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Sample records for juan fernandez seamounts

  1. Aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity of orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) and alfonsino (Beryx splendens) from the Juan Fernandez seamounts area.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, L M; Quiñones, R A; Gonzalez-Saldía, R R; Niklitschek, E J

    2016-06-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity of two important commercial bathypelagic species living in the Juan Fernández seamounts was analyzed: alfonsino (Beryx splendens) and orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus). These seamounts are influenced by the presence of an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) located between 160 and 250 m depth. Both species have vertical segregation; alfonsino is able to stay in the OMZ, while orange roughy remains at greater depths. In this study, we compare the aerobic and anaerobic capacity of these species, measuring the activity of key metabolic enzymes in different body tissues (muscle, heart, brain and liver). Alfonsino has higher anaerobic potential in its white muscle due to greater lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (190.2 μmol NADH min(-1) g ww(-1)), which is related to its smaller body size, but it is also a feature shared with species that migrate through OMZs. This potential and the higher muscle citrate synthase and electron transport system activities indicate that alfonsino has greater swimming activity level than orange roughy. This species has also a high MDH/LDH ratio in its heart, brain and liver, revealing a potential capacity to conduct aerobic metabolism in these organs under prolonged periods of environmental low oxygen conditions, preventing lactic acid accumulation. With these metabolic characteristics, alfonsino may have increased swimming activity to migrate and also could stay for a period of time in the OMZ. The observed differences between alfonsino and orange roughy with respect to their aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity are consistent with their characteristic vertical distributions and feeding behaviors. PMID:26687132

  2. Tectonics and evolution of the Juan Fernandez microplate at the Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic triple junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson-Fontana, S.; Larson, R. L.; Engein, J. F.; Lundgren, P.; Stein, S.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic and bathymetric profiles derived from the R/V Endeavor survey and focal mechanism studies for earthquakes on two of the Juan Fernandez microplate boundaries are analyzed. It is observed that the Nazca-Juan Fernandez pole is in the northern end of the microplate since the magnetic lineation along the East Ridge of the microplate fans to the south. The calculation of the relative motion of the Juan Fernandez-Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic four-plate system using the algorithm of Minster et al. (1974) is described. The development of tectonic and evolutionary models of the region is examined. The tectonic model reveals that the northern boundary of the Juan Fernandez microplate is a zone of compression and that the West Ridge and southwestern boundary are spreading obliquely; the evolutionary model relates the formation of the Juan Fernandez microplate to differential spreading rates at the triple junction.

  3. Mesobathic chondrichthyes of the Juan Fernández seamounts: are they different from those of the central Chilean continental slope?

    PubMed

    Andrade, Isabel; Pequeño, Germán

    2008-03-01

    We compared the geographic distribution of groups of chondrychthid fishes of two physically proximal, although geographically different, regions that include the Juan Fernández seamounts and the central Chilean continental slope, both sampled at mesopelagic and mesobenthonic depths. The ridge is in the Nazca Plate, while the slope region in on the South American Plate, and is closer to the South American continent. We found six species of Chondrichthyes for the seamounts (four orders, four families). The slope sampling produced ten species of Chondrichthyes, of which Torpedo tremens De Buen 1959, was the only species in common with the Juan Fernandez area. There are clear differences between the Chondrichthyes of the two regions. These fisheries require adequate administrative modes. PMID:18624236

  4. Is the Juan Fernandez Ridge (nazca Plate) a Deep-Mantle Hot SPOT Trail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, L. E.; Selles, D.; Díaz, A.; Piña-Gauthier, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Juan Fernández Ridge on the oceanic Nazca plate is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent westward rejuvenation of the eruptive ages. Geochronological data is still scarce to prove this is the case, and other hypothesis should be taken into account. There are a few constrains, like the ca. 9 Ma Ar-Ar age of the O'Higgins seamount (115 km from the Chile-Perú trench), published K-Ar ages of ca. 3-4 Ma in Robinson Crusoe island (580 km from the trench) and ca. 1 Ma in Alejandro Selkirk (180 km further west). New reconnaissance K-Ar ages in Robinson Crusoe yield ca. 1-3 Ma, which partially overlap with the age of Alejandro Selkirk, breaking the expected age progression given that the Nazca plate moves eastwards at ca. 6-8 cm/yr. New geological mapping also shows a sharp unconformity between the older, strongly altered sequences and more recent, post-erosional volcanic piles, where only the vent facies have disappeared. A fixed deep-mantle plume origin for Pacific hot spots has been widely debated and concurrent phenomena arose as a possible explanation for non-linear age progressions and/or long-lived volcanic activity. In fact, intraplate regional tectonics, plume displacement, and mantle heterogeneities could be the main factor of the ridge architecture or the mask for a first-order linear trend. An ongoing mapping and dating effort is aimed to understand the evolution of the Juan Fernández Ridge, testing the main hypothesis. Fondecyt grant 110966 is acknowledged for financial support.

  5. Geochemistry of Axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.M.; Morgan, C.; Lilas, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Axial seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, is the current center of the Cobb hotspot. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most MORB, are generated at shallow mantle levels, mostly within the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. This interpretation also requires that for the upwelling mantle to intersect the solidus at different depths, the mantle supplying Axial seamount must be hotter than the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Axial seamount, therefore, reflects a thermal anomaly in the mantle, rather than a geochemically enriched ocean island basalt type mantle plume.

  6. Sound field near hydrothermal vents on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.A.; Stolzenbach, K.D.; Purdy, G.M.

    1990-08-10

    High-quality acoustic noise measurements were obtained by two hydrophones located 3 m and 40 m from an active hydrothermal vent on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an effort to determine the feasibility of monitoring hydrothermal vent activity through flow noise generation. Most of the measured noise field could be attributed to ambient ocean noise sources of microseisms, distant shipping, and weather, punctuated by local ships and biological sources. Long-period, low-velocity, water/rock interface waves were detected with high amplitudes which rapidly decayed with distance from the seafloor. Detection of vent signals was hampered by unexpected spatial nonstationarity due to the shadowing effects of the calders wall. No continuous vent signals were deemed significant based on a criterion of 90% probability of detection and 5% probability of false alarm. However, a small signal near 40 Hz, with a power level of 0.0001 Pa sq/Hz was noticed on two records taken within 3 m of the Inferno black smoker. The frequency of this signal is consistent with predictions, and the power level suggests the occurrence of jet noise amplification due to convected density inhomogeneities. Keywords: Seamounts; Flow noise; Underwater acoustics; Acoustic measurement; Geothermy/noise; Ocean ridges; Underwater sound signals; Reprints; North Pacific Ocean. (EDC).

  7. Microbial Life in Ridge Flank Crustal Fluids at Baby Bare Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Johnson, H. P.; Butterfield, D. A.; Baross, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    To determine the microbial community diversity within old oceanic crust, a novel sampling strategy was used to collect crustal fluids at Baby Bare Seamount, a 3.5 Ma old outcrop located in the northeast Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Stainless steel probes were driven directly into the igneous ocean crust to obtain samples of ridge flank crustal fluids. Genetic signatures and enrichment cultures of microorganisms demonstrate that these crustal fluids host a microbial community composed of species indigenous to the subseafloor, including anaerobic thermophiles, and species from other deep-sea habitats, such as seawater and sediments. Evidence using molecular techniques indicates the presence of a relatively small but active microbial population, dominated by bacteria. The microbial community diversity found in the crustal fluids may indicate habitat variability in old oceanic crust, with inputs of nutrients from seawater, sediment pore-water fluids and possibly hydrothermal sources. This report further supports the presence of an indigenous microbial community in ridge flank crustal fluids and advances our understanding of the potential physiological and phylogenetic diversity of this community.

  8. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in seamount basalts from the Juan de Fuca Ridge and Kodiak-Bowie seamount chain, northeast Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1989-01-01

    Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic ratios and their parent/daughter element concentrations for 28 basalts from 10 hotspot and nonhotspot seamounts are reported. Nd and Sr isotopic compositions (143Nd/144Nd = 0.51325-0.51304; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70237-0.70275) plot in the envelope for Juan de Fuca-Gorda ridge basalts with tholeiitic basalts showing more depleted sources and a better negative correlation than transitional to alkalic basalts. Pb isotopic ratios in tholeiitic and alkalic basalts overlap (206Pb/204Pb = 18.29-19.44) and display a trend toward more radiogenic Pb in alkalic basalts. The isotopic data for hotspot and nonhotspot basalts are indistinguishable and correlate broadly with rock composition, implying that they are controlled by partial melting. The isotopic variation in the seamount basalts is about 60% (Nd-Sr) to 100% (Pb) of that in East Pacific Rise basalts and is interpreted as a lower limit for the magnitude of mantle heterogeneity in the northeast Pacific. The data indicate absence of a chemically distinct plume component in the linear seamount chains and strongly suggest an origin from mid-ocean ridge basalt-like east Pacific mantle. -Authors

  9. Geochemistry and petrology of andesites from the north rift zone of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithka, I. N.; Perfit, M. R.; Clague, D. A.; Wanless, V. D.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the ROV Doc Ricketts onboard R/V Western Flyer explored ~4 km of an elongate pillow ridge up to ~300 m high along the eastern edge of the north rift zone of Axial Seamount. The steep-sided volcanic ridge is constructed of large pillow lavas up to 2-3 m in diameter and smaller elongated pillow tubes. Of the 27 samples collected during dive D526, all but one are andesites making it one of the largest confirmed high-silica exposures along a mid-ocean ridge (MOR). Based on radiocarbon ages of sediment on top of flows, the mounds are at least ~1390 years old. This minimum age is much younger than the 56 Ka age calculated based on distance from the rift axis, indicating eruption off-axis through older, colder crust and supporting the hypothesis and model calculations that extensive fractional crystallization (>85%) caused the high silica content. The andesitic lavas are primarily glassy, highly vesicular, crusty, and sparsely phyric with small (~1 mm) plagioclase crystals and olivine, clinopyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxide microphenocrysts. Microprobe analyses of glasses are similar to wax-core samples previously collected from this area but are more compositionally variable. Excluding one basalt (7.7 wt% MgO) sampled between mounds, the lavas are basaltic andesites and andesites (53-59 wt% SiO2) with <3 wt% MgO and 12.8-15.7 wt% FeO concentrations. Incompatible trace element abundances are ~4-6 times more enriched than in Axial Seamount T-MORB. Primitive mantle-normalized patterns are similar to those of high-silica lavas from other MORs (southern Juan de Fuca Ridge, 9N East Pacific Rise) with significant positive U anomalies, large negative Sr anomalies, small negative Eu anomalies, and slight positive Zr-Hf anomalies. The andesites are more enriched in light rare earth elements than basalts from Axial Seamount ((La/Yb)N 1.35-1.4 vs. 0.7-1.27) and N-MORB from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The andesites also have high Cl (~0.3-0.6 wt%) and H2O (~1.60-1.71 wt

  10. Microbially-Mediated Sulfur Oxidation in Diffuse Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, N. H.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusely venting hydrothermal fluids can act as a window to the subseafloor microbial environment, where chemically-reduced hydrothermal fluids mixing with oxygenated seawater in the shallow crust creates chemical disequilibria that chemotrophic microorganisms can exploit for energy gain. At Axial Seamount, an active deep-sea volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, sulfide concentrations have been measured as high as 5770 μM, and sulfide oxidation is quantitatively the most important chemical energy source for microbial metabolism. In addition, studies of microbial population structure indicate that diffuse fluids at Axial are dominated by putative sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Epsilonproteobacteria. To further study this important microbial process, we surveyed diffuse vent samples from Axial over a range of temperature, pH, and sulfide concentrations for the presence and expression of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria using a functional gene approach. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decrease exponentially above 40°C and lower the potential for sulfide oxidation, so we identified six sites of different temperatures, two each in the low (< 30°C), medium (~30°C), and high temperature (30 - 50°C) range. The low temperature sites had sulfide-to-temperature ratios of 1 - 26, the medium from 15 - 29, and the high from 26 - 36. PCR primers were designed to target the sulfur oxidation gene soxB specifically from Epsilonproteobacteria and five of the six sites were positive for soxB in the DNA fraction. Bulk RNA was also extracted from the same sites to examine in situ expression of soxB. Data from these analyses, along with quantification of the soxB gene abundance and expression using quantitative PCR, are currently being carried out. Together, this data set of soxB gene diversity, expression, and abundance along with geochemical data will allow us to quantitatively determine the functional dynamics of sulfide oxidation in the subseafloor at

  11. Crustal magnetization and the subseafloor structure of the ASHES vent field, Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for the investigation of hydrothermal sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Crone, Timothy J.; Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Kinsey, James C.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; Tivey, Maurice

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution geophysical data have been collected using the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Sentry over the ASHES (Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study) high-temperature (~348°C) vent field at Axial Seamount, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Multiple surveys were performed on a 3-D grid at different altitudes above the seafloor, providing an unprecedented view of magnetic data resolution as a function of altitude above the seafloor. Magnetic data derived near the seafloor show that the ASHES field is characterized by a zone of low magnetization, which can be explained by hydrothermal alteration of the host volcanic rocks. Surface manifestations of hydrothermal activity at the ASHES vent field are likely controlled by a combination of local faults and fractures and different lava morphologies near the seafloor. Three-dimensional inversion of the magnetic data provides evidence of a vertical, pipe-like upflow zone of the hydrothermal fluids with a vertical extent of ~100 m.

  12. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption “snowblower” vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julie L.; Akerman, Nancy H.; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial “bloom.” Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  13. Geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M; Paduan, Jennifer B; Martin, Julie F; Chadwick, William W Jr; Caress, David W; Portner, Ryan A; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary; Thomas, Hans; Butterfield, David A; Embley, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam (1 m resolution) and side scan data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle, and lava samples, radiocarbon-dated sediment cores, and observations of flow contacts collected by remotely operated vehicle were combined to reconstruct the geologic history and flow emplacement processes on Axial Seamount's summit and upper rift zones. The maps show 52 post-410 CE lava flows and 20 precaldera lava flows as old as 31.2 kyr, the inferred age of the caldera. Clastic deposits 1–2 m thick accumulated on the rims postcaldera. Between 31 ka and 410 CE, there are no known lava flows near the summit. The oldest postcaldera lava (410 CE) is a pillow cone SE of the caldera. Two flows erupted on the W rim between ∼800 and 1000 CE. From 1220 to 1300 CE, generally small eruptions of plagioclase phyric, depleted, mafic lava occurred in the central caldera and on the east rim. Larger post-1400 CE eruptions produced inflated lobate flows of aphyric, less-depleted, and less mafic lava on the upper rift zones and in the N and S caldera. All caldera floor lava flows, and most uppermost rift zone flows, postdate 1220 CE. Activity shifted from the central caldera to the upper S rift outside the caldera, to the N rift and caldera floor, and then to the S caldera and uppermost S rift, where two historical eruptions occurred in 1998 and 2011. The average recurrence interval deduced from the flows erupted over the last 800 years is statistically identical to the 13 year interval between historical eruptions.

  14. Geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; Martin, Julie F.; Chadwick, William W.; Caress, David W.; Portner, Ryan A.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.; Thomas, Hans; Butterfield, David A.; Embley, Robert W.

    2013-10-01

    Multibeam (1 m resolution) and side scan data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle, and lava samples, radiocarbon-dated sediment cores, and observations of flow contacts collected by remotely operated vehicle were combined to reconstruct the geologic history and flow emplacement processes on Axial Seamount's summit and upper rift zones. The maps show 52 post-410 CE lava flows and 20 precaldera lava flows as old as 31.2 kyr, the inferred age of the caldera. Clastic deposits 1-2 m thick accumulated on the rims postcaldera. Between 31 ka and 410 CE, there are no known lava flows near the summit. The oldest postcaldera lava (410 CE) is a pillow cone SE of the caldera. Two flows erupted on the W rim between ˜800 and 1000 CE. From 1220 to 1300 CE, generally small eruptions of plagioclase phyric, depleted, mafic lava occurred in the central caldera and on the east rim. Larger post-1400 CE eruptions produced inflated lobate flows of aphyric, less-depleted, and less mafic lava on the upper rift zones and in the N and S caldera. All caldera floor lava flows, and most uppermost rift zone flows, postdate 1220 CE. Activity shifted from the central caldera to the upper S rift outside the caldera, to the N rift and caldera floor, and then to the S caldera and uppermost S rift, where two historical eruptions occurred in 1998 and 2011. The average recurrence interval deduced from the flows erupted over the last 800 years is statistically identical to the 13 year interval between historical eruptions.

  15. Evidence of active ground deformation on the mid-ocean ridge: Axial seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, April-June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C.G. )

    1990-08-10

    Since September 1987 a precision bottom pressure recorder (BPR) has been deployed within the summit caldera of Axial seamount. The instrument is capable of measuring pressure of 1 mbar resolution and recording these measurements at 64 samples per hour for up to 15 months. Any significant change in the pressure record should indicate a change of depth associated with vertical ground movement, commonly indicative of active inflation or deflation of underlying magma bodies. Results from the first 9 months of the BPR deployment revealed a significant change in pressure, which is interpreted to represent a 15-cm subsidence of the caldera floor during two 2- to 3-week periods in April-June 1988. Also during these periods, an anomalous decline in temperature at the site was recorded that is correlated with an apparent increase in current velocity at the Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study (ASHES) vent field, suggesting vigorous advection of cold water into the caldera. Concurrent oceanographic data from Geosat and from current meter arrays do not indicate any large-scale oceanographic phenomena capable of generating these simultaneous events. One mechanism to explain simultaneous ground subsidence and temperature decline at the caldera center and increased bottom current at the caldera margin is the generation of a buoyant parcel of heated water in response to the intrusion or the eruption of magma associated with volcanic deflation. Similar volcanic events also may have generated large midwater plumes that have been described previously along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  16. Constraining Seasonal and Vertical Distributions of Planktonic Foraminifera for Paleoclimate Reconstruction Since MIS3 at the Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Clague, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The California Current is an upwelling region with dynamic interactions between circulation, biological productivity and ecology. A 77 cm piston push core was taken from the Juan de Fuca Ridge Axial Seamount using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) (2213m, 45.55º N, 130.08º W), an active submarine volcano ~480 km off Oregon's coast. Five radiocarbon dates indicate that the sediment ranges from 42.6 ka at 77 cm to 17.6 ka at 15 cm, with an average sediment accumulation rate of 2.47 cm/ka from 77-15 cm, and an average rate of 0.85 cm/ka during the postglacial period (<17.6 ka). Multiple species of planktic foraminifera from the core representing subtropical, subartic, and arctic fauna have been used to constrain changes in vertical and seasonal temperature since Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3). Measurements of δ18O of the upwelling species Globigerina bulloides, the thermocline dwelling species Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, and the warm mixed-layer species Orbulina universa are offset from each other, reflecting vertical and seasonal variation among the planktonic foraminifera. Of the three species, G. bulloides shows the least variation in δ18O, possibly indicating that marked changes in temperature are masking changes in the δ18O of seawater due to global ice volume changes. G. bulloides and O. universa δ18O values are similar in MIS 3 and diverge with time, indicating the development of strong seasonal succession of species, since the last glacial maximum. Bulk nitrogen isotopes and nitrogen flux provide additional constraints on upwelling strength and insight into local biological productivity and nutrient dynamics. Obtaining Mg/Ca data will clarify the δ 18O interpretation except deep in the core where metal-bearing authigenic precipitates affect Mg concentrations. These climatic proxies together provide insight into how global climate change and local seamount volcanism impacts regional productivity in the California Current.

  17. Competing styles of deep-marine explosive eruptions revealed from Axial seamount and Juan De Fuca ridge push core records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Pyroclastic lithofacies from Axial seamount record two distinct styles of deep-marine explosive eruption activity at 1.4-1.5 km water depth. The first style is preserved by limu o Pele-rich ash, which is widely distributed and thin bedded. Individual beds are normal to coarse-tail graded with increasing planar grain-fabric and decreasing limu o Pele thickness upward. Grain-size generally ranges from medium lapilli to medium ash, which is well to poorly sorted depending on the abundance of outsized fluidal shards. Fluidal shards include limu o Pele and Pele's hair, and lesser amounts of tendril-like tube pumice and droplet-like shards. Rare blocky to fluidal lapilli contain up to 70% vesicles. Angular plagioclase and basalt lithics occur in minor amounts (2-15%). Most beds display overall upward changes in particle morphology from dense blocky angular lapilli in their bases to fluidal ash in their tops. Shards are most equidimensional near the base, and most varied in the mid-upper parts of most beds where 4-8 mm size limu occur with 1-2 mm blocky shards. This outsized-component association results from drastically different settling speeds for the two morphologies. Outsized fluidal shards become abundant across a relatively sharp boundary in the middle to lower portions of most beds causing a seemingly double-graded appearance. These systematic changes in particle morphology and grain size suggest a cogenetic association of blocky and fluidal shards to the same depositional event and causative eruption. Fluidal-vesicular particle morphologies suggest that this lithofacies represents ash fall from magmatically explosive eruptions. Planar-grain fabric trends, absence of shard imbrication, and grading profiles suggest that beds were deposited via near-vertical suspension fall-out from weak turbidity flows. The second pyroclastic lithofacies is dominated by normal graded greenish grey ashy mud beds. Ash makes up 10-80% of individual beds, and is well-sorted, coarse- to

  18. Phylogenetic and Physiological Diversity of Subseafloor Microbial Communities at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Summary of Results From the New Millenium Observatory (NeMO), 1998-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baross, J. A.; Huber, J. A.; Mehta, M. P.; Opatkiewicz, A.; Bolton, S. A.; Butterfield, D. A.; Sogin, M. L.; Embley, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    Axial Seamount (45 ° 58' N; 130 ° 00' W) is an active submarine volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, approximately 300 miles off the coast of Oregon. Lying at the intersection of a seamount chain and a spreading axis, Axial is a unique study site from both the geological and biological perspective. In January of 1998, Axial experienced a week-long series of earthquakes, and subsequent water column and seafloor observations on the southeast portion of the caldera found temperature and chemical anomalies, extensive new seafloor lava flows, large "snow blower" type vents, and other characteristics commonly associated with diking-eruptive events. Due to its high activity and close proximity to shore, Axial was chosen as a site for a multi-year observatory (New Millenium Observatory, NeMO) to document changes and interactions between geology, chemistry, and biology on the mid-ocean ridge system. From 1998 through 2004, we extensively sampled diffuse vents at Axial Seamount to determine the physiological and phylogenetic diversity of subseafloor microbial communities and their relationship to the geochemical environment. Here we present a summary of those studies, including molecular-based phylogenetic surveys of bacteria, archaea, and potential nitrogen-fixing organisms, culturing results of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles from over 20 sites, and the distribution of one particular group of hyperthermophiles at diffuse vents throughout the caldera and how that distribution may be linked to the geochemical habitat. Results indicate that Axial supports a diverse subseafloor microbial community, including hydrogen and sulfur oxidizers, hyperthermophilic methane producers and heterotrophs, and many organisms with the potential to fix nitrogen. In addition, we find that the species composition of the microbial community changes in response to changes in the physical and chemical conditions at each vent site. The extent of seawater mixing with hydrothermal fluids

  19. Distribution and composition of hydrothermal plume particles from the ASHES vent field at Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge. [Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study

    SciTech Connect

    Feely, R.A.; Geiselman, T.L.; Baker, E.T.; Massoth, G.J. ); Hammond, S.R. )

    1990-08-10

    In 1986 and 1987, buoyant and neutrally buoyant hydrothermal plume particles from the ASHES vent field within Axial Volcano were sampled to study their variations in composition with height above the seafloor. Individual mineral phases were identified using standard X ray diffraction procedures. Elemental composition and particle morphologies were determined by X ray fluorescence spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/X ray energy spectrometry techniques. The vent particles were primarily composed of sphalerite, anhydrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, barite, hydrous iron oxides, and amorphous silica. Grain size analyses of buoyant plume particles showed rapid particle growth in the first few centimeters above the vent orifice, followed by differential sedimentation of the larger sulfide and sulfate minerals out of the buoyant plume. The neutrally buoyant plume consisted of a lower plume, which was highly enriched in Fe, S, Zn, and Cu, and an upper plume, which was highly enriched in Fe and Mn. The upper plume was enriched in Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide particles, and the lower plume was enriched in suspended sulfide particles in addition to the Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide particles. The chemical data for the water column particles indicate that chemical scavenging and differential sedimentation processes are major factors controlling the composition of the dispersing hydrothermal particles. Short-term sediment trap experiments indicate that the fallout from the ASHES vent field is not as large as some of the other vent fields on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  20. Active Submarine Volcanoes and Electro-Optical Sensor Networks: The Potential of Capturing and Quantifying an Entire Eruptive Sequence at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, J. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Proskurowski, G.; Fundis, A. T.; Kawka, O.

    2011-12-01

    The NE Pacific Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative is designed to provide unprecedented electrical power and bandwidth to the base and summit of Axial Seamount. The scientific community is engaged in identifying a host of existing and innovative observation and measurement techniques that utilize the high-power and bandwidth infrastructure and its real-time transmission capabilities. The cable, mooring, and sensor arrays will enable the first quantitative documentation of myriad processes leading up to, during, and following a submarine volcanic event. Currently planned RSN instrument arrays will provide important and concurrent spatial and temporal constraints on earthquake activity, melt migration, hydrothermal venting behavior and chemistry, ambient currents, microbial community structure, high-definition (HD) still images and HD video streaming from the vents, and water-column chemistry in the overlying ocean. Anticipated, but not yet funded, additions will include AUVs and gliders that continually document the spatial-temporal variations in the water column above the volcano and the distal zones. When an eruption appears imminent the frequency of sampling will be increased remotely, and the potential of repurposing the tracking capabilities of the mobile sensing platforms will be adapted to the spatial indicators of likely eruption activity. As the eruption begins mobile platforms will fully define the geometry, temperature, and chemical-microbial character of the volcanic plume as it rises into the thoroughly documented control volume above the volcano. Via the Internet the scientific community will be able to witness and direct adaptive sampling in response to changing conditions of plume formation. A major goal will be to document the eruptive volume and link the eruption duration to the volume of erupted magma. For the first time, it will be possible to begin to quantify the time-integrated output of an underwater

  1. Interview of Antonio Vergara Fernandez about the First Beam

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Antonio Vergara Fernandez : Engineer of the LHC commissioning Questions asked : 1. What does it take to start up the LHC machine? 2. What's the plan for 1st injection day? 3. How do you feel about this?

  2. Interview of Antonio Vergara Fernandez about the First Beam

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-31

    Antonio Vergara Fernandez : Engineer of the LHC commissioning Questions asked : 1. What does it take to start up the LHC machine? 2. What's the plan for 1st injection day? 3. How do you feel about this?

  3. Sr isotopic variations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaby, J.; Clague, D.A.; Delaney, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Sr isotopic ratios of 39 glass and microcrystalline basalt samples along the Juan de Fuca Ridge and one glass sample from Brown Bear Seamount are at the lower end of the range for normal MORB; the average 87Sr/86Sr ratio is 0.70249 + or - 0.00014 (2sigma ). Although subtle variations exist along the strike of the ridge, the Sr isotopic data do not show systematic variation relative to the proposed Cobb hotspot. The isotopic data are inconsistent with an enriched mantle-plume origin for the Cobb-Eikelberg Seamount chain.-W.H.B.

  4. Seamount acoustic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  5. A Transpacific Voyage: The Representation of Asia in Jose Joaquin Fernandez de Lizardi's "El Periquillo Sarniento"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagimoto, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    This essay seeks to explore the representation of Asia in Jose Joaquin Fernandez de Lizardi's "El Periquillo Sarniento" (1816), which is often considered the first novel produced in Latin America. Although many scholars have examined the picaresque element as well as the nationalist aspect of the novel, the Asian presence in Fernandez de Lizardi's…

  6. The Eratosthenes Seamount - Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, A.; Schnabel, M.; Damm, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Eratosthenes Seamount forms a prominent landmark in the Eastern Mediterranean. It is located south of Cyprus with the Levantine Basin on its eastern side, the Herodotus Basin on its western side and the Nile Cone south of the seamount. The Eratosthenes Seamount rises up to 750 m below sea surface and is about 1200 m higher than the surrounding seafloor of the Levantine Basin and the Nile Cone sediments. The Eratosthenes Seamount is considered as a continental fragment of the former African-Nubian Plate that was rifted to its present position relative to Africa during the formation of the Tethyan Ocean. In 2010 a detailed geophysical survey was carried out in the area of the Eratosthenes Seamount by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources of Germany including multichannel seismic (MCS), refraction seismics, magnetic, gravity and magnetotelluric data acquisition. First results show a highly deformed seamount, with a plateau-like top that is impacted by west-east trending graben formation. The slopes of the seamount are eroded showing deep incised ripple patterns and recent submarine landslides. The Eratosthenes Seamount produces also a prominent magnetic and gravity anomaly, both supporting its uniqueness in the area of the Eastern Mediterranean. Velocity information by refraction seismic modeling, as well as the models of the magnetic and gravity data show evidence for a volcanic core of the seamount with carbonate layers on top of the volcanic core. The slopes of the seamount terminate against a conspicuous rim-like escarpment that forms in addition the northern and western termination of the Messinian Evaporites in the study area. The MCS and refraction seismic data show a very deep Levantine Basin with maximum acoustic basement depths of 12 to 14 km very close to the slope of the Eratosthenes Seamount. The deepest sediments resolved by the MCS data are of Lower Cretaceous to Jurassic age. The refraction seismic model shows a 14 km thick

  7. Erratic Continental Rocks on Volcanic Seamounts off California and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.

    2006-12-01

    The seamounts off the California continental margin, and those well offshore of California and Oregon that formed near mid-ocean ridges, are all constructed of basaltic lava flows and volcanic breccias and sandstones. However, explorations of these seamounts using dredges, and more recently, the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon, frequently recover rocks of a wide assortment of continental lithologies including gabbro, granodiorite, silicic volcanics, limestone, dolomite, and metamorphic rocks. These rocks are often rounded like river and beach cobbles, and the softer rocks are bored as by worms or bivalves. They are covered with manganese oxide crusts of thicknesses that range from a patina to several cm, approaching the thickness on the in-situ basaltic rocks. These rocks are often easier to collect than the basalts. We recognize these rocks to be erratics of continental origin. Erratics have been documented as being transported by icebergs at higher latitudes, but this mechanism is unlikely to be responsible for the erratics we have found as far south as 31.9° N. Three brief papers published by K.O. Emery from 1941 to 1954 proposed that such erratics found in many thick sections of fine-grained sedimentary sequences such as the Monterey Formation, were transported long distances by kelp holdfasts, tree roots, or in the guts of pinnipeds. We propose that these vectors also transport erratics to seamounts, where they have been accumulating since the seamounts formed millions of years ago. Those seamounts that were once islands would have intercepted even more erratics along their shorelines while they stood above sea level. We have recovered or observed such erratics on the Vance Seamounts; Gumdrop, Pioneer, Guide, Davidson, Rodriguez, San Juan, Little Joe, and San Marcos Seamounts; on the muddy bottom of Monterey Bay; and on Northeast Bank and along the Patton Escarpment at the western edge of the California Borderland. These locations are as far as 250 nautical

  8. Global distribution of seamounts from Seasat profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Claire H.; Sandwell, David T.

    1988-01-01

    A new measurement techique based on a model of a Gaussian seamount loading a thin elastic lithosphere was developed to analyze seamounts that, until then, were not surveyed or seamounts with poor bathymetric coverage. The model predicts that the seamount diameter is equal to the peak-to-trough distance along the vertical deflection profile and that the flexural diameter of a seamount is related to the age of the lithosphere when the seamount formed. This model also suggests that these two measurements are relatively insensitive to the cross-track location from the seamount. These model predictions were confirmed using Seasat altimeter profiles crossing 14 surveyed seamounts in the Pacific. The analysis of the seamount distribution indicated considerable variations in population density and type across the oceans. Most notable among them are the absence of seamounts in the Atlantic, variations in population density across large fracture zones in the Pacific, and the prevalence of small signatures in the Indian Ocean.

  9. Observations on Gulf of Alaska seamount chains by multi-beam sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, N. Christian

    1985-06-01

    Geomorphic and age data are presented for the Dellwood, Denson, Dickins, Giacomini, and Ely seamounts, the Tsimshian Seachannel, and the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge with Brown Bear, Bear Cub, Grizzly Bear, and Cobb seamounts. Formational speculations extrapolated to a regional scale allow the strikes and outer limits of the seamount chains to be interpreted. Six of these chains are shown in the Gulf of Alaska, none of which conform to the Pratt-Welker or Kodiak-Bowie in the literature. Different strikes show the chains/plate to have rotated 23° about 17 m.y. ago. Morphology also shows that there are four less guyots in the Gulf than previously thought, and that, at least in the Gulf of Alaska, guyot heights do not necessarily reflect sealevel during erosion.

  10. The Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain: Hotspot volcanism with mid-ocean ridge basalt affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Desonie, D.L.; Duncan, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Cobb hotspot, currently located beneath Axial seamount on the Juan de Fuca ridge, has the temporal but not the isotopic characteristics usually attributed to a mantle plume. The earlier volcanic products of the hotspot, form eight volcanoes in the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount (CES) chain, show a westward age progression away from the hotspot and a westward increase in the age difference between the seamounts and the crust on which they formed. These results are consistent with movement of the Pacific plate over a fixed Cobb hotspot and eventual encroachment by the westwardly migrating Juan de Fuca ridge. CES lavas are slightly enriched in alkalies and incompatible elements relative to those of the Juan de Fuca ridge but they have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions virtually identical to those found along the ridge. Therefore, Cobb hotspot is a stationary, upper mantle melting anomaly whose volcanic products show strong mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) affinity. These observations can be explained by low degrees of partial melting of entrained heterogeneous upper mantle MORB source material within a thermally driven lower mantle diapir or by an intrinsic MORB-like composition of the deeper mantle source region from which northeast Pacific plumes rise.

  11. Introduction to Seamount Special Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.

    1984-12-01

    This special section is the outcome of a symposium held at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory November 17-19, 1982, on the origin and evolution of seamounts. The topic for the symposium arose from the realization that although there is now a wealth of new ideas on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the ocean floor, the study of seamounts has been relatively neglected despite their great importance to plate tectonics. One of the most interesting features of the ocean floor is the large number of small volcanoes or seamounts. Usually, these features are circular in plan view and have a sharp summit. There has been extensive debate in the literature about the significance of the different morphological types of seamounts. A traditional view has been that flattopped seamounts (e.g., guyots) formed as a result of subaerial erosion when the volcanoes were above sea level. Seamounts covered by fringing reefs or sediments (e.g., atolls), on the other hand, are believed to have formed when the original volcanic foundation subsided below sea level.

