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Sample records for junctional terminal cisternae

  1. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  2. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  3. The SNS Josephson junction with a third terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prans, G. P.; Meissner, H.

    1974-01-01

    Discussion of the operating characteristics of a three-terminal thin-film SNS Josephson junction whose diameter is much greater than the electron pair coherence length in the N metal. It is shown that a junction of this type is essentially a two-terminal device even though the third terminal of the junction supplies the control current. The mechanism underlying this finding is discussed.

  4. Nonlinear electrical properties of Si three-terminal junction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fantao; Sun, Jie; Graczyk, Mariusz; Zhang, Kailiang; Prunnila, Mika; Ahopelto, Jouni; Shi, Peixiong; Chu, Jinkui; Maximov, Ivan; Xu, H. Q.

    2010-12-01

    This letter reports on the realization and characterization of silicon three-terminal junction devices made in a silicon-on-insulator wafer. Room temperature electrical measurements show that the fabricated devices exhibit pronounced nonlinear electrical properties inherent to ballistic electron transport in a three-terminal ballistic junction (TBJ) device. The results show that room temperature functional TBJ devices can be realized in a semiconductor material other than high-mobility III-V semiconductor heterostructures and provide a simple design principle for compact silicon devices in nanoelectronics.

  5. Fabrication and measurement of multi-terminal mesoscopic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Natalya; Tetsuya, Mishima; Santos, Michael; Shabani, Javad; Manucharyan, Vladimir

    We present fabrication and characterization of 3- and 4-terminal mesoscopic Josephson junctions involving InAs quantum well heterostructures and superconducting Al contacts. A cross-shaped nanowire junction region with dimensions of order a few 100 nm is dry-etched in the 2DEG, followed by deposition of superconducting contacts and gating electrodes. These novel 0D devices have been recently predicted to have topological features in their Andreev spectra and finite-bias transport; they may also be useful in efforts towards observation and braiding of Majorana fermions in the solid state. // This material is based upon work supported by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-1207537.

  6. Multi-terminal Josephson junctions as topological matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riwar, Roman-Pascal; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia S.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2016-04-01

    Topological materials and their unusual transport properties are now at the focus of modern experimental and theoretical research. Their topological properties arise from the bandstructure determined by the atomic composition of a material and as such are difficult to tune and naturally restricted to <=3 dimensions. Here we demonstrate that n-terminal Josephson junctions with conventional superconductors may provide novel realizations of topology in n-1 dimensions, which have similarities, but also marked differences with existing 2D or 3D topological materials. For n>=4, the Andreev subgap spectrum of the junction can accommodate Weyl singularities in the space of the n-1 independent superconducting phases, which play the role of bandstructure quasimomenta. The presence of these Weyl singularities enables topological transitions that are manifested experimentally as changes of the quantized transconductance between two voltage-biased leads, the quantization unit being 4e2/h, where e is the electric charge and h is the Planck constant.

  7. Multi-terminal Josephson junctions as topological matter

    PubMed Central

    Riwar, Roman-Pascal; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia S.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2016-01-01

    Topological materials and their unusual transport properties are now at the focus of modern experimental and theoretical research. Their topological properties arise from the bandstructure determined by the atomic composition of a material and as such are difficult to tune and naturally restricted to ≤3 dimensions. Here we demonstrate that n-terminal Josephson junctions with conventional superconductors may provide novel realizations of topology in n−1 dimensions, which have similarities, but also marked differences with existing 2D or 3D topological materials. For n≥4, the Andreev subgap spectrum of the junction can accommodate Weyl singularities in the space of the n−1 independent superconducting phases, which play the role of bandstructure quasimomenta. The presence of these Weyl singularities enables topological transitions that are manifested experimentally as changes of the quantized transconductance between two voltage-biased leads, the quantization unit being 4e2/h, where e is the electric charge and h is the Planck constant. PMID:27040917

  8. Multi-terminal Josephson junctions as topological matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riwar, Roman-Pascal; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia S.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    Topological materials and their unusual transport properties are now at the focus of modern experimental and theoretical research. Their topological properties arise from the bandstructure determined by the atomic composition of a material and as such are difficult to tune and naturally restricted to <= 3 dimensions. Here we demonstrate that n-terminal Josephson junctions with conventional superconductors may provide novel realizations of topology in n - 1 dimensions, which have similarities, but also marked differences with existing 2D or 3D topological materials. For n >= 4 , the Andreev subgap spectrum of the junction can accommodate Weyl singularities in the space of the n - 1 independent superconducting phases, which play the role of bandstructure quasimomenta. The presence of these Weyl singularities enables topological transitions that are manifested experimentally as changes of the quantized transconductance between two voltage-biased leads, the quantization unit being 4e2 / h .

  9. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-07-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions.

  10. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions. PMID:27456200

  11. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions. PMID:27456200

  12. Ballistic thermal rectification in nanoscale three-terminal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifa; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2010-03-01

    We study ballistic thermal transport in three-terminal atomic nanojunctions by the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. We find that there is ballistic thermal rectification in asymmetric three-terminal structures because of the incoherent phonon scattering from the control terminal. With spin-phonon interaction, we also find the ballistic thermal rectification even in symmetric three-terminal paramagnetic structures.

  13. Ultimate efficiency limit of single-junction perovskite and dual-junction perovskite/silicon two-terminal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansouri, Ibraheem; Ho-Baillie, Anita; Green, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    Theoretical calculation based on detailed balance and incorporating different realistic optical and electrical losses predicts conversion efficiency beyond 22% for single-junction perovskite devices. In dual-junction perovskite/silicon devices, theoretical conversion efficiency around 40% is been determined. However, dramatic drop in the conversion efficiency is shown to be due to the glass reflection and FTO parasitic absorption losses. Additionally, practical conversion efficiency limits of dual-junction two-terminal perovskite/silicon tandem solar cell of 30% are achievable as reported in this work using state-of-the-art demonstrated devices. Additionally, various crystalline silicon (industry and laboratory demonstrated) technologies are used as the bottom cell for the current matched tandem cell stacks with higher relative improvements when using commercial c-Si solar cells. Moreover, the effect of eliminating the parasitic resistances and enhancing the external radiative efficiency (ERE) in the perovskite junction on tandem performance are also investigated enhancing the stack efficiencies.

  14. Nonlinear phonon transport and ballistic thermal rectification in asymmetric graphene-based three terminal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Li, Ke-Min; Tang, Li-Ming; Pan, Chang-Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2012-04-01

    By using the nonequilibrium Green's function and the Landauer transport theory, nonlinear phonon properties in asymmetric graphene-based three terminal junctions (AGTTJs) are investigated. Results show that AGTTJs exhibit pronounced nonlinear thermal rectifying behaviors, and the efficiency is efficiently tuned by increasing the asymmetric degree between the left and right terminals or modulating the central probe. The thermal rectifying mechanism is analytically explained by the schematic diagram. It is suggested that AGTTJs may be served as a good ballistic thermal rectifier.

  15. Laser processing for bevel termination of high voltage pn junction in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubiak, A.; Ruta, Ł.; Rosowski, A.; French, P.

    2016-04-01

    Proper edge termination of the p-n junction in silicon carbide is a key requirement in the fabrication of discrete devices able to withstand high voltages in reverse polarization. Due to the hardness of SiC the creation of the bevel termination remains difficult using mechanical machining. The use of laser beam sources with medium wavelength (532 nm) gives new possibilities in the machining of the silicon carbide. The paper presents the fabrication of the bevel termination structure in SiC using a green DPSS laser equipped with scanner and dedicated rotating sample holder. Characterization of the resulting structures proves the high potential of the proposed approach.

  16. Multisubband transport and magnetic deflection of Fermi electron trajectories in three terminal junctions and rings.

    PubMed

    Poniedziałek, M R; Szafran, B

    2012-02-29

    We study the electron transport in three terminal junctions and quantum rings looking for the classical deflection of electron trajectories in the presence of intersubband scattering. We indicate that although the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the Lorentz force effects co-exist in the low subband transport, for higher Fermi energies a simultaneous observation of both effects is difficult and calls for carefully formed structures. In particular, in quantum rings with channels wider than the input lead the Lorentz force is well resolved but the Aharonov-Bohm periodicity is lost in chaotic scattering events. In quantum rings with equal lengths of the channels and T-shaped junctions the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are distinctly periodic but the Lorentz force effects are not well pronounced. We find that systems with wedge-shaped junctions allow for observation of both the periodic Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the magnetic deflection. PMID:22277600

  17. Tunable nonlinear current-voltage characteristic in four-terminal ballistic nano-junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackens, B.; Gence, L.; Farhi, G.; Faniel, S.; Gustin, C.; Bayot, V.; Wallart, X.; Bollaert, S.; Cappy, A.; Vasallo, B. G.; Mateos, J.; Gonzalez, T.

