/M ratio shows a negligible effect onthe U(VI) release over a 4-day period. However, at Day 30 and Day 120,larger V/M ratios cause greater U(VI) release. The maximum U(VI)concentrations observed in the release experiments are in the range ofschoepite estimated under conditions relevant to the experiments,suggesting that schoepite solubility primarily controls the U(VI)release, but that solubilization and desorption effects cannot bedistinguished using macroscopic methods.

  20. Riola release report

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, E.C.

    1983-08-04

    Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables.

  1. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  2. The plant cytoskeleton controls regulatory volume increase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Qiao, Fei; Ismail, Ahmed; Chang, Xiaoli; Nick, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The ability to adjust cell volume is required for the adaptation to osmotic stress. Plant protoplasts can swell within seconds in response to hypoosmotic shock suggesting that membrane material is released from internal stores. Since the stability of plant membranes depends on submembraneous actin, we asked, whether this regulatory volume control depends on the cytoskeleton. As system we used two cell lines from grapevine which differ in their osmotic tolerance and observed that the cytoskeleton responded differently in these two cell lines. To quantify the ability for regulatory volume control, we used hydraulic conductivity (Lp) as readout and demonstrated a role of the cytoskeleton in protoplast swelling. Chelation of calcium, inhibition of calcium channels, or manipulation of membrane fluidity, did not significantly alter Lp, whereas direct manipulation of the cytoskeleton via specific chemical reagents, or indirectly, through the bacterial elicitor Harpin or activation of phospholipase D, was effective. By optochemical engineering of actin using a caged form of the phytohormone auxin we can break the symmetry of actin organisation resulting in a localised deformation of cell shape indicative of a locally increased Lp. We interpret our findings in terms of a model, where the submembraneous cytoskeleton controls the release of intracellular membrane stores during regulatory volume change. PMID:23660128

  3. Evaluation of microbial release probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Work undertaken to improve the estimation of the probability of release of microorganisms from unmanned Martian landing spacecraft is summarized. An analytical model is described for the development of numerical values for release parameters and release mechanisms applicable to flight missions are defined. Laboratory test data are used to evolve parameter values for use by flight projects in estimating numerical values for release probabilities. The analysis treats microbial burden located on spacecraft surfaces, between mated surfaces, and encapsulated within materials.

  4. Source of released carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.

    1979-01-01

    The potential for the release of carbon fibers from aircraft crashes/fires is addressed. Simulation of the conditions of aircraft crash fires in order to predict the quantities and forms of fibrous materials which might be released from civilian aircraft crashes/fires is considered. Figures are presented which describe some typical fiber release test activities together with some very preliminary results of those activities. The state of the art of carbon fiber release is summarized as well as some of the uncertainties concerning accidental fiber release.

  5. Drug release kinetics from carboxymethylcellulose-bacterial cellulose composite films.

    PubMed

    Juncu, Gheorghe; Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Isopencu, Gabriela; Jinga, Sorin Ion

    2016-08-30

    Composite films of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and bacterial cellulose (NaCMC-BC) cross-linked with citric acid (CA) were prepared by solution casting method. Ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) has been used to study the mechanism of drug release from composite films. Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and proved that the BC content influences the aspect of the films. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed specific peaks in IR spectra of composite films which sustain that NaCMC was cross-linked with CA. Starting from swelling observations, the release kinetic of IbuNa was described using a model which neglects the volume expansion due to polymer swelling and which considers non-linear diffusion coefficients for drug and solvent. The IbuNa release is also influenced by BC content, the drug release rate was decreasing with the increase of BC content. PMID:26688041

  6. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.

    1992-10-01

    Detailed results of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) iodine-131 release reconstruction are presented in this volume. Included are daily data on B, D, and F Plant, reactor operations from the P-Department Daily Reports (General Electric Company 1947). Tables of B and T Plant material processed from the three principal sources on separations plant operations: The Jaech report (Jaech undated), the 200 Area Report (Acken and Bird 1945; Bird and Donihee 1945), and the Metal History Reports (General Electric Company 1946). A transcription of the Jaech report is also provided because it is computer-generated and is not readily readable in its original format. The iodine-131 release data are from the STRM model. Cut-by-cut release estimates are provided, along with daily, monthly, and yearly summations. These summations are based on the hourly release estimates. The hourly data are contained in a 28 megabyte electronic file. Interested individuals may request a copy.

  7. Regulation of renin release by local and systemic factors.

    PubMed

    Schweda, F; Kurtz, A

    2011-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is critically involved in the regulation of the salt and volume status of the body and blood pressure. The activity of the RAS is controlled by the protease renin, which is released from the renal juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells into the circulation. Renin release is regulated in negative feedback-loops by blood pressure, salt intake, and angiotensin II. Moreover, sympathetic nerves and renal autacoids such as prostaglandins and nitric oxide stimulate renin secretion. Despite numerous studies there remained substantial gaps in the understanding of the control of renin release at the organ or cellular level. Some of these gaps have been closed in the last years by means of gene-targeted mice and advanced imaging and electrophysiological methods. In our review, we discuss these recent advances together with the relevant previous literature on the regulation of renin release. PMID:22128405

  8. Relevance of exocytotic glutamate release from retinal glia.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Michal; Grosche, Antje; Niemiec, Aurore; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Pannicke, Thomas; Münch, Thomas A; Crocker, Britni; Isope, Philippe; Härtig, Wolfgang; Beck, Susanne C; Huber, Gesine; Ferracci, Geraldine; Perraut, Martine; Reber, Michael; Miehe, Monique; Demais, Valérie; Lévêque, Christian; Metzger, Daniel; Szklarczyk, Klaudia; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Seeliger, Mathias W; Sage-Ciocca, Dominique; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Reichenbach, Andreas; Reibel, Sophie; Pfrieger, Frank W

    2012-05-10

    Glial cells release molecules that influence brain development, function, and disease. Calcium-dependent exocytosis has been proposed as potential release mechanism in astroglia, but the physiological relevance of "gliotransmission" in vivo remains controversial. We focused on the impact of glial exocytosis on sensory transduction in the retina. To this end, we generated transgenic mice to block exocytosis by Cre recombinase-dependent expression of the clostridial botulinum neurotoxin serotype B light chain, which cleaves vesicle-associated membrane protein 1-3. Ubiquitous and neuronal toxin expression caused perinatal lethality and a reduction of synaptic transmission thus validating transgene function. Toxin expression in Müller cells inhibited vesicular glutamate release and impaired glial volume regulation but left retinal histology and visual processing unaffected. Our model to study gliotransmission in vivo reveals specific functions of exocytotic glutamate release in retinal glia. PMID:22578502

  9. Strain Release Amination

    PubMed Central

    Gianatassio, Ryan; Lopchuk, Justin M.; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Malins, Lara R.; Prieto, Liher; Brandt, Thomas A.; Collins, Michael R.; Gallego, Gary M.; Sach, Neal W.; Spangler, Jillian E.; Zhu, Huichin; Zhu, Jinjiang; Baran, Phil S.

    2015-01-01

    To optimize drug candidates, modern medicinal chemists are increasingly turning to an unconventional structural motif: small, strained ring systems. However, the difficulty of introducing substituents such as bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes, azetidines, or cyclobutanes often outweighs the challenge of synthesizing the parent scaffold itself. Thus, there is an urgent need for general methods to rapidly and directly append such groups onto core scaffolds. Here we report a general strategy to harness the embedded potential energy of effectively spring-loaded C–C and C–N bonds with the most oft-encountered nucleophiles in pharmaceutical chemistry, amines. Strain release amination can diversify a range of substrates with a multitude of desirable bioisosteres at both the early and late-stages of a synthesis. The technique has also been applied to peptide labeling and bioconjugation. PMID:26816372

  10. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  11. Quick release engine cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Sunnarborg, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    A quick release engine cylinder allows optical access to an essentially unaltered combustion chamber, is suitable for use with actual combustion processes, and is amenable to rapid and repeated disassembly and cleaning. A cylinder member, adapted to constrain a piston to a defined path through the cylinder member, sealingly engages a cylinder head to provide a production-like combustion chamber. A support member mounts with the cylinder member. The support-to-cylinder mounting allows two relationships therebetween. In the first mounting relationship, the support engages the cylinder member and restrains the cylinder against the head. In the second mounting relationship, the cylinder member can pass through the support member, moving away from the head and providing access to the piston-top and head.

  12. Hazardous animal waste carcasses transformation into slow release fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Sharrock, Patrick; Fiallo, Marina; Nzihou, Ange; Chkir, Mouna

    2009-08-15

    Because of the need to address disposal of materials infected with pathogens new regulations have come into effect for the transport and disposal of dead farm animals or carcasses. For precautionary reasons, disposal to landfill, composting, biogas generation or fertilizer use are banned recycling paths because of incomplete knowledge about contamination transmission paths. Thermal treatment is recognized as a safe elimination process. Animal wastes have a high calorific value (above 16 MJ/kg). However, combustion of the organics leaves mineral residues (near 30%). The ashes contain mostly calcium and phosphate with some sodium, potassium and magnesium. We have examined the transformation of the ashes into a slow release fertilizer. We used a mixture of acids to partly dissolve the combustion residues and form slurry. In a second step, base was added to neutralize and solidify the reaction mixture. The final product was a whitish polycrystalline solid. Leaching tests were made to evaluate the nutrient release rate in laboratory columns. Water leachates were analyzed for up to ten pore-bed volumes and showed, as expected, large differences in release rates. Nitrate release was slowed and phosphate did not level even after ten pore-bed volumes. This demonstrates that insoluble precipitates (gypsum) contribute to control soluble ion release. PMID:19185419

  13. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  14. Fluoride release from fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Godoy, F; Abarzua, I; De Goes, M F; Chan, D C

    1997-01-01

    This 30-day study, compared the amounts and patterns of fluoride release from 5 commercially available fluoride-containing pit and fissure sealants: FluroShield, Helioseal-F, Ultraseal XT, Baritone L3, and Teethmate-F; Delton without fluoride, was used as control. Disc-shaped samples of each sealant were immersed in distilled water and the fluoride release was measured periodically until day 30. All the fluoridated sealants tested released measurable fluoride throughout the test period in a similar pattern: the greatest amount of fluoride was released in the first 24 hours after mixing, fell sharply on the second day and decreased slowly for the last days. On day one, Baritone L3 released significantly more fluoride than all other materials. Teethmate-F released the highest amount of fluoride during all the other time intervals from day 2, until day 30. PMID:9643204

  15. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  16. Unsteady flow volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

    1995-03-01

    Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

  17. Sustained-Release Corticosteroid Options

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Mariana; Yeh, Steven; Albini, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained-release corticosteroid treatment has shown to be a promising strategy for macular edema due to retinovascular disease (i.e., diabetes and retinal vein occlusion) and for the treatment of noninfectious posterior uveitis. Clinicians now have the option of three sustained-release corticosteroid implants: Ozurdex (Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA) which releases dexamethasone and two devices that release fluocinolone acetonide, Retisert (Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY), and Iluvien (Alimera Science, Alpharetta, GA). Each has different physical characteristics and duration effect and has been approved for different indications. Herein we provide a summary of the current clinical knowledge regarding these implants. PMID:25140246

  18. Variable-Volume Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colling, A. K.; Nallette, T. A.; Sansevero, F.

    1989-01-01

    Container holds bed of beads securely while accommodating sizable changes in volume and allowing gases to flow through bed. Developed for air-purifying system in which carbon dioxide is removed by solid amine beads.

  19. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  20. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  1. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior. PMID:26472384

  2. Geomagnetism. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The latest attempt to summarise the wealth of knowledge now available on geomagnetic phenomena has resulted in this multi-volume treatise, with contributions and reviews from many scientists. The first volume in the series contains a thorough review of all existing information on measuring the Earth's magnetic field, both on land and at sea, and includes a comparative analysis of the techniques available for this purpose.

  3. Direct volume editing.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Kai; Krüger, Jens; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present basic methodology for interactive volume editing on GPUs, and we demonstrate the use of these methods to achieve a number of different effects. We present fast techniques to modify the appearance and structure of volumetric scalar fields given on Cartesian grids. Similar to 2D circular brushes as used in surface painting we present 3D spherical brushes for intuitive coloring of particular structures in such fields. This paint metaphor is extended to allow the user to change the data itself, and the use of this functionality for interactive structure isolation, hole filling, and artefact removal is demonstrated. Building on previous work in the field we introduce high-resolution selection volumes, which can be seen as a resolution-based focus+context metaphor. By utilizing such volumes we present a novel approach to interactive volume editing at sub-voxel accuracy. Finally, we introduce a fast technique to paste textures onto iso-surfaces in a 3D scalar field. Since the texture resolution is independent of the volume resolution, this technique allows structure-aligned textures containing appearance properties or textual information to be used for volume augmentation and annotation. PMID:18988988

  4. Roles of cell volume in molecular and cellular biology.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Marc; Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice

    2012-04-01

    Extracellular tonicity and volume regulation control a great number of molecular and cellular functions including: cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, hormone and neuromediator release, gene expression, ion channel and transporter activity and metabolism. The aim of this review is to describe these effects and to determine if they are direct or are secondarily the result of the activity of second messengers. PMID:22192789

  5. New Enhancements in April 85 NASTRAN Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Several features were added to COSMIC NASTRAN, along with some enhancements to improve or update existing capabilities. Most of these additions and enhancements were provided by industry users to be incorporated into NASTRAN for wider use. DIAG 48 provides a synopsis of significant developments in past NASTRAN releases (1983-1985) and indexes all diagnostic output messages and operation requests (DOMOR). Other features include: volume and surface computation of the 2-D and 3-D elements, NOLIN5 input and; NASTRAN PLOTOPT-N (where N = 2, 3, 4, or 5); shrink element plots; and output scan. A nonprint option on stress and force output request cards was added. Automated find and nofind options on the plot card, fully stressed design, high level plate elements, eigenvalue messages, and upgrading of all FORTRAN source code to the ANSI standard are enhancements made.

  6. Controlled Release Applications of Organometals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, John S.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews two classes of controlled release organometals: (1) distributional, to distribute bioactive materials to control a certain target organism; and (2) protective, to protect surface or interior of some structure from attach by organisms. Specific examples are given including a discussion of controlled release for schistosomiasis. (SK)

  7. Volume-dependent osmolyte efflux from neural tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Stephen K.; Cheema, Tooba A.; Foster, Daniel J.; Heacock, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    The CNS is particularly vulnerable to reductions in plasma osmolarity, such as occurr during hyponatremia, the most commonly encountered electrolyte disorder in clinical practice. In response to a lowered plasma osmolarity, neural cells initially swell but then are able to restore their original volume through the release of osmolytes, both inorganic and organic, and the exit of osmotically obligated water. Given the importance of the maintenance of cell volume within the CNS, mechanisms underlying the release of osmolytes assume major significance. In this context, we review recent evidence obtained from our laboratory and others that indicates that the activation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors can markedly enhance the volume-dependent release of osmolytes from neural cells. Of particular significance is the observation that receptor activation significantly lowers the osmotic threshold at which osmolyte release occurs, thereby facilitating the ability of the cells to respond to small, more physiologically relevant, reductions in osmolarity. The mechanisms underlying G-protein-coupled receptor-mediated osmolyte release and the possibility that this efflux can result in both physiologically beneficial and potentially harmful pathophysiological consequences are discussed. PMID:18518929

  8. TREATABILITY MANUAL. VOLUME V: SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatability Manual presents in five volumes an extensive survey of the effectiveness of various water pollution treatment processes when applied to particular industrial effluents. This volume summarizes volumes one through four and outlines their potential utility to Nation...

  9. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    PubMed

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed. PMID:26952168

  10. Toxic releases from power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-09-15

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results.

  11. Kepler Data Release 4 Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Cleve, Jeffrey (Editor); Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Doug; Allen, Christopher L.; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cote, Miles T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Gilliland, Ron; Girouard, Forrest; Haas, Michael R.; Hall, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Middour, Christopher K.; Pletcher, David L.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter G.; Twicken, Joe; Uddin, Akm Kamal

    2010-01-01

    The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFIs and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 4 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html. Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

  12. Controlled release of alendronate from nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Saha, Dipendu; Spurri, Amanda; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.

    2016-04-13

    With this study, we have synthesized a nitrogen doped mesoporous carbon with the BET surface area of 1066 m2/g, total pore volume 0.6 cm3/g and nitrogen content of 0.5%. Total alendronate adsorption in this carbon was ~5%. The release experiments were designed in four different media with sequential pH values of 1.2, 4.5, 6.8 and 7.4 for 3, 1, 3 and 5 h, respectively and at 37 °C to imitate the physiological conditions of stomach, duodenum, small intestine and colon, respectively. Release of the drug demonstrated a controlled fashion; only 20% of the drug was released in the media withmore » pH = 1.2, whereas 64% of the drug was released in pH = 7.4. This is in contrary to pure alendronate that was completely dissolved within 30 min in the first release media (pH = 1.2) only. The relatively larger uptake of alendronate in this carbon and its sustained fashion of release can be attributed to the hydrogen bonding between the drug and the nitrogen functionalities on carbon surface. Based on this result, it can be inferred that this formulation may lower the side effects of oral delivery of alendronate.« less

  13. Experimental Study of Contaminant Release from Reducing Grout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabalan, R. T.; Alexander, G. W.; Waiting, D. J.; Barr, C. S.

    2013-07-01

    A column experiment was conducted to study the release behavior of technetium, uranium, and selenium initially sequestered in reducing grout similar in composition to Savannah River Site (SRS) saltstone, a cementitious waste form made by mixing salt solution from SRS liquid waste storage tanks with a dry mix containing blast furnace slag, fly ash, and Portland cement. The data suggest that uranium was retained in the grout possibly as a CaUO4 phase, whereas most of the selenium was released. Technetium release initially was relatively constant, and then increased significantly after 26 pore volumes. The increase in technetium release was slightly delayed relative to the observed Eh increase. The system Eh-pH started under conditions in which technetium solubility is low, constrained by Tc3O4 solubility, but eventually transitioned into the stability field of the pertechnetate ion. The delay in technetium release relative to the Eh increase was possibly due to slow oxidation of technetium at depth within the grout particles, which in turn was likely controlled by O2 diffusion into the particles. In contrast to technetium and uranium, selenium release was not solubility limited and selenium likely was present in the pore solution initially as a HSe- species.

  14. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  15. ISOPAR L RELEASE RATES FROM SALTSTONE USING SIMULATED SALT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J; Michael Bronikowski, M; Alex Cozzi, A; Russell Eibling, R; Charles Nash, C

    2008-07-31

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability in the saltstone vault. If it is assumed that all the Isopar{reg_sign} L is released instantaneously into the vault from the curing grout before each subsequent pour, the Isopar{reg_sign} L in the vault headspace is well mixed, and each pour displaces an equivalent volume of headspace, the maximum concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the DSS to assure 25% of the lower flammable limit is not exceeded has been determined to be about 4 ppm. The amount allowed would be higher if the release from grout were significantly less. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L released versus time can be treated as a percentage of initial amount present; there was no statistically significant dependence of the release rate on the initial concentration. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release rate is larger than at lower temperatures. Initial curing temperature was found to be very important as slight variations during the first few hours or days had a significant effect on the amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L released. Short scoping

  16. Release of Tenofovir from Carrageenan-Based Vaginal Suppositories

    PubMed Central

    Zaveri, Toral; Hayes, John E.; Ziegler, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Microbicides are an active area of research for HIV prevention, being developed as a woman-initiated method of prevention during unprotected coitus. Along with safety and efficacy, assessing and improving compliance is a major area of research in microbicide development. We have produced microbicide prototypes in the form of semisoft vaginal suppositories prepared from carrageenan and conducted both qualitative and quantitative studies using these prototypes to determine the physical properties that drive acceptability and possibly adherence. In order to ensure that the suppositories function as effective drug delivery vehicles, we have conducted in vitro dissolution studies in water, vaginal simulant fluid (VSF) and semen simulant fluid (SSF) with suppositories loaded with the antiretroviral drug, tenofovir (TFV). TFV was released via diffusion and matrix erosion in water or by diffusion out of the matrix in VSF and SSF. Diffusion studies were conducted in two different volumes of VSF and SSF. The volume of VSF/SSF into which TFV diffused and the size of the suppositories determined the rate of diffusion from the suppositories. About 45%–50% of the encapsulated TFV diffused out of the suppositories within the first two hours, irrespective of suppository size, diffusion medium (VSF/SSF) and the volume of medium. Prior work indicates that a short waiting period between insertion and coitus is highly desired by women; present data suggest our microbicide prototypes have rapid initial release followed by a slow release curve over the first 24 h. PMID:24999606

  17. 75 FR 61521 - NUREG/CR-7010, Cable Heat Release, Ignition, and Spread in Tray Installations During Fire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ...The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued for public comment a document entitled: ``NUREG/CR-7010, Cable Heat Release, Ignition, and Spread in Tray Installations During Fire (CHRISTIFIRE) Volume 1: Horizontal Trays, Draft Report for...

  18. Equipment for drug release testing of medicated chewing gums.

    PubMed

    Kvist, L C; Andersson, S B; Berglund, J; Wennergren, B; Fors, S M

    2000-04-01

    An apparatus was specially designed and constructed for release testing of medicated chewing gums. The adjustable instrumental settings such as temperature, chewing frequency, chewing time, volume of test medium, distance between the jaws and twisting angle increased the versatility of the apparatus. Selection of the test medium was also an important parameter. Each sample was kneaded mechanically in separate test chambers and the drug release was followed by sampling and HPLC analysis. Different gum formulations were tested and the obtained results demonstrated satisfactory release curves for a variety of formulations and active ingredients. The tested gum formulations comprised nicotine, meclizine, dimenhydrinate and xylitol. The apparatus proved to be suitable in product control of commercial batches but also a useful tool in the research and development of medicated gum formulations. PMID:10766358

  19. Modeling of Progesterone Release from Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) Membranes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Analia I; Bermudez, José M; Villegas, Mercedes; Dib Ashur, María F; Parentis, Mónica L; Gonzo, Elio E

    2016-08-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) biodegradable polymeric membranes were evaluated as platform for progesterone (Prg)-controlled release. In the design of new drug delivery systems, it is important to understand the mass transport mechanism involved, as well as predict the process kinetics. Drug release experiments were conducted and the experimental results were evaluated using engineering approaches that were extrapolated to the pharmaceutical field by our research group. Membranes were loaded with different Prg concentrations and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). SEM images showed that membranes have a dense structure before and after the progesterone addition. DSC and FTIR allowed determining the influence of the therapeutic agent in the membrane properties. The in vitro experiments were performed using two different techniques: (A) returning the sample to the receptor solution (constant volume of the delivery medium) and (B) extracting total volume of the receptor solution. In this work, we present a simple and accurate "lumped" second-order kinetic model. This lumped model considers the different mass transport steps involved in drug release systems. The model fits very well the experimental data using any of the two experimental procedures, in the range 0 ≤ t ≤ ∞ or 0 ≤ M t  ≤ M ∞. The drug release analysis using our proposed approaches is relevant for establishing in vitro-in vivo correlations in future tests in animals. PMID:26729524

  20. Volume MLS ray casting.

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Christian; Guennebaud, Gaël; Meyer, Miriah; Bächer, Moritz; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2008-01-01

    The method of Moving Least Squares (MLS) is a popular framework for reconstructing continuous functions from scattered data due to its rich mathematical properties and well-understood theoretical foundations. This paper applies MLS to volume rendering, providing a unified mathematical framework for ray casting of scalar data stored over regular as well as irregular grids. We use the MLS reconstruction to render smooth isosurfaces and to compute accurate derivatives for high-quality shading effects. We also present a novel, adaptive preintegration scheme to improve the efficiency of the ray casting algorithm by reducing the overall number of function evaluations, and an efficient implementation of our framework exploiting modern graphics hardware. The resulting system enables high-quality volume integration and shaded isosurface rendering for regular and irregular volume data. PMID:18988986

  1. Toxic chemical release inventory information.

    PubMed

    Bronson, R J

    1991-01-01

    As part of a U.S. government effort to inform the public about toxic or hazardous chemicals released into the environment, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are jointly producing the TRI (Toxic Chemical Release Inventory) databanks which consist of two separate files, TRI87 and TRI88. Both files reside on NLM's TOX-NET system. The files contain geographic information about reporting facilities and land, air, and water release data for approximately 300 listed chemicals. PMID:10111718

  2. Controlled release liquid dosage formulation

    DOEpatents

    Benton, Ben F.; Gardner, David L.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid dual coated dosage formulation sustained release pharmaceutic having substantial shelf life prior to ingestion is disclosed. A dual coating is applied over controlled release cores to form dosage forms and the coatings comprise fats melting at less than approximately 101.degree. F. overcoated with cellulose acetate phthalate or zein. The dual coated dosage forms are dispersed in a sugar based acidic liquid carrier such as high fructose corn syrup and display a shelf life of up to approximately at least 45 days while still retaining their release profiles following ingestion. Cellulose acetate phthalate coated dosage form cores can in addition be dispersed in aqueous liquids of pH <5.

  3. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  4. Radioactive releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, C.S.; Martin, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive Releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1988 (WSRC-RP-89-737) is the continuation of a series of reports, previously titled Releases of Radioactivity at the Savannah River Plant (DPSU-1-YR-25). The series reflects the use of air and liquid effluent sample analyses in determining the amount of radioactivity released from Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The identification and characterization of these source terms since plant startup in 1954 have aided Site personnel in confining and limiting the amount of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS facilities. Data contained in this report are used for a variety of purposes, including the calculation of offsite dose estimates and aiding special environmental studies. This document is an effluent/source term report. The report is divided into four summary sections. Summary A details volumes of air and water released from emission sources since plant startup. Summary B lists annual radioactive release data from these emission sources, grouped by nuclide and area. Summary C provides yearly totals of radioactive releases by radionuclide, under the headings Atmospheric,'' Liquid to streams,'' or Liquid to Seepage Basins'' accordingly. Monthly radioactive releases from each emission source from 1986 to 1988 are found in Summary D. Where appropriate, headings in the summary tables have been changed to clarify and simplify emission data (see Appendix B). Additionally, any new discharge points, such as the liquid discharge from the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), are included in this report. A listing of 1988 source term and onsite discharge designations is provided in Appendix C. 36 refs.

  5. Assessing volume status.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Mallemat, Haney

    2014-11-01

    Shock is a physiologic state associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The clinician has several tools available to evaluate volume status. Each modality has its benefits and limitations but, to date, no one test can indicate with 100% accuracy which patients will be truly volume responsive. Although the search for the Holy Grail of a perfect intravascular monitor continues, we must remember the importance of early, aggressive, and goal-directed interventions for patients in shock. Finally, there is no substitute for the most important intervention-the frequent presence of the physician at the patient's bedside. PMID:25441036

  6. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  7. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIII; Appraisal of System-Wide Survival Estimation of Snake River Yearling Chinook Salmon Released in 1997 and 1988, Using PIT-Tags Recovered from Caspian Tern and Double-Crested Cormorant Breeding Colonies on Rice Island, 1997-1998 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Skalski, John R.; Perez-Comas, Jose A.

    2000-05-01

    PIT-tags recovered from tern and cormorant breeding colonies at Rice Island and observations from the interrogation systems at John Day and Bonneville Dams were incorporated into survival analyses. Whether the estimates for the upper reaches of the system, between Lower Granite and McNary Dams were as expected (with weighted averages S{sub LGR-LGS} = 0.996, S{sub LGS-LMN} = 0.837, and S{sub LMN-McN} = 0.941), those for the lower reaches, between John Day and Bonneville Dams, appeared positively biased with survival estimates typically greater than 1. Their weighted averages were S{sub McN-JDA} = 0.707 and S{sub JDA-BON} = 1.792 for 1997 releases. For the 1998 releases, they were S{sub McN-JDA} = 0.795 and S{sub JDA-BON} = 1.312. If the estimates for the lower reaches were biased, the estimates for the whole project would also be biased (S{sub LGR-BON} = 0.819). We determined that bias could have arisen if the terns and cormorants of Rice Island fished for salmon yearlings in waters of the BON-Rice reach at low rates (M{sub BON-Rice} {le} 0.2), and the rates of tag-deposition and tag-detection were low (R{sub D} x R{sub R} {le} 0.4). Moreover, unknown levels of uncensored post-detection mortality and scavenging of previously dead salmon yearlings may have also added to the bias.

