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Sample records for jrvi magnus kallas

  1. Site investigation for Magnus

    SciTech Connect

    Semple, R.M.; Rigden, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    In April 1982, BP's Magnus structure was installed about 150 km northeast of the Shetland Islands. The most northerly, deepest water platform in the North Sea, the steel tower is supported on groups of 2 m diameter piles that were driven, in good accordance with predictions, to an average penetration of 85 m in strong cohesive soils. The paper describes investigations performed at the platform site, and documents soil characteristics for conventional and state of the art pile analyses. Reference is made to several innovative techniques first used at the Magnus site that have since been incorporated into the larger North Sea investigations. Information is given about the geological history of the site. Test results are presented on soil strength and stiffness, including critical state soil mechanics parameters, on residual pore pressures after sampling, and on the effect of sample size on strength characteristics.

  2. Rotary and Magnus balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, G. N.

    1981-01-01

    Two wind tunnel techniques for determining part of the aerodynamic information required to describe the dynamic bahavior of various types of vehicles in flight are described. Force and moment measurements are determined with a rotary-balance apparatus in a coning motion and with a Magnus balance in a high-speed spinning motion. Coning motion is pertinent to both aircraft and missiles, and spinning is important for spin stabilized missiles. Basic principles of both techniques are described, and specific examples of each type of apparatus are presented. Typical experimental results are also discussed.

  3. Magnus effect power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, J.L.; Borg, C.J.

    1984-05-01

    Magnus cylinders are mounted for rotation at right angles to shafts that are revolved about a generally vertical axis. The shafts are free to rotate 180/sup 0/. The Magnus cylinders are continuously rotated in the same angular direction. At one position of revolution of the shafts, the cylinders rotate on an axis generally parallel to the axis of revolution of the shafts. When the apparatus is immersed in a fluid flow (gaseous or liquid) a torque of rotation is developed when the shafts are aligned with the fluid flow, and this torque of rotation is reduced as the shaft approaches a position transverse to the fluid flow. As the shafts pass this transverse position, a torque is developed by the rotating cylinder that rotates the shafts 180/sup 0/ until the formerly downwardly depending cylinder is now upright and the formerly upright cylinder is now downwardly depending on its shaft. With two or more shafts to which cylinders are attached, there is a continuous production of torque about the axis of revolution of the shafts.

  4. Magnus air turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Thomas F.

    1982-01-01

    A Magnus effect windmill for generating electrical power is disclosed. A large nacelle-hub mounted pivotally (in Azimuth) atop a support tower carries, in the example disclosed, three elongated barrels arranged in a vertical plane and extending symmetrically radially outwardly from the nacelle. The system provides spin energy to the barrels by internal mechanical coupling in the proper sense to cause, in reaction to an incident wind, a rotational torque of a predetermined sense on the hub. The rotating hub carries a set of power take-off rollers which ride on a stationary circular track in the nacelle. Shafts carry the power, given to the rollers by the wind driven hub, to a central collector or accumulator gear assembly whose output is divided to drive the spin mechanism for the Magnus barrels and the main electric generator. A planetary gear assembly is interposed between the collector gears and the spin mechanism functioning as a differential which is also connected to an auxiliary electric motor whereby power to the spin mechanism may selectively be provided by the motor. Generally, the motor provides initial spin to the barrels for start-up after which the motor is braked and the spin mechanism is driven as though by a fixed ratio coupling from the rotor hub. During high wind or other unusual conditions, the auxiliary motor may be unbraked and excess spin power may be used to operate the motor as a generator of additional electrical output. Interposed between the collector gears of the rotating hub and the main electric generator is a novel variable speed drive-fly wheel system which is driven by the variable speed of the wind driven rotor and which, in turn, drives the main electric generator at constant angular speed. Reference is made to the complete specification for disclosure of other novel aspects of the system such as, for example, the aerodynamic and structural aspects of the novel Magnus barrels as well as novel gearing and other power coupling

  5. Magnus effects on spinning transonic missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Rosenwasser, I.

    1983-01-01

    Magnus forces and moments were measured on a basic-finner model spinning in transonic flow. Spin was induced by canted fins or by full-span or semi-span, outboard and inboard roll controls. Magnus force and moment reversals were caused by Mach number, reduced spin rate, and angle of attack variations. Magnus center of pressure was found to be independent of the angle of attack but varied with the Mach number and model configuration or reduced spin rate.

  6. Magnus approximation in neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Mario A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; D'Olivo, J. C.

    2011-04-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some anomalous experimental observations. In a four-neutrino (three active plus one sterile) mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos with energies of the order of a few GeV, taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  7. Magnus force effect in optical manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cipparrone, Gabriella; Pagliusi, Pasquale; Hernandez, Raul Josue; Provenzano, Clementina

    2011-07-15

    The effect of the Magnus force in optical micromanipulation has been observed. An ad hoc experiment has been designed based on a one-dimensional optical trap that carries angular momentum. The observed particle dynamics reveals the occurrence of this hydrodynamic force, which is neglected in the common approach. Its measured value is larger than the one predicted by the existing theoretical models for micrometric particles and low Reynolds number, showing that the Magnus force can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  8. Magnus force effect in optical manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipparrone, Gabriella; Hernandez, Raul Josue; Pagliusi, Pasquale; Provenzano, Clementina

    2011-07-01

    The effect of the Magnus force in optical micromanipulation has been observed. An ad hoc experiment has been designed based on a one-dimensional optical trap that carries angular momentum. The observed particle dynamics reveals the occurrence of this hydrodynamic force, which is neglected in the common approach. Its measured value is larger than the one predicted by the existing theoretical models for micrometric particles and low Reynolds number, showing that the Magnus force can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  9. A Pedagogical Approach to the Magnus Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanes, S.; Casas, F.; Oteo, J. A.; Ros, J.

    2010-01-01

    Time-dependent perturbation theory as a tool to compute approximate solutions of the Schrodinger equation does not preserve unitarity. Here we present, in a simple way, how the "Magnus expansion" (also known as "exponential perturbation theory") provides such unitary approximate solutions. The purpose is to illustrate the importance and…

  10. Lead-Bismuth Activities at the Karlsruhe Lead Laboratory KALLA

    SciTech Connect

    Knebel, Joachim U.; Muller, Georg; Konys, Jurgen

    2002-07-01

    At Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) the characteristics of an accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS) are evaluated, mainly with respect to the potential of transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products, to the feasibility and to safety aspects. All experimental activities, which are related to lead-bismuth as cooling fluid and spallation material, are performed in the Karlsruhe Lead Laboratory KALLA. This article gives an overview on KALLA, which has three stagnant experiments and three loop experiments. The stagnant experiments are concentrating on corrosion mechanisms, surface treatment, oxygen sensor development, and oxygen control system (OCS), the loop experiments are concentrating on thermalhydraulic measurement techniques, ADS-relevant component testing, and corrosion investigations in flowing lead-bismuth. A fourth loop experiment is planned to investigate the integral heat removal from a 4 MW spallation target for normal and decay heat removal conditions. Among others, latest results are presented of: characteristics of oxygen sensors in flowing liquid Pb-Bi, the oxygen control system (OCS) operating on a loop system, an ultrasonic flow meter applied to lead-bismuth at 400 deg. C. In addition, results are given on the improvement of the corrosion resistivity of steels in flowing lead-bismuth, using a special temperature treatment method (electron beam facility GESA) and alloying aluminium in the surface layer. (authors)

  11. New twist to steering. [Magnus effect rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The new vessel steering system is based on The Magnus Effect which is defined in simplified terms; if a vertical cylinder immersed in water is rotated, it produces a force at right angles to the direction of the water flowing past it. The Magnus Effect rotor needs only sufficient torque to overcome bearing and surface friction forces, so that the power requirements are very low. Further energy savings are realized because the rotor can develop maximum turning force or can return to zero in a few seconds. Tests with these cylindrical rudders have been conducted to verify the hydrodynamic theory. This concept is in the preliminary stages of development. Results are expected soon from field testing on an 1800-hp pushboat working four barges on the Warrior and Tombigbee Rivers in Alabama and Mississippi.

  12. Inverse Magnus effect on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of rotating spheres in the subcritical Reynolds number (Re) regime by measuring the drag and lift forces on the sphere and the two-dimensional velocity in the wake. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 6 ×105 - 2 . 6 ×105 and the spin ratio (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 0.5. The drag coefficient on a stationary sphere remains nearly constant at around 0.52. However, the magnitude of lift coefficient is nearly zero at Re < 2 . 0 ×105 , but rapidly increases to 0.3 and then remains constant with further increasing Reynolds number. On the other hand, with rotation, the lift coefficient shows negative values, called inverse Magnus effect, depending on the magnitudes of the Reynolds number and spin ratio. The velocity field measured from a particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that non-zero lift coefficient on a stationary sphere at Re > 2 . 0 ×105 results from the asymmetry of separation line, whereas the inverse Magnus effect for the rotating sphere results from the differences in the boundary-layer growth and separation along the upper and lower sphere surfaces. Supported by the WCU, Converging Research Center and Priority Research Centers Program, NRF, MEST, Korea.

  13. Magnus force in superfluids and superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sonin, E.B. |

    1997-01-01

    The forces on the vortex, transverse to its velocity, are considered. In addition to the superfluid Magnus force from the condensate (superfluid component), there are transverse forces from thermal quasiparticles and external fields violating the Galilean invariance. The forces between quasiparticles and the vortex originate from interference of quasiparticles with trajectories on the left and on the right from the vortex like similar forces for electrons interacting with the thin magnetic-flux tube (the Aharonov-Bohm effect). These forces are derived for phonons from the equations of superfluid hydrodynamics, and for BCS quasiparticles from the Bogolyubov{endash}de Gennes equations. The effect of external fields breaking Galilean invariance is analyzed for vortices in the two-dimensional Josephson junction array. The symmetry analysis of the classical equations for the array shows that the total transverse force on the vortex vanishes. Therefore the Hall effect which is linear in the transverse force is absent also. This means that the Magnus force from the superfluid component {ital exactly} cancels with the transverse force from the external fields. The results of other approaches are also brought together for discussion. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Magnus forces and statistics in 2 + 1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.L. )

    1990-05-10

    Spinning vortex solutions to the abelian Higgs model, not Nielsen-Olesen solutions, are appropriate to a Ginzburg-Landau description of superconductivity. The main physical distinction is that spinning vortices experience the Magnus force while Nielsen-Olesen vortices do not. In 2 + 1 dimensional superconductivity without a Chern-Simons interaction, the effect of the Magnus force is equivalent to that of a background fictitious magnetic field. Moreover, the phase obtained an interchanging two quasi-particles is always path-dependent. When a Chern-Simons term is added there is an additional localized Magnus flux at the vortex. For point-like vortices, the Chern-Simons interaction can be seen as defining their intrinsic statistics, but in realistic cases of vortices with finite size in strong Magnus fields the quasi-particle statistics are not well-defined.

  15. The Magnus Effect in Theory and in Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborn, F

    1930-01-01

    A discussion of the Flettner rotor is presented from a nautical and economic viewpoint, and although it was a failure, the experimental and theoretical inventions cannot be disregarded. The following critical and experimental investigation will show the relations and applicability of the theories and practical applications. The Magnus effect is described in detail and a discussion and critical review of the Magnus effect is included.

  16. MAGNUS-3D: Accelerator magnet calculations in 3-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pissanetzky, S.

    1988-12-01

    MAGNUS-3D is a professional finite element code for nonlinear magnetic engineering. MAGNUS-3D can solve numerically any general problem of linear or nonlinear magnetostatics in three dimensions. The problem is formulated in a domain with Dirichlet, Neumann or periodic boundary conditions, that can contain any combination of conductors of any shape in space, nonlinear magnetic materials with magnetic properties specified by magnetization tables, and nonlinear permanent magnets with any given demagnetization curve. MAGNUS-3D uses the two-scalar-potentials formulation of Magnetostatics and the finite element method, has an automatic 3D mesh generator, and advanced post-processing features that include graphics on a variety of supported devices, tabulation, and calculation of design quantities required in Magnetic Engineering. MAGNUS-3D is a general purpose 3D code, but it has been extensively used for accelerator work and many special features required for accelerator engineering have been incorporated into the code. One of such features is the calculation of field harmonic coefficients averaged in the direction of the beam, so important for the design of magnet ends. Another feature is its ability to calculate line integrals of any field component along the direction of the beam, or plot the field as a function of the z coordinate. MAGNUS-3D has found applications to the design of accelerator magnets and spectrometers, steering magnets, wigglers and undulators for free electron lasers, microtrons and magnets for synchrotron light sources, as well as magnets for NMR and medical applications, recording heads and various magnetic devices. There are three more programs closely associated with MAGNUS-3D. MAGNUS-GKS is the graphical postprocessor for the package; it supports a numer of output devices, including color vector or bit map devices. WIRE is an independent program that can calculate the field produced by any configuration of electric conductors in space, at any

  17. Magnus force in discrete and continuous two-dimensional superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Gecse, Z.; Khlebnikov, S.

    2005-08-01

    Motion of vortices in two-dimensional superfluids in the classical limit is studied by solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation numerically on a uniform lattice. We find that, in the presence of a superflow directed along one of the main lattice periods, vortices move with the superflow on fine lattices but perpendicular to it on coarse ones. We interpret this result as a transition from the full Magnus force in a Galilean-invariant limit to vanishing effective Magnus force in a discrete system, in agreement with the existing experiments on vortex motion in Josephson junction arrays.

  18. Anatomy of the Adductor Magnus Origin

    PubMed Central

    Obey, Mitchel R.; Broski, Stephen M.; Spinner, Robert J.; Collins, Mark S.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adductor magnus (AM) has historically been a potential source of confusion in patients with suspected proximal hamstring avulsion injuries. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic characteristics of the AM, including its osseous origin, anatomic dimensions, and relationship to the proximal hamstring tendons. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Dissection of the AM origin was performed in 11 (8 cadavers) fresh-frozen hip-to-foot cadaveric hemipelvis specimens. The gross anatomy and architecture of the proximal hamstring and AM tendons were studied. After dissecting the hamstring tendons away from their origin, the dimension, shape, and orientation of the tendon footprints on the ischial tuberosity were determined. Results: The AM was identified in all cadaveric specimens. The mean tendon thickness (anterior to posterior [AP]) was 5.7 ± 2.9 mm. The mean tendon width (medial to lateral [ML]) was 7.1 ± 2.2 mm. The mean tendon length was 13.1 ± 8.7 cm. The mean footprint height (AP dimension) was 12.1 ± 2.9 mm, and mean footprint width (ML dimension) was 17.3 ± 7.1 mm. The mean distance between the AM footprint and the most medial aspect of the conjoint tendon footprint was 8.5 ± 4.2 mm. Tendon measurements demonstrated a considerable degree of both intra- and interspecimen variability. Conclusion: The AM tendon is consistently present just medial to the conjoint tendon at the ischial tuberosity, representing the lateral-most portion of the AM muscle. This study found wide variation in the dimensional characteristics of the AM tendon between specimens. Its shape and location can mimic the appearance of an intact hamstring (conjoint or semimembranosus) tendon intraoperatively or on diagnostic imaging, potentially misleading surgeons and radiologists. Therefore, detailed knowledge of the AM tendon anatomy, footprint anatomy, and its relationship to the hamstring muscle complex is paramount when planning surgical approach and technique

  19. The "Magnus effect" - the principle of the Flettner rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1925-01-01

    The phenomenon of the Magnus effect consists in the fact that a revolving body moving relatively to the surrounding fluid (air) is subjected not only to drag (i.e., a force acting in a direction opposite to that of the direction of motion), but also to a lift.

  20. Magnus Strandqvist: 50th anniversary of his doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Kajanti, M J

    1994-01-01

    This article is dedicated to Magnus Strandqvist's famous doctoral thesis "Studien über die kumulative Wirkung der Röntgenstrahlen bei Fraktionierung. Erfahrungen aus dem Radiumhemmet an 280 Haut- und Lippenkarzinomen" published in Acta Radiologica in 1944. After a short biography of Strandqvist some central points of his work and their influence on future development of modern radiotherapy are presented. PMID:7993639

  1. A review of the Magnus effect in aeronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Jost

    2012-11-01

    The Magnus effect is well-known for its influence on the flight path of a spinning ball. Besides ball games, the method of producing a lift force by spinning a body of revolution in cross-flow was not used in any kind of commercial application until the year 1924, when Anton Flettner invented and built the first rotor ship Buckau. This sailboat extracted its propulsive force from the airflow around two large rotating cylinders. It attracted attention wherever it was presented to the public and inspired scientists and engineers to use a rotating cylinder as a lifting device for aircraft. This article reviews the application of Magnus effect devices and concepts in aeronautics that have been investigated by various researchers and concludes with discussions on future challenges in their application.

  2. Numerical simulation of negative Magnus force on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Flow characteristics and fluid force on a sphere rotating along with axis perpendicular to mean air flow were investigated using Large Eddy Simulation at two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 200,000. As a result of simulation, opposite flow characteristics around the sphere and displacement of the separation point were visualized depending on the Reynolds number even though the sphere rotates at the same rotation speed according to the Reynolds number. When Reynolds number is 10,000, flow characteristics agree with the flow field explained in the Magnus effect. However sphere rotates at the same rotation speed while increasing Reynolds number to 200,000, separation point moves in opposite direction and wake appears in the different direction. The reason of the negative Magnus force was discussed in terms of the boundary layer transition on the surface.

  3. Magnus expansion and in-medium similarity renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, T. D.; Parzuchowski, N. M.; Bogner, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    We present an improved variant of the in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG) based on the Magnus expansion. In the new formulation, one solves flow equations for the anti-Hermitian operator that, upon exponentiation, yields the unitary transformation of the IM-SRG. The resulting flow equations can be solved using a first-order Euler method without any loss of accuracy, resulting in substantial memory savings and modest computational speedups. Since one obtains the unitary transformation directly, the transformation of additional operators beyond the Hamiltonian can be accomplished with little additional cost, in sharp contrast to the standard formulation of the IM-SRG. Ground state calculations of the homogeneous electron gas (HEG) and 16O nucleus are used as test beds to illustrate the efficacy of the Magnus expansion.

  4. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  5. A new 5-alkylresorcinol glucoside derivative from Cybianthus magnus.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, B; Vásquez-Ocmín, P; Zebiri, I; Rengifo, E; Sauvain, M; Le, H L; Vaisberg, A; Voutquenne-Nazabadioko, L; Haddad, M

    2016-01-01

    One new 5-alkylresorcinol glucoside (1) was isolated from leaves of Cybianthus magnus, along with 12 known compounds (2-13), isolated from four plants belonging to Myrsinaceae family. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison of their spectral data with those reported in the literature. Among the tested molecules, only compound 2 displayed a strong cytotoxic activity with IC50 values ranging between 22 and 100 μM for all cell lines tested. One new 5-alkylresorcinol glucoside (1) was isolated from leaves of Cybianthus magnus, along with 12 known compounds, isolated from four plants belonging to Myrsinaceae family (2, 3 isolated from C. magnus; 4-7, 10 and 11 isolated from Myrsine latifolia; 4, 8 and 9 isolated from Myrsine sessiflora; 6, 7, 10, 12 and 13 isolated from Myrsine congesta). Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison of their spectral data with those reported in the literature. So far, only nine 5-alkylresorcinol glucosides were isolated from leaves of Grevillea robusta. Since resorcinols are known to exhibit strong cytotoxic activity, compounds 1 and 2 were tested against cell lines 3T3, H460, DU145 and MCF-7 for cytotoxicity in vitro and compounds 3-13 were tested for their antileishmanial activity. Compound 2 displayed a strong cytotoxic activity with IC50 values ranging between 22 and 100 μM for all tested cell lines. Compounds 3-13 were not active against Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes. PMID:26181307

  6. [Magnus Hirschfeld and monism: mutual fertilization or exchange of errors?].

    PubMed

    Mildenberger, Florian

    2007-01-01

    When Ernst Haeckel was buried in Jena on February 12th, 1919, some of his supporters and followers were allowed to make speeches. One of them was the sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld, although he had entered the German-Monist-Club only six years after its foundation in 1906. He became one of the most important monists, because he worked in the fields of sexuality and eugenics, and was head of discourse for many years. But he imported some ideas of his colleagues for his own studies, especially the neolamarckism. The failure of this theory had decisive consequences for monism and sexology, as well. PMID:18354891

  7. STS-112 M.S. Magnus suits up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus finishes suiting up before launch. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. Launch is scheduled for 3:46 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  8. Vacancy-rearrangement theory in the first Magnus approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    In the present paper we employ the first Magnus approximation (M1A), a unitarized Born approximation, in semiclassical collision theory. We have found previously that the M1A gives a substantial improvement over the first Born approximation (B1A) and can give a good approximation to a full coupled channels calculation of the mean L-shell vacancy probability per electron, p/sub L/, when the L-vacancies are accompanied by a K-shell vacancy (p/sub L/ is obtained experimentally from measurements of K/sub ..cap alpha../-satellite intensities). For sufficiently strong projectile-electron interactions (sufficiently large Z/sub p/ or small v) the M1A ceases to reproduce the coupled channels results, but it is accurate over a much wider range of Z/sub p/ and v than the B1A. 27 references.

  9. Role of transverse-momentum currents in the optical Magnus effect in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun; Shu, Weixing; Fan, Dianyuan

    2010-05-01

    We establish a general vector field model to describe the role of transverse-momentum currents in the optical Magnus effect in free space. As an analogy of the mechanical Magnus effect, the circularly polarized wave packet in our model acts as the rotating ball, and its rotation direction depends on the polarization state. Based on this model, we demonstrate the existence of an optical polarization-dependent Magnus effect which is significantly different from the conventional optical Magnus effect in that light-matter interaction is not required. Further, we reveal the relation between transverse-momentum currents and the optical Magnus effect, and find that such a polarization-dependent rotation is unavoidable when the wave packet possesses transverse-momentum currents. The physics underlying this intriguing effect is the combined contributions of transverse spin and orbital currents. We predict that this effect may be observed experimentally even in the propagation direction. These findings provide further evidence for the optical Magnus effect in free space and can be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  10. Role of transverse-momentum currents in the optical Magnus effect in free space

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Hailu; Wen Shuangchun; Shu Weixing; Fan Dianyuan

    2010-05-15

    We establish a general vector field model to describe the role of transverse-momentum currents in the optical Magnus effect in free space. As an analogy of the mechanical Magnus effect, the circularly polarized wave packet in our model acts as the rotating ball, and its rotation direction depends on the polarization state. Based on this model, we demonstrate the existence of an optical polarization-dependent Magnus effect which is significantly different from the conventional optical Magnus effect in that light-matter interaction is not required. Further, we reveal the relation between transverse-momentum currents and the optical Magnus effect, and find that such a polarization-dependent rotation is unavoidable when the wave packet possesses transverse-momentum currents. The physics underlying this intriguing effect is the combined contributions of transverse spin and orbital currents. We predict that this effect may be observed experimentally even in the propagation direction. These findings provide further evidence for the optical Magnus effect in free space and can be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  11. Origin of the Magnus force on a vortex in fermion superfluids and superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Simanek, E.