    2004-03-01

    We report on low temperature (4.2K - 140K) measurements of four-terminal ballistic nano-junctions, etched on a two-dimensional electron gas confined in an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure. A symmetry-breaking artificial scatterer is introduced in the center of the junctions. The geometry of the junctions and scatterers is inspired by a recent theoretical work by Fleischmann and Geisel (R. Fleischmann and T. Geisel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 016804 (2002)). We measure the voltage V_LU generated between the upper and lower contacts when a current I_SD flows between the left and right contacts. We demonstrate that the shape, the amplitude and even the sign of the nonlinear V_LU(I_SD) characteristic can be tuned by applying voltage biases on side gates and/or illuminating the sample. The origin of this behavior is discussed using comparisons to Monte-Carlo (semiclassical) simulations of our devices.

  18. All-Graphene Three-Terminal-Junction Field-Effect Devices as Rectifiers and Inverters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonjae; Li, Changfeng; Chekurov, Nikolai; Arpiainen, Sanna; Akinwande, Deji; Lipsanen, Harri; Riikonen, Juha

    2015-06-23

    We present prominent tunable and switchable room-temperature rectification performed at 100 kHz ac input utilizing micrometer-scale three-terminal junction field-effect devices. Monolayer CVD graphene is used as both a channel and a gate electrode to achieve all-graphene thin-film structure. Instead of ballistic theory, we explain the rectification characteristics through an electric-field capacitive model based on self-gating in the high source-drain bias regime. Previously, nanoscale graphene three-terminal junctions with the ballistic (or quasi-ballistic) operation have shown rectifications with relatively low efficiency. Compared to strict nanoscale requirements of ballistic devices, diffusive operation gives more freedom in design and fabrication, which we have exploited in the cascading device architecture. This is a significant step for all-graphene thin-film devices for integrated monolithic graphene circuits. PMID:25961680

  19. Dynamical properties of three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions: Spintronics meets spin-orbitronics

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasello, R.; Carpentieri, M.; Finocchio, G.

    2013-12-16

    This Letter introduces a micromagnetic model able to characterize the magnetization dynamics in three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions, where the effects of spin-transfer torque and spin-orbit torque are taken into account. Our results predict that the possibility to separate electrically those two torque sources is very promising from a technological point of view for both next generation of nanoscale spintronic oscillators and microwave detectors. A scalable synchronization scheme based on the parallel connection of those three terminal devices is also proposed.

  20. The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Aragonès, Albert C; Ciampi, Simone; Sanz, Fausto; Darwish, Nadim; Diez-Perez, Ismael

    2015-09-25

    Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform. PMID:26314486

  1. The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Aragonès, Albert C.; Ciampi, Simone; Sanz, Fausto; Darwish, Nadim; Diez-Perez, Ismael

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform.

  2. Neurally Evoked Calcium Transients in Terminal Schwann Cells at the Neuromuscular Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reist, Noreen E.; Smith, Stephen J.

    1992-08-01

    We examined the effects of motor-nerve stimulation on the intracellular Ca2+ levels of Schwann cells, the glial cells at the frog neuromuscular junction. Schwann cells, which were loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 and examined by confocal microscopy, showed a transient increase in free Ca2+ within a few seconds of the onset of tetanic stimulation of the motor nerve. The Ca2+ response was specific to the synapse in that it was found in the terminal Schwann cells at the junction but not in the myelinating Schwann cells along the axon. The Ca2+ transients occurred in the presence of d-tubocurare, indicating that they were not mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and recurred when the stimulus was repeated. The Ca2+ response persisted after degeneration of the postsynaptic muscle fiber, demonstrating that the terminal Schwann cell was stimulated directly by presynaptic activity. The finding that terminal Schwann cells at the neuromuscular junction respond to presynaptic activity suggests that glial-cell function is modulated by synaptic transmission.

  3. Conductance through two-terminal graphene junctions with wetting metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Kindermann, Markus; Chou, Mei-Yin

    2012-02-01

    Metallic contacts become a relevant factor for the behavior of nanoscale graphene devices. A thin layer of a wetting metal --a metal that forms covalent bonds to graphene-- is customarily placed in between graphene and bulk leads. The most common choices for this wetting metal are Titanium, Chromium, and Palladium. We will present the equilibrium conductance through crystalline (defect- and impurity-free) two-terminal graphene junctions attached to normal, spin-unpolarized Titanium metal leads. In addition, we discuss the equilibrium potential profile across the junctions, and the presence of Fabry-Perot oscillations. The conductance shows pronounced noise, and the Fano factor near the Dirac point is seen to fluctuate, as in experiment [1]. The distribution of transmission eigenvalues is bimodal, indicating a disordered-metal-like charge transport through nanoscale two-terminal graphene junctions with wetting metals.[4pt] [1] L. DiCarlo, J. R. Williams, Y. Zhang, D. T. McClure, and C. M. Marcus. Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 156801 (2008).[0pt] [2] S. Barraza-Lopez, M. Kindermann, and M.-Y. Chou. (Manuscript in preparation.)

  4. Tight-binding model for amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions formed with carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok Hyeon; Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-05-01

    We measured the conductance of a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junction formed with carbon electrodes by using a scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction technique. The tight-binding model that includes the molecular backbone states accurately captured the experimentally measured the molecular conductance and the exponential decay trend of the conductance with the molecular backbone length. Furthermore, we found that this model tracked successfully the shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital toward the Fermi energy as increasing the molecular length. Finally, we found that the tight-binding model explaining more week coupling strength with the graphite electrode than that with the Au electrode is in quantitative agreement with the density functional theory calculations.

  5. A new model for four-terminal junction field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Liou, Juin J.; Green, Keith; Cirba, Claude R.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a compact and semi-empirical model for a four-terminal (independent top and bottom gates) junction field-effect transistor (JFET). The model describes the steady-state characteristics for all bias conditions with a unified equation. Moreover, the model provides a high degree of accuracy and continuity for the different operation regions, a critical factor for robust analog circuit simulations. Capacitance modeling is also included to describe the JFET small-signal behavior. The model has been implemented in Cadence framework via Verilog-A and compared with data measured from JFETs used at Texas Instruments.

  6. Subgap structure in the conductance of a three-terminal Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, A. H.; Duvauchelle, J. E.; Courtois, H.; Mélin, R.; Feinberg, D.; Lefloch, F.

    2014-08-01

    Three-terminal superconductor (S)-normal metal (N)-superconductor (S) Josephson junctions are investigated. In a geometry where a T-shape normal metal is connected to three superconducting reservoirs, new subgap structures appear in the differential resistance for specific combinations of the superconductor chemical potentials. Those correspond to a correlated motion of Cooper pairs within the device that persist well above the Thouless energy and is consistent with the prediction of quartets formed by two entangled Cooper pairs. A simplified nonequilibrium Keldysh-Green's function calculation is presented that supports this interpretation.