  12. Resolving Seamounts in Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H.

    2006-12-01

    We have examined three factors influencing the use of satellite altimeter data to map seamounts and guyots in the deep ocean: (1) the resolution of seamount and guyot gravity anomalies by altimetry; (2) the non-linearity of the relationship between gravity and bathymetry; and (3) the homogeneity of the mass density within the seamount or guyot. When altimeter data are used to model the marine gravity anomaly field the result may have limited resolution due to noise levels in the altimeter data, track spacing of the satellite profiles, inclination angles of the orbits, and filters used to combine and interpolate the data (Sandwell and Smith, JGR, 1997). We compared the peak-to-trough amplitude of gravity anomalies in Sandwell and Smith`'s version 15.1 field to peak-to-trough amplitudes measured by gravimeters on board ships. The satellite gravity field amplitudes match ship measurements well over seamounts and guyots having volumes exceeding ~2000 km3. Over smaller volume seamounts, where the anomalies have most of their power at quite short wavelengths, the satellite field under-estimates the anomaly amplitude. If less filtering could be done, or a new mission with a lower noise level were flown, more of the anomalies associated with small seamounts might be resolved. Smith and Sandwell (Science, 1997) predicted seafloor topography from altimetric gravity assuming that the density of seafloor topography is nearly constant over ~100 km distances, and that the relationship between gravity and topography may be approximated by a liner filter over those distances. In fact, the true theoretical relationship is non-linear (Parker, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc, 1972); it can be expressed as an N-th order expansion, with the N=1 term representing a linear filter and the N>1 terms accounting for higher-order corrections. We find that N=2 is a sufficient approximation at both seamounts and guyots. Constant density models of large volume guyots do not fit the observed gravity

  13. Age of Kōko Seamount, Emperor Seamount chain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1973-01-01

    KAr ages obtained by the conventional isotope-dilution and the 40Ar/39Ar techniques on two sanidine trachytes, four basalts, and a phonolite dredged from the top of Ko¯ko Seamount, 300 km north of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend, show that the seamount is 46.4 ± 1.1 my old. These data indicate that the volcanoes in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain continue to increase in age to the west and north beyond Midway Atoll, as predicted by the melting-spot hypothesis for the origin of the chain, and that the rate of volcanic migration along the chain was nonlinear between the time of formation of the island of Hawaii and Ko¯ko Seamount.

  14. Outcome Analysis of Fernandez Osteotomy in Malunited Extra-Articular Fractures of Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, A; Kumar, S

    2016-07-01

    Deformity of wrist is very common after mal union of extra articular fractures over distal end of Radius. It causes limitation of movements too in different directions with or without pain. Deformity may be treated by different types of corrective osteotomy. We treated cases of this type of malunion with Fernandez osteotomy. This study is to observe the amount of correction and recovery of functional status in patients with malunited distal radius fractures treated with Fernandez osteotomy. This is a prospective study. We treated 10 cases of malunited radius with Fernandez osteotomy from February 2013 to October 2014 in the Departments of Orthopaedics, Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, India. There were six males and four females with mean age of thirty years (with range from twenty to forty years. Indications for surgical intervention include pain and functional deficit severe enough to interfere significantly with daily activities. Radius is exposed through distal dorsal radial incision and radial osteotomy done two and half centimetre proximal to the wrist joint and after achieving correction; gap is filled with iliac bone graft and fixed with contoured distal radius T-plate. Follow up was for an average one year and three months. Results were excellent in one, satisfactory in four cases, good in four cases and bad in one case. Fernandez osteotomy is valuable option for correction of malunited distal radius fracture especially in young demanding patients. PMID:27612904

  15. On "Nocilla" and the Urbanization of Consciousness: Multiplicity and Interdisciplinarity in Agustin Fernandez Mallo's Fragmented Trilogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This essay reappropriates the segmentary form of the three works of Agustin Fernandez Mallo's "Nocilla" project ("Nocilla Dream" [2006]; "Nocilla Experience" [2008]; "Nocilla Lab" [2009]) en route to an urban reading of its fragmentary structure. The project's interdisciplinary push, overwhelming incorporation of both scientific and…

  16. Oceanographic aspects of the Emperor Seamounts region

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, G.I.; Taft, B.A.; Ebbesmeyer, C.C.

    1982-11-20

    Effects of the Emperor Seamount Chain on the thermohaline structure and baroclinic flow are investigated on the basis of historical hydrographic data. The amplitudes of dynamic height perturbations are 3 to 5 times larger west than east of the chain. The intensity of the thermal fronts is stronger west than east of the seamounts; near the crest of the southern seamounts, strong east-west thermohaline fronts and a strong northward baroclinic flow are observed. The Kuroshio Extension west of the seamount chain is a well-defined meandering current, the axis of which generally lies between 33/sup 0/ and 36/sup 0/N. The available data indicate that the Kuroshio Extension turns northward and then flows eastward through the gaps of the seamount chain. East of the seamounts, the Kuroshio Extension widens threefold and appears to be poorly defined.

  17. Evidence for age and evolution of Corner seamounts and Great Meteor seamount chain from multibeam bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Smoot, N. Christian

    1990-10-01

    The morphology of the Corner and Cruiser seamounts is discussed and the apparent age of seamount geomorphic features that are thought to have formed at sea level is derived. High-resolution, multibeam bathymetry of the seamounts shows geomorphic features such as guyots and terraces. The pattern of volcanism is consistent with the sequential formation of the New England, Corner, and Great Meteor chain seamounts above the New England hotspot. However, Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic absolute motion of the African plate over the hotspot differs significantly from predictions of the existing models. The derived age pattern of volcanism indicates formation of the Corner seamounts at ca. 80 Ma to 76 Ma.

  18. Evidence for age and evolution of Corner seamounts and Great Meteor seamount chain from multibeam bathymetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Smoot, N. Christian

    1990-01-01

    The morphology of the Corner and Cruiser seamounts is discussed and the apparent age of seamount geomorphic features that are thought to have formed at sea level is derived. High-resolution, multibeam bathymetry of the seamounts shows geomorphic features such as guyots and terraces. The pattern of volcanism is consistent with the sequential formation of the New England, Corner, and Great Meteor chain seamounts above the New England hotspot. However, Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic absolute motion of the African plate over the hotspot differs significantly from predictions of the existing models. The derived age pattern of volcanism indicates formation of the Corner seamounts at ca. 80 Ma to 76 Ma.

  19. Caldera Formation on the Vance Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D.; Paduan, J.; Cousens, B.; Cornejo, L.; Perfit, M.; Wendt, R.; Stix, J.; Helo, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Vance Seamounts are a chain of near-ridge volcanoes located just west of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The six volcanoes are built on ocean crust ranging from 0.78 Ma at the southeastern end to 2.55 Ma in the northwest. Morphologic analysis indicates that the volcanoes were constructed sequentially and get younger to the southeast towards the ridge axis. Like many near-ridge volcanoes, some of the Vance Seamounts have large offset calderas that presumably formed above evacuated shallow magma chambers within the upper ocean crust. In summer 2006, we completed 6 dives using MBARI's ROV Tiburon to study the formation of these calderas. The floor of each caldera consists of flat-lying volcaniclastite, under about 25 cm of pelagic sediment. Some caldera floors have mounds of post-caldera pillow flows. The caldera walls have a lower section covered by talus and an upper section of interbedded massive flows with columnar joints (to 11 m thick) and pillow basalts. The top of each caldera wall has a unit of volcanic mudstone to sandstone ranging from 20 cm to 2 m thick. The fine matrix of many of these samples is green hydrothermal clay. The finest siltstone to mudstone samples appear to be layers of massive tan hydrothermal clays. Talus fragments, lava and volcaniclastite outcrops are universally coated and cemented by 1 to 4 cm-thick deposits of hydrothermal Mn-oxide crusts, even on the youngest of the volcanoes. Volcanic particles in the sandstones are mostly dense angular glass, but bubble-wall fragments (limu o Pele) are present and indicate formation during low-energy pyroclastic eruptions. Without the few percent limu o Pele fragments, the glass fragments would resemble those inferred to form by quench granulation. We suggest that quench granulation is actually pyroclastic fragmentation that occurs as coalesced magmatic gas bubbles disrupt the molten lava surface at the vents. Our observations confirm that the more southeasterly offset calderas truncated thick

  20. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts. Fishing for, and possession of, Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS in the Hancock Seamounts Ecosystem Management Area...

  1. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts. Fishing for, and possession of, Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS in the Hancock Seamounts Ecosystem Management Area...

  2. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium on Hancock Seamount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fishing moratorium on Hancock Seamount... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium on Hancock Seamount. Fishing for Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS on the Hancock Seamount is prohibited through August 31, 2010....

  3. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts. Fishing for, and possession of, Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS in the Hancock Seamounts Ecosystem Management Area...

  4. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts. Fishing for, and possession of, Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS in the Hancock Seamounts Ecosystem Management Area...

  5. Deep-sea fish distribution varies between seamounts: results from a seamount complex off New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Dianne M; Clark, Malcolm R; Anderson, Owen F; Kim, Susan W

    2012-01-01

    Fish species data from a complex of seamounts off New Zealand termed the "Graveyard Seamount Complex' were analysed to investigate whether fish species composition varied between seamounts. Five seamount features were included in the study, with summit depths ranging from 748-891 m and elevation from 189-352 m. Measures of fish species dominance, rarity, richness, diversity, and similarity were examined. A number of factors were explored to explain variation in species composition, including latitude, water temperature, summit depth, depth at base, elevation, area, slope, and fishing effort. Depth at base and slope relationships were significant with shallow seamounts having high total species richness, and seamounts with a more gradual slope had high mean species richness. Species similarity was modelled and showed that the explanatory variables were driven primarily by summit depth, as well as by the intensity of fishing effort and elevation. The study showed that fish assemblages on seamounts can vary over very small spatial scales, in the order of several km. However, patterns of species similarity and abundance were inconsistent across the seamounts examined, and these results add to a growing literature suggesting that faunal communities on seamounts may be populated from a broad regional species pool, yet show considerable variation on individual seamounts. PMID:22745656

  6. Impact of Intrathermocline eddies on seamount and oceanic island off Central Chile: Observation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormazabal, Samuel; Morales, Carmen; Cornejo, Marcela; Bento, Joaquim; Valencia, Luis; Auger, Pierre; Rodriguez, Angel; Correa, Marco; Anabalón, Valeria; Silva, Nelson

    2016-04-01

    In the Southeast Pacific, oceanographic processes that sustain the biological production necessary to maintain the ecosystems associated to seamounts and oceanic islands are still poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that the interaction of mesoscale and submesoescale eddies with oceanic islands and seamounts could be playing an important role in the time-space variability of primary production. In this work, research cruises, satellite data and Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) results have been used to describe the main characteristics of intrathermocline eddies (ITE) and their impact on the Juan Fernández archipelago (JFA), off central Chile. The JFA is located off the coast of central Chile (33°S), and is composed of three main islands: Robinson Crusoe (RC), Alejandro Selkirk (AS) and Santa Clara (SC). Between the RC and AS are located the westernmost seamounts (JF6 and JF5) of the Juan Fernández archipelago. Satellite altimetry data (sea surface height from AVISO) were used to detect and track mesoscale eddies through eddy-tracking algorithm. Physical, chemical and biological parameters as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and fluorescence were measured in the water column at JF5 and JF6, and along the coast off central Chile (30-40°S). Results from the research cruise exhibit the interaction between an ITE and the seamount JF6. Eddy-tracking results showed that the ITE observed at the JF6 was formed at the coast off central-southern Chile, traveled ~900 km seaward and after ~9 months reached the JF5 and JF6 region. Observations along the Chilean coast confirmed that the coast corresponds to the formation area of the observed ITE. In this region, ITEs are represented by subsurface lenses (~100 km diameter; 400 m thickness) of homogeneous salinity, nutrient rich and oxygen-poor equatorial subsurface water mass (ESSW) which is transported poleward by the Peru-Chile undercurrent in the coastal band and seaward by ITEs. The effect of ITEs on the

  7. JUAN BOBO. TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A GUIDE TO HELP PLAN WORTHWILE EXPERIENCES FOR CHILDREN WHICH WILL PROMOTE VERBAL EXPRESSION AND ENCOURAGE THE USE OF LANGUAGE ARTS AND SKILLS IS PRESENTED. JUAN BOBO IS A CHARACTER FROM PUERTO RICAN FOLKLORE. HE IS A POPULAR FIGURE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TESTS USED IN PUERTO RICO, AND HE HAS BEEN TRANSPORTED TO THE LOWER EAST SIDE OF NEW YORK…

  8. Axial, Brownbear and Cobb Seamounts: Examples of Growth and Demise of the Submarine Volcanic Edifice through Time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Merle, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Axial, Brownbear and Cobb Seamounts, located along and to the west of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), are the most recent volcanic expressions of the Cobb Hotspot. Cobb Seamount is the oldest (3.3 Ma) and furthest from the hotspot source. Cobb exhibits a circular volcanic edifice that rises from ~2800 m at its base to within 34 m of the sea surface. Multibeam bathymetry of Cobb indicates there are wave-cut terraces at the summit, as well as landslide scars along the flanks of the volcano. Brownbear Seamount (0.5-1.5 Ma) has an elongated (N-S) shape, which indicates an interaction of the hotspot plume with the extensional-stress field of the JdF spreading center. Brownbear also has two (~4 km wide) summit calderas which likely formed due to collapse once plate motion moved the seamount west of the magma source. Axial Seamount, in contrast, is the volcanic edifice directly above hotspot plume and is therefore in a constructional phase. Axial also straddles the ridge and because of this exhibits an elongate structure with well defined rift zones forming its northern and southern flanks. Axial also has a single large summit caldera (~8 km wide) which has been the location of two eruptions in 1998 and 2011 which produced extensive lava flows within the caldera and down the south rift zone. We will present multibeam bathymetry of these three volcanoes, and include the results of previous surveys and observations, to infer the evolution of the volcanic construction and destruction processes through time along this seamount chain.

  9. Detection of uncharted seamounts using satellite altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarewicz, A.P.; Schwank, D.C.

    1982-04-01

    The topography of the marine geoid (and corresponding sea surface) contains characteristic local features caused by sediments. These features can be successfully detected and located using matched filters to process single tracks of satellite altimeter data. Comparison of detected seamount features with the SNYBAPS and Scripps bathymetric data bases can reveal uncharted seamounts. This technique has been applied to 33 Seasat tracks in a region of the western Pacific bounded by 0 to 15 degrees North and 160 and 165 degrees East. From this analysis, we find three uncharted seamounts in this region. In all three cases, a detailed examination of the bathymetry shows no known bathymetric feature consistent with the detected signature. The method used to estimate the size and location of these uncharted seamounts is discussed.

  10. Kodiak seamount not flat-topped.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, E L; von Huene, R E

    1966-12-01

    Earlier surveys in the Aleutian Trench southeast of Kodiak Island, Alaska, indicated that Kodiak Seamount had a flat top and was a tablemount or guyot. This seamount is of special significance because it has been supposed that its surface was eroded at the same time as those of a line of guyots to the southeast. If so, its present position in the axis of the Aleutian Trench indicates that the line of guyots was formed before the trench. A two-part survey in 1965 showed that Kodiak Seamount is not flat-topped, and should be eliminated from the category of guyots. Reflection profiling records indicate that the seamount was formed before the adjacent sediments were deposited, and that the small trough, or moat, on the south side is a depositional feature probably formed by a scouring effect or by the acceleration of turbidity currents around the base of the mount. PMID:17770303

  11. Evolution of the western segment of Juan Fernández Ridge (Nazca Plate): plume vs. plate tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Luis E.; Rodrigo, Cristián; Reyes, Javier; Orozco, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    The Juan Fernandez Ridge (Eastern Pacific, Nazca Plate) is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent age progression observed in 40Ar-39Ar data. However, geological evidence and some thermochronological data suggest a more complex pattern with a rejuvenation stage in Robinson Crusoe Island, the most eroded of the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. In fact, a postshield stage at 900-700 ka separates the underlying shield-related pile from the post-erosional alkaline succession (Ba/Yb=38.15; La/Yb=15.66; Ba/Y=20.27; Ba/Zr=2.31). Shield volcanoes grew at high effusion rate at ca. 5-4 Ma erupting mostly tholeiitic to transitional magmas (Ba/Yb=18.07-8.32; La/Yb=4.59-9.84; Ba/Y=4.24-8.18; Ba/Zr=0.73-1.09). Taken together, shield volcanoes form a continuous plateau with a base at ca. 3900 mbsl. However, a more complex structural pattern can be inferred from geophysical data, which suggest some intracrustal magma storage and a more extended area of magma ascent. A role for the Challenger Fracture Zone is hypothesized fueling the controversy between pristine plume origin and the effect of plate tectonic processes in the origin of intraplate volcanism. This research is supported by FONDECYT Project 1110966.

  12. Jasper Seamount: Seven million years of volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, M.S. ); Staudigel, H.; Gee, J. )

    1991-04-01

    Jasper Seamount is a young, mid-sized (690 km{sup 3}) oceanic intraplate volcano located about 500 km west-southwest of San Diego, California. Reliable {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age data were obtained for several milligram-sized samples of 4 to 10 Ma plagioclase by using a defocused laser beam to clean the samples before fusion. Gee and Staudigel suggested that Jasper Seamount consists of a transitional to tholeiitic shield volcano formed by flank transitional series lavas, overlain by flank alkalic series lavas and summit alkalic series lavas. Twenty-nine individual {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser fusion analyses on nine samples confirm the stratigraphy: 10.3-10.0 Ma for the flank transitonal series, 8.7-7.5 Ma for the flank alkalic series, and 4.8-4.1 Ma for the summit alkalic series. The alkalinity of the lavas clearly increases with time, and there appear to be 1 to 3 m.y. hiatuses between each series. The age data are consistent with the complex magnetic anomaly of Jasper; however the dominant reversed polarity inferred from the anomaly suggests that most of the seamount formed at ca. 11 Ma, prior to the onset of Chron C5N. The duration of volcanism of Jasper Seamount is slightly longer than the duration of volcanism at Hawaiian volcanoes, suggesting that individual age data from seamounts may constrain the age of a seamount only to within about 7 m.y. unless the stage of volcanism can be unambiguously determined. Extrapolating from the results of our study, similar precision in age determinations should be possible on 50 mg of 1 Ma plagioclase from mid-ocean ridge basalt, opening new possibilities in the geochronology of young, low-potassium volcanic rocks.

  13. Impulsive Seafloor Signals from the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Tan, Y. J.; Tolstoy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Axial Seamount is a hotspot volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge that has erupted three times over the past two decades. The most recent eruption was recorded by a cabled seismic network in the southern half of the summit caldera that has been operated by the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) since November 2014. After five months of increasing seismicity, a 10-hour seismic crisis involving thousands of earthquakes began at 0500 GMT on April 24, 2015 accompanied by ~2 m of deflation in the central caldera (Nooner et al., this meeting). Local seismicity declined rapidly after the eruption, but thousands of impulsive waterborne events were observed across the network starting immediately after the seismic crisis. Over 1500 events per day were recorded on April 25 and 26, decreasing to less than 500 per day after May 1, and ceasing altogether around May 20. Each event comprises a train of three to five consistently spaced arrivals visible on all 3 seismometer channels with a broad frequency content of 10-100 Hz. The timing of arrivals across the network is consistent with water column multiples from a seafloor source to the north. A subset of events has been manually picked and located by modeling travel times of the first three arrivals assuming flat bathymetry at a range of depths between 1500-1800 m and a sound speed of 1.5 km/s. The preliminary locations are clustered around Axial Seamount's northern rift at a distance of 10-15 km from the north rim of the caldera. In July, an OOI cruise discovered fresh pillow lavas up to 100 m thick and 670 m wide, and extending for 7 km along the rift in the same region (Kelley et al., this meeting). The source of the impulsive events is uncertain and could involve gas explosions, bubble collapse, and thermal or mechanical cracking, but their colocation with the fresh lava flow suggests that ocean bottom seismic networks can not only track the faulting and fracturing associated with subsurface magma movements but also the

  14. Deleting the Object Marker Renders the Sentence Ungrammatical: Comment on Casado, Martin-Loeches, Munoz, and Fernandez-Frias (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demestre, Josep

    2012-01-01

    During the last years there has been an increasing interest in examining the brain responses to word order variations. In one ERP study conducted in Spanish, Casado, Martin-Loeches, Munoz, and Fernandez-Frias (2005) had participants read Spanish transitive sentences with either an SVO (subject-verb-object) or an OVS order. The word order of a…

  15. More on the Effects of Explicit Information in Instructed SLA: A Partial Replication and a Response to Fernandez (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Nicholas; Culmana, Hillah; VanPattena, Bill

    2009-01-01

    The role of explicit information (EI) as an independent variable in instructed SLA is largely underresearched. Using the framework of processing instruction, however, a series of offline studies has found no effect for EI (e.g., Benati, 2004; Sanz & Morgan-Short, 2004; VanPatten & Oikkenon, 1996). Fernandez (2008) presented two online experiments…

  16. Petrologic evolution of the Louisville seamount chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, James W.; Lonsdale, Peter F.; Batiza, Rodey

    The Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) extends for 4300 km from Osbourn Seamount, at the junction of the Tonga and Kermadec Trenches, southeasterly towards the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. The chain is formed of 60 or more seamounts and guyots which are aligned along a trend concentric with the Emperor-Hawaii Chain. The Louisville Chain crosses at a low angle several fracture zones which are part of the Eltanin Fracture Zone system, but there is no apparent genetic relation between the two structures. Rocks collected from the Louisville Chain comprise a spectrum of rock types including alkalic basalt, hawaiite, and basanitoid. Some samples have compositions suggesting that they are transitional to tholeiitic basalt, but no true tholeiites have been collected from the seamounts. Osbourn Seamount, at the westernmost end of the chain, is capped with basanitoid; these have been dated as ˜66 Ma. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts in basaltic composition pebbles and detrital grains of clinopyroxene have been recovered from DSDP site 204, north of Osbourn Seamount, at subbottom depths of 112 to 114 meters (Late? Cretaceous age). Some of these pyroxenes have compositions indicating a tholeiitic parental magma, some were derived from alkalic magmas. Osbourn Seamount or an older neighbor were likely sources of the clastic sediments. This is an indication that the early stages of seamount volcanism included tholeiitic magmas, magmatism subsequently evolved through alkalic and basanitic types. Samples dredged from the carapaces of seamounts east of Osbourn are mainly alkalic basalt, or hawaiite, or both. The young, eastern end of the chain near Long. 139°10'W has alkalic basalt lavas. Modeling of trace element and REE data suggest that small amounts (e.g., 4%) melting of garnet Iherzolite could have provided the parental alkalic basalt magmas. Basanitoids represent slightly higher (˜9%) levels of melting. Element ratios of Ti/Zr, Nb/Zr, Y/Zr, Ba/La, La/Ce, La/Sm, Nb/La suggest that the

  17. The Seamount Catalog: Creating a Data Infrastructure for the Seamount Biogeoscience Network (SBN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.; Minett, R.; Staudigel, D.; Konter, J.; Martin, P.

    2006-12-01

    The Seamount Biogeoscience Network (SBN), an international and interdisciplinary association of seamount scientists, argues that seamount research can fundamentally benefit from promoting collaboration and improved data sharing between seamount science disciplines. Seamount scientists cover a wide range of biological sciences, geochemistry, geophysics, geology and physical oceanography. An effective SBN data resource has to be capable of helping access a wide range of disciplinary data relevant to all these fields, but the need for bathymetry data is common to all disciplines. The SBN has used the Seamount Catalog (SC) as its main data portal with a capability of carrying any data, but focusing on bathymetry. Recent SC developments aimed atfacilitating interoperability with other data bases, expanding its contents, and creating an interface that is easy to use on almost any expert level, similarly useful for specialists and interdisciplinary scientists, as well as educational users. Key to interoperability is our choice of giving each seamount an identifier that is made up by an alphanumeric combination of the latitude and longitude values (of the midpoint of the seamount). This identifier serves as a unique name, but it may also be parsed into its geospatial information. Data contents of the SC have now grown to more than 2,500 seamounts worldwide, with a cumulative data inventory of 800 Gb. A variety of search methods are offered by name or location, whereby the latter includes a recent application of "Google Maps" as a particularly promising method of visualizing available information in the user's browser. On the Seamount Catalog website seamounts can be compared or quickly identified through thumbnails and an "index card" with a tabulated description of its size and some vital statistics (size, volume, shape) and a listing of files that can be viewed and/or downloaded from the SC. These files may include any type of data, but the SC focus currently is on

  18. Characteristics of Seamounts Near Hawaii as Viewed by GLORIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, Nathan T.

    1997-01-01

    Using images and data acquired from the GLORIA sonar system, 390 seamounts within the U.S. Hawaiian Exclusive Economic Zone (HEEZ) off Hawaii have been studied. Their diameters range from 1 to 57 km. with most less than 15 km. Seamount abundance increases exponentially with decreasing size. The areal density of observed seamounts having diameters greater than 1 km is 182/10(exp 6) sq km. The theoretical abundance of seamounts of all sizes normalized to a unit area is (309 +/- 17)/10(exp 6) sq km, about an order of magnitude less than other surveyed areas of the Pacific. This may reflect a lower abundance of Cretaceous seamounts in this region, the covering of small seamounts by sediment, or discrepancies from the use of different data sets to derive the abundance statistics. The seamounts have morphologies ranging from steep-sided, flat-topped structures to cones to more amorphous structures; they are similar to volcanoes found elsewhere on the seafloor. A suite of secondary features associated with the seamounts includes summit craters, summit mounds, coalesced boundaries, landslides, and graben. Several seamount chains are aligned parallel to Cretaceous fracture zones, consistent with an origin close to the ancestral East Pacific Rise. Others are aligned parallel to the Necker Ridge, suggesting that they formed contemporaneously with Necker in the plate interior. This observation, together with high abundances of seamounts where other intraplate igneous processes have occurred, suggests some seamounts formed since leaving the spreading center.

  19. The ecology of seamounts: structure, function, and human impacts.

    PubMed

    Clark, Malcolm R; Rowden, Ashley A; Schlacher, Thomas; Williams, Alan; Consalvey, Mireille; Stocks, Karen I; Rogers, Alex D; O'Hara, Timothy D; White, Martin; Shank, Timothy M; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2010-01-01

    In this review of seamount ecology, we address a number of key scientific issues concerning the structure and function of benthic communities, human impacts, and seamount management and conservation. We consider whether community composition and diversity differ between seamounts and continental slopes, how important dispersal capabilities are in seamount connectivity, what environmental factors drive species composition and diversity, whether seamounts are centers of enhanced biological productivity, and whether they have unique trophic architecture. We discuss how vulnerable seamount communities are to fishing and mining, and how we can balance exploitation of resources and conservation of habitat. Despite considerable advances in recent years, there remain many questions about seamount ecosystems that need closer integration of molecular, oceanographic, and ecological research. PMID:21141665

  20. Remembering Juan Navia.

    PubMed

    Dasanayake, A P; Li, Y; Maetz, H M; Vermund, S H

    2013-10-01

    Juan Navia died on September 4, 2010. Those who knew him as the director of the University of Alabama's John J. Sparkman Center for International Public Health Education and later the dean of UAB School of Public Health watched him train and shape the next generation of global public health leaders with a kind heart and a firm, but gentle, hand. On this third anniversary of Professor Navia's passing, in response to an invitation from the Journal of Dental Research to write an essay on an educator who influenced the professional trajectories of many people, we have put together an account of some of his contributions and attributes to highlight this remarkable leader's accomplishments in and impact on dental public health and global nutrition. PMID:23887886

  1. Science Priorities for Seamounts: Research Links to Conservation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Malcolm R.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Stocks, Karen I.; Consalvey, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Seamounts shape the topography of all ocean basins and can be hotspots of biological activity in the deep sea. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam) was a field program that examined seamounts as part of the global Census of Marine Life (CoML) initiative from 2005 to 2010. CenSeam progressed seamount science by collating historical data, collecting new data, undertaking regional and global analyses of seamount biodiversity, mapping species and habitat distributions, challenging established paradigms of seamount ecology, developing new hypotheses, and documenting the impacts of human activities on seamounts. However, because of the large number of seamounts globally, much about the structure, function and connectivity of seamount ecosystems remains unexplored and unknown. Continual, and potentially increasing, threats to seamount resources from fishing and seabed mining are creating a pressing demand for research to inform conservation and management strategies. To meet this need, intensive science effort in the following areas will be needed: 1) Improved physical and biological data; of particular importance is information on seamount location, physical characteristics (e.g. habitat heterogeneity and complexity), more complete and intensive biodiversity inventories, and increased understanding of seamount connectivity and faunal dispersal; 2) New human impact data; these shall encompass better studies on the effects of human activities on seamount ecosystems, as well as monitoring long-term changes in seamount assemblages following impacts (e.g. recovery); 3) Global data repositories; there is a pressing need for more comprehensive fisheries catch and effort data, especially on the high seas, and compilation or maintenance of geological and biodiversity databases that underpin regional and global analyses; 4) Application of support tools in a data-poor environment; conservation and management will have to increasingly rely on predictive modelling

  2. Science priorities for seamounts: research links to conservation and management.

    PubMed

    Clark, Malcolm R; Schlacher, Thomas A; Rowden, Ashley A; Stocks, Karen I; Consalvey, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Seamounts shape the topography of all ocean basins and can be hotspots of biological activity in the deep sea. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam) was a field program that examined seamounts as part of the global Census of Marine Life (CoML) initiative from 2005 to 2010. CenSeam progressed seamount science by collating historical data, collecting new data, undertaking regional and global analyses of seamount biodiversity, mapping species and habitat distributions, challenging established paradigms of seamount ecology, developing new hypotheses, and documenting the impacts of human activities on seamounts. However, because of the large number of seamounts globally, much about the structure, function and connectivity of seamount ecosystems remains unexplored and unknown. Continual, and potentially increasing, threats to seamount resources from fishing and seabed mining are creating a pressing demand for research to inform conservation and management strategies. To meet this need, intensive science effort in the following areas will be needed: 1) Improved physical and biological data; of particular importance is information on seamount location, physical characteristics (e.g. habitat heterogeneity and complexity), more complete and intensive biodiversity inventories, and increased understanding of seamount connectivity and faunal dispersal; 2) New human impact data; these shall encompass better studies on the effects of human activities on seamount ecosystems, as well as monitoring long-term changes in seamount assemblages following impacts (e.g. recovery); 3) Global data repositories; there is a pressing need for more comprehensive fisheries catch and effort data, especially on the high seas, and compilation or maintenance of geological and biodiversity databases that underpin regional and global analyses; 4) Application of support tools in a data-poor environment; conservation and management will have to increasingly rely on predictive modelling

  3. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in basalts and sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-10-10

    Pb, Sr, Nd isotopes of seven basalt glasses collected by the submersible Alvin from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (SJFR) are almost identical (/sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.18.45, /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.15.47, /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.37.81, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Srapprox.0.70249, /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Ndapprox.0.51315). Whereas all basalts appear cogenetic, four of the samples have uniform abundances of U, Th, Rb, Nd, Sm, Pb, and Sr, indicating that they are also comagmatic. Two basalt glasses dredged previously at the SJFR have similar isotopic compositions but higher concentrations of U, Th, and Pb. The /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios are intermediate between generally less radiogenic ridge basalts from south of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR) and often more radiogenic basalts from the northern JFR and NE Pacific seamounts. Sr and Nd isotopic compositions closely resemble data of other ridge basalts from the northernmost East Pacific Rise and are intermediate between isotopically more diverse seamount basalts produced nearby.

  4. Morphology and distribution of seamounts surrounding Easter Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rappaport, Y.; Naar, D.F.; Barton, C.C.; Liu, Z.-J.; Hey, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the morphology and distribution of a seamount population on a section of seafloor influenced by both superfast seafloor spreading and hotspot volcanism. The population under investigation is part of a broad chain of seamounts extending eastward from the East Pacific Rise, near Easter Island. In order to define the morphological variability of the seamounts, basal shape, cross-sectional area, volume, flatness, and flank slope are plotted against height for 383 seamounts with heights greater than 200 m, based on bathymetry data collected by GLORI-B and SeaBeam 2000, during three cruises onboard the R/V Melville in the spring of 1993. Nearly complete swath mapping coverage of the seamounts is available for the analysis of size and shape distribution. We quantitatively describe the seamount population of this active region, in which seamounts cover ???27% of the seafloor, and account for ???4.2% of the total crustal volume. Over 50% of the total volume (61,000 km3) of seamounts used in this study is made up by the 14 largest seamounts, and the remaining volume is made up by the 369 smaller seamounts (>200 m in height). Our analysis indicates there are at least two seamount populations in the Easter Island-Salas y Gomez Island (25??-29??S, 113??-104??W) study area. One population of seamounts is composed of short seamounts (1200 m), shield-like, pointy cones (flatness ???1200 m) originate exclusively from a hotspot source, but only a portion of the smaller volcanoes (

  5. The origin of the Canary Island Seamount Province - New ages of old seamounts

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Canary Island Seamount Province forms a scattered hotspot track on the Atlantic ocean floor ~1300 km long and ~350 km wide, perpendicular to lithospheric fractures, and parallel to the NW African continental margin. New 40Ar/39Ar datings show that seamount ages vary from 133 Ma to 0.2 Ma in the central archipelago, and from 142 Ma to 91 Ma in the southwest. Combining 40Ar/39Ar ages with plate tectonic reconstructions, I find that the temporal and spatial distribution of seamounts is irreconcilable with a deep fixed mantle plume origin, or derivation from passive mantle upwelling beneath a mid-ocean ridge. I conclude that shallow mantle upwelling beneath the Atlantic Ocean basin off the NW African continental lithosphere flanks produced recurrent melting anomalies and seamounts from the Late Jurassic to Recent, nominating the Canary Island Seamount Province as oldest hotspot track in the Atlantic Ocean, and most long-lived preserved on earth. PMID:23838703

  6. The NIWA seamount sled: An effective epibenthic sledge for sampling epifauna on seamounts and rough seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Malcolm R.; Stewart, Rob

    2016-02-01

    Epibenthic sleds, sledges and dredges have been widely used for sampling deep-sea macro and megafaunal communities, providing extensive information on benthic biodiversity and distribution patterns. Different countries and institutes have developed a variety of gear types, but these are often unsuitable for sampling rough seafloor, such as seamount and ridge topography. The NIWA seamount sled, a form of epibenthic sledge, is an inexpensive yet robust and versatile sampling device used to obtain invertebrate and rock samples. It incorporates features from a number of existing designs that have produced a versatile sled that can be used on all habitats from mud through to steep and rocky seamounts. It has been used for many research surveys around New Zealand, where it has proven an efficient sampler of target fauna (large macro- and mega-benthic epifauna). Its design has also been adopted by institutes in France and China for surveying seamounts, and it is suggested it could be used as a simple standardised design for sampling seamounts internationally.