    1995-10-01

    Starting from the time-dependent version of the Feynman-Hellmann theorem, the Magnus force acting on a vortex in fermion superfluid is expressed via the adiabatic curvature over the space of vortex positions. With use of the Bogoliubov--de Gennes approximation, the Magnus force in a homogeneous superfluid at {ital T}=0 is shown to originate from virtual transitions between the lowest quasiparticle core bound states. Nonadiabatic corrections to the curvature are obtained to second order in vortex velocity. The adiabatic approximation is shown to break down at a critical velocity equal to the vortex velocity in the first Landau level. The effect of elastic scattering on the Magnus force is discussed in terms of the relaxation-time approximation. It is suggested that this approximation is appropriate only for a large-scale vortex motion. In this case, the effective Magnus force is drastically reduced when the elastic-scattering rate exceeds the core excitation frequency. We conjecture that quantum vortex tunneling is governed by a local Magnus force obtained from the Berry phase approach.

  12. Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Ray, D.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.

    2015-07-01

    We show using numerical simulations that pronounced ratchet effects can occur for ac driven skyrmions moving over asymmetric quasi-one-dimensional substrates. We find a new type of ratchet effect called a Magnus-induced transverse ratchet that arises when the ac driving force is applied perpendicular rather than parallel to the asymmetry direction of the substrate. This transverse ratchet effect only occurs when the Magnus term is finite, and the threshold ac amplitude needed to induce it decreases as the Magnus term becomes more prominent. Ratcheting skyrmions follow ordered orbits in which the net displacement parallel to the substrate asymmetry direction is quantized. Skyrmion ratchets represent a new ac current-based method for controlling skyrmion positions and motion for spintronic applications.

  13. Magnus force and the inertial properties of magnetic vortices in weak ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvezdin, A. K.; Zvezdin, K. A.

    2010-08-01

    The Magnus force (gyroscopic force) acting on magnetic vortices (Bloch lines) within domain boundaries in weak ferromagnets is discussed. A general formula is derived for the Magnus force in weak ferromagnets. The Magnus force is found to be nonzero for most types of domain boundaries and is determined by the average sublattice magnetization and the constants for the Dzyaloshinsky interaction and the exchange interaction between sublattices. Generalized expressions are obtained for the effective Lagrange and Rayleigh functions in weak ferromagnets taking their vortex structure into account. The question of the vortex mass, which has been found to be on the order of m*˜10-14g/cm in YFeO3, is discussed. The dynamic flexure of domain boundaries when moving vortices are present is analyzed. A formula is derived for the magnetic field dependence of the velocity of a vortex in a motionless domain boundary.

  14. Computations of the Magnus effect for slender bodies in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturek, W. B.; Schiff, L. B.

    1980-01-01

    A recently reported Parabolized Navier-Stokes code has been employed to compute the supersonic flow field about spinning cone, ogive-cylinder, and boattailed bodies of revolution at moderate incidence. The computations were performed for flow conditions where extensive measurements for wall pressure, boundary layer velocity profiles and Magnus force had been obtained. Comparisons between the computational results and experiment indicate excellent agreement for angles of attack up to six degrees. The comparisons for Magnus effects show that the code accurately predicts the effects of body shape and Mach number for the selected models for Mach numbers in the range of 2-4.

  15. Effect of Magnus force on the scale deposition in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, E.E.

    1981-12-01

    The Magnus lift force acts on solid particles present in vertical flows. The action of this force facilitates the mechanism of deposition. In upward flow (production wells), the turbulent fluctuations are necessary for the mechanism of deposition since they bring the particle into the laminar sublayer. In the downward flow, the Magnus force consistently acts toward the wall and turbulent fluctuations are no longer necessary for the mechanism of deposition. If the particle reaches the laminar sublayer, the forces acting on it will keep it near the wall until it is deposited. 10 refs.

  16. Anisotropic Magnus Force in Type-II Superconductors with Planar Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroy, Ricardo Vega; Gomez, Eliceo Cortés

    2015-02-01

    The effect of planar defects on the Magnus force in type-II superconductors is studied. It is shown that the deformation of the vortex due to the presence of a planar defect leads to a local decrease in the mean free path of electrons in the vortex. This effect reduces the effective Magnus coefficient in normal direction to the planar defect, leading to an anisotropic regime of the Hall effect. The presented developments here can qualitatively explain experimental observations of the anisotropic Hall effect in high- T c superconductors in the mixed state.

  17. Negative Magnus Effect on a Rotating Sphere at around the Critical Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2011-12-01

    Negative Magnus lift acting on a sphere rotating about the axis perpendicular to an incoming flow is investigated using large-eddy simulation at three Reynolds numbers of 1.0× 104, 2.0 × 105, and 1.14 × 106. The numerical methods adopted are first validated on a non-rotating sphere and the spatial resolution around the sphere is determined so as to reproduce the laminar separation, reattachment, and turbulent transition of the boundary layer observed at around the critical Reynolds number. In the rotating sphere, positive or negative Magnus effect is observed depending on the Reynolds number and the rotating speed imposed. At the Reynolds number in the subcritical or supercritical region, the direction of the lift force follows the Magnus effect to be independent of the rotational speed tested here. In contrast, negative lift is observed at the Reynolds number at the critical region when particular rotating speeds are imposed. The negative Magnus effect is discussed in the context of the suppression or promotion of boundary layer transition around the separation point.

  18. Negative Magnus lift on a rotating sphere at around the critical Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Negative Magnus lift acting on a sphere rotating about the axis perpendicular to an incoming flow was investigated using large-eddy simulation at three Reynolds numbers of 1.0 × 104, 2.0 × 105, and 1.14 × 106. The numerical methods used were first validated on a non-rotating sphere, and the spatial resolution around the sphere was determined so as to reproduce the laminar separation, reattachment, and turbulent transition of the boundary layer observed in the vicinity of the critical Reynolds number. The rotating sphere exhibited a positive or negative Magnus effect depending on the Reynolds number and the imposed rotating speed. At Reynolds numbers in the subcritical or supercritical regimes, the direction of the Magnus lift force was independent of the rotational speed. In contrast, the lift force was negative in the critical regime when particular rotating speeds were imposed. This negative Magnus effect was investigated in the context of suppression or promotion of boundary layer transition around the separation point.

  19. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.

    2015-04-01

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  20. Synodic Period for 2454 Olaus Magnus from Frank T. Etscorn Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Angelica

    2013-04-01

    The main-belt asteroid 2454 Olaus Magnus was observed between 2012 October 6 and November 6 at Etscorn Observatory. Analysis found a synodic period of 3.804 ± 0.002 h and amplitude of 0.39 ± 0.10 mag.

  1. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takegoshi, K. Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.

    2015-04-07

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  2. Response to Yiannis Miralis, "Manos Hadjidakis: The Story of an Anarchic Youth and a "Magnus Eroticus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serghi, Lenia

    2004-01-01

    Manos Hadjidakis and his work are like his song, "O Mythos," for they take you from reality to fantasy and bring you back again. In Magnus Eroticus, the combination of lyrics and music is at the highest level of sensibility and the musical style of each song is superb. Music follows the verse to express its deepest meaning while maintaining its…

  3. Simulation of Effects of the Saffman Force and the Magnus Force on Sand Saltation in Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Zou, Xueyong; Yang, Xiaofan; Cheng, Hong

    2011-12-11

    The effects of both the Saffman force and Magnus force on sand saltation are investigated. Turbulent flows in a channel and over a barchans dune are considered with sand particles injected into the flow. The results show that both of the forces increase the height and skipping distance of sand saltation, with the Magnus force giving more significant effect on the height. These forces can also increase the sand settling at the lee side of the barchans dune.

  4. Distribution, chemistry, isotopic composition and origin of diagenetic carbonates: Magnus Sandstone, North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Macaulay, C.I.; Haszeldine, R.S. ); Fallick, A.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Diagenetic ferroan carbonates grew in the Upper Jurassic reservoir sandstones of the Magnus oilfield in porewaters which differed in composition across the field. These porewaters remained compositionally different and stratified for at least 35 M.y. Variations in carbonate chemistry across the field are attributable to these porewater variations, which resulted from displacement of marine depositional water from the crest of the field by meteoric water during late Cimmerian subaerial exposure. Original depositional facies and detrital mineralogy strongly influenced diagenetic carbonate distribution. The objective of this paper is twofold: (1) to describe the occurrence of burial diagenetic magnesian siderite and ankerite from the Magnus Sandstone, and (2) to show that variations in the elemental and isotopic geochemistry of siderite and ankerite relate to long-lived variations in the composition of the porewaters in the sandstone during diagenesis.

  5. The Magnus expansion and the in-medium similarity renormalization group

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T. D.; Bogner, S. K.

    2014-10-15

    We present a variant of the in-medium similarity renormalization group(IMSRG) based on the Magnus expansion. In this new variant, the unitary transformation of the IMSRG is constructed explicitly, which allows for the transformation of observables quickly and easily. Additionally, the stiffness of equations encountered by the traditional solution of the IMSRG can be alleviated greatly. We present results and comparisons for the 3d electron gas.

  6. The Magnus-Rademaker Scientific Film Collection: Ethical Issues on Animal Experimentation (1908-1940).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J; Lameris, Bregt

    2016-01-01

    The Magnus-Rademaker scientific film collection (1908-1940) deals with the physiology of body posture by the equilibrium of reflex musculature contractions for which experimental studies were carried out with animals (e.g., labyrinthectomies, cerebellectomies, and brain stem sections) as well as observations done on patients. The films were made for demonstrations at congresses as well as educational objectives and film stills were published in their books. The purpose of the present study is to position these films and their makers within the contemporary discourse on ethical issues and animal rights in the Netherlands and the earlier international debates. Following an introduction on animal rights and antivivisection movements, we describe what Magnus and Rademaker thought about these issues. Their publications did not provide much information in this respect, probably reflecting their adherence to implicit ethical codes that did not need explicit mentioning in publications. Newspaper articles, however, revealed interesting information. Unnecessary suffering of an animal never found mercy in Magnus' opinion. The use of cinematography was expanded to the reduction of animal experimentation in student education, at least in the case of Rademaker, who in the 1930s was involved in a governmental committee for the regulation of vivisection and cooperated with the antivivisection movement. This resulted not only in a propaganda film for the movement but also in films that demonstrate physiological experiments for students with the purpose to avert repetition and to improve the teaching of experiments. We were able to identify the pertinent films in the Magnus-Rademaker film collection. The production of vivisection films with this purpose appears to have been common, as is shown in news messages in European medical journals of the period. PMID:26684427

  7. Curveballs in protoplanetary discs - the effect of the Magnus force on planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, John C.

    2015-10-01

    Spinning planetesimals in a gaseous protoplanetary disc may experience a hydrodynamical force perpendicular to their relative velocities. We examine the effect this force has on the dynamics of these objects using analytical arguments based on a simple laminar disc model and numerical integrations of the equations of motion for individual grains. We focus in particular on metre-sized boulders traditionally expected to spiral in to the central star in as little as 100 years from 1 au We find that there are plausible scenarios in which this force extends the lifetime of these solids in the disc by a factor of several. More importantly the velocities induced by the Magnus force can prevent the formation of planetesimals via gravitational instability in the inner disc if the size of the dust particles is larger than of the order of 10 cm. We find that the fastest growing linear modes of the streaming instability may still grow despite the diffusive effect of the Magnus force, but it remains to be seen how the Magnus force will alter the non-linear evolution of these instabilities.

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sexual oribatid mite Steganacarus magnus: genome rearrangements and loss of tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Domes, Katja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Cameron, Stephen L

    2008-01-01

    Background Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes and the gene rearrangements therein are increasingly used as molecular markers for investigating phylogenetic relationships, especially for elucidating deep splits. Contributing to the complete mt genomes of arthropods, especially Arachnida, available so far, we provide the first complete mt genome of a sarcoptiform mite species, the sexually reproducing oribatid mite Steganacarus magnus (Acari, Oribatida) which was determined by sequencing of long PCR products. Results The mt genome of S. magnus lacks 16 tRNAs, only those for leucine, histidine, proline, tryptophan, glutamine and serine are present. Within those tRNAs only tRNA-His and tRNA-Pro have kept their original position, the others are translocated. Furthermore, the mt genome of S. magnus consists of 13,818 bp and it is composed of 13 protein-coding genes and two genes for the ribosomal RNA subunits that are typically found in metazoan mt genomes. The gene order in S. magnus differs from the hypothetical ancestral chelicerate arrangement as conserved in Limulus polyphemus: instead of nad1-rrnL-rrnS-LNR-nad2 (tRNAs excluded) S. magnus is nad2-rrnL-nad1-rrnS-LNR. Phylogenetic analyses of a concatenated amino acid dataset of all mt protein-coding genes of 28 arthropod species suggest a sister-group relationship of sarcoptiform and prostigmatid mites (S. magnus and Leptotrombidium). Conclusion The mt gene arrangement of S. magnus differs from the hypothetical ground plan of arthropods and from that of other mites further contributing to the variety of mt gene arrangements found in Arachnida. The unexpected lack of tRNAs is enigmatic, probably showing that the loss of mt genes is an ongoing evolutionary process. For solving phylogenetic relationships of oribatid mite lineages and their position within Acari further complete mt genomes are needed. PMID:18992147

  9. Neurocinematography in Pre-World War II Netherlands: The Magnus-Rademaker Collection.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J; Lameris, Bregt; Hielscher, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Historical films made by neuroscientists have shown up in several countries during past years. Although originally supposed to have been lost, we recently found a collection of films produced between 1909 and 1940 by Rudolf Magnus (1873-1927), professor of pharmacology (Utrecht) and his student Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), professor of physiology (1928, succeeding Willem Einthoven) and neurology (1945, both in Leiden). Both collections deal with the physiology of body posture by the equilibrium of reflex musculature contractions for which experimental studies were done with animals (labyrinthectomies, cerebellectomies, and brainstem sections) and observations on patients. The films demonstrate the results of these studies. Moreover, there are films with babies showing tonic neck reflexes and moving images capturing adults with cerebellar symptoms following cerebellectomies for tumors and several other conditions. Magnus' studies resulted in his well-known Körperstellung (1924, "Body Posture") and Rademaker's research in his Das Stehen (1931, "Standing"). The films probably had an educative and scientific purpose. Magnus demonstrated his films at congresses, including the Eighth International Congress of Physiologists (Vienna, 1910) and Rademaker screened his moving images at meetings of the Amsterdam Neurologists Society (at several occasions as reflected in the Winkler-Monakow correspondence and the Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde). Next to these purposes, the films were used to analyze movement and a series of images from the films were published in articles and books. The films are important historical sources that provide a portrait of the pre-World War II era in neuroscience, partly answering questions on how physicians dealt with patients and researchers with their laboratory animals. Moreover, the films confirm that cinematography was an important scientific tool in neuroscience research. PMID:26684426

  10. Floquet-Magnus expansion for general N-coupled spins systems in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical perturbative approach for describing the NMR spectrum of strongly dipolar-coupled spin systems under fast magic-angle spinning. Our treatment is based on two approaches: the Floquet approach and the Floquet-Magnus expansion. The Floquet approach is well known in the NMR community as a perturbative approach to get analytical approximations. Numerical procedures are based on step-by-step numerical integration of the corresponding differential equations. The Floquet-Magnus expansion is a perturbative approach of the Floquet theory. Furthermore, we address the " γ -encoding" effect using the Floquet-Magnus expansion approach. We show that the average over " γ " angle can be performed for any Hamiltonian with γ symmetry.

  11. The tripartite origins of the tonic neck reflex: Gesell, Gerstmann, and Magnus.

    PubMed

    Shevell, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The standard neurologic examination of the newborn and infant includes the elicitation of the tonic neck reflex. Normally present, its persistence is suggestive of neurologic dysfunction and a prognostic marker highly suggestive of an adverse outcome. Working in different fields, with different approaches and largely independently, three leaders of early 20th century neurosciences (Rudolf Magnus, Josef Gerstmann, and Arnold Gesell) elaborated different aspects of this primitive reflex. Magnus provided the first description in an animal model utilizing a meticulously prepared decerebrate cat correctly identifying the reflex's reliance on proprioceptors in the neck and processing in the upper cervical segment. Gerstmann first described its occurrence in the setting of neurologic disease, providing a meticulous written description in an early description of the index case of what would later be eponymously designated Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. Gesell initially described the reflex's fundamental occurrence in normal young infants, highlighting its adaptive role in early development and its persistence as a hallmark of neurologic pathology. PMID:19255413

  12. Nitric oxide in the nucleus raphe magnus modulates cutaneous blood flow in rats during hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Arami, Masoumeh Kourosh; zade, Javad Mirnajafi; Komaki, Alireza; Amiri, Mahmood; Mehrpooya, Sara; Jahanshahi, Ali; Jamei, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Nucleus Raphe Magnus (NRM) that is involved in the regulation of body temperature contains nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Considering the effect of NO on skin blood flow control, in this study, we assessed its thermoregulatory role within the raphe magnus. Materials and Methods: To this end, tail blood flow of male Wistar rats was measured by laser doppler following the induction of hypothermia. Results: Intra-NRM injection of SNP (exogenous NO donor, 0.1- 0.2 μl, 0.2 nM) increased the blood flow. Similarly, unilateral microinjection of glutamate (0.1- 0.2 μl, 2.3 nM) into the nucleus increased the blood flow. This effect of L-glutamate was reduced by prior intra NRM administration of NO synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-L-arginine or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 0.1 µl, 100 nM). Conclusion: It is concluded that NO modulates the thermoregulatory response of NRM to hypothermia and may interact with excitatory amino acids in central skin blood flow regulation. PMID:26730333

  13. The Results of Adductor Magnus Tenodesis in Adolescents with Recurrent Patellar Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Malecki, Krzysztof; Fabis, Jaroslaw; Flont, Pawel; Niedzielski, Kryspin Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent dislocation of the patella is a common orthopaedic problem which occurs in about 44% of cases after first-time dislocation. In most cases of first-time patellar dislocation, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) becomes damaged. Between 2010 and 2012, 33 children and adolescents (39 knees) with recurrent patellar dislocation were treated with MPFL reconstruction using the adductor magnus tendon. The aim of our study is to assess the effectiveness of this surgical procedure. The outcomes were evaluated functionally (Lysholm knee scale, the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, and isokinetic examination) and radiographically (Caton index, sulcus angle, congruence angle, and patellofemoral angle). Four patients demonstrated redislocation with MPFL graft failure, despite the fact that patellar tracking was found to be normal before the injury, and the patients had not reported any symptoms. Statistically significant improvements in Lysholm and Kujala scales, in patellofemoral and congruence angle, were seen (P < 0.001). A statistically significant improvement in the peak torque of the quadriceps muscle and flexor was observed for 60°/sec and 180°/sec angular velocities (P = 0.01). Our results confirm the efficacy of MPFL reconstruction using the adductor magnus tendon in children and adolescents with recurrent patellar dislocation. PMID:25785271

  14. 3-D magnetic field calculations for wiggglers using MAGNUS-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Pissanetzky, S.; Tompkins, P.

    1988-01-01

    The recent but steady trend toward increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of wigglers and undulators, of which tapered wigglers, hybrid structures, laced electromagnetic wigglers, magnetic cladding, twisters and magic structures are examples, has caused a need for reliable 3-D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic systems in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D Group of Programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3-D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of Magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, linear or nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors of any shape in space. The magnetic properties of permanent magnets are described by the complete nonlinear demagnetization curve as provided by the manufacturer, or, at the user's choice, by a simpler approximation involving the coercive force, the residual induction and the direction of magnetization. The ferromagnetic materials are described by a magnetization table and an accurate interpolation relation. An internal library with properties of common industrial steels is available. The conductors are independent of the mesh and are described in terms of conductor elements from an internal library.

  15. Numerical investigation of the effect of sphere dimples on the drag crisis and the Magnus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Tsubokura, Makoto; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigates the flow over a golf ball and a smooth sphere around the critical Reynolds numbers under both stationary and self-spinning conditions by conducting Large-eddy simulations (LES) based on high resolution unstructured grids. For the stationary cases, the present calculation results validate the promotion of the drag crisis at a relatively lower Reynolds number due to the golf ball dimples. It also shows that the golf ball dimples have a limited effect on the time-dependent lateral force development in the subcritical regime, whereas the dimples are beneficial in suppressing the lateral force oscillations in the supercritical regimes. With spin parameter Γ = 0.1, the drag coefficients for the spinning smooth sphere increase slightly in all Reynolds number regimes when compared to the stationary cases, whereas for the spinning golf ball, the drag force decreases in the critical regime and increases in the supercritical regime. For both spinning models, the inverse Magnus effect was reproduced in the critical regime, whereas in the supercritical regime the ordinary Magnus force was generated. Relatively weaker lift forces were also observed in the cases of the spinning golf balls when compared to the spinning smooth spheres.

  16. STS-112 M.S. Magnus in white room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - -- In the White Room at Launch Pad 39B, STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra H. Magnus, Ph.D., receives assistance with her spacesuit before boarding Space Shuttle Atlantis. Liftoff is schedued for 3:46 p.m. EDT. Along with a crew of six, Atlantis will carry the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A to the International Space Station (ISS). The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss.