  7. Osteocytes up-regulate the terminal differentiation of pre-osteoblasts via gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Yoichi; Akiyama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Kiyofumi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Eri; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Mikami, Yoshikazu; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We examined cell-to-cell interaction between pre-osteoblasts and osteocytes using MC3T3-E1 and MLO-Y4, respectively. First, GFP expressing MC3T3-E1 (E1-GFP) cells were generated to isolate the cells from co-culture with MLO-Y4. No changes were observed in the expression of osteogenic transcription factors Runx2, Osterix, Dlx5 and Msx2, but expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) in E1-GFP co-cultured with MLO-Y4 was 300-400-fold greater than that in mono-cultured E1-GFP. In addition, mineralized nodule formation was drastically increased in co-cultured E1-GFP cells compared to mono-cultured cells. Patch clamp assay showed the presence of gap junctions between E1-GFP and MLO-Y4. Furthermore, when the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) was added to the culture, increased expression of ALP and BSP in E1-GFP co-cultured with MLO-Y4 was suppressed. These results suggest that gap junction detected between pre-osteoblasts and osteocytes plays an important role on the terminal differentiation of pre-osteoblasts. PMID:25450679

  8. Three-terminal magnetic tunneling junction device with perpendicular anisotropy CoFeB sensing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Honjo, H. Nebashi, R.; Tokutome, K.; Miura, S.; Sakimura, N.; Sugibayashi, T.; Fukami, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Murahata, M.; Kasai, N.; Ishihara, K.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrated read and write characteristics of a three terminal memory device with a perpendicular anisotropy-free layer of a strip of [Co/Ni] and a low-switching perpendicular-anisotropy CoFeB/MgO sensing layer. This new design of the cell results in a small cell area. The switching magnetic field of the sensing layer can be decreased by changing sputtering gas for the Ta-cap from Ar to Kr. An electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of the cross-section of the magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) revealed that the boron content in CoFeB with a Kr-sputtered Ta-cap was smaller than that with an Ar-sputtered one. A change in resistance for the MTJ was observed that corresponded to the magnetic switching of the Co/Ni wire and its magnetoresistance ratio and critical current were 90% and 0.8 mA, respectively.

  9. A 2-terminal perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell enabled by a silicon tunnel junction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bailie, Colin D.; Johlin, Eric C.; Hoke, Eric T.; Akey, Austin J.; Nguyen, William H.; McGehee, Michael D.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-03-24

    With the advent of efficient high-bandgap metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics, an opportunity exists to make perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. We fabricate a monolithic tandem by developing a silicon-based interband tunnel junction that facilitates majority-carrier charge recombination between the perovskite and silicon sub-cells. We demonstrate a 1 cm2 2-terminal monolithic perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell with a VOC as high as 1.65 V. As a result, we achieve a stable 13.7% power conversion efficiency with the perovskite as the current-limiting sub-cell, and identify key challenges for this device architecture to reach efficiencies over 25%.

  10. Spin-orbit torque magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubukcu, Murat; Boulle, Olivier; Drouard, Marc; Garello, Kevin; Onur Avci, Can; Mihai Miron, Ioan; Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold; Gambardella, Pietro; Gaudin, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    We report on the current-induced magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction by spin-orbit torque and its read-out using the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The device is composed of a perpendicular Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB stack on top of a Ta current line. The magnetization of the bottom FeCoB layer can be switched reproducibly by the injection of current pulses with density 5 × 1011 A/m2 in the Ta layer in the presence of an in-plane bias magnetic field, leading to the full-scale change of the TMR signal. Our work demonstrates the proof of concept of a perpendicular spin-orbit torque magnetic memory cell.

  11. A 2-terminal perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell enabled by a silicon tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bailie, Colin D.; Johlin, Eric C.; Hoke, Eric T.; Akey, Austin J.; Nguyen, William H.; McGehee, Michael D.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-03-24

    With the advent of efficient high-bandgap metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics, an opportunity exists to make perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. We fabricate a monolithic tandem by developing a silicon-based interband tunnel junction that facilitates majority-carrier charge recombination between the perovskite and silicon sub-cells. We demonstrate a 1 cm2 2-terminal monolithic perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell with a VOC as high as 1.65 V. As a result, we achieve a stable 13.7% power conversion efficiency with the perovskite as the current-limiting sub-cell, and identify key challenges for this device architecture to reach efficiencies over 25%.

  12. Spin-orbit torque magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Cubukcu, Murat; Boulle, Olivier; Drouard, Marc; Mihai Miron, Ioan; Gaudin, Gilles; Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold

    2014-01-27

    We report on the current-induced magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction by spin-orbit torque and its read-out using the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The device is composed of a perpendicular Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB stack on top of a Ta current line. The magnetization of the bottom FeCoB layer can be switched reproducibly by the injection of current pulses with density 5 × 10{sup 11} A/m{sup 2} in the Ta layer in the presence of an in-plane bias magnetic field, leading to the full-scale change of the TMR signal. Our work demonstrates the proof of concept of a perpendicular spin-orbit torque magnetic memory cell.

  13. Three-terminal experiments on epitaxial Si/MgO tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurer, Juliane; Schaefer, Mareen; Kronseder, Matthias; Trottmann, Michaela; Haertinger, Markus; Zweck, Josef; Back, Christian H.; Weiss, Dieter; Ciorga, Mariusz; Bougeard, Dominique

    In the field of spin injection into semiconductors, experiments in a three-terminal (3T) Hanle geometry are widely used to determine spin life times and spin diffusion lengths. However, as charge and spin current are not separated in the 3T geometry, it is yet unclear how reliable 3T experiments are to reveal spin-related quantities of the semiconductor channel. In particular, the impact of defect states in the tunnel barrier or at its interfaces on measured 3T Hanle-like signals has intensely been discussed recently.In our contribution, we compare 3T experiments on entirely MBE-grown epitaxial Si/MgO/Fe/Au and Si/MgO/Au, i. e. ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic tunnel junctions. Both sample types show a similar Lorentzian signal comparable to those obtained by the Hanle effect of a precessing and dephasing spin ensemble. In contrast to the ferromagnetic sample, the resistance of the nonmagnetic sample increases for increasing external magnetic field. We discuss the dependence of the signal on bias, temperature and orientation of the external magnetic field, taking into account the high crystalline quality of our epitaxial tunnel junctions with atomically sharp interfaces.

  14. Partially resummed perturbation theory for multiple Andreev reflections in a short three-terminal Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélin, Régis; Feinberg, Denis; Douçot, Benoît

    2016-03-01

    In a transparent three-terminal Josephson junction, modeling nonequilibrium transport is numerically challenging, owing to the interplay between multiple Andreev reflection (MAR) thresholds and multipair resonances in the pair current. An approximate method, coined as "partially resummed perturbation theory in the number of nonlocal Green's functions", is presented that can be operational on a standard computer and demonstrates compatibility with results existing in the literature. In a linear structure made of two neighboring interfaces (with intermediate transparency) connected by a central superconductor, tunneling through each of the interfaces separately is taken into account to all orders. On the contrary, nonlocal processes connecting the two interfaces are accounted for at the lowest relevant order. This yields logarithmically divergent contributions at the gap edges, which are sufficient as a semi-quantitative description. The method is able to describe the current in the full two-dimensional voltage range, including commensurate as well as incommensurate values. The results found for the multipair (for instance quartet) current-phase characteristics as well as the MAR thresholds are compatible with previous results. At intermediate transparency, the multipair critical current is much larger than the background MAR current, which supports an experimental observation of the quartet and multipair resonances. The paper provides a proof of principle for addressing in the future the interplay between quasiparticles and multipairs in four-terminal structures.

  15. Progress toward a 30 percent-efficient, monolithic, three-junction, two-terminal concentrator solar cell for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partain, L. D.; Chung, B.-C.; Virshup, G. F.; Schultz, J. C.; Macmillan, H. F.; Ristow, M. Ladle; Kuryla, M. S.; Bertness, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    Component efficiencies of 0.2/sq cm cells at approximately 100x AMO light concentration and 80 C temperatures are not at 15.3 percent for a 1.9 eV AlGaAs top cell, 9.9 percent for a 1.4 eV GaAs middle cell under a 1.9 eV AlGaAs filter, and 2.4 percent for a bottom 1.0 eV InGaAs cell under a GaAs substrate. The goal is to continue improvement in these performance levels and to sequentially grow these devices on a single substrate to give 30 percent efficient, monolithic, two-terminal, three-junction space concentrator cells. The broad objective is a 30 percent efficient monolithic two-terminal cell that can operate under 25 to 100x AMO light concentrations and at 75 to 100 C cell temperatures. Detailed modeling predicts that this requires three junctions. Two options are being pursued, and both use a 1.9 eV AlGaAs top junction and a 1.4 eV GaAs middle junction grown by a 1 atm OMVPE on a lattice matched substrate. Option 1 uses a low-doped GaAs substrate with a lattice mismatched 1.0 eV InGaAs cell formed on the back of the substrate. Option 2 uses a Ge substrate to which the AlGaAs and GaAs top junctions are lattice matched, with a bottom 0.7 eV Ge junction formed near the substrate interface with the GaAs growth. The projected efficiency contributions are near 16, 11, and 3 percent, respectively, from the top, middle, and bottom junctions.