  8. GREEK BASIC COURSE, VOLUME I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OBOLENSKY, SERGE; AND OTHERS

    THE GREEK LANGUAGE DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I OF THIS INTRODUCTORY COURSE FOR ADULTS IS THE "KATHOMILUMENI" VARIETY, THAT OF THE STANDARD SPEECH OF EDUCATED GREEKS. (VOLUME III OF THE COURSE INTRODUCES THE MORE FORMAL KATHAREVUSA VARIETY.) EACH VOLUME OF THE COURSE CONTAINS 25 UNITS PLUS FIVE REVIEW SECTIONS. A TYPICAL UNIT IN VOLUME I CONSISTS OF--(1)…

  9. Best practices for code release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    In this talk, I want to describe what I think are the best practices for releasing code and having it adopted by end users. Make sure your code is licensed, so users will know how the software can be used and modified, and place your code in a public repository that (and make sure that you follow institutional policies in doing this). Yet licensing and releasing code are not enough: the code must be organized and documented so users can understand what it does, what its limitations are, and how to build and use it. I will describe what I think are best practices in developing the content to support release, including tutorials, design documents, specifications of interfaces and so on. Much of what I have learned on based on ten years of experience in supporting releases of the Montage Image Mosaic Engine.

  10. Gliotransmission: Exocytotic release from astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, Vladimir; Zorec, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Gliotransmitters are chemicals released from glial cells fulfilling a following set of criteria: i) they are synthesized by and/or stored in glia; ii) their regulated release is triggered by physiological and/or pathological stimuli; iii) they activate rapid (milliseconds to seconds) responses in neighboring cells; and iv) they play a role in (patho)physiological processes. Astrocytes can release a variety of gliotransmitters into the extracellular space using several different mechanisms. In this review, we focus on exocytotic mechanism(s) underlying the release of three classes of gliotransmitters: (i) amino acids, such as, glutamate and D-serine; (ii) nucleotides, like adenosine 5'-triphosphate; and (iii) peptides, such as, atrial natriuretic peptide and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. It is becoming clear that astrocytes are endowed with elements that qualify them as cells communicating with neurons and other cells within the central nervous system by employing regulated exocytosis. PMID:19948188

  11. Tyrosine - Effects on catecholamine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acworth, Ian N.; During, Matthew J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine administration elevates striatal levels of dopamine metabolites in animals given treatments that accelerate nigrostriatal firing, but not in untreated rats. We examined the possibility that the amino acid might actually enhance dopamine release in untreated animals, but that the technique of measuring striatal dopamine metabolism was too insensitive to demonstrate such an effect. Dopamine release was assessed directly, using brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid. Tyrosine administration (50-200 mg/kg IP) did indeed cause a dose related increase in extracellular fluid dopamine levels with minor elevations in levels of DOPAC and HVA, its major metabolites, which were not dose-related. The rise in dopamine was short-lived, suggesting that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms responded to the increased dopamine release by diminishing neuronal firing or sensitivity to tyrosine. These observations indicate that measurement of changes in striatal DOPAC and HVA, if negative, need not rule out increases in nigrostriatal dopamine release.

  12. SELF-RELEASING GRAPPLING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, D.A. Sr.

    1963-11-01

    >A self-releasing grappling device that lifts by virtue of engagement between clamping jaws and the undercut lower side of a conical head of a lifting lug attached to the object to be lifted and employs a releasing sleeve on the lug to free the jaws from the lug is presented. When the jaws are to be released, they are dropped over the releasing sleeve, which is located well below lug head. When the jaws are lifted, they engage a conical surface on the sleeve and lift it up to the head of the lifting lug. In this position of the sleeve, the lower side of the lug head is covered by the sleeve and so cannot be engaged by the jaws, which move past before clearing the sleeve. (AEC)

  13. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  14. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  15. Liter - Metric Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Diane

    This autoinstructional program, developed as part of a general science course, is offered for students in the middle schools. Mathematics of fractions and decimals is considered to be prerequisite knowledge. The behavioral objectives are directed toward mastery of determining volumes of solid objects using the water displacement method as well as…

  16. Overview of the Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Emslie, A. G.; Hudson, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this introductory chapter, we provide a brief summary of the successes and remaining challenges in understanding the solar flare phenomenon and its attendant implications for particle acceleration mechanisms in astrophysical plasmas. We also provide a brief overview of the contents of the other chapters in this volume, with particular reference to the well-observed flare of 2002 July 23.

  17. Volume measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oele, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Chamber is designed to be airtight; it includes face mask for person to breathe outside air so that he does not disturb chamber environment. Chamber includes piston to vary air volume inside. Also included are two microphone transducers which record pressure information inside chamber.

  18. Navajo Biographies. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Virginia

    The life stories of eight Navajo ("Dine", their term for themselves) leaders are presented in volume one of this collection of biographies. Interspersed with portraits, drawings, and maps, the narrative chronologically covers the time period from 1766 when the Navajos lived on land under the rule of Spain into the twentieth century and dealings…

  19. Strategic Plan. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the strategic plan and associated organizational structure that the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will utilize to achieve the defined mission and objectives provided by NASA. Much of the information regarding the background and establishment of the NSBRI by NASA has been provided in other documentation and will not be repeated in this Strategic Plan. This Strategic Plan is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this volume) begins with an Introduction (Section 2) that provides the Institute's NASA-defined mission and objectives, and the organizational structure adopted to implement these through three Strategic Programs: Countermeasure Research; Education, Training and Outreach; and Cooperative Research and Development. These programs are described in Sections 3 to 5. Each program is presented in a similar way, using four subsections: Goals and Objectives; Current Strategies; Gaps and Modifications; and Resource Requirements. Section 6 provides the administrative infrastructure and total budget required to implement the Strategic Programs and assures that they form a single cohesive plan. This plan will ensure continued success of the Institute for the next five years. Volume II of the Strategic Plan provides an in-depth analysis of the current and future strategic programs of the 12 current NSBRI teams, including their goals, objectives, mutual interactions and schedules.

  20. VOLUME AND SURFACE AREA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE (1) MEASURING VOLUMES OF RECTANGULAR SOLIDS, RIGHT RECTANGULAR…

  1. Negotiating Salaries, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Service Bureau, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This volume discusses specific strategy and tactics that can be employed in the effort to reach an agreement on salaries at the bargaining table. Although strategies and situations may vary from case to case, this report focuses on those principles and approaches that are essential to any good bargaining procedure. The discussion covers public vs.…

  2. Negotiating Salaries, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Service Bureau, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This volume deals with concepts important to the effective negotiation of salaries in public schools. The discussion covers the compensation patterns in education, the goals and pressures affecting reacher negotiators, salaries in relation to other benefits and proposals, extra pay for extra duties and merit pay, and the stance of the negotiators…

  3. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  4. Slow Release of Permanganate from Injectable Fumed Silica Gel: Rheological Properties and Release Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Zhong, L.; Oostrom, M.; Li, G.

    2014-12-01

    ISCO (In Situ Chemical Oxidation) has been proved to be a useful remediation technology in destroying most prevalent aqueous organic contaminants. For permanganate (MnO4-) in particular, the chemistry of degradative oxidation is well established for cleaning up groundwater containing trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). However the long-term effectiveness of the application of this oxidant has been questioned due to the observed post remediation rebound of contaminant concentrations. To improve the efficiency of ISCO using MnO4-under specific site conditions, the technology of emplacing slow-releasing permanganate in an aquifer has been studied. We have developed an injectable slow-release permanganate slurry/gel (ISRPG) by mixing KMnO4 with fumed silica in water. Ideally, the slurry/gel forms would release low concentration of MnO4- by diffusion to maintain a desired concentration level of the agent within the chemically active zone. We have investigated the properties and tested the application of this ISRPG in laboratory studies. Rheological study indicated ISRPG has high viscosity and shear thinning property. The viscosity of silica gel could be lowered by mechanical mixing thus making it easy for subsurface injection. Batch tests revealed that MnO4- was diffused from ISRPG and the gel did not disperse but maintained its initial shape. In column experiments we showed that permanganate release covered 6 times more effluent pore volumes when ISRPG was injected compared to MnO4- solution injection. We also observed TCE degradation by released MnO4-, and the remedial performance occurred over a much longer timeframe with ISRPG compared to MnO4- solution injection. In 2-D flow cell tests we demonstrated that water flows around the injected gel, carrying MnO4- diffused out from the gel and forming a downstream oxidant plume, while the gel was stationary. ISRPG slowly released low concentrations of permanganate to maintain a predetermined level of the

  5. Added release time in diffusion/dissolution coupled release.

    PubMed

    Nuxoll, Eric

    2015-10-15

    While increasingly sophisticated models have been developed to more accurately predict dispersed solute release from complex systems, distillation of their results into quantitative trends has been difficult. Here, the numerically calculated release profiles of coupled diffusion/dissolution systems are quantified by their cumulative release time (CRT) and compared against corresponding diffusion-controlled limits. The increase in CRT due to a finite dissolution rate was found to vary inversely with the second Damköhler number across several orders of magnitude, and also vary linearly with the amount of solid drug loaded in the system. The analytical nature of the relationship provides new physical insights into the system and appears to be indifferent to the form of the secondary rate-limiting step. This work provides a simple analytical expression with which one can not only predict the mean release time for a given set of parameter values, but understand precisely how each parameter value will affect it. The simplicity of the correlation and the lack of apparent limits to its validity also suggest the existence of an analytical pathway for its derivation, which may yield additional insights into the effect of secondary rate processes on controlled release. PMID:26276252

  6. Influence of pore water velocity on the release of carbofuran and fenamiphos from commercial granulates embedded in a porous matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradelo, Marcos; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; López-Periago, J. Eugenio

    2012-11-01

    Pore water flow velocity can influence the processes involved in the contaminant transport between relative stagnant zones of porous media and their adjacent mobile zones. A particular case of special interest is the occurrence of high flow rates around the controlled release granules containing pesticides buried in soil. The release of the pesticides carbofuran and fenamiphos from commercial controlled release formulations (CRFs) was studied, comparing release tests in a finite volume of water with water flow release tests in saturated packed sand at different seepage velocities. For water release kinetics, the time taken for 50% of the pesticide to be released (T50) was 0.64 hours for carbofuran and 1.97 hours for fenamiphos. In general, the release rate was lower in the porous matrix than in the free water tests. The faster release rate for carbofuran was attributed to its higher water diffusivity. The seepage velocity has a strong influence on the pesticide release rate. The dominant release mechanism varies with the progress of release. The evolution of the mechanism is discussed on the basis of the successive steps that involve the moving boundary of the dissolution front of the pesticide inside the granule, the concentration gradient inside the granule and the flow boundary layer resistance to solute diffusion around the granule. The pore water velocity influences the overall release dynamics. Therefore, seepage velocity should be considered in pesticide release to evaluate the risk of pesticide leaching, especially in scenarios with fast infiltration.

  7. Controlled release of ethylene via polymeric films for food packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Roberto; Bazzano, Marco; Capozzi, Luigi Carlo; Ferri, Ada; Sangermano, Marco

    2015-12-01

    In modern fruit supply chain a common method to trigger ripening is to keep fruits inside special chambers and initiate the ripening process through administration of ethylene. Ethylene is usually administered through cylinders with inadequate control of its final concentration in the chamber. The aim of this study is the development of a new technology to accurately regulate ethylene concentration in the atmosphere where fruits are preserved: a polymeric film, containing an inclusion complex of α-cyclodextrin with ethylene, was developed. The complex was prepared by molecular encapsulation which allows the entrapment of ethylene into the cavity of α-cyclodextrin. After encapsulation, ethylene can be gradually released from the inclusion complex and its release rate can be regulated by temperature and humidity. The inclusion complex was dispersed into a thin polymeric film produced by UV-curing. This method was used because is solvent-free and involves low operating temperature; both conditions are necessary to prevent rapid release of ethylene from the film. The polymeric films were characterized with respect to thermal behaviour, crystalline structure and kinetics of ethylene release, showing that can effectively control the release of ethylene within confined volume.

  8. Fission product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S

    1980-07-01

    Due to present international concerns over nuclear proliferation, TRIGA reactor fuels will utilize only low-enriched uranium (LEU) (enrichment <20%). This requires increased total uranium loading per unit volume of fuel in order to maintain the appropriate fissile loading. Tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing up to 45 wt-% uranium. These tests, performed in late 1977 and early 1978, were similar to those conducted earlier on TRIGA fuels with 8.5 wt-% U. Fission gas release measurements were made on prototypic specimens from room temperature to 1100 deg. C in the TRIGA King Furnace Facility. The fuel specimens were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at a low power level. The fractional releases of the gaseous nuclides of krypton and xenon were measured under steady-state operating conditions. Clean helium was used to sweep the fission gases released during irradiation from the furnace into a standard gas collection trap for gamma counting. The results of these tests on TRIGA-LEU fuel agree well with data from the similar, earlier tests on TRIGA fuel. The correlation used to calculate the release of fission products from 8.5 wt-% U TRIGA fuel applies equally well for U contents up to 45 wt-%. (author)

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a HAp-based biomarker with controlled drug release for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    González, Maykel; Merino, Ulises; Vargas, Susana; Quintanilla, Francisco; Rodríguez, Rogelio

    2016-04-01

    A biocompatible hybrid porous polymer-ceramic material was synthesized to be used as a biomarker in the treatment of breast cancer. This device was equipped with the capacity to release medicaments locally in a controlled manner. The biomaterial was Hydroxyapatite(HAp)-based and had a controlled pore size and pore volume fraction. It was implemented externally using a sharp end and a pair of barbed rings placed opposite each other to prevent relative movement once implanted. The biomarker was impregnated with cis-diamine dichloride platinum (II) [Cl2-Pt-(NH3)2]; the rate of release was obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and release occurred over the course of three months. Different release profiles were obtained as a function of the pore volume fraction. The biomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26838911

  10. Downstream effects of reservoir releases to the Potomac River from Luke, Maryland, to Washington, DC

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trombley, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    A digital computer flow-routing model was developed for the Potomac River in order to determine the downstream effects of flow releases from the Bloomington and Savage River Reservoirs. Both reservoirs are located above Luke, Maryland approximately 230 miles upstream from Washington, D. C. The downstream effects of reservoir releases were determined by using the unit-response method of flow routing implemented by a diffusion analogy. Results are in the form of unit response coefficients which are used to route flows downstream from Luke. A 24-hour sustained reservoir release input at Luke will result in 35 percent of the flow arriving at Washington, D.C., during the 4th day after the beginning of the release, followed by 61 percent and 4 percent arriving on the 5th and 6th days, respectively. For a 7-day sustained reservoir release, 47 percent of the flow will arrive during the 1st week, and 53 percent will arrive the 2d week. Two methods were used to estimate the amount of water that goes into channel storage between Luke and Washington, D.C., during sustained reservoir releases. Analysis of the flow-routing results indicates channel storage is equivalent to the volume of water releases over a 3.7-day period. Using channel geometry relationships, that volume is equal to 3.2 days ' release. (USGS)

  11. Global bioconversions. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    These volumes present the most active bioconversion-based research and development projects worldwide, with an emphasis on the important practical aspects of this work. A major focus of the text is the bioconversion of organic residues to useful products, which also encompasses the field of anaerobic methane fermentation. Chapters from an international perspective are also included, which further address the global importance of bioconversion.

  12. Global bioconversions. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    These volumes present the most active bioconversion-based research and development projects worldwide, with an emphasis on the important practical aspects of this work. A major focus of the text is the bioconversion of organic residues to useful products, which also encompasses the field of anaerobic methane fermentation. Chapters from an international perspective are also included, which further address the global importance of bioconversion.

  13. Variable volume calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, R.L. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for determining the volume of a closed chamber. The apparatus includes a body having a cylindrical cavity therein including a threaded rear portion and a closed front end, and a piston having a threaded portion which mates with threaded rear portion of the cavity and which reciprocates in the cavity. A gas-impermeable seal, which is carried by the piston in one embodiment, forms a closed chamber in the front end of the cavity. A linear-movement indicator, attached to the rear end of the piston, measures the reciprocating movement of the piston in the cavity, while a pressure sensing device, connected to the front end of the cavity, determines the pressure in the closed system. In use, a vessel, having a volume enclosing experimental materials, is also connected to the front end of the cavity, and pressure and piston movement measurements are made which enable calculation of a volume change in the vessels. The design and operation of this instrument are presented. 7 figs.

  14. Anisotropic Ambient Volume Shading.

    PubMed

    Ament, Marco; Dachsbacher, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method to compute anisotropic shading for direct volume rendering to improve the perception of the orientation and shape of surface-like structures. We determine the scale-aware anisotropy of a shading point by analyzing its ambient region. We sample adjacent points with similar scalar values to perform a principal component analysis by computing the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance matrix. In particular, we estimate the tangent directions, which serve as the tangent frame for anisotropic bidirectional reflectance distribution functions. Moreover, we exploit the ratio of the eigenvalues to measure the magnitude of the anisotropy at each shading point. Altogether, this allows us to model a data-driven, smooth transition from isotropic to strongly anisotropic volume shading. In this way, the shape of volumetric features can be enhanced significantly by aligning specular highlights along the principal direction of anisotropy. Our algorithm is independent of the transfer function, which allows us to compute all shading parameters once and store them with the data set. We integrated our method in a GPU-based volume renderer, which offers interactive control of the transfer function, light source positions, and viewpoint. Our results demonstrate the benefit of anisotropic shading for visualization to achieve data-driven local illumination for improved perception compared to isotropic shading. PMID:26529745

  15. Release behavior and kinetic evaluation of berberine hydrochloride from ethyl cellulose/chitosan microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui-Yun; Cao, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Li, Jun-Bo; Zhang, Fa-Liang

    2014-12-01

    Novel ethyl cellulose/chitosan microspheres (ECCMs) were prepared by the method of w/o/w emulsion and solvent evaporation. The microspheres were spherical, adhesive, and aggregated loosely with a size not bigger than 5 μm. The drug loading efficiency of berberine hydrochloride (BH) loaded in microspheres were affected by chitosan (CS) concentration, EC concentration and the volume ratio of V(CS)/ V(EC). ECCMs prepared had sustained release efficiency on BH which was changed with different preparation parameters. In addition, the pH value of release media had obvious effect on the release character of ECCMs. The release rate of BH from sample B was only a little more than 30% in diluted hydrochloric acid (dHCl) and that was almost 90% in PBS during 24 h. Furthermore, the drug release data were fitted to different kinetic models to analyze the release kinetics and the mechanism from the microspheres. The released results of BH indicated that ECCMs exhibited non-Fickian diffusion mechanism in dHCl and diffusion-controlled drug release based on Fickian diffusion in PBS. So the ECCMs might be an ideal sustained release system especially in dHCl and the drug release was governed by both diffusion of the drug and dissolution of the polymeric network.

  16. Solid Manure As a Source of Fecal Indicator Microorganisms: Release under Simulated Rainfall.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, Ryan A; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Hill, Robert L; Shelton, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    Understanding and quantifying microbial release from manure is a precondition to estimation and management of microbial water quality. The objectives of this work were to determine the effects of rainfall intensity and surface slope on the release of Escherichia coli, enterococci, total coliforms, and dissolved chloride from solid dairy manure and to assess the performance of the one-parametric exponential model and the two-parametric Bradford-Schijven model when simulating the observed release. A controlled-intensity rainfall simulator induced 1 h of release in runoff/leachate partitioning boxes at three rainfall intensities (30, 60, and 90 mm h(-1)) and two surface slopes (5% and 20%). Bacterial concentrations in initial release were more than 1 order of magnitude lower than their starting concentrations in manure. As bacteria were released, they were partitioned into runoff and leachate at similar concentrations, but in different volumes, depending on slope. Bacterial release occurred in two stages that corresponded to mechanisms associated with release of manure liquid- and solid-phases. Parameters of the two models fitted to the bacterial release dependencies on rainfall depth were not significantly affected by rainfall intensity or slope. Based on model performance tests, the Bradford-Schijven model is recommended for simulating bacterial release from solid manure. PMID:26011817

  17. Fabrication of drug eluting implants: study of drug release mechanism from titanium dioxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlekhan, Azhang; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T.; Sukotjo, Cortino; Yarin, Alexander L.; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    2015-06-01

    Formation of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) on a titanium surface holds great potential for promoting desirable cellular response. However, prolongation of drug release from these nano-reservoirs remains to be a challenge. In our previous work TNTs were successfully loaded with a drug. In this study the effect of TNTs dimensions on prolongation of drug release is quantified aiming at the introduction of a simple novel technique which overcomes complications of previously introduced methods. Different groups of TNTs with different lengths and diameters are fabricated. Samples are loaded with a model drug and rate of drug release over time is monitored. The relation of the drug release rate to the TNT dimensions (diameter, length, aspect ratio and volume) is established. The results show that an increase in any of these parameters increases the duration of the release process. However, the strongest parameter affecting the drug release is the aspect ratio. In fact, TNTs with higher aspect ratios release drug slower. It is revealed that drug release from TNT is a diffusion-limited process. Assuming that diffusion of drug in (Phosphate-Buffered Saline) PBS follows one-dimensional Fick’s law, the theoretical predictions for drug release profile is compatible with our experimental data for release from a single TNT.

  18. ISOPAR L Release Rates from Saltstone Using Simulated Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bronikowski, M

    2006-02-06

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Deactivated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability in the saltstone vault. If it is assumed that all the Isopar{reg_sign} L is released instantaneously into the vault from the curing grout before each subsequent pour; the Isopar{reg_sign} L in the vault headspace is well mixed; and each pour displaces an equivalent volume of headspace, the allowable concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the DSS sent to SPF has been calculated at approximately 4 ppm. The amount allowed would be higher, if the release from grout were significantly less. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 mg/L to 200 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the Isopar{reg_sign} L release data can be treated as a percentage of initial concentration in the concentration range studied. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release is larger than at lower temperatures. In one test at 95 C essentially all of the Isopar{reg_sign} L was released in three months. Initial curing temperature was found to be very important as slight variations during the first few days affected the final Isopar{reg_sign} L amount released. Short scoping tests at 95 C with solvent containing all components (Isopar

  19. Research Summary No. 36-6, Volume II. Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  20. Research Summary No. 36-5, Volume II. Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  1. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  2. Payload holddown and release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaput, Dale; Visconti, Mark; Edwards, Michael; Moran, Tom

    1994-01-01

    A payload holddown and release mechanism, designated the Model 1172, was designed and built at G&H Technology during the winter of 1992/1993. The mechanism is able to restrain and release a 45-pound payload with minimal tipoff. The payload is held in place by a stainless steel band and released using electrically triggered non-explosive actuators. These actuators provide reliable operation with negligible shock and no special handling requirements. The performance of the mechanism was demonstrated in two flight tests. Data showed pitch and yaw tipoff rates of less than 0.07 radian (4 degree) per second. The Model 1172 design is an efficient replacement for conventional payload deployment devices, especially where low transmitted shock is required.

  3. Effect of brushing on fluoride release from 3 bracket adhesives.

    PubMed

    Staley, Robert N; Mack, Steven J; Wefel, James S; Vargas, Marcos A; Jakobsen, Jane R

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare fluoride ion release from 3 orthodontic bracket adhesives with and without brushing the bracketed teeth with a fluoridated dentifrice. The bracket adhesives included a light-cured composite resin (Transbond; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), a fluoride-releasing composite resin (Advance; L D Caulk Division, Dentsply International, Milford, Del), and a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC; GC America, Alsip, Ill). The teeth in the control group were not bonded with brackets. Sixty extracted human teeth were randomly assigned to 6 groups of 10 each: (1) Transbond, brushed; (2) Advance, brushed; (3) Advance, not brushed; (4) Fuji, brushed; (5) Fuji, not brushed; and (6) control, brushed. After bonding, each tooth was placed in a sealed plastic test tube containing 4 ml of deionized water. The toothpaste used in brushing contained 0.15% weight per volume sodium fluoride, 1500 parts per million parts fluoride (Winter-fresh gel; Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York, NY). Brushing began 24 hours after the teeth were bonded and placed in deionized water. After brushing, the teeth were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water and returned to a sealed test tube. Fluoride measurements were taken before brushing began, at intervals of 72 hours for 22 days, and 90 and 93 days after bonding. Findings included: (1) brushing significantly increased the release of fluoride ions from the teeth in the composite resin and control groups, (2) the enamel crowns of the unbonded control teeth absorbed and re-released a substantial amount of fluoride ions obtained from the toothpaste, (3) the brushed group of teeth bonded with the fluoride-releasing composite resin released significantly more fluoride on the last 4 days that measurements were taken after brushing than the nonbrushed group bonded with the same adhesive, (4) the brushed group of teeth bonded with the resin-modified glass ionomer released significantly more fluoride on the last 4

  4. Nanostructured Diclofenac Sodium Releasing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Harlin, A.; Seppälä, J.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Various techniques have been developed to produce second generation biomaterials for tissue repair. These include extrusion, molding, salt leaching, spinning etc, but success in regenerating tissues has been limited. It is important to develop porous material, yet with a fibrous structure for it to be biomimetic. To mimic biological tissues, the extra-cellular matrix usually contains fibers in nano scale. To produce nanostructures, self-assembly or electrospinning can be used. Adding a drug release function to such a material may advance applications further for use in controlled tissue repair. This turns the resulting device into a multifunctional porous, fibrous structure to support cells and drug releasing properties in order to control tissue reactions. A bioabsorbable poly(ɛ-caprolactone-co-D,L lactide) 95/5 (PCL) was made into diluted solution using a solvent, to which was added 2w-% of diclofenac sodium (DS). Nano-fibers were made by electrospinning onto substrate. Microstructure of the resulting nanomat was studied using SEM and drug release profiles with UV/VIS spectroscopy. Thickness of the electrospun nanomat was about 2 mm. SEM analysis showed that polymeric nano-fibers containing drug particles form a highly interconnected porous nano structure. Average diameter of the nano-fibers was 130 nm. There was a high burst peak in drug release, which decreased to low levels after one day. The used polymer has slow a degradation rate and though the nanomat was highly porous with a large surface area, drug release rate is slow. It is feasible to develop a nano-fibrous porous structure of bioabsorbable polymer, which is loaded with test drug. Drug release is targeted at improving the properties of biomaterial for use in controlled tissue repair and regeneration.