  7. The origin of the Canary Island Seamount Province - new ages of old seamounts.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Canary Island Seamount Province forms a scattered hotspot track on the Atlantic ocean floor ~1300 km long and ~350 km wide, perpendicular to lithospheric fractures, and parallel to the NW African continental margin. New (40)Ar/(39)Ar datings show that seamount ages vary from 133 Ma to 0.2 Ma in the central archipelago, and from 142 Ma to 91 Ma in the southwest. Combining (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages with plate tectonic reconstructions, I find that the temporal and spatial distribution of seamounts is irreconcilable with a deep fixed mantle plume origin, or derivation from passive mantle upwelling beneath a mid-ocean ridge. I conclude that shallow mantle upwelling beneath the Atlantic Ocean basin off the NW African continental lithosphere flanks produced recurrent melting anomalies and seamounts from the Late Jurassic to Recent, nominating the Canary Island Seamount Province as oldest hotspot track in the Atlantic Ocean, and most long-lived preserved on earth. PMID:23838703

  8. Volcanic Rocks Collected With ROV Tiburon From Rodriguez Seamount, Located at the Continental Slope of the California Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. S.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.

    2004-12-01

    Volcanic rocks were collected from Rodriguez Seamount at the outer margin off the Continental Borderland with MBARI's ROV Tiburon in October 2003 and April 2004. Six dives recovered lava and volcaniclastic samples from the deep flanks ( ˜2120 m) to the summit at 630 m. Whole rock compositions of plagioclase-olivine-clionpyroxene bearing lava samples are predominantly alkalic basalt (<8% MgO) and hawaiite with minor mugearite (MgO=1.5%). Glass compositions of pillow rims and of volcaniclastic fragments in breccia and bedded sandstone are predominantly hawaiite, mugearite and minor evolved alkalic basalt. The lava samples include one rhyolite and one basaltic andesite with subduction-related chemistry; they are probably erratics. Other clearly identifiable erratics include granite, quartzite, amphibolite, and bored, erosion-sculpted sandstone, resembling typical beach deposits. Most of these erratics are pebble- to small cobble-size and occur in conglomerate and crossbedded sandstone that surround the summit at a break in slope that most likely marks the shoreline when Rodriguez was an island. The lava outcrops on the gently domed platform of the summit are dense, oxidized àà-like flows without glassy rinds. Sulfur content of glass, collected from the flanks of the volcano, ranges from 1300 ppm of a glass inclusion in an olivine crystal to ˜160 ppm of volcaniclastic grains, indicating extensive degassing. Petrographically and chemically these lavas are virtually identical to those erupted on Miocene seamounts offshore central California (e.g. Davidson, Guide, Pioneer, Gumdrop seamounts, Davis et al, 2002) as well as Northeast Bank on the continental shelf south of Rodriguez and seamounts farther offshore from the Continental Borderland (e.g. Little Joe, San Marcos, San Juan seamounts, Clague et al, unpublished; Davis et al., 1995). Trace element abundances and ratios (e.g. LREE, Zr/Nb, Ta/Nb) also completely overlap with those from the other sites, suggesting

  9. NOAA Research Vessel Explores Atlantic Ocean Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-10-01

    Mike Ford, a biological oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), sat rapt in front of a bank of high-definition monitors. They provided live video and data feeds from a tethered pair of instrument-laden remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) that were descending 4692 meters on their deepest dive ever. Their target: an unnamed and unexplored New England seamount discovered in the North Atlantic last year.

  10. Geophysical Age Dating of Seamounts using Dense Core Flexure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gyuha; Kim, Seung-Sep

    2016-04-01

    Lithospheric flexure of oceanic plate is thermo-mechanical response of an elastic plate to the given volcanic construct (e.g., seamounts and ocean islands). If the shape and mass of such volcanic loads are known, the flexural response is governed by the thickness of elastic plate, Te. As the age of oceanic plate increases, the elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere becomes thicker. Thus, we can relate Te with the age of plate at the time of loading. To estimate the amount of the driving force due to seamounts on elastic plate, one needs to approximate their density structure. The most common choice is uniform density model, which utilizes constant density value for a seamount. This approach simplifies computational processes for gravity prediction and error estimates. However, the uniform density model tends to overestimate the total mass of the seamount and hence produces more positive gravitational contributions from the load. Minimization of gravity misfits using uniform density, therefore, favors thinner Te in order to increase negative contributions from the lithospheric flexure, which can compensate for the excessive positives from the seamount. An alternative approach is dense core model, which approximate the heterogeneity nature of seamount density as three bodies of infill sediment, edifice, and dense core. In this study, we apply the dense core model to the Louisville Seamount Chain for constraining flexural deformation. We compare Te estimates with the loading time of the examined seamounts to redefine empirical geophysical age dating of seamounts.

  11. Can seamounts provide a good habitat for polychaete annelids? Example of the northeastern Atlantic seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surugiu, Victor; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Gillet, Patrick; Ruellet, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    Two seamount groups in the northeastern Atlantic were investigated during the 1980s and 1990s: the first was located along the Iberian and African coasts (Galicia, to the north of Portugal; and the Ampere, Gorringe, Josephine and Seine banks near the Madeira-Canary Islands) and the second was located offshore of the southern part of the Azores Islands, included the Atlantis, Hyeres, Irving, Meteor and Plato banks. Among the invertebrates, Annelida, specifically Polychaeta, were studied as surrogates for the biogeographical relationship between coastal and mid-oceanic seamounts in the northeastern Atlantic and the fauna in these areas. The dominant families were Onuphidae (27.46%), Syllidae (18.23%), Eunicidae (15.65%), Amphinomidae (11.45%) and Nereididae (5.61%), representing 78.4% of the total fauna. Data analyses clearly distinguished two seamount groups, one for coastal seamounts and the other offshore. Although the species distinguished and the family composition at the sampled sites were different (i.e., most diversified at the Josephine site and most impoverished at the Irving site), no coastal/offshore faunal impoverishment gradient could be identified. Thus, it seems that seamount environments do not favour any relationship between planktotrophic development and the direct development of polychaetes. Though the number of apparent endemic species was low (<7%), it remained in keeping with other invertebrate groups. Still, while seamounts may well encourage oceanic biodiversity in some zoological groups, this was clearly not the case for the polychaetes. We offer two explanations for this paradox: pelagic productivity and local environmental conditions.

  12. Effects of subducted seamount on interplate coupling and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Liu, Y.; Lin, J.

    2011-12-01

    It has been proposed that large seamounts riding on a subducting plate may play a critical role in controlling the characteristics of earthquakes in a subduction zone, including the maximum sizes of the potential mega-earthquakes. However, the specific relationships between subducted seamounts and megathrust earthquakes are still poorly understood. Here we conduct a numerical investigation of the physical interaction of subducted seamounts with a subduction zone by considering the rate and state friction properties of the subducting interface, and complete stressing cycles of earthquake faults. The seamount is incorporated as additional normal stress into the model. The preliminary results from a 2D Cascadia-like subduction fault model show: (1) The subducted seamount acts as a "barrier" if the seamount is sitting up-dip to the earthquake nucleation zone, regardless of the seamount size. When the seamount is subducted adjacent to the nucleation zone, a higher additional effective normal stress is required to impede ruptures. (2) The higher the additional effective normal stress caused by the seamount is, the larger coseismic slip may be released by a large earthquake when rupturing the whole seismogenic zone in different earthquake cycles, suggesting that the "barrier" seamount also enhances the seismic coupling. (3) The seamount could turn into an "asperity" that initiates seismic ruptures if it is preceded by a deeper and smaller rupture. In addition, the seamount may also cause stress transfer on the fault which leads to earthquakes nucleated in the shallow part of the seismogenic zone. (4) If the seamount is subducted to the nucleation zone, megathrust earthquakes can still occur and will release larger coseismic slip, indicating the enhancement of seismic coupling between the overriding and subducting plates. (5) If it is subducted beneath the seismogenic zone, the seamount had little effects on the characteristics of megathrust earthquakes and the coseismic

  13. Telepresence and real-time data transmission from Axial Seamount: implications for education and community engagement utilizing the OOI-RSN cabled observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fundis, A. T.; Kelley, D. S.; Sautter, L. R.; Proskurowski, G.; Kawka, O.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount, the most robust volcanic system on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, is a future site of the cabled observatory component of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) (see Delaney et al; Proskurowski et al., this meeting). In 2014, high-bandwidth data, high-definition video and digital still imagery will be streamed live from the cable observatory at Axial Seamount via the Internet to researchers, educators, and the public. The real-time data and high-speed communications stream will open new approaches for the onshore public and scientists to experience and engage in sea-going research as it is happening. For the next 7 years, the University of Washington and the OOI will collaboratively support an annual multi-week cruise aboard the research vessel Thomas G. Thompson. These "VISIONS" cruises will include scientific and maintenance operations related to the cabled network, the OOI Regional Scale Nodes (RSN). Leading up to 2014, VISIONS cruises will also be used to engage students, educators, scientists and the public in science focused at Axial Seamount through avenues that will be adaptable for the live data stream via the OOI-RSN cable. Here we describe the education and outreach efforts employed during the VISIONS'11 cruise to Axial Seamount including: 1) a live HD video stream from the seafloor and the ship to onshore scientists, educators, and the public; 2) a pilot program to teach undergraduates from the ship via live and taped broadcasts; 3) utilizing social media from the ship to communicate with scientists, educators, and the public onshore; and 4) providing undergraduate and graduate students onboard immersion into sea-going research. The 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount (see Chadwick et al., this meeting) is a prime example of the potential behind having these effective tools in place to engage the scientific community, students, and the public when the OOI cabled observatory comes online in 2014.

  14. Emplacement and Growth of Serpentinite Seamounts on the Mariana Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, A. J.; Taylor, B.; Moore, G. F.; Fryer, P.; Morgan, J. K.; Goodliffe, A. M.

    2004-12-01

    Seamounts comprised primarily of serpentinite muds are found on the outer forearc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction system. They represent some of the first material outputs of the recycling process that takes place in subduction zones. Therefore, understanding their evolution is necessary to correctly quantify the flux of material through the subduction system. Serpentinite seamounts have been described as mud diapirs, mud volcanoes, uplifted blocks of mantle material, and a composite of the latter two. Multi-channel seismic (MCS) data collected in 2002 from the outer Mariana forearc imaged, for the first time, the large-scale internal structure of these seamounts. These data, combined with new bathymetry, have provided insight into how the seamounts grow and deform with time and have allowed us to evaluate proposed models for their formation. The serpentinite seamounts rest on faulted and sedimented Mariana forearc basement. Flank flows of serpentinite muds downlap existing forearc substrate, leaving the underlying stratigraphy largely undisturbed. Reflections located 3.5-5 km beneath forearc basement may represent Moho, suggesting that the seamounts are built on anomalously thin forearc crust. A strong reflection at the summit of Big Blue, the largest serpentinite seamount in the Mariana Forearc, represents a collapse structure that has been partially in-filled by younger muds, supporting the idea that serpentinite seamount growth is episodic. Basal thrusts that incorporate forearc sediments at the toe of Turquoise Seamount provide evidence for seamount settling and lateral growth. We are conducting numerical simulations of seamount growth and evolution using the discrete element method (DEM), previously used to examine gravity spreading phenomena in magmatic volcanoes. Simulations employing distinctly low basal and internal friction coefficients provide a good match to the overall morphology of the serpentinite seamounts, and offer insight into their internal

  15. Some remarks on resolving seamounts in satellite gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H. F.

    2007-02-01

    We examine peak-to-trough gravity anomaly amplitudes over seamounts, comparing gravity derived from satellite altimetry with gravity measured by ships. We also compare amplitudes from linear and higher-order (non-linear) computations, and conclude that two-term forward modeling of seamounts should be adequate. Altimetric amplitudes are within 90% of ship amplitudes at seamounts greater than 14 km in characteristic radius. At smaller seamounts, altimetric amplitude is reduced, probably due to smoothing filters used to process the altimeter data. Perhaps fortuitously, this amplitude loss nearly matches the amplitude under-estimate that occurs if one assumes the forward model should contain only a linear term. Thus bathymetric prediction by linear filtering may do a fairly good job of resolving seamounts much smaller than 14 km in characteristic radius.

  16. Diversity of microbial communities in ocean crust below ancient hotspot seamounts along the Louisville Seamount Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvan, J. B.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of Integrated Ocean Drilling Expedition 330, Louisville Seamount Trail, was to understand the motion of the Louisville hotspot during 50-80 Ma. As such, >1 km of volcanic basement was collected from five sites on four seamounts, providing an excellent chance to study how microbial populations are effected by different lithologies, different seamounts and age of basement rock along the Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC). Analysis of bacteria growing in enrichment incubations that targeted oligotrophs (with 1% or 10% Marine Broth 2216 diluted with 3% NaCl) and sulfur oxidizers reveals the presence of a diverse array of bacteria, including ɛ-proteobacteria closely related to Sulfurimonas autotrophica, β-proteobacterial methylotrophs, ζ-proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes most closely related to organisms cultured from sediments. Many of these sequences are <97% similar to the closest cultured relatives, indicating the subsurface LSC may be home to unique new species. One isolate recently obtained in pure culture from the original enrichments is 99% similar to Halomonas sulfidaeris str. Esulfude1, a bacterium originally isolated from a hydrothermal sulfide chimney. A second isolate may be a new species of Bacillus. Initial molecular analysis of bacterial communities by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as part of the Census of Deep Life (CoDL) supports the data from the culturing work; in one sample collected 174 meters below seafloor, the most abundant bacteria detected include species from the genera Pseudomonas, Sulfurimonas, Methyloversatilis and Desulfocapsa. More CoDL samples will be analyzed in the near future. We will describe results to date on subsurface microbial diversity along the Louisville Seamount Chain from the culturing work and CoDL project and draw comparisons to data derived from younger crustal sites to try to understand how the LSC ecosystem fits into our global picture of life in ocean crust.

  17. Oceanic sharks clean at coastal seamount.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Simon P; Hussey, Nigel E; Turner, John R; Beckett, Alison J

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between pelagic thresher sharks (Alopias pelagicus) and cleaner wrasse were investigated at a seamount in the Philippines. Cleaning associations between sharks and teleosts are poorly understood, but the observable interactions seen at this site may explain why these mainly oceanic sharks regularly venture into shallow coastal waters where they are vulnerable to disturbance from human activity. From 1,230 hours of observations recorded by remote video camera between July 2005 and December 2009, 97 cleaner-thresher shark events were analyzed, 19 of which were interrupted. Observations of pelagic thresher sharks interacting with cleaners at the seamount were recorded at all times of day but their frequency declined gradually from morning until evening. Cleaners showed preferences for foraging on specific areas of a thresher shark's body. For all events combined, cleaners were observed to conduct 2,757 inspections, of which 33.9% took place on the shark's pelvis, 23.3% on the pectoral fins, 22.3% on the caudal fin, 8.6% on the body, 8.3% on the head, 2.1% on the dorsal fin, and 1.5% on the gills respectively. Cleaners did not preferentially inspect thresher sharks by time of day or by shark sex, but there was a direct correlation between the amount of time a thresher shark spent at a cleaning station and the number of inspections it received. Thresher shark clients modified their behavior by "circular-stance-swimming," presumably to facilitate cleaner inspections. The cleaner-thresher shark association reflected some of the known behavioral trends in the cleaner-reef teleost system since cleaners appeared to forage selectively on shark clients. Evidence is mounting that in addition to acting as social refuges and foraging grounds for large visiting marine predators, seamounts may also support pelagic ecology by functioning as cleaning stations for oceanic sharks and rays. PMID:21423796

  18. The Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotberg, N. K.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.; Perez, J.

    2004-12-01

    Seamounts are important to research and education in many scientific fields, providing a wide range of data on physical, chemical, biological and geological processes. In order to make a diverse set of seamount data accessible we have developed the Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org, available through the http://earthref.org/databases/SC/. The primary goal of the Seamount Catalog is to provide access to digital data files on a large assortment of interdisciplinary seamount research. The catalog can be searched at a variety of ability or expert levels allowing it to be used from basic education to advanced research. Each seamount is described in terms of its location, height, volume, elongation, azimuth, irregularity, rifts, morphological classification and relation to other features. GEBCO (General Bathymetric Chart of the Ocean) gazetteer data (2002; 2003) is included in the database in order to provide information on the history, discovery and names of the seamounts. Screen-optimized bathymetry maps, grid files and the original multibeam data files are available for online viewing with higher resolution downloadable versions (AI, PS, PDF) also offered. The data files for each seamount include a map made from the multibeam data only, a map made from Smith and Sandwell's (1996) predicted bathymetry, a merged map incorporating both data sets, and a map showing the differences between the two data sets. We are working towards expanding the Seamount Catalog by integrating bathymetry data from various sources, developing and linking disciplinary reference models, and integrating information from multiple disciplines and from the literature. We hope to create a data integrative environment that provides access to seamount data and the tools needed for working with that data.

  19. Deformation associated with the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, S. L.; Chadwick, W.; Caress, D. W.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Yoerger, D.; Sasagawa, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    On April 24th 2015, an eruption began at Axial Seamount, a seafloor volcano located about 480 km west of the Oregon coast at the intersection of the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This eruption was first detected in real time by the newly operational Ocean Observatories Initiative cabled instrumentation at Axial (Delaney, AGU-2015, Wilcock, AGU-2015, Caplan-Auerbach, AGU-2015). Two prior eruptions have been observed since routine observations began in the 1990's, one in January 1998 and the other in April 2011. Precise water pressure measurements made on the volcano have documented an inflation/deflation cycle within Axial's summit caldera for the past 15 years. These data are now being supplemented by repeat bathymetric mapping by AUV. The long-term pattern appears to be "inflation predictable", in which eruptions are triggered at or near the same level of inflation. This pattern allowed us to successfully forecast in September 2014 that the next eruption was expected to occur at Axial sometime in 2015 (a 1-year time window). It is noteworthy that the rate of inflation between the 2011 and 2015 eruptions was about 4 times higher than between the 1998 and 2011 eruptions (60 cm/yr vs. 15 cm/yr). Subsidence at the caldera center began at 06:00 on 24 April (all times GMT) and amounted to 2.2 m by 02:00 on 25 April (20 hours in), 2.4 m by 00:00 on 28 April, and 2.45 m by 05 May when subsidence ended and re-inflation began (which has continued ever since). This amount of subsidence is similar to that observed during the 2011 eruption, but in 2015 the initial rate of subsidence was higher (11 cm/hr during the first 20 hours vs. 7 cm/hr in 2011) and the duration appears to have been longer (11 days vs. 6 days). Also, the 1998 and 2011 eruptions occurred along the southeastern edge of the caldera and along Axial's south rift zone, whereas the 2015 eruption occurred along the north rift zone (Kelley, AGU-2015). Here we present preliminary results of our August

  20. Jasper Seamount: seven million years of volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pringle, M.S.; Staudigel, H.; Gee, J.

    1991-01-01

    Jasper Seamount is a young, mid-sized (690 km3) oceanic intraplate volcano located about 500 km west-southwest of San Diego, California. Reliable 40Ar/39Ar age data were obtained for several milligram-sized samples of 4 to 10 Ma plagioclase by using a defocused laser beam to clean the samples before fusion. Gee and Staudigel suggested that Jasper Seamount consists of a transitional to tholeiitic shield volcano formed by flank transitional series lavas, overlain by flank alkalic series lavas and summit alkalic series lavas. Twenty-nine individual 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion analyses on nine samples confirm the stratigraphy: 10.3-10.0 Ma for the flank transitional series, 8.7-7.5 Ma for the flank alkalic series, and 4.8-4.1 Ma for the summit alkalic series. The alkalinity of the lavas clearly increases with time, and there appear to be 1 to 3 m.y. hiatuses between each series. -from Authors

  1. Seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity in the open ocean

    PubMed Central

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D.; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    The identification of biodiversity hotspots and their management for conservation have been hypothesized as effective ways to protect many species. There has been a significant effort to identify and map these areas at a global scale, but the coarse resolution of most datasets masks the small-scale patterns associated with coastal habitats or seamounts. Here we used tuna longline observer data to investigate the role of seamounts in aggregating large pelagic biodiversity and to identify which pelagic species are associated with seamounts. Our analysis indicates that seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Higher species richness was detected in association with seamounts than with coastal or oceanic areas. Seamounts were found to have higher species diversity within 30–40 km of the summit, whereas for sets close to coastal habitat the diversity was lower and fairly constant with distance. Higher probability of capture and higher number of fish caught were detected for some shark, billfish, tuna, and other by-catch species. The study supports hypotheses that seamounts may be areas of special interest for management for marine pelagic predators. PMID:20448197

  2. Seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J

    2010-05-25

    The identification of biodiversity hotspots and their management for conservation have been hypothesized as effective ways to protect many species. There has been a significant effort to identify and map these areas at a global scale, but the coarse resolution of most datasets masks the small-scale patterns associated with coastal habitats or seamounts. Here we used tuna longline observer data to investigate the role of seamounts in aggregating large pelagic biodiversity and to identify which pelagic species are associated with seamounts. Our analysis indicates that seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Higher species richness was detected in association with seamounts than with coastal or oceanic areas. Seamounts were found to have higher species diversity within 30-40 km of the summit, whereas for sets close to coastal habitat the diversity was lower and fairly constant with distance. Higher probability of capture and higher number of fish caught were detected for some shark, billfish, tuna, and other by-catch species. The study supports hypotheses that seamounts may be areas of special interest for management for marine pelagic predators. PMID:20448197

  3. An ecosystem evaluation framework for global seamount conservation and management.

    PubMed

    Taranto, Gerald H; Kvile, Kristina Ø; Pitcher, Tony J; Morato, Telmo

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years, several global targets for protection of marine biodiversity have been adopted but have failed. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) aims at preserving 10% of all the marine biomes by 2020. For achieving this goal, ecologically or biologically significant areas (EBSA) have to be identified in all biogeographic regions. However, the methodologies for identifying the best suitable areas are still to be agreed. Here, we propose a framework for applying the CBD criteria to locate potential ecologically or biologically significant seamount areas based on the best information currently available. The framework combines the likelihood of a seamount constituting an EBSA and its level of human impact and can be used at global, regional and local scales. This methodology allows the classification of individual seamounts into four major portfolio conservation categories which can help optimize management efforts toward the protection of the most suitable areas. The framework was tested against 1000 dummy seamounts and satisfactorily assigned seamounts to proper EBSA and threats categories. Additionally, the framework was applied to eight case study seamounts that were included in three out of four portfolio categories: areas highly likely to be identified as EBSA with high degree of threat; areas highly likely to be EBSA with low degree of threat; and areas with a low likelihood of being EBSA with high degree of threat. This framework will allow managers to identify seamount EBSAs and to prioritize their policies in terms of protecting undisturbed areas, disturbed areas for recovery of habitats and species, or both based on their management objectives. It also identifies seamount EBSAs and threats considering different ecological groups in both pelagic and benthic communities. Therefore, this framework may represent an important tool to mitigate seamount biodiversity loss and to achieve the 2020 CBD goals. PMID:22905190

  4. An Ecosystem Evaluation Framework for Global Seamount Conservation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Taranto, Gerald H.; Kvile, Kristina Ø.; Pitcher, Tony J.; Morato, Telmo

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years, several global targets for protection of marine biodiversity have been adopted but have failed. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) aims at preserving 10% of all the marine biomes by 2020. For achieving this goal, ecologically or biologically significant areas (EBSA) have to be identified in all biogeographic regions. However, the methodologies for identifying the best suitable areas are still to be agreed. Here, we propose a framework for applying the CBD criteria to locate potential ecologically or biologically significant seamount areas based on the best information currently available. The framework combines the likelihood of a seamount constituting an EBSA and its level of human impact and can be used at global, regional and local scales. This methodology allows the classification of individual seamounts into four major portfolio conservation categories which can help optimize management efforts toward the protection of the most suitable areas. The framework was tested against 1000 dummy seamounts and satisfactorily assigned seamounts to proper EBSA and threats categories. Additionally, the framework was applied to eight case study seamounts that were included in three out of four portfolio categories: areas highly likely to be identified as EBSA with high degree of threat; areas highly likely to be EBSA with low degree of threat; and areas with a low likelihood of being EBSA with high degree of threat. This framework will allow managers to identify seamount EBSAs and to prioritize their policies in terms of protecting undisturbed areas, disturbed areas for recovery of habitats and species, or both based on their management objectives. It also identifies seamount EBSAs and threats considering different ecological groups in both pelagic and benthic communities. Therefore, this framework may represent an important tool to mitigate seamount biodiversity loss and to achieve the 2020 CBD goals. PMID:22905190

  5. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in basalts and sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Isotopic Pb, Sr, and Nd data were collected by the Alvin submersible from seven basalt glasses in the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR), giving similar ratios for Pb-206/Pb-204 of about 18.45, for Pb-207/Pb-204 of about 15.47, for Pb-208/Pb-204 of about 37.81, for Sr-87/Sr-86 of about 0.70249, and for Nd-143/Nd-144 of about 0.51315. Data suggest that the basalts are all cogenetic, and that four of the samples are also comagmatic. It is concluded that isotopic data for the JFR and seamount basalts provide additional support for the mantle blob cluster model (Allegre et al., 1984), suggesting the involvement of multiple components in the genesis of ridge basalts, and including an unusual end-member that has nonradiogenic Sr and variable Pb-206/Pb-204 isotopic compositions.

  6. Search for seamounts in the southern Cook and Austral region

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeck, K.; Coleman, R.

    1982-04-01

    The existence of uncharted seamounts in the Cook-Austral region of the South Pacific has been investigated using GEOS 3 and SEASAT radar altimeter observations. Three previously uncharted submarine seamounts, provisionally named GEOS A to GEOS C, have been located between Mauke and Rimatara and a fourth, GEOS D, has been located east of Rurutu. This confirms that the Aitutaki-Mauke islands of the Southern Cooks are a continuation of the Austral chain. A second group of uncharted seamounts has been provisionally located some 200 km south of Rimatara and Maria and this is suggestive of a second seamount chain, south of the first, that includes Raratonga and Mangaia. Fabert Bank, to the south of Mangaia, appears to be mislocated by about 2/sup 0/ in longitude.

  7. Lagrangian observations of surface circulation at the Emperor Seamount chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vastano, A. C.; Hagan, D. E.; Mcnally, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    In a Kuroshio tracking experiment initiated in February 1977, two satellite-reporting buoys, drogued to 100-m depth, were released southeast of Kuyshu Island, Japan. These drifters crossed the Shatskiy Rise in the Kuroshio extension during May and October and then traversed the Emperor Seamount Chain. Although they reached the chain 117 days apart, their movements near the seamounts display remarkably similar patterns, demonstrating upstream meanders in the surface flow; cyclonic eddy activity immediately west of the chain; passage through the same gap associated with the Jingu and Nintoku seamounts; and a wavelike pattern present over the Hess Rise east of the chain. One drifter exhibited cyclonic eddy motion east of the chain in the lee of the Kinmei Seamount.

  8. Microbial community on oceanic ferro-manganese crusts from Takuyo-Daigo Seamount and Ryusei Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitahara, S.; Kato, S.; Yamagishi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Background and Purpose Iron and manganese oxide deposits are often found on deep seafloor. Rocks covered with these oxides are called ferro-manganese crusts (Mn crusts), and are ubiquitously distributed on deep seafloor (Rona 2003). Because Mn crusts contain rare metals such as Co, Pt and rare earth element, it can be resources in the future. Mn crusts and microbes on Mn crusts may contribute to material, especially carbon and nitrogen circulation between hydrosphere and lithosphere. Mechanism of Mn crust formation is not completely understood. Wang et al. propose a model that microorganisms associate with initial Mn mineral deposition (Wang et al., 2011). There is a possibility that microbes may contribute to formation of Mn crust relying on their ability to oxidize Fe and Mn. However, there is limited information about diversity, spatial distribution and abundance of microbes on Mn crust surface. Our purpose is to clarify microbial community composition, spatial distribution, diversity and abundance of microbes on Mn crusts collected from Takuyo-Daigo seamount and Ryusei seamount. Method We collected Mn crusts, sediments and ambient seawater from Takuyo-Daigo seamount at the depth of 1200 m, 1419 m, 2209 m and 2991 m during NT09-02 cruise in Feb 2009 and Ryusei seamount at the depth of 1194 m, 2079 m during KY11-02 in Feb 2011 with remotely operated vehicle Hyper-Dolphin (JAMSTEC). Genomic DNA was extracted from each sample using Fast DNA kit for soil (Qbiogene). Partial 16S rRNA gene and amoA gene were amplified by PCR with prokaryote-universal primer set (Uni516F-Uni1407R) and bacterial and archaeal amoA specific primer sets. PCR products were cloned. The nucleotide sequences of randomly selected clones were determined. We performed phylogenetic and statistical analysis to determine microbial community compositions, and estimated diversity indices. We also estimated the copy numbers of 16S rRNA and amoA genes of Bacteria and Archaea by quantitative PCR. Results

  9. New Application of Finite Element Method to Seamount Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HA, G.; Kim, S. S.; So, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic method can be utilized in a wide range of applications, including investigation of small-scale near-surface targets and characterization of large-scale geologic structures. In particular, marine magnetic studies involve with various interpretation approaches to constrain geophysical information regarding the depth of a particular seamount, its size and shape, and the orientation and magnitude of its magnetization. The accuracy of the estimated information is normally governed by the quality and amount of available data and by the sophistication of the employed modeling techniques. Here we aim to advance geomagnetic modeling approaches using the interactive finite element solver, COMSOL Multiphysics, and improve the degree of detail that can be obtained from the measured magnetic field. First, we carried out benchmark tests by comparing the computed results using the analytic solutions for simple bodies. We built two types of synthetic models with rectangular and sphere shaped ore bodies having high intensity of magnetization and we changed magnetized direction in each calculation. Comparisons of FEM-based results with the analytic ones exhibited good agreement in general. Second, marine magnetic data obtained at seamounts can be very crucial to determine the age and location of seamount formation. Traditional magnetic methods often assume the uniformly magnetized seamounts to simplify computational efforts. However, the inner structures of seamounts constrained by seismic data show a clear distinction between the dense core and edifice layers. Here we divide the seamount into the dense core and edifice layers in a synthetic model, assign different magnetization direction and intensity to them, and optimize these parameters by minimizing differences between the observed and numerical computed data. These examined results will be valuable to understand seamount formation processes in detail. In addition, we discuss FEM-based magnetic models to mimic the

  10. Trophodynamic studies on the Condor seamount (Azores, Portugal, North Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaço, A.; Giacomello, E.; Porteiro, F.; Menezes, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Compared to the surrounding ocean waters, seamounts are commonly considered habitats where biological productivity is higher and consumers proliferate. Despite their high productivity, studies of seamount trophic webs are still scarce and fragmentary, and little is known about the connections between the different compartments. What are the trophic interactions of seamount fauna? How do the pelagic and benthic environment couple? In order to answer these questions, stable isotopes δ15N and δ13C were measured in the organisms collected during the course of numerous campaigns at the Condor seamount in the North Atlantic. The Condor seamount food chain is composed of five trophic levels. Mesopelagic organisms are the link between the epipelagic environment and the benthic and benthopelagic organisms, bridging the gap between primary consumers and the 4th and 5th trophic chain levels. Our results demonstrate, through stable isotope analysis, the important role of mesopelagic organisms in the transfer of energy within the seamount food web, as modeling/theoretical studies have previously suggested.

  11. Water column hydrothermal plumes on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Lupton, J.E. )

    1990-08-10

    Hydrographic surveys on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) carried out from 1980 to 1987 show a complex pattern of {sup 3}He and Mn-rich water column plumes produced by venting from several submarine hot spring areas. In the vicinity of Axial Volcano at latitude 46{degree}N, distinct plumes were detected in 1980, 1982, and 1983 with {sup 3}He signatures up to {delta}({sup 3}He) = 64% at {approximately} 1,500 m depth at distances of {approximately} 10 km from the seamount summit. However, the same plumes had no detectable thermal signature, a paradox which is attributed to the high {sup 3}He/heat ratios and low salinities of the fluids venting within the caldera of Axial Volcano. Profiles directly over the seamount show hydrothermal {sup 3}He in the water column up to 300 m above the caldera floor, with the {sup 3}He signal increasing with depth to very high and uniform ratios of {delta}({sup 3}He) = 108-150% below the {approximately} 1,500-m caldera sill depth. Another apparent locus of hydrothermal input is Helium Basin, a depression on the northeast flank of Axial Volcano which had {delta}({sup 3}He) = 51% when first sampled in 1980. However, subsequent hydrocasts into Helium Basin in 1982 and 1983 yielded lower helium enrichments, suggesting either a decrease in hydrothermal input or flushing of the basin via a mixing event. To the south of Axial Volcano, high {delta}({sup 3}He) values of {approximately} 40% observed over the ridge axis at 45{degree}18{prime}N and 45{degree}39{prime}N indicate venting on this previously unexplored section of the ridge. The water column plumes over the US Geological Survey vent site at {approximately} 44{degree}40{prime}N on the southern JdFR have very high Mn/{sup 3}He ratios of 4,600 mol/cm{sup 3}, an apparently unique characteristic which can be used to distinguish these plumes from those originating at other JdFR vent fields.

  12. Patterns of Macro-invertebrate Biodiversity on Seamounts in the New Zealand Region: are Seamounts What we Think They are?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowden, A. A.; Clark, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    Seamounts are prominent and widely distributed features of the New Zealand marine environment, and also the focus of important commercial fisheries and some exploratory mineral mining. Ten seamount-specific voyages were conducted between 1999 and 2004 to sample and characterize the macro-invertebrate assemblages, and their habitat, of forty seamounts throughout the New Zealand region. Samples were taken with the same type of gear at over 200 stations in water depths of ~200 to 3000 m. Over a 1000 benthic macro- invertebrate taxa were recorded. The preliminary results of an analysis of data from this regional sampling will be presented and discussed with respect to ecological theory and the observed patterns of biodiversity. These patterns include those observed for assemblage composition within and between seamounts (including between isolated, clusters and chains of seamounts); measures of taxonomic distinctness for taxon groups with different life history characteristics; and estimated species richness and environmental heterogeneity. Some of these patterns do not appear to conform to ecological theory as currently applied to seamount habitats.