  16. Theoretical efficiency limit for a two-terminal multi-junction "step-cell" using detailed balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Hadi, Sabina; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-02-01

    Here we present detailed balance efficiency limit for a novel two-terminal dual and triple junction "step-cell" under AM 1.5G and AM 0 incident spectrums. The step-cell is a multi-junction (MJ) solar cell in which part of the top cell is removed, exposing some of the bottom cell area to unfiltered incident light, thus increasing bottom cell's photogenerated current. Optical generation of the bottom cell is modeled in two parts: step part, limited by the bottom cell bandgap, and conventional part, additionally limited by the top cell absorption. Our results show that conventionally designed MJ cell with optimized bandgap combination of 1.64 eV/0.96 eV for dual junction and 1.91 eV/1.37 eV/0.93 eV for triple junction has the highest theoretical efficiency limit. However, the step-cell design provides significant efficiency improvement for cells with non-optimum bandgap values. For example, for 1.41 eV ( ˜GaAs)/Si dual junction under AM 1.5G, efficiency limit increases from ˜21% in a conventional design to 38.7% for optimized step-cell. Similar benefits are observed for three-junction step-cell and for AM 0 spectrum studied here. Step-cell relaxes bandgap requirements for efficient MJ solar cells, providing an opportunity for a wider selection of materials and cost reduction.

  17. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  18. Edge termination study and fabrication of a 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Men; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Hu; Chen, Wen-Hao

    2011-11-01

    The 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) diodes terminated by field guard rings and offset field plate are designed, fabricated and characterized. It is shown experimentally that a 3-μ P-type implantation window spacing gives an optimum trade-off between forward drop voltage and leakage current density for these diodes, yielding a specific on-resistance of 8.3 mΩ·cm2. A JBS diode with a turn-on voltage of 0.65 V and a reverse current density less than 1 A/cm2 under 500 V is fabricated, and the reverse recovery time is tested to be 80 ns, and the peak reverse current is 28.1 mA. Temperature-dependent characteristics are also studied in a temperature range of 75 °C-200 °C. The diode shows a stable Schottky barrier height of up to 200 °C and a stable operation under a continuous forward current of 100 A/cm2.

  19. Stretching of BDT-gold molecular junctions: thiol or thiolate termination?

    PubMed

    Souza, Amaury de Melo; Rungger, Ivan; Pontes, Renato Borges; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; da Silva, Antônio José Roque; Schwingenschlöegl, Udo; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    It is often assumed that the hydrogen atoms in the thiol groups of a benzene-1,4-dithiol dissociate when Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions are formed. We demonstrate, by stability and transport property calculations, that this assumption cannot be made. We show that the dissociative adsorption of methanethiol and benzene-1,4-dithiol molecules on a flat Au(111) surface is energetically unfavorable and that the activation barrier for this reaction is as high as 1 eV. For the molecule in the junction, our results show, for all electrode geometries studied, that the thiol junctions are energetically more stable than their thiolate counterparts. Due to the fact that density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) underestimates the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital by several electron-volts, and that it does not capture the renormalization of the energy levels due to the image charge effect, the conductance of the Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions is overestimated. After taking into account corrections due to image charge effects by means of constrained-DFT calculations and electrostatic classical models, we apply a scissor operator to correct the DFT energy level positions, and calculate the transport properties of the thiol and thiolate molecular junctions as a function of the electrode separation. For the thiol junctions, we show that the conductance decreases as the electrode separation increases, whereas the opposite trend is found for the thiolate junctions. Both behaviors have been observed in experiments, therefore pointing to the possible coexistence of both thiol and thiolate junctions. Moreover, the corrected conductance values, for both thiol and thiolate, are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those calculated with DFT-LDA. This brings the theoretical results in quantitatively good agreement with experimental data. PMID:25347152

  20. Stretching of BDT-gold molecular junctions: thiol or thiolate termination?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Amaury De Melo; Rungger, Ivan; Pontes, Renato Borges; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; da Silva, Antônio José Roque; Schwingenschlöegl, Udo; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    It is often assumed that the hydrogen atoms in the thiol groups of a benzene-1,4-dithiol dissociate when Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions are formed. We demonstrate, by stability and transport property calculations, that this assumption cannot be made. We show that the dissociative adsorption of methanethiol and benzene-1,4-dithiol molecules on a flat Au(111) surface is energetically unfavorable and that the activation barrier for this reaction is as high as 1 eV. For the molecule in the junction, our results show, for all electrode geometries studied, that the thiol junctions are energetically more stable than their thiolate counterparts. Due to the fact that density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) underestimates the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital by several electron-volts, and that it does not capture the renormalization of the energy levels due to the image charge effect, the conductance of the Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions is overestimated. After taking into account corrections due to image charge effects by means of constrained-DFT calculations and electrostatic classical models, we apply a scissor operator to correct the DFT energy level positions, and calculate the transport properties of the thiol and thiolate molecular junctions as a function of the electrode separation. For the thiol junctions, we show that the conductance decreases as the electrode separation increases, whereas the opposite trend is found for the thiolate junctions. Both behaviors have been observed in experiments, therefore pointing to the possible coexistence of both thiol and thiolate junctions. Moreover, the corrected conductance values, for both thiol and thiolate, are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those calculated with DFT-LDA. This brings the theoretical results in quantitatively good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Internalization of a GFP-tetanus toxin C-terminal fragment fusion protein at mature mouse neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Roux, Sylvie; Colasante, Cesare; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Barbier, Julien; Curie, Thomas; Girard, Emmanuelle; Molgó, Jordi; Brûlet, Philippe

    2005-09-01

    The distribution, dynamics, internalization, and retrograde axonal traffic of a fusion protein composed of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the atoxic C-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin (TTC) were studied after its in vivo injection. Confocal microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy revealed that the fusion protein (GFP-TTC) rapidly clustered in motor nerve terminals of the neuromuscular junction. Clathrin-coated pits, and axolemma infoldings located between active zones appeared to be involved in the internalization of the fusion protein. Biochemical analysis of detergent-extracted neuromuscular preparations showed that the GFP-TTC fusion protein was associated with lipid microdomains. We suggest that GFP-TTC clustering in these lipid microdomains favors the recruitment of other proteins involved in its endocytosis and internalization in motor nerve terminals. During its retrograde trafficking, GFP-TTC accumulated in different axonal compartments than those used by cholera toxin B-subunit suggesting that these two proteins are transported by different pathways and cargos. PMID:16023367

  2. Internalization of a GFP-tetanus toxin C-terminal fragment fusion protein at mature mouse neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Roux, Sylvie; Colasante, Cesare; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Barbier, Julien; Curie, Thomas; Girard, Emmanuelle; Molgó, Jordi; Brûlet, Philippe

    2005-12-01

    The distribution, dynamics, internalization, and retrograde axonal traffic of a fusion protein composed of green fluorescent protein (GFP)and the atoxic C-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin (TTC) were studied after its in vivo injection. Confocal microscopy and immuno-gold electron microscopy revealed that the fusion protein (GFP-TTC) rapidly clustered in motor nerve terminals of the neuromuscular junction. Clathrin-coated pits, and axolemma infoldings located between active zones appeared to be involved in the internalization of the fusion protein. Biochemical analysis of detergent-extracted neuromuscular preparations showed that the GFP-TTC fusion protein was associated with lipid microdomains. We suggest that GFP-TTC clustering in these lipid microdomains favors the recruitment of other proteins involved in its endocytosis and internalization in motor nerve terminals. During its retrograde trafficking, GFP-TTC accumulated indifferent axonal compartments than those used by cholera toxin B-subunit suggesting that these two proteins are transported by different pathways and cargos. PMID:16456925

  3. Majorana modes in a triple-terminal Josephson junction with embedded parallel-coupled double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guang-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Gao, Zhen; Wu, Hai-Na; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the Josephson effect in one triple-terminal junction with embedded parallel-coupled double quantum dots. It is found that the inter-superconductor supercurrent has opportunities to oscillate in period 4 π, with the adjustment of the phase differences among the superconductors. What is notable is that such a result is robust and independent of fermion parities, intradot Coulomb strength, and the dot-superconductor coupling manner. By introducing the concept of spinful many-particle Majorana modes, we present the analytical definition of the Majorana operator via superposing electron and hole operators. It can be believed that this work provide a simple but feasible proposal for the realization of Majorana modes in a nonmagnetic system.