  5. Properties and glial origin of osmotic-dependent release of taurine from the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Deleuze, C; Duvoid, A; Hussy, N

    1998-03-01

    1. Taurine, prominently concentrated in glial cells in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), is probably involved in the inhibition of SON vasopressin neurones by peripheral hypotonic stimulus, via activation of neuronal glycine receptors. We report here the properties and origin of the osmolarity-dependent release of preloaded [3H]taurine from isolated whole SO nuclei. 2. Hyposmotic medium induced a rapid, reversible and dose-dependent increase in taurine release. Release showed a high sensitivity to osmotic change, with a significant enhancement with less than a 5% decrease in osmolarity. Hyperosmotic stimulus decreased basal release. 3. Evoked release was independent of extracellular Ca2+ and Na+, and was blocked by the Cl- channel blockers DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) and DPC (N-phenylanthranilic acid), suggesting a diffusion process through volume-sensitive Cl- channels. 4. Evoked release was transient for large osmotic reductions (> or = 15%), probably reflecting regulatory volume decrease (RVD). However, it was sustained for smaller changes, suggesting that taurine release induced by physiological variations in osmolarity is not linked to RVD. 5. Basal and evoked release were strongly inhibited by an incubation of the tissue with the glia-specific toxin fluorocitrate, but were unaffected by a neurotoxic-treatment with NMDA, demonstrating the glial origin of the release of taurine in the SON. 6. The high osmosensitivity of taurine release suggests an important role in the osmoregulation of the SON function. These results strengthen the notion of an implication of taurine and glial cells in the regulation of the whole-body fluid balance through the modulation of vasopressin release. PMID:9518705

  6. Properties and glial origin of osmotic-dependent release of taurine from the rat supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Duvoid, Anne; Hussy, Nicolas

    1998-01-01

    Taurine, prominently concentrated in glial cells in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), is probably involved in the inhibition of SON vasopressin neurones by peripheral hypotonic stimulus, via activation of neuronal glycine receptors. We report here the properties and origin of the osmolarity-dependent release of preloaded [3H]taurine from isolated whole SO nuclei.Hyposmotic medium induced a rapid, reversible and dose-dependent increase in taurine release. Release showed a high sensitivity to osmotic change, with a significant enhancement with less than a 5 % decrease in osmolarity. Hyperosmotic stimulus decreased basal release.Evoked release was independent of extracellular Ca2+ and Na+, and was blocked by the Cl− channel blockers DIDS (4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid) and DPC (N-phenylanthranilic acid), suggesting a diffusion process through volume-sensitive Cl− channels.Evoked release was transient for large osmotic reductions (≥ 15 %), probably reflecting regulatory volume decrease (RVD). However, it was sustained for smaller changes, suggesting that taurine release induced by physiological variations in osmolarity is not linked to RVD.Basal and evoked release were strongly inhibited by an incubation of the tissue with the glia-specific toxin fluorocitrate, but were unaffected by a neurotoxic treatment with NMDA, demonstrating the glial origin of the release of taurine in the SON.The high osmosensitivity of taurine release suggests an important role in the osmoregulation of the SON function. These results strengthen the notion of an implication of taurine and glial cells in the regulation of the whole-body fluid balance through the modulation of vasopressin release. PMID:9518705

  7. Hydrocarbon release investigations in Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Fels, J.B.

    1996-09-01

    Hydrocarbon releases are among the most common environmental problems in Missouri, as well as across the country. Old, unprotected underground storage tanks and buried piping from the tanks to pumps are notorious sources of petroleum contamination at LUST (leaking underground storage tank) sites. Missouri has an estimated 5000 LUST sites across the state with the majority being simple spills into clay-rich soils or into a shallow perched water system. However, in the southern half of the state, where residual soils and karst bedrock are not conducive to trapping such releases, significant groundwater supplies are at risk. This article discusses the process used to identify the source of contamination.

  8. CIRMIS Data system. Volume 2. Program listings

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrichs, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (OWNI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for utilization by the hydraulic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required.The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System is a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display. This is the second of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

  9. Environmental Report 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1996, prepared for the US Department of Energy. Volume 2 supports Volume 1 summary data and is essentially a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable. Volume 2 includes information on monitoring of air, air effluents, sewerable water, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, environmental radiation, and quality assurance.

  10. Oxycodone controlled release in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Oral opioids are the treatment of choice for chronic cancer pain. Morphine is the strong opioid of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain according to guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). This recommendation by the WHO was derived from availability, familiarity to clinicians, established effectiveness, simplicity of administration, and relative inexpensive cost. It was not based on proven therapeutic superiority over other options. Patients who experience inadequate pain relief or intolerable side effects with one opioid may often be successfully treated with another agent or with the same agent administered by a different route. Opioid rotation, or switching to an alternative opioid, helps some patients achieve better pain control with fewer associated adverse effects. Oxycodone is a mu-opioid receptor specific ligand, with clear agonist properties. It is an active potent opioid, which is in part a kappa-receptor agonist. Like morphine and other pure agonists, there is no known ceiling to the analgesic effects of oxycodone. The active metabolites of oxycodone (eg, oxymorphone) could be important in oxycodone-mediated analgesia. The main pharmacokinetic difference between oxycodone and morphine is in oral bioavailability. The bioavailability of oxycodone is >60% and the bioavailability of morphine is 20%. Controlled-release oxycodone is absorbed in a bi-exponential fashion. There is a rapid phase with a mean half-life of 37 min, accounting for 38% of the dose, and a slow phase with a half-life of 6.2 h, which accounts for the residual 62%. Oxycodone elimination is impaired by renal failure because there are both an increased volume of distribution and reduced clearance. A lot of studies prove that the efficacy of controlled-release oxycodone in cancer-pain control is at least the same as morphine, immediate-release oxycodone and hydromorphone. Its toxicity profile seems better than that of morphine. There are actually several

  11. BULGARIAN, BASIC COURSE, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HODGE, CARLETON T.; AND OTHERS

    A BASIC COURSE IN BULGARIAN HAS BEEN PREPARED IN TWO VOLUMES. THIS VOLUME, VOLUME 1, IS DIVIDED INTO THREE PARTS--BASIC SENTENCES, NOTES, AND DRILLS. AN ADDITIONAL PART INCLUDES READING PASSAGES. THE BASIC SENTENCES ARE NORMAL DIALOG MATERIAL, MEANT TO BE MEMORIZED. THE NOTES EXPLAIN THE GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE OF THE LANGUAGE AND ARE DIVIDED INTO…

  12. Calculus Students' Understanding of Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorko, Allison; Speer, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have documented difficulties that elementary school students have in understanding volume. Despite its importance in higher mathematics, we know little about college students' understanding of volume. This study investigated calculus students' understanding of volume. Clinical interview transcripts and written responses to volume…

  13. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  14. Very low shock release pyromechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulier, Grégory; Gaechter, J. Pierre

    2003-09-01

    Pyromechanisms have long been used in space for launchers and satellites applications, particularly for release or separation purposes, such as bolt cutters, release nuts, pyrovalves, etc. They offer a great variety of uses, a high potential between the power supplied and the weight on board with, at the same time, a high reliability. However, they also feature a drawback due to the high dynamics generated by their functioning. Pyroshocks levels may damage adjacent sensible equipments (eg electronic boxes, reaction wheels,...) and require to design damping systems or to remove those equipments from the shock source. In a mechanism using standard pyrodevices, shock generation comes from three sources: 1. Pyrotechnic reaction. 2. Energy from internal parts in motion. 3. The release of structural constraints. Devices developed by E. LACROIX have the objectives to avoid the two last ones by: Using heat and gas generated by pyrotechnic effects. Reducing speed of parts in motion. Reducing release speed of mechanical constraints. In this paper, LACROIX presents two products named "PYROSOFT" and "VIROSOFT " designed by LACROIX and supported by CNES Toulouse (French Space Agency). R&T contracts.

  15. 78 FR 73083 - Compassionate Release

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... the regulations in 28 CFR part 571, subpart G, on December 21, 2006 (71 FR 76619). We also published an interim rule making a technical change to the regulations on February 28, 2013 (78 FR 13478). We... of Prisons 28 CFR Part 571 RIN 1120-AB68 Compassionate Release AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons,...

  16. 2014 Pee Dee germplasm releases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PD 05035, PD 05041, PD 05064, PD 05069, PD 05070, PD 05071, PD 06001, and PD 06078 are noncommercial breeding lines of cotton jointly released by the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Clemson University Experiment Station, and Cotton Incorporated in 2014. These ...

  17. Photodegradable Polyesters for Triggered Release

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Cong; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Peng; Tang, Xinjing

    2012-01-01

    Photodegradable polyesters were synthesized with a photolabile monomer 2-nitrophenylethylene glycol and dioyl chlorides with different lengths. These polymers can be assembled to form polymeric particles with encapsulation of target substances. Light activation can degrade these particles and release payloads in both aqueous solutions and RAW 264.7 cells. PMID:23208376

  18. 28 CFR 2.83 - Release planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release planning. 2.83 Section 2.83... Release planning. (a) All grants of parole shall be conditioned on the development of a suitable release... correctional or supervision staff shall assist the prisoner in formulating a release plan for investigation....

  19. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

  20. 19 CFR 142.41 - Line Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Line Release. 142.41 Section 142.41 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.41 Line Release. Line Release is an automated system designed...

  1. 19 CFR 142.41 - Line Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Line Release. 142.41 Section 142.41 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.41 Line Release. Line Release is an automated system designed...

  2. 19 CFR 142.41 - Line Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Line Release. 142.41 Section 142.41 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.41 Line Release. Line Release is an automated system designed...

  3. 19 CFR 142.41 - Line Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Line Release. 142.41 Section 142.41 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.41 Line Release. Line Release is an automated system designed...

  4. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices: 1985 supplement, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, K. E.; Gauthier, M. K.; Coss, J. R.; Dantas, A. R. V.; Price, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state, total-dose radiation test data are provided, in graphic format, for use by electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. The data were generated by JPL for various NASA space programs. The document is in two volumes: Volume 1 provides data on diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and miscellaneous semiconductor types, and Volume 2 provides total-dose radiation test data on integrated circuits. Volume 1 of this 1985 Supplement contains new total-dose radiation test data generated since the August 1, 1981 release date of the original Volume 1. Publication of Volume 2 of the 1985 Supplement will follow that of Volume 1 by approximately three months.

  5. New volume and inverse volume operators for loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinsong; Ma, Yongge

    2016-08-01

    A new alternative volume operator is constructed for loop quantum gravity by using the so-called cotriad operators as building blocks. It is shown that the new volume operator shares the same qualitative properties with the standard volume operator. Moreover, a new alternative inverse volume operator is also constructed in the light of the construction of the alternative volume operator, which is possessed of the same qualitative properties as those of the alternative volume operator. The new inverse volume operator can be employed to construct the Hamiltonian operator of matter fields, which may lead to an anomaly-free on-shell quantum constraint algebra without any special restriction on the regularization procedure for gravity coupled to matter fields.

  6. Strong volume, stable prices

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This article is the September-October 1993 market report, providing trading volume and prices in the Uranium market. Activity was brisk, with 15 deals concluded. Six were in the spot concentrates market, with four of the six deals involving U.S. utilities and approximately 1.8M pounds of U3O8 equivalent. There were five conversion deals announced, with four of the five deals involving U.S. utilities. Four deals were concluded in the enrichment market, and the deals involving U.S. utilities were approximately 327k SWUs. On the horizon, there are deals for approximately 4.1M SWU.

  7. Mining volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph Saul (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In a shaft with a curved or straight primary segment and smaller off-shooting segments, at least one standing wave is generated in the primary segment. The shaft has either an open end or a closed end and approximates a cylindrical waveguide. A frequency of a standing wave that represents the fundamental mode characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. Alternatively, a frequency differential between two successive harmonic modes that are characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. In either event, the measured frequency or frequency differential is characteristic of the length and thus the volume of the shaft based on length times the bore area.

  8. Kepler Data Release 3 Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleve, Jeffrey E.

    2010-01-01

    This describes the collection of data and the processing done on it so when researchers around the world get the Kepler data sets (which are a set of pixels from the telescope of a particular target (star, galaxy or whatever) over a 3 month period) they can adjust their algorithms fro things that were done (like subtracting all of one particular wavelength for example). This is used to calibrate their own algorithms so that they know what it is they are starting with. It is posted so that whoever is accessing the publicly available data (not all of it is made public) can understand it .. (most of the Kepler data is under restriction for 1 - 4 years and is not available, but the handbook is for everyone (public and restricted) The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFls and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 3 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http:// archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html .Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

  9. Drug release control and system understanding of sucrose esters matrix tablets by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chansanroj, Krisanin; Petrović, Jelena; Ibrić, Svetlana; Betz, Gabriele

    2011-10-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were applied for system understanding and prediction of drug release properties from direct compacted matrix tablets using sucrose esters (SEs) as matrix-forming agents for controlled release of a highly water soluble drug, metoprolol tartrate. Complexity of the system was presented through the effects of SE concentration and tablet porosity at various hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) values of SEs ranging from 0 to 16. Both effects contributed to release behaviors especially in the system containing hydrophilic SEs where swelling phenomena occurred. A self-organizing map neural network (SOM) was applied for visualizing interrelation among the variables and multilayer perceptron neural networks (MLPs) were employed to generalize the system and predict the drug release properties based on HLB value and concentration of SEs and tablet properties, i.e., tablet porosity, volume and tensile strength. Accurate prediction was obtained after systematically optimizing network performance based on learning algorithm of MLP. Drug release was mainly attributed to the effects of SEs, tablet volume and tensile strength in multi-dimensional interrelation whereas tablet porosity gave a small impact. Ability of system generalization and accurate prediction of the drug release properties proves the validity of SOM and MLPs for the formulation modeling of direct compacted matrix tablets containing controlled release agents of different material properties. PMID:21878388

  10. Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-08-02

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  11. Slow Release of Plant Volatiles Using Sol-Gel Dispensers.

    PubMed

    Bian, L; Sun, X L; Cai, X M; Chen, Z M

    2014-12-01

    The black citrus aphid, also known as the tea aphid, (Toxoptera aurantii Boyer) attacks economically important crops, including tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze). In the current study, silica sol-gel formulations were screened to find one that could carry and release C. sinensis plant volatiles to lure black citrus aphids in a greenhouse. The common plant volatile trans-2-hexen-1-al was used as a model molecule to screen for suitable sol-gel formulations. A zNose (Electronic Sensor Technology, Newbury Park, CA) transportable gas chromatograph was used to continuously monitor the volatile emissions. A sol-gel formulation containing tetramethyl orthosilicate and methyltrimethoxysilane in an 8:2 (vol:vol) ratio was selected to develop a slow-release dispenser. The half-life of trans-2-hexen-1-al in the sol-gel dispenser increased slightly with the volume of this compound in the dispenser. Ten different volatiles were tested in the sol-gel dispenser. Alcohols of 6-10 carbons had the longest half-lives (3.01-3.77 d), while esters of 6-12 carbons had the shortest (1.53-2.28 d). Release of these volatiles from the dispensers could not be detected by the zNose after 16 d (cis-3-hexenyl acetate) to 26 d (3,7-dimethylocta-1,6-dien-3-ol). In greenhouse experiments, trans-2-hexen-1-al and cis-3-hexen-1-ol released from the sol-gel dispensers attracted aphids for ≍17 d, and release of these volatiles could not be detected by the zNose after ≍24 d. The sol-gel dispensers performed adequately for the slow release of plant volatiles to trap aphids in the greenhouse. PMID:26470065

  12. Tailored Sequential Drug Release from Bilayered Calcium Sulfate Composites

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt%) of metronidazole-loaded poly poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography (MicroCT) images showed the overall layered geometry as well as homogenous distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4% per day). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. PMID:25175211

  13. Release of lonapalene from two-phase emulsion-type ointment systems.

    PubMed

    Ong, J T; Manoukian, E

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro release of lonapalene, a novel nonsteroidal antipsoriatic agent, was studied from two-phase emulsion-type ointment systems into a perfect sink of propylene carbonate at 32 degrees C. Lonapalene was completely solubilized in the ointments consisting of an internal phase of propylene carbonate (PC)-propylene glycol (PG) mixture dispersed within an external phase of a petrolatum base. The PC:PG ratio was varied to investigate separately the effects of (1) the initial concentration of lonapalene, (2) its saturation level, and (3) the volume fraction of the internal phase. The release profile consisted of an initial release rate which was higher than the ensuing diffusion-controlled release rate. The initial rate was attributed to the release of lonapalene from the surface globules of internal phase directly into the sink. Both rates increased with increasing lonapalene initial concentration in the ointment. For ointment systems in which the saturation level of lonapalene was kept constant, neither release rate was affected by the increasing volume fraction of the internal phase up to 12%. Further increase in this volume fraction to 25% afforded a significantly higher initial rate, while the diffusion-controlled rate was unchanged. However, an increase in the volume fraction of the internal phase with a concomitant decrease in the saturation level of lonapalene in the ointment resulted in a decrease in the initial rates and, to a lesser degree, the diffusion-controlled release rates. The diffusion coefficient in the external phase, calculated from the effective diffusion coefficient, was (2.68 +/- 0.24) X 10(-9) cm2/sec. PMID:3244603

  14. Transparent volume imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wixson, Steve E.

    1990-07-01

    Transparent Volume Imaging began with the stereo xray in 1895 and ended for most investigators when radiation safety concerns eliminated the second view. Today, similiar images can be generated by the computer without safety hazards providing improved perception and new means of image quantification. A volumetric workstation is under development based on an operational prototype. The workstation consists of multiple symbolic and numeric processors, binocular stereo color display generator with large image memory and liquid crystal shutter, voice input and output, a 3D pointer that uses projection lenses so that structures in 3 space can be touched directly, 3D hard copy using vectograph and lenticular printing, and presentation facilities using stereo 35mm slide and stereo video tape projection. Volumetric software includes a volume window manager, Mayo Clinic's Analyze program and our Digital Stereo Microscope (DSM) algorithms. The DSM uses stereo xray-like projections, rapidly oscillating motion and focal depth cues such that detail can be studied in the spatial context of the entire set of data. Focal depth cues are generated with a lens and apeture algorithm that generates a plane of sharp focus, and multiple stereo pairs each with a different plane of sharp focus are generated and stored in the large memory for interactive selection using a physical or symbolic depth selector. More recent work is studying non-linear focussing. Psychophysical studies are underway to understand how people perce ive images on a volumetric display and how accurately 3 dimensional structures can be quantitated from these displays.

  15. Environmental report 1995. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

  16. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Michak, Patty

    1991-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

  17. Chronic, Anthropogenic Hydrocarbon Releases in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshgar Asl, S.; Amos, J.; Woods, P.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.; MacDonald, I. R.

    2012-12-01

    We used satellite remote sensing to quantify hydrocarbon releases cataloged in the Gulf of Mexico. Satellite SAR has frequently been used for detecting small volume releases of oil in the Gulf. Hydrocarbon compounds reduce water surface roughness and therefore can be detected on SAR images as dark areas. We compiled National Response Center (NRC) oil and hazardous materials spill reports in the Gulf of Mexico submitted by the polluters and by passers-by, collected and filtered by SkyTruth from 2001 to 2012 and determined whether the reports coincided with archived SAR images. So, 316 out of a total 4,574 reports could be investigated from 64 SAR images over the report locations. Some of the images covered multiple reports and oil releases described one report could be observed in more than one image. Current information on platforms, pipeline locations, and ages provided by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEM) can also help us in identifying sources of anthropogenic pollution. The visibility analysis indicated 66 reports of releases were from pipeline, platforms or other anthropogenic sources. Of these, 21 could be seen in SAR images. There were also 133 reports of releases from unknown sources. Of these, 28 were visible in the images. Moreover, 103 anthropogenic reports were attributed to the Taylor offshore platform (platform 23051 in Mississippi Canyon Block 20) which was destroyed during Hurricane Ivan in 2004 and subsequently removed. Of those, 55 were visible in the SAR images and were significantly larger when compared with other reported anthropogenic slicks. The rest of the reports were coded invisible for reasons such as attendance of multiple slicks which makes the decision difficult, report falling outside of the image, image contrast, noisy image, no slick at all, wrong coding, and no slick at the site but another slick in proximity. We then focused on the size of the visible reports which were extracted. The

  18. Fission-product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S.

    1980-11-01

    The release of fission products, both gaseous and volatile metals, from TRIGA fuel is important for the analysis of possible accident conditions related to reactor operation and the design of future TRIGA fuel systems. Because of present national concerns over nuclear proliferation, it has become clear that future reactor fuels will, of necessity, utilize low-enriched uranium (LEU, enrichment <20%). This will require increasing the total uranium loading per unit volume of the higher-loaded TRIGA fuels for the purpose of maintaining the appropriate fissile loading. Because of these new developments, tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing 8.5 to 45 wt % uranium.

  19. Bubble Jet agent release cartridge for chemical single cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wangler, N; Welsche, M; Blazek, M; Blessing, M; Vervliet-Scheebaum, M; Reski, R; Müller, C; Reinecke, H; Steigert, J; Roth, G; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2013-02-01

    We present a new method for the distinct specific chemical stimulation of single cells and small cell clusters within their natural environment. By single-drop release of chemical agents with droplets in size of typical cell diameters (d <30 μm) on-demand micro gradients can be generated for the specific manipulation of single cells. A single channel and a double channel agent release cartridge with integrated fluidic structures and integrated agent reservoirs are shown, tested, and compared in this publication. The single channel setup features a fluidic structure fabricated by anisotropic etching of silicon. To allow for simultaneous release of different agents even though maintaining the same device size, the second type comprises a double channel fluidic structure, fabricated by photolithographic patterning of TMMF. Dispensed droplet volumes are V = 15 pl and V = 10 pl for the silicon and the TMMF based setups, respectively. Utilizing the agent release cartridges, the application in biological assays was demonstrated by hormone-stimulated premature bud formation in Physcomitrella patens and the individual staining of one single L 929 cell within a confluent grown cell culture. PMID:22833153

  20. Controlled Release of Agrochemicals Intercalated into Montmorillonite Interlayer Space

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Periodic application of agrochemicals has led to high cost of production and serious environmental pollution. In this study, the ability of montmorillonite (MMT) clay to act as a controlled release carrier for model agrochemical molecules has been investigated. Urea was loaded into MMT by a simple immersion technique while loading of metalaxyl was achieved by a rotary evaporation method. The successful incorporation of the agrochemicals into the interlayer space of MMT was confirmed by several techniques, such as, significant expansion of the interlayer space, reduction of Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore volumes and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, and appearance of urea and metalaxyl characteristic bands on the Fourier-transform infrared spectra of the urea loaded montmorillonite (UMMT) and metalaxyl loaded montmorillonite (RMMT) complexes. Controlled release of the trapped molecules from the matrix was done in water and in the soil. The results reveal slow and sustained release behaviour for UMMT for a period of 10 days in soil. For a period of 30 days, MMT delayed the release of metalaxyl in soil by more than 6 times. It is evident that MMT could be used to improve the efficiency of urea and metalaxyl delivery in the soil. PMID:24696655

  1. Analysis of hazardous material releases due to natural hazards in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Cruz, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    Natural hazards were the cause of approximately 16,600 hazardous material (hazmat) releases reported to the National Response Center (NRC) between 1990 and 2008-three per cent of all reported hazmat releases. Rain-induced releases were most numerous (26 per cent of the total), followed by those associated with hurricanes (20 per cent), many of which resulted from major episodes in 2005 and 2008. Winds, storms or other weather-related phenomena were responsible for another 25 per cent of hazmat releases. Large releases were most frequently due to major natural disasters. For instance, hurricane-induced releases of petroleum from storage tanks account for a large fraction of the total volume of petroleum released during 'natechs' (understood here as a natural hazard and the hazardous materials release that results). Among the most commonly released chemicals were nitrogen oxides, benzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Three deaths, 52 injuries, and the evacuation of at least 5,000 persons were recorded as a consequence of natech events. Overall, results suggest that the number of natechs increased over the study period (1990-2008) with potential for serious human and environmental impacts. PMID:22329456

  2. 14 CFR 125.373 - Original flight release or amendment of flight release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Original flight release or amendment of flight release. 125.373 Section 125.373 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Flight Release Rules § 125.373 Original flight release or amendment of flight release. (a) A...

  3. The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Mark; SERVS Team

    2009-05-01

    The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) will image a total of 18 deg2 of sky to micro-Jansky depth in the [3.6] and [4.5] micron bands split amongst the SWIRE ELAIS-S1, ELAIS-N1, XMM-LSS, Lockman and CDFS fields. SERVS will have substantial overlap with the VISTA/VIDEO and UKIDSS DXS near-infrared surveys, and the Hermes far-infrared survey with Herschel. Key science goals include: understanding stellar mass assembly in massive galaxies from z 5 to the present across a wide range of environments, studying the effects of AGN feedback on the formation of massive galaxies, and finding quasars at z>6.5. In this talk I shall describe the science possible with SERVS, the data taking and analysis schedule, plans for bandmerging with other surveys, and eventual public release.

  4. Neutron-absorber release device

    DOEpatents

    VAN Erp, Jan B.; Kimont, Edward L.

    1976-01-01

    A resettable device is provided for supporting an object, sensing when an environment reaches a critical temperature and releasing the object when the critical temperature is reached. It includes a flexible container having a material inside with a melting point at the critical temperature. The object's weight is supported by the solid material which gives rigidity to the container until the critical temperature is reached at which point the material in the container melts. The flexible container with the now fluid material inside has insufficient strength to support the object which is thereby released. Biasing means forces the container back to its original shape so that when the temperature falls below the melting temperature the material again solidifies, and the object may again be supported by the device.

  5. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... tested under the conditions specified in S6.1 of Standard No. 131 (49 CFR 571.131), meets the criteria... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and... Figure 3D(1) and Figure 3D(2) for an interior release mechanism for a rear emergency exit door,...

  6. In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Brewster, M.E.; Chen, G.; Reid, H.C.; Shepard, C.L.; Terrones, G.; Mendoza, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report is a detailed characterization of gas retention and release in 6 Hanford DS waste tanks. The results came from the ball rheometer and void fraction instrument in (flammable gas watch list) tanks SY-101, SY-103, AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 are presented. Instrument operation and derivation of data reduction methods are presented. Gas retention and release information is summarized for each tank and includes tank fill history and instrumentation, waste configuration, gas release, void fraction distribution, gas volumes, rheology, and photographs of the waste column from extruded core samples. Potential peak burn pressure is computed as a function of gas release fraction to portray the `hazard signature` of each tank. It is shown that two tanks remain well below the maximum allowable pressure, even if the entire gas content were released and ignited, and that none of the others present a hazard with their present gas release behavior.

  7. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  8. Instantaneous stroke volume by PDE during and after constant LBNP (-50 torr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Six male subjects were exposed to -50 torr lower body negative pressure (LBNP) for 10 min while stroke volume was recorded beat by beat at regular intervals before, during and after release of LBNP. Stroke volume was calculated from the systolic velocity integral in the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler echocardiography (PDE) and the cross sectional area of the vessel by M mode echocardiography. Changes in leg volume were recorded continuously and blood pressure was taken every minute. Stroke volume dropped by 51% of the control in the first 33 sec of LBNP and continued to decline slowly to -62% toward the end. Heart rate increased by 15% in the first 10 sec and was 22% above control at the end of exposure. The resulting cardiac output closely followed the course of stroke volume (-47% at 33 sec, -53% at 8 min) showing that the modest increase in heart rate did little to offset the drop in stroke volume. Leg volume increased markedly within the first 10 sec with a more gradual rise reaching +3.5% at the end. Upon sudden release of LBNP, leg volume dropped significantly during the first 3 sec simultaneously with an increase in stroke volume followed by a substantial decline in heart rate below the baseline.

  9. Shape memory actuated release devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bernie F.; Clark, Cary R.; Weems, Weyman

    1996-05-01

    Spacecraft require a variety of separation and release devices to accomplish mission related functions. Current off-the-shelf devices such as pyrotechnics, gas-discharge systems, paraffin wax actuators, and other electro-mechanical devices may not be able to meet future design needs. The use of pyrotechnics on advanced lightweight spacecraft, for example, will expose fragile sensors and electronics to high shock levels and sensitive optics might be subject to contamination. Other areas of consideration include reliability, safety, and cost reduction. Shape memory alloys (SMA) are one class of actuator material that provides a solution to these design problems. SMA's utilize a thermally activated reversible phase transformation to recover their original heat treated shape (up to 8% strain) or to generate high recovery stresses (> 700 Mpa) when heated above a critical transition temperature. NiTiCu alloy actuators have been fabricated to provide synchronized, shockless separation within release mechanisms. In addition, a shape memory damper has been incorporated to absorb the elastic energy of the preload bolt and to electrically reset the device during ground testing. Direct resistive heating of the SMA actuators was accomplished using a programmable electric control system. Release times less than 40 msec have been determined using 90 watt-sec of power. Accelerometer data indicate less than 500 g's of shock were generated using a bolt preload of 1350 kgs.