  13. Vigorous venting and biology at Pito Seamount, Easter microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naar, D. F.; Hekinian, R.; Segonzac, M.; Francheteau, J.; Armijo, R.; Cogne, J.-P.; Constantin, M.; Girardeau, J.; Hey, R. N.; Searle, R. C.

    A Nautile submersible investigation of Pito Seamount documents vigorous hydrothermal venting at 23°19.65'S, 111°38.41'W and at a depth of 2270 m. The data indicate the volcano is young and recently active, as predicted from analyses of SeaMARC II side-scan and swath bathymetry, and geophysical data. Pito Seamount lies near Pito Deep (5980 m), which marks the tip of the northwestward propagating East rift of the Easter microplate. Bathymetry surrounding Pito Seamount consists of a series of ridges and valleys with relief up to ˜4 km. The 4-km submersible-transect to the summit of Pito Seamount crossed areas of very glassy basalt with little or no sediment cover, suggesting the lava flows are very young. Most of the lava samples from Pito Seamount are depleted normal MORB (mid-ocean ridge basalt). Lava samples associated with active and dead hydrothermal vents consist of phyric and aphyric transitional and enriched MORB. Sulfides consist primarily of sphalerite and pyrite, with traces of chalcopyrite. The active hydrothermal chimney on Pito Seamount has a small, undiversified biological community similar to northern East Pacific Rise vent sites (alvinellid worms, bythograeid crabs and bythitid fishes) and western Pacific back-arc basin sites (alvinocaridid shrimps). No vestimentiferan worms were observed. Previous geophysical data, and new geochemical data and visual observations, suggest that the vigorous black smoker is a result of deep, extensive crosscutting faults formed by extensive tectonic thinning of Pito Deep, and a very robust magmatic supply being supplied from upwelling asthenosphere. Although no biological or vent fluid samples were obtained, geological and biological observations, such as the large number of inactive chimneys, old hydrothermal deposits, and starfish, as well as the occurrence of dead mollusks (gastropod and mussels), suggest a recent waning of hydrothermal activity near the summit. The speculative interpretation that Pito Seamount

  14. Seismic velocity structure of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates revealed by a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiying

    2016-05-01

    The crust and upper mantle seismic structure, spanning from the Juan de Fuca and Gorda spreading centers to the Cascade back arc, is imaged with full-wave propagation simulation and a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquake recordings. The spreading centers have anomalously low shear wave velocity beneath the oceanic lithosphere. Around the Cobb axial seamount, we observe a low-velocity anomaly underlying a relatively thin oceanic lithosphere, indicating its influence on the Juan de Fuca ridge. The oceanic Moho is clearly defined by a P velocity increase from 6.3 km/s to 7.5 km/s at about 6 km depth beneath the seafloor. The thickness of the oceanic plates is less than 40 km prior to subduction, and the structure of the oceanic lithosphere varies both along strike and along dip. Farther landward, very low velocity anomalies are observed above the plate interface along the Cascade fore arc, indicative of subducted sediments.

  15. Spionidae (Polychaeta: Canalipalpata: Spionida) from seamounts in the NE Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Meißner, Karin; Bick, Andreas; Guggolz, Theresa; Götting, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Spionidae (Polychaeta) collected from seamounts in the Atlantic Ocean were studied. Altogether six species were found of which two are new to science and one belongs to a new genus. Aonidella cf. dayi Maciolek in López-Jamar, 1989 and Glandulospio orestes gen. et sp. nov. were the most common species and occurred on both the Great and Little Meteor Seamount, the Irving Seamount and the Hyeres Seamount. Laonice norgensis Sikorski, 2003 and Malacoceros jirkovi Sikorski, 1992 have a wider distribution in the North Atlantic, including the Mediterranean Sea in case of L. norgensis. Aonides selvagensis Brito, Núñez and Riera, 2006 is only known from the Macaronesian Region. Dipolydora paracaulleryi sp. nov. has been collected from both the Great and Little Meteor Seamounts. All species are compared with morphological similar species and their taxonomy is discussed. Detailed descriptions are provided for the species new to science and descriptions of the previously known species are amended. Accompanying histological studies revealed the presence of very strong dorsoventral musculature in A. cf. dayi and for G. orestes gen. et sp. nov. the presence of glandular organs in the middle body region. Laonice maciolekae Aguirrezabalaga & Ceberio, 2005 was found to be a junior synonym of L. appellöfi Söderström, 1920 and is formally synonymised. Molecular data suggest gene flow between seamounts and autochthonous as well as allochthonous larval recruitment for different species. The results of previous studies by other authors, that polychaete communities of the North Atlantic Seamounts are characterized by low diversity, low rates of endemism, and the predominance of widely distributed (and cosmopolitan) species is not corroborated by our results.  PMID:24869536

  16. High-resolution AUV mapping and lava flow ages at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Dreyer, B. M.; Caress, D. W.; Martin, J.

    2011-12-01

    Mapping along mid-ocean ridges, as on land, requires identification of flow boundaries and sequence, and ages of some flows to understand eruption history. Multibeam sonars on autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) now generate 1-m resolution maps that resolve lava pillars, internal flow structures and boundaries, and lava flow emplacement sequences using crosscutting relations and abundance of fissures. MBARI has now mapped the summit caldera floor and rims and the upper south rift zone on Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. With the advent of the high-resolution bathymetry and the ability to observe flow contacts to determine superposition using ROVs and submersibles, the missing component has been determining absolute ages of the flows. We used the MBARI ROV Doc Ricketts to collect short push cores (<30 cm) of the thin sediment nestled between pillow lava lobes and sieve and then hand-pick planktic foraminifera from the base of the cores to date by AMS 14C. Ages of planktic foraminifera are marine-calibrated in years before present, and provide minimum ages for the underlying flows, as there is probably some basal sediment that is not recovered. 14C ages have been determined for 10 cores near the summit of Axial Seamount and for 6 from the lowermost south rift. Ages of nearby samples commonly yield statistically identical ages, and 2 cores near the center of the caldera had multiple layers dated. These ages systematically increase with depth, indicating that redistribution of sediment by bottom currents does not significantly affect the stratigraphy. We will expand these collections in summer 2011. The coring is accompanied by collection of flow samples for chemistry and video observations to confirm contact locations and flow superposition inferred from the mapping data. Six ages from the lowermost part of the south rift of Axial Seamount include samples on a cone with deep summit crater that is ~16,580 aBP and on 5 flows between 950 and 1510 aBP. Two

  17. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  18. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  19. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport.

  20. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts: results from a global science program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocks, K.; Clark, M.; Rowden, A.; Consalvey, M.

    2010-12-01

    CenSeam (a Global Census of Marine Life on Seamounts) is a network of more than 500 scientists, policy makers and conservationists around the world. These participants are collaborating to increase our understanding of the factors driving seamount community composition and diversity, such that we can better understand and manage the effects of human activities. The major scientific outcomes of the CenSeam community include the findings that 1) Seamount community composition is often similar to surrounding habitats; however, community structure can be different. 2) Contrary to conventional wisdom, few seamounts follow island biogeography predictions. 3) Seamounts can support a higher benthic biomass than surrounding habitats. 4) Seamounts can support species and communities new to science, and represent range extensions for known species, which are being described from CenSeam voyages. 5) For the first time, the extent of the vulnerability and risk to seamount benthic communities from fishing has been quantified. 6) Whilst long assumed, CenSeam researchers have demonstrated that seamount communities are disturbed by fishing and are slow to recover. And 7) Seamounts might act as repositories of biodiversity during future periods of extreme environmental change, as they have likely done in the past. The major products of Censeam include 1) a book synthesizing seamount knowledge: Seamounts: Ecology, Fisheries and Conservation (from Blackwell Publishing); 2) a recent review of the structure and function of seamount benthic communities, human impacts, and seamount management and conservation (Ann Rev Mar Sci); 3) hundreds of scientific publications, including Special Issues in Marine Ecology and Oceanography (in collaboration with the Seamount Biogeogsciences Network), and a Special Collection in PLoSONE; 4) guidance documents and formal advising for seamount management communities, including the United Nations Environment Program, International Seabed Authority

  1. Time-Dependent Flexural Deformation Beneath the Emperor Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, P.; Watts, A. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Hawaii-Emperor seamount chain stretches over 6000 km from the Big Island of Hawaii to the subduction cusp off Kamchatka and represents a near-continuous record of hotspot volcanism since the Late Cretaceous. The load of these seamounts and islands has caused the underlying lithosphere to deform, developing a flexural flanking moat that is now largely filled with volcanoclastic sediments. Because the age differences between the seafloor and the seamounts vary by an order of magnitude or more along the chain, the Hawaii-Emperor chain and surrounding area is considered a natural laboratory for lithospheric flexure and has been studied extensively in order to infer the rheology of the oceanic lithosphere. While most investigations have focused on the Hawaiian Islands and proximal seamounts (where data sets are more complete, including seismic reflection and refraction, swath bathymetry and even mapping and dating of drowned reef terraces), far fewer studies have examined the flexural deformation beneath the remote Emperor chain. Preliminary analysis of satellite altimetry data shows the flexural moats to be associated with very large negative gravity anomalies relative to the magnitudes of the positive anomalies over the loads, suggesting considerable viscous or viscoelastic relaxation since the loads were emplaced 50-80 Myr ago. In our study, we will attempt to model the Emperor seamount chain load as a superposition of individual elliptical Gaussian seamounts with separate loading histories. We use Optimal Robust Separation (ORS) techniques to extract the seamount load from the regional background bathymetry and partition the residual load into a set of individual volcanoes. The crustal age grid and available seamount dates are used to construct a temporal loading model and evaluate the flexural response of the lithosphere beneath the Emperor seamounts. We explore a variety of rheological models and loading scenarios that are compatible with the inferred load

  2. Abundance of litter on Condor seamount (Azores, Portugal, Northeast Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C. K.; Gomes-Pereira, J. N.; Isidro, E. J.; Santos, R. S.; Morato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Marine litter is an emerging problem for the world's ocean health but little is known on its distribution and abundance on seamounts and how it affects deep-sea ecosystems. The scientific underwater laboratory set up on Condor seamount offered an ideal case study for the first documentation of litter distribution on a shallow seamount with historical fishing. A total of 48 video transects deployed on the summit (n=45) and the northern flank (n=3) covered an area of 0.031 and 0.025km2, respectively, revealing 55 litter items. Litter density on the summit was 1439 litter items km-2, whilst on the deeper northern flank, estimates indicate densities of 397 litter items km-2. Lost fishing line was the dominant litter item encountered on both areas (73% of total litter on the summit and 50% on northern flank), all being entirely or partly entangled in the locally abundant gorgonians Dentomuricea cf. meteor and Viminella flagellum. Other items included lost weights, anchors and glass bottles. The predominance of lost fishing gear identifies the source of litter on Condor seamount as exclusively ocean-based and related to fishing activities. Abundance of litter on the Condor seamount was much lower than that reported from other locations closer to populated areas.

  3. Seamount physiography and biology in North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morato, T.; Kvile, K. Ø.; Taranto, G. H.; Tempera, F.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Hebbeln, D.; Menezes, G.; Wienberg, C.; Santos, R. S.; Pitcher, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (North-East Atlantic Ocean) and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in-situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (North-East Atlantic) and in Mediterranean Sea is large with around 1061 and 202 seamount-like features, respectively. Similarly, seamounts occupy large areas of about 1 116 000 km2 in the OSPAR region and of about 184 000 km2 in the Mediterranean Sea, which is much larger than previously thought. The presence of seamounts in the North-East Atlantic has been known since the late 19th Century but overall knowledge regarding seamount ecology and geology is still relatively poor. Only 37 seamounts in the OSPAR area (3.5% of all seamounts in the region), 22 in the Mediterranean Sea (9.2% of all seamounts in the region) and 25 in the North-East Atlantic south of the OSPAR have in-situ information. Seamounts mapped in both areas are in general very heterogeneous, showing diverse geophysical characteristics. These differences will likely affect the biological diversity and production of resident and associated organisms.

  4. Internal tidal currents over the summit of cross seamount

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, M.; Mullineaux, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 46 days of record from a current meter deployed above the summit of Cross Seamount (approximately 300 km west of the Hawaiian Islands) indicates that the strongest current fluctuations were driven by the semidiurnal tide. The tides accounted for 28% of the variance in the current spectrum, were mainly baroclinic in character, and were propagated towards the west-northwest. The amplitude of the S2 current flowing parallel to the major axis of the current ellipse ranged between 4 and 9 cm-1 s. The S2 current was 1.5 times larger than the M2 current. This ratio is 4 times larger than is expected for this region of the Pacific and is not a general characteristics of flows over seamounts. Instantaneous current speeds over the seamount often exceeded 20 cm s-1 and were probably responsible for the small ripples observed on the sediment-covered regions of the summit. ?? 1990.

  5. Geophysical exploration of the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy): Seamounts batimetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Milano, Girolamo

    2010-05-01

    The Tyrrhenian Sea is a young extensional basin in the Central Mediterranean that formed within a complex convergent boundary between Africa and Eurasian Plates. Its opening, associated to the west dipping subduction of the Ionian lithosphere, started about 11 My ago and was marked first by an EW and successively by an ESE directed extension. This last mainly affected the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea and led to the formation of the Marsili ocean-like basin. This large-scale extension produced the onset of volcanism throughout the Tyrrhenian Sea and the formation of several seamounts. High values of heat flow (>150 mW m-2) and the thin crust (7 km on average) and lithosphere (30 km on average) testify the young age of formation of oceanic crust in the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea. On November 2007, a multidisciplinary oceanographic survey was carried out in the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea by a group of researchers of the IAMC-CNR (Naples), Osservatorio Vesuviano (INGV, Naples), NOAA (Seattle) and GNS (New Zealand) on board of the R/V Urania. The main aim of the survey was the identification and the exploration of potential active volcanic and/or hydrothermal vents on the seamounts located in the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea. Twelve Tyrrhenian seamounts have been explored with a modified CTD system, in order to acquire "tow-yo" profiles in dynamic mode (real time monitoring of physical and chemical parameters of seawater along vertical/horizontal profiles). In addiction, Multibeam swath bathymetry was carried out over fifteen seamounts. The strategy for the achieving of the aim consisted in two phases: i) row multibeam acquisition of the sea floor morphology to verify, confirm or review all available data, ii) tow-yo activity and seawater sampling. Here, we show the main results of bathymetric data acquisition carried out over fifteen seamounts with the use of the Reson Seabat 8160 multibeam sonar system mounted on keel of the R/V Urania. The most interesting morphostructural

  6. The global distribution of seamounts based on 30 arc seconds bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesson, Chris; Clark, Malcolm R.; Taylor, Michelle L.; Rogers, Alex D.

    2011-04-01

    Seamounts and knolls are 'undersea mountains', the former rising more than 1000 m from the seafloor. These features provide important habitats for aquatic predators, demersal deep-sea fish and benthic invertebrates. However most seamounts have not been surveyed and their numbers and locations are not well known. Previous efforts to locate and quantify seamounts have used relatively coarse bathymetry grids. Here we use global bathymetric data at 30 arc-sec resolution to identify seamounts and knolls. We identify 33,452 seamounts and 138,412 knolls, representing the largest global set of identified seamounts and knolls to date. We compare estimated seamount numbers, locations, and depths with validation sets of seamount data from New Zealand and Azores. This comparison indicates the method we apply finds 94% of seamounts, but may overestimate seamount numbers along ridges and in areas where faulting and seafloor spreading creates highly complex topography. The seamounts and knolls identified herein are significantly geographically biased towards areas surveyed with ship-based soundings. As only 6.5% of the ocean floor has been surveyed with soundings it is likely that new seamounts will be uncovered as surveying improves. Seamount habitats constitute approximately 4.7% of the ocean floor, whilst knolls cover 16.3%. Regional distribution of these features is examined, and we find a disproportionate number of productive knolls, with a summit depth of <1.5 km, located in the Southern Ocean. Less than 2% of seamounts are within marine protected areas and the majority of these are located within exclusive economic zones with few on the High Seas. The database of seamounts and knolls resulting from this study will be a useful resource for researchers and conservation planners.

  7. Live from the Seafloor: Seismic Signals associated with the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S. D.; Tolstoy, M.; Garcia, C.; Tan, Y. J.; Waldhauser, F.

    2015-12-01

    Axial seamount is the most active volcanic feature on the Juan de Fuca Ridge having previously erupted in 1998 and 2011. In 2014, the Ocean Observatories Initiative installed a multidisciplinary, cabled observatory on Axial seamount that includes a compact network of 7 seismometers spanning the southern half of the summit caldera with another seismometer located at the base of the volcano. Real-time data from the seismic network has been archived at the IRIS Data Management Center from mid-November 2014. We have implemented an automated algorithm to detect earthquakes, pick P and S wave phases, determine hypocenters and estimate magnitudes. Over 5 months to mid-April earthquake rates increased from an average of ~100 per day to >500 per day. Most of the earthquakes were small (MW ≤ 1.5) and occurred in swarms beneath the east and west walls of the caldera at depths clustering around 1.5 km. On April 23, 2015 at 1700-2100 GMT there was a sizeable swarm of earthquakes near the east wall of the caldera with most activity north of the network. The main seismic crisis, which coincided with ~2 m of deflation at the center of the caldera (Nooner et al., this meeting), commenced at 0500 GMT on April 24. For the first 2 hours epicenters were confined near the east wall north of the network. The southern limit of seismicity then migrated ~3 km south over one hour to beneath the network where very high levels of seismicity (~500 per hour) persisted until 1500 GMT. During the seismic crisis, the caldera seismometers were swamped by nearby earthquakes, including ~100 per hour with MW ≥ 2; additional analysis is required to determine if seismicity also migrated outside the caldera. In the following weeks, earthquake rates beneath the caldera decreased to <10 per day. An exciting discovery during this period was the detection of a large number of impulsive water borne signals, each comprising a train of water column multiples with arrival times consistent with sound sources

  8. The Economic Impact of San Juan College on San Juan County, New Mexico, 1991-92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary Jo

    A study was conducted of the economic impact of San Juan College (SJC) in Farmington, New Mexico, on businesses and employment in San Juan County during fiscal year (FY) 1991-92. The five components used to measure the college's tangible economic impact on the local community were SJC's total expenditures in FY 1991-92 used to buy goods and…

  9. 33 CFR 165.754 - Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... remain in the safety zone unless authorized by the Captain of the Port, San Juan, Puerto Rico, or a... through the safety zone with a Coast Guard designated escort. (3) The Captain of the Port and the Duty Officer at Sector San Juan, Puerto Rico, can be contacted at telephone number 787-289-2041. The...

  10. 75 FR 51098 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Register on August 14, 2007 (72 FR 45444), announcing our intent to complete a CCP/EA and inviting public... Fish and Wildlife Service Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan, Skagit, and Whatcom Counties, WA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior....

  11. Deep subsurface microbiology of 64-71 million year old inactive seamounts along the Louisville Seamount Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvan, J. B.; Morono, Y.; Grim, S.; Inagaki, F.; Edwards, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the objectives of IODP Expedition 330, Louisville Seamount Trail, was to sample and learn about the subsurface biosphere in the Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC). Seamounts are volcanic constructs that are ubiquitous along the seafloor - models suggest there are >100,000 seamounts of >1 km in height globally (Wessel et al., 2010). Therefore, knowledge about microbiology in the LSC subsurface can broadly be interpreted as representative of much the seafloor. In addition, despite the fact that the vast majority of the sea floor is comprised of crust >10 Ma, the majority of work to date has focused on young sites with active hydrology. Our presentation summarizes work focusing on subsurface microbiology from two different LSC seamounts: holes U1374A (65-71 Ma) and U1376A (64 Ma). We here present data for microbial biomass in the LSC subsurface using a method we developed to quantify microbial biomass in subseafloor ocean crust. We also present results from pyrotag analysis of 15 samples from holes U1374A and holes U1376A, representing several different lithologies from 40-491 meters below seafloor (mbsf) in hole U1374A and from 29-174 mbsf in hole U1376A. Finally, we present preliminary analysis of metagenomic sequencing from three of the samples from Hole U1376A. Biomass was low in the subsurface of both seamounts, ranging from below detection to ~104 cells cm-3. Bacteria comprised >99% of the prokaryotic community in LSC subsurface samples, therefore, bacterial diversity was assessed through 454 pyrosequencing of the V4V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Rarefaction analysis indicates that bacterial communities from the LSC subsurface are low diversity, on the order of a few hundred operational taxonomic units per sample. The phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and the classes α-, β- and γ-Proteobacteria are most abundant in the LSC subsurface. Within these, the orders Actinomycetales, Sphingobacteriales, Bacillales and Burkholderiales are the most

  12. Endemicity, biogeograhy, composition, and community structure on a northeast pacific seamount.

    PubMed

    McClain, Craig R; Lundsten, Lonny; Ream, Micki; Barry, James; DeVogelaere, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The deep ocean greater than 1 km covers the majority of the earth's surface. Interspersed on the abyssal plains and continental slope are an estimated 14000 seamounts, topographic features extending 1000 m off the seafloor. A variety of hypotheses are posited that suggest the ecological, evolutionary, and oceanographic processes on seamounts differ from those governing the surrounding deep sea. The most prominent and oldest of these hypotheses, the seamount endemicity hypothesis (SMEH), states that seamounts possess a set of isolating mechanisms that produce highly endemic faunas. Here, we constructed a faunal inventory for Davidson Seamount, the first bathymetric feature to be characterized as a 'seamount', residing 120 km off the central California coast in approximately 3600 m of water (Fig 1). We find little support for the SMEH among megafauna of a Northeast Pacific seamount; instead, finding an assemblage of species that also occurs on adjacent continental margins. A large percentage of these species are also cosmopolitan with ranges extending over much of the Pacific Ocean Basin. Despite the similarity in composition between the seamount and non-seamount communities, we provide preliminary evidence that seamount communities may be structured differently and potentially serve as source of larvae for suboptimal, non-seamount habitats. PMID:19127302

  13. Diversity and endemism of the benthic seamount fauna in the southwest Pacific.

    PubMed

    de Forges, B R; Koslow, J A; Poore, G C

    2000-06-22

    Seamounts comprise a unique deep-sea environment, characterized by substantially enhanced currents and a fauna that is dominated by suspension feeders, such as corals. The potential importance of these steep-sided undersea mountains, which are generally of volcanic origin, to ocean biogeography and diversity was recognized over 40 years ago, but this environment has remained very poorly explored. A review of seamount biota and biogeography reported a total of 597 invertebrate species recorded from seamounts worldwide since the Challenger expedition of 1872. Most reports, based on a single taxonomic group, were extremely limited: 5 seamounts of the estimated more than 30,000 seamounts in the world's oceans accounted for 72% of the species recorded. Only 15% of the species occurring on seamounts were considered potential seamount endemics. Here we report the discovery of more than 850 macro- and megafaunal species from seamounts in the Tasman Sea and southeast Coral Sea, of which 29-34% are new to science and potential seamount endemics. Low species overlap between seamounts in different portions of the region indicates that the seamounts in clusters or along ridge systems function as 'island groups' or 'chains' leading to highly localized species distributions and apparent speciation between groups or ridge systems that is exceptional for the deep sea. These results have substantial implications for the conservation of this fauna, which is threatened by fishing activity. PMID:10879534

  14. Weak interplate coupling by seamounts and repeating M approximately 7 earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Shinohara, Masanao; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Kanazawa, Toshihiko

    2008-08-29

    Subducting seamounts are thought to increase the normal stress between subducting and overriding plates. However, recent seismic surveys and laboratory experiments suggest that interplate coupling is weak. A seismic survey in the Japan Trench shows that a large seamount is being subducted near a region of repeating earthquakes of magnitude M approximately 7. Both observed seismicity and the pattern of rupture propagation during the 1982 M 7.0 event imply that interplate coupling was weak over the seamount. A large rupture area with small slip occurred in front of the seamount. Its northern bound could be determined by a trace of multiple subducted seamounts. Whereas a subducted seamount itself may not define the rupture area, its width may be influenced by that of the seamount. PMID:18755973

  15. Botanical and geological significance of potassium-argon dates from the Juan Fernández Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuessy, Tod F.; Foland, K.A.; Sutter, John F.; Sanders, Roger W.; Silva, O. Mario

    1984-01-01

    Potassium-argon dating of five basalts from the three main islands of the Juan Fernández (or Robinson Crusoe) Islands of Chile in the southeastern Pacific gives ages of 1.01 ± 0.12 and 2.44 ± 0.14 million years for Masafuera, 3.79 ± 0.20 and 4.23 ± 0.16 for Masatierra, and 5.8 ± 2.1 for Santa Clara. These ages are much younger than that of the underlying oceanic plate and are consistent with the origin of the island-seamount chain from a mantle hot spot beneath the eastward moving Nazca plate. The young age for the archipelago suggests that speciation within endemic genera has occurred within the past 4 to 5 million years. Endemic genera of apparently more ancient origins, such as Lactoris and Thyrsopteris, have apparently dispersed to the islands and survive refugially.

  16. Quantifying the direct use value of Condor seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressurreição, Adriana; Giacomello, Eva

    2013-12-01

    Seamounts often satisfy numerous uses and interests. Multiple uses can generate multiple benefits but also conflicts and impacts, calling, therefore, for integrated and sustainable management. To assist in developing comprehensive management strategies, policymakers recognise the need to include measures of socioeconomic analysis alongside ecological data so that practical compromises can be made. This study assessed the direct output impact (DOI) of the relevant marine activities operating at Condor seamount (Azores, central northeast Atlantic) as proxies of the direct use values provided by the resource system. Results demonstrated that Condor seamount supported a wide range of uses yielding distinct economic outputs. Demersal fisheries, scientific research and shark diving were the top-three activities generating the highest revenues, while tuna fisheries, whale watching and scuba-diving had marginal economic significance. Results also indicated that the economic importance of non-extractive uses of Condor is considerable, highlighting the importance of these uses as alternative income-generating opportunities for local communities. It is hoped that quantifying the direct use values provided by Condor seamount will contribute to the decision making process towards its long-term conservation and sustainable use.

  17. Mapping AUV Survey of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, H.; Caress, D.; Conlin, D.; Clague, D.; Paduan, J.; Butterfield, D.; Chadwick, W.; Tucker, P.

    2006-12-01

    In late August and early September 2006, the MBARI Mapping Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed for 5 missions on Axial Seamount during a NOAA NeMO cruise on the R/V Thompson. The objective of the survey was to determine the geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount using high resolution multibeam, sidescan, and sub-bottom profiler data. The Mapping AUV is a torpedo-shaped, 6000 m rated vehicle designed and constructed by MBARI. The vehicle is equipped with a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz and 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, and a 2-16 kHz sweep chirp sub-bottom profiler. The multibeam provides a 120-degree swath with 0.94 degree by 0.94 degree beam resolution. The endurance of the AUV is eight hours at 3 knots. Navigation derives from an inertial navigation system (INS) incorporating a ring laser gyro aided by GPS at the surface and by velocity-over- ground observations from a Doppler velocity log (DVL) when within 130 m of the seafloor. A navigational precision of 0.05 percent of distance traveled is achieved with continuous DVL bottom lock. An acoustic modem allows surface aiding of navigation during deep descents. The AUV ran two types of missions: those on the rim of the caldera were run at 90 m altitude with a line spacing of 250 m and those on the caldera floor were run at 50 m altitude with a line spacing of 150 or 175 m. The surveys covered most of 1998 lava flow on the south rim of the caldera and northern part of the south rift zone, the southern region of the caldera floor where hydrothermal vents are common, the northeast rim of the caldera where volcaniclastic deposits related to caldera collapse drape the surface, the north rift zone, and the northern portion of the caldera floor. The low-altitude maps have a resolution of 1 m, so large individual lava pillars and hydrothermal chimneys can be seen, fissures stand out clearly, and the regions of collapsed lobate flows and lava channels are prominent. Many of the flows, including the

  18. Exploring the mineralogical heterogeneities of the Louisville Seamount Trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorais, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Diopside phenocrysts of the Louisville Seamount Trail show an increase in Ti, Al, and Na with decreasing Mg/(Mg + Fe) as is typical for clinopyroxene in alkalic basalts. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of calculated liquids from LA-ICPMS analyses are comparable to whole-rock and glass values. Exceptions are clinopyroxene crystals from the Rigil Seamount, the second oldest seamount drilled at the northern end of the chain. Some crystals from this site are strongly zoned with distinct compositional boundaries between cores and mantles. The cores have high Mg/(Mg + Fe) and low Al and Ti concentrations compared to the mantles and phenocrysts. Major element, clinopyroxene discrimination diagrams indicate that the clinopyroxene mantles and phenocrysts crystallized from alkalic basalts. In contrast, the Mg-rich cores have tholeiitic affinities. The REE abundances of the cores are similar to that of clinopyroxene from transitional tholeiites of the Kerguelen Archipelago. Calculated liquid La/Yb values for the cores have ratios that are similar to transitional tholeiites in Hawaii, whereas the mantles have higher La/Yb values similar to Hawaiian alkalic basalts. The major and trace element compositions of clinopyroxene cores from the Rigil seamount suggest that a transitional tholeiitic magma was present, but no evidence for Hawaiian shield-type tholeiites was found. Plagioclase crystals from the Rigil seamount have 86Sr/86Sr from 0.70306 to 0.70363, within the range of FOZO. The transitional tholeiitic signature of the Mg-rich clinopyroxene cores probably did not have a distinct source compared to other Louisville magmas, but more likely indicates a higher degree of partial melting (2-5%) of that FOZO source.

  19. 76 FR 12692 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15 Burnett Court, Durango, CO...

  20. 75 FR 48306 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15 Burnett Court, Durango, CO...

  1. 76 FR 40876 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... Sonoran Meeting Rooms. Written comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1385 - Strait of Juan de Fuca.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca. 80.1385... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1385 Strait of Juan de Fuca. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca....

  3. Diversity, ecological distribution and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria inhabiting seamounts and non-seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea.

    PubMed

    Ettoumi, Besma; Chouchane, Habib; Guesmi, Amel; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Neifar, Mohamed; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the ecological distribution of marine Actinobacteria isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations in the Tyrrhenian Sea was investigated. A collection of 110 isolates was analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives for each ARISA haplotype (n=49). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed a wide diversity of marine isolates and clustered the strains into 11 different genera, Janibacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Dietzia, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Citricoccus, Brevibacterium, Brachybacterium and Nocardioides. Interestingly, Janibacter limosus was the most encountered species particularly in seamounts stations, suggesting that it represents an endemic species of this particular ecosystem. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting on J. limosus sub-collection (n=22), allowed their separation into seven distinct BOX-genotypes suggesting a high intraspecific microdiversity among the collection. Furthermore, by screening the biotechnological potential of selected actinobacterial strains, J. limosus was shown to exhibit the most important biosurfactant activity. Our overall data indicates that Janibacter is a major and active component of seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea adapted to low nutrient ecological niche. PMID:27242145

  4. Juan de Fuca Plate Ridge-to-Trench Experiment: initial results from active source seismic imaging of the Juan de Fuca plate and Cascadia fore-arc (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Canales, J.; Carton, H. D.; Han, S.; Gibson, J. C.; Janiszewski, H. A.; Horning, G.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Abers, G. A.; Trehu, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Active source seismic data were acquired during the Juan de Fuca Ridge-to-Trench experiment (June-July 2012) to characterize the evolution and structure of the Juan de Fuca plate from formation at the ridge, through evolution in the plate interior, to subduction at the Cascadia trench. The survey provides plate-scale images of the sediments, crust, and shallowest mantle along two ridge-perpendicular transects, one extending from Axial seamount to the Oregon margin near Hydrate Ridge and the other from near Endeavour segment to Grays Harbor offshore Washington. In addition, a 450 km long trench-parallel line ~10 km seaward of the Cascadia deformation front was acquired to characterize variations in plate structure along the margin. Coincident long-streamer (8 km) multi-channel seismic (MCS) and wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data were collected along each transect. Using these data, our current investigations focus on the properties of the thick sediment blanket covering the Juan de Fuca plate and evidence for fluid flow at the deformation front, crustal structure within the plate interior and near the deformation front, and tracking the downgoing plate beneath the margin. Highlights include the discovery of numerous pockmarks on the seafloor providing evidence of active fluid flow up to 60 km west of the deformation front. Along the Oregon transect, a bright decollement horizon is imaged at ~1sec twtt above basement whereas at the Washington margin, protothrusts of the deformation front reach to the top of the oceanic crust. Variations in sediment properties are documented within the margin-parallel transect with changes in the stratigraphic level of decollement. While crustal thickness is quite uniform along the margin (~ 6 km), variations in crustal reflectivity and in shallowest mantle velocities are observed over ~30-50 km length scales that could be related to structural variations in the Cascadia subduction zone. Further landward, the top of the

  5. A Global Census of Marine Life on Seamounts: are They Really Oases in the Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consalvey, M.; Clark, M.; Rowden, A.; Stocks, K.

    2006-12-01

    Seamounts have been referred to as oases in the ocean, yet our knowledge is such that this notion can neither be refuted nor accepted. We know that seamounts can support high levels of biodiversity and endemism, that they can play an important role in patterns of marine biogeography, and that they can be highly productive ecosystems acting as feeding grounds for fishes, marine mammals and seabirds. However, our current state of knowledge is such that these observations cannot be taken as generalisations. Under the umbrella of the Census of Marine Life the project CenSeam is conducting a global census of marine life on seamounts, and working towards quantifying what is known, unknown, and will never be known. Seamounts are found in every ocean of the world but of the estimated 100 000, less than 400 have been sampled, and of these, less than 100 in sufficient biological detail. Furthermore, the global sampling effort has been geographically biased - high latitude as well as equatorial seamounts are currently under sampled and the majority of sampled seamounts have summit depths of less than 500m, sampling being limited by practical and financial capabilities. Through uniting the active seamount research community CenSeam aims to establish, at a global scale, the roles that seamounts play in the biogeography, biodiversity, productivity and evolution of marine organisms in order to determine the effect and contribution of seamounts to the global oceanic ecosystem. Recognising that it is not feasible to sample all the world's seamounts, future sampling efforts must be standardised and strategically guided, through assessing the current state of knowledge, to fill critical knowledge gaps and target understudied regions and types of seamounts. This paper will synthesise the current state of seamount knowledge and critically evaluate the global sampling effort stimulating discussion about the future of seamount research and associated methodology and data analysis.