  4. Specific recognition of four-way DNA junctions by the C-terminal zinc-binding domain of HPV oncoprotein E6.

    PubMed

    Ristriani, T; Nominé, Y; Masson, M; Weiss, E; Travé, G

    2001-01-26

    E6 is an oncoprotein implicated in cervical cancers produced by " high risk " human papillomaviruses. E6 binds specifically to several cellular proteins, including the tumour suppressor p53 and the ubiquitin ligase E6-AP. However, E6 is also a DNA-binding protein which recognizes a structural motive present in four-way junctions. Here, we demonstrate that the C-terminal zinc-binding domain of E6, expressed separately from the rest of the protein, fully retains the selective four-way junction recognition activity. The domain can bind to two identical and independent sites on a single junction, whereas full-length E6 can only bind to one site. The junction bound to either one or two domains adopts an extended square conformation. These results allow us to assign the structure-dependent DNA recognition activity of E6 to its C-terminal domain, which therefore represents a new class of zinc-stabilized DNA-binding module. Comparison with the binding characteristics of other junction-specific proteins enlightens the rules which govern protein-induced deformation of four-way DNA junctions. PMID:11162088

  5. Neuregulin1 displayed on motor axons regulates terminal Schwann cell-mediated synapse elimination at developing neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Schwab, Markus H.; Thompson, Wesley J.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic connections in the nervous system are rearranged during development and in adulthood as a feature of growth, plasticity, aging, and disease. Glia are implicated as active participants in these changes. Here we investigated a signal that controls the participation of peripheral glia, the terminal Schwann cells (SCs), at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in mice. Transgenic manipulation of the levels of membrane-tethered neuregulin1 (NRG1-III), a potent activator of SCs normally presented on motor axons, alters the rate of loss of motor inputs at NMJs during developmental synapse elimination. In addition, NMJs of adult transgenic mice that expressed excess axonal NRG1-III exhibited continued remodeling, in contrast to the more stable morphologies of controls. In fact, synaptic SCs of these adult mice with NRG1-III overexpression exhibited behaviors evident in wild type neonates during synapse elimination, including an affinity for the postsynaptic myofiber surface and phagocytosis of nerve terminals. Given that levels of NRG1-III expression normally peak during the period of synapse elimination, our findings identify axon-tethered NRG1 as a molecular determinant for SC-driven neuromuscular synaptic plasticity. PMID:26755586

  6. Tuned NV emission by in-plane Al-Schottky junctions on hydrogen terminated diamond

    PubMed Central

    Schreyvogel, Christoph; Wolfer, Marco; Kato, Hiromitsu; Schreck, Matthias; Nebel, Christoph E.

    2014-01-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre exhibits outstanding optical and spin properties and thus is very attractive for applications in quantum optics. Up to now an active control of the charge state of near-surface NV centres is difficult and the centres switch in an uncontrolled way between different charge states. In this work, we demonstrate an active control of the charge state of NV centres (implanted 7 nm below the surface) by using an in-plane Schottky diode geometry from aluminium on hydrogen terminated diamond in combination with confocal micro-photoluminescence measurements. The partial quenching of NV-photoluminescence caused by the hole accumulation layer of the hydrogen terminated surface can be recovered by applying reverse bias potentials on this diode, i.e. the NV0 charge state is depleted while the NV− charge state is populated. This charge state conversion is caused by the bias voltage affected modulation of the band bending in the depletion region which shifts the Fermi level across the NV charge transition levels. PMID:24407227

  7. Efficiency and dissipation in a two-terminal thermoelectric junction, emphasizing small dissipation.

    PubMed

    Entin-Wohlman, O; Jiang, J-H; Imry, Y

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency and cooling power of a two-terminal thermoelectric refrigerator are analyzed near the limit of vanishing dissipation (ideal system), where the optimal efficiency is the Carnot one, but the cooling power vanishes. This limit, where transport occurs only via a single sharp electronic energy, has been referred to as "strong coupling" or "the best thermoelectric." Confining the discussion to the linear-response regime, it is found that "parasitic" effects that make the system deviate from the ideal limit, and reduce the efficiency from the Carnot limit, are crucial for the usefulness of the device. Among these parasitics, there are: parallel phonon conduction, finite width of the electrons' transport band, and more than a single energy transport channel. In terms of a small parameter characterizing the deviation from the ideal limit, the efficiency and power grow linearly, and the dissipation quadratically. The results are generalized to the case of broken time-reversal symmetry, and the major nontrivial changes are discussed. Finally, the recent universal relation between the thermopower and the asymmetry of the dissipation between the two terminals is briefly discussed, including the small dissipation limit. PMID:24580188

  8. Efficiency and dissipation in a two-terminal thermoelectric junction, emphasizing small dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entin-Wohlman, O.; Jiang, J.-H.; Imry, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency and cooling power of a two-terminal thermoelectric refrigerator are analyzed near the limit of vanishing dissipation (ideal system), where the optimal efficiency is the Carnot one, but the cooling power vanishes. This limit, where transport occurs only via a single sharp electronic energy, has been referred to as "strong coupling" or "the best thermoelectric." Confining the discussion to the linear-response regime, it is found that "parasitic" effects that make the system deviate from the ideal limit, and reduce the efficiency from the Carnot limit, are crucial for the usefulness of the device. Among these parasitics, there are: parallel phonon conduction, finite width of the electrons' transport band, and more than a single energy transport channel. In terms of a small parameter characterizing the deviation from the ideal limit, the efficiency and power grow linearly, and the dissipation quadratically. The results are generalized to the case of broken time-reversal symmetry, and the major nontrivial changes are discussed. Finally, the recent universal relation between the thermopower and the asymmetry of the dissipation between the two terminals is briefly discussed, including the small dissipation limit.

  9. Magnetic-tunnel-junction based low-energy nonvolatile flip-flop using an area-efficient self-terminated write driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Hanyu, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    A nonvolatile flip-flop (NV-FF) that makes it possible to minimize the backup energy before power-off is proposed. The use of a self-terminated write driver with continuous voltage monitoring enables automatic write-current termination to be performed immediately after the desired data are written, resulting in great energy saving. Moreover, by utilizing single-ended circuitry together with a symmetrical write current path structure, both a nonvolatile storage function and self-termination are compactly embedded in the NV-FF without performance degradation. As a result, the backup energy is reduced by 83% compared to that of the average of conventional magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)-based NV-FFs with no self-termination. It is also demonstrated that total transistor counts are reduced by 43% compared to a conventional MTJ-based NV-FF with self-termination.

  10. Logic circuit prototypes for three-terminal magnetic tunnel junctions with mobile domain walls.

    PubMed

    Currivan-Incorvia, J A; Siddiqui, S; Dutta, S; Evarts, E R; Zhang, J; Bono, D; Ross, C A; Baldo, M A

    2016-01-01

    Spintronic computing promises superior energy efficiency and nonvolatility compared to conventional field-effect transistor logic. But, it has proven difficult to realize spintronic circuits with a versatile, scalable device design that is adaptable to emerging material physics. Here we present prototypes of a logic device that encode information in the position of a magnetic domain wall in a ferromagnetic wire. We show that a single three-terminal device can perform inverter and buffer operations. We demonstrate one device can drive two subsequent gates and logic propagation in a circuit of three inverters. This prototype demonstration shows that magnetic domain wall logic devices have the necessary characteristics for future computing, including nonlinearity, gain, cascadability, and room temperature operation. PMID:26754412

  11. Logic circuit prototypes for three-terminal magnetic tunnel junctions with mobile domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Currivan-Incorvia, J. A.; Siddiqui, S.; Dutta, S.; Evarts, E. R.; Zhang, J.; Bono, D.; Ross, C. A.; Baldo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Spintronic computing promises superior energy efficiency and nonvolatility compared to conventional field-effect transistor logic. But, it has proven difficult to realize spintronic circuits with a versatile, scalable device design that is adaptable to emerging material physics. Here we present prototypes of a logic device that encode information in the position of a magnetic domain wall in a ferromagnetic wire. We show that a single three-terminal device can perform inverter and buffer operations. We demonstrate one device can drive two subsequent gates and logic propagation in a circuit of three inverters. This prototype demonstration shows that magnetic domain wall logic devices have the necessary characteristics for future computing, including nonlinearity, gain, cascadability, and room temperature operation. PMID:26754412

  12. Logic circuit prototypes for three-terminal magnetic tunnel junctions with mobile domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currivan-Incorvia, J. A.; Siddiqui, S.; Dutta, S.; Evarts, E. R.; Zhang, J.; Bono, D.; Ross, C. A.; Baldo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Spintronic computing promises superior energy efficiency and nonvolatility compared to conventional field-effect transistor logic. But, it has proven difficult to realize spintronic circuits with a versatile, scalable device design that is adaptable to emerging material physics. Here we present prototypes of a logic device that encode information in the position of a magnetic domain wall in a ferromagnetic wire. We show that a single three-terminal device can perform inverter and buffer operations. We demonstrate one device can drive two subsequent gates and logic propagation in a circuit of three inverters. This prototype demonstration shows that magnetic domain wall logic devices have the necessary characteristics for future computing, including nonlinearity, gain, cascadability, and room temperature operation.