  10. Timed-release polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen T D; Truong, Nghia P; Gu, Wenyi; Jia, Zhongfan; Cooper, Matthew A; Monteiro, Michael J

    2013-02-11

    Triggered-release of encapsulated therapeutics from nanoparticles without remote or environmental triggers was demonstrated in this work. Disassembly of the polymer nanoparticles to unimers at precise times allowed the controlled release of oligo DNA. The polymers used in this study consisted of a hydrophilic block for stabilization and second thermoresponsive block for self-assembly and disassembly. At temperatures below the second block's LCST (i.e., below 37 °C for in vitro assays), the diblock copolymer was fully water-soluble, and when heated to 37 °C, the polymer self-assembled into a narrow size distribution of nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 25 nm. The thermoresponsive nature of the second block could be manipulated in situ by the self-catalyzed degradation of cationic 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate (DMAEA) units to negatively charged acrylic acid groups and when the amount of acid groups was sufficiently high to increase the LCST of the second block above 37 °C. The disassembly of the nanoparticles could be controlled from 10 to 70 h. The use of these nanoparticles as a combined therapy, in which one or more agents can be released in a predetermined way, has the potential to improve the personal point of care treatment of patients. PMID:23298322

  11. Prehospital tidal volume influences hospital tidal volume: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stoltze, Andrew J.; Wong, Terrence S.; Harland, Karisa K.; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Fuller, Brian M.; Mohr, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe current practice of ventilation in a modern air medical system, and to measure the association of ventilation strategy with subsequent ventilator care and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Materials and Methods Retrospective observational cohort study of intubated adult patients (n=235) transported by a university-affiliated air medical transport service to a 711-bed tertiary academic center between July 2011 and May 2013. Low tidal volume ventilation was defined as tidal volumes ≤ 8 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW). Multivariable regression was used to measure the association between prehospital tidal volume, hospital ventilation strategy, and ARDS. Results Most patients (57%) were ventilated solely with bag-valve ventilation during transport. Mean tidal volume of mechanically ventilated patients was 8.6 mL/kg PBW (SD 0.2 mL/kg). Low tidal volume ventilation was used in 13% of patients. Patients receiving low tidal volume ventilation during air medical transport were more likely to receive low tidal volume ventilation in the emergency department (p < 0.001) and intensive care unit (p = 0.015). ARDS was not associated with pre-hospital tidal volume (p = 0.840). Conclusions Low tidal volume ventilation was rare during air medical transport. Air transport ventilation strategy influenced subsequent ventilation, but was not associated with ARDS. PMID:25813548

  12. Mercury study report to Congress. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, M.H.; Mahaffey, K.R.; Schoeny, R.; Rice, G.E.; Bullock, O.R.

    1997-12-01

    This volume summarizes findings of the Mercury Study Report to Congress required of U.S. EPA under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The Report assesses anthropogenic sources contributing to mercury emissions from electric utility stream generating units, municipal waste combustion units, and other sources, including area sources. The summary volume provides an overview of the Report`s findings on properties and industrial uses of mercury; analysis of atmospheric releases, process, fate and transport of mercury; and analysis of potential exposure pathways of wildlife and humans. This summary volume focuses on potential adverse health effects of methylmercury exposure to humans and wildlife from consumption of fish and shellfish. Management alternatives including the following possible control strategies were reviewed. Costs of various control measures and research needs were presented.

  13. Volume Rendering of Heliospheric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hick, P. P.; Jackson, B. V.; Bailey, M. J.; Buffington, A.

    2001-12-01

    We demonstrate some of the techniques we currently use for the visualization of heliospheric volume data. Our 3D volume data usually are derived from tomographic reconstructions of the solar wind density and velocity from remote sensing observations (e.g., Thomson scattering and interplanetary scintillation observations). We show examples of hardware-based volume rendering using the Volume Pro PCI board (from TeraRecon, Inc.). This board updates the display at a rate of up to 30 frames per second using a parallel projection algorithm, allowing the manipulation of volume data in real-time. In addition, the manipulation of 4D volume data (the 4th dimension usually representing time) enables the visualization in real-time of an evolving (time-dependent) data set. We also show examples of perspective projections using IDL. This work was supported through NASA grant NAG5-9423.

  14. Retained gas sampler interface volume

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.

    1997-10-01

    The maximum Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) interface volume was determined; this volume can trap contamination gases during the sampling process. A new technique (helium backfill) for eliminating contamination gases from the RGS sampler interface volume is described, and verification testing reported. Also demonstrated was that RGS data obtained prior to the introduction of the new helium backfill technique can be compensated for air contamination using the measured oxygen concentration and normal air composition.

  15. Electromagnetic Theory 3 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaviside, Oliver

    2011-09-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Outline of the electromagnetic connections; 3. The elements of vectorial algebra and analysis; 4. Theory of plane electromagnetic waves; Appendix. Volume 2: Preface; 5. Mathematics and the age of the earth; 6. Pure diffusion of electric displacement; 7. Electromagnetic waves and generalised differentiation; 8. Generalised differentiation and divergent series; Appendix. Volume 3: 9. Waves from moving sources; 10. Waves in the ether.

  16. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  17. The physics of volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Radiation transfer is an important topic in several physical disciplines, probably most prominently in astrophysics. Computer scientists use radiation transfer, among other things, for the visualization of complex data sets with direct volume rendering. In this article, I point out the connection between physical radiation transfer and volume rendering, and I describe an implementation of direct volume rendering in the astrophysical radiation transfer code RADMC-3D. I show examples for the use of this module on analytical models and simulation data.

  18. Heliophysics 3 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2010-11-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Prologue Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Introduction to heliophysics Thomas J. Bogdan; 3. Creation and destruction of magnetic field Matthias Rempel; 4. Magnetic field topology Dana W. Longcope; 5. Magnetic reconnection Terry G. Forbes; 6. Structures of the magnetic field Mark B. Moldwin, George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 7. Turbulence in space plasmas Charles W. Smith; 8. The solar atmosphere Viggo H. Hansteen; 9. Stellar winds and magnetic fields Viggo H. Hansteen; 10. Fundamentals of planetary magnetospheres Vytenis M. Vasyliūnas; 11. Solar-wind magnetosphere coupling: an MHD perspective Frank R. Toffoletto and George L. Siscoe; 12. On the ionosphere and chromosphere Tim Fuller-Rowell and Carolus J. Schrijver; 13. Comparative planetary environments Frances Bagenal; Bibliography; Index. Volume 2: Preface; 1. Perspective on heliophysics George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 2. Introduction to space storms and radiation Sten Odenwald; 3. In-situ detection of energetic particles George Gloeckler; 4. Radiative signatures of energetic particles Tim Bastian; 5. Observations of solar and stellar eruptions, flares, and jets Hugh Hudson; 6. Models of coronal mass ejections and flares Terry Forbes; 7. Shocks in heliophysics Merav Opher; 8. Particle acceleration in shocks Dietmar Krauss-Varban; 9. Energetic particle transport Joe Giacalone; 10. Energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres Vytenis Vasyliūnas; 11. Energization of trapped particles Janet Green; 12. Flares, CMEs, and atmospheric responses Tim Fuller-Rowell and Stanley C. Solomon; 13. Energetic particles and manned spaceflight 358 Stephen Guetersloh and Neal Zapp; 14. Energetic particles and technology Alan Tribble; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index. Volume 3: Preface; 1. Interconnectedness in heliophysics Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Long-term evolution of magnetic activity of Sun

  19. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Takenaka, S.; Nuimura, T.; Surazakov, A. B.; Sawagaki, T.; Yamanokuchi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs), and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the risk of such flooding, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs). We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes flooded. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA), on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV); i.e. the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability because it requires no particular expertise to carry out. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using the ASTER data. The distribution follows a power-law function, and we identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3 that require further detailed field investigations.

  20. Release properties on gelatin-gum arabic microcapsules containing camphor oil with added polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Pong; Leung, Ting-Kai; Lin, Shang-Ming; Hsu, Che-Chang

    2006-07-01

    In this study, gelatin blended with arabic gum microcapsules containing camphor oil with added polystyrene were fabricated by a compound coacervation method. The parameters of oil/wall volume ratio, emulsification stirring speed, concentration of cross-linking agent, treated time and oil release properties were investigated. In order to improve the constant release effect of camphor oil, oil-soluble polystyrene (PS) was used as a sustained release agent. The camphor oil release curves were expressed by the exponential equation: psi(t)=C(eq)(1-e(-t/tau)), where psi(t) represent the variant of camphor oil concentration in the operation environment, C(eq) as the equilibrium state, t as the release time and tau as time constant. C(eq) and tau are significant factors pertaining to the camphor oil release properties. The results indicated that, for the microcapsules, the optimal oil/wall volume ratio was 0.75 to achieve the encapsulation efficiency of 99.6 wt.%. The average particle size were 294.7+/-14.2 microm, 167.2+/-11.2 microm, 85.7+/-8.7 microm at the homogenization stirring speed of 500, 1000, and 2000 rpm, respectively. The effect of sustained oil release will increase whereas the stirring speed decreases and the concentration of glutaraldehyde (GA) and treated time increases. Along with the increasing of quantity of polystyrene added, C(eq) decreased and tau increased, indicating that the sustained oil release amount and the release rate depend on the quantity of PS considerably. PMID:16797942

  1. Direct volume estimation without segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, X.; Wang, Z.; Islam, A.; Bhaduri, M.; Chan, I.; Li, S.

    2015-03-01

    Volume estimation plays an important role in clinical diagnosis. For example, cardiac ventricular volumes including left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) are important clinical indicators of cardiac functions. Accurate and automatic estimation of the ventricular volumes is essential to the assessment of cardiac functions and diagnosis of heart diseases. Conventional methods are dependent on an intermediate segmentation step which is obtained either manually or automatically. However, manual segmentation is extremely time-consuming, subjective and highly non-reproducible; automatic segmentation is still challenging, computationally expensive, and completely unsolved for the RV. Towards accurate and efficient direct volume estimation, our group has been researching on learning based methods without segmentation by leveraging state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. Our direct estimation methods remove the accessional step of segmentation and can naturally deal with various volume estimation tasks. Moreover, they are extremely flexible to be used for volume estimation of either joint bi-ventricles (LV and RV) or individual LV/RV. We comparatively study the performance of direct methods on cardiac ventricular volume estimation by comparing with segmentation based methods. Experimental results show that direct estimation methods provide more accurate estimation of cardiac ventricular volumes than segmentation based methods. This indicates that direct estimation methods not only provide a convenient and mature clinical tool for cardiac volume estimation but also enables diagnosis of cardiac diseases to be conducted in a more efficient and reliable way.

  2. Thermo-responsive hydrogels for intravitreal injection and biomolecule release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapala, Pawel

    In this dissertation, we develop an injectable polymer system to enable localized and prolonged release of therapeutic biomolecules for improved treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Thermo-responsive hydrogels derived from N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) poly(L-Lactic acid) (PLLA) copolymer were synthesized via free-radical polymerization. These materials were investigated for (a) phase change behavior, (b) in-vitro degradation, (c) capacity for controlled drug delivery, and (d) biocompatibility. The volume-phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the PNIPAAm- co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels was adjusted using hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties so that it is ca. 33°C. These hydrogels did not initially show evidence of degradation at 37°C due to physical cross-links of collapsed PNIPAAm. Only after addition of glutathione chain transfer agents (CTA)s to the precursor did the collapsed hydrogels become fully soluble at 37°C. CTAs significantly affected the release kinetics of biomolecules; addition of 1.0 mg/mL glutathione to 3 mM cross-linker accelerated hydrogel degradation, resulting in 100% release in less than 2 days. This work also explored the effect of PEGylation in order to tether biomolecules to the polymer matrix. It was demonstrated that non-site-specific PEGylation can postpone the burst release of solutes (up to 10 days in hydrogels with 0.5 mg/mL glutathione). Cell viability assays showed that at least two 20-minute buffer extraction steps were needed to remove cytotoxic elements from the hydrogels. Clinically-used therapeutic biomolecules LucentisRTM and AvastinRTM were demonstrated to be both stable and bioactive after release form PNIPAAm-co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels. The thermo-responsive hydrogels presented here offer a promising platform for the localized delivery of proteins such as recombinant antibodies.

  3. Influence of High Level Long Duration Dam Release on Stream-Aquifer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, P. W.; McCabe, M. F.; Ajami, H.

    2012-12-01

    The controlled release of water from dam operation is known to result in river stage fluctuations reflective of volume and duration of the dam release. In connected river-aquifer systems, these stage fluctuations are further controlled by groundwater levels leading to recharge or discharge from the riverine ecosystem. Here, an assessment of the impact of high level and long duration dam releases on a Quaternary alluvial aquifer down stream of the dam is undertaken. Using hydraulic and temperature data, the extent of bank storage and recharge volume in response to high and low level dam releases were explored. The study found during high level dam releases (up to 17,000ML/day for 18 days) groundwater levels raise up to 0.3m at a distance of 330m from the river. As well as contributing to variations immediately adjacent to the river, temperature changes of up to 0.3 degrees in the groundwater 100m from the bank were also found. The study suggests the controlled dam releases has a significant impact on groundwater systems potentially altering the ecological communities present within the hyporheic exchange zone and causing prolonged stagnation of groundwater flow systems. The findings have ramifications for aquifer management particularly in environmentally sensitive areas where long term variations to groundwater levels, temperature and chemistry may have a detrimental effect.

  4. Healthy People 2010: Conference Edition, Volume I [and] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

    This document contains the two volumes of the Conference Edition of Healthy People 2010, a comprehensive, nationwide health promotion and disease prevention agenda. The first section of Volume I, "Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health," includes "Introduction,""Leading Health Indicators," and "Bibliography. The second section,…

  5. The Occupational Thesaurus: Volume 1 and Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, Everett A.

    Presented in two volumes, the job guide handbook can be used by high school and college counselors, students, recruiters for business and industry, and parents in determining areas of employment which are compatible with a student's or potential employee's interests, abilities, and preparation. Volume 1 lists job areas for students majoring in…

  6. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S < or = 0.007%) release less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel in acid artificial sweat and elicit no reactions in patients already sensitized to nickel. In contrast, nickel-plated samples release around 100 micrograms/cm2/week of Ni and high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same

  7. Voltage-gated and calcium-gated calcium release during depolarization of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemond, V; Csernoch, L; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-01-01

    The role of elevated intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) in activating calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in skeletal muscle fibers microinjected with strong calcium buffers. After the injection of 3.8 +/- 0.5 mM (mean +/- S.E. of mean, n = 16) BAPTA (1,2-bis[o-aminophenoxy]ethane- N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) or 2.2-2.8 mM fura-2 the normal increase in [Ca2+] during a depolarizing pulse was virtually eliminated. Even though calcium was released from the SR the kinetics of this release were markedly altered: the extensive buffering selectively eliminated the early peak component of SR calcium release with no effect on the maintained steady level. Microinjections of similar volumes but with low concentrations of fura-2 had no significant effect on the release waveform. The calcium released by voltage-dependent activation during depolarization may thus be involved in activating further calcium release, that is, in a calcium-induced calcium release mechanism. PMID:1660317

  8. Controllable Multicompartmental Capsules with Distinct Cores and Shells for Synergistic Release.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Wang, Wei; He, Xiao-Heng; Yang, Xiu-Lan; Li, Ming; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2016-04-01

    A facile and flexible approach is developed for controllable fabrication of novel multiple-compartmental calcium alginate capsules from all-aqueous droplet templates with combined coextrusion minifluidic devices for isolated coencapsulation and synergistic release of diverse incompatible components. The multicompartmental capsules exhibit distinct compartments, each of which is covered by a distinct part of a heterogeneous shell. The volume and number of multiple compartments can be well-controlled by adjusting flow rates and device numbers for isolated and optimized encapsulation of different components, while the composition of different part of the heterogeneous shell can be individually tailored by changing the composition of droplet template for flexibly tuning the release behavior of each component. Two combined devices are first used to fabricate dual-compartmental capsules and then scaled up to fabricate more complex triple-compartmental capsules for coencapsulation. The synergistic release properties are demonstrated by using dual-compartmental capsules, which contain one-half shell with a constant release rate and the other half shell with a temperature-dependent release rate. Such a heterogeneous shell provides more flexibilities for synergistic release with controllable release sequence and release rates to achieve advanced and optimized synergistic efficacy. The multicompartmental capsules show high potential for applications such as drug codelivery, confined reactions, enzyme immobilizations, and cell cultures. PMID:26977710

  9. Release of chemical transmitters from cell bodies and dendrites of nerve cells

    PubMed Central

    De-Miguel, Francisco F.; Nicholls, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Papers in this issue concern extrasynaptic transmission, namely release of signalling molecules by exocytosis or diffusion from neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, axons and glia. Problems discussed concern the molecules, their secretion and importance for normal function and disease. Molecules secreted extrasynaptically include transmitters, peptides, hormones and nitric oxide. For extrasynaptic secretion, trains of action potentials are required, and the time course of release is slower than at synapses. Questions arise concerning the mechanism of extrasynaptic secretion: how does it differ from the release observed at synaptic terminals and gland cells? What kinds of vesicles take part? Is release accomplished through calcium entry, SNAP and SNARE proteins? A clear difference is in the role of molecules released synaptically and extrasynaptically. After extrasynaptic release, molecules reach distant as well as nearby cells, and thereby produce long-lasting changes over large volumes of brain. Such changes can affect circuits for motor performance and mood states. An example with clinical relevance is dyskinesia of patients treated with l-DOPA for Parkinson's disease. Extrasynaptically released transmitters also evoke responses in glial cells, which in turn release molecules that cause local vasodilatation and enhanced circulation in regions of the brain that are active. PMID:26009760

  10. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

  11. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Takenaka, S.; Nuimura, T.; Surazakov, A. B.; Sawagaki, T.; Yamanokuchi, T.

    2013-07-01

    Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs), and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the outburst probability, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs). We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes experienced an outburst flood. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA), on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV); i.e., the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability to assess the possibility of GLOF hazards because it requires no particular expertise to carry out, though the PFV does not quantify the GLOF risk. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using visible band images and DEMs of ASTER data. The PFV distribution follows a power-law function. We found that 794 lakes did not have an SLA, and consequently had a PFV of zero, while we also identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3, which is a comparable volume to that of recorded major GLOFs. This PFV approach allows us to preliminarily identify and prioritize those Himalayan glacial lakes that require further detailed investigation on GLOF hazards and risk.

  12. Mars Express releases Beagle 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    At 9:31 CET, the crucial sequence started to separate the Beagle 2 lander from Mars Express. As data from Mars Express confirm, the pyrotechnic device was fired to slowly release a loaded spring, which gently pushed Beagle 2 away from the mother spacecraft. An image from the onboard visual monitoring camera (VMC) showing the lander drifting away is expected to be available later today. Since the Beagle 2 lander has no propulsion system of its own, it had to be put on the correct course for its descent before it was released. For this reason, on 16 December the trajectory of the whole Mars Express spacecraft had to be adjusted to ensure that Beagle 2 would be on course to enter the atmosphere of Mars. This manoeuvre, called "retargeting'' was critical: if the entry angle is too steep, the lander could overheat and burn up in the atmosphere; if the angle is too shallow, the lander might skim like a pebble on the surface of a lake and miss its target. This fine targeting and today's release were crucial manoeuvres for which ESA's Ground Control Team at ESOC (European Space Operations Centre) had trained over the past several months. The next major milestone for Mars Express will be the manoeuvre to enter into orbit around Mars. This will happen at 3:52 CET on Christmas morning, when Beagle 2 is expected to land on the surface of Mars. "Good teamwork by everybody - ESA, industry and the Beagle 2 team - has got one more critical step accomplished. Mars, here comes Europe!" said David Southwood, ESA Director of Science.

  13. Multilayer volume microwave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdev, V. I.; Smirnov, S. V.; Chernushenko, A. M.

    1985-09-01

    Multilayer volume microwave filters are particularly suitable for miniaturization of radioelectronic devices by way of circuit integration, the principal advantage over planar filters being the much higher Q-factor; Q sub 0 or = 10 to the 3rd power as compared with Q sub 0 or = 10 to the 2nd power. Their metal-dielectric structure forms an array of coupled half-wavelength resonators electrically symmetric with respect to the center layer, coupling being effected by a magnetic field normal to the plane of resonators. The structure consists of an asymmetric strip line with conductor at the input end, followed by a metal layer with cut out symmetric slot line, a dielectric layer, a symmetric strip line with conductor, a metal layer with cut out symmetric slot line, a dielectric layer, and an asymmetric strip line with conductor at the output end. The size of such a filter depends directly on the number of resonator stages and, without the case, is comparable with the size of conventional filters on symmetric strip lines only but is much smaller than that of conventional filters on asymmetric strip lines only.

  14. Cordoba Durchmusterung, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 'Cordoba Durchmusterung' (CD) is a visual survey of southern stars in the declination zones -22 to -89 deg, carried out as an extension to the 'Bonner Durchmusterung' (BD) catalogs of Argelander and Schoenfeld. This volume covers the declination range -40 deg through -49 deg. The survey was performed using techniques similar to those used for the BD; i.e., the stars were cataloged by allowing the telescope to drift along the mean declination of each zone and recording the positions and magnitudes of stars crossing the transit line of the field. The goal of the survey was to obtain a position and estimated visual magnitude for every star down to 10.0 magnitude inclusive, but the faint limit was confirmed from comparisons with other catalogs, to be somewhat below 10. The positions are given to 0.1 s in right ascension and 0.1 min in declination for the equinox 1875. The positional uncertainties quoted in the original publications are plus or minus 0.42 sec and plus or minus 0.23 min for zones -22 deg to -32 deg. A list of all corrections made to the original data as a result of published corrigenda is presented. No other corrections or changes were incorporated into the original data, e.g., from more modern positions and magnitudes or comparison with the 'Cape Photographic Durchmusterung'.

  15. Cordoba Durchmusterung, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 'Cordoba Durchmusterung' (CD) is a visual survey of southern stars in the declination zones -22 to -89 deg, carried out as an extension to the 'Bonner Durchmusterung' (BD) catalogs of Argelander and Schoenfeld. This volume covers the declination range -22 deg through -30 deg. The survey was performed using techniques similar to those used for the BD; i.e., the stars were cataloged by allowing the telescope to drift along the mean declination of each zone and recording the positions and magnitudes of stars crossing the transit line of the field. The goal of the survey was to obtain a position and estimated visual magnitude for every star down to 10.0 magnitude inclusive, but the faint limit was confirmed from comparisons with other catalogs, to be somewhat below 10. The positions are given to 0.1 s in right ascension and 0.1 min in declination for the equinox 1875. The positional uncertainties quoted in the original publications are plus or minus 0.42 s and plus or minus 0.23 min for zones -22 deg to -32 deg. A list of all corrections made to the original data as a result of published corrigenda is presented. No other corrections or changes were incorporated into the original data, e.g., from more modern positions and magnitudes or comparison with the 'Cape Photographic Durchmusterung'.

  16. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Malcolm M.; McKenna, Robert J.; Deschamps, Claude C.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is the safe, effective, and durable palliation of dyspnea in appropriately selected patients with moderate to severe emphysema. Appropriate patient selection and preoperative preparation are prerequisites for successful LVRS. An effective LVRS program requires participation by and communication between experts from pulmonary medicine, thoracic surgery, thoracic anesthesiology, critical care medicine, rehabilitation medicine, respiratory therapy, chest radiology, and nursing. The critical analysis of perioperative outcomes has influenced details of the conduct of the procedure and has established a bilateral, stapled approach as the standard of care for LVRS. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) remains the world's largest multi-center, randomized trial comparing LVRS to maximal medical therapy. NETT purposely enrolled a broad spectrum of anatomic patterns of emphysema. This, along with the prospective, audited collection of extensive demographic, physiologic, radiographic, surgical and quality-of-life data, has positioned NETT as the most robust repository of evidence to guide the refinement of patient selection criteria for LVRS, to assist surgeons in providing optimal intraoperative and postoperative care, and to establish benchmarks for survival, complication rates, return to independent living, and durability of response. This article reviews the evolution of current LVRS practice with a particular emphasis on technical aspects of the operation, including the predictors and consequences of its most common complications. PMID:18453353

  17. Instantaneous stroke volume in man during lower body negative pressure /LBNP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Richards, K. L.; Greene, E. R.; Eldridge, M. W.; Hoekenga, D. E.; Venters, M. D.; Luft, U. C.

    1982-01-01

    Results of an examination of the instantaneous time course of the stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (Q) in response to the onset and release of -50 torr lower body negative pressure (LBNP) are reported. Six male subjects were sealed into a LBNP box up to the iliac crest while being monitored by echocardiograph for centerlamina blood velocity, fluid displacement, stroke volume, heart rate, and leg volume. Particular use was made of pulsed ultrasonic Doppler velocity meters for measuring the blood velocities and flow dynamics. Measurements were made of the subjects continuously beginning from 20 sec prior to and one min after LBNP onset and release. A linear fall in the SV was observed with LBNP at 49% of the baseline value after 33 sec. A 62% drop, the lowest, was detected after 8 min of LBNP. The leg volume was inversely related to Q for the duration of the experiment.

  18. Flammable gas concentrations in ex-tank volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1998-06-17

    A simple two-volume model was defined and used for calculating flammable gas concentrations within headspace volumes of single-shell tanks, and within smaller ex-tank volumes connected to the headspace. Assumptions and parameters used to characterize the headspace portion of the model were taken from the GRE Analysis Tool (AT) for simulating gas release events. Additional assumptions used to construct the ex-tank portion of the two-volume model were conservative extensions of those made within the AT, and chosen to simulate headspace to ex-tank gas-flow conditions that would maximize ex-tank concentrations. Numerical evaluations of the two-volume model were performed over a range of headspace GRE conditions and representative ex-tank parameters. To assure consistency with the AT, the range of headspace parameters was taken from 1000 simulated GREs generated by the AT computer code RESOLVE. Based upon waste level fill factors, three tanks (TX-102, SX-103, and TX 112) were chosen to represent typical large, medium, and small headspace volumes available in actual SSTs. Engineering drawings of these tanks were used to determine values of their ex-tank parameters (V2`s and estimates for the gas-flow fraction ``a`` into the specific V2). The results of these evaluations were used to compare time periods for which flammable gas concentrations in the tank headspace and the ex-tank volumes exceeded the lower flammability limit for upward flame propagation. These results indicate that even for relatively small flow fractions, headspace concentrations that exceed the LFI, can cause delayed ex-tank concentrations to also exceed the LFLU. The extent to which this occurs is determined mostly by the geometrical aspects of the model, as expressed in the effective volume fraction parameter.

  19. Flexible Timed-Release Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Maki; Fujiwara, Toru

    This paper presents a new scheme for Timed-Release Encryption (TRE), which is mainly designed for global use. TRE aims to control the timing of disclosing information. The major approach to TRE assumes that any participants can receive a time token broadcasted by a trusted agent, called a time server. Our scheme is based on this approach and allows participants to generate an encrypted message that can be decrypted using designated or any authenticated time servers including even those which are authenticated after encryption. In this sense, our scheme has a more flexible framework in terms of message decryption.

  20. 40 CFR 302.8 - Continuous releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 355, which require initial telephone and written notifications of continuous releases to be... release data, engineering estimates, knowledge of operating procedures, or best professional judgment to... facility or vessel; and (ii) The name(s) and identity(ies) of the hazardous substance(s) being released....

  1. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release... have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into...

  2. 28 CFR 2.33 - Release plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release plans. 2.33 Section 2.33 Judicial..., AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.33 Release plans. (a) A grant of parole is conditioned upon the approval of release plans by the Regional Commissioner. In...

  3. 28 CFR 2.33 - Release plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Release plans. 2.33 Section 2.33 Judicial..., AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.33 Release plans. (a) A grant of parole is conditioned upon the approval of release plans by the Regional Commissioner. In...

  4. 32 CFR 806b.45 - Releasable information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Releasable information. 806b.45 Section 806b.45... PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.45 Releasable information. Following are examples of information normally releasable to the public without the written consent of the subject. This list is not...

  5. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into...

  6. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into...

  7. 40 CFR 302.8 - Continuous releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 355, which require initial telephone and written notifications of continuous releases to be... release data, engineering estimates, knowledge of operating procedures, or best professional judgment to... requirements of this section, the person in charge may rely on recent release data, engineering estimates,...