  17. Textual alchemy: the transformation of pseudo-Albertus Magnus's Semita recta into the Mirror of Lights.

    PubMed

    Grund, Peter

    2009-11-01

    This article explores the strategies of and the reasons behind the reworking of pseudo-Albertus Magnus's Semita recta into the Mirror of Lights. I argue that the redactor sought to provide a more comprehensive defence of the legitimacy of alchemy than found in the Semita recta. In the process of doing so, he reshaped the original text so as to present three units that addressed different parts of the alchemical opus: first, theory and justification of alchemy; second, basic information on substances and procedures; and, third, practice. The redactor employed sophisticated textual tools identical to those seen in scholastic texts. These strategies, I argue, constitute part of the redactor's attempt to bring authority and credibility to his project and to alchemy in general. Certainly, much more attention needs to be paid to these experiments of textual alchemy in order to understand the practice of alchemy in the late medieval period. PMID:20506702

  18. Magnus Hirschfeld, his biographies and the possibilities and boundaries of "biography" as "doing history.".

    PubMed

    Brennan, Toni; Hegarty, Peter

    2009-12-01

    This article considers the two major biographies of sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld, MD (1868-1935), an early campaigner for "gay rights" avant la lettre. Like him, his first biographer Charlotte Wolff (1897-1986) was a Jewish doctor who lived and worked in Weimar Republic Berlin and fled Germany when the Nazi regime came to power. When researching Hirschfeld's biography (published in English in 1986) Wolff met a librarian and gay activist, Manfred Herzer, who would eventually be a cofounder of the Gay Museum in Berlin and publish (in German, in 1992) the other major Hirschfeld biography currently available. Using, inter alia, the correspondence between Wolff and Herzer, the article aims to explore and interrogate the boundaries and possibilities of "biography" as a form of "doing history." PMID:20422759

  19. The adductor part of the adductor magnus is innervated by both obturator and sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Megumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ito, Hajime; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uchiyama, Eiichi

    2014-07-01

    The hip adductor group, innervated predominantly by the obturator nerve, occupies a large volume of the lower limb. However, case reports of patients with obturator nerve palsy or denervation have described no more than minimal gait disturbance. Those facts are surprising, given the architectural characteristics of the hip adductors. Our aim was to investigate which regions of the adductor magnus are innervated by the obturator nerve and by which sciatic nerve and to consider the clinical implications. Twenty-one lower limbs were examined from 21 formalin-fixed cadavers, 18 males and 3 females. The adductor magnus was dissected and was divided into four parts (AM1-AM4) based on the locations of the perforating arteries and the adductor hiatus. AM1 was supplied solely by the obturator nerve. AM2, AM3, and AM4 received innervation from both the posterior branch of the obturator nerve and the tibial nerve portion of the sciatic nerve in 2 (9.5%), 20 (95.2%), and 6 (28.6%) of the cadavers, respectively. The double innervation in more than 90% of the AM3s is especially noteworthy. Generally, AM1-AM3 corresponds to the adductor part, traditionally characterized as innervated by the obturator nerve, and AM4 corresponds to the hamstrings part, innervated by the sciatic nerve. Here, we showed that the sciatic nerve supplies not only the hamstrings part but also the adductor part. These two nerves spread more widely than has generally been believed, which could have practical implications for the assessment and treatment of motor disability. PMID:23813615

  20. Floquet resonant states and validity of the Floquet-Magnus expansion in the periodically driven Friedrichs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The Floquet eigenvalue problem is analyzed for periodically driven Friedrichs models on discrete and continuous space. In the high-frequency regime, there exists a Floquet bound state consistent with the Floquet-Magnus expansion in the discrete Friedrichs model, while it is not the case in the continuous model. In the latter case, however, the bound state predicted by the Floquet-Magnus expansion appears as a metastable state whose lifetime diverges in the limit of large frequencies. We obtain the lifetime by evaluating the imaginary part of the quasienergy of the Floquet resonant state. In the low-frequency regime, there is no Floquet bound state and instead the Floquet resonant state with exponentially small imaginary part of the quasienergy appears, which is understood as the quantum tunneling in the energy space.

  1. Investigation of the effect of finite pulse errors on the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mananga, Eugene S.; Reid, Alicia E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of finite pulse widths for the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) approach. In the FME scheme, the first order ? is identical to its counterparts in average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and Floquet theory (FT). However, the timing part in the FME approach is introduced via the ? function not present in other schemes. This function provides an easy way for evaluating the spin evolution during the time in between' through the Magnus expansion of the operator connected to the timing part of the evolution. The evaluation of ? is particularly useful for the analysis of the non-stroboscopic evolution. Here, the importance of the boundary conditions, which provide a natural choice of ? , is ignored. This work uses the ? function to compare the efficiency of the BABA pulse sequence with ? and the BABA pulse sequence with finite pulses. Calculations of ? and ? are presented.

  2. Taxonomic studies on a new marine ciliate, Apocoleps magnus gen. nov., spec. nov. (Ciliophora, Colepidae), isolated from Qingdao, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangrui; Warren, Alan; Song, Weibo

    2009-12-01

    The morphology and infraciliature of a new marine colepid ciliate, Apocoleps magnus gen. nov., spec. nov., are described based on living observations and silver impregnations. The new genus Apocoleps is characterized by having 8 (vs. 6 in most other related genera) armour tiers, spines at both ends of the cell, 3 adoral organelles and plates with 4 reniform uni-windows. Apocoleps magnus spec. nov. is defined by the following features: body elongated and slightly curved, about 100-120µm× 35-45 µm in vivo; anterior tertiary tier plate with four uni-windows, most secondary and main tier plates with four uni-windows, posterior tertiary tier plate with two uni-windows; left plate margin slightly serrated; on average 23 transverse and 22 longitudinal ciliary rows; one terminal contractile vacuole; marine habitat.

  3. An analysis of texture, timbre, and rhythm in relation to form in Magnus Lindberg's "Gran Duo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Brian Thomas

    Gran Duo (1999-2000) by Magnus Lindberg (b. 1958) is the result of a commission by Sir Simon Rattle, former conductor of the City of Birmingham (England) Symphony Orchestra, and the Royal Festival Hall to commemorate the third millennium. Composed for twenty-four woodwinds and brass, Lindberg divides the woodwind and brass families into eight characters that serve as participants in an attentive twenty-minute conversation. The document includes biographical information about the composition to further understand Lindberg's writing style. The composer's use of computer-assisted composition techniques inspires an alternative structural analysis of Gran Duo. Spectral graphs provide a supplementary tool for score study assisting with the verification of formal structural elements. A tempo chart allows the conductor to easily identify form and tempo relationships between each of the nineteen sections throughout the five-movement composition. In order to reveal character areas and their relation to the structure of the work, the analysis of texture, timbre, and rhythm reveal the formal structure of the composition, which reflects a conversation between the brass and woodwinds in this setting for wind instruments.

  4. Floquet-Magnus theory and generic transient dynamics in periodically driven many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Mori, Takashi; Saito, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    This work explores a fundamental dynamical structure for a wide range of many-body quantum systems under periodic driving. Generically, in the thermodynamic limit, such systems are known to heat up to infinite temperature states in the long-time limit irrespective of dynamical details, which kills all the specific properties of the system. In the present study, instead of considering infinitely long-time scale, we aim to provide a general framework to understand the long but finite time behavior, namely the transient dynamics. In our analysis, we focus on the Floquet-Magnus (FM) expansion that gives a formal expression of the effective Hamiltonian on the system. Although in general the full series expansion is not convergent in the thermodynamics limit, we give a clear relationship between the FM expansion and the transient dynamics. More precisely, we rigorously show that a truncated version of the FM expansion accurately describes the exact dynamics for a certain time-scale. Our theory reveals an experimental time-scale for which non-trivial dynamical phenomena can be reliably observed. We discuss several dynamical phenomena, such as the effect of small integrability breaking, efficient numerical simulation of periodically driven systems, dynamical localization and thermalization. Especially on thermalization, we discuss a generic scenario on the prethermalization phenomenon in periodically driven systems.

  5. Black holes and fundamental fields: Hair, kicks, and a gravitational Magnus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirotada; Cardoso, Vitor

    2014-11-01

    Scalar fields pervade theoretical physics and are a fundamental ingredient to solve the dark matter problem, to realize the Peccei-Quinn mechanism in QCD or the string-axiverse scenario. They are also a useful proxy for more complex matter interactions, such as accretion disks or matter in extreme conditions. Here, we study the collision between scalar "clouds" and rotating black holes. For the first time we are able to compare analytic estimates and strong field, nonlinear numerical calculations for this problem. As the black hole pierces through the cloud it accretes according to the Bondi-Hoyle prediction, but is deflected through a purely kinematic gravitational "anti-Magnus" effect, which we predict to be present also during the interaction of black holes with accretion disks. After the interaction is over, we find large recoil velocities in the transverse direction. The end-state of the process belongs to the vacuum Kerr family if the scalar is massless, but can be a hairy black hole when the scalar is massive.

  6. The Sexologist Albert Moll – between Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld

    PubMed Central

    Sigusch, Volkmar

    2012-01-01

    Albert Moll was one of the most influential sexologists during the first three decades of the twentieth century. In contrast to his rivals Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld, his achievements have not yet been recognised adequately. The author gives a comparative account of the work of these three protagonists. This shows that Moll formed some ideas which are regarded as psychoanalytical today before Freud, and that he, in contrast to Hirschfeld, was able to reflect critically on contemporary discourses, such as the debates on racial improvement through eugenics. As scientific theories, Freud’s psychoanalysis represented the unconscious, fantasy, experience and latency, while Moll’s sexology represented consciousness, ontological reality, behaviour and manifestation. Moll’s major disagreement with Hirschfeld’s sexology was his advocacy of apolitical and impartial science, whereas Hirschfeld’s aim was to achieve sexual reforms politically. Added to these differences were strong personal animosities. Freud called Moll a ‘beast’ and ‘pettifogger’; and Moll complained about Hirschfeld’s ‘problematic’ character. When Hirschfeld escaped the Nazi terror and went to Paris, Moll denounced him in order to prevent him rebuilding a new existence in exile. PMID:23002292

  7. Interaction of the topological phase and the Magnus effect in a multimode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksiev, A.; Modnikova, E.; Fadeyeva, Tatyana A.; Lapayeva, S. N.; Volyar, Alexander V.

    1996-04-01

    The phenomenon of a light topological birefringence in a multimode fiber has been discussed in papers. The physical mechanism of the topological birefringence, as expected earlier is determined by the interaction of the two effects, namely, the topological Berry's phase and the optical Magnus effect. So, for a square distribution of a refractive index in a fiber cross section the near-meridianal local waves propagate along ray trajectories represented by strongly stretched ellipses of an elliptical helix. A plane made by a fiber axis and a major axis of a ray elliptical helix undergoes a rotation into the fiber, and the rotation hand of this plane is defined by a sign of the wave polarization circularity. If a linear polarized light drops into a fiber input its left-hand polarized component will rotate the major axis of the elliptical helix counterclockwise, and the right-hand polarized component rotates clockwise. Since the angular rates of this rotation are slightly different one from another forthcoming the local waves having counter circulation of a polarization should be collapsed in a single linear polarized local wave. However if the local wave trajectory doesn't lie in a plane then it is a space curve.

  8. Metamaterials with tunable refractive index fabricated from amorphous ferromagnetic microwires and optical Magnus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Andrey; Vedyayev, Anatoly; Galkin, Vladimir; Shalygin, Alexander; Ivanov, Valery

    2009-03-01

    For homogeneous NPVM (negative phase--velocity mediums) [V. G. Veselago, Soviet Physics - Uspekhi 10 (1968) 509; T. G. Mackay, A. Lakhtakia, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 026602] anomalous effects such as negative refraction, light pressure, Doppler shift, Cherenkov-Vavilov radiation, Goos-Hanchen effect have been discovered in different frequency ranges. In this presentation the optical circular polarized effect is calculated for inhomogeneous mediums (optical Magnus effect) and it is shown that it is anomalous in NPVM with respect to ``right-handed'' materials. The proposed metamaterials fabricated from glass coated amorphous ferromagnetic Co-Fe-Cr-B-Si microwires are shown to exhibit a negative refractive index for electromagnetic waves over scale of GHz frequencies [A.V. Ivanov, A.N. Shalygin, A.V. Vedyayev, V.A. Ivanov, JETP Letters 85 (2007) 565]. The magnetostatic interaction between microwires has been taken into account. The phase and group velocities in proposed metamaterial have been calculated. The ratio of thereof depends monotonically on the size of the microwires. Optical properties of such metamaterials are tunable by an external magnetic field and mechanical stress.

  9. Serotonergic raphe magnus cell discharge reflects on-going autonomic and respiratory activities

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Peggy; Gao, Keming; Genzen, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic cells are located in a restricted number of brainstem nuclei, send projections to virtually all parts of the central nervous system, and are critical to normal brain function. They discharge tonically at a rate modulated by sleep/wake cycle and, in the case of medullary serotonergic cells in raphe magnus and the adjacent reticular formation (RM), are excited by cold challenge. Yet, beyond behavioral state and cold, endogenous factors that influence serotonergic cell discharge remain largely mysterious. The present study in the anesthetized rat investigated predictors of serotonergic RM cell discharge by testing whether cell discharge correlated to three rhythms observed in blood pressure recordings that averaged >30 minutes in length. A very slow frequency rhythm with a period of minutes, a respiratory rhythm, and a cardiac rhythm were derived from the blood pressure recording. Cross correlations between each of the derived rhythms and cell activity revealed that the discharge of 38 of the 40 serotonergic cells studied was significantly correlated to the very slow and/or respiratory rhythms. Very few serotonergic cells discharged in relation to the cardiac cycle and those that did, did so weakly. The correlations between serotonergic cell discharge and the slow and respiratory rhythms cannot arise from baroreceptive input. Instead we hypothesize that they are by-products of on-going adjustments to homeostatic functions that happen to alter blood pressure. Thus, serotonergic RM cells integrate information about multiple homeostatic activities and challenges and can consequently modulate spinal processes according to the most pressing need of the organism. PMID:17715191

  10. Authigenic albite formation due to water-rock interactions - Case study: Magnus oilfield (UK, Northern North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nana; Fu, Yunjiao; Schulz, Hans-Martin; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this contribution to test whether organic-inorganic interactions could induce the formation of authigenic albite. This concept and related results are being compared with modelling scenarios which are purely based on inorganic geochemical reactions. In order to unravel the pathway of authigenic albite formation, this paper presents results of a multidisciplinary study from imaging, geochemistry, mineralogy, and hydrogeochemical modelling. The Jurassic reservoir sandstones of the Magnus oilfield (UK, North Sea) were chosen as a test site. Albite occurs with 4-18 wt.% in the Magnus sandstones and its contents vary with depth. However, albite contents increase with increasing K-feldspar contents and decreasing grain size. It occurs in three forms: (1) as lamellae in perthite, (2) as overgrowth on/in corroded feldspar, and, (3) as cloudy replacing albite patches in K-feldspar. The albite overgrowth has the highest chemical purity (100% albite) whilst albite lamellae and replacing albite patches are slightly less pure (containing 1-4% anorthite). Albite appears non-altered, and has a euhedral morphology and dull cathodoluminescence. It commonly co-occurs with corroded K-feldspar grains. The precipitation of diagenetic albite in the Magnus sandstones is attributed to deep burial 80 Ma ago and may have continued until today at temperatures between 90-120 °C. The results of hydrogeochemical modelling offer two possible pathways for the authigenic albite formation: (1) Dissolution of unstable minerals (such as kaolinite and chalcedony) coupled to reduction of ferric iron minerals by products generated during oil generation, migration and degradation; (2) Dissolution of non-end member feldspar, such as K-feldspar with 10% albite, coupled to illite formation can account for trace amounts of albite due to an elevated Na+/K+ activity ratio in the pore water.

  11. Vortex currents in turbulent superfluid and classical fluid channel flow, the magnus effect, and Goldstone boson fields

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, E.R. )

    1994-09-01

    Expressing hydrodynamics in terms of the flow of vorticity, using the vortex current tensor, helps unify the picture of turbulent channel flow for viscous fluids and for superfluids. In both, eddy viscosity plays a major role in energy dissipation, and in both there is a similar cross stream flow of vorticity, which in the case of superfluids leads to the Josephson frequency. The vortex current tensor, which was introduced in an earlier paper to derive an exact three dimensional Magnus effect formula, turns out to be the classical hydrodynamic limit of the vortex current that is the source for a classical Goldstone-boson field.

  12. Reproductive cycle of Ensis magnus in the Ría de Pontevedra (NW Spain): Spatial variability and fisheries management implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Otero, A.; Martínez-Castro, C.; Vázquez, E.; Macho, G.

    2014-08-01

    Mesoscale differences in the reproductive cycle of the commercial sword razor clam Ensis magnus (Schumacher, 1817) were studied in six shellfish beds in the Ría de Pontevedra (NW Spain) between March 2008 and July 2010. The GCI accurately described the reproductive cycle as indicated by the histological analysis. Both methods showed that the reproductive cycle was similar at different sites and was characterized by a resting stage during summer and early autumn, initiation of gametogenesis in autumn and a period of successive spawning interspersed with gonad recovery during winter and spring. However, a 15-day to one month delay in advanced stages of gametogenesis and maturation was observed between the inner and the outermost site of the ria, as well as an extended spawning period in the outermost area. Lower bottom seawater temperatures at the outermost sites appeared to delay maturation and to prolong the spawning periods, whereas salinity fluctuations at the innermost sites appeared to reduce the length of the cycle. This study provides the first estimation of the size at which E. magnus reaches sexual maturity in the Iberian Peninsula, determined in 79 mm, and it is also the first work in determining the mesoscale variation in gonadal development of any species of the superfamily Solenoidea. The results highlight the importance of carrying out mesoscale studies of the reproductive biology in coastal fisheries resources. Some of the findings of the present study have already been applied in the rotation scheme of the fishery harvesting plan.

  13. Applications of Floquet-Magnus expansion, average Hamiltonian theory and Fer expansion to study interactions in solid state NMR when irradiated with the magic-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the possibility of applying the Floquet-Magnus expansion and the Fer expansion approaches to the most useful interactions known in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using the magic-echo scheme. The results of the effective Hamiltonians of these theories and average Hamiltonian theory are presented. PMID:24034855

  14. Bioactivation of cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides by cysteine conjugate beta-lyase purified from Peptostreptococcus magnus.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Kinouchi, T; Akimoto, S; Ohnishi, Y

    1995-01-01

    To determine the role of cysteine conjugate beta-lyase (beta-lyase) in the metabolism of mutagenic nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we determined the effect of beta-lyase on the mutagenicities and DNA binding of cysteine conjugates of 4,5-epoxy-4,5-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 4,5-oxide) and 9,10-epoxy-9,10-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 9,10-oxide), which are detoxified metabolites of the mutagenic compound 1-nitropyrene. We purified beta-lyase from Peptostreptococcus magnus GAI0663, since P. magnus is one of the constituents of the intestinal microflora and exhibits high levels of degrading activity with cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides (1-NP oxide-Cys). The activity of purified beta-lyase was optimal at pH 7.5 to 8.0, was completely inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid and hydroxylamine, and was eliminated by heating the enzyme at 55 degrees C for 5 min. The molecular weight of beta-lyase was 150,000, as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography. S-Arylcysteine conjugates were good substrates for this enzyme. As determined by the Salmonella mutagenicity test, 5 ng of beta-lyase protein increased the mutagenicity of the cysteine conjugate of 1-NP 9,10-oxide (10 nmol per plate) 4.5-fold in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and 4.1-fold in strain TA100. However, beta-lyase had little effect on the cysteine conjugate of 1-NP 4,5-oxide (10 nmol per plate). Both conjugates exhibited only low levels of mutagenicity with nitroreductase-deficient strain TA98NR. In vitro binding of 1-NP oxide-Cys to calf thymus DNA was increased by adding purified beta-lyase or xanthine oxidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8526486

  15. Mercury and sulphur among the High Medieval alchemists: from Rāzī and Avicenna to Albertus Magnus and pseudo-Roger Bacon.

    PubMed

    Newman, William R

    2014-11-01

    This essay challenges the often expressed view that the principles of metals, namely mercury and sulphur, were generally viewed by alchemists as being of a 'metaphysical' character that made them inaccessible to the tools and operations of the laboratory. By examining a number of Arabo-Latin and Latin alchemical texts in circulation before the end of the thirteenth century, the author presents evidence that most alchemists of the period considered mercury and sulphur to be materials subject to techniques of purification in the same way that naturally occurring salts and minerals could be freed of their impurities or dross. The article also points to the immense influence of Avicenna and Albertus Magnus in formulating the theory that mercury and sulphur were compounds of different materials, containing both fixed and unfixed components. Finally, the author briefly examines the relationship between this materialist approach to the principles and the chymical atomism of early modern authors who were deeply aware of medieval alchemical literature. PMID:25509633

  16. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF SEROTONIN RELEASE IN THE RAT’S LUMBAR SPINAL CORD FOLLOWING ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF THE NUCLEUS RAPHE MAGNUS

    PubMed Central

    Hentall, I. D.; Pinzon, A.; Noga, B. R.

    2009-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin is released from spinal terminals of nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) neurons and important in sensory and motor control, but its pattern of release has remained unclear. Serotonin was measured by the high-resolution method of fast cyclic voltammetry (2 Hz) with carbon-fiber microelectrodes in lumbar segments (L3–L6) of halothane-anesthetized rats during electrical stimulation of the NRM. Because sites of serotonin release are often histologically remote from membrane transporters and receptors, rapid emergence into aggregate extracellular space was expected. Increased monoamine oxidation currents were found in 94% of trials of 50-Hz, 20-s NRM stimulation across all laminae. The estimated peak serotonin concentration averaged 37.8 nM (maximum 287 nM), and was greater in dorsal and ventral laminae (I–III and VIII–IX) than in intermediate laminae (IV–VI). When measured near NRM-evoked changes, basal monoamine levels (relative to dorsal white matter) were highest in intermediate laminae, while changes in norepinephrine level produced by locus ceruleus (LC) stimulation were lowest in laminae II/III and VII. The NRM-evoked monoamine peak was linearly proportional to stimulus frequency (10–100 Hz). The peak often occurred before the stimulus ended (mean 15.6 s at 50 Hz, range 4–35 s) regardless of frequency, suggesting that release per impulse was constant during the rise but fell later. The latency from stimulus onset to electrochemical signal detection (mean 4.2 s, range 1–23 s) was inversely correlated with peak amplitude and directly correlated with time-to-peak. Quantitative modeling suggested that shorter latencies mostly reflected the time below detection threshold (5–10 nM), so that extrasynaptic serotonin was significantly elevated well within 1 s. Longer latencies (>5 s), which were confined to intermediate laminae, appeared mainly to be due to diffusion from distant sources. In conclusion, except possibly in

  17. Magnus and Iordanskii Forces in Superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, C.

    1997-08-01

    The transverse force acting on a quantized vortex in a superfluid is a problem that has eluded a complete understanding for more than three decades. In this Letter I calculate the {ital superfluid } velocity part of the transverse force in a way closely related to Laughlin{close_quote}s argument for the quantization of conductance in the quantum Hall effect. A combination of this result, the {ital vortex} velocity part of the transverse force found by Thouless, Ao, and Niu [Phys.Rev.Lett.{bold 76}, 3758 (1996)], and Galilean invariance shows that there cannot be a transverse force proportional to the normal fluid velocity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Improved Magnus` form approximation of saturation vapor pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Alduchov, O.A.; Eskridge, R.E.

    1997-11-01

    Relative humidity is usually measured in aerological observations and dew point depression is usually reported in upper-air reports. These variables must frequently be converted to other moisture variables in meteorological analysis. If relative humidity is converted to vapor pressure, most humidity variables can then be determined. Elliott and Gaffen reviewed the practices and procedures of the US radiosonde system. In their paper, a comparison of the relative errors was made between the saturation vapor pressure formulations of Tetens (1930), Goff-Gratch (1946), Wexler (1976), and Buck (1981). In this paper, the authors will expand the analysis of Elliott and Gaffen by deriving several new saturation vapor pressure formulas, and reviewing the various errors in these formulations. They will show that two of the new formulations of vapor pressure over water and ice are superior to existing formulas. Upper air temperature data are found to vary from about +50 C to {minus}80 C. This large variation requires a saturation vapor pressure equation to be accurate over a large temperature range. While the errors introduced by the use of relatively inaccurate conversion equations are smaller than the errors due to the instruments, dewpoint coding errors, and dewpoint conversion algorithms (Elliott and Gaffen, 1993); they introduce additional systematic errors in humidity data. The most precise formulation of vapor pressure over a plane surface of water was given by Wexler (1976). The relative errors of Tetens` (1930) formula and one due to Buck (1981) (Buck`s equation is recommended in the Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 3, 1991) are shown. The relative errors in this table are the predicted value minus the Wexler value divided by the Wexler value.