  13. The conserved P body component HPat/Pat1 negatively regulates synaptic terminal growth at the larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sarala J; Nesler, Katherine R; Rosen, Sarah F; Kato, Yasuko; Nakamura, Akira; Ramaswami, Mani; Barbee, Scott A

    2012-12-15

    The temporal and spatial regulation of protein synthesis plays an important role in the control of neural physiology. In axons and dendrites, translationally repressed mRNAs are actively transported to their destinations in a variety of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). A subset of these neuronal RNPs has been shown to contain proteins associated with mRNA processing bodies (P bodies). P bodies are a class of highly conserved cytoplasmic granules that have been linked to both mRNA decay and translational repression via general and miRNA-mediated pathways. Here, we characterize functions for HPat/Pat1 (also known as Patr-1), a core component of P bodies, at the glutamatergic larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We show that hpat mutants exhibit a strong synaptic hyperplasia at the NMJ. The synaptic defects observed in hpat mutants are associated with rearrangement of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton suggesting that HPat negatively regulates presynaptic microtubule-based growth during NMJ development. Consistent with this, overexpression of HPat also blocks the rapid growth of presynaptic boutons induced by spaced depolarization. Finally, we demonstrate that HPat interacts genetically with the catalytic subunit of the deadenylase complex (twin/CCR4) and the miRNA pathway (Argonaute 1) to control bouton formation. We propose that HPat is required to target mRNAs involved in the control of microtubule architecture and synaptic terminal growth for repression, presumably in P bodies, via both general and miRNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:23097047

  14. The conserved P body component HPat/Pat1 negatively regulates synaptic terminal growth at the larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sarala J.; Nesler, Katherine R.; Rosen, Sarah F.; Kato, Yasuko; Nakamura, Akira; Ramaswami, Mani; Barbee, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The temporal and spatial regulation of protein synthesis plays an important role in the control of neural physiology. In axons and dendrites, translationally repressed mRNAs are actively transported to their destinations in a variety of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). A subset of these neuronal RNPs has been shown to contain proteins associated with mRNA processing bodies (P bodies). P bodies are a class of highly conserved cytoplasmic granules that have been linked to both mRNA decay and translational repression via general and miRNA-mediated pathways. Here, we characterize functions for HPat/Pat1 (also known as Patr-1), a core component of P bodies, at the glutamatergic larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We show that hpat mutants exhibit a strong synaptic hyperplasia at the NMJ. The synaptic defects observed in hpat mutants are associated with rearrangement of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton suggesting that HPat negatively regulates presynaptic microtubule-based growth during NMJ development. Consistent with this, overexpression of HPat also blocks the rapid growth of presynaptic boutons induced by spaced depolarization. Finally, we demonstrate that HPat interacts genetically with the catalytic subunit of the deadenylase complex (twin/CCR4) and the miRNA pathway (Argonaute 1) to control bouton formation. We propose that HPat is required to target mRNAs involved in the control of microtubule architecture and synaptic terminal growth for repression, presumably in P bodies, via both general and miRNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:23097047

  15. Current-induced magnetization switching of a three terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction by spin-orbit torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubukcu, Murat; Drouard, Marc; Boulle, Olivier; Garello, Kevin; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold; Gambardella, Pietro; Gaudin, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    A current flowing in the plane of a magnetic multilayer with structural inversion asymmetry, such as Pt/Co/AlOx, creates a torque on the magnetization. This torque is due to the strong spin-orbit interaction present in such multilayers and can lead to fast magnetization reversal with a low writing energy.We will present the first proof of concept of a perpendicular spin-orbit torque magnetic random access memory (SOT-MRAM) cell composed of a Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB magnetic tunnel junction. The basic write and read operations, i.e., the magnetization reversal by current injection in the Ta track and its detection using the high TMR signal, are demonstrated. Our results open a path for the development of a novel class of three terminal MRAM combining fast, reliable and low energy writing. This work was supported by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Program (Grant Agreement 318144, spot project).

  16. High-performance 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky diodes with double resistive termination extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liu; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Sheng-Bei; Dong, Lin; Liu, Xing-Fang; Fan, Zhong-Chao; Liu, Bin; Yan, Guo-Guo; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Wan-Shun; Sun, Guo-Sheng; He, Zhi; Yang, Fu-Hua

    2013-09-01

    4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) diodes with a high-temperature annealed resistive termination extension (HARTE) are designed, fabricated and characterized in this work. The differential specific on-state resistance of the device is as low as 3.64 mΩ·cm2 with a total active area of 2.46 × 10-3 cm2. Ti is the Schottky contact metal with a Schottky barrier height of 1.08 V and a low onset voltage of 0.7 V. The ideality factor is calculated to be 1.06. Al implantation annealing is performed at 1250°C in Ar, while good reverse characteristics are achieved. The maximum breakdown voltage is 1000 V with a leakage current of 9 × 10-5 A on chip level. These experimental results show good consistence with the simulation results and demonstrate that high-performance 4H-SiC JBS diodes can be obtained based on the double HARTE structure.

  17. Fuzzy-Logic Based Detection and Characterization of Junctions and Terminations in Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Neurons.

    PubMed

    Radojević, Miroslav; Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Digital reconstruction of neuronal cell morphology is an important step toward understanding the functionality of neuronal networks. Neurons are tree-like structures whose description depends critically on the junctions and terminations, collectively called critical points, making the correct localization and identification of these points a crucial task in the reconstruction process. Here we present a fully automatic method for the integrated detection and characterization of both types of critical points in fluorescence microscopy images of neurons. In view of the majority of our current studies, which are based on cultured neurons, we describe and evaluate the method for application to two-dimensional (2D) images. The method relies on directional filtering and angular profile analysis to extract essential features about the main streamlines at any location in an image, and employs fuzzy logic with carefully designed rules to reason about the feature values in order to make well-informed decisions about the presence of a critical point and its type. Experiments on simulated as well as real images of neurons demonstrate the detection performance of our method. A comparison with the output of two existing neuron reconstruction methods reveals that our method achieves substantially higher detection rates and could provide beneficial information to the reconstruction process. PMID:26701809

  18. C-terminal Src Kinase Gates Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Fasciclin II Expression at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Ashlyn M.; Brusich, Douglas J.; Frank, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Forms of homeostatic plasticity stabilize neuronal outputs and promote physiologically favorable synapse function. A well-studied homeostatic system operates at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). At the NMJ, impairment of postsynaptic glutamate receptor activity is offset by a compensatory increase in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We aim to elucidate how this process operates on a molecular level and is preserved throughout development. In this study, we identified a tyrosine kinase-driven signaling system that sustains homeostatic control of NMJ function. We identified C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk) as a potential regulator of synaptic homeostasis through an RNAi- and electrophysiology-based genetic screen. We found that Csk loss-of-function mutations impaired the sustained expression of homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ, without drastically altering synapse growth or baseline neurotransmission. Muscle-specific overexpression of Src Family Kinase (SFK) substrates that are negatively regulated by Csk also impaired NMJ homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic Csk-YFP can support homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ when expressed either in the muscle or in the nerve. However, only muscle-expressed Csk-YFP was able to localize to NMJ structures. By immunostaining, we found that Csk mutant NMJs had dysregulated expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule homolog Fasciclin II (FasII). By immunoblotting, we found that levels of a specific isoform of FasII were decreased in homeostatically challenged GluRIIA mutant animals–but markedly increased in Csk mutant animals. Additionally, we found that postsynaptic overexpression of FasII from its endogenous locus was sufficient to impair synaptic homeostasis, and genetically reducing FasII levels in Csk mutants fully restored synaptic homeostasis. Based on these data, we propose that Csk and its SFK substrates impinge upon homeostatic control of NMJ function by regulating