  8. 40 CFR 302.8 - Continuous releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 355, which require initial telephone and written notifications of continuous releases to be... release data, engineering estimates, knowledge of operating procedures, or best professional judgment to... requirements of this section, the person in charge may rely on recent release data, engineering estimates,...

  9. In vitro release of Tacrolimus from Tacrolimus ointment and its speculated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Tamura, S; Toyoda, T; Kado, K; Ohnishi, N; Ibuki, R

    2004-02-11

    The in vitro release profiles and the bleeding phenomenon of Tacrolimus and propylene carbonate (PC) as a dispersing solvent for Tacrolimus drug substance in Tacrolimus ointment were investigated when changing concentrations of Tacrolimus and PC in the ointment were used, respectively. The bleeding test result indicated that Tacrolimus was in equilibrium between inside and outside of PC droplets in intact ointment base. A cumulative release amount of Tacrolimus from ointment, plotted against the square root of time, showed a straight line initially with a slope of q1 followed to change a slope to be q2 at a certain time, where the relation of these slopes being q1release from ointment, namely, first phase was related with the period during PC release and the second phase was related with the state of ointment after PC release. When the PC release was applied to the Higuchi's release equation, the above slope q1 was found to be correlated to the parameter of A/phi(0), where A was a parameter of release rate of PC and phi(0) was an initial volume fraction of PC droplets. It should be indicated that more rapid release rate of PC rather than that of Tacrolimus resulted in the generation of amorphous phase of Tacrolimus outside of remaining PC droplets. During PC release, the slope q1 could be influenced by the thermodynamic activity of Tacrolimus dissolved in PC droplets. After PC release, it would be reasonable to speculate that the amorphous cluster of Tacrolimus with a constant thermodynamic activity would give constant q2 values regardless of PC contents in Tacrolimus ointment. PMID:14726122

  10. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  11. ATP release through pannexon channels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed ‘pannexon’. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  12. Fully redundant mechanical release actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, Melvin H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for performing a mechanical release function exhibiting low shock. This system includes two pyrotechnic detents fixed mounted in opposing axial alignment within a cylindrical housing having two mechanical bellows. Two mechanical bellow assemblies, each having one end hermetically bonded to the housing and the other to the respective actuator pin extending from either end of the housing, ensure that all outgassing and contamination from the operation of the pyrotechnic devices will be contained within the housing and bellows. The pin on one end of the assembly is fixed mounted and supported, via a bolt or ball-and-socket joint so that when the charge corresponding to that pin ignites, the entire assembly will exhibit rectilinear movement, including the opposing pin providing the unlatching motion. The release detent pin is supported by a linear bearing and when its corresponding pyrotechnic charge ignites the pin is retracted within the housing producing the same unlatching motion without movement of the entire assembly, thus providing complete mechanical, electrical and pyrotechnic redundancy for the unlatching pin.

  13. Modern Written Arabic, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naja, A. Nashat; Snow, James A.

    This second volume of Modern Written Arabic builds on the previous volume and is the second step designed to teach members of the Foreign Service to read the modern Arabic press. The student will gain recognitional mastery of an extensive set of vocabulary items and will be more intensively exposed to wider and more complex morphological and…

  14. Portuguese Programmatic Course. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulsh, Jack Lee; And Others

    This volume, containing units 26-48, completes the Portuguese Programmatic Course. The odd-numbered units present the grammatical features not covered in Volume One in a programmed format. The even numbered units contain dialogs, substitution drills, practice with irregular verb forms, and exercises geared to vocabulary expansion. The…

  15. PDLE: Sustaining Professionalism. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Patricia, Ed.; Nelson, Gayle, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This third volume looks at ways that seasoned professionals continue to develop throughout their careers. The text includes descriptive accounts of professionals seeking to enhance their careers while remaining inspired to continue to develop professionally. This volume reveals how personal and professional lives are entwined. It proves that TESOL…

  16. Lao Basic Course, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Warren G.; And Others

    This second volume on Lao is designed as the continuation of the introductory material presented in volume one. The objectives are to produce greater proficiency in the use of Lao and, at the same time, to provide a general introduction to Laotian culture. The course is divided into six modules concerning various aspects of culture: physical…

  17. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs. PMID:26146475

  18. Radiological release criteria at the Fernald Environmental Management Project theory and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrter, R.W.

    1995-01-17

    As environmental restoration activities progress at the DOE`s Fernald site, and across the country, large volumes of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) are being generated. Despite the existence of ``free-release`` guidelines from DOE. The strategy of onsite decontamination and release of RSM for unrestricted use has been generally overlooked in recent years. A pilot project was completed at Fernald in which 120 tons of RSM were decontaminated onsite and released for unrestricted use. This paper compares that strategy to more traditional DOE RSM management practices. Many options exist for managing RSM. DOE orders dictate that contractors demonstrate flexibility in utilizing a combination of techniques to optimize the benefits of waste management activates. The FERMCO Recycling Department led an effort to provide their customer with an economical alternative to the traditional approach of burying contaminated metal as LLW, based on established DOE free-release guidelines.

  19. Probabilistic consequence model of accidenal or intentional chemical releases.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.-S.; Samsa, M. E.; Folga, S. M.; Hartmann, H. M.

    2008-06-02

    In this work, general methodologies for evaluating the impacts of large-scale toxic chemical releases are proposed. The potential numbers of injuries and fatalities, the numbers of hospital beds, and the geographical areas rendered unusable during and some time after the occurrence and passage of a toxic plume are estimated on a probabilistic basis. To arrive at these estimates, historical accidental release data, maximum stored volumes, and meteorological data were used as inputs into the SLAB accidental chemical release model. Toxic gas footprints from the model were overlaid onto detailed population and hospital distribution data for a given region to estimate potential impacts. Output results are in the form of a generic statistical distribution of injuries and fatalities associated with specific toxic chemicals and regions of the United States. In addition, indoor hazards were estimated, so the model can provide contingency plans for either shelter-in-place or evacuation when an accident occurs. The stochastic distributions of injuries and fatalities are being used in a U.S. Department of Homeland Security-sponsored decision support system as source terms for a Monte Carlo simulation that evaluates potential measures for mitigating terrorist threats. This information can also be used to support the formulation of evacuation plans and to estimate damage and cleanup costs.

  20. Estimation of exposure to toxic releases using spatial interaction modeling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data are frequently used to estimate a community's exposure to pollution. However, this estimation process often uses underdeveloped geographic theory. Spatial interaction modeling provides a more realistic approach to this estimation process. This paper uses four sets of data: lung cancer age-adjusted mortality rates from the years 1990 through 2006 inclusive from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, TRI releases of carcinogens from 1987 to 1996, covariates associated with lung cancer, and the EPA's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model. Results The impact of the volume of carcinogenic TRI releases on each county's lung cancer mortality rates was calculated using six spatial interaction functions (containment, buffer, power decay, exponential decay, quadratic decay, and RSEI estimates) and evaluated with four multivariate regression methods (linear, generalized linear, spatial lag, and spatial error). Akaike Information Criterion values and P values of spatial interaction terms were computed. The impacts calculated from the interaction models were also mapped. Buffer and quadratic interaction functions had the lowest AIC values (22298 and 22525 respectively), although the gains from including the spatial interaction terms were diminished with spatial error and spatial lag regression. Conclusions The use of different methods for estimating the spatial risk posed by pollution from TRI sites can give different results about the impact of those sites on health outcomes. The most reliable estimates did not always come from the most complex methods. PMID:21418644

  1. Radionuclide release from research reactor spent fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtius, H.; Kaiser, G.; Müller, E.; Bosbach, D.

    2011-09-01

    Numerous investigations with respect to LWR fuel under non oxidizing repository relevant conditions were performed. The results obtained indicate slow corrosion rates for the UO 2 fuel matrix. Special fuel-types (mostly dispersed fuels, high enriched in 235U, cladded with aluminium) are used in German research reactors, whereas in German nuclear power plants, UO 2-fuel (LWR fuel, enrichment in 235U up to 5%, zircaloy as cladding) is used. Irradiated research reactor fuels contribute less than 1% to the total waste volume. In Germany, the state is responsible for fuel operation and for fuel back-end options. The institute for energy research (IEF-6) at the Research Center Jülich performs investigation with irradiated research reactor spent fuels under repository relevant conditions. In the study, the corrosion of research reactor spent fuel has been investigated in MgCl 2-rich salt brine and the radionuclide release fractions have been determined. Leaching experiments in brine with two different research reactor fuel-types were performed in a hot cell facility in order to determine the corrosion behaviour and the radionuclide release fractions. The corrosion of two dispersed research reactor fuel-types (UAl x-Al and U 3Si 2-Al) was studied in 400 mL MgCl 2-rich salt brine in the presence of Fe 2+ under static and initially anoxic conditions. Within these experimental parameters, both fuel types corroded in the experimental time period of 3.5 years completely, and secondary alteration phases were formed. After complete corrosion of the used research reactor fuel samples, the inventories of Cs and Sr were quantitatively detected in solution. Solution concentrations of Am and Eu were lower than the solubility of Am(OH) 3(s) and Eu(OH) 3(s) solid phases respectively, and may be controlled by sorption processes. Pu concentrations may be controlled by Pu(IV) polymer species, but the presence of Pu(V) and Pu(IV) oxyhydroxides species due to radiolytic effects cannot

  2. A rapid technique for prediction of nutrient release from controlled release fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient release from soluble granular fertilizers can be modified by polymer coating to extend the total duration nutrient release up to 3 to 9 months and rate of release to match the nutrient requirement of the plant during the growing period. Hence these products are termed as “Controlled Release...

  3. Factors affecting sporoplasm release in Kudoa septempunctata.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Phil; Zenke, Kosuke; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi

    2015-02-01

    The myxosporean parasite Kudoa septempunctata has been isolated from cultured olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and was recently identified as a cause of food poisoning in humans. Since the sporoplasm plays an important role in causing diarrhea by invading intestinal cells, the specific factors affecting the release of sporoplasm from spores should be determined. Thus, we investigated the effect of digestive and serum enzymes, fetal bovine serum (FBS), temperature, and the role of glucose in cell culture media on the release of sporoplasm. Sporoplasm release was observed in the groups treated with FBS and media containing glucose. In addition, 1,10-phenanthroline inhibited the release of sporoplasm in the FBS medium. These results indicate that K. septempunctata uses glucose for releasing its sporoplasm and that zinc or metalloprotease is related to the release mechanism. The present study provides important information for the development of agents to prevent sporoplasm release and the consequent food poisoning caused by K. septempunctata. PMID:25563617

  4. Revised SRC-I project baseline. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The SRC Process Area Design Baseline consists of six volumes. The first four were submitted to DOE on 9 September 1981. The fifth volume, summarizing the Category A Engineering Change Proposals (ECPs), was not submitted. The sixth volume, containing proprietary information on Kerr-McGee's Critical Solvent Deashing System, was forwarded to BRHG Synthetic Fuels, Inc. for custody, according to past instructions from DOE, and is available for perusal by authorized DOE representatives. DOE formally accepted the Design Baseline under ICRC Release ECP 4-1001, at the Project Configuration Control Board meeting in Oak Ridge, Tennessee on 5 November 1981. The documentation was then revised by Catalytic, Inc. to incorporate the Category B and C and Post-Baseline Engineering Change Proposals. Volumes I through V of the Revised Design Baseline, dated 22 October 1982, are nonproprietary and they were issued to the DOE via Engineering Change Notice (ECN) 4-1 on 23 February 1983. Volume VI again contains proprieary information on Kerr-McGee Critical Solvent Deashing System; it was issued to Burns and Roe Synthetic Fuels, Inc. Subsequently, updated process descriptions, utility summaries, and errata sheets were issued to the DOE and Burns and Roe Synthetic Fuels, Inc. on nonproprietary Engineering Change Notices 4-2 and 4-3 on 24 May 1983.

  5. Flight set 360L001 (STS-26) insulation component. Volume 3: Final release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrechtsen, K.; Passman, J.

    1989-01-01

    The postfire condition of the external and internal insulation for STS-26 is documented and the thermal safety factors of the RSRM-1A and RSRM-1B internal insulation are evaluated. The Insulation Component Program Team assessment of the observation is discussed.

  6. Supplemental water releases for fisheries restoration in a Brazilian floodplain River: A conceptual model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godinho, Alexandre L.; Kynard, B.; Martinez, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    Highly productive floodplain rivers in Brazil and elsewhere provide livelihood and recreational fishing for millions of people around the world, but damming and controlled water discharge are a threat to these valuable ecosystems. Supplemental water releases (SWRs) at a dam are increasingly used for restoring fisheries productivity in many floodplain rivers. We proposed a conceptual model for a hypothetical water release to enhance fisheries using Tre??s Marias Reservoir (TMR) on the Sa??o Francisco River (SFR), Brazil. The information needed by the model follows: (i) Biologically, what is the best release date? (ii) How much water will be released? (iii) What is the pattern of impoundment and how much impounded water will be released? (iv) What is the lost revenue to the power plant associated with SWR? (v) What is the relationship between river discharge and the area of floodplain that is flooded? (vi) What is the relationship between SWR and fisheries value? Ichthyoplankton studies in the SFR showed a clear positive relationship between fish density and water level (WL). While the relationship between WL and floodplain area flooded and recruitment is not known, we concluded the best date for release is when there is a natural flood, which naturally triggers fish spawning and the SWR will add to the natural flood and cover a greater floodplain area. The released volume will range from 0.302km3 to 2.192 km3, depending on SWR duration. In most years from 1976 to 2003, TMR impounded enough water for SWR only in the second half of the fish-spawning season (January-March). Lost revenue at TMR depended on release volume and ranged from US$ 0.493 million to US$ 3.452 million for the actual power rate. However, SWR could increase commercial fisheries income an estimated US$ 4.468 million. We forecast that SWR can bring fisheries benefits that surpass the lost revenue.

  7. ATLAS-2 Video News Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video presents a Marshall Space Flight Center-Television (MSFC-TV) news release describing the objectives of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications in Science-2 (ATLAS-2), which is being flown on STS-56. Dr. Tim Miller (Mission Scientist), Dr. Marsha Torr (Mission Scientist), and Teresa Vanhooser (Mission Manager) explain that the ATLAS-2 mission is being launched to study earth atmospheric interactions with the sun in general and how manmade chemicals and pollution are contributing to ozone depletion in our atmosphere in particular. Seven instruments comprise the core payload. ATLAS-2 is an integral part of the Spacelab contribution to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth and characterizes the chemical and physical components of Earth's middle atmosphere and the solar energy injected in the atmosphere, studies that began on ATLAS-1.

  8. ATLAS-1 Video News Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Allen Kenitzer, from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), narrates this NASA Kennedy Space Center video presenting a MSFC-Television news release describing the overall scientific objectives of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications in Science-1 (ATLAS-1) Spacelab mission. Byron Lichtenberg (NASA Science Astronaut) and Anthony O'Neil (ATLAS-1 Mission Manager) explain that the 13 sophisticated and complementary instruments carried in shuttle Atlantis' payload bay are designed to identify the chemical species in our atmosphere, to measure the Sun's energy falling on and entering the atmosphere, to study the behavior of charged particles in the electric and magnetic fields surrounding the earth, and to gather ultraviolet light from stars and galaxies. ATLAS-1 is the first Spacelab flight of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Mission to Planet Earth.

  9. Screw-released roller brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  10. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

    1999-06-15

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

  11. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  12. Hydraulic latch scram release mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, R. C.; Zaman, S. U.

    1980-02-05

    A poison bundle release mechanism within a safety assembly of a liquid metal nuclear reactor. A baffle consisting of a plate with recesses in fluid communication with low pressure coolant is formed in the upper portion of the safety assembly. A plug attached to the upper end of the poison bundle fits snugly against the recesses and is held up against the plate by the coolant pressure difference acting on the lower and upper sides of the plug. A conduit and valve arrangement is provided within the plug whereby the actuation of the valve permits high pressure coolant to enter the recessed region, reducing the pressure difference across the plug and producing rapid disengagement thereof from the plate.

  13. Costs of reservoir releases aeration

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.R.; Bohac, C.E.

    1984-12-01

    Reservoir releases sometimes lack sufficient amounts of dissolved oxygen (DO) to assimilate wastes or to support aquatic life. Various types of aeration technology have been investigated, including turbine hub baffles, draft tube baffles, compressed air injected into the draft tube, compressed air injected through the headcover, and oxygen injected into the reservoir. To evaluate the feasibility of improving DO by various aeration techniques, TVA installed temporary aeration systems at several sites and conducted tests of their performance. Based on these experiments, TVA estimated the costs of installing and operating permanent aeration systems at several of its hydropower projects. This report describes the aeration alternatives investigated, documents current estimates of initial and annual costs for each alternative, and presents a general evaluation of the aeration methods based on their estimated costs and aeration capabilities.

  14. Chemical releases in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    The study of the interaction between the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere is identified as a major task worthy of pursuit. The present review demonstrates the major contributions to this complex problem already made by active experiments involving the injection of chemicals and energetic electron beams into the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere. Through the use of chemical releases, it has been possible to investigate a number of quantities including high-altitude winds and electric fields, the detailed configurations of the geomagnetic field within the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, as well as the propagation of energetic particle beams and their interaction with natural neutral and ionized constituents of the high atmosphere. So far, virtually all of this effort has been accomplished using rockets. In the future, it is obvious that satellite platforms will play a greater role, both in making injections and in observing their effects.

  15. Gas release in comet nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prialnik, Dina; Bar-Nun, Akiva

    1990-01-01

    Processes taking place during the evolution of a comet nucleus are examined, taking into account the release of gas on crystallization and the gas flow through the porous nucleus. In particular, the stresses caused by the gas pressure, the contribution of gas flow to the heat transfer, and the rate of gas emission by the comet along its orbit were determined using a model of spherically symmetric comet nucleus made of porous amorphous ice, with 10 percent CO gas trapped in it. Several values of density and pore size are considered, and for each combination of parameters, the model is evolved for 20-30 revolutions in Comet P/Halley's orbit. It is shown that a model of 0.2 g/cu cm density reproduces well many of the light-curve and activity characteristics of Comet P/Halley.

  16. 8-year field comparison of naturally seeded to planted container `pinus taeda`, with and without release

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, M.D.; Barnett, J.P.

    1996-01-09

    A field study compared genetically improved, container loblolly pines (Pinus taedo L.) with naturally seeded loblolly pines through eight growing seasons on a cutover site in southern Arkansas, U.S.A. Measurement pines on 6 of 12 plots were released from woody and herbaceous competition within a 61-cm radius of each tree stem. On natural pine plots, only 1st-year pine seedlings were selected for measurement based on quality standards and their spacing. Woody competition was controlled by hand cutting for 5 consecutive years, and herbaceous competition was controlled with herbicides for 4 consecutive years. Release treatments increased 8-year survival by 50% for natural pines and by 35% for planted pines. Greater gains (343-391%) in individual tree volumes were achieved within regeneration techniques, as a result of release, than were achieved with the two regeneration techniques. In addition, stand volume gains of 647% and 910% were achieved by planted and natural pines, respectively, as a result of release. Eight years after field establishment, stand volume index averaged 46% higher on planted plots than on natural plots. Degree of overtopping was a better predictor of pine performance than live-crown ratio.

  17. Gas release in comet nuclei.

    PubMed

    Prialnik, D; Bar-Nun, A

    1990-11-01

    The evolution of a comet nucleus is investigated, taking into account the crystallization process by which the gas trapped in the ice is released to flow through the porous ice matrix. The equations of conservation of the energy and of the masses of ice and gas are solved throughout the nucleus, to obtain the evolution of the temperature, gas pressure and density profiles. A spherical nucleus composed of cold, porous amorphous ice, with 10% of CO trapped in it, serves as initial model. Several values of density (porosity) and pore size are considered. For each combination of parameters the model is evolved for 20-30 revolutions in comet P/Halley's orbit. Two aspects of the release of gas upon crystallization are analyzed and discussed: (a) the resulting continuous outward flux with high peaks at the time of crystallization, which is a cyclic process in the low-density models and sporadic in the high-density ones; (b) the internal pressures obtained down to depths of a few tens to approximately 200 m (depending on parameters), that are found to exceed the compressional strength of cometary ice. As a result, both cracking and explosions of the overlying ice layer and ejection of gas and ice/dust grains are expected to follow crystallization. They should appear as outbursts or sudden brightening of the comet. The model of 0.2 g cm-3 density is found to reproduce quite well many of the light-curve and activity characteristics of comet P/Halley. PMID:11538699

  18. Volume Segmentation and Ghost Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, Isaac; Adrian, Ronald

    2011-11-01

    Volume Segmentation Tomographic PIV (VS-TPIV) is a type of tomographic PIV in which images of particles in a relatively thick volume are segmented into images on a set of much thinner volumes that may be approximated as planes, as in 2D planar PIV. The planes of images can be analysed by standard mono-PIV, and the volume of flow vectors can be recreated by assembling the planes of vectors. The interrogation process is similar to a Holographic PIV analysis, except that the planes of image data are extracted from two-dimensional camera images of the volume of particles instead of three-dimensional holographic images. Like the tomographic PIV method using the MART algorithm, Volume Segmentation requires at least two cameras and works best with three or four. Unlike the MART method, Volume Segmentation does not require reconstruction of individual particle images one pixel at a time and it does not require an iterative process, so it operates much faster. As in all tomographic reconstruction strategies, ambiguities known as ghost particles are produced in the segmentation process. The effect of these ghost particles on the PIV measurement is discussed. This research was supported by Contract 79419-001-09, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  19. Sonographic measurement of gallbladder volume.

    PubMed

    Dodds, W J; Groh, W J; Darweesh, R M; Lawson, T L; Kishk, S M; Kern, M K

    1985-11-01

    Sonographic images of the gallbladder enable satisfactory approximation of gallbladder volume using the sum-of-cylinders method. The sum-of-cylinder measurements, however, are moderately cumbersome and time consuming to perform. In this investigation, in vitro and in vivo testing was done to determine that a simple ellipsoid method applied to sonographic gallbladder images yields reasonable volume approximations that are comparable to the volumes calculated by the sum-of-cylinders method. Findings from a water-bath experiment showed that measurement of gallbladder volume by the ellipsoid method closely approximated the true volume with a mean difference of about 1.0 ml. The results of in vivo studies in five volunteers demonstrated that the gallbladder contracted substantially after a fatty meal and that volumes calculated by the ellipsoid and sum-of-cylinders methods were nearly identical. Thus, a simple ellipsoid method, requiring negligible time, may be used to approximate satisfactory gallbladder volume for clinical or investigative studies. PMID:3901703

  20. FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, O.J.

    1996-02-22

    Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

  1. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system use in premenopausal women with symptomatic uterine leiomyoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenxiao; Shen, Qi; Chen, Miaomiao; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Qingfeng; Zhu, Xuejie; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2014-08-01

    A systematic review is done to determine the efficacy and safety of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems as a treatment using in premenopausal women with symptomatic uterine leiomyoma. We searched the Medline, Central and ICTRP databases for all articles published from inception through July 2013 that examined the following outcomes: uterine volume, uterine leiomyoma volume, endometrial thickness, then menstrual blood loss, blood haemoglobin, ferritin and hematocrit levels, treatment failure rate, device expulsion rate, hysterectomy rate and side effects. From 645 studies, a total of 11 studies met our inclusion criteria with sample sizes ranging from 10 to 104. Evidence suggested that levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems could decrease uterine volume and endometrial thickness, significantly reduce menstrual blood loss, and increase blood haemoglobin, ferritin and hematocrit levels. There was no evidence for decreasing uterine leiomyoma volume. There were no adverse effects on the ovarian function except for ovarian cysts. Device expulsion rates were low, which associated with leiomyoma size (larger than 3cm) but not with leiomyoma location. Irregular bleeding/spotting was observed at the beginning of the follow-up period and then decreased progressively. Results of this systematic review indicate that levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems may be effective and safe treatment for symptomatic uterine leiomyoma in premenopausal women. PMID:24832215

  2. Release of Water Soluble Drugs from Dynamically Swelling POLY(2-HYDROXYETHYL Methacrylate - CO - Methacrylic Acid) Hydrogels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jim Hwai-Cher

    In this study, ionizable copolymers of HEMA and methacrylic acid (MA) are investigated for their potential use in developing pH dependent oral delivery systems. Because of the MA units, these gels swell extensively at high pH. Since solute diffusion in the hydrophilic polymers depends highly on the water content of the matrix, it is anticipated that the release rate will be modulated by this pH induced swelling. From a practical point of view, the advantage of the present system is that one can minimize drug loss in the stomach and achieve a programmed release in intestine. This approach is expected to improve delivery of acid labile drugs or drugs that cause severe gastrointestinal side effects. This work mainly focuses on the basic understanding of the mechanism involved in drug release from the poly(HEMA -co- MA) gels, especially under dynamic swelling conditions. Equilibrium swelling is first characterized since water content is the major determinant of transport properties in these gels. Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is chosen as the model drug for the release study and its diffusion characteristics in the gel matrix determined. The data obtained show that the PPA diffusivity follows the free volume theory of Yasuda, which explains the accelerating effect of swelling on drug release. A mathematical model based on a diffusion mechanism has been developed to describe PPA release from the swelling gels. Based on this model, several significant conclusions can be drawn. First, the release rate can be modulated by the aspect ratio of the cylindrical geometry, and this has a practical implication in dosage form design. Second, the release rate can be lowered quite considerably if the dimensional increase due to swelling is significant. Consequently, it is the balance between the drug diffusivity increase and the gel dimensional growth that determines the release rate from the swelling matrix. Third, quasi-steady release kinetics, which are characteristic of swelling

  3. Transit losses and traveltimes for reservoirs releases during drought conditions along the Neosho River from Council Grove Lake to Iola, east-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, W.J.; Hart, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the transit losses and water-wave traveltimes in the Neosho River for varying reservoir-release volumes and durations is necessary for proper management of water supply. Two reaches were studied along the Neosho River in east-central Kansas. The upper reach is from Council Grove Lake to John Redmond Reservoir, a distance of 83.0 river miles. The lower reach is from John Redmond Reservoir to Iola, Kansas, a distance of 56.3 river miles. Channel and aquifer characteristics were estimated from available data and used in a streamflow routing model. These estimated characteristics were verified using the model by comparing simulated reservoir releases to observed reservoir releases. The verified model then was used to simulate transit losses (or gains) and traveltimes for selected reservoir release volumes and durations from Council Grove Lake to Iola. Transit losses and traveltimes were investigated for the selected reservoir releases while under a severe drought antecedent streamflow condition (zero base flow) and a less severe drought antecedent streamflow condition (2% drought base flows). The largest total transit loss from Council Grove Lake to Iola occurred during the severe drought antecedent streamflow condition, small reservoir release rates, and long reservoir release durations. The total transit loss included water that was temporarily lost to bank storage. For a severe drought condition, transit losses ranged from 1,100 acre-ft for a release volume of 1,840 acre-ft for a duration of 50 days to 6 ,280 acre-ft for a release volume of 6,280 acre-ft for a duration of 365 days. For a less severe drought condition, transit losses ranged from 860 acre-ft to 3,234 acre-ft for the same release volumes and durations as for the severe drought condition. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Particles in small volume injections.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A; Spence, J

    1983-12-01

    The level of particulate contamination in small volume injections has been examined using the light blockage (HIAC) and electrical sensing zone (Coulter counter) techniques, the HIAC system being found to be the more suitable. Particle counts on the same batch of injection showed a large and variable difference between the HIAC and the Coulter counter results, especially below 5 micron. None of the injections examined complied with the British Pharmacopoeia limits for particulates in large volume parenterals, suggesting the unsuitability of the limits for small volume parenterals. PMID:6141237

  5. Image space adaptive volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Andrew; Dingliana, John

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique for interactive direct volume rendering which provides adaptive sampling at a reduced memory requirement compared to traditional methods. Our technique exploits frame to frame coherence to quickly generate a two-dimensional importance map of the volume which guides sampling rate optimisation and allows us to provide interactive frame rates for user navigation and transfer function changes. In addition our ray casting shader detects any inconsistencies in our two-dimensional map and corrects them on the fly to ensure correct classification of important areas of the volume.