  19. One-dimensional Magnus-type platinum double salts.

    PubMed

    Hendon, Christopher H; Walsh, Aron; Akiyama, Norinobu; Konno, Yosuke; Kajiwara, Takashi; Ito, Tasuku; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Interest in platinum-chain complexes arose from their unusual oxidation states and physical properties. Despite their compositional diversity, isolation of crystalline chains has remained challenging. Here we report a simple crystallization technique that yields a series of dimer-based 1D platinum chains. The colour of the Pt(2+) compounds can be switched between yellow, orange and blue. Spontaneous oxidation in air is used to form black Pt(2.33+) needles. The loss of one electron per double salt results in a metallic state, as supported by quantum chemical calculations, and displays conductivity of 11 S cm(-1) at room temperature. This behaviour may open up a new avenue for controllable platinum chemistry. PMID:27320502

  20. One-dimensional Magnus-type platinum double salts

    PubMed Central

    Hendon, Christopher H.; Walsh, Aron; Akiyama, Norinobu; Konno, Yosuke; Kajiwara, Takashi; Ito, Tasuku; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Interest in platinum-chain complexes arose from their unusual oxidation states and physical properties. Despite their compositional diversity, isolation of crystalline chains has remained challenging. Here we report a simple crystallization technique that yields a series of dimer-based 1D platinum chains. The colour of the Pt2+ compounds can be switched between yellow, orange and blue. Spontaneous oxidation in air is used to form black Pt2.33+ needles. The loss of one electron per double salt results in a metallic state, as supported by quantum chemical calculations, and displays conductivity of 11 S cm−1 at room temperature. This behaviour may open up a new avenue for controllable platinum chemistry. PMID:27320502

  1. Manos Hadjidakis: The Story of an Anarchic Youth and a "Magnus Eroticus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miralis, Yiannis

    2004-01-01

    The name of Manos Hadjidakis is probably unknown to contemporary musicians and music educators. After all, the Greek composer achieved his international fame back in 1961 when he won an Oscar for his soundtrack of the movie, "Never on Sunday." Numerous other awards followed from England, Krance, Germany, and of course, Greece. After his six years…

  2. Response to Yiannis Miralis, "Manos Hadjidakis: The Story of an Anarchic Youth and a "Magnus Eroticus""

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfer, Jason

    2004-01-01

    There are two issues that struck the author, Jason Helfer, as essential from his consideration of Miralis' paper and the ideas of Manos Hadjidakis: Eros as a pedagogical idea and learner interactions in the music classroom. These ideas developed from his interpretation of Miralis' paper, from his experiences in teacher training, and teaching in…

  3. Albertus, "Magnus" or Magus? Magic, natural philosophy, and religious reform in the late middle ages.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the fifteenth-century attempt by the Dominican order, especially in Cologne, to win canonization for the thirteenth-century natural philosopher Albert the Great. It shows how Albert's thought on natural philosophy and magic was understood and variously applied, how the Dominicans at Cologne composed his vitae, and how the order's Observant movement participated in these developments. It situates the canonization attempt at the intersection of two significant trends in which the order was a leading participant: first, the late medieval efforts to reform Christian society beginning with the religious life of monks and mendicants; second, the increasing concerns about the practice of learned and demonic mafic that laid groundwork for the witch-hunting of the early modern period. This article aims to shed light on intersections of science and religion -- their apprehension and negotiation -- at a decisive moment in European history for both fields of human endeavor. PMID:20527358

  4. Cooperative excited-state behavior in plantinum(II) magnus-type double-salt materials. Active and inactive photosensitizers for H/sub 2/ production in aqueous suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Houlding, V.H.; Frank, A.J.

    1985-10-23

    Diffuse-reflectance and emission behavior are used to characterize the lowest excited state of the following (Pt/sup II//sup 2 +/(Pt/sup II/)/sup 2 +/ double salts and in some cases their hydrates: (Pt(NH/sub 34/)(PtCl/sub 4/) (MGS), (Pt(bpy)/sub 2/)(PtCl/sub 4/) (PB(Cl); bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), (Pt-(bpy)(MHB))(PtCl/sub 4/) (PHB(Cl); MHB = 4-methyl-4'-heptyl-2,2'-bipyridine), )Pt(bpy)/sub 2/)(Pt(CN)/sub 4/) (PBC), and (Pt(bpy)-(MHB))(Pt(CN)/sub 4/)(PHBC). All of the salts containing the PtCl/sub 4//sup 2 -/ anion have lowest excited states of the ligand field type. In green MGS, where metal-metal interaction is significant, no emission occurs, but in yellow PB(Cl)x2.5H/sub 2/O and PHBC x 2.5 H/sub 2/O where interaction is weak, emission characteristic of PtCl/sub 2//sup 2 -/ is observed. In orange PBCx2H/sub 2/O and PHB(Cl), and their red anhydrates, the lowest excited state is assigned as a delocalized /sup 3/Pt(5d/sub z/sup 2//-6p/sub z/) state. Both salts exhibit strong emission (in PBC powder at room temperature, the emission quantum yield is 0.002 +/- 0.001 and the lifetime is 16.8 +/- 2.5 ns), which overlaps well with an intense visible absorption band. PBC and PHBC powders are active as photosensitizers for the reduction of water in EDTA solutions. In the presence of Pt(0) catalyst, H/sub 2/ production is sustained at a constant rate to >1 turnover with respect to photosensitizer, with no evidence for photosensitizer degradation. In the absence of Pt(0), PBC produces H/sub 2/ at a constant rate that is less than 1% of the rate of the presence of Pt(0), but again, without degradation. MGS, PB(Cl), and PHB(Cl) are photoinert and completely inactive as photosensitzers in this reaction. 31 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  5. Interaction of ultrasound with vortices in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sonin, E.B.

    1996-04-01

    The theory of ultrasound in the mixed state of type-II superconductors is suggested which takes into account the Magnus force on vortices, the anti-Magnus force on ions, and diamagnetism of the mixed state. The acoustic Faraday effect (rotation of polarization of the transverse ultrasonic wave propagating along vortices) is linear in the Magnus force in any regime of the flux flow for wavelengths now used in the ultrasound experiments. Therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, the Faraday effect should be looked for only in clean superconductors with a strong Magnus force. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Transverse forces on a vortex in lattice models of superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    The paper derives the transverse forces (the Magnus and the Lorentz forces) in the lattice models of superfluids in the continuous approximation. The continuous approximation restores translational invariance absent in the original lattice model, but the theory is not Galilean invariant. As a result, calculation of the two transverse forces on the vortex, Magnus force and Lorentz force, requires the analysis of two balances, for the true momentum of particles in the lattice (Magnus force) and for the quasimomentum (Lorentz force) known from the Bloch theory of particles in the periodic potential. While the developed theory yields the same Lorentz force, which was well known before, a new general expression for the Magnus force was obtained. The theory demonstrates how a small Magnus force emerges in the Josephson-junction array if the particle-hole symmetry is broken. The continuous approximation for the Bose-Hubbard model close to the superfluid-insulator transition was developed, which was used for calculation of the Magnus force. The theory shows that there is an area in the phase diagram for the Bose-Hubbard model, where the Magnus force has an inverse sign with respect to that which is expected from the sign of velocity circulation.

  7. An analytical treatment for three neutrino oscillations in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Supanitsky, A. D.

    2012-08-01

    A simple, and at the same time accurate, description of the Earth matter effects on the oscillations between three neutrino flavors is given in terms of the Magnus expansion for the evolution operator.

  8. Final Shuttle Crew Recaps Mission for Dryden Staff - Duration: 110 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    STS-135 crew members, commander Chris Ferguson, pilot Doug Hurley and mission specialists Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim, recalled personal highlights of the final shuttle mission and their involveme...

  9. Stennis Space Center Wakes STS-135 Crew - Duration: 116 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flight Day 10 wakeup music was “Celebration” by Kool and the Gang, which was played for Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus. The song was accompanied by a special good morning message recorded ...

  10. Sir Paul McCartney Wake-up Song and Greeting

    NASA Video Gallery

    Paul McCartney and Beatles favorite "Good Day Sunshine" greet the Atlantis crew of Chris Ferguson, Doug Hurley, Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim first thing on Flight Day 8. Sir Paul and the Beatles’...

  11. Effects of central opiate and serotoninergic structures on heart rhythm during acute myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Prokop'eva, E V; Pivovarov, Y I

    2001-12-01

    Electrostimulation of the central gray matter in the sylvian aqueduct and nucleus raphe magnus produced an antiarrhythmic effect during acute myocardial ischemia. Stimulation and blockade of opiate receptors in the central amygdaloid nucleus and lateral hypothalamus with dalargin and naloxone induced the same effect. Destruction of the central gray matter in the sylvian aqueduct and nucleus raphe magnus decreased electrical stability of ischemic myocardium. PMID:12152875

  12. Simulation of aeolian sand saltation with rotational motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ning; Wang, Cong; Pan, Xiying

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we propose a theoretical model based on the distribution functions of initial liftoff velocity and angular velocity of sand grains to describe a sand saltation process in which both wind field-sand grain coupling and the Magnus force experienced by saltating sand grains have been incorporated. The computation results showed that the Magnus force had significant effects on sand grain saltation. In particular, when the Magnus force was incorporated, the calculated sand transport fluxes and sand transport rate per unit width were closer to the experimental value than when this force was excluded. The sand transport flux is enhanced because the Magnus force owing to particle rotation causes the particles to have higher and longer trajectories, so the particles can get more speed and energy from the wind, which leads to a larger sand transport flux. In addition, it was found that when taking the Magnus force into account, the probability density of the impact velocity and angular velocity of saltating sand grains followed an exponential distribution and a unimodal asymmetric distribution, respectively. Moreover, the sand energy flux increased with the height above the sand surface until the energy flux reached its maximum and then decreased. Furthermore, the energy flux near the ground surface decreased as the grain diameter increased, but beyond a specific height the energy flux increased with the grain diameter. Finally, for the same sand grain diameter, the energy flux increased with the friction velocity.

  13. Vortices in superconducting films: Statistics and fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dziarmaga, J.

    1996-03-01

    We present a derivation of the Berry phase picked up during exchange of parallel vortices. This derivation is based on the Bogolubov{endash}de Gennes formalism. The origin of the Magnus force is also critically reanalyzed. The Magnus force can be interpreted as an interaction with the effective magnetic field. The effective magnetic field may be even of the order 10{sup 6}{ital T}/A. We discuss a possibility of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in vortex systems. As the real magnetic field is varied to drive changes in vortex density, the vortex density will prefer to stay at some quantized values. The mere existence of the FQHE does not depend on vortex quantum statistics, although the pattern of the plateaux does. We also discuss how the density of anyonic vortices can lower the effective strengh of the Magnus force, what might be observable in measurements of Hall resistivity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. STS-112 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-112 mission, the crew members of Atlantis (Commander Jeff Ashby; Pilot Pam Melroy; Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus, Piers Sellers, Dave Wolf, and Fyodor Yurchikhin) are seen preparing for the mission's third extravehicular activity (EVA). Magnus is shown reviewing instructions for operation of the International Space Station's (ISS) robot arm. Wolf and Sellers are seen successfully attaching cable connections to the S1 truss during the EVA. Scenes shown include: the ISS's robot arm, the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the deployment of the central radiator panel of the S1 truss.

  15. Numerical simulation of steady supersonic flow over spinning bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturek, W. B.; Schiff, L. B.

    1982-01-01

    A recently reported parabolized Navier-Stokes code has been employed to compute the supersonic flowfield about a spinning cone and spinning and nonspinning ogive cylinder and boattailed bodies of revolution at moderate incidence. The computations were performed for flow conditions where extensive measurements for wall pressure, boundary-layer velocity profiles, and Magnus force had been obtained. Comparisons between the computational results and experiment indicate excellent agreement for angles of attack up to 6 deg. At angles greater than 6 deg discrepancies are noted which are tentatively attributed to turbulence modeling errors. The comparisons for Magnus effects show that the code accurately predicts the effects of body shape for the selected models.

  16. Viscous flow over spinning cones at angle of attack.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. C.; Rubin, S. G.

    1973-01-01

    A numerical finite-difference method is developed for evaluating the Magnus coefficients on spinning cones in laminar flow. The merged layer, the strong interaction region, and the downstream boundary layer are all considered. The numerical method is a predictor-corrector scheme developed for three-dimensional flows with or without crossflow diffusion. This method is particularly useful in problems in which a symmetry plane does not exist. Several contributions to the Magnus force and moments are considered. These include asymmetries in displacement thickness, centrifugal force and crossflow shear, and the effects of crossflow separation and vortex formation. Comparisons are made with experimental data and other analyses.

  17. Hypersonic Laminar Viscous Flow Past Spinning Cones at Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh; Rakich, John V.

    1982-01-01

    Computational results are presented for hypersonic viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones of angle of attack, obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flowfield resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, cross-flow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, cross-flow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other theoretical analyses based on boundary-layer and boundary-region equations, and an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results.

  18. Interaction of vortex lattice with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R. |

    1995-03-27

    The interaction of sound with the vortex lattice is considered for high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. At low temperatures the Magnus force results in the acoustic Faraday effect; the velocity of sound propagating along the magnetic field depends on the polarization. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. In the thermally activated flux flow regime, the Faraday effect is caused by electric and magnetic fields induced by vortices and acting on ions.

  19. STS-112 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-112 mission, the crew members of Atlantis (Commander Jeff Ashby; Pilot Pam Melroy; Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus, Piers Sellers, Dave Wolf, and Fyodor Yurchikhin) are seen preparing for the mission's third extravehicular activity (EVA). Magnus is shown reviewing instructions for operation of the International Space Station's (ISS) robot arm. Wolf and Sellers are seen successfully attaching cable connections to the S1 truss during the EVA. Scenes shown include: the ISS's robot arm, the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the deployment of the central radiator panel of the S1 truss.

  20. Landing Day Wake Up Song and Greeting

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kate Smith’s rendition of Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America” woke Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim. But unlike most wakeup s...

  1. Clausius-Clapeyron Equation and Saturation Vapour Pressure: Simple Theory Reconciled with Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2012-01-01

    While the Clausius-Clapeyron equation is very important as it determines the saturation vapour pressure, in practice it is replaced by empirical, typically Magnus-type, equations which are more accurate. It is shown that the reduced accuracy reflects an inconsistent assumption that the latent heat of vaporization is constant. Not only is this…

  2. Dr. von Braun Surrenders to U.S. Army

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1945-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun surrenders to U.S. Army Counterintelligence persornel of the 44th Infantry Division in Ruette, Bavaria on May 2, 1945. Left to right are Charles Stewart, CIC agent; Dr. Herbert Axster; Dieter Huzel; Dr. von Braun (arm in cast); Magnus von Braun (brother); and Hans Lindenberg.

  3. Finishing High School: Alternative Pathways and Dropout Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, John H.; Lofstrom, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    John Tyler and Magnus Lofstrom take a close look at the problems posed when students do not complete high school. The authors begin by discussing the ongoing, sometimes heated, debate over how prevalent the dropout problem is. They note that one important reason for discrepancies in reported dropout rates is whether holders of the General…

  4. STS-111 Expedition Five Crew Training Clip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-111 Expedition Five Crew begins with training on payload operations. Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson and Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus are shown in Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) procedures. Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev gets suited for Neutral Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) training. Virtual Reality lab training is shown with Peggy Whitson. Habitation Equipment and procedures are also presented.

  5. Vortex pair production and decay of a two-dimensional supercurrent by a quantum-field-theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Iengo, R. |; Jug, G. |

    1995-09-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of the decay of a supercurrent through homogeneous nucleation of vortex-antivortex pairs in a two-dimensional (2D) like superconductor or superfluid by means of a quantum electrodynamic formulation for the decay of the 2D vacuum. The case in which both externally driven current and Magnus force are present is treated exactly, taking the vortex activation energy and its inertial mass as independent parameters. Quantum dissipation is included through the formulation introduced by Caldeira and Leggett. The most relevant consequence of quantum dissipation is the elimination of the threshold for vortex production due to the Magnus force. In the dissipation-dominated case, corresponding formally to the limit of zero intertial mass, an exact formula for the pair production rate is given. If however the inertial mass is strictly zero we find that vortex production is inhibited by a quantum effect related to the Magnus force. The possibility of including vortex pinning is investigated by means of an effective harmonic potential. While an additional term in the vortex activation energy can account for the effect of a finite barrier in the direction perpendicular to the current, pinning along the current depresses the role of the Magnus force in the dissipation-dominated dynamics, except for the above-mentioned quantum effect. A possible description of vortex nucleation due to the combined effects of temperature and externally driven currents is also presented along with an evaluation of the resulting voltage drop.

  6. Noncommuting Momenta of Topological Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    We show that momentum operators of a topological soliton may not commute among themselves when the soliton is associated with the second cohomology H2 of the target space. The commutation relation is proportional to the winding number, taking a constant value within each topological sector. The noncommutativity makes it impossible to specify the momentum of a topological soliton, and induces a Magnus force.

  7. Recent Experiments at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1925-01-01

    This report presents the results of various experiments carried out at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute. These include: experiments with Joukowski wing profiles; experiments on an airplane model with a built-in motor and functioning propeller; and the rotating cylinder (Magnus Effect).

  8. Nonadiabatic three-neutrino oscillations in matter

    SciTech Connect

    DOlivo, J.C.; Oteo, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Oscillations of three neutrinos in matter are analyzed by using the Magnus expansion for the time-evolution operator. We derive a simple expression for the electron-neutrino survival probability which is applied to the examination of the effect of a third neutrino on the nonadiabatic flavor transformations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. The Bernoulli or Coanda Conundrum and Other Classical Demonstration Myths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stille, Dale

    2009-11-01

    Lecture Demonstration professionals have recently taken a closer look at demonstrations that were traditionally labeled ``Bernoulli Demonstrations'' in most textbooks. This examination has shown that in most cases the Coanda Effect, Magnus Effect, and Entrainment may be better explanations for most of these classic demonstrations. A discussion of other similarly classic demonstrations and some of their problems or misconceptions will also be presented.

  10. Heart and Reason: A Comparison of John Dewey's "A Common Faith" and His "Religious" Poems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miedema, Siebren

    2010-01-01

    In this article a comparison is drawn between the way in which the pragmatist philosopher and pedagogue John Dewey addressed religious issues and his view on Religious Education in his poetic narratives and in his scholarly writings, especially in his "magnus opus" on religion, "A Common Faith". Do we gain deeper insight into Dewey's view on…

  11. Beckham as Physicist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireson, Gren

    2001-01-01

    If football captures the interest of students, it can be used to teach physics. In this case, a Beckham free-kick can be used to introduce concepts such as drag, the Bernoulli principle, Reynolds number, and the Magnus effect by asking the simple question: How does he curve the ball so much? Introduces basic mechanics along the way. (Author/ASK)

  12. [Astrologic and medical manuscript of the 18th Century].

    PubMed

    Kugener, Henri

    2010-01-01

    We present a manuscript from the 18th century, an extract taken from the "Great and the Little Albert" attributed to Albertus Magnus. The linguistic variety in the paper is typical for a text composed in Luxembourg. Added to this text are two incantations and a short cartomancy paper. PMID:20882751

  13. Registration of ‘Zenith' black bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Zenith’ black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (Reg. no. CV- , PI -), developed by Michigan State University AgBioResearch was released in 2014 as an upright, full-season cultivar with anthracnose [caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. et Magnus) Lams.-Scrib] resistance and excellent canning q...

  14. Chemical, Biochemical, and Genetic Approaches to Arsenic Metabolism" -An overview of arsenic metabolism and toxicity- A series of five papers to appear together in Current Protocols in Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxic properties of arsenic (As) were recognized long before Albertus Magnus in the 13th century prepared its elemental form (Buchanan, 1962). Its use as a poison has played lethal and decisive roles in domestic and dynastic intrigues throughout history (Cullen, 2008). Inorga...

  15. Direct numerical simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations with an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method are used to investigate the effects of particle rotation on flows past random arrays of mono-disperse spheres at moderate particle Reynolds numbers. This study is an extension of a previous study of the authors [Q. Zhou and L.-S. Fan, "Direct numerical simulation of low-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres," J. Fluid Mech. 765, 396-423 (2015)] that explored the effects of particle rotation at low particle Reynolds numbers. The results of this study indicate that as the particle Reynolds number increases, the normalized Magnus lift force decreases rapidly when the particle Reynolds number is in the range lower than 50. For the particle Reynolds number greater than 50, the normalized Magnus lift force approaches a constant value that is invariant with solid volume fractions. The proportional dependence of the Magnus lift force on the rotational Reynolds number (based on the angular velocity and the diameter of the spheres) observed at low particle Reynolds numbers does not change in the present study, making the Magnus lift force another possible factor that can significantly affect the overall dynamics of fluid-particle flows other than the drag force. Moreover, it is found that both the normalized drag force and the normalized torque increase with the increase of the particle Reynolds number and the solid volume fraction. Finally, correlations for the drag force, the Magnus lift force, and the torque in random arrays of rotating spheres at arbitrary solids volume fractions, rotational Reynolds numbers, and particle Reynolds numbers are formulated.

  16. Flight dynamics of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1989-02-01

    During the past twenty years Sandia National Laboratories and the US Army have vertically gun launched numerous 155mm and eight-inch diameter flight test projectiles. These projectiles are subsequently recovered using an on-board parachute recovery system which is attached to the forward case structure of the projectile. There have been at least five attempts to describe, through analytical and numerical simulations, the translational and rotational motions of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute. However, none of these investigations have correctly described the large nutational motion of the projectile since all of them overlooked the fundamental mechanism which causes these angular motions. Numerical simulations as well as a closed form analytical solution show conclusively that the Magnus moment is responsible for the large nutational motion of the projectile. That is, when the center of pressure for the Magnus force is aft of the center of mass for the projectile, the Magnus moment causes an unstable (or large) nutational motion which always tends to turn the spinning projectile upside down while it is descending on the parachute. Conversely, when the center of mass for the projectile is aft of the center of pressure for the Magnus force, the Magnus moment stabilizes the nutational motion tending to always point the base of the spinning projectile down. The results of this work are utilized to render projectile parachute recovery systems more reliable and to explain what initially may appear to be strange gyrodynamic behavior of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute. 14 refs., 20 figs.

  17. Paradoxical pop-ups: Why are they difficult to catch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Michael K.; Nathan, Alan M.; Bahill, A. Terry; Baldwin, David G.