  19. Early Detection of a Two-Long-Terminal-Repeat Junction Molecule in the Cytoplasm of Recombinant Murine Leukemia Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Fatima; Penaud, Magalie; Petit, Caroline; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Trajcevski, Stéphane; Klatzmann, David; Duisit, Ghislaine; Sonigo, Pierre; Moullier, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    We showed that a U5-U3 junction was reproducibly detected by a PCR assay as early as 1 to 2 h postinfection with a DNase-treated murine leukemia virus (MLV)-containing supernatant in aphidicolin-arrested NIH 3T3 cells, as well as in nonarrested cells. Such detection is azidothymidine sensitive and corresponded to neosynthesized products of the reverse transcriptase. This observation was confirmed in two additional human cell lines, TE671 and ARPE-19. Using cell fractionation combined with careful controls, we found that a two-long-terminal-repeat (two-LTR) junction molecule was detectable in the cytoplasm as early as 2 h post virus entry. Altogether, our data indicated that the neosynthesized retroviral DNA led to the early formation of structures including true two-LTR junctions in the cytoplasm of MLV-infected cells. Thus, the classical assumption that two-LTR circles are a mitosis-dependent dead-end product accumulating in the nucleus must be reconsidered. MLV-derived products containing a two-LTR junction can no longer be used as an exclusive surrogate for the preintegration complex nuclear translocation event. PMID:15163712

  20. An investigation of the SNS Josephson junction as a three-terminal device. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, H.; Prans, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    A particular phenomenon of the SNS Josephson junction was investigated; i.e., control by a current entering the normal region and leaving through one of the superconducting regions. The effect of the control current on the junction was found to be dependent upon the ration of the resistances of the two halves of the N layer. A low frequency, lumped, nonlinear model was proposed to describe the electrical characteristics of the device, and a method was developed to plot the dynamic junction resistance as a function of junction current. The effective thermal noise temperature of the sample was determined. Small signal linearized analysis of the device suggests its use as an impedance transformer, although geometric limitations must be overcome. Linear approximation indicates that it is reciprocal and no power gain is possible. It is felt that, with suitable metallurgical and geometrical improvements, the device has promise to become a superconducting transistor.

  1. Deletion of the last five C-terminal amino acid residues of connexin43 leads to lethal ventricular arrhythmias in mice without affecting coupling via gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Lübkemeier, Indra; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Lin, Xianming; Sasse, Philipp; Andrié, René; Schrickel, Jan Wilko; Chkourko, Halina; Bukauskas, Feliksas F; Kim, Jung-Sun; Frank, Marina; Malan, Daniela; Zhang, Jiong; Wirth, Angela; Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Mohler, Peter J; Offermanns, Stefan; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Delmar, Mario; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    The cardiac intercalated disc harbors mechanical and electrical junctions as well as ion channel complexes mediating propagation of electrical impulses. Cardiac connexin43 (Cx43) co-localizes and interacts with several of the proteins located at intercalated discs in the ventricular myocardium. We have generated conditional Cx43D378stop mice lacking the last five C-terminal amino acid residues, representing a binding motif for zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1), and investigated the functional consequences of this mutation on cardiac physiology and morphology. Newborn and adult homozygous Cx43D378stop mice displayed markedly impaired and heterogeneous cardiac electrical activation properties and died from severe ventricular arrhythmias. Cx43 and ZO-1 were co-localized at intercalated discs in Cx43D378stop hearts, and the Cx43D378stop gap junction channels showed normal coupling properties. Patch clamp analyses of isolated adult Cx43D378stop cardiomyocytes revealed a significant decrease in sodium and potassium current densities. Furthermore, we also observed a significant loss of Nav1.5 protein from intercalated discs in Cx43D378stop hearts. The phenotypic lethality of the Cx43D378stop mutation was very similar to the one previously reported for adult Cx43 deficient (Cx43KO) mice. Yet, in contrast to Cx43KO mice, the Cx43 gap junction channel was still functional in the Cx43D378stop mutant. We conclude that the lethality of Cx43D378stop mice is independent of the loss of gap junctional intercellular communication, but most likely results from impaired cardiac sodium and potassium currents. The Cx43D378stop mice reveal for the first time that Cx43 dependent arrhythmias can develop by mechanisms other than impairment of gap junction channel function. PMID:23558439

  2. Deletion of the last five C-terminal amino acid residues of connexin43 leads to lethal ventricular arrhythmias in mice without affecting coupling via gap junction channels

    PubMed Central

    Lübkemeier, Indra; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Lin, Xianming; Sasse, Philipp; Andrié, René; Schrickel, Jan Wilko; Chkourko, Halina; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.; Kim, Jung-Sun; Frank, Marina; Malan, Daniela; Zhang, Jiong; Wirth, Angela; Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Mohler, Peter J.; Offermanns, Stefan; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Delmar, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The cardiac intercalated disc harbors mechanical and electrical junctions as well as ion channel complexes mediating propagation of electrical impulses. Cardiac connexin43 (Cx43) co-localizes and interacts with several of the proteins located at intercalated discs in the ventricular myocardium. We have generated conditional Cx43D378stop mice lacking the last five C-terminal amino acid residues, representing a binding motif for zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1), and investigated the functional consequences of this mutation on cardiac physiology and morphology. Newborn and adult homozygous Cx43D378stop mice displayed markedly impaired and heterogeneous cardiac electrical activation properties and died from severe ventricular arrhythmias. Cx43 and ZO-1 were co-localized at intercalated discs in Cx43D378stop hearts, and the Cx43D378stop gap junction channels showed normal coupling properties. Patch clamp analyses of isolated adult Cx43D378stop cardiomyocytes revealed a significant decrease in sodium and potassium current densities. Furthermore, we also observed a significant loss of Nav1.5 protein from intercalated discs in Cx43D378stop hearts. The phenotypic lethality of the Cx43D378stop mutation was very similar to the one previously reported for adult Cx43 deficient (Cx43KO) mice. Yet, in contrast to Cx43KO mice, the Cx43 gap junction channel was still functional in the Cx43D378stop mutant. We conclude that the lethality of Cx43D378stop mice is independent of the loss of gap junctional intercellular communication, but most likely results from impaired cardiac sodium and potassium currents. The Cx43D378stop mice reveal for the first time that Cx43 dependent arrhythmias can develop by mechanisms other than impairment of gap junction channel function. PMID:23558439

  3. Multi-terminal magnetotransport measurements over a tunable graphene p-n junction created by AFM-nanomachining

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Smirnov, D.; Rode, J.; Haug, R. J.

    2013-12-04

    An Atomic Force Microscope is used to alter one part of a single layer graphene sample locally. Transport experiments at low temperatures are then used to characterize the different parts independently with field effect and Hall measurements. It is shown, that the nanomachining leads to an effective doping in the altered area and therefore to a difference in the charge carrier density of Δn = 3.5 ⋅ 10{sup 15}m{sup −2} between the unchanged and changed part. These two parts can be tuned with a global backgate to form a junction of different polarity, i.e. a p-n junction.