  6. The influence of a Hawaiian seamount on mesopelagic micronekton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Forest, Lisa; Drazen, Jeffrey

    2009-02-01

    The distribution of mesopelagic micronekton (small fishes, crustaceans, and cephalopods) is not uniform throughout the oceans. Seamounts are a feature that may influence the abundance, biomass, diversity, and taxonomic composition of a community of mesopelagic micronekton by introducing a hard substrate and benthic predators into a realm normally devoid of these. Cross Seamount, located roughly 295 km south of the island of Oahu, Hawaii, has a summit that is 330 m below sea surface and has a diameter of approximately 8 km. Using a large, modified Cobb trawl, samples were taken both directly over and away from the summit of Cross Seamount to sample the deep scattering layer during the day and the shallow scattering layer during the night. Trawls were conducted during two cruises in the spring of 2005 and 2007. All organisms collected were identified to the lowest taxonomic level possible resulting in a description of the local assemblage of mesopelagic micronekton over and around Cross Seamount. Results indicate that there is a significant decrease in total abundance of organisms and an absence of certain diel vertically migrating taxa directly over the summit as opposed to away. While predation might be partly the cause, the taxa that are absent from the summit all have daytime depths that are deeper than the depth of the summit indicating that avoidance may be a major reason for the low abundance. The overall taxonomic composition of the community over the summit is dominated numerically by epipelagic juvenile fishes and stomatopod larvae. This is in opposition to that found away from the summit where the community is dominated numerically by mesopelagic fishes, mostly myctophid fishes, with the epipelagic juvenile fishes and stomatopod larvae contributing little to the overall taxonomic composition. The community over the summit also contains two species that appear to be found in higher abundance over the summit as opposed to away and may be considered as

  7. 33 CFR 165.754 - Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... referenced use datum: NAD 83. (2) The waters around Liquefied Petroleum Gas ships departing San Juan Harbor... coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (b) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter, transit...

  8. Emplacement, growth, and gravitational deformation of serpentinite seamounts on the Mariana forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, A. J.; Taylor, B.; Fryer, P.; Moore, G. F.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Morgan, J. K.

    2007-08-01

    Serpentinite seamounts, representing some of the first material outputs of the recycling process that takes place in subduction zones, are found on the outer Mariana forearc. Multichannel seismic (MCS) and bathymetric data collected in 2002 image the large-scale structures of five seamounts, as well as the pre-seamount basement geometry and sediment stratigraphy. We present data from three edifices that provide insights into seamount growth and internal deformation processes and allow us to support the interpretation that serpentinite mud volcanoes are formed by the episodic eruption of mud flows from a central region. The presence of thrust faulting at the base of Turquoise and Big Blue Seamounts, along with the low surface slopes (5°-18°) of all the seamounts studied, lead us to infer that these edifices spread laterally and are subject to gravitational deformation as they grow. Numerical simulations using the discrete element method (DEM) were used to model their growth and the origins of features that we see in MCS sections, such as basal thrusts, inward-dipping reflections and mid-flank benches. The DEM simulations successfully reproduced many of the observed features. Simulations employing very low basal and internal friction coefficients (~0.1 and ~0.4, respectively) provide the best match to the overall morphology and structures of the serpentinite seamounts. However the simulations do not capture all of the processes involved in seamount growth, such as withdrawal of material from a central conduit leading to summit deflation; compaction, dewatering and degassing of mud flows; mass wasting in the form of sector collapse and growth upon a dipping substrate. A strong reflection beneath the summit of Big Blue, the largest serpentinite seamount on the Mariana forearc, represents the floor of a summit depression that has been partially in-filled by younger muds, supporting the idea that serpentinite seamounts grow by episodic mud volcanism. Boundaries of mud

  9. Persistence and Attrition at San Juan College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Nelle

    A project was undertaken at San Juan College, in New Mexico, to examine findings from several studies of student persistence and retention to shed light on factors influencing persistence at the college. The project took into account several definitions of persistence, including re-enrollment in the subsequent semester (semester to semester),…

  10. Juan Carlos D'Olivo: A portrait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Arévalo, Alexis A.

    2013-06-01

    This report attempts to give a brief bibliographical sketch of the academic life of Juan Carlos D'Olivo, researcher and teacher at the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares of UNAM, devoted to advancing the fields of High Energy Physics and Astroparticle Physics in Mexico and Latin America.

  11. On geoid heights and flexure of the lithosphere at seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.; Ribe, N. M.

    1984-12-01

    The sea surface height has now been mapped to an accuracy of better than ±1 m by using radar altimeters on board orbiting satellites. The major influence on the mean sea surface height is the marine geoid which is an equipotential surface. We have carried out preliminary studies of how oceanic volcanoes, which rise above the ocean floor as isolated seamounts and oceanic islands or linear ridges, contribute to the marine geoid. Simple one- and two-dimensional models have been constructed in which it is assumed that the oceanic lithosphere responds to volcanic loads as a thin elastic plate overlying a weak fluid substratum. Previous studies based on gravity and bathymetry data and uplift/subsidence patterns show that the effective flexural rigidity of oceanic lithosphere and the equivalent elastic thickness Te increase with the age of the lithosphere at the time of loading. The models predict that isolated seamounts emplaced on relatively young lithosphere on or near a mid-ocean ridge crest will be associated with relatively low amplitude geoid anomalies (about 0.4-0.5 m/km of height), while seamounts formed on relatively old lithosphere, on ridge flanks, will be associated with much higher amplitude anomalies (1.4-1.5 m/km). Studies of the Seasat altimetric geoid prepared by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory support these model predictions; geoid amplitudes are relatively low over the Mid-Pacific Mountains and Line Islands, which formed on or near a mid-ocean ridge crest, and relatively high over the Magellan Seamounts and Wake Guyots, which formed off ridge. Direct modeling of the altimetric geoid over these features is complicated, however, by the wide spacing of the satellite tracks (which can exceed 100 km) and poor bathymetric control beneath individual satellite tracks. In regions where multibeam bathymetric surveys are available, models can be constructed that fit the altimetric geoid to better than ±1 m. Studies of geoid anomalies over the Emperor seamount

  12. Statistical self-similarity of hotspot seamount volumes modeled as self-similar criticality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tebbens, S.F.; Burroughs, S.M.; Barton, C.C.; Naar, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    The processes responsible for hotspot seamount formation are complex, yet the cumulative frequency-volume distribution of hotspot seamounts in the Easter Island/Salas y Gomez Chain (ESC) is found to be well-described by an upper-truncated power law. We develop a model for hotspot seamount formation where uniform energy input produces events initiated on a self-similar distribution of critical cells. We call this model Self-Similar Criticality (SSC). By allowing the spatial distribution of magma migration to be self-similar, the SSC model recreates the observed ESC seamount volume distribution. The SSC model may have broad applicability to other natural systems.

  13. Dredged trachyte and basalt from kodiak seamount and the adjacent aleutian trench, alaska.

    PubMed

    Forbes, R B; Hoskin, C M

    1969-10-24

    Blocky fragments of aegirine-augite trachyte (with accompanying icerafted gravels.) were recovered from the upper slopes of Kodiak Seamount in several dredge hauls. An alkali basalt pillow segment was also dredged from a moatlike depression, at a depth of 5000 meters, near the west base of the seamount. These retrievals confirm the volcanic origin of Kodiak Seamount and further support the view of Engel, Engel, and Havens that the higher elevations of seamounts are composed of alkali basalts or related variants. PMID:17731907

  14. Subsidence and flexure along the Pratt-Welker seamount chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambeck, K.; Penney, C. L.; Nakiboglu, S. M.; Coleman, R.

    1984-02-01

    A geophysical examination of the degree of isostatic compensation of guyots in the Pratt-Welker seamount chain in the Gulf of Alaska is presented in order to test the hypothesis of several previous studies that the origin of the Pratt-Welker chain cannot be attributed to a single cause. The test is carried out using GEOS 3 and Seasat altimeter data. The effective flexural rigidity of the lithosphere below all the seamounts in the chain is found to be less than about 10 to the 20th Nm, such that the isostatic state is local rather than regional. This may be the result of all seamounts having formed on an initially weak lithosphere. The subsidence of guyots in the chain is associated with numerous factors including thermal contraction of the seafloor, sediment loading, the flexure of the lithosphere prior to its subduction along the Aleutian Trench, and stress relaxation. The conclusions from the flexure and subsidence analyses are in agreement with the bulk of data from previous studies of the area.

  15. Is there a seamount effect on microbial community structure and biomass? The case study of Seine and Sedlo seamounts (northeast Atlantic).

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Ana; Arístegui, Javier; Vilas, Juan Carlos; Montero, Maria Fernanda; Ojeda, Alicia; Espino, Minerva; Martins, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Seamounts are considered to be "hotspots" of marine life but, their role in oceans primary productivity is still under discussion. We have studied the microbial community structure and biomass of the epipelagic zone (0-150 m) at two northeast Atlantic seamounts (Seine and Sedlo) and compared those with the surrounding ocean. Results from two cruises to Sedlo and three to Seine are presented. Main results show large temporal and spatial microbial community variability on both seamounts. Both Seine and Sedlo heterotrophic community (abundance and biomass) dominate during winter and summer months, representing 75% (Sedlo, July) to 86% (Seine, November) of the total plankton biomass. In Seine, during springtime the contribution to total plankton biomass is similar (47% autotrophic and 53% heterotrophic). Both seamounts present an autotrophic community structure dominated by small cells (nano and picophytoplankton). It is also during spring that a relatively important contribution (26%) of large cells to total autotrophic biomass is found. In some cases, a "seamount effect" is observed on Seine and Sedlo microbial community structure and biomass. In Seine this is only observed during spring through enhancement of large autotrophic cells at the summit and seamount stations. In Sedlo, and despite the observed low biomasses, some clear peaks of picoplankton at the summit or at stations within the seamount area are also observed during summer. Our results suggest that the dominance of heterotrophs is presumably related to the trapping effect of organic matter by seamounts. Nevertheless, the complex circulation around both seamounts with the presence of different sources of mesoscale variability (e.g. presence of meddies, intrusion of African upwelling water) may have contributed to the different patterns of distribution, abundances and also changes observed in the microbial community. PMID:22279538

  16. Dynamics at an elongated, intermediate depth seamount in the North Atlantic (Sedlo Seamount, 40°20‧N, 26°40‧W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohn, Christian; White, Martin; Bashmachnikov, Igor; Jose, Felix; Pelegrí, Josep L.

    2009-12-01

    Observations from a five-mooring array deployed in the vicinity of Sedlo Seamount over a 4-month period, together with supporting hydrographic and underway ADCP measurements, are described. Sedlo Seamount is an elongated, intermediate depth seamount with three separate peaks, rising from 2200 m water depth to summit peaks between 950 and 780 m depth, located at 40°20'N, 26°40W. Currents measured in depth range 750 and 820 m - the layer close to the summit depth of the shallowest southeast peak - showed a mean anti-cyclonic flow around the seamount, with residual current velocities of 2-5 cm s -1. Significant mesoscale variability was present at this level, and this is attributed to the weak and variable background impinging flow. Stronger, more persistent currents were found at the summit mooring as a result of tidal rectification and some weak amplification. Below 1300 m, currents were extremely weak, even close to the seabed. Time series of relative vorticity for the depth layer 750-820 m showed persistent anti-cyclonic vorticity except for two periods of cyclonic vorticity. A mean relative vorticity of -0.06 f ( f=the local Coriolis frequency) was calculated from a triangle of current meters located at the flanks of the seamount. Modelling results confirmed that anti-cyclonic flow above the seamount was likely due to Taylor Cone generation driven by a combination of steady impinging and tidally rectified flow. The closed circulation pattern over the seamount was found to extend to ˜150 m above the summit level, consistent with simple idealised theory and the supporting hydrographic observations. At shallower depths (<500 m) model simulations predicted a predominantly cyclonic recirculation most likely controlled by topographic steering along the zonal axis of the seamount. There was some indication of flow reversal at these depths from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements carried out at one hydrographic survey. The model results were in good

  17. Organic matter composition and macrofaunal diversity in sediments of the Condor Seamount (Azores, NE Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorni, Lucia; Ravara, Ascensão; Parretti, Paola; Santos, Ricardo S.; Rodrigues, Clara F.; Amaro, Teresa; Cunha, Marina R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years increasing knowledge has been accumulated on seamounts ecology; however their sedimentary environments and associated biological communities remain largely understudied. In this study we investigated quantity and biochemical composition of organic matter and macrofaunal diversity in sediments of the Condor Seamount (NE Atlantic, Azores). In order to test the effect of the seamount on organic matter distribution, sediment samples were collected in 6 areas: the summit, the northern and southern flanks and bases, and in an external far field site. Macrofauna abundance and diversity were investigated on the summit, the southern flank and in the far field site. The organic matter distribution reflected the complex hydrodynamic conditions occurring on the Condor. Concentrations of organic matter compounds were generally lower on the whole seamount than in the far field site and on the seamount summit compared to flanks and bases. A clear difference was also evident between the northern and southern slopes of the Condor, suggesting a role of the seamount in conditioning sedimentation processes and distribution of food resources for benthic consumers. Macrofauna assemblages changed significantly among the three sampling sites. High abundance and dominance, accompanied by low biodiversity, characterized the macrofauna community on the Condor summit, while low dominance and high biodiversity were observed at the flank. Our results, although limited to five samples on the seamount and two off the seamount, do not necessarily support the paradigm that seamounts are more biodiverse than the surrounding seafloor. However, the abundance (and biomass), functional diversity and taxonomical distinctiveness of the macrofaunal assemblages from the Condor Seamount suggest that seamounts habitats may play a relevant role in adding to the regional biodiversity.

  18. Changes in nematode communities in different physiographic sites of the condor seamount (north-East atlantic ocean) and adjacent sediments.

    PubMed

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Bongiorni, Lucia; Serrão Santos, Ricardo; Vanreusel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Several seamounts are known as 'oases' of high abundances and biomass and hotspots of biodiversity in contrast to the surrounding deep-sea environments. Recent studies have indicated that each single seamount can exhibit a high intricate habitat turnover. Information on alpha and beta diversity of single seamount is needed in order to fully understand seamounts contribution to regional and global biodiversity. However, while most of the seamount research has been focused on summits, studies considering the whole seamount structure are still rather poor. In the present study we analysed abundance, biomass and diversity of nematodes collected in distinct physiographic sites and surrounding sediments of the Condor Seamount (Azores, North-East Atlantic Ocean). Our study revealed higher nematode biomass in the seamount bases and values 10 times higher in the Condor sediments than in the far-field site. Although biodiversity indices did not showed significant differences comparing seamount sites and far-field sites, significant differences were observed in term of nematode composition. The Condor summit harboured a completely different nematode community when compared to the other seamount sites, with a high number of exclusive species and important differences in term of nematode trophic diversity. The oceanographic conditions observed around the Condor Seamount and the associated sediment mixing, together with the high quality of food resources available in seamount base could explain the observed patterns. Our results support the hypothesis that seamounts maintain high biodiversity through heightened beta diversity and showed that not only summits but also seamount bases can support rich benthic community in terms of standing stocks and diversity. Furthermore functional diversity of nematodes strongly depends on environmental conditions link to the local setting and seamount structure. This finding should be considered in future studies on seamounts, especially in

  19. Changes in Nematode Communities in Different Physiographic Sites of the Condor Seamount (North-East Atlantic Ocean) and Adjacent Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Bongiorni, Lucia; Serrão Santos, Ricardo; Vanreusel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Several seamounts are known as ‘oases’ of high abundances and biomass and hotspots of biodiversity in contrast to the surrounding deep-sea environments. Recent studies have indicated that each single seamount can exhibit a high intricate habitat turnover. Information on alpha and beta diversity of single seamount is needed in order to fully understand seamounts contribution to regional and global biodiversity. However, while most of the seamount research has been focused on summits, studies considering the whole seamount structure are still rather poor. In the present study we analysed abundance, biomass and diversity of nematodes collected in distinct physiographic sites and surrounding sediments of the Condor Seamount (Azores, North-East Atlantic Ocean). Our study revealed higher nematode biomass in the seamount bases and values 10 times higher in the Condor sediments than in the far-field site. Although biodiversity indices did not showed significant differences comparing seamount sites and far-field sites, significant differences were observed in term of nematode composition. The Condor summit harboured a completely different nematode community when compared to the other seamount sites, with a high number of exclusive species and important differences in term of nematode trophic diversity. The oceanographic conditions observed around the Condor Seamount and the associated sediment mixing, together with the high quality of food resources available in seamount base could explain the observed patterns. Our results support the hypothesis that seamounts maintain high biodiversity through heightened beta diversity and showed that not only summits but also seamount bases can support rich benthic community in terms of standing stocks and diversity. Furthermore functional diversity of nematodes strongly depends on environmental conditions link to the local setting and seamount structure. This finding should be considered in future studies on seamounts, especially in

  20. 50 CFR Table 22 to Part 679 - Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas 22 Table 22 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 22 Table 22 to Part 679— Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas...

  1. 50 CFR Table 22 to Part 679 - Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas 22 Table 22 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 22 Table 22 to Part 679— Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas...

  2. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Davidson Seamount Management Zone F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922—Davidson Seamount Management...

  3. 50 CFR 665.200 - Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish fisheries. 665.200 Section 665.200 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.200 Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish fisheries....

  4. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Davidson Seamount Management Zone F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922—Davidson Seamount Management...

  5. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Davidson Seamount Management Zone F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922—Davidson Seamount Management...

  6. Fish biodiversity of the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain, southwestern Atlantic: an updated database.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Hudson T; Mazzei, Eric; Moura, Rodrigo L; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M; Carvalho-Filho, Alfredo; Braga, Adriana C; Costa, Paulo A S; Ferreira, Beatrice P; Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo L; Floeter, Sergio R; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B; Gasparini, João Luiz; Macieira, Raphael M; Martins, Agnaldo S; Olavo, George; Pimentel, Caio R; Rocha, Luiz A; Sazima, Ivan; Simon, Thiony; Teixeira, João Batista; Xavier, Lucas B; Joyeux, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Despite a strong increase in research on seamounts and oceanic islands ecology and biogeography, many basic aspects of their biodiversity are still unknown. In the southwestern Atlantic, the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain (VTC) extends ca. 1,200 km offshore the Brazilian continental shelf, from the Vitória seamount to the oceanic islands of Trindade and Martin Vaz. For a long time, most of the biological information available regarded its islands. Our study presents and analyzes an extensive database on the VTC fish biodiversity, built on data compiled from literature and recent scientific expeditions that assessed both shallow to mesophotic environments. A total of 273 species were recorded, 211 of which occur on seamounts and 173 at the islands. New records for seamounts or islands include 191 reef fish species and 64 depth range extensions. The structure of fish assemblages was similar between islands and seamounts, not differing in species geographic distribution, trophic composition, or spawning strategies. Main differences were related to endemism, higher at the islands, and to the number of endangered species, higher at the seamounts. Since unregulated fishing activities are common in the region, and mining activities are expected to drastically increase in the near future (carbonates on seamount summits and metals on slopes), this unique biodiversity needs urgent attention and management. PMID:25738798

  7. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Davidson Seamount Management Zone F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922—Davidson Seamount Management...

  8. 50 CFR 665.200 - Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish fisheries. 665.200 Section 665.200 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.200 Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish fisheries....

  9. 75 FR 69015 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish; Measures To Rebuild...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... on August 30, 2010 (75 FR 52921), and is not repeated here. The public comment period for the... Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish; Measures To Rebuild Overfished Armorhead at Hancock Seamounts AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  10. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Davidson Seamount Management Zone F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922—Davidson Seamount Management...

  11. Geophysical investigation of seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone, western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-G.; Lee, K.; Hein, J. R.; Moon, J.-W.

    2009-03-01

    This paper provides an analysis of multi-channel seismic data obtained during 2000-2001 on seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone (OFZ) northwest of the Marshall Islands in the western Pacific. The OFZ is unique in that it is a wide rift zone that includes many seamounts. Seven units are delineated on the basis of acoustic characteristics and depth: three units (I, II, and III) on the summit of seamounts and four units (IV, V, VI, and VII) in basins. Acoustic characteristics of layers on the summit of guyots and dredged samples indicate that the seamounts had been built above sea level by volcanism. This was followed by reef growth along the summit margin, which enabled deposition of shallow-water carbonates on the summit, and finally by subsidence of the edifices. The subsidence depth of the seamounts, estimated from the lower boundary of unit II, ranges between 1,550 and 2,040 m. The thick unit I of the southern seamounts is correlated with proximity to the equatorial high productivity zone, whereas local currents may have strongly affected the distribution of unit I on northern seamounts. A seismic profile in the basin around the Ita Mai Tai and OSM4 seamounts shows an unconformity between units IV and V, which is widespread from the East Mariana Basin to the Pigafetta Basin.

  12. Fish Biodiversity of the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain, Southwestern Atlantic: An Updated Database

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Hudson T.; Mazzei, Eric; Moura, Rodrigo L.; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M.; Carvalho-Filho, Alfredo; Braga, Adriana C.; Costa, Paulo A. S.; Ferreira, Beatrice P.; Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo L.; Floeter, Sergio R.; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B.; Gasparini, João Luiz; Macieira, Raphael M.; Martins, Agnaldo S.; Olavo, George; Pimentel, Caio R.; Rocha, Luiz A.; Sazima, Ivan; Simon, Thiony; Teixeira, João Batista; Xavier, Lucas B.; Joyeux, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Despite a strong increase in research on seamounts and oceanic islands ecology and biogeography, many basic aspects of their biodiversity are still unknown. In the southwestern Atlantic, the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain (VTC) extends ca. 1,200 km offshore the Brazilian continental shelf, from the Vitória seamount to the oceanic islands of Trindade and Martin Vaz. For a long time, most of the biological information available regarded its islands. Our study presents and analyzes an extensive database on the VTC fish biodiversity, built on data compiled from literature and recent scientific expeditions that assessed both shallow to mesophotic environments. A total of 273 species were recorded, 211 of which occur on seamounts and 173 at the islands. New records for seamounts or islands include 191 reef fish species and 64 depth range extensions. The structure of fish assemblages was similar between islands and seamounts, not differing in species geographic distribution, trophic composition, or spawning strategies. Main differences were related to endemism, higher at the islands, and to the number of endangered species, higher at the seamounts. Since unregulated fishing activities are common in the region, and mining activities are expected to drastically increase in the near future (carbonates on seamount summits and metals on slopes), this unique biodiversity needs urgent attention and management. PMID:25738798

  13. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of volcanic rocks from Daimao Seamount (South China Sea) and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Quanshu; Castillo, Paterno; Shi, Xuefa; Wang, Liaoliang; Liao, Lin; Ren, Jiangbo

    2015-03-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) experienced three episodes of seafloor spreading and left three fossil spreading centers presently located at 18°N, 17°N and 15.5°N. Spreading ceased at these three locations during magnetic anomaly 10, 8, and 5c, respectively. Daimao Seamount (16.6 Ma) was formed 10 my after the cessation of the 17°N spreading center. Volcaniclastic rocks and shallow-water carbonate facies near the summit of Daimao Seamount provide key information on the seamount's geologic history. New major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of basaltic breccia clasts in the volcaniclastics suggest that Daimao and other SCS seamounts have typical ocean island basalt-like composition and possess a 'Dupal' isotopic signature. Our new analyses, combined with available data, indicate that the basaltic foundation of Daimao Seamount was formed through subaqueous explosive volcanic eruptions at 16.6 Ma. The seamount subsided rapidly (> 0.12 mm/y) at first, allowing the deposition of shallow-water, coral-bearing carbonates around its summit and, then, at a slower rate (< 0.12 mm/y). We propose that the parental magmas of SCS seamount lavas originated from the Hainan mantle plume. In contrast, lavas from contemporaneous seamounts in other marginal basins in the western Pacific are subduction-related.

  14. Modelled effects of primary and secondary production enhancement by seamounts on local fish stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morato, Telmo; Bulman, Cathy; Pitcher, Tony J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses how large aggregations of fish found on many seamounts are sustained. We used a generic seamount ecosystem model from the Northeast Atlantic to examine the impact of a potential increase of local primary production on higher trophic levels, to quantify the immigration of allochthonous micronekton that would be required to maintain a "typical" seamount community, and to quantify if the necessary immigration ratios could be supported by local oceanographic conditions. Our simulation predictions indicate a lack of autochthonous resources in the system to support large amounts of seamount aggregating fish. In other words, autochthonous seamount production may be responsible for sustaining only a small amount of its total biomass. Additionally, our study supports the idea that enhancement of primary productivity also cannot sustain large aggregations of seamount fish. Our seamount model, which took into account high abundances of fish, marine mammals, seabirds and tuna, required a total immigration of allochthonous micronekton of 95.2 t km -2 yr -1 less than the potential available biomass after considering the immigration of prey based upon average current velocities and prey standing stocks in oceanic waters. Our model predicted that the horizontal flux of prey would be sufficient to sustain the rich communities living on seamounts.

  15. 50 CFR Table 22 to Part 679 - Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas 22 Table 22 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 22 Table 22 to Part 679— Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas...

  16. 50 CFR Table 22 to Part 679 - Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas 22 Table 22 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 22 Table 22 to Part 679— Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas...

  17. 50 CFR Table 22 to Part 679 - Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas 22 Table 22 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 22 Table 22 to Part 679— Alaska Seamount Habitat Protection Areas...

  18. AUV Mapping and ROV Sampling of Ridges and Seamounts: No Longer Wandering Around in the Dark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Dreyer, B. M.; Caress, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration by submersible has been described as akin to dangling from a helicopter, at night, in a snowstorm, with a flashlight. Until recently, the divers were further hampered by not knowing where they were: the best bathymetric maps had resolution the length of a football field, and detailed maps could be constructed only after considerable investment in ship time to deploy and calibrate long baseline networks on the sea floor. Since then, maps have greatly improved with the use of high-frequency multibeam sonars flown close to the bottom, reliable navigation systems on the vehicles and surface ships, and sophisticated software to process the data. Our submersible dives are now guided, and older dives reinterpreted, using 1-meter resolution maps made with the MBARI Mapping AUV. We have utilized this combo at 7 sites along NE Pacific mid-ocean ridges, 3 seamounts off California, and 2 back-arc volcanoes in the Lau Basin. Among these, on the northern Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, four ROV dives were conducted over six years on a 30 km-long section of the ridge axis that was mapped with the AUV in two 18-hour surveys in 2009. Our experiences there will be used to illustrate advantages and challenges of studying the sea floor armed with better maps. The AUV maps are at a resolution where individual sulfide chimneys, lava pillars, eruptive fissures, lava channels and flow margins can be distinguished. Inflated flows and tectonically faulted seamounts can be examined in detail. Characteristic progressions in flow morphology from eruptive fissures through collapsed channels to pillowed margins can be traced along lava flow units. Relative age relationships can be determined from truncations of flow channels and tectonic fractures. The ROV's HD camera and array of samplers permit ground-truthing and refining of our interpretations of the maps. The mapped relationships of flows allow us to focus ROV sampling efforts and give wider context to the camera

  19. The ecology of xenophyophores (Protista) on eastern Pacific seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Thomas, Cynthia L.

    1988-12-01

    Large, agglutinating protozoans of the class Xenophyophorea are the dominant epifaunal organisms on soft and hard substrates of many bathyal seamounts in the eastern Pacific Ocean off Mexico. Observations made with the submersible Alvin and remotely towed camera sleds on 17 seamounts at 31°, 20°, 13° and 10°N revealed more than ten distinct xenophyophore test morphologies. Most of these appear to represent previously undescribed species. Reticulate forms are numerically dominant at 20°, 13° and 10°N. Xenophyophore abundances increase with decreasing latitude, being rare at 30°N, present at densities of 0.1-1.0 m -2 at 20° and 13°N and often exceeding 1.0 m -2 at 10°N, occasionally reaching 10-18 m -2. Highest concentrations are observed on caldera floors near the base of steep caldera walls, at depths between 1700 and 2500 m. Most individuals select sand-size pelagic foraminiferan tests (63-500 μm) and exclude pebble, silt and clay-size particles for test construction. Xenophyophore on seamounts modify the structure of metazoan communities and may play a role in maintenance of infaunal diversity. Twenty-seven xenophyophore tests were found to provide habitat for 16 major macrofaunal taxa (152 individuals) and three meiofaunal taxa (333 individuals). The presence of xenophyophores also enhances the abundance of isopods, tanaids, ophiuroids, nematodes and harpacticoid copepods dwelling in sediments surrounding the tests. Mobile megafauna are attracted to sediment beneath and adjacent to xenophyophores. We suggest that xenophyophores, which are abundant on many topographic features in deep water (e.g. guyots, trenches, canyons and continental slopes), are a functionally important component of deep-sea benthic communities and require further autecological and synecological investigation.

  20. High-resolution mapping of the 1998 lava flows at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Caress, D. W.; Paduan, J. B.; Sasnett, P.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount (an active hotspot volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge) last erupted in 1998 and produced two lava flows (a "northern" and a "southern" flow) along the upper south rift zone separated by a distance of 4 km. Geologic mapping of the 1998 lava flows has been carried out with a combination of visual observations from multiple submersible dives since 1998, and with high-resolution bathymetry, most recently collected with the MBARI mapping AUV (the D. Allan B.) since 2007. The new mapping results revise and update the previous preliminary flow outlines, areas, and volumes. The high-resolution bathymetry (1-m grid cell size) allows eruptive fissures fine-scale morphologic features to be resolved with new and remarkable clarity. The morphology of both lava flows can be interpreted as a consequence of a specific sequence of events during their emplacement. The northern sheet flow is long (4.6 km) and narrow (500 m), and erupted in the SE part of Axial caldera, where it temporarily ponded and inflated on relatively flat terrain before draining out southward toward steeper slopes. The inflation and drain-out of this sheet flow by ~ 3.5 m over 2.5 hours was previously documented by a monitoring instrument that was caught in the lava flow. Our geologic mapping shows that the morphology of the northern sheet flow varies along its length primarily due to gradients in the underlying slope and processes active during flow emplacement. The original morphology of the sheet flow where it ponded is lobate, with pillows near the margins, whereas the central axis of drain-out and collapse is floored with lineated, ropy, and jumbled lava morphologies. The southern lava flow, in contrast, is mostly pillow lava where it cascaded down the steep slope on the east flank of the south rift zone, but also has a major area of collapse where lava ponded temporarily near the rift axis. These results show that submarine lava flows have more subsurface hydraulic connectivity than has

  1. Axial Seamount 2015 Eruption: A 127 m Thick, Microbially-Covered Lava Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Chadwick, W.; Philip, B. T.; Merle, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    On April 24th, Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge erupted. This site now hosts the most advanced submarine volcanic observatory with a diverse, multidisciplinary array of 48 cabled instruments at its summit and base, and an instrumented state-of-the-art shallow profiling mooring providing real-time data to shore as part of NSF's Ocean Observatory Initiative (Delaney et al., AGU-2015). The onset of the eruption was marked by more than 8000 earthquakes (Wilcock et al., AGU-2015; Garcia et al., AGU-2015) and a drop in the seafloor of 2.4 m (Nooner et al., AGU-2015). Follow-on analyses of hydrophone data (Tolstoy et al., AGU-2015) pointed to the location of the eruption as the Northern Rift zone. During the OOI-NSF-UW Cabled Array maintenance cruise, the Northern Rift and eastern side of the caldera was mapped using the R/V Thompson's EM302 system at. Differencing of 2007 (Hydrosweep) and 2013 EM302 bathymetric data indicated that the flow was ~ 7 km in length and up to 127 m thick, where it filled in a preexisting small depression. On July 26th, the ROV ROPOS dove near the toe of the northeastern lobe of the flow, the location of the highest bathymetric difference. The steep north face of this lobe is composed of glassy pillow flows: ROPOS ascended ~ 85 m before reaching the summit. Immediately upon reaching the summit, the vehicle was engulfed in a blizzard of biologically-produced 'snowblower' material issuing from distributed small sites of diffuse flow that reached 18°C. These areas hosted white filamentous bacteria, presumably methane metabolizers. Extensive areas of the flow summit were covered with orange microbial mats that completely masked the underlying pillows flows. Particle-poor diffuse fluids issued from microbially-covered collapse features along the summit, assumed to mark the main feeder channels. This eruption was markedly different than the Axial April 2011 eruption, which was characterized by vast sheet flows and extensive collapse zones.

  2. Tidal currents and anticyclonic motions on two North Pacific seamounts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Genin, A.; Noble, M.; Lonsdale, P.F.

    1989-01-01

    Near-bottom currents were measured for several days at three sites on the summits of Fieberling Guyot (32??26???N, 127??46???W) and Horizon Guyot (19??15???N, 160??00???W). Three moorings comprised of two current meters were deployed on each summit; two moorings were deployed on opposite sides of the rim of the summit and one mooring was deployed near the center of the summit. The observed currents were strong, with maximum speeds of 48 and 24 cm s-1 on Fieberling and Horizon, respectively. The currents at specific frequencies were enhanced relative to those in the surrounding ocean. Diurnal currents were the dominant component of the current field on Fieberling Guyot. They accounted for 39-68% of the energy and had amplitudes around 12 cm s-1. We suspect that these diurnal currents were waves trapped over the seamount. Semidiurnal internal tidal currents were the strongest currents over Horizon Guyot, with amplitudes around 4 cm s-1. The flow patterns determined in this study seemed to affect the biological and geological characteristics of the seamounts. ?? 1990.

  3. Seamount, ridge, and transform subduction in southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, Kristin D.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the factors that control subduction zone processes is a first-order goal in the study of convergent margins. In southern Central America, a growing body of research reveals strong links between the character of the subducting slab and the mechanics of important processes that include subduction erosion, fluid flow, deformation, and seismogenesis. In this paper, I evaluate the role that seamount, ridge, and transform subduction have in the development of upper plate deformation and volcanism by summarizing previous work across a >500 km long region of Central America where each of these three scenarios are present along strike. The data show that the subduction of short-wavelength bathymetry (e.g., seamounts and faults on the seafloor) produces short-wavelength deformation that persists for relatively short timescales (104-105 years), whereas the subduction of longer-wavelength bathymetry (e.g., the aseismic Cocos Ridge) results in longer-wavelength deformation that endures over a longer time scale (106 years). The timing and distribution of upper plate deformation are consistent with subhorizontal Cocos Ridge subduction driving upper plate deformation, and the increased crustal thickness (>20 km) of the subducting Cocos Ridge is likely one of the most important factors in the production of upper plate contraction and crustal thickening. The data illustrate a fundamental connection between lower plate properties and upper plate deformation and highlight the profound influence that bathymetry and crustal thickness have in the localization and kinematics of upper plate strain and volcanism in Middle America.