    2008-08-01

    Professional baseball players occasionally find it difficult to gracefully approach seemingly routine pop-ups. We describe a set of towering pop-ups with trajectories that exhibit cusps and loops near the apex. For a normal fly ball the horizontal velocity continuously decreases due to drag caused by air resistance. For pop-ups the Magnus force is larger than the drag force. In these cases the horizontal velocity initially decreases like a normal fly ball, but after the apex, the Magnus force accelerates the horizontal motion. We refer to this class of pop-ups as paradoxical because they appear to misinform the typically robust optical control strategies used by fielders and lead to systematic vacillation in running paths, especially when a trajectory terminates near the fielder. Former major league infielders confirm that our model agrees with their experiences.

  18. Description of three new troglobiontic species of Cybaeodes (Araneae, Liocranidae) endemic to the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Carles; De Mas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Three new troglobiontic species of the spider genus Cybaeodes Simon endemic to caves in the southeastern Iberian Peninsula are described and illustrated: Cybaeodes indalo sp. n. from Almería, C. dosaguas sp. n. from València and C. magnus sp. n. from Alacant. The new species confirm the presence of Cybaeodes on the Iberian Peninsula and its wide distribution throughout the Western Mediterranean including Algeria, Tunisia, Italy, France, Spain and the islands of Sardinia, Sicily and Mallorca. A record of C. liocraninus (Simon), from an Iberian cave was probably based on misidentified specimens of C. magnus sp. n. C. liocraninus is known only from Algeria and should be removed from lists of the Iberian fauna. In addition, the three new species are clear candidates for protection: they have highly restricted ranges and show a high degree of adaptation to the subterranean environment. PMID:26249078

  19. Burying flowlines and cables in 186-m water

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, G.

    1983-07-01

    UDI Group Ltd. and British Petroleum Development Ltd. have developed a 30-ton remote controlled seabed vehicle. The vehicle was built with the expressed purpose of burying the 35 km of flowlines for the remote wellheads on the Magnus field in 186-m of water, in order to increase thermal insulation of pipelines and to produce a greater degree of physical protection against damage from fishing gear, etc. During the 1981 trials, it was decided to carry out further development of the system for simultaneous laying and burial of the control umbilicals required for the remote wellhead controls on Magnus. For this work, it was necessary for each control umbilical to be positioned alongside its respective flowline along the route between the wellhead and the platform. At the platform end of the route, the flowlines and umbilicals are densely concentrated, and accuracy is required in the laying and burying of the umbilicals.

  20. Computation of hypersonic laminar viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, R.; Rakich, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    Computational results, obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code, are presented for hypersonic viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones at angle of attack. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flow field resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other theoretical analyses based on boundary-layer and boundary-region equations, and an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results. In addition, a new criterion for defining crossflow separation behind spinning bodies is introduced which generalizes the Moore-Rott-Sears criterion for two-dimensional unsteady separation. A condition which characterizes the onset of separation in the flow field is defined.

  1. Collective Transport Properties of Driven Skyrmions with Random Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Ray, D.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2015-05-01

    We use particle-based simulations to examine the static and driven collective phases of Skyrmions interacting with random quenched disorder. We show that nondissipative effects due to the Magnus term reduce the depinning threshold and strongly affect the Skyrmion motion and the nature of the dynamic phases. The quenched disorder causes the Hall angle to become drive dependent in the moving Skyrmion phase, while different flow regimes produce distinct signatures in the transport curves. For weak disorder, the Skyrmions form a pinned crystal and depin elastically, while for strong disorder the system forms a pinned amorphous state that depins plastically. At high drives the Skyrmions can dynamically reorder into a moving crystal, with the onset of reordering determined by the strength of the Magnus term.

  2. Magnetic bilayer-skyrmions without skyrmion Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions might be used as information carriers in future advanced memories, logic gates and computing devices. However, there exists an obstacle known as the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE), that is, the skyrmion trajectories bend away from the driving current direction due to the Magnus force. Consequently, the skyrmions in constricted geometries may be destroyed by touching the sample edges. Here we theoretically propose that the SkHE can be suppressed in the antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled bilayer system, since the Magnus forces in the top and bottom layers are exactly cancelled. We show that such a pair of SkHE-free magnetic skyrmions can be nucleated and be driven by the current-induced torque. Our proposal provides a promising means to move magnetic skyrmions in a perfectly straight trajectory in ultra-dense devices with ultra-fast processing speed. PMID:26782905

  3. Computation of supersonic turbulent flow past a spinning cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Computational results are presented for supersonic laminar and turbulent flow past a pointed cone at angle of attack obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flowfield resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other analyses based on boundary-layer equations. For certain laminar flow conditions, an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results. For turbulent flow, at small angles of attack, good agreement is obtained with the experimental data and other theoretical results.

  4. Magnetic bilayer-skyrmions without skyrmion Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions might be used as information carriers in future advanced memories, logic gates and computing devices. However, there exists an obstacle known as the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE), that is, the skyrmion trajectories bend away from the driving current direction due to the Magnus force. Consequently, the skyrmions in constricted geometries may be destroyed by touching the sample edges. Here we theoretically propose that the SkHE can be suppressed in the antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled bilayer system, since the Magnus forces in the top and bottom layers are exactly cancelled. We show that such a pair of SkHE-free magnetic skyrmions can be nucleated and be driven by the current-induced torque. Our proposal provides a promising means to move magnetic skyrmions in a perfectly straight trajectory in ultra-dense devices with ultra-fast processing speed.

  5. Vortex dynamics in self-dual Chern-Simons-Higgs systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. ); Lee, K. )

    1994-02-15

    We consider vortex dynamics in self-dual Chern-Simons-Higgs systems. We show that the naive Aharonov-Bohm phase is the inverse of the statistical phase expected from the vortex spin, and that the self-dual configurations of vortices are degenerate in energy but not in angular momentum. We also use the path integral formalism to derive the dual formulation of Chern-Simons-Higgs systems in which vortices appear as charged particles. We argue that in addition to the electromagnetic interaction, there is an additional interaction between vortices, the so-called Magnus force, and that these forces can be put together into a single dual electromagnetic'' interaction. This dual electromagnetic interaction leads to the right statistical phase. We also derive and study the effective action for slowly moving vortices, which contains terms both linear and quadratic in the vortex velocity. We show that vortices can be bounded to each other by the Magnus force.

  6. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  7. STS-112 crew walks out of O&C building before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Still waving at spectators, the STS-112 crew heads for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and Space Shuttle Atlantis. Liftoff is scheduled for 3:46 p.m. EDT. From left are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin David Wolf, and Piers Sellers; Pilot Pamela Melroy; Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus; and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. Sellers, Magnus and Yurchikhin are making their first Shuttle flights. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station.

  8. STS-112 crew after arrival at SLF for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew pauses for a photo after their arrival at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Standing, left to right, are Mission Specialist Piers Sellers, Pilot Pamela Melroy, Commander Jeffrey Ashby, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Sandra Magnus and cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin. Sellers, Magnus and Yurchikhin are making their first Shuttle flights. STS-112, aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis, is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks. Launch is scheduled for Oct. 2 between 2 and 6 p.m.

  9. Magnetic bilayer-skyrmions without skyrmion Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions might be used as information carriers in future advanced memories, logic gates and computing devices. However, there exists an obstacle known as the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE), that is, the skyrmion trajectories bend away from the driving current direction due to the Magnus force. Consequently, the skyrmions in constricted geometries may be destroyed by touching the sample edges. Here we theoretically propose that the SkHE can be suppressed in the antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled bilayer system, since the Magnus forces in the top and bottom layers are exactly cancelled. We show that such a pair of SkHE-free magnetic skyrmions can be nucleated and be driven by the current-induced torque. Our proposal provides a promising means to move magnetic skyrmions in a perfectly straight trajectory in ultra-dense devices with ultra-fast processing speed. PMID:26782905

  10. Individual cells in the raphe nuclei of the medulla oblongata in rat that contain immunoreactivities for both serotonin and enkephalin project to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Verhofstad, A A; Terenius, L

    1989-01-01

    The ventral medulla oblongata of rats was analyzed with a double-labelling immunofluorescence technique using guinea pig antibodies directed against serotonin (5-HT) and rabbit antisera directed against enkephalin (ENK). Numerous cells in the region of nucleus raphe obscurus, nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus showed immunostaining for either 5-HT or ENK. A substantial number of cells showed positive immunostaining for both 5-HT and ENK. 5-HT/ENK double-labelled cells were most frequently encountered in an area that extended from the rostral aspect of the inferior olivary nucleus to the pontomedullary border. This region corresponds anatomically to nucleus raphe magnus/nucleus paragigantocellularis. In addition, a number of the 5-HT/ENK-containing cells were retrogradely labelled with Fluoro-Gold dye that had been injected into the thoracic spinal cord several days prior to perfusion. Schematic drawings showing the anatomical distribution of 5-HT/ENK colocalization are provided. PMID:2744110

  11. Immunohistochemical evidence for colocalization of gamma-aminobutyric acid and serotonin in neurons of the ventral medulla oblongata projecting to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Seroogy, K; Oertel, W; Verhofstad, A A; Wu, J Y

    1987-04-28

    Fluorescence immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the medulla oblongata of colchicine-treated rats that had been incubated with guinea pig antibodies to serotonin (5-HT) and either rabbit or sheep antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Numerous cells in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in the region of nucleus raphe magnus were immunostained for either 5-HT or GAD. A substantial number of neurons showed positive immunoreactivity for both substances, and were most frequently observed in the lateral aspect of nucleus raphe magnus. In addition, a number of the 5-HT/GAD-containing neurons were retrogradely labelled with Fast blue dye that had been injected into the thoracic spinal cord. This work provides evidence for colocalization of the classical neurotransmitters 5-HT and GABA in single cells of the ventral medulla oblongata, some of which project to the spinal cord. PMID:3555707

  12. The Fos expression in rat brain following electrical stimulation of dura mater surrounding the superior sagittal sinus changed with the pre-treatment of rizatriptan benzoate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Yu, Shengyuan; Dong, Zhao; Jiang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Fos expression in the brain was systematically investigated by means of immunohistochemical staining after electrical stimulation of the dura mater surrounding the superior sagittal sinus in conscious rats. Fos-like immunoreactive neurons are distributed mainly in the upper cervical spinal cord, spinal trigeminal nucleus caudal part, raphe magnus nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and mediodorsal thalamus nucleus. With the pre-treatment of intraperitoneal injection of rizatriptan benzoate, the number of Fos-like immunoreactive neurons decreased in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudal part and raphe magnus nucleus, increased in the periaqueductal gray, and remained unchanged in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and mediodorsal thalamus nucleus. These results provide morphological evidence that the nuclei described above are involved in the development and maintenance of the trigeminovascular headache. PMID:20934408

  13. Niche partitioning in a sympatric cryptic species complex.

    PubMed

    Scriven, Jessica J; Whitehorn, Penelope R; Goulson, Dave; Tinsley, Matthew C

    2016-03-01

    Competition theory states that multiple species should not be able to occupy the same niche indefinitely. Morphologically, similar species are expected to be ecologically alike and exhibit little niche differentiation, which makes it difficult to explain the co-occurrence of cryptic species. Here, we investigated interspecific niche differentiation within a complex of cryptic bumblebee species that co-occur extensively in the United Kingdom. We compared the interspecific variation along different niche dimensions, to determine how they partition a niche to avoid competitive exclusion. We studied the species B. cryptarum, B. lucorum, and B. magnus at a single location in the northwest of Scotland throughout the flight season. Using mitochondrial DNA for species identification, we investigated differences in phenology, response to weather variables and forage use. We also estimated niche region and niche overlap between different castes of the three species. Our results show varying levels of niche partitioning between the bumblebee species along three niche dimensions. The species had contrasting phenologies: The phenology of B. magnus was delayed relative to the other two species, while B. cryptarum had a relatively extended phenology, with workers and males more common than B. lucorum early and late in the season. We found divergent thermal specialisation: In contrast to B. cryptarum and B. magnus, B. lucorum worker activity was skewed toward warmer, sunnier conditions, leading to interspecific temporal variation. Furthermore, the three species differentially exploited the available forage plants: In particular, unlike the other two species, B. magnus fed predominantly on species of heather. The results suggest that ecological divergence in different niche dimensions and spatio-temporal heterogeneity in the environment may contribute to the persistence of cryptic species in sympatry. Furthermore, our study suggests that cryptic species provide distinct

  14. The Burnside problem and related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adian, Sergei I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a survey of results related to the famous Burnside problem on periodic groups. A negative solution of this problem was first published in joint papers of P.S. Novikov and the author in 1968. The theory of transformations of words in free periodic groups that was created in these papers and its various modifications give a very productive approach to the investigation of hard problems in group theory. In 1950 the Burnside problem gave rise to another problem on finite periodic groups, formulated by Magnus and called by him the restricted Burnside problem. Here it is called the Burnside-Magnus problem. In the Burnside problem the question of local finiteness of periodic groups of a given exponent was posed, but the Burnside-Magnus problem is the question of the existence of a maximal finite periodic group R(m,n) of a fixed period n with a given number m of generators. These problems complement each other. The publication in a joint paper by the author and Razborov in 1987 of the first effective proof of the well-known result of Kostrikin on the existence of a maximal group R(m,n) for any prime n, together with an indication of primitive recursive upper bounds for the orders of these groups, stimulated investigations of the Burnside-Magnus problem as well. Very soon other effective proofs appeared, and then Zel'manov extended Kostrikin's result to the case when n is any power of a prime number. These results are discussed in the last section of this paper. Bibliography: 105 titles.

  15. [Book review] The Sound Approach to Birding: A Guide to Understanding Bird Sound. --Mark Constantine and The Sound Approach. 2006. Poole, Dorset, United Kingdom.192 pp. + 2 CDs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    What is the ?Sound Approach?? It is a trio of enthusiastic bird-sound recordists?analysts (Arnoud B. van den Berg, Mark Constantine, and Magnus Robb) who, with friends, traveled to 42 countries in a massive effort to record all the songs and calls of the birds of the Western Palearctic. The recordings in this guide are selected from the 30,000 or so recorded digitally with stereo microphones by the authors since the year 2000.

  16. Quantum depinning of flux lines from columnar defects

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, E.M. ); Ferrera, A.; Vilenkin, A. )

    1995-01-01

    The depinning of a flux line from a columnar defect is studied within the path-integral approach. Instantons of the quantum field theory in 1+1 dimensions are computed for the flux line whose dynamics is dominated by the Magnus force. The universal temperature dependence of the decay rate in the proximity of the critical current is obtained. This problem provides an example of macroscopic quantum tunneling, which is accessible to the direct comparison between theory and experiment.

  17. Earth matter effect on active-sterile neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Mario A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; D'Olivo, J. C.

    2011-08-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some experimental observations. In a four-neutrino mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  18. Physical optics in a uniform gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a (quasi-)plane wave in a uniform gravitational field is studied. It is shown that the energy of an elliptically polarized wave does not propagate along a geodesic, but in a direction that is rotated with respect to the gravitational force. The similarity with the walk-off effect in anisotropic crystals or the optical Magnus effect in inhomogeneous media is pointed out.

  19. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  20. The algebraic criteria for the stability of control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremer, H.; Effertz, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper critically examines the standard algebraic criteria for the stability of linear control systems and their proofs, reveals important previously unnoticed connections, and presents new representations. Algebraic stability criteria have also acquired significance for stability studies of non-linear differential equation systems by the Krylov-Bogoljubov-Magnus Method, and allow realization conditions to be determined for classes of broken rational functions as frequency characteristics of electrical network.

  1. Quantum depinning in layered superconductors with defects produced by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L.N.; Larkin, A.I.; Maley, M.P.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1995-10-01

    We consider Magnus force vortex dynamics in superclean superconductors and calculate the quantum tunneling rate of the pancake vortex creep from the pinning cites in the nondissipative limit. The consideration is based on the exact representation of the one-particle wave functions in the magnetic and electric fields. The obtained results are compared to the experimental data and the possibility of the observation of the discrete structure of the pinned pancake energy levels is discussed.

  2. STS-112 takes part in post-landing briefing for the media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew takes part in a post-landing briefing for the media. From left are Mission Specialists David Wolf, Sandra Magnus, responding to a question, and Piers Sellers. Mission STS-112 was the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, installing the S1 truss. The landing was the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  3. STS-112 Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- (STS112-S-002) These five astronauts and cosmonaut take a break from training to pose for the STS-112 crew portrait. Astronauts Pamela A. Melroy and Jeffrey S. Ashby, pilot and commander respectively, are in the cen ter of the photo. The mission specialists are from left to right, astronauts Sandra H. Magnus, David A. Wolf and Piers J. Sellers, and cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, who represents Rosaviakosmos.

  4. Models of Structure of the Envelope of Influenza Virus*†

    PubMed Central

    Tiffany, John M.; Blough, Herbert A.

    1970-01-01

    Possible models of the structure of the influenza virus envelope are considered in terms of the known chemical composition. Models incorporating lipid in the form of a bimolecular leaflet are shown to be unlikely on geometrical grounds. A model having „inverted toadstool” protein units separated by spherical lipid micelles is favored, and is capable of explaining the appearance of the virus in the electron microscope and differences between normal and incomplete (von Magnus) forms of the virus. Images PMID:5266149

  5. Dynamics of skyrmions in chiral magnets: Dynamic phase transitions and equation of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shi-Zeng Reichhardt, Charles; Batista, Cristian D.; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-07

    We study the dynamics of skyrmions in a metallic chiral magnet. First, we show that skyrmions can be created dynamically by destabilizing the ferromagnetic background state through a spin polarized current. We then treat skyrmions as rigid particles and derive the corresponding equation of motion. The dynamics of skyrmions is dominated by the Magnus force, which accounts for the weak pinning of skyrmions observed in experiments. Finally, we discuss the quantum motion of skyrmions.

  6. STS-112 Crew Training Clip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Footage shows the crew of STS-112 (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus, and Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialists) during several parts of their training. The video is arranged into short segments. In 'Topside Activities at the NBL', Wolf and Sellers are fitted with EVA suits for pool training. 'Pre-Launch Bailout Training in CCT II' shows all six crew members exiting from the hatch on a model of a shuttle orbiter cockpit. 'EVA Training in the VR Lab' shows a crew member training with a virtual reality simulator, interspersed with footage of Magnus, and Wolf with Melroy, at monitors. There is a 'Crew Photo Session', and 'Pam Melroy and Sandy Magnus at the SES Dome' also features a virtual reality simulator. The final two segments of the video involve hands-on training. 'Post Landing Egress at the FFT' shows the crew suiting up into their flight suits, and being raised on a harness, to practice rapelling from the cockpit hatch. 'EVA Prep and Post at the ISS Airlock' shows the crew assembling an empty EVA suit onboard a model of a module. The crew tests oxygen masks, and Sellers is shown on an exercise bicycle with an oxygen mask, with his heart rate monitored (not shown).

  7. Ratchet Effects, Negative Mobility, and Phase Locking for Skyrmions on Periodic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles; Ray, Dipanjan; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia

    We examine the dynamics of skyrmions interacting with 1D and 2D periodic substrates in the presence of dc and ac drives. We find that the Magnus term strongly affects the skyrmion dynamics and that new kinds of phenomena can occur which are absent for overdamped ac and dc driven particles interacting with similar substrates. We show that it is possible to realize a Magnus induced ratchet for skyrmions interacting with an asymmetric potential, where the application of an ac drive can produce quantized dc motion of the skyrmions even when the ac force is perpendicular to the substrate asymmetry direction. For symmetric substrates it is also possible to achieve a negative mobility effect where the net skyrmion motion runs counter to an applied dc drive. Here, as a function of increasing dc drive, the velocity-force curves show a series of locking phases that have different features from the classic Shapiro steps found in overdamped systems. In the phase locking and ratcheting states, the skyrmions undergo intricate 2D orbits induced by the Magnus term.

  8. STS-112 Crew Training Clip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    Footage shows the crew of STS-112 (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus, and Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialists) during several parts of their training. The video is arranged into short segments. In 'Topside Activities at the NBL', Wolf and Sellers are fitted with EVA suits for pool training. 'Pre-Launch Bailout Training in CCT II' shows all six crew members exiting from the hatch on a model of a shuttle orbiter cockpit. 'EVA Training in the VR Lab' shows a crew member training with a virtual reality simulator, interspersed with footage of Magnus, and Wolf with Melroy, at monitors. There is a 'Crew Photo Session', and 'Pam Melroy and Sandy Magnus at the SES Dome' also features a virtual reality simulator. The final two segments of the video involve hands-on training. 'Post Landing Egress at the FFT' shows the crew suiting up into their flight suits, and being raised on a harness, to practice rapelling from the cockpit hatch. 'EVA Prep and Post at the ISS Airlock' shows the crew assembling an empty EVA suit onboard a model of a module. The crew tests oxygen masks, and Sellers is shown on an exercise bicycle with an oxygen mask, with his heart rate monitored (not shown).