  6. The Study of Release of Chlorhexidine from Preparations with Modified Thermosensitive Poly-N-isopropylacrylamide Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Musial, Witold; Voncina, Bojana; Pluta, Janusz; Kokol, Vanja

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the release rates of chlorhexidine (CX) base entrapped in the polymeric beads of modified poly-N-isopropylacrylamides (pNIPAMs) at temperatures below and over the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of synthesized polymers: pNIPAM-A with terminal anionic groups resulting from potassium persulfate initiator, pNIPAM-B with cationic amidine terminal groups, and pNIPAM-C comprising anionic terminals, but with increased hydrophobicity maintained by the N-tert-butyl functional groups. The preparations, assessed in vitro below the VPTT, release an initial burst of CX at different time periods between 120 and 240 min, followed by a period of 24 h, when the rate of release remains approximately constant, approaching the zero-order kinetics; the release rates for the polymers beads are as follows: pNIPAM-C>pNIPAM-B>pNIPAM-A. The pattern of release rates at temperature over the VPTT is as follows: pNIPAM-C>pNIPAM-A>pNIPAM-B. In the presence of pNIPAM-C, the duration between the start of the release and the attained minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for most of the microbes, in conditions over the VPTT, increased from 60 to 90 min. The release prolongation could be ascribed to some interactions between the practically insoluble CX particle and the hydrophobic functional groups of the polymer. PMID:22629123

  7. New data for aerosols generated by releases of pressurized powders and solutions in static air

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Sutter, S.L.; Hodgson, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop radioactive source-term estimation methods. Experiments measuring the mass airborne and particle size distribution of aerosols produced by pressurized releases were run. Carbon dioxide was used to pressurize uranine solutions to 50, 250, and 500 psig before release. The mass airborne from these experiments was higher than for comparable air-pressurized systems, but not as great as expected based on the amount of gas dissolved in the liquid and the volume of liquid ejected from the release equipment. Flashing sprays of uranine at 60, 125, and 240 psig produced a much larger source term than all other pressurized releases performed under this program. Low-pressure releases of depleted uranium dioxide at 9, 17.5, and 24.5 psig provided data in the energy region between 3-m spills and 50-psig pressurized releases.

  8. Cardiac mast cells regulate myocyte ANP release via histamine H2 receptor in beating rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Wen, Jin Fu; Jin, Jing Yu; Quan, He Xiu; Cho, Kyung Woo

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that histamine inhibits atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release. Because cardiac mast cells are the principal source of histamine in the heart, we hypothesized that cardiac mast cells are involved in the regulation of atrial ANP release. To test the hypothesis, experiments were performed in perfused beating rabbit atria allowing atrial pacing and measurements of changes in atrial stroke volume, intraatrial pulse pressure and myocyte ANP release. Mast cell degranulation with Compound 48/80 decreased atrial myocyte ANP release, and the response was blocked by a selective histamine H(2) receptor blocker, cimetidine, indicating that histamine was responsible for the decrease in ANP release. Mast cell stabilization with cromolyn blocked the Compound 48/80-induced decrease in ANP release. These data suggest that mast cell-derived histamine is involved in the regulation of cardiac ANP release. Thus, the cardiac mast cell-cardiomyocyte communication via the histamine-ANP pathway may implicate in the cardiac disorder associated with mast cell degranulation such as in acute coronary syndrome or cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:19328828

  9. Release Data Package for Hanford Site Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert G.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Engel, David W.

    2006-07-01

    Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support a Hanford assessment. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 through 2005 to support the Release Module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) for the updated composite analysis. This work was completed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, part of the Remediation and Closure Science Project, the Hanford Assessments Project, and the Characterization of Systems Project managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Related characterization activities and data packages for the vadose zone and groundwater are being developed under the remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The Release Module applies release models to waste inventory data from the Inventory Module and accounts for site remediation activities as a function of time. The resulting releases to the vadose zone, expressed as time profiles of annual rates, become source terms for the Vadose Zone Module. Radioactive decay is accounted for in all inputs and outputs of the Release Module. The Release Module is implemented as the VADER (Vadose zone Environmental Release) computer code. Key components of the Release Module are numerical models (i.e., liquid, soil-debris, cement, saltcake, and reactor block) that simulate contaminant release from the different waste source types found at the Hanford Site. The Release Module also handles remediation transfers to onsite and offsite repositories.

  10. Modelling of contaminant release from a uranium mine tailings site

    SciTech Connect

    Kahnt, Rene; Metschies, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Uranium mining and milling continuing from the early 1960's until 1990 close to the town of Seelingstaedt in Eastern Germany resulted in 4 tailings impoundments with a total tailings volume of about 105 Mio. m{sup 3}. Leakage from these tailings impoundments enters the underlying aquifers and is discharged into surface water streams. High concentration of salts, uranium and several heavy metals are released from the tailings. At present the tailings impoundments are reshaped and covered. For the identification of suitable remediation options predictions of the contaminant release for different remediation scenarios have to be made. A compartment model representing the tailings impoundments and the surrounding aquifers for the calculation of contaminant release and transport was set up using the software GOLDSIM. This compartment model describes the time dependent hydraulic conditions within the tailings and the surrounding aquifers taking into account hydraulic and geotechnical processes influencing the hydraulic properties of the tailings material. A simple geochemical approach taking into account sorption processes as well as retardation by applying a k{sub d}-approach was implemented to describe the contaminant release and transport within the hydraulic system. For uranium as the relevant contaminant the simple approach takes into account additional geochemical conditions influencing the mobility. Alternatively the model approach allows to include the results of detailed geochemical modelling of the individual tailings zones which is than used as source term for the modelling of the contaminant transport in the aquifer and to the receiving streams. (authors)

  11. Reptation and constraint release dynamics in bidisperse polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Langeloth, Michael; Masubuchi, Yuichi; Böhm, Michael C; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2014-11-21

    Bidisperse melts of linear, entangled polymer chains were studied using dissipative particle dynamics. The entanglement constraints were mimicked with our newly developed slip-spring approach. The compositions cover blends with short matrix chains, slightly above the molecular entanglement weight as well as blends were both chain lengths exhibit distinct entangled dynamics at various weight fractions. The Struglinsky-Graessley parameter Gr, which is the ratio between the relaxation time of the long chains due to pure reptation and the relaxation time of the tube caused by constraint release, ranges between values high above and below unity. We compare our slip-spring model with simulations that use conventional generic polymer models where bond crossings are prevented by excluded-volume interactions and find fairly good agreement in terms of the mean squared displacement. However, the slip-spring approach requires only a fraction of the computational time, making large scale systems feasible. The dynamical interference of the two different chain lengths is discussed in terms of reptation and constraint release dynamics. For bidisperse melt compositions with Gr < 1.0 the relaxation time of the long chain component is not affected by constraint release. However, for compositions where constraint release is supposed to contribute significantly to the relaxation mechanism (Gr > 1.0), we find strong evidence that the long chains reptate inside a dilated tube whose diameter increases with an exponent of 1/2 towards lower weight fraction of the long chains. Furthermore we observe a linear relation between the relaxation time and weight fraction. Therefore, based on the relaxation times, our results support the validity of the tube dilation model as proposed by Doi et al. [Macromolecules 20, 1900-1906 (1987)]. PMID:25416909

  12. A mathematical model of drug release from liposomes by low frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Enden, Giora; Schroeder, Avi

    2009-12-01

    Administration of drugs using small (<100 nm) unilamellar liposomes enables effective targeting of tumors and inflamed tissue. Therapeutic efficacy may be enhanced by triggering liposomal drug release in the desired organ in a controlled manner using a noninvasive external signal. Previous studies have demonstrated that low frequency ultrasound (LFUS) can be used to control the release of drugs from liposomes. LFUS irradiation has a twofold effect: (1) it causes the impermeable liposome membrane to become permeable and (2) it induces liposome disintegration. Immediately upon cessation of LFUS irradiation the membrane resumes its impermeable state and liposome disintegration stops. The mathematical model presented here is aimed at providing a better quantitative and qualitative understanding of LFUS-induced liposomal drug release, which is essential for safe and effective implementation of this technique. The time-dependent release patterns are determined by the liposome disintegration patterns and by two key parameters: (a) the average permeability of the membrane to the drug and (b) the ratio between the volume of the entire dispersion and the initial volume of all the liposomes in the dispersion. The present model implies that LFUS irradiation triggers two liposomal drug-release mechanisms: the predominant one is diffusion through the LFUS-compromised liposome membrane, and the less significant one is liposome disintegration. PMID:19731036

  13. Drug release kinetic analysis and prediction of release data via polymer molecular weight in sustained release diltiazem matrices.

    PubMed

    Adibkia, K; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Mohammadi, G; Khiavi, H Z; Sabzevari, A; Barzegar-Jalali, M

    2014-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of HPMC (K4M and K100M) as well as tragacanth on the drug release rate of diltiazem (DLTZ) from matrix tablets prepared by direct compression method.Mechanism of drug transport through the matrices was studied by fitting the release data to the 10 kinetic models. 3 model independent parameters; i. e., mean dissolution time (MDT), mean release rate (MRR) and release rate efficacy (RE) as well as 5 time point approaches were established to compare the dissolution profiles. To find correlation between fraction of drug released and polymer's molecular weight, dissolution data were fitted into two proposed equations.All polymers could sustain drug release up to 10 h. The release data were fitted best to Peppas and Higuchi square root kinetic models considering squared correlation coefficient and mean percent error (MPE). RE and MRR were decreased when polymer to drug ratio was increased. Conversely, t60% was increased with raising polymer /drug ratio. The fractions of drug released from the formulations prepared with tragacanth were more than those formulated using the same amount of HPMC K4M and HPMC K100M.Preparation of DLTZ matrices applying HPMCK4M, HPMC K100M and tragacanth could effectively extend the drug release. PMID:23986307

  14. VOLUMNECT: measuring volumes with Kinect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintino Ferreira, Beatriz; Griné, Miguel; Gameiro, Duarte; Costeira, João. Paulo; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a solution to volume measurement object packing using 3D cameras (such as the Microsoft KinectTM). We target application scenarios, such as warehouses or distribution and logistics companies, where it is important to promptly compute package volumes, yet high accuracy is not pivotal. Our application auto- matically detects cuboid objects using the depth camera data and computes their volume and sorting it allowing space optimization. The proposed methodology applies to a point cloud simple computer vision and image processing methods, as connected components, morphological operations and Harris corner detector, producing encouraging results, namely an accuracy in volume measurement of 8mm. Aspects that can be further improved are identified; nevertheless, the current solution is already promising turning out to be cost effective for the envisaged scenarios.

  15. Volumetric measurement of tank volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Richard T. (Inventor); Vanbuskirk, Paul D. (Inventor); Weber, William F. (Inventor); Froebel, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the volume of compressible gas in a system including incompressible substances in a zero-gravity environment consisting of measuring the change in pressure (delta P) for a known volume change rate (delta V/delta t) in the polytrophic region between isothermal and adiabatic conditions. The measurements are utilized in an idealized formula for determining the change in isothermal pressure (delta P sub iso) for the gas. From the isothermal pressure change (delta iso) the gas volume is obtained. The method is also applicable to determination of gas volume by utilizing work (W) in the compression process. In a passive system, the relationship of specific densities can be obtained.

  16. Adaptive Tracking of Atmospheric Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D; Calhoun, R

    2002-01-31

    When dangerous chemical or biological releases occur in the atmosphere, emergency responders and decision makers must assess exposure rates to the affected population, establish evacuation routes, and allocate medical resources We have been working to improve the scientific basis for making such decisions. We believe that future rapid response teams, from LLNI, and other centers of expertise, will use a variety of atmospheric sensors and atmospheric computer models to predict and characterize the movement of chemical or biological releases in urban environments, and that LLNL is likely to contribute expertise in this area. A key advance will be to merge the information and capabilities of computer models with real-time atmospheric data from sensors. The resulting product will dynamically interpolate and extrapolate the raw sensor data into a coordinated ''picture'' or interpretation of the developing flow scenario. The scientific focus of the project was the exploration and development of algorithms to fuse lidar data (which measure wind speed much as a police radar measures vehicle speed) and a dispersion model into a single system. Our goal was to provide the scientific foundation for a combined lidar/model approach capable of accurately tracking the evolution of atmospheric releases on distance scales of about 20 km. The fundamental idea is to create feedbacks, so that lidar data can be used for wind field inputs into a dispersion model, which would, in turn, guide lidar data acquisition by directing more intensive scanning to regions where more data are key to improving the modeling. We created a database of synthetic lidar data that can be used to test algorithms relating to a combined lidar/dispersion model. We obtained the data, which represent nocturnal atmospheric drainage flows in the Salt Lake City Basin, from calculations on the LLNL ASCI White supercomputer with a computational fluid dynamics model running in large-eddy simulation mode. A simple

  17. A urine volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Sabin, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    An improved urine volume measurement system for use in the unusual environment of manned space flight is reported. The system utilizes a low time-constant thermal flowmeter. The time integral of the transient response of the flowmeter gives the urine volume during a void as it occurs. In addition, the two phase flows through the flowmeter present no problem. Developments of the thermal flowmeter and a verification of the predicted performance characteristics are summarized.

  18. Midface volumization with injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Marietta; Kontis, Theda C

    2015-05-01

    The aging midface has long been overlooked in cosmetic surgery. Our understanding of facial aging in terms of 3 dimensions has placed increased importance on volume restoration. Although an "off-label" indication for most fillers in this facial region, volumization of the midface with injectable fillers is usually a safe and straightforward procedure technically. Injectors, nevertheless, need to have an excellent understanding of facial anatomy and the characteristics of the injected products should problems arise. PMID:25921573

  19. Effects of artemisinin sustained-release granules on mixed alga growth and microcystins production and release.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Hu, Shuzhen; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    To safely and effectively apply artemisinin sustained-release granules to control and prevent algal water-blooms, the effects of artemisinin and its sustained-release granules on freshwater alga (Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) and Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa)), as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs) were studied. The results showed that artemisinin sustained-release granules inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa (above 95% IR) and S. obliquus (about 90% IR), with M. aeruginosa more sensitive. The artemisinin sustained-release granules had a longer inhibition effect on growth of pure algae and algal coexistence than direct artemisinin dosing. The artemisinin sustained-release granules could decrease the production and release of algal toxins due to the continued stress of artemisinin released from artemisinin sustained-release granules. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium. PMID:26432265

  20. Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2003-05-01

    A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

  1. Projection-Based Volume Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lingbo; Snapp, Robert R.; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    When heterogeneous samples of macromolecular assemblies are being examined by 3D electron microscopy (3DEM), often multiple reconstructions are obtained. For example, subtomograms of individual particles can be acquired from tomography, or volumes of multiple 2D classes can be obtained by random conical tilt reconstruction. Of these, similar volumes can be averaged to achieve higher resolution. Volume alignment is an essential step before 3D classification and averaging. Here we present a projection-based volume alignment (PBVA) algorithm. We select a set of projections to represent the reference volume and align them to a second volume. Projection alignment is achieved by maximizing the cross-correlation function with respect to rotation and translation parameters. If data are missing, the cross-correlation functions are normalized accordingly. Accurate alignments are obtained by averaging and quadratic interpolation of the cross-correlation maximum. Comparisons of the computation time between PBVA and traditional 3D cross-correlation methods demonstrate that PBVA outperforms the traditional methods. Performance tests were carried out with different signal-to-noise ratios using modeled noise and with different percentages of missing data using a cryo-EM dataset. All tests show that the algorithm is robust and highly accurate. PBVA was applied to align the reconstructions of a subcomplex of the NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, followed by classification and averaging. PMID:23410725

  2. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); Poindexter, Samantha (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 1 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Material Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approx. 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in materials science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance was

  3. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); Poindexter, Samantha (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Materials Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the Microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approx. 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference- In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference %%,its to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in material,, science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance

  4. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Bennett, Nancy; McCauley, Dannah; Murphy, Karen; Poindexter, Samantha

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 3 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Materials Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the Microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference- In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in material,, science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance was close

  5. TREATABILITY STUDY BULLETIN: MOBILE VOLUME REDUCTION UNIT AT THE SAND CREEK SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) Releases Control Branch (RCB) has developed a pilot-scale Mobile Volume Reduction Unit (VRU) to determine the feasibility of soil washing for the remediation of contaminated soils. This mobile unit, mounted on two trailers, can pro...

  6. Pharmacological characterization of volume-sensitive, taurine permeable anion channels in rat supraoptic glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Brès, Vanessa; Hurbin, Amandine; Duvoid, Anne; Orcel, Hélène; Moos, Françoise C; Rabié, Alain; Hussy, Nicolas

    2000-01-01

    To characterize the volume-sensitive, osmolyte permeable anion channels responsible for the osmodependent release of taurine from supraoptic nucleus (SON) astrocytes, we investigated the pharmacological properties of the [3H]-taurine efflux from acutely isolated SON.Taurine release induced by hypotonic stimulus (250 mosmol l−1) was not antagonized by the taurine transporter blocker guanidinoethyl sulphonate, confirming the lack of implication of the transporter.The osmodependent release of taurine was blocked by a variety of Cl− channel inhibitors with the order of potency: NPPB>niflumic acid>DPC>DIDS>ATP. On the other hand, release of taurine was only weakly affected by other compounds (dideoxyforskolin, 4-bromophenacyl bromide, mibefradil) known to block volume-activated anion channels in other cell preparations, and was completely insensitive to tamoxifen, a broad inhibitor of these channels.Although the molecular identity of volume-sensitive anion channels is not firmly established, a few genes have been postulated as potential candidates to encode such channels. We checked the expression in the SON of three of them, ClC3, phospholemman and VDAC1, and found that the transcripts of these genes are found in SON neurons, but not in astrocytes. Similar observation was previously reported for ClC2.In conclusion, the osmodependent taurine permeable channels of SON astrocytes display a particular pharmacological profile, suggesting the expression of a particular type or subtype of volume-sensitive anion channel, which is likely to be formed by yet unidentified proteins. PMID:10952690

  7. Pharmacological characterization of volume-sensitive, taurine permeable anion channels in rat supraoptic glial cells.

    PubMed

    Brès, V; Hurbin, A; Duvoid, A; Orcel, H; Moos, F C; Rabié, A; Hussy, N

    2000-08-01

    To characterize the volume-sensitive, osmolyte permeable anion channels responsible for the osmodependent release of taurine from supraoptic nucleus (SON) astrocytes, we investigated the pharmacological properties of the [(3)H]-taurine efflux from acutely isolated SON. Taurine release induced by hypotonic stimulus (250 mosmol l(-1)) was not antagonized by the taurine transporter blocker guanidinoethyl sulphonate, confirming the lack of implication of the transporter. The osmodependent release of taurine was blocked by a variety of Cl(-) channel inhibitors with the order of potency: NPPB>niflumic acid>DPC>DIDS>ATP. On the other hand, release of taurine was only weakly affected by other compounds (dideoxyforskolin, 4-bromophenacyl bromide, mibefradil) known to block volume-activated anion channels in other cell preparations, and was completely insensitive to tamoxifen, a broad inhibitor of these channels. Although the molecular identity of volume-sensitive anion channels is not firmly established, a few genes have been postulated as potential candidates to encode such channels. We checked the expression in the SON of three of them, ClC(3), phospholemman and VDAC(1), and found that the transcripts of these genes are found in SON neurons, but not in astrocytes. Similar observation was previously reported for ClC(2). In conclusion, the osmodependent taurine permeable channels of SON astrocytes display a particular pharmacological profile, suggesting the expression of a particular type or subtype of volume-sensitive anion channel, which is likely to be formed by yet unidentified proteins. PMID:10952690

  8. NASA Space Flight Human System Standard, Volume 2, and HIDH (Human Integration Design Handbook)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Janis; Fitts, David; Stroud, Kenneth; Boyer, Jennifer; Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the review and re-issuance of the NASA Space Flight Human System Standard, Volume 2, and the Human Integration Design Handbook. These standards were last updated in 1995. The target date for the release is September 2009.

  9. Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume IV. Design drawings

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    This volume contains design drawings for the biomass cogeneration plant to be built in Maine. The drawings show a considerable degree of detail, however, they are not to be considered released for construction. There has been no actual procurement of equipment, therefore equipment drawings certified by suppliers have not been included. (DMC)

  10. LOW OZONE-DEPLETING HALOCARBONS AS TOTAL-FLOOD AGENTS: VOLUME 1. CANDIDATE SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume describes an effort to identify chemical fire protection and explosion prevention agents which may replace the ozone-depleting agent Halon-1301 (CF3Br). Halon-1301 is used in total-flood fire protection systems where the agent is released as a gas into an enclosed spac...

  11. Environmental releases for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Diediker, L.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-30

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1995 from facilities managed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and monitored by Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). WHC provides effluent monitoring services for BHI, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate,comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  12. Environmental releases for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-07-31

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1996 from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (formerly the Westinghouse Hanford Company) and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated provides effluent monitoring services for Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  13. Double-Swivel Mechanism For Reliable Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Guy L.; Schneider, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Double-swivel toggle mechanism releases large, heavy objects reliably. Double-swiveling action of mechanism ensures it clears restraining pins upon release. Pins retain toggle and its load. If pin fails to withdraw at designated time for releasing payload, toggle swivels about its upper ball, and ring swivels about lower ball so ring flange clears failed pin. Double-swivel action ensures disengagement even it two pins fail to withdraw.

  14. The effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on the response of cerebral blood flow to acute hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Sugawara, Jun; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the response of cerebral blood flow to an acute change in perfusion pressure is modified by an acute increase in central blood volume. Nine young, healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. To measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation during normocapnic and hypercapnic (5%) conditions, the change in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity was analyzed during acute hypotension caused by two methods: 1) thigh-cuff occlusion release (without change in central blood volume); and 2) during the recovery phase immediately following release of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -50 mmHg) that initiated an acute increase in central blood volume. In the thigh-cuff occlusion release protocol, as expected, hypercapnia decreased the rate of regulation, as an index of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (0.236 ± 0.018 and 0.167 ± 0.025 s(-1), P = 0.024). Compared with the cuff-occlusion release, the acute increase in central blood volume (relative to the LBNP condition) with LBNP release attenuated dynamic cerebral autoregulation (P = 0.009). Therefore, the hypercapnia-induced attenuation of dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not observed in the LBNP release protocol (P = 0.574). These findings suggest that an acute change in systemic blood distribution modifies dynamic cerebral autoregulation during acute hypotension. PMID:26159757

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the osmosensitivity of volume-dependent taurine efflux from glial cells in the rat supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Duvoid, Anne; Moos, Françoise C; Hussy, Nicolas

    2000-01-01

    In the supraoptic nucleus, taurine, selectively released in an osmodependent manner by glial cells through volume-sensitive anion channels, is likely to inhibit neuronal activity as part of the osmoregulation of vasopressin release. We investigated the involvement of various kinases in the activation of taurine efflux by measuring [3H]taurine release from rat acutely isolated supraoptic nuclei. The protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin B44 specifically reduced, but did not suppress, both the basal release of taurine and that evoked by a hypotonic stimulus. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase by orthovanadate had the opposite effect. The tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors shifted the relationship between taurine release and medium osmolarity in opposite directions, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the osmosensitivity of taurine release, but is not necessary for its activation. Genistein also increased the amplitude of the decay of the release observed during prolonged hypotonic stimulation. Potentiation of taurine release by tyrosine kinases could serve to maintain a high level of taurine release in spite of cell volume regulation. Taurine release was unaffected by inhibitors and/or activators of PKA, PKC, MEK and Rho kinase. Our results demonstrate a unique regulation by protein tyrosine kinase of the osmosensitivity of taurine efflux in supraoptic astrocytes. This points to the presence of specific volume-dependent anion channels in these cells, or to a specific activation mechanism or regulatory properties. This may relate to the particular role of the osmodependent release of taurine in this structure in the osmoregulation of neuronal activity. PMID:10699075

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the osmosensitivity of volume-dependent taurine efflux from glial cells in the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Deleuze, C; Duvoid, A; Moos, F C; Hussy, N

    2000-03-01

    1. In the supraoptic nucleus, taurine, selectively released in an osmodependent manner by glial cells through volume-sensitive anion channels, is likely to inhibit neuronal activity as part of the osmoregulation of vasopressin release. We investigated the involvement of various kinases in the activation of taurine efflux by measuring [3H]taurine release from rat acutely isolated supraoptic nuclei. 2. The protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin B44 specifically reduced, but did not suppress, both the basal release of taurine and that evoked by a hypotonic stimulus. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase by orthovanadate had the opposite effect. 3. The tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors shifted the relationship between taurine release and medium osmolarity in opposite directions, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the osmosensitivity of taurine release, but is not necessary for its activation. 4. Genistein also increased the amplitude of the decay of the release observed during prolonged hypotonic stimulation. Potentiation of taurine release by tyrosine kinases could serve to maintain a high level of taurine release in spite of cell volume regulation. 5. Taurine release was unaffected by inhibitors and/or activators of PKA, PKC, MEK and Rho kinase. 6. Our results demonstrate a unique regulation by protein tyrosine kinase of the osmosensitivity of taurine efflux in supraoptic astrocytes. This points to the presence of specific volume-dependent anion channels in these cells, or to a specific activation mechanism or regulatory properties. This may relate to the particular role of the osmodependent release of taurine in this structure in the osmoregulation of neuronal activity. PMID:10699075

  17. Preparation and characterisation of controlled release co-spray dried drug-polymer microparticles for inhalation 2: evaluation of in vitro release profiling methodologies for controlled release respiratory aerosols.