  4. Chinanteco de San Juan Lealao, Oaxaca (Chinantec of San Juan Lealao, Oaxaca).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Chinantec, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in San Juan Lealao, in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling of…

  5. Trique de San Juan Copala, Oaxaca (Trique of San Juan Copala, Oaxaca).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Trique, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in San Juan Copala, in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling of the…

  6. 78 FR 35593 - Special Local Regulation; Christmas Boat Parade, San Juan Harbor; San Juan, PR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73, FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We... Juan, Puerto Rico during the Christmas Boat Parade, a Boat Parade. The event is scheduled to take...

  7. Una Visita al Viejo San Juan (A Visit to Old San Juan).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabello, Victor; And Others

    Written in Spanish, this black and white illustrated booklet provides a tour of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico's oldest and most historic city. Brief historical information is provided on the Perro de San Jeronimo, a statue of a barking dog found in front of the Castillo; Plaza de Colon, a small plaza dedicated to Christopher Columbus; the Catedral de…

  8. 77 FR 47358 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... recommendations to the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with Title II of the Act....

  9. Juan's Dilemma: A New Twist on the Old Lemon Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Vanessa; Sorey, Timothy; Balandova, Evguenia; Palmquist, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    When life hands you lemons, make a battery! In this article, the authors describe an activity they refer to as "Juan's Dilemma," an extension of the familiar lemon-battery activity (Goodisman 2001). Juan's Dilemma integrates oxidation and reduction chemistry with circuit theory in a fun, real-world exercise. The authors designed this activity for…

  10. Volcanology and Geochemistry of the Taney Seamounts northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coumans, J. P.; Clague, D. A.; Stix, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Taney seamounts are a NW-SE trending, linear, near-ridge chain consisting of five submarine volcanoes located on the Pacific plate 300 km west of San Francisco, California. Morphologically, the seamounts are characterized as truncated cones with nested calderas decreasing in age towards the ridge axis. This study examines the volcanology and geochemistry of the largest and oldest seamount, (Taney A, ~26 Ma), which is comprised of four well-exposed nested calderas. Each successive collapse event exposes previously infilled lavas, defining a relative chronology. The caldera walls and intracaldera pillow mounds were carefully sampled by the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Doc Ricketts to obtain stratigraphically-controlled samples. Whole rock samples were analyzed for major and trace elements, volcanic glasses were analyzed for major and volatile elements(S, Cl), and plagioclase phenocrysts were separated for mineral and glass inclusion microprobe analysis. Overall, the erupted lavas are mostly subalkalic mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) varying from differentiated to more primitive (6.0 - 8.2 wt. % MgO) with decreasing age. Incompatible elements and REE profiles normalized to primitive mantle suggest that the lavas are transitional to slightly enriched (0.1 - 0.3 wt. % K2O; 1.1 - 2.2 wt. % TiO2), which is unusual for near-ridge seamounts. Sc, which is compatible in clinopyroxene, increases linearly with TiO2 at primitive compositions (>7.0 wt. % MgO). In more evolved seamount basalts (<7.0 wt. % MgO), the low CaO and Sc contents and decreasing CaO/Al2O3 suggest that there is either extensive clinopyroxene fractionation, or mixing with magmas that have undergone extensive clinopyroxene fractionation. MELTS modeling suggests that clinopyroxene fractionation occurs at <6.0 wt. % MgO, inconsistent with the observed clinopyroxene imprint at <7.0 wt. % MgO. The discrepancy could indicate magma mixing. Although whole rock ICP-MS data have some scatter, especially for

  11. Temporal patterns in the acoustic signals of beaked whales at Cross Seamount.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D W; McDonald, M; Polovina, J; Domokos, R; Wiggins, S; Hildebrand, J

    2008-04-23

    Seamounts may influence the distribution of marine mammals through a combination of increased ocean mixing, enhanced local productivity and greater prey availability. To study the effects of seamounts on the presence and acoustic behaviour of cetaceans, we deployed a high-frequency acoustic recording package on the summit of Cross Seamount during April through October 2005. The most frequently detected cetacean vocalizations were echolocation sounds similar to those produced by ziphiid and mesoplodont beaked whales together with buzz-type signals consistent with prey-capture attempts. Beaked whale signals occurred almost entirely at night throughout the six-month deployment. Measurements of prey presence with a Simrad EK-60 fisheries acoustics echo sounder indicate that Cross Seamount may enhance local productivity in near-surface waters. Concentrations of micronekton were aggregated over the seamount in near-surface waters at night, and dense concentrations of nekton were detected across the surface of the summit. Our results suggest that seamounts may provide enhanced foraging opportunities for beaked whales during the night through a combination of increased productivity, vertical migrations by micronekton and local retention of prey. Furthermore, the summit of the seamount may act as a barrier against which whales concentrate prey. PMID:18252660

  12. Generation of mesoscale hydrodynamic phenomena by the Grappler and Whiting Seamounts, southeast of Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents the results of research on topographically generated mesoscale eddies in the region of the Grappler and Whiting Seamounts which are located 22 km southeast of Puerto Rico. Three different data sets were used: (1) site specific hydrographic data, (2) satellite images from TIROS/NOAA, Landsat and Skylab satellites, and (3) free-drifting drogued-buoy tracks. A reference current meter station was established at the Benchmark B OTEC site (17/sup 0/ 57.3' N, 65/sup 0/ 51.5' W), at a depth of 20 meters. Predictions from numerical and analytical models were tested using the site specific data and then compared to experimental results. The hydrographic and drogue data definitively establish the presence of perturbations over the seamounts which are qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Closed contour regions in the distribution of dynamic heights, temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen were found in the surface and subsurface waters above the top of Grappler Seamount. Horizontal flow perturbations, detected down to 100m, probably extend deeper. Whiting Seamount's effect was detected in the depth range from 200 to 300m, also near its top. Two distinct warm and cold regions were detected over this seamount. A cyclonic eddy-like feature located close to Grappler Seamount, in the satellite images, also suggests that eddies are being shed from the seamount region. 42 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Prokaryote diversity and viral production in deep-sea sediments and seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Luna, Gian Marco; Magagnini, Mirko; Manini, Elena; Pusceddu, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Despite the fact that marine prokaryotes and viruses have been increasingly investigated over the last decade, knowledge on prokaryote diversity and viral production in bathyal sediments is limited. We investigated microbial variables in the deep-sea sediments around two seamounts at 3000-m depth in the Tyrrhenian Sea and sediments located at the same depth, but not affected by the presence of the seamounts. We hypothesized that seamounts altered significantly prokaryotes-viruses interactions in surrounding deep-sea sediments. Sediments surrounding seamounts were characterised by prokaryotic abundances significantly higher than those observed in non-seamount sediments. Benthic viral production was about double in sediments close to seamounts than in non-seamount sediments, where virus turnover was up to 3 times lower. Total Bacteria, as assessed by CARD-FISH, dominated prokaryotic community structure, whereas Archaea accounted on average for approximately 10%. The fraction of Crenarchaeota was always higher than Euryarchaeota. Bacterial diversity, estimated using ARISA, was high, with up to 127 different microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in a single sample. Archaeal richness (determined using T-RFLP of the 16S rRNA gene) ranged from 12 to 20 OTUs, while Archaeal evenness was comprised between 0.529±0.018 and 0.623±0.08. Results represent a pointer for future investigations dealing with the interactions between viruses and prokaryotes in deep-sea sediments.

  14. Characteristics of Seamounts in the South China Sea: Implications on Mid-Ocean Ridge Magmatism during Cessation of Seafloor Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Lin, J.

    2014-12-01

    We have analyzed bathymetric, seismic, and geophysical data of the South China Sea (SCS) to investigate the characteristics of seamounts and their implications on the magmatic evolution of a mid-ocean ridge from active seafloor spreading to post-spreading volcanism. Among the two dozens of seamounts that can be identified with ease on multi-beam bathymetry data, about half of them are located along the fossil spreading ridge while the remaining located off axis. The distribution of off-axis seamounts also shows strong asymmetry about the fossil spreading ridge with a much greater population of seamounts concentrated in the northern basin. The shape of individual seamounts is approximated as elliptical cones to yield best-fitting models: the population of seamounts in the SCS has an average major-axis length of 21 km (standard deviation σ = 8.3 km) and an average minor-axis length of 14 km (σ = 5.3 km); The above-seafloor height and volume of the seamounts have average value of 2.9 km (σ = 1.1 km) and 1.21*1012 m3 (σ = 0.99*1012 m3), respectively. However, limited seismic reflection data show that when the parts of the seamounts buried in the sediment are considered, the resulting estimations of the seamount dimension and volume would increase significantly. Overall, seamounts located on the fossil ridge in the East Subbasin have larger dimension and volume than those in the Southwest Subbasin, except for a seamount neat the Zhongnan Fault between the two subbasins. Adjacent seamounts on the fossil ridge have an average separation distance of 53 km (σ = 9.4 km). We are currently investing lithospheric and mantle melting mechanisms that might control the observed characteristics of the spatial distribution and dimension of seamounts in the SCS. Keywords: the South China Sea, fossil spreading ridge, seamounts

  15. Source rock maturation, San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.

    1989-09-01

    Kinetic modeling for thermal histories was simulated for seven wells in the San Juan sag honoring measured geochemical data. Wells in the area of Del Norte field (Sec. 9, T40N, R5E), where minor production has been established from an igneous sill reservoir, show that the Mancos Shale source rocks are in the mature oil generation window as a combined result of high regional heat flow and burial by approximately 2,700 m of Oligocene volcanic rocks. Maturation was relatively recent for this area and insignificant during Laramide subsidence. In the vicinity of Gramps field (Sec. 24, T33N, R2E) on the southwest flank of the San Juan sag, these same source rocks are exposed due to erosion of the volcanic cover but appear to have undergone a similar maturation history. At the north and south margins of the sag, two wells (Champlin 34A-13, Sec. 13, T35N, R4.5E; and Champlin 24A-1, Sec. 1, T44N, R5E) were analyzed and revealed that although the regional heat flow was probably similar to other wells, the depth of burial was insufficient to cause maturation (except where intruded by thick igneous sills that caused localized maturation). The Meridian Oil 23-17 South Fork well (Sec. 17, T39N, R4E) was drilled in a deeper part of the San Juan sag, and source rocks were intruded by numerous igneous sills creating a complex maturation history that includes overmature rocks in the lowermost Mancos Shale, possible CO{sub 2} generation from the calcareous Niobrara Member of the Mancos Shale, and mature source rocks in the upper Mancos Shale.

  16. Petrology and tectonic significance of seamounts within transitional crust east of Orphan Knoll, offshore eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pe-Piper, Georgia; Meredyk, Shawn; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Piper, David J. W.; Edinger, Evan

    2013-12-01

    The Early Cretaceous separation of Newfoundland from Iberia-Ireland is a classic example of a magma-poor continental margin with hyperextension and with widespread minor magmatism resulting in seamounts. This study defines the distribution of seamounts east of Orphan Knoll, and documents and interprets the geochemical character of the one recovered lava sample. Video imagery of lava outcrops, and the sample, were obtained by ROV from Orphan seamount, one of a linear series of small seamounts overlying transitional thinned continental crust on the seaward side of Orphan Knoll. New multibeam bathymetry and legacy seismic data show several seamounts that extend irregularly along the fault-bound NE margin of Orphan Knoll. Whole rock geochemistry shows the sample to be highly alkaline basanite or possibly tephrite. Diopside-hedenbergite, kaersutite and K-feldspar phenocrysts were analyzed by electron microprobe and scanning electron microscope, and alteration minerals including kaolinite were identified by X-ray diffraction. The highly alkaline character of the basanite is similar only to Early Cretaceous volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks erupted through thick continental crust of the Mesoproterozoic Grenville Orogeny. The location of the linear set of seamounts is related to margin-parallel faults on the seaward side of Orphan Knoll that provided a pathway for magma, although ENE-trending lineaments in individual seamounts or seamount groups suggest the influence of oceanic fracture zones. A lower gradient crest to Orphan seamount above 2,200 m suggests subaerial erosion, consistent with the presence of kaolinite as an alteration product and the absence of lava pillows at and above this depth.

  17. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico. (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  18. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  19. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  20. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  1. High-Resolution Imaging of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    To date, seismic experiments have been key in our understanding of the internal structure of volcanic systems. However, most experiments, especially subaerial-based, are often restricted to refraction geometries with limited numbers of sources and receivers, and employ smoothing constraints required by tomographic inversions that produce smoothed and blurry images with spatial resolutions well below the length scale of important features that define these magmatic systems. Taking advantage of the high density of sources and receivers from multichannel seismic (MCS) data should, in principle, allow detailed images of velocity and reflectivity to be recovered. Unfortunately, the depth of mid-ocean ridges has the detrimental effect of concealing critical velocity information behind the seafloor reflection, preventing first arrival travel-time tomographic approaches from imaging the shallowest and most heterogeneous part of the crust. To overcome the limitations of the acquisition geometry, here we are using an innovative multistep approach. We combine a synthetic ocean bottom experiment (SOBE), 3-D traveltime tomography, 2D elastic full waveform and a reverse time migration (RTM) formalism, and present one of the most detailed imagery to date of a massive and complex magmatic system beneath Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano that lies at the intersection of the Juan de Fuca ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain. We present high-resolution images along 12 seismic lines that span the volcano. We refine the extent/volume of the main crustal magma reservoir that lies beneath the central caldera. We investigate the extent, volume and physical state of a secondary magma body present to the southwest and study its connections with the main magma reservoir. Additionally, we present a 3D tomographic model of the entire volcano that reveals a subsiding caldera floor that provides a near perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows, supporting a "trapdoor

  2. Seismic Structure of the Shallow Mantle Beneath the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderBeek, B. P.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Soule, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the seismic structure of the shallow mantle beneath the intermediate-spreading Endeavor segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Our results provide insight into the relationship between magma supply from the mantle and overlying ridge crest processes. We use seismic energy refracted below the Moho (Pn), as recorded by the Endeavor tomography (ETOMO) experiment, to image the anisotropic and isotropic P wave velocity structure. The ETOMO experiment was an active source seismic study conducted in August 2009 as part of the RIDGE2000 science program. The experimental area extends 100 km along- and 60 km across-axis and encompasses active hydrothermal vent fields near the segment center, the eastern end of the Heck seamount chain, and two overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at either end of the segment. Previous tomographic analyses of seismic arrivals refracted through the crust (Pg), and reflected off the Moho (PmP), constrain a three-dimensional starting model of crustal velocity and thickness. These Pg and PmP arrivals are incorporated in our inversion of Pn travel-time data to further constrain the isotropic and anisotropic mantle velocity structure. Preliminary results reveal three distinct mantle low-velocity zones, inferred as regions of mantle melt delivery to the base of the crust, that are located: (i) off-axis near the segment center, (ii) beneath the Endeavor-West Valley OSC, and (iii) beneath the Cobb OSC near Split Seamount. The mantle anomalies are located at intervals of ~30 to 40 km along-axis and the low velocity anomalies beneath the OSCs are comparable in magnitude to the one located near the segment center. The direction of shallow mantle flow is inferred from azimuthal variations in Pn travel-time residuals relative to a homogeneous isotropic mantle. Continuing analysis will focus on constraining spatial variations in the orientation of azimuthal anisotropy. On the basis of our results, we will discuss the transport of

  3. Learning to Characterize Submarine Lava Flow Morphology at Seamounts and Spreading Centers using High Definition Video and Photomosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fundis, A. T.; Sautter, L. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Kerr-Riess, M.; Denny, A. R.; Elend, M.

    2010-12-01

    In August, 2010 the UW ENLIGHTEN ’10 expedition provided ~140 hours of seafloor HD video footage at Axial Seamount, the most magmatically robust submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During this expedition, direct imagery from an Insite Pacific HD camera mounted on the ROV Jason 2 was used to classify broad expanses of seafloor where high power (8 kw) and high bandwidth (10 Gb/s) fiber optic cable will be laid as part of the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF funded Ocean Observatories Initiative. The cable will provide power and two-way, real-time communication to an array of >20 sensors deployed at the summit of the volcano and at active sites of hydrothermal venting to investigate how active processes within the volcano and at seafloor hot springs within the caldera are connected. In addition to HD imagery, over 10,000 overlapping photographs from a down-looking still camera were merged and co-registered to create high resolution photomosaics of two areas within Axial’s caldera. Thousands of additional images were taken to characterize the seafloor along proposed cable routes, allowing optimal routes to be planned well in advance of deployment. Lowest risk areas included those free of large collapse basins, steep flow fronts and fissures. Characterizing the modes of lava distribution across the seafloor is crucial to understanding the construction history of the upper oceanic crust at mid-ocean ridges. In part, reconstruction of crustal development and eruptive histories can be inferred from surface flow morphologies, which provide insights into lava emplacement dynamics and effusion rates of past eruptions. An online resource is under development that will educate students about lava flow morphologies through the use of HD video and still photographs. The objective of the LavaFlow exercise is to map out a proposed cable route across the Axial Seamount caldera. Students are first trained in appropriate terminology and background content

  4. Morphology, petrography, age and origin of Fogo Seamount chain, offshore eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pe-Piper, G.; de Jonge, A.; Piper, D. J. W.; Jansa, L. F.

    2003-04-01

    The Fogo Seamounts are located approximately 500 km offshore from Newfoundland to the southwest of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. This complex seamount chain is early Cretaceous in age and is partially buried under later continental slope deposits. It has in the past been ascribed to the passage of a Canary or Azores hot spot. The seamounts are developed along the northeastern transform margin of the Jurassic central Atlantic Ocean. The Narwhal F-99 well was drilled in 1986 on the continental slope into one buried seamount. In this study, we bring together unpublished data on the bathymetry, seismic-reflection character, and distribution of the Fogo Seamounts and interpret new petrographic, geochemical, isotopic and geochronological data from a dredge sample from the central part of the seamount chain and from the Narwhal F-99 well, making comparisons with other offshore volcanic rocks on the eastern Canadian margin. Petrographically, the seamount samples consist of vitrophyric basalt, with clinopyroxene at Narwhal and kaersutite in the dredge sample. Chemically, the samples are olivine basalt with a low Mg number and low concentration of transition metals. Trace element and REE abundances are similar to those of other early Cretaceous volcanic rocks on the southeast Canadian margin. Three petrogenetic types of mafic magma are recognised in the area. The dredge sample is typical OIB rather alkalic basalts and similar to those in other seamount chains. Rocks at Narwhal and Brant have a greater signature of a depleted mantle source (are more tholeiitic). All have Nd isotopes similar to the Newfoundland and New England seamounts. In Orpheus graben to the northwest, there appears to have been greater crustal contamination, either from the crust in the region or from mantle previously enriched in crustal contaminants. The dredge sample gave a 40Ar/39Ar age of 130.3 +/- 1.3 Ma (Hauterivian). A K/Ar age from the Narwhal F-99 well of 127 +/- 6 Ma is inconsistent with

  5. Towards a paleolatitude record from the Louisville Seamount trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J. S.; Pressling, N.; Hoshi, H.; Yamazaki, T.; Scientists, E. 3; IODP Expedition 330 Scientists

    2011-12-01

    The 4300 km long Louisville Seamount trail is the South Pacific counterpart of the much better studied Hawaii-Emperor chain. Both chains are thought to reflect motion of the Pacific plate over persistent mantle melting anomalies although the stationarity of these hotspots, and thus their suitability as a reference frame for Pacific plate motions, remains uncertain. Drilling at the Emperor Seamounts documented an ~15° southward shift of the Hawaiian hotspot between about 80 and 50 Ma. IODP Expedition 330 provided the first drillcore samples from the Louisville chain, with a primary goal of documenting the paleolatitudes of seamounts with ages comparable to those drilled in the Hawaii-Emperor chain. Six sites were drilled on five Louisville guyots. The recovered materials include sediments, submarine lava flows/pillows, less abundant subaerial flows and a substantial proportion of volcaniclastic and hyaloclastite material. Sites U1374 and U1373 on Rigil Guyot (28.6°S, ~73 Ma) penetrated 522m and 66m, respectively, and yielded about thirty cooling units including both normal and reversed polarity flows. Approximately 20 normal polarity cooling units were recovered from the 233m cored interval at Site U1372 on Canopus Guyot (26.5°, ~76 Ma). Site U1376 on Burton Guyot (32.2°, ~64 Ma) penetrated 182m, with 11 reversed polarity flows. A total of 17 reversed polarity cooling units were sampled at Hadar Guyot (38.2°S, ~50 Ma) despite more limited penetration. Characteristic remanent magnetization directions were determined for more than 22,000 two-cm intervals on the archive half cores. The most reliable of these data were used to calculate average directions for individual core pieces that compare well with results from stepwise demagnetization of nearly 500 discrete samples. Because of the abundance of (mostly submarine) volcaniclastic material recovered, estimating the paleolatitude for the Louisville guyots is less straightforward than for the sites on the Hawaii

  6. Extraordinarily high biomass benthic community on Southern Ocean seamounts.

    PubMed

    Thresher, R E; Adkins, J; Fallon, S J; Gowlett-Holmes, K; Althaus, F; Williams, A

    2011-01-01

    We describe a previously unknown assemblage of seamount-associated megabenthos that has by far the highest peak biomass reported in the deep-sea outside of vent communities. The assemblage was found at depths of 2-2.5 km on rocky geomorphic features off the southeast coast of Australia, in an area near the Sub-Antarctic Zone characterised by high rates of surface productivity and carbon export to the deep-ocean. These conditions, and the taxa in the assemblage, are widely distributed around the Southern mid-latitudes, suggesting the high-biomass assemblage is also likely to be widespread. The role of this assemblage in regional ecosystem and carbon dynamics and its sensitivities to anthropogenic impacts are unknown. The discovery highlights the lack of information on deep-sea biota worldwide and the potential for unanticipated impacts of deep-sea exploitation. PMID:22355636

  7. Extraordinarily high biomass benthic community on Southern Ocean seamounts

    PubMed Central

    Thresher, R. E.; Adkins, J.; Fallon, S. J.; Gowlett-Holmes, K.; Althaus, F.; Williams, A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a previously unknown assemblage of seamount-associated megabenthos that has by far the highest peak biomass reported in the deep-sea outside of vent communities. The assemblage was found at depths of 2–2.5 km on rocky geomorphic features off the southeast coast of Australia, in an area near the Sub-Antarctic Zone characterised by high rates of surface productivity and carbon export to the deep-ocean. These conditions, and the taxa in the assemblage, are widely distributed around the Southern mid-latitudes, suggesting the high-biomass assemblage is also likely to be widespread. The role of this assemblage in regional ecosystem and carbon dynamics and its sensitivities to anthropogenic impacts are unknown. The discovery highlights the lack of information on deep-sea biota worldwide and the potential for unanticipated impacts of deep-sea exploitation. PMID:22355636

  8. Geochemistry of hydrothermal plume in the Suiyo Seamount Caldera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitashima, K.; Maeda, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Chemical compounds of the hot basalt origin are discharged into the deep ocean via hydrothermal plume by the deep-sea hydrothermal activity. The hydrothermal plume is widely diffused to the ocean by mixing with ambient seawater. Chemical reactions and interactions with microorganisms in the diffusion process of the hydrothermal plume are important to comprehend the oceanic geochemical cycles. Recently, it has been clarified that the variation of hydrothermal activity is greatly controlled in the tidal current. Not only geochemical observation but also physical observation, such as water current measurement, are necessary for the understanding of the deep-sea hydrothermal systems including the behavior of hydrothermal plume. In order to observe the diffusion process of hydrothermal plumes, sampling and chemical mapping of the hydrothermal plume and measurement of water current were carried out at the Suiyo Seamount Caldera during research cruises under the ?Archaean Park? project funded by MEXT. The three-dimensional acoustic current meters were moored at the height of 13m and 125m above the bottom in the Suiyo Seamount Caldera. At the 13m height, average water current speed and current direction were 10.46 cm/second and 228.1 degrees, respectively, and maximum water current speed was over 40.46 cm/second. On the other hand, average water current speed and current direction at the 125m height were 3.87 cm/second and 57.8 degrees, respectively. The strong water current of the southwest direction in 24 hours periods existed near bottom of the caldera. In addition, downward current and water temperature depreciation were observed, when there was the strong current in 24 hours periods. These results suggest that the low-temperature ocean water around the Suiyo Seamount flows toward the bottom of caldera periodically. The mini CTDT-RMS mounted twelve 1.2L Niskin bottles and the in-situ pH sensor were installed on the ROV or manned submersible. The hydrothermal plume

  9. Composition and origin of hydrothermal ironstones from central Pacific seamounts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Hsueh-Wen, Y.; Gunn, S.H.; Gibbs, A.E.; Chung-ho, W.

    1994-01-01

    Ironstones recovered from five Late Cretaceous seamounts in the central Pacific region probably formed during late-stage edifice-building volcanism. Ironstones are dense and compact with the appearance of brown chert. The ironstones are characterized by a goethite mineralogy with FeOOH contents up to 88%, extreme fractionation of Fe and Mn, low trace-element and rare earth element abundances, low Co Zn ratios, and isotopic equilibration temperatures of about 20-45 ??C. These characteristics indicate that the ironstones formed from hydrothermal fluids. Ironstones probably formed below the seawater-seafloor interface, as indicated by their occurrence as a proximal hydrothermal deposit, presence of primary goethite cement, pervasive replacement of rocks by goethite, and absence of interbedded pyro-clastic beds. ?? 1994.

  10. Frequency synchronization of blue whale calls near Pioneer Seamount.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michael D; Garfield, Newell; Bland, Roger W

    2010-07-01

    Vocalizations of blue whales were recorded with a cabled hydrophone array at Pioneer Seamount, 50 miles off the California coast. Most calls occurred in repeated sequences of two-call pairs (A, then B). The B call is a frequency-modulated tone highly repeatable in form and pitch. A model of this sound is described which permits detecting very small frequency shifts. B calls are found to be aligned in frequency to about one part in 180. This requires very fine pitch discrimination and control over calling frequency, and suggests that synchronizing to a common frequency pattern carries some adaptive advantage. Some possibilities for acoustic sensing by whales requiring this fine frequency resolution are discussed. PMID:20649243

  11. The magnetisation of Rosemary Bank Seamount, Rockall Trough, northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, P. R.; Roberts, D. G.

    1981-08-01

    Rosemary Bank is a non-uniformly magnetised seamount in the northern Rockall Trough. The reversely magnetised major component of the anomaly field was simulated by a numerical method and modelled using the Talwani three-dimensional magnetics program. The results suggest a higher Koenigsberger ratio than earlier reported for Rosemary Bank and a remanent magnetisation vector compatible with post-Jurassic formation and probably of a Late Cretaceous to Tertiary age. The limited depth to the base of the model implies that Rosemary Bank post-dates the underlying basement in agreement with a volcanic origin. The residual of the observed anomaly field is interpreted as being caused by normally magnetised bodies within and on top of the bank. This suggests subsequent volcanic activity during an interval of normal polarity.

  12. Seamounts Identified By High-Resolution Imagery Offshore Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, J. F.; Kagasi, J.; Gikuhi, M.; Njuguna, S.

    2008-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry and 2-D seismic reflection surveys were carried out between 2007 and 2008 by the Government of Kenya for the purpose of delineating Kenya's extended continental shelf beyond the 200 nautical mile boundary, as allowed under Article 76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). The unique dataset acquired includes areas surveyed for the first time and provides new information on the geological processes of the continental shelf, slope and abyssal plain along the Kenyan passive margin. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry of almost the entire Kenyan continental slope was acquired using two multibeam systems (Kongsberg Simrad EM120 and EM710) aboard the M/V L'Espoir in November/December 2007. A multi-channel seismic survey followed in April/May 2008 (R/V Akademik Alexander Karpinsky) and provided high-resolution seismic reflection profiles. During these surveys, three features interpreted to be seamounts were discovered along Kenya's continental slope at water depths between 2750 and 3500 m. The size of the features varies from 2.5 to 10 km in diameter and 570 to 1740 m in height. The Davie Fracture Zone, a north-south trending transform fault was also identified in the seismic reflection profiles. The ridge, possibly extending from 26°S off south Madagascar to as far north as 2°S, is thought to have been created by the separation and direction of motion of Madagascar from Africa that began in the middle Jurassic. The discovery of these features and the integration of both multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles provides new information in the study of seamount distribution and their relationship to nearby transform faults.

  13. Volcanic inflation of Axial Seamount since the 1998 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, S. L.; Chadwick, W.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2000, ambient seawater pressure has been precisely measured at five seafloor benchmarks inside the summit caldera at Axial Seamount in order to measure their relative depth and monitor volcanic inflation that has been occurring since an eruption in 1998. A remotely operated vehicle has been used to deploy a mobile pressure recorder (MPR) in campaign-style surveys, with additional seawater pressure data collected at the caldera center with multiyear deployments of continuously recording bottom pressure recorders (BPRs). Our previous measurements at Axial Seamount have shown steady inflation of the caldera center through 2007 and the spatial pattern of uplift has been consistent with magma storage in a shallow reservoir underlying the caldera at a depth of 3.5 km. This is the only location in the world where long-term monitoring of volcanic inflation has been accomplished at a submarine volcano. Here we present the results of new pressure data (both MPR and BPR) collected during a cruise on board the R/V Thomas Thompson in August-September 2010 and using the Jason ROV. Three years have passed since the previous survey, providing enough time to distinguish between two alternative models of inflation and magma recharge for the volcano. This allows us to refine our forecast for the next eruption at Axial and estimate total uplift that has occurred since the 1998 eruption. During the 2010 survey we also deployed new concrete benchmarks to replace our original galvanized steel benchmarks. The new benchmarks are larger and much heavier, and we expect them to be much more durable and stable over long time periods and help keep measurement errors as small as possible. We installed a sixth benchmark at a new site within the caldera, near the Ashes vent field, which will help constrain our modeling of the inflation signal in future years.

  14. The fish fauna of Ampère Seamount (NE Atlantic) and the adjacent abyssal plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Bernd; Vieira, Rui P.; Christiansen, Sabine; Denda, Anneke; Oliveira, Frederico; Gonçalves, Jorge M. S.

    2015-03-01

    An inventory of benthic and benthopelagic fishes is presented as a result of two exploratory surveys around Ampère Seamount, between Madeira and the Portuguese mainland, covering water depths from 60 to 4,400 m. A total of 239 fishes were collected using different types of sampling gear. Three chondrichthyan species and 31 teleosts in 21 families were identified. The collections showed a vertical zonation with little overlap, but indications for an affinity of species to certain water masses were only vague. Although most of the species present new records for Ampère Seamount, all of them have been known for the NE Atlantic; endemic species were not found. The comparison with fish communities at other NE Atlantic seamounts indicates that despite a high ichthyofaunal similarity, which supports the "stepping stone" hypothesis of species dispersal, some differences can be attributed to the local features of the seamounts.

  15. 76 FR 8330 - Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Modification to Advance Notification Period...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-BA58 Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Modification to Advance Notification Period for Fishery Closures...

  16. Chemically diverse, sporadic volcanism at seamounts offshore southern and Baja California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, A.S.; Gunn, S.H.; Bohrson, W.A.; Gray, L.-B.; Hein, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Compositions of lavas from seven small to medium-sized seamounts offshore southern and Baja California, include low-K2O tholeiitic, transitional, and mildly to moderately alkalic basalt and their differentiates. The seamounts with these MORB-like lavas are inferred to have formed at or near the spreading center. Based on 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion techniques, MORB-like lava from one of the northern edifices is as old as the underlying oceanic crust (>20 Ma), indicating that it originated at a spreading center. Other seamount lava ages are much younger than the oceanic crust on which they reside. Some of the seamounts with transitional and alkalic lavas may have formed as part of a short, age-progressive chain formed by a short-lived mantle plume. Many others, may have resulted from upwelling mantle diapirs in response to localized extension. -from Authors

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Mariprofundus ferrooxydans Strain JV-1, Isolated from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Heather; Hager, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    Mariprofundus ferrooxydans strain JV-1 was isolated in 1998 from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii. Here, we present the draft genome of strain JV-1, which shows similarity to other sequenced Mariprofundus isolates, strains PV-1 and M34. PMID:26450720

  18. 75 FR 51237 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish; Management Measures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This document is also available at www.gpoaccess.gov/fr . Fishing for pelagic... seamounts lie west of 180 W. and north of 28 N., to the northwest of Kure Atoll in the Northwestern...

  19. Crustal structure of the Central Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina (31°S) using teleseismic receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammirati, Jean-Baptiste; Alvarado, Patricia; Perarnau, Marcelo; Saez, Mauro; Monsalvo, Guillermo

    2013-10-01

    The subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American plate around 31°S is characterized by flat slab geometry. The (Chilean) Pampean flat slab of Argentina associated with the subduction of the Juan Fernandez ridge lies in a region of a series of foreland uplifts corresponding to the thin-skinned Precordillera and basement cored Sierras Pampeanas ranges. The SIEMBRA project deployed 40 broadband stations in 2008-2009 in both the Precordillera and the Sierras Pampeanas with the aim to foster the understanding of the entire central Andean flat slab region. One of the SIEMBRA station (DOCA) located on the western flank of Sierra de la Invernada in the Central Precordillera appears particularly appropriate to study the crustal structure and eventually detect discontinuities related to terranes establishment. We thus performed a receiver function analysis using teleseismic data recorded at the DOCA station during the SIEMBRA project and from October 2011 to June 2012 using a broadband UNSJ (National University of San Juan) seismic station with the purpose to obtain crustal images with details of the intracrustal structure consistent with a mechanism that could explains both the observed earthquake depths and the uplift pattern in the Central Precordillera. Our results show that the Moho beneath the Precordillera lies at a depth of about 66 km. The Moho signal appears diminished and behaves irregularly as a function of azimuthal orientations. Although this observation could be the result of an irregular geometry it also correlates with the hypothesis of partial eclogitisation in the lower crust. Two mid-crustal discontinuities have also been revealed. The shallower one could correspond to a décollement level between the Precordilleran strata and the Cuyania basement at 21 km depth. The deeper one which the presence has been matched with a sharp decrease of the crustal seismic activity drove us to the hypothesis of a major change in crustal composition at 36 km

  20. Geophysical investigation of seamounts near the Ogasawara fracture zone, western Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, T.-G.; Lee, Kenneth; Hein, J.R.; Moon, J.-W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of multi-channel seismic data obtained during 2000-2001 on seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone (OFZ) northwest of the Marshall Islands in the western Pacific. The OFZ is unique in that it is a wide rift zone that includes many seamounts. Seven units are delineated on the basis of acoustic characteristics and depth: three units (I, II, and III) on the summit of seamounts and four units (IV, V, VI, and VII) in basins. Acoustic characteristics of layers on the summit of guyots and dredged samples indicate that the seamounts had been built above sea level by volcanism. This was followed by reef growth along the summit margin, which enabled deposition of shallow-water carbonates on the summit, and finally by subsidence of the edifices. The subsidence depth of the seamounts, estimated from the lower boundary of unit II, ranges between 1,550 and 2,040 m. The thick unit I of the southern seamounts is correlated with proximity to the equatorial high productivity zone, whereas local currents may have strongly affected the distribution of unit I on northern seamounts. A seismic profile in the basin around the Ita Mai Tai and OSM4 seamounts shows an unconformity between units IV and V, which is widespread from the East Mariana Basin to the Pigafetta Basin. Copyright ?? The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS); The Seismological Society of Japan; The Volcanological Society of Japan; The Geodetic Society of Japan; The Japanese Society for Planetary Sciences; TERRAPUB.