  9. Fos and serotonin immunoreactivity in the raphe nuclei of the cat during carbachol-induced active sleep: a double-labeling study.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, J; Sampogna, S; López-Rodríguez, F; Luppi, P H; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1995-07-01

    The microinjection of carbachol into the nucleus pontis oralis produces a state which is polygraphically and behaviorally similar to active sleep (rapid eye movement sleep). In the present study, using double-labeling techniques for serotonin and the protein product of c-fos (Fos), we sought to examine whether immunocytochemically identified serotonergic neurons of the raphe nuclei of the cat were activated, as indicated by their expression of c-fos, during this pharmacologically-induced behavioral state (active sleep-carbachol). Compared with control cats, which were injected with saline, active sleep-carbachol cats exhibited a significantly greater number of c-fos-expressing neurons in the raphe dorsalis, magnus and pallidus. Whereas most of the c-fos-expressing neurons in the raphe dorsalis were small, those in the raphe magnus were medium-sized and in the raphe pallidus they were small and medium-sized. The mean number of serotonergic neurons that expressed c-fos (i.e. double-labeled cells) was similar in control and active sleep-carbachol cats. These data indicate that there is an increased number of non-serotonergic, c-fos-expressing neurons in the raphe dorsalis, magnus and pallidus during the carbachol-induced state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7477901

  10. Two new species of the deep-sea genus Parameiropsis (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) from the eastern central Pacific.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dae Hyun; Wi, Jin Hee; Suh, Hae-Lip

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of Parameiropsis are herein described that were identified from the Korean Deep Ocean Study (KODOS) in the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone, located in the eastern central Pacific. Parameiropsis kodosensis n. sp. is similar to P. magnus Itô, 1983 in two key respects: the presence of a distal seta on the syncoxa of the maxilliped, and the general features of its swimming legs. However, P. kodosensis can be differentiated from P. magnus by a higher length-to-width ratio of the caudal ramus (2.5:1 and 1:1 respectively), the setal number on the exp-3 of P1, and the exp and benp of P5 are separated in P. kodosensis, while they are fused in P. magnus. Parameiropsis tetraspinosa n. sp. resembles P. peruanus Becker, 1974 in the absence of a fused seta in the outermost spine on the endopod of antenna and the general features of the swimming legs. However, P. tetraspinosa can be distinguished from P. peruanus by a higher length-to-width ratio of the caudal ramus (3.9:1 and 2.3:1 respectively), the presence of a distal seta on the syncoxa of the maxilliped, and by its medially fused P5. In this study full descriptions and a comparison with previously described species are provided. Additionally, a key to females of Parameiropsis species is given. PMID:27395690

  11. Evolution of the Dynamic Symptoms Model.

    PubMed

    Brant, Jeannine M; Dudley, William N; Beck, Susan; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Theories and conceptual models can be thought of as broad nets that attempt to rationalize, explain, and master a phenomenon within clinical nursing and interdisciplinary care. They can be used to guide a review of the literature and to formulate and organize research variables and relationships. Gaps in the literature can be identified and opportunities for additional research revealed (Fawcett, 2005). A variety of symptom models or theories exist, including the Theory of Symptom Management (Dodd et al., 2001), Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (Lenz, Pugh, Milligan, Gift, & Suppe, 1997), Symptoms Experience Model (Armstrong, 2003), and Symptom Experiences in Time Theory (Henly, Kallas, Klatt, & Swenson, 2003). Most recently, the National Institute of Nursing Research identified a new National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model to guide symptom science research (Cashion & Grady, 2015).
. PMID:27541557

  12. Quantized transport for a skyrmion moving on a two-dimensional periodic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Ray, D.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the dynamics of a skyrmion moving over a two-dimensional periodic substrate utilizing simulations of a particle-based skyrmion model. We specifically examine the role of the nondissipative Magnus term on the driven motion and the resulting skyrmion velocity-force curves. In the overdamped limit, there is a depinning transition into a sliding state in which the skyrmion moves in the same direction as the external drive. When there is a finite Magnus component in the equation of motion, a skyrmion in the absence of a substrate moves at an angle with respect to the direction of the external driving force. When a periodic substrate is added, the direction of motion or Hall angle of the skyrmion is dependent on the amplitude of the external drive, only approaching the substrate-free limit for higher drives. Due to the underlying symmetry of the substrate the direction of skyrmion motion does not change continuously as a function of drive, but rather forms a series of discrete steps corresponding to integer or rational ratios of the velocity components perpendicular ( ) and parallel ( ) to the external drive direction: / =n /m , where n and m are integers. The skyrmion passes through a series of directional locking phases in which the motion is locked to certain symmetry directions of the substrate for fixed intervals of the drive amplitude. Within a given directionally locked phase, the Hall angle remains constant and the skyrmion moves in an orderly fashion through the sample. Signatures of the transitions into and out of these locked phases take the form of pronounced cusps in the skyrmion velocity versus force curves, as well as regions of negative differential mobility in which the net skyrmion velocity decreases with increasing external driving force. The number of steps in the transport curve increases when the relative strength of the Magnus term is increased. We also observe an overshoot phenomena in the directional locking

  13. Yeast biogeography and the effects of species recognition approaches: the case study of widespread basidiomycetous species from birch forests in Russia.

    PubMed

    Yurkov, Andrey; Inácio, João; Chernov, Ivan Yu; Fonseca, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Understanding diversity and distribution patterns of fungi, including yeasts, ultimately depends on accuracy of species recognition. However, different approaches to yeast species recognition often result in different entities or operational taxonomic units. We studied the effects of using different yeast species recognition approaches, namely morphological species recognition (MSR) and phylogenetic species recognition (PSR), on the distribution patterns of widespread basidiomycetous yeasts. Hence, we have revised a collection of yeast fungi isolated from spatially remote birch forests in the Moscow Region and Western Siberia with molecular typing and identification tools. PCR fingerprinting and rDNA sequencing analyses of strains of nine species previously identified on the basis of morphological and physiological tests (MSR) yielded 21 phylogenetic species (PSR), including three currently undescribed taxa. The number of distinct phylogenetic species comprised within a single morphospecies ranged from one to seven. A total of ten species were found in both regions, whereas the distribution of 11 yeasts was restricted to a single region only. Both geographical region and type of substrate (plant or soil) influence yeast distribution. Cryptococcus wieringae, C. victoriae, C. magnus, and Leucosporidium scottii were frequently found on plant substrates, whereas C. terricola and C. podzolicus were associated to soil substrates. Occurrence of C. magnus, C. albidus and Sporobolomyces roseus was found to depend on the geographical region. Microsatellite-PCR fingerprinting, MSP-PCR, applied to studying yeast intraspecific variability revealed three different types of distribution: (a) variability that depends on geographical factors (Curvibasidium cygneicollum, C. podzolicus, C. victoriae), (b) genetic identity irrespectively of the region of isolation (Rhodotorula pinicola, C. terricola), and (c) high degree of genetic variability that did not correlate with region of

  14. Testing the Accuracy of a Projectile Motion Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bret; Martell, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to predict where a ball would land given initial velocity, angular velocity, and atmospheric conditions. A spinning spherical object flying through air is affected by gravity, quadratic drag forces, and the Magnus force. Mathematica was used to numerically solve predictions for the equations of motion. These predictions were compared with experimental data gathered by launching tennis balls, baseballs, and/or soccer balls from a machine we designed to propel the balls with a pre-determined initial velocity and initial angular velocity.

  15. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson's ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  16. Dynamics of two-dimensional vortex pairs in a spatially varying potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.H. ); Gunn, J.M.F. )

    1992-10-01

    We consider the dynamics of vortices in a superfluid {sup 4}He film flowing over a substrate at zero temperature. The vortex trajectories are assumed to be governed by the Magnus-force equation with the effect of the substrate incorporated via the gradient of a potential. We use an equivalent Hamiltonian formulation to show that two vortices in a slowly varying potential can exhibit stochastic behavior. In this regard, there are differences between the cases of two vortices of the same sign and those of the opposite sign, the latter becoming stochastic more readily.

  17. Hydrodynamic Aspects of the Toms Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strel‧nikova, S. A.; Tkachenko, G. V.; Uryukov, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    The physicomathematical model of migration of polymers in a liquid turbulent flow in a pipe is based on a comparison of forces transverse to the motion of the mainstream flow: the Saffman, Magnus, and turbophoresis forces. It has been shown that the polymer particles are grouped near a certain boundary within the limits of the boundary layer. On this basis, the authors have made assumptions on the mechanism of suppression of turbulent pulsations and decrease in the viscous friction near the wall, which makes up the Toms effect. The proposed model satisfies, at least, qualitatively, various actually observed manifestations of the effect.

  18. Improving the In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group via approximate inclusion of three-body effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Titus; Bogner, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group (IM-SRG) has been applied successfully not only to several closed shell finite nuclei, but has recently been used to produce effective shell model interactions that are competitive with phenomenological interactions in the SD shell. A recent alternative method for solving of the IM-SRG equations, called the Magnus expansion, not only provides a computationally feasible route to producing observables, but also allows for approximate handling of induced three-body forces. Promising results for several systems, including finite nuclei, will be presented and discussed.

  19. Dynamics of bubbles in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Suzuki, Naoya; Saito, Hiroki

    2011-03-01

    The dynamics of a phase-separated two-component Bose-Einstein condensate are investigated, in which a bubble of one component moves through the other component. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal a variety of dynamics associated with the creation of quantized vortices. In two dimensions, a circular bubble deforms into an ellipse and splits into fragments with vortices, which undergo the Magnus effect. The Bénard-von Kármán vortex street is also generated. In three dimensions, a spherical bubble deforms into toruses with vortex rings. When two rings are formed, they exhibit leapfrogging dynamics.

  20. STS-112 crew in front of Launch Pad 39B before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the STS-112 crew pose in front of Launch Pad 39B during a tour of Kennedy Space Center prior to launch. From left, they are Mission Specialist Sandra H. Magnus, Commander Jeffrey S. Ashby, Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy, a nd Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, Fyodor N. Yurchikhin of the Russian Space Agency, and Piers J. Sellers. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis was postponed today to no earlier than Thursday, Oct. 3, while weather forecasters and the mission managemen t team assess the possible effect Hurricane Lili may have on the Mission Control Center located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

  1. Force balance on two-dimensional superconductors with a single moving vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chun Kit; Arahata, Emiko; Kato, Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    We study forces on two-dimensional superconductors with a single moving vortex based on a recent fully self-consistent calculation of DC conductivity in an s-wave superconductor (E. Arahata and Y. Kato, arXiv:1310.0566). By considering momentum balance of the whole liquid, we attempt to identify various contributions to the total transverse force on the vortex. This provides an estimation of the effective Magnus force based on the quasiclassical theory generalized by Kita [T. Kita, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 054503 (2001)], which allows for the Hall effect in vortex states.

  2. Dynamics of bubbles in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Suzuki, Naoya; Saito, Hiroki

    2011-03-15

    The dynamics of a phase-separated two-component Bose-Einstein condensate are investigated, in which a bubble of one component moves through the other component. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal a variety of dynamics associated with the creation of quantized vortices. In two dimensions, a circular bubble deforms into an ellipse and splits into fragments with vortices, which undergo the Magnus effect. The Benard-von Karman vortex street is also generated. In three dimensions, a spherical bubble deforms into toruses with vortex rings. When two rings are formed, they exhibit leapfrogging dynamics.

  3. Effects of time ordering in quantum nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, Nicolás; Sipe, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    We study time-ordering corrections to the description of spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC), four-wave mixing (SFWM), and frequency conversion using the Magnus expansion. Analytic approximations to the evolution operator that are unitary are obtained. They are Gaussian preserving, and allow us to understand order-by-order the effects of time ordering. We show that the corrections due to time ordering vanish exactly if the phase-matching function is sufficiently broad. The calculation of the effects of time ordering on the joint spectral amplitude of the photons generated in SPDC and SFWM are reduced to quadrature.

  4. STS-112 Flight Day 7 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On this seventh day of STS-112 mission members of the crew (Commander Jeff Ashby; Pilot Pam Melroy; Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus, Piers Sellers, Dave Wolf, and Fyodor Yurchikhin) along with the Expedition Five crew (Commander Valery Korzun; Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson, and Sergei Treschev) are seen answering questions during the mission's press interview and photo opportunity. They answered various questions regarding the mission's objectives, the onboard science experiments, the extravehicular activities (EVAs) and the effects of living in space. Shots of the test deployment of the S1 truss radiator and Canadarm rotor joint are also shown.

  5. Skyrmionic spin Seebeck effect via dissipative thermomagnonic torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2014-06-01

    We derive thermomagnonic torque and its "β-type" dissipative correction from the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The β-type dissipative correction describes viscous coupling between magnetic dynamics and magnonic current and it stems from spin mistracking of the magnetic order. We show that thermomagnonic torque is important for describing temperature gradient induced motion of skyrmions in helical magnets while dissipative correction plays an essential role in generating transverse Magnus force. We propose to detect such skyrmionic motion by employing the transverse spin Seebeck effect geometry.

  6. Second-order shaped pulsed for solid-state quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Pinaki

    2008-01-01

    We present the construction and detailed analysis of highly optimized self-refocusing pulse shapes for several rotation angles. We characterize the constructed pulses by the coefficients appearing in the Magnus expansion up to second order. This allows a semianalytical analysis of the performance of the constructed shapes in sequences and composite pulses by computing the corresponding leading-order error operators. Higher orders can be analyzed with the numerical technique suggested by us previously. We illustrate the technique by analyzing several composite pulses designed to protect against pulse amplitude errors, and on decoupling sequences for potentially long chains of qubits with on-site and nearest-neighbor couplings.

  7. Unfolding of Vortices into Topological Stripes in a Multiferroic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Mostovoy, M.; Han, M. G.; Horibe, Y.; Aoki, T.; Zhu, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2014-06-01

    Multiferroic hexagonal RMnO3 (R =rare earths) crystals exhibit dense networks of vortex lines at which six domain walls merge. While the domain walls can be readily moved with an applied electric field, the vortex cores so far have been impossible to control. Our experiments demonstrate that shear strain induces a Magnus-type force pulling vortices and antivortices in opposite directions and unfolding them into a topological stripe domain state. We discuss the analogy between this effect and the current-driven dynamics of vortices in superconductors and superfluids.

  8. STS-112 Pilot Melroy inspects cables prior to launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-112 Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy (left) conducts a last-minute inspection of some cables inside Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39B prior to the launch of her mission. The STS-112 crew also includes Commander Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, Sandra H. Magnus, Piers J. Sellers, and Fyodor N. Yurchikhin of the Russian Space Agency. Launch of the mission was postponed today to no earlier than Thursday, Oct. 3, while weather forecasters and the mission management team assess the possible effect Hurricane Lili may have on the Mission Control Center located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

  9. Survival of Rydberg atoms in intense laser fields and the role of nondipole effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Michael; Dimitrovski, Darko

    2015-02-01

    We consider the interaction of Rydberg atoms with strong infrared laser pulses using an approach based on the Magnus expansion of the time evolution operator. First-order corrections beyond the electric dipole approximation are also included in the theory. We illustrate the dynamics of the interaction at the parameters of the experiment [Eichmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 203002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.203002]. It emerges that the depletion of Rydberg atoms in this regime comes predominantly from the nondipole effects.

  10. [Arthur Kronfeld (1886-1941)--a psychiatrist in the service of psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Schröder, C

    1986-07-01

    The psychotherapeutic life-work of psychiatrist Arthur Kronfeld has almost fallen into oblivion. Against the background of the 100th anniversary of his birth the author traces Kronfeld's psychotherapeutic career, pointing out his activity at the Berliner "Institute of Sexual Research" under Magnus Hirschfeld, and his psychotherapeutic concept--the psychagogic guidance of the patient--and its connection with the individual psychology of Alfred Adler. Kronfeld translated his theoretical positions into activities directed towards socialization and the teachability of psychotherapy which are still worthy of note by those engaged in the field. PMID:3532156

  11. Follow-up investigations of GPHS motion during heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1992-03-23

    Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, which were conducted in the heat pulse intervals associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth's atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse of reentry, (2) determine the effect of magnus force on the roll rate and angle of attack of the GPHS during an EGA entry, (3) determine the effect of the magnitude of pitch and roll damping on the GPHS motion.

  12. Extent of colocalization of serotonin and GABA in neurons of the ventral medulla oblongata in rat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Seroogy, K; Verhofstad, A A

    1988-09-27

    The colocalization of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the ventral aspect of the rat medulla oblongata was studied using antibodies directed against 5-HT and GABA. Although 5-HT- and GABA-immunoreactive cell bodies were observed over the entire rostral-caudal extent of the ventral medulla, the colocalization of these two classical neurotransmitters in single cells was, for the most part, limited to a region that corresponds anatomically to nucleus raphe magnus/nucleus paragigantocellularis. Schematic drawings showing the distribution of 5-HT/GABA cell bodies in the ventral medulla are provided. PMID:3066433

  13. ["Different from the others". Kraepelin's assessment of Hirschfeld's educational film. A contribution to the history of psychiatry of the Weimar Republic].

    PubMed

    Weber, M M; Burgmair, W

    1997-01-01

    In 1921 the Medical Court of Honour of the County Brandenburg and Berlin procured an expert opinion by the well-known psychiatrist Emil Kraepelin on the first sex education film "Anders als die Andern". The Berlin sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld had launched the film in 1919 to bring his scientific targets of abolition of section 175 StGB and the liberalization of sexual morality to a greater public. Kraepelin succeeded in banning the film because of its subject being a threat to population policy in post World War I Germany. PMID:9333997

  14. Differentiation of Peptococcus and Peptostreptococcus by gas-liquid chromatography of cellular fatty acids and metabolic products.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, M A; Armfield, A Y

    1979-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) profiles of cellular fatty acids and metabolic products were useful in identifying strains of Peptococcus saccharolyticus, Peptococcus asaccharolyticus, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Peptostreptococcus micros, and Streptococcus intermedius. The GLC results supported the recent taxonomic decision to transfer aerotolerant Peptostreptococcus species to the genus Streptococcus. Because inconsistencies in the results prevented our differentiating Peptococcus prevotii. Peptococcus magnus, and Peptococcus variabilis by GLC, additional strains will have to been examined. These GLC techniques are amenable to routine use; however, for interlaboratory results to be meaningful, the classification and nomenclature of the anaerobic gram-positive cocci should be standardized. PMID:528680

  15. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada: Omaliinae, Micropeplinae, Phloeocharinae, Olisthaerinae, and Habrocerinae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eleven species of Omaliinae are newly recorded from New Brunswick, bringing the total number of species known from the province to 32 described species. Supporting data are presented for the New Brunswick record of Geodromicus strictus (Fauvel) reported by Majka et al. (2011). Micropeplus browni Campbell, Micropeplus laticollis Mäklin (Micropeplinae), Charyhyphus picipennis (LeConte) (Phloeocharinae), Olisthaerus substriatus (Paykull) (Olisthaerinae), Habrocerus capillaricornis (Gravenhorst), Habrocerus magnus LeConte, and Habrocerus schwarzi Horn (Habrocerinae) are also newly recorded for New Brunswick. These are the first records of the latter four subfamilies from New Brunswick. Collection and bionomic data are presented for each species and discussed. PMID:22577316

  16. A revision of the Chinese Aulacidae (Hymenoptera, Evanioidea)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-yan; Turrisi, Giuseppe Fabrizio; Xu, Zai-fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Chinese Aulacidae are revised, keyed and illustrated for the first time. In total twenty-five species are recorded from China, included within two genera Aulacus Jurine, 1807 and Pristaulacus Kieffer, 1900, with five and twenty species respectively. Among the treated species, six are newly described for science: Aulacus magnus sp. n., Pristaulacus calidus sp. n., Pristaulacus centralis sp. n., Pristaulacus fopingi sp. n., Pristaulacus obscurus sp. n., and Pristaulacus pseudoiosephi sp. n. Three species are newly recorded from China: Pristaulacus excisus Turner, 1922, Pristaulacus iosephi Turrisi & Madl, 2013, and Pristaulacus rufobalteatus Cameron, 1907. PMID:27408528

  17. The Mass of a Spin Vortex, in a Bose Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ari

    2009-03-01

    Ferromagnetic condensates can have both spin-current and charge-current vortices. A moving charge-vortex experiences the Magnus force, perpendicular to its motion, when it moves. This effective ``magnetic field" is so strong that it dominates the inertial term in Newton's law; therefore it is not possible to set a charge-vortex moving at an arbitrary speed relative to the condensate. As we will show, a spin-vortex can move ``inertially" through a condensate and resists acceleration with a mass.

  18. Bioactive Mimetics of Conotoxins and other Venom Peptides.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Peter J; Tuck, Kellie L

    2015-10-01

    Ziconotide (Prialt®), a synthetic version of the peptide ω-conotoxin MVIIA found in the venom of a fish-hunting marine cone snail Conus magnus, is one of very few drugs effective in the treatment of intractable chronic pain. However, its intrathecal mode of delivery and narrow therapeutic window cause complications for patients. This review will summarize progress in the development of small molecule, non-peptidic mimics of Conotoxins and a small number of other venom peptides. This will include a description of how some of the initially designed mimics have been modified to improve their drug-like properties. PMID:26501323

  19. Non-linear meteor trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Martin

    1988-08-01

    In this essay an attempt is made to not only review but reopen the debate on nonlinear meteor trails. On the basis of data culled from various, now historical, sources it is found that approximately one in every two hundred of the visual meteors is likely to show a nonlinear trail, and that of such trails about 60 percent will be continuously curved and 40 percent sinusoidal. It is suggested that two mechanisms may explain the various trail types: the continuously curved trails being a manifestation of the classical Magnus effect, and the sinusoidal trails resulting from torque-free precession.

  20. Bioactive Mimetics of Conotoxins and other Venom Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Peter J.; Tuck, Kellie L.

    2015-01-01

    Ziconotide (Prialt®), a synthetic version of the peptide ω-conotoxin MVIIA found in the venom of a fish-hunting marine cone snail Conus magnus, is one of very few drugs effective in the treatment of intractable chronic pain. However, its intrathecal mode of delivery and narrow therapeutic window cause complications for patients. This review will summarize progress in the development of small molecule, non-peptidic mimics of Conotoxins and a small number of other venom peptides. This will include a description of how some of the initially designed mimics have been modified to improve their drug-like properties. PMID:26501323

  1. Rigorous Bound on Energy Absorption and Generic Relaxation in Periodically Driven Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takashi; Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Saito, Keiji

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the universal nature of relaxation in isolated many-body quantum systems subjected to global and strong periodic driving. Our rigorous Floquet analysis shows that the energy of the system remains almost constant up to an exponentially long time in frequency for arbitrary initial states and that an effective Hamiltonian obtained by a truncation of the Floquet-Magnus expansion is a quasiconserved quantity in a long time scale. These two general properties lead to an intriguing classification on the initial stage of relaxation, one of which is similar to the prethermalization phenomenon in nearly integrable systems.

  2. Aerodynamics in the classroom and at the ball park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-04-01

    Experiments suitable for classroom projects or demonstrations are described concerning the aerodynamics of polystyrene balls. A light ball with sufficient backspin can curve vertically upward through the air, defying gravity and providing a dramatic visual demonstration of the Magnus effect. A ball projected with backspin can also curve downward with a vertical acceleration greater than that due to gravity if the Magnus force is negative. These effects were investigated by filming the flight of balls projected in an approximately horizontal direction so that the lift and drag forces could be easily measured. The balls were also fitted with artificial raised seams and projected with backspin toward a vertical target in order to measure the sideways deflection over a known horizontal distance. It was found that (a) a ball with a seam on one side can deflect either left or right depending on its launch speed and (b) a ball with a baseball seam can also deflect sideways even when there is no sideways component of the drag or lift forces acting on the ball. Depending on the orientations of the seam and the spin axis, a sideways force on a baseball can arise either if there is rough patch on one side of the ball or if there is a smooth patch. A scuff ball with a rough patch on one side is illegal in baseball. The effect of a smooth patch is a surprising new observation.

  3. STS-112 crew walks out of O&C building before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew wave to spectators as they exit the Operations and Checkout Building for their ride to Launch Pad 39B and the launch scheduled 3:46 p.m. EDT. Leading the way are Pilot Pamela Melroy and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. In the second row are Mission Specialists David Wolf (left) and Sandra Magnus. Behind them are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin and Piers Sellers. Sellers, Magnus and Yurchikhin are making their first Shuttle flights. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station.