    PubMed

    Salama, Rania O; Traini, Daniela; Chan, Hak-Kim; Young, Paul M

    2008-09-01

    Three in vitro methodologies were evaluated as models for the analysis of drug release from controlled release (CR) microparticulates for inhalation. USP Apparatus 2 (dissolution model), USP Apparatus 4 (flow through model) and a modified Franz cell (diffusion model), were investigated using identical sink volumes and temperatures (1000 ml and 37 degrees C). Microparticulates containing DSCG and different percentages of PVA (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%) were used as model CR formulations. Evaluation of the release profiles of DSCG from the modified PVA formulations, suggested that all data fitted a Weibull distribution model with R2 > or =0.942. Statistical analysis of the t(d) (time for 63.2% drug release) indicated that all methodologies could distinguish between microparticles that did or did not contain PVA (Students t-test, p<0.05). However, only the diffusion model could differentiate between samples containing different PVA percentages. Similar results were observed when analysing the data using similarity and difference factors. Furthermore, analysis of the release kinetic profiles for all samples suggested the data fitted the Higuchi diffusion model (R2 > or =0.862 for the diffusion methodology data set). Due to the relatively low water content in the respiratory tract and the lack of differentiation between formulations for USP Apparatus 2 and 4, it is concluded that the diffusion model is more applicable for the evaluation of CR inhalation medicines. PMID:18534832

  18. Quick-release medical tape

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Bryan; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Medical tape that provides secure fixation of life-sustaining and -monitoring devices with quick, easy, damage-free removal represents a longstanding unmet medical need in neonatal care. During removal of current medical tapes, crack propagation occurs at the adhesive–skin interface, which is also the interface responsible for device fixation. By designing quick-release medical tape to undergo crack propagation between the backing and adhesive layers, we decouple removal and device fixation, enabling dual functionality. We created an ordered adhesive/antiadhesive composite intermediary layer between the medical tape backing and adhesive for which we achieve tunable peel removal force, while maintaining high shear adhesion to secure medical devices. We elucidate the relationship between the spatial ordering of adhesive and antiadhesive regions to create a fully tunable system that achieves strong device fixation and quick, easy, damage-free device removal. We also described ways of neutralizing the residual adhesive on the skin and have observed that thick continuous films of adhesive are easier to remove than the thin islands associated with residual adhesive left by current medical tapes. PMID:23112196

  19. Circadian regulation of ATP release in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Marpegan, Luciano; Swanstrom, Adrienne E; Chung, Kevin; Simon, Tatiana; Haydon, Philip G; Khan, Sanjoy K; Liu, Andrew C; Herzog, Erik D; Beaulé, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Circadian clocks sustain daily oscillations in gene expression, physiology, and behavior, relying on transcription-translation feedback loops of clock genes for rhythm generation. Cultured astrocytes display daily oscillations of extracellular ATP, suggesting that ATP release is a circadian output. We hypothesized that the circadian clock modulates ATP release via mechanisms that regulate acute ATP release from glia. To test the molecular basis for circadian ATP release, we developed methods to measure in real-time ATP release and Bmal1::dLuc circadian reporter expression in cortical astrocyte cultures from mice of different genotypes. Daily rhythms of gene expression required functional Clock and Bmal1, both Per1 and Per2, and both Cry1 and Cry2 genes. Similarly, high-level, circadian ATP release also required a functional clock mechanism. Whereas blocking IP(3) signaling significantly disrupted ATP rhythms with no effect on Bmal1::dLuc cycling, blocking vesicular release did not alter circadian ATP release or gene expression. We conclude that astrocytes depend on circadian clock genes and IP(3) signaling to express daily rhythms in ATP release. PMID:21653839

  20. Circadian regulation of ATP release in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marpegan, Luciano; Swanstrom, Adrienne E.; Chung, Kevin; Simon, Tatiana; Haydon, Philip G.; Khan, Sanjoy K.; Liu, Andrew C.; Herzog, Erik D.; Beaulé, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks sustain daily oscillations in gene expression, physiology and behavior, relying on transcription-translation feedback loops of clock genes for rhythm generation. Cultured astrocytes display daily oscillations of extracellular ATP, suggesting that ATP release is a circadian output. We hypothesized that the circadian clock modulates ATP release via mechanisms that regulate acute ATP release from glia. To test the molecular basis for circadian ATP release, we developed methods to measure in real-time ATP release and Bmal1::dLuc circadian reporter expression in cortical astrocyte cultures from mice of different genotypes. Daily rhythms of gene expression required functional Clock and Bmal1, both Per1 and Per2, and both Cry1 and Cry2 genes. Similarly, high level, circadian ATP release also required a functional clock mechanism. Whereas blocking IP3 signaling significantly disrupted ATP rhythms with no effect on Bmal1::dLuc cycling, blocking vesicular release did not alter circadian ATP release or gene expression. We conclude that astrocytes depend on circadian clock genes and IP3 signaling to express daily rhythms in ATP release. PMID:21653839

  1. Oxygen Releasing Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Alemdar, Neslihan; Annabi, Nasim; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing demand to generate thick and vascularized tissue engineered constructs, novel strategies are currently being developed. An emerging example is the generation of oxygen-releasing biomaterials to tackle mass transport and diffusion limitations within engineered tissue-like constructs. Biomaterials containing oxygen releasing molecules can be fabricated in various forms such as, hybrid thin films, microparticles, or three dimensional (3D) scaffolds. In this perspective, we will summarize various oxygen-releasing reagents and their potential applications in regenerative engineering. Moreover, we will review the main approaches to fabricate oxygen-releasing biomaterials for a range of tissue engineering applications. PMID:23853426

  2. Proceedings: Neurohormonal control of prolactin release.

    PubMed

    Deis, R P; Alonso, N; Vermouth, N T

    1973-01-01

    Neurohomonal control of prolactin release was studied in pseudopregnant and pregnant rats. Nembutal administered at 1300 hours on Day 3 of pseudopregnancy prevented prolactin release which normally occurred at 1700 hours of the same day. Antiestrogen administered the day before did not prevent prolactin release but ovariectomy did. Estrogen administered immediately after ovariectomy did not restore prolactin secretion; however, progesterone on Day 3 in the ovariectomized-estrogen treated induced an increase in prolactin at 1700 hours. Progesterone was capable of increasing prolactin release the first 5 days of pseudopregnancy but not Days 6-12 when prolactin values were low. A similar effect was seen the first 7 days of pregnancy. Progesterone, but not estrogen, modified prolactin values on Day 9 at 1700 hours. Ovariectomy on Day 19 of pregnancy induced prolactin release within 4 hours and persisted for 58 hours. Progesterone administration immediately after ovariectomy prevented prolactin release for a few hours. These results suggest that the regulation of prolactin release by the central nervous system depends on the circulating estrogen/progesterone ratio, since estrogen facilitated prolactin release when plasma progesterone was low and progesterone induced prolactin release when adequated levels of estrogen existed, but exerted an inhibitory action when estrogen was not present. PMID:4795042

  3. NASA Reactor Facility Hazards Summary. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Supplements to volume 1 are presented herein. Included in these papers are information unavailable when volume 1 was written, an evaluation of the proposed nuclear facility, and answers to questions raised by the AEC concerning volume 1.

  4. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

  5. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    SciTech Connect

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  6. Preparation and In-vitro Evaluation of Controlled Release PLGA Microparticles Containing Triptoreline.

    PubMed

    Mahboubian, Alireza; Hashemein, Seyyed Kazem; Moghadam, Shadi; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2010-01-01

    Triptoreline is a potent agonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, currently used in the treatment of prostatic cancer where therapy may be required over months or years. Frequent injection of drug decreases patients' compliance. The present study describes the formulation of a sustained release microparticulate drug delivery system containing triptoreline acetate, using poly (D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). Biodegradable microspheres were prepared using 50 : 50 PLGA by a water in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsion-solvent evaporation procedure and characterized for drug content and drug release rate using the a HPLC method, particle size distribution using the laser diffraction method, and surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy and drug release rate. Effect of critical process parameters and formulation variables; i.e. volume of inner water phase, addition of NaCl to the outer aqueous phase (W2), addition of different types and amounts of emulsifying agents on microsphere characteristics; were investigated. Microspheres prepared were spherical with a smooth surface, but addition of poloxamer to the first emulsion produced microspheres with large pores. Size of microparticles was dependent on the type, as well as the amount of co-encapsulated surfactants. Increasing the inner water phase volume resulted in larger particles with a lower encapsulation efficiency. Low concentrations of Span 20 decreased triptoreline release rate, whereas the addition of poloxamer or high concentrations of Span 20 increased the drug release rateit. In conclusion, by selecting an appropriate level of the investigated parameters, spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiencies higher than 90% and a prolonged triptoreline release over 45 days were obtained. PMID:24381601

  7. Sharp Ca2+ nanodomains beneath the ribbon promote highly synchronous multivesicular release at hair cell synapses

    PubMed Central

    Graydon, Cole W.; Cho, Soyoun; Li, Geng-Lin; Kachar, Bechara; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Hair cell ribbon synapses exhibit several distinguishing features. Structurally, a dense body, or ribbon, is anchored to the presynaptic membrane and tethers synaptic vesicles; functionally, neurotransmitter release is dominated by large EPSC events produced by seemingly synchronous multivesicular release. However, the specific role of the synaptic ribbon in promoting this form of release remains elusive. Using complete ultrastructural reconstructions and capacitance measurements of bullfrog amphibian papilla hair cells dialyzed with high concentrations of a slow Ca2+ buffer (10 mM EGTA), we found that the number of synaptic vesicles at the base of the ribbon correlated closely to those vesicles that released most rapidly and efficiently, while the rest of the ribbon-tethered vesicles correlated to a second, slower pool of vesicles. Combined with the persistence of multivesicular release in extreme Ca2+ buffering conditions (10 mM BAPTA), our data argues against the Ca2+-dependent compound fusion of ribbon-tethered vesicles at hair cell synapses. Moreover, during hair cell depolarization, our results suggest that elevated Ca2+ levels enhance vesicle pool replenishment rates. Finally, using Ca2+ diffusion simulations, we propose that the ribbon and its vesicles define a small cytoplasmic volume where Ca2+ buffer is saturated, despite 10 mM BAPTA conditions. This local buffer saturation permits fast and large Ca2+ rises near release sites beneath the synaptic ribbon that can trigger multiquantal EPSCs. We conclude that, by restricting the available presynaptic volume, the ribbon may be creating conditions for the synchronous release of a small cohort of docked vesicles. PMID:22090491

  8. Gold Nanocages Covered with Thermally-responsive Polymers for Controlled Release by High-intensity Focused Ultrasound**

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiyang; Cai, Xin; Kim, Chulhong; Sun, Guorong; Zhang, Yu; Deng, Rui; Yang, Miaoxin; Chen, Jingyi; Achilefu, Samuel; Wang, Lihong V.; Xia, Younan

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Au nanocages covered with smart, thermally-responsive polymers for controlled release with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a highly precise medical procedure that uses focused ultrasound to heat and destroy pathogenic tissue rapidly and locally in a non-invasive or minimally invasive manner. The released dosage could be remotely controlled by manipulating the power of HIFU and/or the duration of exposure. We demonstrated localized release within the focal volume of HIFU by using gelatin phantom samples containing dye-loaded Au nanocages. By placing chicken breast tissues on top of the phantoms, we further demonstrated the feasibility of this system for controlled release at depths up to 30 mm. Because it can penetrate more deeply into soft tissues than near-infrared light, HIFU is a potentially more effective external stimulus for rapid, on-demand drug release. PMID:21321760

  9. Effects of Globally Waste-Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Huckaby, James L.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2003-07-30

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford tanks that disturb all or much of the waste. The globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given. This revision (Rev. 2)incorporates additional comments from Office of River Protection reviewers. An appendix presents the checklist for technical peer review of Revision 1 of this report.

  10. Effects of Globally Waste-Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Huckaby, James L.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2002-12-18

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  11. Applications of texture mapping to volume and flow visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1995-05-01

    The authors describe six visualization methods which take advantage of hardware polygon scan conversion, texture mapping, and compositing, to give interactive viewing of 3D scalar fields, and motion for 3D flows. For volume rendering, these are splatting of an optimized 3D reconstruction filter, and tetrahedral cell projection using a texture map to provide the exponential per pixel necessary for accurate opacity calculation. For flows, these are the above tetrahedral projection method for rendering the ``flow volume`` dyed after passing through a dye releasing polygon, ``splatting`` of cycled anisotropic textures to provide flow direction and motion visualization, splatting motion blurred particles to indicate flow velocity, and advecting a texture directly to show the flow motion. All these techniques are tailored to take advantage of existing graphics pipelines to produce interactive visualization tools.

  12. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  13. Summary Profiles of Hanford Effluent Release Data

    SciTech Connect

    KM Tominey; MK White

    1999-01-07

    Hanford publishes extensive estimates of their offsite releases of various chemical and radiological species annuaIly. In this report we examine using these estimates to develop additional insight into how effectively such releases of hazardous materials are being controlled at Hanford. Historical estimates of airborne and surface water releases of selected contaminants are compared with estimates of the overall Site inventory of those contaminants and with the corresponding release limits and background levels. These comparisons are also examined over a five-year period (1993 to 1997) to determine how these releases have changed during that time. Most of the waste management and environmental restoration activities under way at Hanford are intended to provide final, permanent disposition of the Site's inventory of hazardous materials, with the ultimate objective of ensuring that risks to the public and the environment are controlled to an acceptable level. An important consideration during the conduct of these activities is prott%ting the public and the environment while accomplishing the longer-term ~~ objectives. The amounts of hazardous materials that are being released to the air or surface water while waste management and environmental activities are being conducted is one important measure of their overall effectiveness. The comparisons described in this report indicate that measures to control the release of the selected contaminants from the Hanford Site are, and have been, veryeffective. The amounts of these materials released to surface water and air are very small compared with background and regulatory limits and smaller still considering the inventories" under management. Comparisons of annual releases ranged from slightly over background to five orders of magnitude below background levels (e.g., l/10,000* of background levels), and up to 14 orders of magnitude less than estimates of Site inventories. Annual releases for these contaminants

  14. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  15. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  16. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  17. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  18. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  19. Formulation effects on the release of silica dioxide nanoparticles from paint debris to water.

    PubMed

    Zuin, Stefano; Massari, Andrea; Ferrari, Arlen; Golanski, Luana

    2014-04-01

    Waterborne paints with integrated nanoparticles have been recently introduced into the market as nanoparticles offer improved or novel functionalities to paints. However, the release of nanoparticles during the life cycle of nano-enhanced paint has only been studied to a very limited extent. The paint composition could determine in what quantities and forms the nanoparticles are released. In this work, paint formulations containing the same amount of silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles but differing in the pigment volume concentration (PVC) and in amount and type of binder and pigment, were studied through leaching test to investigate the influence of these parameters on release of Si from paint. The results indicate greater release of Si, about 1.7 wt.% of the SiO2 nanoparticles in the paint, for paint formulated with higher PVC value (63%), suggesting that the PVC is a crucial factor for release of SiO2 nanoparticles from paints. This hypothesis was also based on the fact that agglomerates of SiO2 nanoparticles were only found in leachates from paint with higher PVC. A paint sample with the higher amount of binder and less calcite filler exhibited a lower release of Si among the paints with a low PVC value (35%), and no SiO2 particles were detected in leachates collected from this paint. This could be due to the fact that a high portion of binder forms a suitable matrix to hold the SiO2 ENPs in paint. The paint sample in which the amount of calcite was partially substituted with TiO2 pigment did not show an important reduction on Si release. Our work suggests that paint debris containing SiO2 nanoparticles may release a limited amount of Si into the environment, and that by adjusting the properties of the binder in combination with common pigments it is possible to reduce the release of SiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:24468504

  20. Weak correlation of starch and volume in synchronized photosynthetic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rading, M. Michael; Sandmann, Michael; Steup, Martin; Chiarugi, Davide; Valleriani, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    In cultures of unicellular algae, features of single cells, such as cellular volume and starch content, are thought to be the result of carefully balanced growth and division processes. Single-cell analyses of synchronized photoautotrophic cultures of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveal, however, that the cellular volume and starch content are only weakly correlated. Likewise, other cell parameters, e.g., the chlorophyll content per cell, are only weakly correlated with cell size. We derive the cell size distributions at the beginning of each synchronization cycle considering growth, timing of cell division and daughter cell release, and the uneven division of cell volume. Furthermore, we investigate the link between cell volume growth and starch accumulation. This work presents evidence that, under the experimental conditions of light-dark synchronized cultures, the weak correlation between both cell features is a result of a cumulative process rather than due to asymmetric partition of biomolecules during cell division. This cumulative process necessarily limits cellular similarities within a synchronized cell population.

  1. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements. PMID:22034331

  2. 12 CFR 793.8 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Release. 793.8 Section 793.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE OPERATIONS OF THE NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 793.8 Release. Acceptance by the claimant,...

  3. 12 CFR 793.8 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Release. 793.8 Section 793.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE OPERATIONS OF THE NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 793.8 Release. Acceptance by the claimant,...

  4. 12 CFR 793.8 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Release. 793.8 Section 793.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE OPERATIONS OF THE NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 793.8 Release. Acceptance by the claimant,...

  5. 12 CFR 793.8 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Release. 793.8 Section 793.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE OPERATIONS OF THE NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 793.8 Release. Acceptance by the claimant,...

  6. 12 CFR 793.8 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Release. 793.8 Section 793.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE OPERATIONS OF THE NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 793.8 Release. Acceptance by the claimant,...

  7. 38 CFR 1.961 - Releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Releases. 1.961 Section 1.961 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Referrals to Gao, Department of Justice, Or Irs § 1.961 Releases. On matters within its jurisdiction,...

  8. 38 CFR 1.961 - Releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Releases. 1.961 Section 1.961 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Referrals to Gao, Department of Justice, Or Irs § 1.961 Releases. On matters within its jurisdiction,...

  9. 34 CFR 35.8 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release. 35.8 Section 35.8 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 35.8 Release. Acceptance by the claimant, his agent or legal representative, of any award, compromise or settlement...

  10. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section 236.790... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated....

  11. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section 236.790... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated....

  12. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release. Each air tight or vapor tight space,...

  13. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release. Each air tight or vapor tight space, such as a paint locker, that is protected by a CO2 system...

  14. Contamination surveys for release of material

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, J.S.; Johnson, M.L.; Gardner, D.L.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes, and presents the technical basis for, a methodology for performing instrument surveys to release material from radiological control, including release to controlled areas and release from radiological control. The methodology is based on a fast scan survey, a large-area wipe survey, and a series of statistical, fixed measurements. The methodology meets the requirements of the US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual (RadCon Manual) (DOE 1994) and DOE Order 5400.5 (DOE 1990) for release of material in less time than is required by a conventional scan survey. Implementation of the proposed methodology with a confidence interval of 67% will meet the material release requirements. The material evaluation process will allow material that has not been exposed to contamination to be released from radiological control without a survey. For potential radioactive contaminants that are not reserved in DOE Order 5400.5, the methodology will allow material to be released from radiological control. For other radionuclides, with the exception of some difficult-to-detect radionuclides, material may be released for controlled use. Compared with current techniques, the proposed methodology will reduce the amount of time required to perform surveys.

  15. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or...

  16. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or...

  17. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or...

  18. 14 CFR 1240.111 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Release. 1240.111 Section 1240.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INVENTIONS AND CONTRIBUTIONS Awards for Scientific and Technical Contributions § 1240.111 Release. Under subsection 306(b)(1) of the...

  19. 14 CFR 1240.111 - Release

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Release 1240.111 Section 1240.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INVENTIONS AND CONTRIBUTIONS Awards for Scientific and Technical Contributions § 1240.111 Release Under subsection 20136(c) of the...

  20. 14 CFR § 1240.111 - Release

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Release § 1240.111 Section § 1240.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INVENTIONS AND CONTRIBUTIONS Awards for Scientific and Technical Contributions § 1240.111 Release Under subsection 20136(c) of the...

  1. 14 CFR 1240.111 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Release. 1240.111 Section 1240.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INVENTIONS AND CONTRIBUTIONS Awards for Scientific and Technical Contributions § 1240.111 Release. Under subsection 306(b)(1) of the...

  2. 14 CFR 1240.111 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Release. 1240.111 Section 1240.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INVENTIONS AND CONTRIBUTIONS Awards for Scientific and Technical Contributions § 1240.111 Release. Under subsection 306(b)(1) of the...

  3. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section 236.790... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated....

  4. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or...

  5. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or...

  6. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  7. Teach with Databases: Toxics Release Inventory. [Multimedia].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barracato, Jay; Spooner, Barbara

    This curriculum unit provides students with real world applications of science as it pertains to toxic releases into the environment. This boxed package contains the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Teacher's Guide, TRI Database Basics guide, comprehensive TRI compact disk with user's guide, "Getting Started: A Guide to Bringing Environmental…

  8. 45 CFR 35.8 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Release. 35.8 Section 35.8 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures § 35.8 Release. Acceptance by the claimant, his agent or legal representative, of any award,...

  9. 49 CFR 236.791 - Release, value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Release, value. 236.791 Section 236.791 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Release, value. The electrical value at which the movable member of an electromagnetic device will move...

  10. 49 CFR 236.791 - Release, value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Release, value. 236.791 Section 236.791 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Release, value. The electrical value at which the movable member of an electromagnetic device will move...

  11. 49 CFR 236.791 - Release, value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Release, value. 236.791 Section 236.791 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Release, value. The electrical value at which the movable member of an electromagnetic device will move...

  12. 49 CFR 236.791 - Release, value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Release, value. 236.791 Section 236.791 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Release, value. The electrical value at which the movable member of an electromagnetic device will move...

  13. 49 CFR 236.791 - Release, value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Release, value. 236.791 Section 236.791 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Release, value. The electrical value at which the movable member of an electromagnetic device will move...

  14. Fluoride and chlorhexidine release from filled resins.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Zhang, N-Z; Anusavice, K J

    2010-09-01

    Resin-based materials that release either fluoride or chlorhexidine have been formulated for inhibiting caries activity. It is not known if the two agents, when incorporated into one material, would interact and affect their release potential. We hypothesized that the ratio of fluoride to chlorhexidine incorporated into a resin, and the pH of the storage medium, will affect their releases from the material. The material investigated contained 23 wt% of filler, and the ratios of calcium fluoride to chlorhexidine diacetate were 8/2, 5/5, and 2/8. The release was conducted in pH 4, 5, and 6 acetate buffers. The results showed that release of either agent increased as the pH of the medium decreased. The presence of fluoride salt substantially reduced the chlorhexidine release, while the presence of a specific quantity of chlorhexidine significantly increased fluoride release. This interaction can be utilized to optimize the release of either agent for therapeutic purposes. PMID:20581354

  15. 10 CFR 850.31 - Release criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Release criteria. 850.31 Section 850.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.31 Release criteria. (a) The responsible employer must clean beryllium-contaminated equipment and other items to...

  16. 10 CFR 850.31 - Release criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Release criteria. 850.31 Section 850.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.31 Release criteria. (a) The responsible employer must clean beryllium-contaminated equipment and other items to...

  17. 10 CFR 850.31 - Release criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Release criteria. 850.31 Section 850.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.31 Release criteria. (a) The responsible employer must clean beryllium-contaminated equipment and other items to...

  18. BLOOD TRIGGERED RAPID RELEASE POROUS NANOCAPSULES

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Tiffany P.; Dergunov, Sergey A.; Akers, Walter J.; Cao, Qian; Magalotti, Selena; Achilefu, Samuel; Pinkhassik, Eugene; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid-release drug delivery systems present a new paradigm in emergency care treatments. Such systems combine a long shelf life with the ability to provide a significant dose of the drug to the bloodstream in the shortest period of time. Until now, development of delivery formulations has concentrated on slow release systems to ensure a steady concentration of the drug. To address the need for quick release system, we created hollow polyacrylate nanocapsules with nanometer-thin porous walls. Burst release occurs upon interaction with blood components that leads to escape of the cargo. The likely mechanism of release involves a conformational change of the polymer shell caused by binding albumin. To demonstrate this concept, a near-infrared fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) was incorporated inside the nanocapsules. ICG-loaded nanocapsules demonstrated remarkable shelf life in aqueous buffers with no release of ICG for twelve months. Rapid release of the dye was demonstrated first in vitro using albumin solution and serum. SEM and light scattering analysis demonstrated the retention of the nanocapsule architecture after the release of the dye upon contact with albumin. In vivo studies using fluorescence lifetime imaging confirmed quick discharge of ICG from the nanocapsules following intravenous injection. PMID:23606942

  19. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) Operation Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) is a field instrument that provides an in-situ measurement of asbestos releasability from consistent and reproducible mechanical agitation of the source material such as soil. The RAFS was designed to measure concentration (asbestos st...

  20. Controlled drug release from hydrogel nanoparticle networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Gao, Jun; Hu, Zhibing; St John, John V; Ponder, Bill C; Moro, Dan

    2004-02-10

    Monodisperse nanoparticles of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-allylamine (PNIPAM-co-allylamine) and PNIPAM-co-acrylic acid (PNIPAM-co-AA) were synthesized. The close-packed PNIPAM-co-allylamine and PNIPAM-co-AA nanoparticles were converted to three-dimensional gel networks by covalently crosslinking neighboring particles at room temperature and neutral pH using glutaric dialdehyde and adipic acid dihydrazide, respectively. Controlled release studies were conducted using dextran markers of various molecular weights as model macromolecular drugs. Release was quantified under various physical conditions, including a range of temperatures and dextran molecular weights. Dextran, entrapped in cavities in the nanoparticle network, was released with a rate regulated by their molecular weights and cavity size. No release from a conventional bulk PNIPAM gel, with high crosslinking density, was observed. The rate of release from the PNIPAM-co-allylamine network was temperature-dependent, being much faster at room temperature than that at human body temperature. In contrast, release of low molecular weight dextrans from the PNIPAM-co-AA network showed a temperature-independent release profile. These nanoparticle networks have several advantages over conventional bulk gels for controlling the release of high molecular weight biomolecules. PMID:14744482

  1. Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2013-02-19

    A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

  2. Recent and pending blueberry cultivar releases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four new blueberry Cultivars were released by the USDA-ARS Small Fruits Research Station in 2004 and 2005 and another will be submitted for release in 2007. These new blueberries were developed from germplasm adapted to the southern U.S. and include two rabbiteye ('DeSoto' and 'Prince'), two southe...

  3. Selection of Hydrological Model for Waterborne Release

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-04-21

    This evaluation will aid in determining the potential impacts of liquid releases to downstream populations on the Savannah River. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the two available models and determine the appropriate model for use in following waterborne release analyses. Additionally, this report will document the Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis accidents to be used in the future study.

  4. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated. ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section...

  5. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated. ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section...

  6. 10 CFR 850.31 - Release criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Release criteria. 850.31 Section 850.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.31 Release criteria. (a) The responsible employer must clean beryllium-contaminated equipment and other items to...

  7. Analysis of drug effects on neurotransmitter release

    SciTech Connect

    Rowell, P.; Garner, A.

    1986-03-05

    The release of neurotransmitter is routinely studied in a superfusion system in which serial samples are collected and the effects of drugs or other treatments on the amount of material in the superfusate is determined. With frequent sampling interval, this procedure provides a mechanism for dynamically characterizing the release process itself. Using automated data collection in conjunction with polyexponential computer analysis, the equation which describes the release process in each experiment is determined. Analysis of the data during the nontreated phase of the experiment allows an internal control to be used for accurately assessing any changes in neurotransmitter release which may occur during a subsequent treatment phase. The use of internal controls greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and allows determinations of very low concentrations of drugs on small amounts of tissue to be made. In this presentation, the effects of 10 ..mu..M nicotine on /sup 3/H-dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens is described. The time course, potency and efficacy of the drug treatment is characterized using this system. Determinations of the exponential order of the release as well as the rate constants allow one to study the mechanism of the release process. A description of /sup 3/H-dopamine release in normal as well as Ca/sup + +/-free medium is presented.

  8. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    PubMed

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions. PMID:27524015

  9. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  10. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  11. Probing the Release of Shocked Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Ivancic, S.; Gregor, M. C.; McCoy, C. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.

    2015-11-01

    The behavior of shocked material as it releases to lower pressures is important for equation-of-state experiments and inertial confinement fusion research. We present results of experiments that used a 10-ps, 263-nm probe beam to image the release plumes of various target material shocked to multi-megabar pressures by the OMEGA EP laser. One-dimensional streaked x-ray radiography also provided a time-resolved trajectory of the release wave. Simultaneous VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) measurements provide the initial shocked state from which these materials release. Models for the optical properties of the released material is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Environmental release summary (ERS) database CY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1998-07-01

    This report discusses the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database. The current needs of the Effluent and Environmental database is continually modified to fulfill monitoring (EEM) program (managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Incorporated, Air and Water Services Organization). Changes are made to accurately calculate current releases, to affect how past releases are calculated. This document serves as a snap-shot of the database and software for the CY-1997 data and releases. This document contains all of the relevant data for calculating radioactive-airborne and liquid effluent. The ERS database is the official repository for the CY-1997 ERS release reports and the settings used to generate those reports. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, FDH is committed to provide a hard copy of the ERS database for Washington State Department of Ecology, upon request. This document also serves as that hard copy for the last complete calendar year.