  1. Model Simulations of Waves in Hurricane Juan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrie, W.; Toulany, B.; Padilla-Hernandez, R.; Hu, Y.; Smith, P.; Zhang, W.; Zou, Q.; Ren, X.

    2004-05-01

    Hurricane Juan made landfall at 0300 UTC near Halifax Nova Scotia. This was a category 2 hurricane with winds of 44 m/s, the largest storm to pass over these coastal areas in several decades. Associated high ocean waves were experienced in coastal waters, from Peggy's Cove to Sheet Harbour, growing to epic proportions on the Scotian Shelf, and exceeding the 100-year return wave based on the present climatology. As part of the GoMOOS program (Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System, www.gomoos.org), winds from the USA Navy COAMPS (Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Model Prediction System) were used to evaluate and compare three widely-used third generation numerical wave models, SWAN, WAM and WaveWatch-III (hereafter WW3) for accuracy, with in situ measurements. Model comparisons consist of a set of composite model systems, respectively nesting WAM, WW3 and SWAN in WAM and WW3. We report results from the intermediate-resolution grid for Hurricane Juan. Wave measurements were made using four operational deep-water buoys (C44258, C44142, C44137, 44005), by a conventional directional wave rider (DWR) moored offshore from Lunenburg Bay, and also by two acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) located (1) near an oil rig on Sable Island Bank, in relatively shallow water, and (2) near the outer boundary of Lunenburg Bay. We discuss the reliability of DWR wave data compared to ADCP wave data. We show that all models provide reliable hindcasts for significant wave height (Hs) and for peak period (Tp) for Juan, although a clear under-estimation of Hs at the peak of the storm is evident, compared to observations. A feature in the COAMPS storm simulation is that the storm track appears to be slightly to the east of that of Quikscat scatterometer data. Comparisons between models and 2-dimensional wave spectra are presented. Preliminary results suggest that the recently released upgrade to the WW3 model shows slightly enhanced skill compared to the other models.

  2. Sea-surface and deep-magnetic data at Vavilov Seamount, Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccini, Filippo; Cocchi, Luca; Locritani, Marina; Carmisciano, Cosmo

    2016-04-01

    Sea surface and deep magnetic data were acquired at Vavilov seamount, in the Tyrrhenian sea. Vavilov seamount is located in the central portion of the homonymous Vavilov basin. The seamount stands about 2800 meters above the seafloor at 3600 meters depth, with the top at about 800 meters below the sea level. Oceanization of the basin occurred during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene. The magnetic data were collected in 2011 on board the Nave Ammiraglio Magnaghi by using a Marine Magnetics Seaspy magnetometer. The sea surface magnetic survey was realized with two different grids: the first regional one, with 13 parallel lines about 43 Km long, 3 Km spaced (104° N oriented) and 6 tie control lines about 40 Km long, 5 Km spaced (014° N oriented). The second one was realized to better define the volcanic structure of the seamount, and was achieved by acquiring 12 magnetic parallel lines (104° N), 18 Km long and 1 Km spaced. The deep magnetic data were collected by towing a magnetic sensor coupled with a L3 sidescan sonar Klein 3000. A set of 5 parallel lines were acquired in correspondence of the bathymetric top of the seamount with the sensor flying at about constant depth of 700 meters. These data represents the first near-bottom magnetic data collected for Vavilov seamount and it allows comparison between sea-surface and deep magnetic data.

  3. Isolated communities of Epsilonproteobacteria in hydrothermal vent fluids of the Mariana Arc seamounts.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Cantin, Holly V; Huse, Susan M; Welch, David B Mark; Sogin, Mitchell L; Butterfield, David A

    2010-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vent fluids represent access points to diverse microbial communities living in oceanic crust. This study examined the distribution, relative abundance, and diversity of Epsilonproteobacteria in 14 low-temperature vent fluids from five volcanically active seamounts of the Mariana Arc using a 454 tag sequencing approach. Most vent fluids were enriched in cell concentrations compared with background seawater, and quantitative PCR results indicated that all fluids were dominated by bacteria. Operational taxonomic unit-based statistical tools applied to 454 data show that all vents from the northern end of the Mariana Arc grouped together, to the exclusion of southern arc seamounts, which were as distinct from one another as they were from northern seamounts. Statistical analysis also showed a significant relationship between seamount and individual vent groupings, suggesting that community membership may be linked to geographical isolation and not geochemical parameters. However, while there may be large-scale geographic differences, distance is not the distinguishing factor in the microbial community composition. At the local scale, most vents host a distinct population of Epsilonproteobacteria, regardless of seamount location. This suggests that there may be barriers to exchange and dispersal for these vent endemic microorganisms at hydrothermal seamounts of the Mariana Arc. PMID:20533947

  4. Co-rich Mn crusts from the Magellan Seamount cluster: the long journey through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasby, Geoffrey P.; Ren, Xiangwen; Shi, Xuefa; Pulyaeva, Irina A.

    2007-10-01

    The Magellan seamounts began forming as large submarine shield volcanoes south of the equator during the Cretaceous. These volcanoes formed as a cluster on the small Pacific plate in a period when tectonic stress was absent. Thermal subsidence of the seafloor led to sinking of these volcanoes and the formation of guyots as the seamounts crossed the equatorial South Pacific (10-0°S) sequentially and ocean surface temperatures became too high for calcareous organisms to survive. Guyot formation was completed between about 59 and 45 Ma and the guyots became phosphatized at about 39-34 and 27-21 Ma. Ferromanganese crusts began formation as proto-crusts on the seamounts and guyots of the Magellan Seamount cluster towards the end of the Cretaceous up to 55 Ma after the formation of the seamounts themselves. The chemical composition of these crusts evolved over time in a series of steps in response to changes in global climate and ocean circulation. The great thickness of these crusts (up to 15-20 cm) reflects their very long period of growth. The high Co contents of the outer parts of the crusts are a consequence of the increasing deep circulation of the ocean and the resulting deepening of the oxygen minimum zone with time. Growth of the Co-rich Mn crusts in the Magellan Seamount cluster can be considered to be the culmination of a long journey through time.

  5. Utility of San Juan basin silcretes

    SciTech Connect

    Gassaway, J.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Silcretes are silicified paleosols that formed as part of deep-weathering profiles during depositional hiatuses under humid climatic regimes. They provide chronostratigraphic support for hypotheses regarding local and regional tectonic and surface events. Silcrete occurs in the San Juan basin (SJB), near the top of the Kirtland Shale (Cretaceous), in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone (Paleocene), and in the Nacimiento Formation (Paleocene). These occurrences mark the southern limit of a 1,000 mi-long, discontinuous outcrop of silcrete discovered during reconnaissance of 16 Western Interior basins. These silcretes, common in Upper Cretaceous to middle Paleocene rocks, are rare in older and younger rocks. Recognition of silcrete occurrences may prove useful to field geologists where other chronostratigraphic information is absent. For example, geologists searching for the K-T boundary could use the lowest silcrete as a starting point.

  6. Availability of hydrologic data in San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klausing, R.L.; Welder, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    San Juan County, in the northwestern corner of New Mexico, uses surface water from the San Juan, Animas, and La Plata Rivers as a principal source of water for the county, but the water in these streams is fully appropriated. Ground water is present in San Juan County in several bedrock formations and in the alluvium of the river valleys. This report describes the hydrologic data that have been collected in San Juan County, presents examples of the data, shows the locations of the data-collection sites, and indicates where more complete records may be obtained. This data base should be helpful in assessing the quantity, quality, and availability of the county 's water resources. Information collected at 1,877 water wells, 39 streamflow-gaging stations, and 172 springs is presented. The collection sites and geology are shown on a base map with a scale of 1 inch = 2 miles. (USGS).

  7. SAN JUAN BAY ESTUARY PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION REVIEW ATTACHMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compilation of attachments referenced in the San Juan Bay Estuary Program Implementation Review (2004). Materials include, entity reports, water and sediment quality action plans, progress reports, correspondence with local municipalities and Puerto Rican governmental agencies,...

  8. Meiofauna assemblages of the Condor Seamount (North-East Atlantic Ocean) and adjacent deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Bongiorni, Lucia; Cattaneo, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto; Santos, Ricardo Serrão

    2013-12-01

    Seamounts are currently considered hotspots of biodiversity and biomass for macro- and megabenthic taxa, but knowledge of meiofauna is still limited. Studies have revealed the existence of highly diverse meiofauna assemblages; however most data are mainly qualitative or focused only on specific groups, thus preventing comparisons among seamounts and with other deep-sea areas. This study, conducted on Condor Seamount (Azores, North-East Atlantic Ocean), describes variation in abundance, biomass, community structure and biodiversity of benthic meiofauna from five sites located on the Condor Seamount: and one site away from the seamount. While the summit of the seamount hosted the highest alpha biodiversity, the flanks and the bases showed a rich meiofauna assemblage in terms of abundance and biomass. The observed marked differences in grain size composition of sediments reflected the oceanographic conditions impacting different sectors of the Condor seamount, and could play an important role in the spatial distribution of different meiofaunal taxa. Trophic conditions (biochemical composition of organic matter) explained 78% of the variability in the meiofauna biomass pattern while sediment grain influenced the vertical distribution of meiofauna and only partially explained meiofaunal taxa composition. This study provides a further advancement in the knowledge of meiofaunal communities of seamounts. Only a deeper understanding of the whole benthic communities (including meiofauna) will allow to elaborate effective management and conservation tools for seamount ecosystems.

  9. Petrological variability in recent magmatism at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Gill, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount is known for its compositional homogeneity. We report on petrological variability in lavas from the summit caldera and rims of Axial Seamount during the last ~1.2ka and its implications for shallow crustal magma dynamics. AUVs have mapped the summit at ~1 m resolution, and ROVs have collected numerous lavas and volcaniclastic cores. Geospatial, superpositional, compositional, and age constraint data were used to outline flow units and construct geologic maps. Nearly 200 glasses from summit lavas were analyzed for major elements. A subset of ~20 samples were analyzed for selected trace elements, Pb-, U-, and Th- isotope ratios, and 226Ra and 210Pb. The results a) confirm a high degree compositional homogeneity, b) demonstrate a more restricted range in Pb-isotope ratios than previous data, c) indicate uniform compositional source component(s) genetically linked to that of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, and d) expand the dataset of distinctly-low 230Th/232Th lavas and subdivide them into geospatial groups. Hundreds of volcaniclastic grains collected from subsurface depths of up to several tens of cm analyzed for major elements extend the record of summit magmatism beyond what is exposed. Summit lava glasses are compositionally N-MORB. Summit volcaniclastics range to higher MgO (+1%); thus, magmatism likely included more mafic episodes than is recorded in the flows as yet sampled or that volcaniclastics preferentially sample higher temperature lavas. Negative correlation of CaO/Al2O3 with MgO in all glasses suggests fractionation from parental melt(s) of plag ± ol but not cpx. K2O/TiO2 ranges are typical for much of the JdFR. Summit lavas range from aphyric to ~35% plag phyric ± a few % ol. Plag-phyric summit lavas tend to have greater MgO (>7.5%), lower CaO/Al2O3 (<0.80), and lower K2O/TiO2 (<0.10) compared to aphyric lavas. For ~18 caldera flows with absolute or relative age control, plag-phyric lavas are older than aphyric lavas, the oldest of

  10. Caldera formation and varied eruption styles on North Pacific seamounts: the clastic lithofacies record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, Ryan A.; Clague, Dave A.; Paduan, Jennifer B.

    2014-08-01

    Detailed examination of volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks collected from the Taney (30 Ma), President Jackson (4 Ma), Vance (3 Ma) and Alarcon (2 Ma) near-ridge seamount chains of the North Pacific reveals seven clastic lithofacies that record various modes of eruption, magma fragmentation, and particle dispersal. Lithofacies are distinguished by differences in lithology, bedding habit, compositional heterogeneity, and relationship to volcanic landforms. Breccia lithofacies were produced through mechanical fragmentation during caldera collapse (polymict) or effusive eruptions onto steep slopes (monomict). Rare globular lapilli mudstone lithofacies contain clasts with morphologies formed by magma-sediment mingling processes (peperite). Seamount summit pyroclastic deposits include proximal lapilli tuff with vesicular pyroclasts, and more distal limu o Pele tuff lithofacies. Much finer-grained hydrothermal mudstone/tuff lithofacies occurs around caldera rims and contains greenschist minerals, hydrothermal clays and basaltic ash that record subsurface phreatomagmatic fragmentation processes. Very fine-grained ash is transported to distal regions by oceanic currents and hydrothermal plumes, and is a component of the regional pelagic sediment budget. Pyroclastic lithofacies only occur on seamount summits suggesting formation during the latter stages of seamount evolution. As a seamount drifts away from an adjacent ridge axis and associated heat source, its magma supply is reduced allowing for magmatic gas buildup and mild explosive eruptions. During this stage, the diminished melt supply under the seamount is unable to fully compensate for extension along the ridge axis and vertical seamount growth. Lateral intrusion into spreading-related structures in this stage causes magma withdrawal and caldera formation. Formation of caldera ring faults also promotes seawater ingress into subseafloor hydrothermal cells, which interact with magma conduits causing phreatomagmatic

  11. Re-examining the global distribution of seamounts using neural network techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, A. P.; Kalnins, L. M.; Trampert, J.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of seamounts and ocean islands, ranging from small hills just a few hundred meters in height to mountains such as Mauna Kea, offers key insights into the patterns of intraplate volcanism and their spatial and temporal variations. This may in turn provide information about the underlying lithosphere and asthenosphere. Mapping the global distribution of seamounts is complicated by the limitations of marine topography data and by the scale of the problem: 335 billion km2 of ocean must be searched. Whilst seamounts are comparatively easy to identify by visual inspection, automating this identification is often difficult, since a mathematical description of the feature is required. Previous techniques include modelling seamounts using simple Gaussian or elliptical polynomial models (e.g. Kim & Wessel, 2011) or searching for sinks in inverted bathymetry data (e.g. Kitchingman & Lai, 2004). However, seamounts exhibit significant natural variation, and any particular model may not suit all examples. It is therefore difficult to develop an algorithm that detects the full range of seamount morphologies, yet excludes other features of different origin but similar general form, such as tectonic fabric or abyssal hills. One potential avenue lies in the use of neural networks, or other learning algorithms, inspired by the pattern-recognition ability of the brain. Rather than formulating an textit{a priori} description of the feature, a neural network assimilates characteristics from a set of hand-picked examples. Here, we use an autoencoder network to assess whether small patches of ocean floor display the representative characteristics learnt by our network. From this, we can build up a database of seamount locations, with early indications suggesting a reduction in false positives such as abyssal hills when compared with traditional methods, whilst results over large features are generally similar. Once the dataset is constructed, the distribution of the

  12. Morphometry of Concepcion Bank: Evidence of Geological and Biological Processes on a Large Volcanic Seamount of the Canary Islands Seamount Province.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jesus; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic; Hermida, Nuria; Amblas, David; Arrese, Beatriz; Martín-Sosa, Pablo; Acosta, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Concepcion Bank is the largest seamount in the Canary Islands Seamount Province (CISP), an oceanic area off NW Africa including 16 main seamounts, the Canaries archipelago and the Selvagens subarchipelago. The Bank is located 90 km northeast of Lanzarote Island and has been identified as a candidate Marine Protected Area (MPA) to be included in the Natura 2000 network. A compilation of complementary datasets consisting of multibeam bathymetry, TOPAS seismic reflection profiles, side scan sonar sonographs, Remotely Operated Vehicle video records and seafloor samples allowed describing in detail and ground truthing the submarine landforms and bioconstructions exhibited by the bank. The Concepcion Bank presently rises up to 2,433 m above the adjacent seafloor and exhibits two main domains: an extensive summit plateau and steep flanks. The sub-round summit plateau is 50km by 45 km and ranges from 158 to 1,485 m depth. The steep flanks that bound it descend to depths ranging between 1,700 and 2,500 m and define a seamount base that is 66km by 53 km. This morphology is the result of constructive and erosive processes involving different time scales, volumes of material and rates of change. The volcanic emplacement phase probably lasted 25-30 million years and was likely responsible for most of the 2,730 km3 of material that presently form the seamount. Subsequently, marine abrasion and, possibly, subaerial erosion modulated by global sea level oscillations, levelled the formerly emerging seamount summit plateau, in particular its shallower (<400 m), flatter (<0.5°) eastern half. Subsidence associated to the crustal cooling that followed the emplacement phase further contributed the current depth range of the seamount. The deeper and steeper (2.3°) western half of Concepcion Bank may result from tectonic tilting normal to a NNE-SSW fracture line. This fracture may still be expressed on the seafloor surface at some scarps detected on the seamount's summit. Sediment waves

  13. Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall (Perciformes, Mullidae), a new subspecies of goatfish from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Randall, John E; Golani, Daniel; Bogorodsky, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    The number of goatfish species has increased recently, thanks in part to the application of molecular approaches to the taxonomy of a family with conservative morphology and widespread intraspecific color variation. A new subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall is described from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea, including Socotra and Gulf of Oman. It is characterized by a yellow caudal fin, 25-28 gill rakers, and 37-38 lateral-line scales and it is differentiated from nominal subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus by 1.7% sequence divergence at the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The morphometric examination of specimens of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus revealed variation in head length, eye diameter, and barbel length, in western direction from the Hawaiian Islands, South Pacific, Micronesia, and the East Indies to the Indian Ocean. The population of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus subsp. n. in the Gulf of Aqaba differs from that of the remaining Red Sea by shorter barbels, smaller eyes, shorter head, and shorter pelvic fins. We present a list of 26 endemic fishes from the Gulf of Aqaba and discuss the probable basis for the endemism in the light of the geological history of this region. PMID:27551217

  14. Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall (Perciformes, Mullidae), a new subspecies of goatfish from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Randall, John E.; Golani, Daniel; Bogorodsky, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The number of goatfish species has increased recently, thanks in part to the application of molecular approaches to the taxonomy of a family with conservative morphology and widespread intraspecific color variation. A new subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall is described from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea, including Socotra and Gulf of Oman. It is characterized by a yellow caudal fin, 25–28 gill rakers, and 37–38 lateral-line scales and it is differentiated from nominal subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus by 1.7% sequence divergence at the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The morphometric examination of specimens of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus revealed variation in head length, eye diameter, and barbel length, in western direction from the Hawaiian Islands, South Pacific, Micronesia, and the East Indies to the Indian Ocean. The population of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus subsp. n. in the Gulf of Aqaba differs from that of the remaining Red Sea by shorter barbels, smaller eyes, shorter head, and shorter pelvic fins. We present a list of 26 endemic fishes from the Gulf of Aqaba and discuss the probable basis for the endemism in the light of the geological history of this region. PMID:27551217

  15. Quantitative Approach To Seamount Volumes And Eruption Rates For Serpentinite Mud Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedenczuk, T.; Fryer, P.

    2008-12-01

    Serpentinite mud volcanoes in the Mariana forearc are formed by the hydration of mantle peridotite with slab- derived fluids. We calculated the volumes of five seamounts (Pacman, Celestial, Conical, Turquoise, and Big Blue Seamounts) using bathymetric, and (where available) multi-channel seismic reflection data. We interpolated the underlying pre-emplacent surfaces of each seamount using three methods (kriging, harmonic, and multiquadratic radial function), and three estimation techniques to define the pre-eruption seafloor surface beneath the seamounts (perimeter outline, wide area grid, and a geologically interpreted subsurface). We compared the percent difference between each. The interpolation methods produced volume results that differ as follows: 1.9% between kriging and the multiquadratic radial function, 3.6% between kriging and the harmonic function, and 3.8% between multiquadratic radial and the harmonic function. The techniques for determining the subsurface had larger percent differences as follows: 22% between the wide area grid and the geologic interpretation, 20% between geologic interpretation and the perimeter technique, and 18% between wide area grid and the perimeter technique. Based on linear regression results with a high R2, we conclude that there is a strong correlation between the results provided by all three methods. Based on the similarity of all of the regression slopes and their proximity to 1, we can conclude that no method will consistently over- or underestimate the volumes. The geologic interpretation technique should be used when subsurface data (seismic, drill cores, etc.) is available, or when workers have a strong geologic understanding and/or experience in the area. The other two techniques (perimeter and wide area grid) may be useful for large scale comparison studies that include many tens or hundreds of seamounts (or other features), where time constraints and a need for a systematic and repeatable approach is required, or

  16. Petrology and Geochemistry of the Northeast Seamounts of the Galapagos Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Harpp, K. S.; Christie, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    One of the best locations to study hotspot-ridge interactions is the Northern Galápagos Province (NGP), the region that lies between the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) and the central portion of the Galapagos Archipelago. The Galapagos hotspot is currently located off-axis from the GSC but still has a profound influence on the ridge in terms of axial lava composition and ridge bathymetry. The NGP is characterized by an array of volcanic lineaments that are composed of seamounts and five small islands. The eastern edge of the NGP is defined by a group of at least five seamounts (the Northeast Seamounts), three of which were mapped and dredged in 1990 during Leg 2 of the PLUME expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington. We report petrological and geochemical data from the basalts recovered at six dredge sites. All basalts are tholeiitic with a general MORB-like composition, but with considerable variation within some individual dredge hauls and between seamounts. Previously published isotopic data are limited but 3He/4He ratios (Graham et al. 1993) and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data (Harpp and White 2000) are consistent with a depleted mantle source for all three seamounts. Based on geochemistry and petrological observations, the basalts can be divided into at least thirteen distinct groups. The bulk of the analyzed glass samples have compositions more than MORB with MgO content of 8-10% wt., although two of the groups are in the 6-7% range. In addition, the primitive lavas have high CaO and Al2O3 . The mineralogy ranges from aphyric for the more evolved lavas to olivine + plagioclase-phyric or plagioclase ultraphyric for the more primitive basalts. The plagioclase appear to be very calcic (up to An91) xenocrysts that are often hosting aluminous spinel (Al2O3 46-48% wt.) and primitive melt inclusions (Sinton et al., 1993). Initial trace element data show light rare earth (LREE)-depleted signatures, although several samples are slightly enriched in the LREE. Taken together

  17. Is the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend Coeval for all Pacific Seamount Trails?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.

    2004-12-01

    By far the largest number of hotspots can be found in the South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly (SOPITA). Its Cretaceous counterpart is preserved in a large range of seamounts and guyots found in the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP). The seamounts in these regions display very distinct and long-lived isotopic signatures (Staudigel et al., 1991; Koppers et al., 2003) that can be used to combine source region chemistry and seamount geochronology to map out mantle melting anomalies over geological time. These mappings may resolve many important questions regarding the stationary character, continuity and longevity of the hotspots in the South Pacific mantle. Most importantly, it may also answer the question whether the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend (HEB) is coeval for all Pacific Seamount trails at 47 Ma? Fixed hotspots should be expressed in volcanic trails on the lithospheric plates revealing absolute rates of motion from their age progressions and the direction of motion based on their azimuths. By definition, bends in these hotspot trails thus should give an indication of changing plate motion happening simultaneously across individual lithospheric plates. Based on the morphology of seamounts in the Pacific, the Hawaiian-Emperor, Louisville, Gilbert Ridge and Tokelau seamount trails may be identified as the only hotspot trails to exhibit a clear HEB-type bend (Kroenke et al. 2004). Of these, the Louisville seamount trail only displays a faint bend that may be coeval with the sharp 60 degree bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor trail (Koppers et al. 2004) at 47 Ma. However, new 40Ar/39Ar analyses indicate that the HEB-type bends in the Gilberts Ridge and Tokelau seamount trails are asynchronous around 67 Ma and 57 Ma, respectively. We argue, therefore, that plate motion alone cannot explain these age systematics, but that both hotspot motion and changing lithospheric stress regimes may play an important role in their creation. The simple and elegant hotspot model that

  18. The Morphology, Structure and Origin of Seamounts on the South-West Indian Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, L. A.; Watts, A. B.; JC066 shipboard scientific party

    2012-04-01

    The South-West Indian Ridge (SWIR) between longitude 46 and 57° East is an ultra-slow spreading (~16 mm/a) mid-ocean ridge system with a highly oblique (>50°) spreading direction and a large number of closely spaced transform faults. Previous swath bathymetry surveys onboard R/V Dr. Fridtjof Nansen in 2009 show that the ridge crest is characterised by a number of irregularly shaped seamounts which rise about 2500 m above the mean depth of the surrounding seafloor. However, the origin of these seamounts and whether they reflect passive cracking of the lithosphere or deep mantle processes is not clear. In November/December, 2011 we re-surveyed 5 of these seamounts onboard RRS James Cook using an EM120 swath bathymetry system, a Lacoste-Romberg air-sea gravimeter and a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV). Preliminary results show that the seamounts are highly fractured, with fault trends parallel and orthogonal to the spreading direction. There is evidence of both growth and collapse structures, including head scars, chutes and debris flows. We present here a preliminary analysis of the morphology, gravity field and rock sample data and its implications for tectonics, mass wasting and eruptive processes at young seamounts that have formed in an active extensional setting.

  19. Thrust-type subduction-zone earthquakes and seamount asperites: A physical model for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Cloos, M. )

    1992-07-01

    A thrust-type subduction-zone earthquake of M{sub W} 7.6 ruptures an area of {approximately}6,000 km{sup 2}, has a seismic slip of {approximately}1 m, and is nucleated by the rupture of an asperity {approximately}25km across. A model for thrust-type subduction-zone seismicity is proposed in which basaltic seamounts jammed against the base of the overriding plate act as strong asperities that rupture by stick-slip faulting. A M{sub W} 7.6 event would correspond to the near-basal rupture of a {approximately}2-km-tall seamount. The base of the seamount is surrounded by a low shear-strength layer composed of subducting sediment that also deforms between seismic events by distributed strain (viscous flow). Planar faults form in this layer as the seismic rupture propagates out of the seamount at speeds of kilometers per second. The faults in the shear zone are disrupted after the event by aseismic, slow viscous flow of the subducting sediment layer. Consequently, the extent of fault rupture varies for different earthquakes nucleated at the same seamount asperity because new fault surfaces form in the surrounding subducting sediment layer during each fast seismic rupture.

  20. Geodynamic Inferences from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 330 to the Louisville Seamount Trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Yamazaki, T.; Geldmacher, J.; Scientific Party, E. 3; IODP Expedition 330 Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 330 drilled five different guyots in the Louisville Seamount Trail ranging in age between 80 and 50 Ma. The primary goals of this expedition were to drill a sufficiently large number of in situ lava flows at each seamount for high-quality estimates of their paleolatitudes using paleomagnetic measurements, for improving the overall age progression using high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and for detailed geochemical studies of the volcanic evolution of these seamounts. With these data we can provide the unique record of the paleolatitude shift (or lack thereof) of the Louisville mantle plume and compare it with the ~15° paleolatitude shift observed for seamounts in the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Trail over the same time period. These comparisons are of fundamental importance to determine whether these two primary hotspots have moved coherently or not, to understand the nature of hotspots and convection in the Earth's mantle, and to evaluate the possibility of true polar wander. We will present new 40Ar/39Ar age data for Sites U1372, U1373, U1374 and U1376 in conjunction with Expedition 330 shipboard paleomagnetic inclination data to discuss the geodynamic inferences from the resulting paleolatitude history of the Louisville hotspot between 80 and 65 Ma.

  1. On geoid heights derived from GEOS 3 altimeter data along the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, A. B.

    1979-01-01

    The geoid heights derived from preliminary GEOS 3 satellite radar altimeter data over the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain are examined. Two objectives are pursued: (1) to evaluate the contribution of the topography of the seamount chain and its compensation to the marine geoid; and (2) to determine whether geoid heights derived from GEOS 3 altimeter data can be used to provide information on isostasy at geological features such as the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain which formed as relatively young loads on the oceanic lithosphere. Short-wavelength geoid highs of 5-12 m over the crest of the seamount chain and geoid lows over flanking regions are observed. The geological undulations can be explained by a simple model in which the seamount-chain load is supported by a strong rigid lithospheric plate. The elastic thickness estimates agree with values based on surface ship gravity and bathymetry observations, and provide further support to the hypothesis that the elastic thickness acquired at a surface load depends on the temperature gradient of the lithosphere at the time of loading.

  2. Hydrothermal Vents of Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Joyce

    As a member of REVEL (Research and Education: Volcanoes, Exploration and Life), I had an opportunity to participant in a scientific research cruise focused on the active volcanoes along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the submarine spreading center off the Washington- Oregon-Canada coast. REVEL was sponsored by the National Science Foundation, University of Washington, Pennsylvania State University and the American Museum of Natural History. We studied the geological, chemical and biological processes associated with active hydrothermal systems and my research focused on the biological communities of the sulfide structures. We worked on board the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Vessel, R/V Atlantis and the submersible ALVIN was used to sample the "Black Smokers". As a member of the scientific party, I participated in collection and sorting of biological specimens from the vent communities, attended lectures by scientists, contributed to the cruise log website, maintained a journal and developed my own research project. It was my responsibility to bring this cutting-edge research back to the classroom.

  3. Morphometry of Concepcion Bank: Evidence of Geological and Biological Processes on a Large Volcanic Seamount of the Canary Islands Seamount Province

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic; Hermida, Nuria; Amblas, David; Arrese, Beatriz; Martín-Sosa, Pablo; Acosta, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Concepcion Bank is the largest seamount in the Canary Islands Seamount Province (CISP), an oceanic area off NW Africa including 16 main seamounts, the Canaries archipelago and the Selvagens subarchipelago. The Bank is located 90 km northeast of Lanzarote Island and has been identified as a candidate Marine Protected Area (MPA) to be included in the Natura 2000 network. A compilation of complementary datasets consisting of multibeam bathymetry, TOPAS seismic reflection profiles, side scan sonar sonographs, Remotely Operated Vehicle video records and seafloor samples allowed describing in detail and ground truthing the submarine landforms and bioconstructions exhibited by the bank. The Concepcion Bank presently rises up to 2,433 m above the adjacent seafloor and exhibits two main domains: an extensive summit plateau and steep flanks. The sub-round summit plateau is 50km by 45 km and ranges from 158 to 1,485 m depth. The steep flanks that bound it descend to depths ranging between 1,700 and 2,500 m and define a seamount base that is 66km by 53 km. This morphology is the result of constructive and erosive processes involving different time scales, volumes of material and rates of change. The volcanic emplacement phase probably lasted 25–30 million years and was likely responsible for most of the 2,730 km3 of material that presently form the seamount. Subsequently, marine abrasion and, possibly, subaerial erosion modulated by global sea level oscillations, levelled the formerly emerging seamount summit plateau, in particular its shallower (<400 m), flatter (<0.5°) eastern half. Subsidence associated to the crustal cooling that followed the emplacement phase further contributed the current depth range of the seamount. The deeper and steeper (2.3°) western half of Concepcion Bank may result from tectonic tilting normal to a NNE-SSW fracture line. This fracture may still be expressed on the seafloor surface at some scarps detected on the seamount’s summit. Sediment

  4. Louisville seamount subduction and its implication on mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc.

    PubMed

    Timm, Christian; Bassett, Daniel; Graham, Ian J; Leybourne, Matthew I; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Woodhead, Jon; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Watts, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    Subduction of intraplate seamounts beneath a geochemically depleted mantle wedge provides a seldom opportunity to trace element recycling and mantle flow in subduction zones. Here we present trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc, west of the contemporary Louisville-Tonga trench intersection, to provide new insights into the effects of Louisville seamount subduction. Elevated (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, (86)Sr/(87)Sr in lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc front are consistent with localized input of subducted alkaline Louisville material (lavas and volcaniclastics) into sub-arc partial melts. Furthermore, absolute Pacific Plate motion models indicate an anticlockwise rotation in the subducted Louisville seamount chain that, combined with estimates of the timing of fluid release from the subducting slab, suggests primarily trench-normal mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc system. PMID:23591887

  5. Asynchronous bends in Pacific seamount trails: a case for extensional volcanism?

    PubMed

    Koppers, Anthony A P; Staudigel, Hubert

    2005-02-11

    The Gilbert Ridge and Tokelau Seamounts are the only seamount trails in the Pacific Ocean with a sharp 60 degrees bend, similar to the Hawaii-Emperor bend (HEB). These two bends should be coeval with the 47-million-year-old HEB if they were formed by stationary hot spots, and assuming Pacific plate motion only. New 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate that the bends in the Gilbert Ridge and Tokelau seamount trail were formed much earlier than the HEB at 67 and 57 million years ago, respectively. Such asynchronous bends cannot be reconciled with the stationary hot spot paradigm, possibly suggesting hot spot motion or magmatism caused by short-term local lithospheric extension. PMID:15705846

  6. The Tasmantid Seamounts: A window into the structural inheritance of ocean floor fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, F. D.; Kalnins, L. M.; Watts, A. B.; Cohen, B. E.; Beaman, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The extinct Tasman Sea spreading centre, active from 84--53 Ma, is intersected at a number of locations by the Tasmantid Seamount Chain. The chain, which extends for over 2000 km off the east coast of Australia, progressively increases in age from south to north with ages ranging between 6 Ma and ˜50 Ma. While thick sediment (˜1 km) obscures much of the northern Tasman Sea basement, detailed morphological and geophysical analyses of the seamounts reveal a strong correlation between tectonic setting, seamount orientation, and volcanic structure, despite the ≥20 Ma offset between spreading cessation and initial seamount emplacement. Morphologically, structural inheritance is evidenced by the contrast between two volcanic styles: 1) the rugged, predominantly fissure-fed, fabrics characterizing seamounts emplaced at inside corners of spreading segment-transform intersections; and 2) the conical seamounts with summit craters and isolated dyke-fed flank cones that develop off-axis. Furthermore, volcanic fabrics align closely with the principal stress directions expected for a spreading ridge system in which strong mechanical coupling occurs across transform faults. This suggests that the lithosphere is dissected by numerous deep faults, allowing magma to be channelled away from the site of melting along pre-existing structural trends. The generally low effective elastic thickness, TeT_e, (≤15 km) and lack of a plate age-TeT_e relationship along the chain indicate that structural inheritance is also the major control on lithospheric strength near the extinct spreading centre. While the importance of structural inheritance in controlling magmatic behaviour is commonly acknowledged in continental settings, these results clearly demonstrate the need to also consider it in the oceanic realm.The extinct Tasman Sea spreading centre, active from 84--53 Ma, is intersected at a number of locations by the Tasmantid Seamount Chain. The chain, which extends for over 2000 km off

  7. Molluskan species richness and endemism on New Caledonian seamounts: Are they enhanced compared to adjacent slopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelin, Magalie; Puillandre, Nicolas; Lozouet, Pierre; Sysoev, Alexander; de Forges, Bertrand Richer; Samadi, Sarah

    2011-06-01

    Seamounts were often considered as 'hotspots of diversity' and 'centers of endemism', but recently this opinion has been challenged. After 25 years of exploration and the work of numerous taxonomists, the Norfolk Ridge (Southwest Pacific) is probably one of the best-studied seamount chains worldwide. However, even in this intensively explored area, the richness and the geographic patterns of diversity are still poorly characterized. Among the benthic organisms, the post-mortem remains of mollusks can supplement live records to comprehensively document geographical distributions. Moreover, the accretionary growth of mollusk shells informs us about the life span of the pelagic larva. To compare diversity and level of endemism between the Norfolk Ridge seamounts and the continental slopes of New Caledonia we used species occurrence data drawn from (i) the taxonomic literature on mollusks and (ii) a raw dataset of mainly undescribed deep-sea species of the hyperdiverse Turridae. Patterns of endemism and species richness were analyzed through quantitative indices of endemism and species richness estimator metrics. To date, 403 gastropods and bivalves species have been recorded on the Norfolk Ridge seamounts. Of these, at least 38 species (˜10%) are potentially endemic to the seamounts and nearly all of 38 species have protoconchs indicating lecithotrophic larval development. Overall, our results suggest that estimates of species richness and endemism, when sampling effort is taken into account, were not significantly different between slopes and seamounts. By including in our analyses 347 undescribed morphospecies from the Norfolk Ridge, our results also demonstrate the influence of taxonomic bias on our estimates of species richness and endemism.