  4. Interaction of vortices with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B. |; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    We study the interaction of sound waves with vortices in type-II superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. We propose ultrasound techniques as a method for obtaining information about vortex dynamics. This is particularly appropiate at low temperatures where transport measurements are ineffective. The changes in sound velocity and attenuation due to vortices, can provide information on the elastic constants of the vortex system and on vortex dissipation, respectively. At low temperatures the Magnus force acting on vortices leads to the {ital acoustic} {ital Faraday} {ital effect}: there is a rotation of the polarization plane of tranverse sound waves propagating along the magnetic field. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. We discuss how this effect can be measured by means of either pulse-echo techniques or standing sound waves. Also, we show that an ac electromagnetic field acting on the vortex system can generate ultrasound. We calculate the amplitude of the generated sound waves in the linear regime and compare with recent experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Spin-orbit torques and anisotropic magnetization damping in skyrmion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, Kjetil M. D.; Brataas, Arne

    2014-02-01

    The length scale of the magnetization gradients in chiral magnets is determined by the relativistic Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Thus, even conventional spin-transfer torques are controlled by the relativistic spin-orbit coupling in these systems, and additional relativistic corrections to the current-induced torques and magnetization damping become important for a complete understanding of the current-driven magnetization dynamics. We theoretically study the effects of reactive and dissipative homogeneous spin-orbit torques and anisotropic damping on the current-driven skyrmion dynamics in cubic chiral magnets. Our results demonstrate that spin-orbit torques play a significant role in the current-induced skyrmion velocity. The dissipative spin-orbit torque generates a relativistic Magnus force on the skyrmions, whereas the reactive spin-orbit torque yields a correction to both the drift velocity along the current direction and the transverse velocity associated with the Magnus force. The spin-orbit torque corrections to the velocity scale linearly with the skyrmion size, which is inversely proportional to the spin-orbit coupling. Consequently, the reactive spin-orbit torque correction can be the same order of magnitude as the nonrelativistic contribution. More importantly, the dissipative spin-orbit torque can be the dominant force that causes a deflected motion of the skyrmions if the torque exhibits a linear or quadratic relationship with the spin-orbit coupling. In addition, we demonstrate that the skyrmion velocity is determined by anisotropic magnetization damping parameters governed by the skyrmion size.

  6. Spin-Orbit Torques and Anisotropic Magnetization Damping in Skyrmion Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, Kjetil; Brataas, Arne

    2014-03-01

    We theoretically study the effects of reactive and dissipative homogeneous spin-orbit torques and anisotropic damping on the current-driven skyrmion dynamics in cubic chiral magnets. Our results demonstrate that spin-orbit torques play a significant role in the current-induced skyrmion velocity. The dissipative spin-orbit torque generates a relativistic Magnus force on the skyrmions, whereas the reactive spin-orbit torque yields a correction to both the drift velocity along the current direction and the transverse velocity associated with the Magnus force. The spin-orbit torque corrections to the velocity scale linearly with the skyrmion size, which is inversely proportional to the spin-orbit coupling. Consequently, the reactive spin-orbit torque correction can be the same order of magnitude as the non-relativistic contribution. More importantly, the dissipative spin-orbit torque can be the dominant force that causes a deflected motion of the skyrmions if the torque exhibits a linear or quadratic relationship with the spin-orbit coupling. In addition, we demonstrate that the skyrmion velocity is determined by anisotropic magnetization damping parameters governed by the skyrmion size.

  7. STS-112 Flight Day 1 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On the first day of STS-112 the crew (Commander Jeff Ashby, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus, Piers Sellers, David Wolf and Fyodor Yurchikhin) are shown preparing for launch at Kennedy Space Center, being transported to the Space Shuttle Atlantis at its launch pad, and being seated in the Orbiter. During the launch, the External Tank (ET) camera, mounted to the top of Atlantis's ET and aimed downward) will provide never before seen footage of the shuttle during lift-off. Following the final countdown and liftoff, the ET camera provides footage as Atlantis quickly leaves the Earth behind, at speeds over 2,800 miles per hour. Following orbital insertion, the shuttle's payload bay doors are shown opening in footage provided by a payload bay camera. Sellers and Magnus narrate their thoughts during a replay of the initial launch sequence, shortly after entering orbit. Following the tape, they are shown in the crewcabin with the rest of the crew, and they each share brief thoughts.

  8. Lethal outcome in xanthogranulomatous endometritis.

    PubMed

    Noack, Frank; Briese, Juliane; Stellmacher, Florian; Hornung, Daniela; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2006-05-01

    Xanthogranulomatous inflammation is rare, mainly involving the kidneys, while primary xanthogranulomatous endometritis (XE) is a very unusual finding, histologically characterized by partial or complete replacement of the mucosa by granulation tissue with an abundance of foamy histiocytes, siderophages and multinucleated giant cells. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman with a short history of abdominal pain and a palpable mass in the pouch of Douglas. Dilatation of the cervix drained a pyometra. Histological examination of the curettage rendered the diagnosis of XE. Microbiological studies revealed enterococcus spp. and Peptostreptococcus magnus. Despite antibiotic treatment the patient died of heart failure due to systemic inflammation. Autopsy confirmed the diagnosis of XE with transmural extension into the peritoneal cavity. Such a lethal course of XE is extraordinary. Proposed causes of XE include obstruction, infection and hemorrhage. Demonstration of enterococcus spp. and P. magnus supports the probable significance of bacteria in the development of XE. Because this condition may mimic malignant disease macroscopically and histologically, knowledge of XE is of major importance for both pathologists and gynecologists. PMID:16725016

  9. STS-112 Crew exit O&C building before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew eagerly exit the Operations and Checkout Building for their ride to Launch Pad 39B and the launch scheduled 3:46 p.m. EDT. Leading the way are Pilot Pamela Melroy and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. In the second row are Mission Specialists David Wolf (left) and Sandra Magnus. Behind them are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin and Piers Sellers. Sellers, Magnus and Yurchikhin are making their first Shuttle flights. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. [Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews

  10. Cycloid motions of grains in a dust plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong-Liang, Zhang; Fan, Feng; Fu-Cheng, Liu; Li-Fang, Dong; Ya-Feng, He

    2016-02-01

    Hypocycloid and epicycloid motions of irregular grains (pine pollen) are observed for the first time in a dust plasma in a two-dimensional (2D) horizontal plane. These cycloid motions can be regarded as a combination of a primary circle and a secondary circle. An inverse Magnus force originating from the spin of the irregular grain gives rise to the primary circle. Radial confinement resulting from the electrostatic force and the ion drag force, together with inverse Magnus force, plays an important role in the formation of the secondary circle. In addition, the cyclotron radius is seen to change periodically during the cycloid motion. Force analysis and comparison experiments have shown that the cycloid motions are distinctive features of an irregular grain immersed in a plasma. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2011201006 and A2012201015), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. Y2012009), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project.

  11. Topological dynamics and current-induced motion in a skyrmion lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J. C.; Jalil, M. B. A.

    2016-03-01

    We study the Thiele equation for current-induced motion in a skyrmion lattice through two soluble models of the pinning potential. Comprised by a Magnus term, a dissipative term and a pinning force, Thiele’s equation resembles Newton’s law but in virtue of the topological character to the first, it differs significantly from Newtonian mechanics and because the Magnus force is dominant, unlike its mechanical counterpart—the Coriolis force—skyrmion trajectories do not necessarily have mechanical counterparts. This is important if we are to understand skyrmion dynamics and tap into its potential for data-storage technology. We identify a pinning threshold velocity for the one-dimensional pinning potential and for a two-dimensional attractive potential we find a pinning point and the skyrmion trajectories toward that point are spirals whose frequency (compare Kepler’s second law) and amplitude-decay depend only on the Gilbert constant and potential at the pinning point. Other scenarios, e.g. other choices of initial spin velocity, a repulsive potential, etc are also investigated.

  12. STS-112 Flight Day 1 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    On the first day of STS-112 the crew (Commander Jeff Ashby, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus, Piers Sellers, David Wolf and Fyodor Yurchikhin) are shown preparing for launch at Kennedy Space Center, being transported to the Space Shuttle Atlantis at its launch pad, and being seated in the Orbiter. During the launch, the External Tank (ET) camera, mounted to the top of Atlantis's ET and aimed downward) will provide never before seen footage of the shuttle during lift-off. Following the final countdown and liftoff, the ET camera provides footage as Atlantis quickly leaves the Earth behind, at speeds over 2,800 miles per hour. Following orbital insertion, the shuttle's payload bay doors are shown opening in footage provided by a payload bay camera. Sellers and Magnus narrate their thoughts during a replay of the initial launch sequence, shortly after entering orbit. Following the tape, they are shown in the crewcabin with the rest of the crew, and they each share brief thoughts.

  13. ConnesFusionTensorProduct/Photon GluonFusion in Mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wh-Maksoed, Prodi Of Physics Ui, Depok 16415-Indonesia; Ssi, Wh-Maksoed

    2016-05-01

    As in AJ Wassermann distinguished of classical invariant theory & quantum invariant theory subfactor, in S. Palcoux:``From Neveu-Schwarz Subfactors & Connes Fusion'' described the subfactor theory & Witt-algebra whereas Andreas Thom's explanation about ConnesFusionTensorProduct/CFTP related Connes fusion to composition of homomorphism (i). classical tensor product O-X adds the changes,(ii). Relative tensor product H-X preserve the changes. For photonGluonFusion/PGF defined:''photon is the gauge boson of QED, the simplest of all boson'' devotes to CFT as ``quantum field theory which are invariant under conformal transformation & in 2D there are infinite dimensional algebra. Alain Connes states theirselves Connes fusion as ``associative tensor operation'' to be in coincidences with ``their dynamic behavior driven by the balance in mitochondrial fusion & fission (Carveney, 2007) from Peter Alexander Williams: ``Retinal neuronal remodeling in a model of Optic Atrophy'', Dec, 2011. Great acknowledged to the VicePresident of the R.I, HE.Mr. Drs. M. JUSUF KALLA.

  14. Kinetics of gas phase oxygen control system (OCS) for stagnant and flowing Pb-Bi Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefhalm, C. H.; Knebel, J. U.; Mack, K. J.

    2001-07-01

    Pb and Pb-Bi are known to be very corrosive to structural materials at elevated temperatures. In recent studies, the necessity of measurement and control of the oxygen concentration in the liquid metal in order to safely operate a liquid Pb or Pb-Bi loop has been shown. The dynamic behaviour of the gas phase oxygen control system (OCS), which was developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), is investigated with respect to diffusion as the limiting process of oxygen exchange between the gas phase and the liquid metal. In this paper the development of a physical model for this diffusion process is described and compared to experimental results of a stagnant liquid Pb-Bi system. The experimental findings are in very good agreement with the theoretical equations describing the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of such a system. Recent investigations in a Pb-Bi loop at the Karlsruhe Lead Laboratory (KALLA) indicate that this gas phase OCS is a promising candidate system for an accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS).

  15. Direct and indirect pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert

    1988-01-01

    The pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat were traced using horse-radish-peroxidase (HRP) and autoradiographic techniques. The HRP results indicated that several neuronal cell groups in the brain stem and hypothalamus project to the spinal cord throughout its total length. The autoradiographic tracing results demonstrated that the strongest projections to lamina I are derived from the following four areas: the caudal nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the ventral part of the caudal pontine and NRM, the contralaterally projecting lateral pontine or paralemniscal tegmentum, and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, a limited, especially at lumbosacral levels, distinct projection to lamina I was found to originate in the most caudal part of the medullary tegmentum.

  16. STS-112 crew talks to media after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew clown for the camera in front of Atlantis after saying a few words about their 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. From left are Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus, Pilot Pamela Melroy, Commander Jeffrey Ashby, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Fyodor Yurchikhin and Piers Sellers. The flawless landing of Space Shuttle Atlantis on Runway 33 at KSC completed the 10 day, 19 hour, 58 minute, 44 second- long mission. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment.

  17. What Is the Best Launch Angle To Hit a Home Run?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David

    2010-04-01

    Your students will proudly raise their hands and answer, "45 degrees!" They are, however, answering a different question. It is true that in the absence of air resistance, for a given initial speed, the launch angle that maximizes the range is 45°. For a real homer, there are many complicating factors that make the question far more challenging to answer. Here is a partial list: 1. The initial speed off the bat is not fixed. Garvey's law, "The harder you hit it, the further it goes" is definitely at play; 2. Air resistance is a substantial influence on the flight of the ball. ; 3. The backspin on a well-hit ball creates lift due to the Magnus effect.2; 4. Atmospheric conditions such as humidity, temperature, air density, and the wind affect the motion as well.3; 5. Baseball parks are unique in size and shape. So, a home run in one park may not be a home run in another.

  18. How Far Would a Home Run Really Have Gone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwin, W. G.; Cheng, Y. C.; Chunko, J. D.; Eagan, T. P.; Brown, R. W.

    2002-04-01

    A controversial issue in professional baseball arises from attempts to estimate how far home run balls would have traveled if they had not hit some obstruction, such as a scoreboard or bleacher seating. A Runge-Kutta numerical simulation model is developed for baseball trajectories including the effects of velocity-dependent drag forces, velocity-dependent Magnus spin forces (including a model for the decrease of the spin rate over the trajectory), and the wind. The computational model is used to build a numerical catalog for the combination of initial ball speeds and angles that give rise to a set of trajectories that have the same final impact point (e.g., on the scoreboard). The data required by an observer to estimate the actual home run range are discussed. A homerun hit by Mark McGwire against the Cleveland Indians on 30 April 1997 that dented the Jacobs Field scoreboard is analyzed.

  19. STS-112 Flight Day 2 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On the second flight day of STS-112 (Commander Jeff Ashby, Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus, Piers Sellers, David Wolf and Fyodor Yurchikhin), video footage is shown of the Space Shuttle Atlantis's payload bay, which contains the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 (S-One) truss section, which will be installed on the ISS by Sellers and Wolf during EVAs (extravehicular activities) following Atlantis's docking with the station. Also shown, via a camera on the shuttle's robotic arm, are the three radiators that reside on the truss structure and will provide cooling capability for the entire station. During this flight day, Atlantis passes over Southern California, Nevada, Wyoming, South Dakota, and Minnesota in a track that will eventually bring it over Newfoundland and Labrador.

  20. STS-112 crew during meal before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew relaxes at the traditional crew meal before getting ready for launch later in the day. Seated, from left, are Mission Specialist Piers Sellers and Fyodor Yurchikhin, Pilot Pamela Melroy, Commander Jeffrey Ashby, and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and David Wolf. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. Launch is scheduled for 3:46 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  1. An Unusual Course and Termination of Small Saphenous Vein: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Prakashchandra; D'Souza, Melanie Rose; Nayak, Satheesha B

    2016-03-01

    The superficial veins of the lower limb can vary in their course and termination. We report a relatively rare type of variation in the course and termination of small saphenous vein. The small saphenous vein had normal origin and course in the leg. However, instead of terminating into the popliteal vein, it continued up in the posterior compartment of the thigh and terminated into the femoral vein after piercing the fleshy part of the adductor magnus muscle. This course might lead to varicosity of the small saphenous vein due to the compression by the fleshy fibres of adductor magus near its termination. The case may be of interest to general and plastic surgeons and even cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:27134850

  2. An Unusual Course and Termination of Small Saphenous Vein: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prakashchandra; D’Souza, Melanie Rose

    2016-01-01

    The superficial veins of the lower limb can vary in their course and termination. We report a relatively rare type of variation in the course and termination of small saphenous vein. The small saphenous vein had normal origin and course in the leg. However, instead of terminating into the popliteal vein, it continued up in the posterior compartment of the thigh and terminated into the femoral vein after piercing the fleshy part of the adductor magnus muscle. This course might lead to varicosity of the small saphenous vein due to the compression by the fleshy fibres of adductor magus near its termination. The case may be of interest to general and plastic surgeons and even cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:27134850

  3. International Program and Local Organizing Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    International Program Committee Dionisio Bermejo (Spain) Roman Ciurylo (Poland) Elisabeth Dalimier (France) Alexander Devdariani (Russia) Milan S Dimitrijevic (Serbia) Robert Gamache (USA) Marco A Gigosos (Spain) Motoshi Goto (Japan) Magnus Gustafsson (Sweden) Jean-Michel Hartmann (France) Carlos Iglesias (USA) John Kielkopf (USA) John C Lewis (Canada) Valery Lisitsa (Russia) Eugene Oks (USA) Christian G Parigger (USA) Gillian Peach (UK) Adriana Predoi-Cross (Canada) Roland Stamm (Germany) Local Organizing Committee Nikolay G Skvortsov (Chair, St Petersburg State University) Evgenii B Aleksandrov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St Petersburg) Vadim A Alekseev (Scientific Secretary, St Petersburg State University) Sergey F Boureiko (St.Petersburg State University) Yury N Gnedin (Pulkovo Observatory, St Petersburg) Alexander Z Devdariani (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Alexander P Kouzov (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Nikolay A Timofeev (St Petersburg State University)

  4. Many-body energy localization transition in periodically driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, Luca; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-03-01

    According to the second law of thermodynamics the total entropy and energy of a system is increased during almost any dynamical process. Notable exceptions are known in noninteracting systems of particles moving in periodic potentials. Here the phenomenon of dynamical localization can prevent heating beyond certain threshold. However, it was believed that driven ergodic systems will always heat without bound. Here, on the contrary, we report strong evidence of dynamical localization transition in periodically driven ergodic systems in the thermodynamic limit. This phenomenon is reminiscent of many-body localization in energy space. We report numerical evidence based on exact diagonalization of small spin chains and theoretical arguments based on the Magnus expansion. Our findings are valid for both classical and quantum systems.

  5. On the transgressiveness of ambiguity: Richard Bruce Nugent and the flow of sexuality and race.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J Edgar

    2015-01-01

    The study focuses on the slender corpus of literary work by Harlem Renaissance poet, author and visual artist Richard Bruce Nugent (1906-1987), arguably America's foremost Black aesthete. As an individualist in the footsteps of post-Hegelian and pre-Nietzschean philosopher Max Stirner (1806-1856), Nugent sought to re-think sexuality and race beyond fixed schemes of categorial distribution. To this end, Nugent deployed a strategy of sexual and racial ambiguity that aimed at situating the uniquely sexed and raced individual within the continuities of ever-diversifying Nature. Nugent's deconstructive approach of sexuality and race proves to be convergent with (but not genealogically dependent on) the universalization of sexual intermediariness and racial miscegenation postulated by German-Jewish sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld during the first third of the twentieth century. Nugent's non-identitarian conception of sex acts anticipated by more than a decade comparable insights propounded by Alfred Kinsey. PMID:25710478

  6. [CCA of water beetles' distribution and environmental factors in lentic samples of north Changbai Mountain].

    PubMed

    We, Yulian; Ji, Lanzhu; Wang, Miao; Zhao, Min

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between 28 species water beetles in 12 lentic samples and environmental factors of North Chang-bai Mountain was studied by Cononical Correspondence Analysis (CCA). The results showed that degree of underwater humus and altitude are the major factors correlated with beetles distribution, and the correlation coefficients of environmental factors and axes of CCA were 0.8371 and 0.7206 respectively, while water temperature and plant density also had certain effects. Under the influence of environmental factors, the water beetles' populations were different in different habitat. Coelambus impressopunctatus, Colymbetes magnus, Helophorus browni, Haliplus spp. distributed in deep water pool. Water temperature was not important for those beetles. Ilybius sp. and Limnebius glabriventris correlated with altitude and humus. PMID:11962329

  7. Comparative Susceptibility of Anaerobic Bacteria to Minocycline, Doxycycline, and Tetracycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Patten, Valerie; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The comparative susceptibility of 622 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria to minocycline, doxycycline, and tetracycline was determined by an agar-dilution technique. In addition to Bacteroides fragilis, a variety of other anaerobic bacteria was resistant to achievable blood concentrations of tetracycline (55% inhibited by 6.25 μg/ml) and doxycycline (58% inhibited by 2.5 μg/ml). In contrast, minocycline was significantly more active (P < 0.05) than both doxycycline and tetracycline, and 70% of strains were inhibited by achievable blood concentrations of this antibiotic (2.5 μg/ml). The enhanced activity of minocycline was particularly striking for Peptococcus asaccharolyticus, P. magnus, P. prevotii, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Bacteroides melaninogenicus. Further evaluation of the clinical efficacy of minocycline against anaerobic infections is indicated. PMID:1137358

  8. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis drops to the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  9. Does Kutta lift exist on a vortex ring in a uniform cross flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, T. T.; Lua, K. B.; Thet, K.

    2008-05-01

    Past works [Y. K. Chang and A. D. Vakili, Phys. Fluids 7, 1583 (1995); R. Sau and K. Mahesh, AIAA Paper No. 2007-1316] show that a vortex ring ejected normal to a cross flow tilts and deforms as it propagates downstream, and they attribute this phenomenon to the Kutta lift or Magnus effect. Here, we show through a controlled experiment that there is no physical evidence of the existence of a Kutta lift when a fully developed vortex ring is exposed to a uniform cross flow. The observed phenomenon could be attributed to the modification of vorticity distribution of the vortex core due to the combined effect of the cross flow itself and the entrainment of boundary layer material during the formation of vortex ring.

  10. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  11. Multitime correlation functions in nonclassical stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumm, F.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2016-06-01

    A general method is introduced for verifying multitime quantum correlations through the characteristic function of the time-dependent P functional that generalizes the Glauber-Sudarshan P function. Quantum correlation criteria are derived which identify quantum effects for an arbitrary number of points in time. The Magnus expansion is used to visualize the impact of the required time ordering, which becomes crucial in situations when the interaction problem is explicitly time dependent. We show that the latter affects the multi-time-characteristic function and, therefore, the temporal evolution of the nonclassicality. As an example, we apply our technique to an optical parametric process with a frequency mismatch. The resulting two-time-characteristic function yields full insight into the two-time quantum correlation properties of such a system.

  12. Follow-up investigations of GPHS motion during heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories. Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1992-03-23

    Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, which were conducted in the heat pulse intervals associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth`s atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse of reentry, (2) determine the effect of magnus force on the roll rate and angle of attack of the GPHS during an EGA entry, (3) determine the effect of the magnitude of pitch and roll damping on the GPHS motion.

  13. Geometrical Optics of Beams with Vortices: Berry Phase and Orbital Angular Momentum Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.

    2006-07-28

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed.

  14. Numerical calculations of the driving force on an Abrikosov vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.; Pardo, E.; Sanchez, A.

    2010-05-01

    The driving force on an Abrikosov vortex is calculated numerically from the London equation and involved energies for a vortex perpendicular to the screening current near the surface of a superconductor. Compared with previous analytical derivation of the total force, the partial magnetic, kinematic, and external forces are also obtained so that the nature of the driving force may be deeply discussed. It is shown that the force is neither a Lorentz force nor a Magnus force as often believed and that in order to get a correct result, the image effects and the work done by the applied field must be taken into account. A name of London force is suggested for the driving force. A deep understanding of the nature of the driving force on Abrikosov vortices may also be important in the study of vortex pinning and dynamics in type-II superconductors.

  15. Comparing the dynamics of skyrmions and superconducting vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Lin, S. Z.; Ray, D.; Reichhardt, C.