  13. Ecological release in White Sands lizards

    PubMed Central

    Roches, S Des; Robertson, J M; Harmon, L J; Rosenblum, E B

    2011-01-01

    Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for ecological release in three lizard colonists of White Sands, New Mexico (Sceloporus undulatus, Holbrookia maculata, and Aspidoscelis inornata). First, we provide evidence for ecological opportunity by demonstrating reduced species richness and abundance of potential competitors and predators at White Sands relative to nearby dark soils habitats. Second, we characterize ecological release at White Sands by demonstrating density compensation in the three White Sands lizard species and expanded resource use in White Sands S. undulatus. Contrary to predictions from ecological release models, we observed directional trait change but not increased trait variation in S. undulatus. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity and ecological release can be identified in natural populations, especially those that have recently colonized isolated ecosystems. PMID:22393523

  14. Encapsulation of ketoprofen for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Arida, Adi I; Al-Tabakha, Moawia M

    2007-04-01

    Ketoprofen particles were encapsulated with polyions and gelatin to control the release of the drug in aqueous solutions. Charged linear polyions and gelatin were alternatively deposited on 6 microm drug microcrystals through layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. Sequential layers of poly(dimethyldiallyl ammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) were followed by adsorption of two to six gelatin/PSS bilayers with corresponding capsule wall thicknesses ranging from 41 to 111 nm. The release of Ketoprofen from the coated microparticles was measured in aqueous solutions of pH 1.4, 4.1, and 7.4. The release rate has changed at these different pH values. At pH 7.4 the release rate of Ketoprofen from the encapsulated particles was less by 107 times compared to uncoated Ketoprofen. The results provide a method of achieving prolonged drug release through self-assembly of polymeric shells on drug crystals. PMID:17098404

  15. Gas release and conductivity modification studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linson, L. M.; Baxter, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of gas clouds produced by releases from orbital velocity in either a point release or venting mode is described by the modification of snowplow equations valid in an intermediate altitude regime. Quantitative estimates are produced for the time dependence of the radius of the cloud, the average internal energy, the translational velocity, and the distance traveled. The dependence of these quantities on the assumed density profile, the internal energy of the gas, and the ratio of specific heats is examined. The new feature is the inclusion of the effect of the large orbital velocity. The resulting gas cloud models are used to calculate the characteristics of the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity enhancements that would be produced by the release of barium thermite at orbital velocity in either the point release or venting modes as a function of release altitude and chemical payload weight.

  16. Dust release from surfaces exposed to plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J.

    2006-12-15

    Micrometer-sized particles adhered to a surface can be released when exposed to plasma. In an experiment with a glass surface coated with lunar-simulant dust, it was found that particle release requires exposure to both plasma and an electron beam. The dust release rate diminishes almost exponentially in time, which is consistent with a random process. As proposed here, charges of particles adhered to the surface fluctuate. These charges experience a fluctuating electric force that occasionally overcomes the adhesive van der Waals force, causing particle release. The release rate increases with plasma density, so that plasma cleaning is feasible at high plasma densities. Applications of this cleaning include controlling particulate contamination in semiconductor manufacturing, dust mitigation in the exploration of the moon and Mars, and dusty plasmas.

  17. Locking and releasing system in space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijian; Dong, Jihong; Li, Wei; Zhao, Weiguo

    2014-09-01

    Space telescope locking and releasing system is one of the most important part in aerospace. It can provide the part in the spacecraft from being under attack. In this letter, the developing status and primary characteristics of several locking and releasing system in recent years were summarized. The main locking and releasing system can be part with pyrotechnic device and un-pyrotechnic device. The paper introduces the system and the way that the device released by compared the pyrotechnic and the un-pyrotechnic device. In the way of comparing the different device, the letter made the point that each of these device had its advantages that should been developed, and the disadvantages that should been improved. These analyses will provide references for the design of the locking and releasing system in the future of telescope research.

  18. Age estimation from canine volumes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Gaudio, Daniel; Guercini, Nicola; Cipriani, Filippo; Gibelli, Daniele; Caputi, Sergio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Techniques for estimation of biological age are constantly evolving and are finding daily application in the forensic radiology field in cases concerning the estimation of the chronological age of a corpse in order to reconstruct the biological profile, or of a living subject, for example in cases of immigration of people without identity papers from a civil registry. The deposition of teeth secondary dentine and consequent decrease of pulp chamber in size are well known as aging phenomena, and they have been applied to the forensic context by the development of age estimation procedures, such as Kvaal-Solheim and Cameriere methods. The present study takes into consideration canines pulp chamber volume related to the entire teeth volume, with the aim of proposing new regression formulae for age estimation using 91 cone beam computerized scans and a freeware open-source software, in order to permit affordable reproducibility of volumes calculation. PMID:25698302

  19. Flex bearing UUEC, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapper, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    This volume, Volume 2, of this Flex Bearing UUEC Final Report documents findings and data pertaining to Team B's tasks. Team B was organized as one of two sub-teams of the Unplanned/Unintended Event or Condition (UUEC) board established per InterOffice Memorandum (IOM) A100-FY93-072. Team A determined the cause of the unacceptable unbonds (referred to as 'heat-affect' unbonds), including the initial, light rust film, in the FSM #3 flex bearing was overheating of the Forward End Ring (FER) during cure, specifically in zone 8 of the mold. Team A's findings are documented in Volume 1 of this report. Team B developed flight rationale for existing bearings, based on absence or presence of an unpropitious unbond condition like that in FSM #3's flex bearing.

  20. Shock compression and adiabatic release of lunar fines from Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Cole, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted with the objective to obtain quantitative bounds, in terms of shock pressure and hence meteoroid impact velocity, concerning the conditions required to compact and lithify lunar fines. The measured pressure-particle velocity release states provide a basis for the determination of the approximate values of shock pressure associated with various postshock volumes and temperatures concomitant with solid-state vitrification and thermal melting. The implications of the obtained results for the study of regolith evolution are discussed.

  1. 14 CFR 125.373 - Original flight release or amendment of flight release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airport at the time the airplane would arrive at the alternate airport. However, the flight release may be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Original flight release or amendment of flight release. 125.373 Section 125.373 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,...

  2. 14 CFR 125.373 - Original flight release or amendment of flight release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airport at the time the airplane would arrive at the alternate airport. However, the flight release may be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Original flight release or amendment of flight release. 125.373 Section 125.373 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,...

  3. 14 CFR 125.373 - Original flight release or amendment of flight release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airport at the time the airplane would arrive at the alternate airport. However, the flight release may be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Original flight release or amendment of flight release. 125.373 Section 125.373 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,...

  4. Software control of intelligent drug releases using stimuli-responsive release systems and IR data communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Shoei; Uchida, Kumao; Kaetsu, Isao; Kita, Yoshimi; Tsuji, Daisuke

    2007-04-01

    Intelligent drug delivery systems using UV polymerized hydrogels controlled by software were developed. The conditions of drug releases such as drug concentration, timing and amount of released drug could be controlled. It was also shown that the release threshold and the program design could be modified by IR data communication.

  5. A Rapid Test for Prediction of Nutrient Release from Controlled Release Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient release from soluble granular fertilizers can be modified by polymer coating. The coating technology can be fine-tuned to change the duration (3 to 9 months) and rate of nutrient release, hence these products are termed as controlled release fertilizers (CRF). There is a need to develop a r...

  6. Incorporating small molecules or biologics into nanofibers for optimized drug release: A review.

    PubMed

    Sebe, István; Szabó, Péter; Kállai-Szabó, Barnabás; Zelkó, Romána

    2015-10-15

    Over the past several decades, the formulation of novel nanofiber-based drug delivery systems focusing on specific delivery purposes has been investigated worldwide with a continuous level of interest. The unique structure and properties of nanoscale fibrous systems, such as their high specific-area-to-volume ratio and high porosity and the possibility of controlling their crystalline-amorphous phase transitions, make them a desirable formulation pathway to satisfy the needs of recent pharmaceutical development. Fibrous delivery systems can facilitate the accelerated dissolution and increased solubility of small molecules and can also be useful in controlling drug delivery over time (for local or systemic drug administration). In the latter case, the release periods can be tuned over a wide range (from hours to weeks), e.g., by adjusting the fiber diameter and selecting the appropriate polymers. The solubility of the polymer, the fiber diameter and the fiber structure are the primary parameters affecting drug release. In addition to immediate and sustained release, other release profiles, such as biphasic release, can also be achieved. Chemical conjugation and surface functionalization offer further possibilities for the control of drug release. In the case of small molecules, developments focus mostly on overcoming the unfavorable physicochemical nature of the active agents. By contrast, in the preparation of macromolecule-loaded nanofibers, maximizing the biological activity of the macromolecules presents the greatest challenge. The authors' intent is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key parameters of advanced drug delivery systems of this type. PMID:26307263

  7. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  8. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  9. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Terrones, Guillermo; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Sukamto, Johanes H.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2000-01-24

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.

  10. Characterization of degradation fragments released by arc-induced ablation of polymers in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminlashgari, Nina; Becerra, Marley; Hakkarainen, Minna

    2016-02-01

    Polymers exposed to high intensity arc plasmas release material in a process called arc-induced ablation. In order to investigate the degradation fragments released due to this process, two different polymeric materials, poly(oxymethylene) copolymer (POM-C) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were exposed to a transient, high-power arc plasma in air. A small fraction of the ablated material drifting away from the arcing volume was deposited on a fixed glass substrate during the total duration of a 2 kA ac current semicycle. In addition, another fraction of the released material was deposited on a second moving substrate to obtain a time-resolved streak ‘image’ of the arc-induced ablation process. For the first time, mass spectra of degradation fragments produced by arc-induced ablation were obtained from the material deposited on the substrates by using laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). It was found that oligomers with mean molecular weight ranging between 400 and 600 Da were released from the surface of the studied polymers. The obtained spectra suggest that the detected degradation fragments of POM could be released by random chain scission of the polymer backbone. In turn, random chain scission and splitting-off the side groups are suggested as the main chemical mechanism leading to the release of PMMA fragments under arc-induced ablation.

  11. Effect of porosity on the release kinetics of propafenone-loaded PEG-g-PLA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sant, Shilpa; Nadeau, Véronique; Hildgen, Patrice

    2005-10-01

    Nanoparticle preparation by the emulsification-solvent evaporation method is a complex phenomenon. Various formulation factors can affect the internal structure and release of drug from nanoparticles (NPs). The aim of the present study is to optimize NPs of PEG-g-PLA polymer and study the effect of various factors on the porosity as well as release profile of drug-loaded NPs. Propafenone hydrochloride (Prop.HCl), a model drug, was encapsulated in NPs using different amounts of triethylamine (TEA) and initial drug loading levels. NPs were also prepared without TEA by using propafenone base (Prop). All the formulations were characterized for surface morphology, size and size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, thermal analysis, porosimetry and in vitro release studies. Encapsulation efficiency of Prop ranged between 10% and 43% and was dependent on initial drug loading as well as amount of TEA added. Porosity studies revealed different pore size distribution (PSD) for formulations with and without TEA. Formulations with higher drug loading showed greater volume contribution of small pores, higher fractal dimension suggesting more complex pore structure and slower drug release, probably due to decrease in the effective diffusion coefficient of Prop. Results suggest that formulation factors play an important role affecting the porosity and release rate of NPs. Also, fractal dimension could be one of the most important factors in determining the release behavior of NPs. PMID:16099525

  12. Predicting the size-dependent tissue accumulation of agents released from vascular targeted nanoconstructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tullio, Marco D.; Singh, Jaykrishna; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Vascular targeted nanoparticles have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents in cancer and cardiovascular diseases. However, at authors' knowledge, a comprehensive systematic analysis on their delivery efficiency is still missing. Here, a computational model is developed to predict the vessel wall accumulation of agents released from vascular targeted nanoconstructs. The transport problem for the released agent is solved using a finite volume scheme in terms of three governing parameters: the local wall shear rate , ranging from to ; the wall filtration velocity , varying from to ; and the agent diffusion coefficient , ranging from to . It is shown that the percentage of released agent adsorbing on the vessel walls in the vicinity of the vascular targeted nanoconstructs reduces with an increase in shear rate , and with a decrease in filtration velocity and agent diffusivity . In particular, in tumor microvessels, characterized by lower shear rates () and higher filtration velocities (), an agent with a diffusivity (i.e. a 50 nm particle) is predicted to deposit on the vessel wall up to of the total released dose. Differently, drug molecules, exhibiting a smaller size and much higher diffusion coefficient (), are predicted to accumulate up to . In healthy vessels, characterized by higher and lower , the largest majority of the released agent is redistributed directly in the circulation. These data suggest that drug molecules and small nanoparticles only can be efficiently released from vascular targeted nanoconstructs towards the diseased vessel walls and tissue.

  13. Mathematical Model-Based Accelerated Development of Extended-release Metformin Hydrochloride Tablet Formulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Desai, D; Good, D; Crison, J; Timmins, P; Paruchuri, S; Wang, J; Ha, K

    2016-08-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to predict metformin release from a hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) matrix-based extended-release formulation that took into consideration the physical and chemical properties of the drug substance, composition, as well as size and shape of the tablet. New high dose strength (1000 mg) tablet geometry was selected based on the surface area/volume (SA/V) approach advocated by Lapidus/Lordi/Reynold to obtain the desired equivalent metformin release kinetics. Maintaining a similar SA/V ratio across all extended-release metformin hydrochloride (Met XR) tablet strengths that had different geometries provided similar simulations of dissolution behavior. Experimental dissolution profiles of three lots of high-strength tablets agreed with the simulated release kinetics. Additionally, a pharmacokinetic absorption model was developed using GastroPlus™ software and known physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, and in vitro dissolution properties of metformin to predict the clinical exposure of the new high strength (1000 mg) tablet prior to conducting a human clinical bioequivalence study. In vitro metformin release kinetics were utilized in the absorption model to predict exposures in humans for new 1000-mg Met XR tablets, and the absorption model correctly projected equivalent in vivo exposure across all dose strengths. A clinical bioequivalence study was pursued based on the combined modeling results and demonstrated equivalent exposure as predicted by the simulations. PMID:26729531

  14. Rockets and People. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertok, Boris E; Siddiqi, Asif A. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Much has been written in the West on the history of the Soviet space program but few Westerners have read direct first-hand accounts of the men and women who were behind the many Russian accomplishments in exploring space.The memoirs of Academician Boris Chertok, translated from the original Russian, fills that gap.Chertok began his career as an electrician in 1930 at an aviation factory near Moscow.Twenty-seven years later, he became deputy to the founding figure of the Soviet space program, the mysterious Chief Designer Sergey Korolev. Chertok s sixty-year-long career and the many successes and failures of the Soviet space program constitute the core of his memoirs, Rockets and People. These writings are spread over four volumes. This is volume I. Academician Chertok not only describes and remembers, but also elicits and extracts profound insights from an epic story about a society s quest to explore the cosmos. In Volume 1, Chertok describes his early years as an engineer and ends with the mission to Germany after the end of World War II when the Soviets captured Nazi missile technology and expertise. Volume 2 takes up the story with the development of the world s first intercontinental ballistic missile ICBM) and ends with the launch of Sputnik and the early Moon probes. In Volume 3, Chertok recollects the great successes of the Soviet space program in the 1960s including the launch of the world s first space voyager Yuriy Gagarin as well as many events connected with the Cold War. Finally, in Volume 4, Chertok meditates at length on the massive Soviet lunar project designed to beat the Americans to the Moon in the 1960s, ending with his remembrances of the Energiya-Buran project.

  15. Gas volume contents within a container, smart volume instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Van Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for determining the volume of an incompressible gas in a system including incompressible substances in a zero-gravity environment. The method includes inducing a volumetric displacement within a container and measuring the resulting pressure change. From this data, the liquid level can be determined.

  16. Thai Basic Course. Volume 1 and Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Warren G.; Tryon, Absorn

    The 40 lessons in these two volumes and the accompanying tape recordings are designed to teach standard spoken Thai to Foreign Service Officers and other American Government personnel. After completing the "Programed Introduction to Thai Phonology," the student should be able to read the phonemic transcription in which all Thai material is…

  17. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Willeke, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  18. Be the Volume: A Classroom Activity to Visualize Volume Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikhaylov, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    A hands-on activity can help multivariable calculus students visualize surfaces and understand volume estimation. This activity can be extended to include the concepts of Fubini's Theorem and the visualization of the curves resulting from cross-sections of the surface. This activity uses students as pillars and a sheet or tablecloth for the…

  19. Impacts of ethanol-blended fuels release on groundwater aquifers and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10, two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol...

  20. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10, two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol...

  1. Toxics Release Inventory, 1996. Public data release: Ten years of right-to-know industry sector analyses

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This volume presents the data for 15 industrial sectors, identified by Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes, that are presently required to report to TRI. These chapters set the TRI data in context of economic, regulatory, and technological developments that influence industry-wide releases and other waste management. They also analyze reporting by industrial activities at the four-digit SIC code level. Industry sectors covered are: Food and Beverage Processing; Tobacco Products; Textile Mill Products; Apparel and Fabricated Textiles; Lumber and Wood Products; Furniture; Printing and Publishing; Rubber and Plastics Products; Leather and Leather Products; Stone, Clay, Glass, and Concrete; Fabricated Metals; Industrial Machinery; Transportation Equipment; Instruments and Photographic Equipment; and Miscellaneous Manufacturing.

  2. Disorders of Erythrocyte Volume Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Glogowska, Edyta; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited disorders of erythrocyte volume homeostasis are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders with phenotypes ranging from dehydrated to overhydrated erythrocytes. Clinical, laboratory, physiologic, and genetic heterogeneity characterize this group of disorders. A series of recent reports have provided novel insights into our understanding of the genetic bases underlying some of these disorders of red cell volume regulation. This report reviews this progress in understanding determinants that influence erythrocyte hydration and how they have yielded a better understanding of the pathways that influence cellular water and solute homeostasis. PMID:25976965

  3. Vector quantization for volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    Volume rendering techniques typically process volumetric data in raw, uncompressed form. As algorithmic and architectural advances improve rendering speeds, however, larger data sets will be evaluated requiring consideration of data storage and transmission issues. In this paper, we analyze the data compression requirements for volume rendering applications and present a solution based on vector quantization. The proposed system compresses volumetric data and then renders images directly from the new data format. Tests on a fluid flow data set demonstrate that good image quality may be achieved at a compression ratio of 17:1 with only a 5 percent cost in additional rendering time.

  4. Time-Critical Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Arie

    1998-01-01

    For the past twelve months, we have conducted and completed a joint research entitled "Time- Critical Volume Rendering" with NASA Ames. As expected, High performance volume rendering algorithms have been developed by exploring some new faster rendering techniques, including object presence acceleration, parallel processing, and hierarchical level-of-detail representation. Using our new techniques, initial experiments have achieved real-time rendering rates of more than 10 frames per second of various 3D data sets with highest resolution. A couple of joint papers and technique reports as well as an interactive real-time demo have been compiled as the result of this project.

  5. Foaming volume and foam stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Sydney

    1947-01-01

    A method of measuring foaming volume is described and investigated to establish the critical factors in its operation. Data on foaming volumes and foam stabilities are given for a series of hydrocarbons and for a range of concentrations of aqueous ethylene-glycol solutions. It is shown that the amount of foam formed depends on the machinery of its production as well as on properties of the liquid, whereas the stability of the foam produced, within specified mechanical limitations, is primarily a function of the liquid.

  6. Changes of Heavy Metals in Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTRs) in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Su; Bae, Mi-Jung; Park, Young-Seuk

    2014-01-01

    Industrial effluent containing heavy metals discharged into streams may pose high toxicity risks to aquatic organisms and to human health. Therefore, it is important to understand how to change the amount of effluent with heavy metals discharged from industries into open aquatic ecosystems both for effective management of heavy metals and to foster sustainable ecosystems. This study was conducted to characterize the release of heavy metals from industries based on the Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers database in Korea from 1999 to 2010. From the database, we selected nine heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Mn, Sb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Sn, and Ni) and compared the differences in their effluent for different types of industries. The heavy metal effluents released into freshwater ecosystems were classified into four clusters through the learning process of the self-organizing map. Cluster 1 was characterized by the relatively higher effluent volumes of heavy metals, whereas cluster 4 had lower effluent volumes. The different patterns of the effluent volumes in heavy metals were closely associated with the differences of industrial types, and the changes of effluents of heavy metals reflected the changes in regulations and laws for aquatic ecosystem management. PMID:24577281

  7. The preparation of the sustained release metformin hydrochloride microcapsules by the Wurster fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jin; Liu, Hongfei; Pan, Weisan; Sun, Changshan; Feng, Yingshu; Zhong, Hui; Shi, Shuang Shuang; He, Yan

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to prepare sustained release metformin hydrochloride microcapsules by the Wurster fluidized bed and to obtain the optimized coating process and formulation. Fine microcapsules without agglomeration were obtained in a continuous coating process with the atomization air pressure of 0.2Mpa and an appropriate coating speed temperature. With other design variables of coating process fixed, the effects of different fluidizing air volume, coating temperature, coating speed, coating material, coating materials amount, plasticizer type and plasticizer amount on drug release were investigated respectively. Coating solution was achieved by dissolving EC45cps of 21 g, EC100cps of 7 g, DBS of 2.8 g and talcum powder of 8 g in ethanol to get a final volume of 500 ml. Particles of 150g along with 500mL coating solution would be fine. The results showed that with the air volume of 35 m3•h-1, coating temperature of 35o, coating speed of 6 mL•min-1 and proper amount of coating solution, fine microcapsules were obtained. The mean diameter of the microcapsules obtained eventually were 213 μm and the drug content were 23%, which was suitable for producing a suspension. Particle diameter distribution corresponded to the normal distribution and obviously prolonged drug-release was achieved. PMID:25015440

  8. Changes of heavy metals in Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTRs) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Su; Bae, Mi-Jung; Park, Young-Seuk

    2014-03-01

    Industrial effluent containing heavy metals discharged into streams may pose high toxicity risks to aquatic organisms and to human health. Therefore, it is important to understand how to change the amount of effluent with heavy metals discharged from industries into open aquatic ecosystems both for effective management of heavy metals and to foster sustainable ecosystems. This study was conducted to characterize the release of heavy metals from industries based on the Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers database in Korea from 1999 to 2010. From the database, we selected nine heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Mn, Sb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Sn, and Ni) and compared the differences in their effluent for different types of industries. The heavy metal effluents released into freshwater ecosystems were classified into four clusters through the learning process of the self-organizing map. Cluster 1 was characterized by the relatively higher effluent volumes of heavy metals, whereas cluster 4 had lower effluent volumes. The different patterns of the effluent volumes in heavy metals were closely associated with the differences of industrial types, and the changes of effluents of heavy metals reflected the changes in regulations and laws for aquatic ecosystem management. PMID:24577281

  9. Electrically credible polymer gel for controlled release of drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ick Chan; Bae, You Han; Kim, Sung Wan

    1991-11-01

    NEW controlled drug-delivery systems are being explored to overcome the disadvantages of conventional dosage forms1. For example, stimulated drug-delivery has been used to overcome the tolerance problems that occur with a constant delivery rate, to mimic the physiological pattern of hormonal concentration and to supply drugs on demand1,2. Stimuli-sensitive polymers, which are potentially useful for pulsed drug delivery, experience changes in either their structure or their chemical properties in response to changes in environmental conditions2. Environmental stimuli include temperature3,4, pH5,6, light (ultraviolet7 or visible8), electric field9-12 or certain chemicals13. Volume changes of stimuli-sensitive gel networks are particularly responsive to external stimuli, but swelling is slow to occur14,15. As well as being useful in the controlled release of drugs, such systems also provide insight into intermolecular interactions16. Here we report on a novel polymeric system, which rapidly changes from a solid state to solution in response to small electric currents, by disintegration of the solid polymer complex into two water-soluble polymers. We show that the modulated release of insulin, and by extension other macromolecules, can be achieved with this polymeric system.

  10. Silver Dissolution and Release from Ceramic Water Filters.

    PubMed

    Mittelman, Anjuliee M; Lantagne, Daniele S; Rayner, Justine; Pennell, Kurt D

    2015-07-21

    Application of silver nanoparticles (nAg) or silver nitrate (AgNO3) has been shown to improve the microbiological efficacy of ceramic water filters used for household water treatment. Silver release, however, can lead to undesirable health effects and reduced filter effectiveness over time. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the contribution of nanoparticle detachment, dissolution, and cation exchange to silver elution, and to estimate silver retention under different influent water chemistries. Dissolved silver (Ag(+)) and nAg release from filter disks painted with 0.03 mg/g casein-coated nAg or AgNO3 were measured as a function of pH (5-9), ionic strength (1-50 mM), and cation species (Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)). Silver elution was controlled by dissolution as Ag(+) and subsequent cation exchange reactions regardless of the applied silver form. Effluent silver levels fell below the drinking water standard (0.1 mg/L) after flushing with 30-42 pore volumes of pH 7, 10 mM NaNO3 at pH 7. When the influent water was at pH 5, contained divalent cations or 50 mM NaNO3, silver concentrations were 5-10 times above the standard. Our findings support regular filter replacement and indicate that saline, hard, or acidic waters should be avoided to minimize effluent silver concentrations and preserve silver treatment integrity. PMID:26068303

  11. Global warming releases microplastic legacy frozen in Arctic Sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obbard, Rachel W.; Sadri, Saeed; Wong, Ying Qi; Khitun, Alexandra A.; Baker, Ian; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-06-01

    When sea ice forms it scavenges and concentrates particulates from the water column, which then become trapped until the ice melts. In recent years, melting has led to record lows in Arctic Sea ice extent, the most recent in September 2012. Global climate models, such as that of Gregory et al. (2002), suggest that the decline in Arctic Sea ice volume (3.4% per decade) will actually exceed the decline in sea ice extent, something that Laxon et al. (2013) have shown supported by satellite data. The extent to which melting ice could release anthropogenic particulates back to the open ocean has not yet been examined. Here we show that Arctic Sea ice from remote locations contains concentrations of microplastics at least two orders of magnitude greater than those that have been previously reported in highly contaminated surface waters, such as those of the Pacific Gyre. Our findings indicate that microplastics have accumulated far from population centers and that polar sea ice represents a major historic global sink of man-made particulates. The potential for substantial quantities of legacy microplastic contamination to be released to the ocean as the ice melts therefore needs to be evaluated, as do the physical and toxicological effects of plastics on marine life.

  12. Localized chemical release from an artificial synapse chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Mark C.; Noolandi, Jaan; Blumenkranz, Mark S.; Fishman, Harvey A.

    2004-07-01

    A device that releases chemical compounds in small volumes and at multiple, well defined locations would be a powerful tool for clinical therapeutics and biological research. Many biomedical devices such as neurotransmitter-based prostheses or drug delivery devices require precise release of chemical compounds. Additionally, the ability to control chemical gradients will have applications in basic research such as studies of cell microenvironments, stem cell niches, metaplasia, or chemotaxis. We present such a device with repeatable delivery of chemical compounds at multiple locations on a chip surface. Using electroosmosis to drive flow through microfluidic channels, we pulse minute quantities of a bradykinin solution through four 5-µm apertures onto PC12 cells and show stimulation of individual cells using a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye. We also present basic computational results with experimental verification of both fluid ejection and fluid withdrawal by imaging pH changes by using a fluorescent dye. This "artificial synapse chip" is a prototype neural interface that introduces a new paradigm for neural stimulation, with eventual application in treating macular degeneration and other neurological disorders.

  13. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  14. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  15. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  16. Carnegie Observatories Astrophysics 4 Volume Hardback Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis

    2004-11-01

    Volume 1: Coevolution of Black Holes and Galaxies Luis C. Ho. Volume 2: Measuring and Modelling the Universe Wendy L. Freedman. Volume 3: Clusters of Galaxies John S. Mulchaey, Alan Dressler and Augustus Oemler. Volume 4: Origin and Evolution of the Elements Andrew McWilliam and Michael Rauch.

  17. Carnegie Observatories Astrophysics 4 Volume Paperback Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis

    2011-11-01

    Volume 1: Coevolution of Black Holes and Galaxies Luis C. Ho. Volume 2: Measuring and Modelling the Universe Wendy L. Freedman. Volume 3: Clusters of Galaxies John S. Mulchaey, Alan Dressler and Augustus Oemler. Volume 4: Origin and Evolution of the Elements Andrew McWilliam and Michael Rauch.

  18. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  19. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  20. HANDBOOK: GROUND WATER VOLUME II: METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook is an extensively revised version of the Ground Water Handbook, originally published in 1987 as EPA/625/6-87/016. It has been published in two volumes: Volume I: Ground Water and Contamination, EPA/625/6-90/016a, and Volume II: Methodology, EPA/625/6-90/016b. Volume...