  8. Deformation And Fluid Escape Related to Two Stages of Evolution of Seamount Subduction Offshore Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguen, C.; Ranero, C. R.; Weinrebe, W.; Spiess, V.; Sahling, H.; Klaucke, I.; Bihrmann, G.

    2003-04-01

    We have studied upper plate deformation and fluid flow related to the subduction of seamounts of the Cocos plate. New multibeam bathymetry, side scan sonar, high resolution seismics, sediment echosoundings and deep-towed video camera observations have been recorded over two of the most prominent features: Jaco and Parrita scars. The bathymetric highs observed upslope of both scars as well as their side walls are characterised by a complex morphostructural pattern shaped by two main sets of crosscutting faults: (1) radial normal faults, probably related to seafloor uplift due to seamount subduction and (2) linear compressive faults trending perpendicular to the direction of subduction (N130-N140). Surface deformation, mainly characterized by elongated short wavelength folding, has been observed on both structures and could be related to the combination of compressive stresses in front of the subducting seamounts and strike-slip motion on the lateral walls. However, some noticeable differences have been observed between both scars. The radial normal faults seem better developed upslope of Jaco scar and many sigmoidal structures might reveal strike-slip motions. Parrita scar is mainly controled upslope by folding and linear N140 trending faults. A number of highly reflective patches (100m to 1Km wide) have been observed in both areas and are attributed either to encrusted material related to fluid escape or mud flows injected through the crosscutting faults which may allow fluid ascension. Several hypotheses may explain the differences observed between both structures. (1) Parrita scar only 6 Km upslope from the deformation front is a more recently subducted seamount covered by a thinner sedimentary sequence than Jaco scar. This could explain why Parrita scar shows less important uplift and brittle deformation. (2) The Parrita seamount could also be a smaller seamount more easily subducted. Both hypotheses also account for the presence of a larger amount of reflective

  9. Chemistry of hydrothermal solutions from Pele's Vents, Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Sedwick, P.N.; McMurtry, G.M. ); Macdougall, J.D. )

    1992-10-01

    Hydrothermal fluids were sampled from Pele's Vents on the summit of Loihi Seamount, an intraplate, hotspot volcano, on four occasions from February 1987 to September 1990. The warm ([le]31C) vent solutions are enriched in dissolved Si, CO[sub 2], H[sub 2]S, alkalinity, K[sup +], Li[sup +], Rb[sup +], Ca[sup 2+], Ba[sup 2+], Fe[sup 2+], Mn[sup 2+], NH[sup +][sub 4], and possibly Ni[sup 2+], and depleted in SO[sup 2-][sub 4], O[sub 2], Mg[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, NO[sup -][sub 3], and sometimes Cl[sup -] and Na[sup +] (calculated), relative to ambient seawater. Dissolved Si correlates linearly with sample temperature, suggesting that the solutions sampled from numerous vents in the [approximately]20 m diameter field have a common source and that Si can be used as a conservative tracer for mixing of the vent fluids with ambient seawater. These juvenile inputs likely reflect the shallow, hotspot setting of this hydrothermal system. A simple quantitative fluid-history model is considered and shown to be consistent with mass-balance constraints and saturation-state calculations, which suggest that the Si concentration of the fluids may be controlled by amorphous silica saturation at [approximately]31C. Observed temporal variations in fluid composition between expeditions - specifically, in Cl[sup -], A[sub T], C[sub T], Na[sup +] (calculated), Mg[sup 2+], Ca[sup 2+], Sr[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, Fe[sup 2+], Mn[sup 2+] and perhaps NH[sup +][sub 4], relative to Si - are, excepting Mg[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, and Mn[sup 2+], consistent with the effects of variable phase segregation at the proposed high-temperature endmember.

  10. Genomic insights into the uncultivated marine Zetaproteobacteria at Loihi Seamount

    PubMed Central

    Field, Erin K; Sczyrba, Alexander; Lyman, Audrey E; Harris, Christopher C; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    The Zetaproteobacteria are a candidate class of marine iron-oxidizing bacteria that are typically found in high iron environments such as hydrothermal vent sites. As much remains unknown about these organisms due to difficulties in cultivation, single-cell genomics was used to learn more about this elusive group at Loihi Seamount. Comparative genomics of 23 phylogenetically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) and two isolates indicate niche specialization among the Zetaproteobacteria may be largely due to oxygen tolerance and nitrogen transformation capabilities. Only Form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) genes were found in the SAGs, suggesting that some of the uncultivated Zetaproteobacteria may be adapted to low oxygen and/or high carbon dioxide concentrations. There is also genomic evidence of oxygen-tolerant cytochrome c oxidases and oxidative stress-related genes, indicating that others may be exposed to higher oxygen conditions. The Zetaproteobacteria also have the genomic potential for acquiring nitrogen from numerous sources including ammonium, nitrate, organic compounds, and nitrogen gas. Two types of molybdopterin oxidoreductase genes were found in the SAGs, indicating that those found in the isolates, thought to be involved in iron oxidation, are not consistent among all the Zetaproteobacteria. However, a novel cluster of redox-related genes was found to be conserved in 10 SAGs as well as in the isolates warranting further investigation. These results were used to isolate a novel iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. Physiological studies and genomic analysis of this isolate were able to support many of the findings from SAG analyses demonstrating the value of these data for designing future enrichment strategies. PMID:25303714

  11. Mineralogy of iron microbial mats from loihi seamount.

    PubMed

    Toner, Brandy M; Berquó, Thelma S; Michel, F Marc; Sorensen, Jeffry V; Templeton, Alexis S; Edwards, Katrina J

    2012-01-01

    Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings - freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents - where ever opposing Fe(II)-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of Fe-phases using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering, low-temperature magnetic measurements, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Particle sizes of 3.5-4.6 nm were estimated from magnetism data, and coherent scattering domain (CSD) sizes as small as 1.6 nm are indicated by pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Disorder in the nanostructured Fe-bearing phases results in limited intermediate-range structural order: less than that of standard two-line ferrihydrite (Fh), except for the Pohaku site. The short-range ordered natural Fh (Fh(SRO)) phases were stable at 4°C in the presence of oxygen for at least 1 year and during 400°C treatment. The observed stability of the Fh(SRO) is consistent with magnetic observations that point to non-interacting nanoparticles. PDF analyses of total scattering data provide further evidence for Fh(SRO) particles with a poorly ordered silica coating. The presence of coated particles explains the small CSD for the mat minerals, as well as the stability of the minerals over time and against heating. The mineral properties observed here provide a starting point from which progressively older and more extensively altered Fe deposits may be examined, with the ultimate goal of improved interpretation of past biogeochemical conditions and diagenetic processes. PMID:22485113

  12. Genomic insights into the uncultivated marine Zetaproteobacteria at Loihi Seamount.

    PubMed

    Field, Erin K; Sczyrba, Alexander; Lyman, Audrey E; Harris, Christopher C; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Emerson, David

    2015-04-01

    The Zetaproteobacteria are a candidate class of marine iron-oxidizing bacteria that are typically found in high iron environments such as hydrothermal vent sites. As much remains unknown about these organisms due to difficulties in cultivation, single-cell genomics was used to learn more about this elusive group at Loihi Seamount. Comparative genomics of 23 phylogenetically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) and two isolates indicate niche specialization among the Zetaproteobacteria may be largely due to oxygen tolerance and nitrogen transformation capabilities. Only Form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) genes were found in the SAGs, suggesting that some of the uncultivated Zetaproteobacteria may be adapted to low oxygen and/or high carbon dioxide concentrations. There is also genomic evidence of oxygen-tolerant cytochrome c oxidases and oxidative stress-related genes, indicating that others may be exposed to higher oxygen conditions. The Zetaproteobacteria also have the genomic potential for acquiring nitrogen from numerous sources including ammonium, nitrate, organic compounds, and nitrogen gas. Two types of molybdopterin oxidoreductase genes were found in the SAGs, indicating that those found in the isolates, thought to be involved in iron oxidation, are not consistent among all the Zetaproteobacteria. However, a novel cluster of redox-related genes was found to be conserved in 10 SAGs as well as in the isolates warranting further investigation. These results were used to isolate a novel iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. Physiological studies and genomic analysis of this isolate were able to support many of the findings from SAG analyses demonstrating the value of these data for designing future enrichment strategies. PMID:25303714

  13. Mineralogy of Iron Microbial Mats from Loihi Seamount

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Brandy M.; Berquó, Thelma S.; Michel, F. Marc; Sorensen, Jeffry V.; Templeton, Alexis S.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings – freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents – where ever opposing Fe(II)-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of Fe-phases using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering, low-temperature magnetic measurements, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Particle sizes of 3.5–4.6 nm were estimated from magnetism data, and coherent scattering domain (CSD) sizes as small as 1.6 nm are indicated by pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Disorder in the nanostructured Fe-bearing phases results in limited intermediate-range structural order: less than that of standard two-line ferrihydrite (Fh), except for the Pohaku site. The short-range ordered natural Fh (FhSRO) phases were stable at 4°C in the presence of oxygen for at least 1 year and during 400°C treatment. The observed stability of the FhSRO is consistent with magnetic observations that point to non-interacting nanoparticles. PDF analyses of total scattering data provide further evidence for FhSRO particles with a poorly ordered silica coating. The presence of coated particles explains the small CSD for the mat minerals, as well as the stability of the minerals over time and against heating. The mineral properties observed here provide a starting point from which progressively older and more extensively altered Fe deposits may be examined, with the ultimate goal of improved interpretation of past biogeochemical conditions and diagenetic processes. PMID:22485113

  14. Structural evolution of preexisting oceanic crust through intraplate igneous activities in the Marcus-Wake seamount chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Kentaro; Kodaira, Shuichi; Nishizawa, Azusa; Morishita, Taisei; Takahashi, Narumi

    2010-10-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection studies and seismic refraction surveys with ocean bottom seismographs in the Marcus-Wake seamount chain in the northwestern Pacific Ocean reveal P wave velocity structures of hot spot-origin seamounts and adjacent oceanic crust. Inside the seamounts are central high-velocity (>6.5 km/s) structures extending nearly to the top that may indicate intrusive cores. Thick sediment layers (up to 4 km) with P wave velocities of 4-5 km/s have accumulated on seafloor that predates seamount formation. Downward crustal thickening of up to 2 km was documented beneath a large seamount cluster, but thickening was not confirmed below a small seamount cluster. Volume ratios of an intrusive core to a seamount body are 15-20%, indicating that most of the supplied magma was consumed in forming the thick sedimentary and volcaniclastic layer constituting the seamount flanks. Underplating and downward crustal thickening may tend to occur when second or later intrusive cores are formed in a seamount. P wave velocities in the lowest crust and in the uppermost mantle below the seamount chain are 0.1-0.2 km/s higher and 0.3-0.5 km/s lower, respectively, than velocities below oceanic crust. We explain this difference as a result of sill-like intrusion of magma into the lower crust and uppermost mantle. Reflected waves observed at offsets >200 km are from mantle reflectors at depths of 30-45 km and 55-70 km. The shallower reflectors may indicate structures formed by intraplate igneous activities, and the deeper reflectors may correspond to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  15. Enhanced seamount location database for the western and central Pacific Ocean: Screening and cross-checking of 20 existing datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Valérie; Kerandel, Julie-Anne; Andréfouët, Serge; Magron, Franck; Clark, Malcolm; Kirby, David S.; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

    2008-08-01

    Seamounts are habitats of considerable interest in terms of conservation and biodiversity, and in terms of fisheries for bentho-pelagic and pelagic species. Twenty previously compiled datasets including seamount/underwater feature lists, bathymetric maps and emerged feature maps from different sources (ship-derived and satellite altimetry-derived) at different spatial scales (from individual cruise to worldwide satellite data) were gathered in order to compile an enhanced list of underwater features for parts of the western and central Pacific Ocean (WCPO). The KL04 dataset [Kitchingman, A., and Lai, S., 2004. Inferences on potential seamount locations from mid-resolution bathymetric data. Fisheries Centre Research Reports 12 (5), 7-12], listing seamount positions and depths as calculated from satellite altimetry-derived bathymetry, provided the baseline data for this study as it covered the entire region of interest and included summit depth information. All KL04 potential seamounts were cross-checked with other datasets to remove any atolls and islands that had been incorrectly classified as seamounts, to add seamounts undetected by KL04, to update the overall database (geolocation, depth, elevation, and name) and to compile a 12-class typology of the different types of underwater features. Of the 4626 potential seamounts identified in KL04, 719 were multiple identifications of the same large underwater features and 373 (10%) were actually emerged banks, atolls and islands, leaving 3534 actual underwater features. Conversely, 487 underwater features were documented in other datasets but not registered by KL04. The screening of all the potential WCPO seamounts produced a final list of 4021 underwater features with agreed upon position and information. This enhanced list should have many applications in oceanography, biodiversity conservation and studies of the influence of seamounts on pelagic ecosystems and fisheries.

  16. The Forts of Old San Juan: Guardians of the Caribbean. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltzin, Rosanna

    The massive masonry defenses of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, which were begun in the 16th century, exist today as the oldest European-style fortifications within the territory of the United States. This lesson is based on the World Heritage Site nomination file and the National Park Service Handbook, "San Juan: The Forts of Old San Juan." The lesson…

  17. 33 CFR 110.74c - Bahia de San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bahia de San Juan, PR. 110.74c... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74c Bahia de San Juan, PR. The waters of San Antonio Channel, Bahia de San Juan, eastward of longitude 66°05′45″ W....

  18. Hydrophysical processes in the vicinity of Ampere Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, V. A.

    2009-04-01

    The description and interpretation of dynamic processes in the vicinity of Ampere bank(35°04'N,12°52'W) on the basis of in-situ shipboard measurements and modern high-resolution satellite SSHA and SST data are given. The measurements consist of six moorings current and temperature time series(sampling rate 1 hour, rows length 10 days). Two buoys with four instruments were deployed atop of each flat of two-headed Ampere mountain. The other four moorings with instruments depths approximately 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 500, 1000m were anchored on the deep plain around the Bank at roughly 20n.miles distance from it. The CTD measurements(towed and vertical) were collected in the 30x25n.miles square (34°45'-35°15'N, 12°40'-13°05'W) over the Bank and along several longer towed CTD probe sections to the north and to the south from the Bank. Space resolution of towed CTD measurements was chosen experimentally, accounting for the complexity of field, and was 200-250m horizontally and 0,5m vertically. Vertical casts were taken down to 500 m during vessel stop. There were two periods of measurements: November,1982 and February,1985. On the basis of data analysis, we concluded about mean field and fluctuations, as follows. In winter season, the dominant large-scale feature was a front, which stretched from Josefin Seamount to the Ampere Bank in meridional direction and bent round the Bank from west to south flank of it. It's width was 1-1,5n.miles, horizontal temperature gradient - 0,3-0,4°C/km, mean current velocity along the front - 30cm/sec in the upper layer of the ocean and reduced to 7cm/sec at 350m depth. Frontal zone separated two different types of waters: relatively warm(17,0-16,3°C), saline(36,48-36,38psu) waters to the west, and colder(16,0-15,9°C), fresher(36,32-36,28psu) waters to the east. Over the Bank, intermediate waters were formed with temperatures in the range 16,2-16,0°C and salinities within 36,35-36,34psu limits. Using T-S analysis, it was shown

  19. Generating geomorphological catalogues using neural networks: Seamounts in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Andrew; Kalnins, Lara; van Dinther, Chantal; Trampert, Jeannot

    2013-04-01

    We recently introduced the idea that neural networks may be used to construct catalogues of geomorphological features, by extrapolating from the characteristics of a set of hand-selected examples (Valentine et al., 2012). These learning algorithms are inspired by the complex pattern identification and recognition capabilities of the human brain and remove the need to develop an a priori model of the feature of interest. In order to demonstrate this approach, and to develop a clearer understanding of its possibilities and pitfalls, we concentrate on the problem of identifying seamounts - isolated topographic highs of volcanic origin - in the world's oceans. The distribution of seamounts in time and space can provide important constraints on the tectonic history and evolution of the Earth and has been studied using several conventional approaches (e.g. Kim & Wessel, 2011). However, these typically perform poorly in the Atlantic, where the slow spreading rate results in a rough 'background' seafloor that produces many false positives. The learning algorithm approach should improve this, as it attempts to encapsulate more complex information about the seamount and its surroundings. We present an overview of our work to date, with a focus on results from a systematic search for seamounts in the Atlantic. We compare the performance of our approach in detecting seamounts in bathymetric, free-air gravity anomaly and vertical gravity gradient (VGG) datasets to examine the particular strengths and weaknesses of each data type and to assess the potential benefits of assimilating information from two or three data types simultaneously. We compare the resulting seamount database with existing catalogues, examining the variations in measures such as total count, height distribution, and spatial and temporal distribution across the Atlantic, and comment on the potential implications for our understanding of the tectonic history of the region. Kim, S.-S. & Wessel, P., 2011. New

  20. The Morphology of the Tasmantid Seamounts: Interactions between Tectonic Inheritance and Magmatic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Fred; Kalnins, Lara; Watts, Anthony; Cohen, Benjamin; Beaman, Robin

    2015-04-01

    The Tasmantid seamounts extend for over 2000 km off the east coast of Australia and constitute one of three contemporaneous, sub-parallel Cenozoic hotspot tracks that traverse the region (the Tasmantid, Lord Howe, and East Australian volcanic chains), locally separated by as little as 500 km. Where dated, the three chains young from north to south, spanning ca. 34-6 Ma. At multiple locations, the Tasmantid chain intersects the extinct Tasman Sea spreading centre, which was active from 84 Ma to 53 Ma. Detailed morphological analysis reveals a strong correlation between tectonic setting, seamount orientation, and volcanic structure. Seamounts at inside corners of the spreading segment-transform intersections are more rugged and constructed via numerous intersecting fissure-fed volcanic ridges, whereas off-axis seamounts tend to be conical with summit craters and isolated dyke-fed flank cones. In addition, the orientation of the Bouguer gravity anomaly highs, interpreted as magmatic conduits, and the long axes of the seamounts align closely with the principal stress directions expected for a ridge system in which strong mechanical coupling occurs across transform faults. Such a strong connection between the long-lived mantle upwelling, ridge structure, and subsequent dyke emplacement ' despite the ≥ 20 Ma offset between spreading cessation and initial seamount emplacement ' suggests deep faulting of the Tasman Sea oceanic lithosphere in order to channel melts along pre-existing structural trends. Despite the large size of the edifices, up to ~ 4000 m high, slope gradient and backscatter analysis along the chain point to sluggish mass wasting rates with few or no large sector collapse structures. In addition, most seamounts are associated with Bouguer gravity highs. Together, these features suggest that the seamounts have dense, coherent cores with high intrusive to extrusive volume ratios. This indicates low rates of melt generation and intra-lithospheric transport

  1. Geochemistry characteristics of Seamounts in the Tonga arc : Influence of subduction component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myeong, B.; Kim, J. H.; Woo, H.; Jang, Y. D.

    2015-12-01

    Located in the southwest Pacific ocean, The seamounts, from TA07 seamount to TA26, in the Tonga arc are located from 20 °S to 25 °S. At 25 °S, the Tonga trench is intersected by the Louisville ridge, a ~4,300-km-long chain of seamounts and the Osbourn trough, a paleo-spreading center. For this reason, magma which created these seamounts may have various origin. Based on this, the seamounts which forming the Tonga arc are divided into three groups; including group 1(region that the earliest Louisville ridge subduction arised, correspond to TA07-12), group 2(region that the second Louisville ridge subduction arised, correspond to TA14-24); and group 3(region that the Louisville ridge and the Osbourn trough are subducting, correspond to TA25-26). These seamounts are mostly stratovolcanoes with caldera. Rocks recovered by dredging have been identified as pumice, dacite, andesite, basaltic andesites and basalts(most abundant). Major element concentrations are constant, trace element concentrations are enriched LILE, depleted HFSE compared with MORB. The Tonga arc is affected by subduction components divided into the shallow and deep subduction components. Related to subduction components, variables include mantle source, AOC(altered oceanic crust), PS(pelagic sediment), LSC(Louisville seamount chain) and OS(Osbourn trough). In the case of shallow subduction component, it tends to have higher contents in group 1, 3 and lower contents in group 2. Thus, comparatively speaking, it seems that group 1, 3 have been heavily influenced by the fluid. However, origin of the fluid seems to be different, since its locations are not continuous. In the case of deep subduction component, it shows similar range in the group 1, 2, and shows a significantly lower ratio in the group 3. The reason why its values are similar is that it is effected by the melt during the Louisville ridge was subducting and the reason why the ratio in the group 3 shown lower is because of the fluid effect

  2. Seamounts and ferromanganese crusts within and near the U.S. EEZ off California - Data for RV Farnella cruise F7-87-SC

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Reid, Jane A.; Conrad, Tracey A.; Dunham, Rachel E.; Clague, David A.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Davis, Alice S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present and briefly describe ship-board and laboratory data for a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research cruise aboard the RV Farnella that took place December 3-21, 1987 (cruise F7-87-SC). The purpose of the cruise was to survey seamounts and ferromanganese crusts within and near the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) off California. Eight seamounts were studied - Rodriguez, San Marcos, Adam, Hoss, Little Joe, Ben, Flint, and Jasper. A geophysical survey of Jasper Seamount took place, but that seamount was not sampled; whereas Adam and Hoss Seamounts were sampled, but not surveyed with geophysics lines.

  3. LOD First Estimates In 7406 SLR San Juan Argentina Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, A.; Podestá, R.; Yin, Z.; Adarvez, S.; Liu, W.; Zhao, L.; Alvis Rojas, H.; Actis, E.; Quinteros, J.; Alacoria, J.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we show results derived from satellite observations at the San Juan SLR station of Felix Aguilar Astronomical Observatory (OAFA). The Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) telescope was installed in early 2006, in accordance with an international cooperation agreement between the San Juan National University (UNSJ) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The SLR has been in successful operation since 2011 using NAOC SLR software for the data processing. This program was designed to calculate satellite orbits and station coordinates, however it was used in this work for the determination of LOD (Length Of Day) time series and Earth Rotation speed.

  4. Elastic Full Waveform Inversion reveals the fine-scale structure of Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.

    2012-12-01

    Axial volcano (sometimes referred to as "Axial seamount" or "Axial") is located at 46N, 130W at the intersection of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain. It is the most recent eruptive center of the Cobb hotspot, which last erupted in 2011. The volcano rises ~700 m above the adjacent ridge axis and its summit features a U-shaped caldera open to the southeast, which hosts an active hydrothermal field and very young lava flows. Located at the junction of a mid-ocean ridge and a volcanic hotspot, Axial volcano is atypical and its internal structure remains poorly understood. Here, we present results from an elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) along multiple seismic lines that span the whole volcano. We have used a multi-stage FWI, inverting successively wide-angle reflections and refractions arrivals from downward extrapolated streamer data, then windowed short offset reflections from the underlying magma chamber. Our final models show fine scale velocity structures with spatial resolutions of tens of meters. Our results indicate that Layer 2A thickness is extremely heterogeneous (350-900 m) within the volcano with abrupt vertical throws of >300 m beneath the caldera walls that suggests the tectonic thinning of a geologically defined Layer 2A. Interestingly, Layer 2A appears to be extremely thin beneath the active hydrothermal field and the most recent lava flows, on the southeast end of the caldera, where sheeted dikes might lay <100 m beneath the seafloor. On the other hand, the nearby caldera center is filled by successive lava sequences (~450 m thick) that further appear to be micro faulted, suggesting a constant interplay between magmatic and tectonic processes. Surface velocities show limited variation over the whole volcano and may suggest relative recent formation, considering the rapid increase in layer 2A velocity with age. Finally, our velocity structures image a wide and complex magma chamber system beneath the volcano at depth

  5. Seamounts and organic matter—Is there an effect? The case of Sedlo and Seine seamounts, Part 2. Composition of suspended particulate organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriakoulakis, K.; Vilas, J. C.; Blackbird, S. J.; Arístegui, J.; Wolff, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    The suspended particulate organic matter (sPOM) around two isolated NE Atlantic seamounts, Seine (33°46'N 14°21'W; summit at ˜170 m) and Sedlo (40°19'N 26°40'W; summit at ˜780 m), was studied over a period of 2 years during four 2-4-week oceanographic surveys. Elemental (C and N), chlorophyll a and lipid biomarker concentrations and N stable isotopic values were variable close to the surface (40-90 m), although some chlorophyll a enrichment above the summits was discerned sporadically. Results from near-surface waters showed a generally "fresh", mainly phytoplankton signature in sPOM with some seasonality, which was more pronounced around Sedlo. sPOM concentrations and composition changed with depth, apparently controlled by seasonality and proximity to the seamounts. A few metres above the Seine summit, the suspended particulate organic carbon (sPOC) concentrations and labile polyunsaturated fatty acids (% of lipids) were higher than elsewhere at similar depths (˜200 m) in summer 2004. In the same season at Sedlo, polyunsaturated fatty acids were also relatively more abundant (up to 43% of total lipids) around the topographic feature throughout the water column, indicating supply of more labile sPOM, perhaps by advection, downwelling or passive sinking of locally produced phytoplankton and/or in situ production. The high-quality sPOM that seems to be present around the seamounts could provide an important food source to the biological community.

  6. Euryhaline Halophilic Microorganisms From the Suiyo Seamount Hydrothermal Vents.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Kimura, H.; Maruyama, A.; Naganuma, T.

    2002-12-01

    The euryhaline halophilic microorganisms grow in a wide salinity range from <3% NaCl (seawater equivalent) to >15% NaCl or to even saturation (about 30% NaCl). A number of euryhaline halophiles have been found in a wide range of habitats from oceanic and terrestrial regimes, from deep-sea vents and seeps, and from Antarctic sea ice and terrains. We have isolated the euryhaline strains independently from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge vent fluids and Antarctic terrains are closely related species of the genus Halomonas. Some euryhaline halophiles maintain intracellular osmotic balance by controlling the concentration of compatible solute such as ectoine. This compatible solute not only stabilizes the proteins from denaturation caused by high salt concentration but also serves as a protectant against stresses such as heating, freezing and drying. The sub-seafloor structure of a hydrothermal vent is highly complicated with mosaic heterogeneity of physicochemical parameters such as temperature and salinity. This premise led us to the hypothesis that some euryhaline halophiles including Halomonas species well adapt to a wide salinity-ranged habitat in the sub-vent. To test this hypothesis, isolation and characterization of euryhaline halophiles from the Suiyo Seamount hydrothermal vents were conducted the drill-cored rock samples from the sites APSK-02, 03, and 07 and the filter-trapped fluid particle samples from the sites APSK-01 and 05 were used. For initial cultivation, a heterotrophic bacterial medium of 15% NaCl was used. The samples was added to the medium and incubated under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions at room temperature. A total of 5 euryhaline halophilic strains were obtained and phylogenetically characterized: two strains (both related to Marinobacter) from APSK-02 core section 2; one strain (related to H. meridiana) from APSK-07 core section 3; and two strains (related to H. meridiana and H. variabilis) from APSK-01 trapped particles. In addition, some

  7. Macrobiotic Communities of Vailulu'u Seamount, Samoan Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. M.; Lee, R. W.; Pile, A. J.; Hudson, I. R.; Brooke, S. D.; Ted, P.; Staudigel, H.; Hart, S.; Bailey, B. E.; Haucke, L.; Koppers, A.; Konter, J.; Templeton, A.; Tebo, B.

    2005-12-01

    Vailulu'u, the active seamount on the hotspot at the Eastern end of the Samoan volcanic chain, was the focus of two research cruises in April and June 2005 using the Pisces V submersible. Warm-water vents on the summit of a newly formed volcanic cone in the crater supported a low-diversity community dominated by thick microbial mats and the synaphobranchid eel Dysommina rugosa. Isotope and gut analyses indicated that the eels feed not on the mats but on planktonic crustaceans imported to the system from the overlying water column. The microbial mat exhibited isotopic signatures consistent with local chemosynthesis, but not methane-based chemosynthesis; A<

  8. Subseafloor nitrogen redox processes at Loihi Seamount, Hawai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, S. D.; Sylvan, J. B.; LaRowe, D.; Huber, J. A.; Moyer, C. L.; Edwards, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Loihi seamount is a mid-plate hotspot volcano located 30 kilometers off the southeast corner of the Big Island of Hawai'i. We measured temperature, concentrations of nitrate + nitrite (NOx), ammonium (NH4+), nitrite (NO2-) and dissolved silica (dSi), as well as the stable N and O isotopic composition of nitrate (δ15N and δ18O) in end-member hydrothermal fluids and microbial mats during three cruises in 2008, 2009 and 2013. We also sequenced 16S rRNA from archaea and bacteria from the same sites during 2006. NH4+ ranged ~0.71-7.5 μM, was positively correlated to dSi and negatively correlated to NOx. NO2- ranged from below detection to 0.49 μM and was not correlated to NOx, dSi or NH4+. In the microbial mats found at the Ula Nui site at 5000 m, NO2-, dSi and NH4+ all increase with depth in the mat, creating a vertical zonation of niches within these mounds. Measured δ15N and δ18O of nitrate suggest biological production and reduction of nitrate are both occurring. Analysis of δ15N-NH4+ is underway and will help constrain the relative magnitude of nitrification to NO2- and the potential for N-fixation. Using the measured concentrations of NOx, NO2- and NH4+ and other published data from Loihi, Gibbs energy calculations reveal that several catabolic strategies involving the reduction of NO3- and NO2- could provide energy to microbes in Loihi fluids. Thermodynamically feasible electron donors including HS-, CH4, Fe2+ and NH4+, and the amount of energy available, in units of Joules per kg H2O, varies by orders of magnitude from one sample site to the next. Pyrosequencing of the V6 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA from four sites at Loihi detected groups known to participate in denitrification, N-fixation and NO2- oxidation. Among these, the most abundant putative N-reducing microbes include Caldithrix, Epsilonproteobacteria, Thiohalophilus and members of the SAR324 clade. Putative N-fixers detected include members of the bacterial order Chlorobiales and

  9. The Mysteries of Seamounts: Case Study Results of a Teacher Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjelm, E. E.

    2006-12-01

    Based on our classroom experiences, earth sciences websites can form the foundation for scientific discovery for students as young as 12. Using the latest developments in digital library technology and research models from the ERESE 2005 Plate Tectonics Teacher Workshop, Crossroads Academy sixth grade scientists developed a research program on biodiversity, volcanology, tectonic setting, life cycle and physical structure of seamounts. Using their own questions as starting points for individual inquiry, each student developed a testable hypothesis, gathered and analyzed data from selected seamount websites and reached a significant conclusion on an important aspect of seamounts. All of the work was documented in lab reports written as html files. References were linked into the lab reports to facilitate the teacher's checking of data sources and of the student's interpretations of their data. The links also provided a simple mechanism for twelve year olds to accurately cite data sources. Lab reports were presented to the class during a formal research session. The completed lab reports produced a student generated research database that was initially used by the students to complete a separate lab on factors influencing biodiversity at seamounts. Finally, the student investigators were able to work as a research team to answer a variety of additional questions posed by the teacher and other students.

  10. Characteristics of the Mesophotic Megabenthic Assemblages of the Vercelli Seamount (North Tyrrhenian Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Marzia; Bertolino, Marco; Borghini, Mireno; Castellano, Michela; Covazzi Harriague, Anabella; Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Gasparini, GianPietro; Misic, Cristina; Povero, Paolo; Pusceddu, Antonio; Schroeder, Katrin; Bavestrello, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the megabenthic assemblages of the mesophotic zone of a Tyrrhenian seamount (Vercelli Seamount) is described using Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) video imaging from 100 m depth to the top of the mount around 61 m depth. This pinnacle hosts a rich coralligenous community characterized by three different assemblages: (i) the top shows a dense covering of the kelp Laminaria rodriguezii; (ii) the southern side biocoenosis is mainly dominated by the octocorals Paramuricea clavata and Eunicella cavolinii; while (iii) the northern side of the seamount assemblage is colonized by active filter-feeding organisms such as sponges (sometimes covering 100% of the surface) with numerous colonies of the ascidian Diazona violacea, and the polychaete Sabella pavonina. This study highlights, also for a Mediterranean seamount, the potential role of an isolated rocky peak penetrating the euphotic zone, to work as an aggregating structure, hosting abundant benthic communities dominated by suspension feeders, whose distribution may vary in accordance to the geomorphology of the area and the different local hydrodynamic conditions. PMID:21304906