    2014-08-01

    Vortices in type-II superconductors have attracted enormous attention as ideal systems in which to study nonequilibrium collective phenomena, since the self-ordering of the vortices competes with quenched disorder and thermal effects. Dynamic effects found in vortex systems include depinning, nonequilibrium phase transitions, creep, structural order-disorder transitions, and melting. Understanding vortex dynamics is also important for applications of superconductors which require the vortices either to remain pinned or to move in a controlled fashion. Recently, topological defects called skyrmions have been realized experimentally in chiral magnets. Here we highlight similarities and differences between skyrmion dynamics and vortex dynamics. Many of the previous ideas and experimental setups that have been applied to superconducting vortices can also be used to study skyrmions. We also discuss some of the differences between the two systems, such as the potentially large contribution of the Magnus force in the skyrmion system that can dramatically alter the dynamics and transport properties.

  16. Static and Dynamical Properties of Antiferromagnetic Skyrmions in the Presence of Applied Current and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Joseph; Tretiakov, Oleg A.

    2016-04-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected entities in magnetic materials which have the potential to be used in spintronics for information storage and processing. However, Skyrmions in ferromagnets have some intrinsic difficulties which must be overcome to use them for spintronic applications, such as the inability to move straight along current. We show that Skyrmions can also be stabilized and manipulated in antiferromagnetic materials. An antiferromagnetic Skyrmion is a compound topological object with a similar but of opposite sign spin texture on each sublattice, which, e.g., results in a complete cancellation of the Magnus force. We find that the composite nature of antiferromagnetic Skyrmions gives rise to different dynamical behavior due to both an applied current and temperature effects.

  17. Quantum vortex dynamics in two-dimensional neutral superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-C. Joseph; Duine, R. A.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2010-01-15

    We derive an effective action for the vortex-position degree of freedom in a superfluid by integrating out condensate phase- and density-fluctuation environmental modes. When the quantum dynamics of environmental fluctuations is neglected, we confirm the occurrence of the vortex Magnus force and obtain an expression for the vortex mass. We find that this adiabatic approximation is valid only when the superfluid droplet radius R, or the typical distance between vortices, is very much larger than the coherence length xi. We go beyond the adiabatic approximation numerically, accounting for the quantum dynamics of environmental modes and capturing their dissipative coupling to condensate dynamics. For the case of an optical-lattice superfluid, we demonstrate that vortex motion damping can be adjusted by tuning the ratio between the tunneling energy J and the on-site interaction energy U. We comment on the possibility of realizing vortex-Landau-level physics.

  18. Transformation of the vector part of the 4-momentum in the Dirac equation and in Maxwell's equations in Majorana form for chiral media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, N. R.

    2011-03-01

    It is suggested to extend the results obtained for Maxwell's equations in Majorana form (spin-1 particles) for spin particles with a half-integer spin and a nonzero mass. It is shown that in an unbounded "chiral medium" (twisted media) the degeneration existing between particles of different helicities is removed. For ultrarelativistic particles, an analog to the inverse optical Magnus effect follows where the effect is determined by the chirality of the medium. From the inverse scattering problem for the transforms under consideration it follows that the amplitude of the wave function of a particle in a chiral medium can vary with time according to a linear law (for example, the process of neutrino (antineutrino) production or annihilation), and the parameters of the medium satisfy the evolution equation.

  19. A brief summary of the attempts to develop large wind-electric generating systems in the U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savino, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Interest in developing large wind-electric generating systems in the United States was stimulated primarily by one man, Palmer C. Putnam. He was responsible for the construction of the largest wind-power system ever built - the 1250 kilowatt Smith-Putnam wind-electric plant. The existence of this system prompted the U.S. Federal Power Commission to investigate the potential of using the winds as a source energy. Also, in 1933 prior to Putnam's effort, there was an abortive attempt by J. D. Madaras to develop a wind system based on the Magnus effect. These three projects comprise the only serious efforts in America to develop large wind driven plants. In this paper, the history of each project is briefly described. Also discussed are some of the reasons why wind energy was not seriously considered as a major source of energy for the U.S.

  20. Semiclassical Dynamics of Electron Wave Packet States with Phase Vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.; Bliokh, Yury P.; Savel'ev, Sergey; Nori, Franco

    2007-11-09

    We consider semiclassical higher-order wave packet solutions of the Schroedinger equation with phase vortices. The vortex line is aligned with the propagation direction, and the wave packet carries a well-defined orbital angular momentum (OAM) ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})l (l is the vortex strength) along its main linear momentum. The probability current coils around the momentum in such OAM states of electrons. In an electric field, these states evolve like massless particles with spin l. The magnetic-monopole Berry curvature appears in momentum space, which results in a spin-orbit-type interaction and a Berry/Magnus transverse force acting on the wave packet. This brings about the OAM Hall effect. In a magnetic field, there is a Zeeman interaction, which, can lead to more complicated dynamics.

  1. Edge tunneling of vortices in superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Iengo, R. |; Jug, G. |

    1996-11-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of the decay of a supercurrent due to the zero-temperature quantum tunneling of vortices from the edge in a thin superconducting film in the absence of an external magnetic field. An explicit formula is derived for the tunneling rate of vortices, which are subject to the Magnus force induced by the supercurrent, through the Coulomb-like potential barrier binding them to the film{close_quote}s edge. Our approach ensues from the nonrelativistic version of a Schwinger-type calculation for the decay of the two-dimensional vacuum previously employed for describing vortex-antivortex pair nucleation in the bulk of the sample. In the dissipation-dominated limit, our explicit edge-tunneling formula yields numerical estimates which are compared with those obtained for bulk nucleation to show that both mechanisms are possible for the decay of a supercurrent. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. A brief summary of the attempts to develop large wind-electric generating systems in the US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savino, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Interest in developing large wind-electric generating systems in the United States was simulated primarily by one man, Palmer C. Putnam. He was responsible for the construction of the 1250 kilowatt Smith-Putnam wind-electric plant. The existence of this system prompted the U. S. Federal Power Commission to investigate the potential of using the winds as a source energy. Also, in 1933 prior to Putnam's effort, there was an abortive attempt by J. D. Madaras to develop a wind system based on the Magnus effect. These three projects comprise the only serious efforts in America to develop large wind driven plants. In this paper the history of each project is briefly described. Also discussed are some of the reasons why wind energy was not seriously considered as a major source of energy for the U. S.

  3. Self-propulsion of a body with rigid surface and variable coefficient of lift in a perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramodanov, Sergey M.; Tenenev, Valentin A.; Treschev, Dmitry V.

    2012-11-01

    We study the system of a 2D rigid body moving in an unbounded volume of incompressible, vortex-free perfect fluid which is at rest at infinity. The body is equipped with a gyrostat and a so-called Flettner rotor. Due to the latter the body is subject to a lifting force (Magnus effect). The rotational velocities of the gyrostat and the rotor are assumed to be known functions of time (control inputs). The equations of motion are presented in the form of the Kirchhoff equations. The integrals of motion are given in the case of piecewise continuous control. Using these integrals we obtain a (reduced) system of first-order differential equations on the configuration space. Then an optimal control problem for several types of the inputs is solved using genetic algorithms.

  4. STS-112 crew in front of Launch Pad 39B before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-112 Commander Jeffrey S. Ashby poses in front of Launch Pad 39B during a tour of Kennedy Space Center prior to launch. Also on the tour were the other members of the crew including Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy and Mission Speci alists David A. Wolf, Sandra H. Magnus, Piers J. Sellers, and Fyodor N. Yurchikhin of the Russian Space Agency. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis was postponed today to no earlier than Thursday, Oct. 3, while weather forecasters and the mission managem ent team assess the possible effect Hurricane Lili may have on the Mission Control Center located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

  5. Vortex loops: Are they always doomed to die

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ya'acov, U. )

    1995-03-15

    The effective equations of motion of relativistic strings in material media are derived and applied to moving rings with a time-dependent radius. The equations contain the Magnus force, due to the motion of the ring relative to the medium, whose eventual effect is the possible stabilization of the ring against shrinking. A constant solution is identified, and small fluctuations around it are bound, demonstrating the stability of the solution. If the string loops created in the cosmological cosmic string scenario interact via this mechanism with a formed-up Higgs particle condensate, then the stabilizing velocities are [similar to][delta][sub loop]/[ital R][sub loop], and the overall effect of this phenomenon is to stabilize large loops and reduce the general disappearance rate of the string loops.

  6. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A fire rescue truck stands by for safety reasons as Space Shuttle Atlantis slows to a stop on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  7. Deep pockets for deep seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Peter Auster, a fisheries ecologist with the National Undersea Research Center in Connecticut, plans to assess degradation of the deep-shelf seafloor from bottom trawling. Magnus Ngoile, an official with Tanzania's National Environmental Management Council, will work on building capacity of poor villagers to protect their coastline. And Alison Rieser, a lawyer with the University of Maine School of Law, will produce a textbook to educate scientists on how to apply the law for marine conservation.These individuals are among 11 recipients of the Pew Charitable Trust's 10th annual marine conservation fellowships, announced on July 12. With each recipient receiving an award of $150,000, the program is the world's largest award for marine conservationists. Other 1999 recipients will be involved with areas including investigating marine pollution in the Arctic region, examining economic incentives for conservation in Baja, Mexico, and establishing a marine conservation biology training program for minority students.

  8. A Common Miscitation of William Gilbert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijs, Marinus Anthony

    2014-04-01

    Dozens of scientific textbooks [e.g., Spaldin, 2011, p. v; Krijgsman and Langereis, 2009, p. 252; Prölls, 2004, p. 211; Merrill et al., 1996, p. 7; Livingston, 1996, p. 27; Blakely, 1996, pp. xiv, 154; Gillmor, 1990, p. 9] attribute the famous dictum magnus magnes ipse est globus terrestris ("the terrestrial globe is itself a big magnet") to the English physician and scientist William Gilbert (1544-1603). It is repeatedly claimed that these words were contained in the title of Gilbert's book or one of his chapters [e.g., Carlowicz and Lopez, 2002, n.p.; Courtillot, 2002, pp. 26, 49; Lang and Whitney, 1991, p. 120]. Certainly, they convey the thrust of Gilbert's De Magnete, in which it was argued for the first time that the Earth sustains its own magnetic dipole field, on the basis of experimentation on magnets.

  9. Augmentation of transfers for a quadriplegic patient using an implanted FNS system. Case report.

    PubMed

    Marsolais, E B; Scheiner, A; Miller, P C; Kobetic, R; Daly, J J

    1994-08-01

    A 22 year old man with incomplete quadriplegia (C6-7) was unable to perform either a sliding or a pivot transfer. He was instrumented with an implanted functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) system, radio frequency-linked to a belt-worn controller. The system activated eight muscles selected from among quadriceps, hamstrings, posterior portion of the adductor magnus, gluteus maximus, and erector spinae, bilaterally. The two-stage implantation procedure included electrode implantation with percutaneous leads followed by stimulator implantation and removal of the percutaneous leads. All implants were well tolerated with no adverse effects. The subject was able independently to put on the external controller portion of the system and to perform a standing pivot transfer with only standby assistance. An unexpected outcome of the FNS system use was increased voluntary upper body strength that resulted in improvement of the sliding transfer from 'inability' to 'independent'. PMID:7970864

  10. STS-112 crew practices emergency egress training during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus (left) sits in the slidewire basket basket on the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, while Mission Specialist Piers Sellers (right) reaches for the release lever. They and the rest of the crew are practicing emergency egress from the pad during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. Mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts.

  11. Comparison of four commercial brucella agar media for growth of anaerobic organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Mangels, J I; Douglas, B P

    1989-01-01

    Four different commercial brucella blood agar plating media (Anaerobe Systems, BBL Microbiology Systems, Remel, and Scott Laboratories) were compared for the abilities to recover anaerobic organisms from clinical specimens and to support the growth of American Type Culture Collection anaerobic stock cultures. Following 24 h of incubation in an anaerobe chamber, Anaerobe Systems prereduced, anaerobically sterilized brucella plates yielded 63% of the total clinical anaerobe isolates, the Scott medium yielded 51%, the Remel medium yielded 42%, and the BBL medium yielded 37%. Poor growth of Peptostreptococcus magnus, P. anaerobius, Fusobacterium necrophorum, F. nucleatum, and pigmented Bacteroides spp. was observed on brucella media obtained from BBL, Remel, and Scott. Data obtained with stock anaerobic cultures showed that Anaerobe Systems plates yielded good growth and produced a larger colony size with all of the strains tested in 1 day, whereas poor growth of Peptostreptococcus spp., B. melaninogenicus, and Fusobacterium spp. was noted on brucella media from BBL, Remel, and Scott. PMID:2584378

  12. A numerical study of the motion of a neutrally buoyant cylinder in two dimensional shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Huang, Shih-Lin; Chen, Shih-Di; Chu, Chin-Chou; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated the motion of a neutrally buoyant cylinder of circular or elliptic shape in two dimensional shear flow of a Newtonian fluid by direct numerical simulation. The numerical results are validated by comparisons with existing theoretical, experimental and numerical results, including a power law of the normalized angular speed versus the particle Reynolds number. The centerline between two walls is an expected equilibrium position of the cylinder mass center in shear flow. When placing the particle away from the centerline initially, it migrates toward another equilibrium position for higher Reynolds numbers due to the interplay between the slip velocity, the Magnus force, and the wall repulsion force. T-W Pan acknowledges the support by the US NSF and S-L Huang, S-D Chen, C-C Chu, C-C Chang acknowledge the support by the National Science Council of Taiwan, ROC.

  13. Non-Abelian evolution of electromagnetic waves in a weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, K. Yu.; Frolov, D. Yu.; Kravtsov, Yu. A.

    2007-05-15

    A theory of electromagnetic wave propagation in a weakly anisotropic smoothly inhomogeneous medium is developed, based on the quantum-mechanical diagonalization procedure applied to Maxwell equations. The equations of motion for the translational (ray) and intrinsic (polarization) degrees of freedom are derived ab initio. The ray equations take into account the optical Magnus effect (spin Hall effect of photons) as well as trajectory variations owing to the medium anisotropy. Polarization evolution is described by the precession equation for the Stokes vector. In the generic case, the evolution of wave turns out to be non-Abelian: it is accompanied by mutual conversion of the normal modes and periodic oscillations of the ray trajectories analogous to electron zitterbewegung. The general theory is applied to examples of wave evolution in media with circular and linear birefringence.

  14. The Versatile Elastohydrodynamics of a Free Particle near a Thin Soft Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salez, Thomas; Saintyves, Baudouin; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    We address the free motion of a buoyant particle inside a viscous fluid, in the vicinity of a thin compressible elastic wall. After discussing the main scalings, we obtain analytically the dominant drag forces within the soft lubrication approximation. By including those into the equations of motion of the particle, we establish a general governing system of three coupled nonlinear and singular differential equations, that describe the three essential motions: sedimentation, hydroplaning, and hydrospinning, through four dimensionless control parameters. Numerical integration allows us to predict a wide zoology of exotic solutions - despite the low-Reynolds feature of the flow - including: spontaneous oscillation, Magnus-like effect, enhanced sedimentation, and boomerang-like effect. We compare these predictions to experiments. The presented elementary approach could be of interest in the description of a broad variety of elastohydrodynamical phenomena, including: landslides, ageing of cartilaginous joints, and motion of a cell in a microfluidic channel or in a blood vessel.

  15. Analysis of the performance of a phase alternated multiple pulse sequence in spin I = 7/2 zero-field NQR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, A.

    Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solids containing quadrupole nuclei usually results in broad spectral lines. This line-broadening is due mainly to the inhomogeneity of the electric field gradient (EFG) at the quadrupolar nuclear site. High resolution spectra of such solids can be obtained with the application of suitably designed multiple radiofrequency (RF) pulse sequences. The performance is reported for a periodic and cyclic phase alternated multiple RF pulse sequence (PAPS) in a spin I = 7/2 system in zero external magnetic field. Average Hamiltonian theory based on the Magnus expansion is used to solve the time-dependent Liouville-von Neumann equation of motion of the spin system under the effect of the PAPS sequence. Single transition operators are employed in the spin dynamics calculations. It is shown that the multiple pulse seqeuncearation pulse, suppresses the EFG inhomogeneity to a maximum extent when = 2 . [-- ] 2 , where is the prep1 2 2 N 1 2 1

  16. STS-112 Crew walkout of O&C building for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew heads for the Astrovan and a ride to the launch pad for a simulated countdown. From left are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin (RSA), David Wolf and Piers Sellers; Pilot Pamela Melroy; Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus; and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. Mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts.

  17. STS-112 Crew walkout of O&C building for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew strides out of the Checkout and Operations Building on their way to the launch pad and a simulated countdown. On the left, front to back, are Pilot Pamela Melroy and Mission Specialists David Wolf and Fyodor Yurchikhin (RSA). On the right, front to back, are Commander Jeffrey Ashby and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Piers Sellers. Mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts.

  18. STS-112 crew arrives at KSC's SLF for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After their arrival at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-112 crew members stride happily to the side of the parking apron and a photo opportunity. From left are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Mission Specialist Piers Sellers, Pilot Pamela Melroy and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin, who is with the Russian Space Agency. Launch is scheduled for Oct. 2 between 2 and 6 p.m. STS-112, aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis, is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks.

  19. STS-112 crew arrives at KSC's SLF for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus is happy to return to KSC to prepare for launch. She will be making her first Shuttle flight. STS-112, aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis, is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks. Launch is scheduled for Oct. 2 between 2 and 6 p.m.

  20. STS-112 crew take break during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-112 Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus, and Pilot Pamela Melroy take a momentary break from training at Pad 39B during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown. Launch of STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled for Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts.

  1. STS-112 crew practices emergency egress training during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus takes a break during emergency egress practice on the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B. She and the rest of the crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts.

  2. STS-112 crew boarding Atlantis for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room at Launch Pad 39B, STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus, Ph.D., receives assistance with her spacesuit during a simulated launch countdown, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a dress rehearsal for launch. Launch of STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled for Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, which will be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts.

  3. STS-112 crew practices emergency egress training during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During emergency egress practice on the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, STS-112 Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus opens her helmet visor. She and the rest of the crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts.

  4. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis approaches the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  5. [Topography and cytoarchitecture of the raphe nuclei in the rat].

    PubMed

    Hölzel, B; Pfister, C

    1981-01-01

    Within the raphe complex of adult rat, ribonucleoproteids have been demonstrated by means of the Gallocyanin-Chromalaun-reaction according to EINARSON. The following subnuclei were characterized in a topographical and cytological view: nucleus raphe dorsalis, nucleus centralis superior, nucleus raphe pontis, nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus raphe obscurus, nucleus raphe pallidus. In all raphe nuclei 3 neuron types could be differentiated which differ both with respect to size and shape of their soma and nuclear morphology and intensity and distribution of the cellular ribonucleoproteids: 1. Large polygonal neurons, 2. medium-sized fusiform neurons, 3. small pyriform neurons. The results may serve as a basis for performing further investigations of these brain regions, employing morphological and pharmacological methods. PMID:7338625

  6. Ethanol and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, A Y; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Neve, E; Matsumoto, H; Nishitani, Y; Minowa, Y; Fukui, Y; Bailey, S M; Patel, V B; Cunningham, C C; Zima, T; Fialova, L; Mikulikova, L; Popov, P; Malbohan, I; Janebova, M; Nespor, K; Sun, G Y

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chair was Albert Y. Sun. The presentations were (1) Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-4502E1 in alcoholic liver disease, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg and Etienne Neve; (2) Regulation of NF-kappaB by ethanol, by H. Matsumoto, Y. Nishitani, Y. Minowa, and Y. Fukui; (3) Chronic ethanol consumption increases concentration of oxidized proteins in rat liver, by Shannon M. Bailey, Vinood B. Patel, and Carol C. Cunningham; (4) Antiphospholipids antibodies and oxidized modified low-density lipoprotein in chronic alcoholic patients, by Tomas Zima, Lenka Fialova, Ludmila Mikulikova, Ptr Popov, Ivan Malbohan, Marta Janebova, and Karel Nespor; and (5) Amelioration of ethanol-induced damage by polyphenols, by Albert Y. Sun and Grace Y. Sun. PMID:11391077

  7. [Histotopographic and morphometric studies of the intramural coronary arteries in the trabecula septomarginalis of swine and pigmy goats].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, G; Guski, H

    1990-01-01

    Up to six arteries traverse from the interventricular septum to the M. papillaris magnus in the trabecula septomarginalis (moderator band) of swine and pygmy goat. Musculo-elastic intimal thickenings, many of them quite extensive, are recordable from along the entire length of all these intramural coronary arteries which are between 50 microns and 300 microns in diameter. The conclusion may be drawn from the results of morphometric analysis that coronary arteries undergo enlargement in response to increased intimal thickening and that such enlargement does not lead to narrowing of the lumen. Peculiarities in wall structure of the arteries in the trabecula septomarginalis are interpreted as adaptive processes of the vascular wall to the extraordinary stress on those vessels. PMID:2327188

  8. High-frequency approximation for periodically driven quantum systems from a Floquet-space perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, André; Anisimovas, Egidijus

    2015-09-01

    We derive a systematic high-frequency expansion for the effective Hamiltonian and the micromotion operator of periodically driven quantum systems. Our approach is based on the block diagonalization of the quasienergy operator in the extended Floquet Hilbert space by means of degenerate perturbation theory. The final results are equivalent to those obtained within a different approach (Rahav et al 2003 Phys. Rev. A 68 013820), (Goldman and Dalibard 2014 Phys. Rev. X 4 031027) and can also be related to the Floquet-Magnus expansion (Casas et al 2001 J. Phys. A 34 3379). We discuss that the dependence on the driving phase, which plagues the latter, can lead to artifactual symmetry breaking. The high-frequency approach is illustrated using the example of a periodically driven Hubbard model. Moreover, we discuss the nature of the approximation and its limitations for systems of many interacting particles.

  9. STS-112 crew talks to media after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-112 crew pauses at the microphone in front of Atlantis after exiting the crew transport vehicle. From left are Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus, Pilot Pamela Melroy, Commander Jeffrey Ashby, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Fyodor Yurchikhin and Piers Sellers. The flawless landing of Space Shuttle Atlantis on Runway 33 at KSC completed a 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment.

  10. [SCIENCE AND DREAMS IN THE MIDDLE AGES: IL "DE SOMNIIS" DI BOEZIO DI DACIA].

    PubMed

    Feti, Viola

    2015-01-01

    Boethius of Dacia's opera "De somnis" can be defined as a brief treaty that partially follows the traditional quaestio scheme. It includes a passage that seems to copy Etienne Tempier's proposition number sixty-five, which condemns the importance attributed to astrology by many medieval authors. Boethius moves off Aristotle's "De somno et vigilia" idea of physiological dreams to assert a new kind of oneiric phenomena linked to constellations, that, according to the author, aren't divinely inspired, whereas they are to be considered as natural events. Boethius isn't the only philosopher who writes about this particular type of dream as another medieval author, Albertus Magnus, in his "Speculum Astronomiae", describes astrology and its relationship to medicine. PMID:26946816