  4. THE GAP JUNCTION INHIBITOR 2-AMINOETHOXY-DIPHENYL-BORATE PROTECTS AGAINST ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY BY INHIBITING CYTOCHROME P450 ENZYMES AND C-JUN N-TERMINAL KINASE ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:24070586

  5. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4-6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:24070586

  6. Clinical Improvement of Alpha-mannosidosis Cat Following a Single Cisterna Magna Infusion of AAV1.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sea Young; Bagel, Jessica H; O'Donnell, Patricia A; Vite, Charles H; Wolfe, John H

    2016-02-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are debilitating neurometabolic disorders for most of which long-term effective therapies have not been developed. Gene therapy is a potential treatment but a critical barrier to treating the brain is the need for global correction. We tested the efficacy of cisterna magna infusion of adeno-associated virus type 1 (AAV1) expressing feline alpha-mannosidase gene in the postsymptomatic alpha-mannosidosis (AMD) cat, a homologue of the human disease. Lysosomal alpha-mannosidase (MANB) activity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were increased above the control values in untreated AMD cats. Clinical neurological signs were delayed in onset and reduced in severity. The lifespan of the treated cats was significantly extended. Postmortem histopathology showed resolution of lysosomal storage lesions throughout the brain. MANB activity in brain tissue was significantly above the levels of untreated tissues. The results demonstrate that a single cisterna magna injection of AAV1 into the CSF can mediate widespread neuronal transduction of the brain and meaningful clinical improvement. Thus, cisterna magna gene delivery by AAV1 appears to be a viable strategy for treatment of the whole brain in AMD and should be applicable to many of the neurotropic LSDs as well as other neurogenetic disorders. PMID:26354342

  7. Golgi apparatus cisternae of monensin-treated cells accumulate in the cytoplasm of liver slices.

    PubMed

    Morré, D J; Morré, D M; Mollenhauer, H H; Reutter, W

    1987-04-01

    Protein transport via the endoplasmic reticulum Golgi apparatus-cell surface export route was blocked when slices (6-15 cells thick) of livers of 10-day-old rats were incubated with 1 microM monensin. Production of secretory vesicles by Golgi apparatus was reduced or eliminated and, in their place, swollen cisternae accumulated in the cytoplasm at the trans Golgi apparatus face. The swelling response was restricted to the six external cell layers of the liver slices, and the number of cells showing the response was little increased by either a greater concentration of monensin or by longer times of incubation. When monensin was added post-chase to the slices, flux of radioactive proteins to the cell surface was inhibited by about 80% as determined from standard pulse-chase analyses with isolated cell fractions. Radioactive proteins accumulated in both endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus and in a fraction that may contain monensin-blocked Golgi apparatus cisternae released from the stack. The latter fraction was characterized by galactosyltransferase/thiamine pyrophosphatase ratios similar to those of Golgi apparatus from control slices. The use of monensin with the tissue slice system may provide an opportunity for the cells to accumulate monensin-blocked Golgi apparatus cisternae in sufficient quantities to permit their isolation and purification by conventional cell fractionation methods. PMID:3595634

  8. PREDICTING WATER ACTIVITY IN ELECTROLYTE SOLUTIONS WITH THE CISTERNAS-LAM MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    REYNOLDS JG; GREER DA; DISSELKAMP RL

    2011-03-01

    Water activity is an important parameter needed to predict the solubility of hydrated salts in Hanford nuclear waste supernatants. A number of models available in the scientific literature predict water activity from electrolyte solution composition. The Cisternas-Lam model is one of those models and has several advantages for nuclear waste application. One advantage is that it has a single electrolyte specific parameter that is temperature independent. Thus, this parameter can be determined from very limited data and extrapolated widely. The Cisternas-Lam model has five coefficients that are used for all aqueous electrolytes. The present study aims to determine if there is a substantial improvement in making all six coefficients electrolyte specific. The Cisternas-Lam model was fit to data for six major electrolytes in Hanford nuclear waste supernatants. The model was first fit to all data to determine the five global coefficients, when they were held constant for all electrolytes it yielded a substantially better fit. Subsequently, the model was fit to each electrolyte dataset separately, where all six coefficients were allowed to be electrolyte specific. Treating all six coefficients as electrolyte specific did not make sufficient difference, given the complexity of applying the electrolyte specific parameters to multi-solute systems. Revised water specific parameters, optimized to the electrolytes relevant to Hanford waste, are also reported.

  9. Iatrogenic Aorto-Cisterna Chyli Fistula During Percutaneous Balloon Aortoplasty in a Patient with Takayasu's Arteritis: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Hye Sun; Shin, Sung Wook Kim, Eun Hui; Do, Young Soo; Choo, Sung Wook; Cho, Sung Ki; Park, Kwang Bo

    2007-04-15

    We present a case of iatrogenic aorto-cisterna chyli fistula that developed during percutaneous transluminal aortoplasty in a 16-year old girl with Takayasu's arteritis. The aorto-cisterna chyli fistula was angiographically confirmed and treated using a stent-graft, which successfully occluded the fistula. Her claudication then improved, although follow-up CT angiography at 10 months revealed mild recurrent aortic stenosis.

  10. Influence of carriers injection conditions on current-voltage characteristic of InGaAs/InAlAs-based three-terminal ballistic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhi, G.; Hackens, B.; Faniel, S.; Gustin, C.; Bayot, V.; Wallart, X.; Bollaert, S.; Cappy, A.; Vasallo, B. G.; Mateos, J.; Gonzalez, T.

    2004-03-01

    We report on nonlinear electrical properties of three-terminal ballistic junctions (TBJs), etched on a two-dimensional electron gas confined in an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure. Measurements are performed in the six-probe configuration between 4.2K and room temperature. We measure the voltage Vc generated at the central stem when voltages Vl and Vr are applied on the left and right branches of the TBJs in push-pull fashion (Vl = -Vr =V_0). We observe that the sign and the amplitude of the nonlinear Vc vs V0 characteristic are strikingly influenced by voltage biases applied on side gates as well as by the carriers injection conditions at the left and right branches (injection angle, collimation). In particular, sign reversal is observed in some conditions. The experimental results are compared with predictions by Xu (H.Q. Xu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 78, 2064 (2001)).

  11. Three-junction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Ludowise, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  12. Panventriculomegaly with a wide foramen of Magendie and large cisterna magna.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hiroshi; Miyajima, Masakazu; Ogino, Ikuko; Nakajima, Madoka; Shimoji, Kazuaki; Fukai, Ryoko; Miyake, Noriko; Nishiyama, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Arai, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The authors' goal in this paper is to provide the first clinical, radiological, and genetic studies of panventriculomegaly (PaVM) defined by a wide foramen of Magendie and large cisterna magna. METHODS Clinical and brain imaging data from 28 PaVM patients (including 10 patients from 5 families) were retrospectively studied. Five children were included. In adult patients, the age at onset was 56.0 ± 16.7 years. Tetraventricular dilation, aqueductal opening with flow void on T2-weighted images, and a wide foramen of Magendie and large cisterna magna (wide cerebrospinal fluid space at the fourth ventricle outlet) were essential MRI findings for PaVM diagnosis. 3D fast asymmetrical spin echo sequences were used for visualization of cistern membranes. Time-spatial labeling inversion pulse examination was performed to analyze cerebrospinal fluid movement. Copy number variations were determined using high-resolution microarray and were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction with breakpoint sequencing. RESULTS Adult patients showed gait disturbance, urinary dysfunction, and cognitive dysfunction. Five infant patients exhibited macrocranium. Patients were divided into 2 subcategories, those with or without downward bulging third ventricular floors and membranous structures in the prepontine cistern. Patients with bulging floors were successfully treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Genetic analysis revealed a deletion in DNAH14 that encodes a dynein heavy chain protein associated with motile cilia function, and which co-segregated with patients in a family without a downward bulging third ventricular floor. CONCLUSIONS Panventriculomegaly with a wide foramen of Magendie and a large cisterna magna may belong to a subtype of congenital hydrocephalus with familial accumulation, younger age at onset, and symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus. In addition, a family with PaVM has a gene mutation associated with dysfunction of motile cilia. PMID

  13. Programmable pump for the administration of morphine in the cisterna magna. A new approach.

    PubMed

    Narváez, Manuel Juliá; Bulnes, José Manuel Galicia; Elena, José Manuel Montero; Rivas, Javier Márquez; Márquez, Bernarda Márquez

    2002-07-01

    The implantation of a drug (opioid) infusion system catheter at the level of the cisterna magna, connected to an implanted programmable pump (Synchromed pump, 8611-H, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) is the procedure we use most commonly for the treatment of craniofacial and upper cervical pain. Our implantation technique, which we consider simple and easy to perform, is discussed in this article. Our results have been extremely encouraging, without untoward effects occurring. Adverse effects are prevented by the close proximity of the catheter tip to the pain receptors. PMID:22150811

  14. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. - Highlights: • 2-APB protected against APAP-induced liver injury in mice in vivo and in vitro • 2-APB protected by inhibiting APAP metabolic activation and JNK signaling pathway • DMSO inhibited APAP metabolic activation as the solvent of 2-APB

  15. Ziram, a pesticide associated with increased risk for Parkinson's disease, differentially affects the presynaptic function of aminergic and glutamatergic nerve terminals at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ciara A; Myers, Katherine M; Chen, Audrey; Martin, Nathan T; Barajas, Angel; Schweizer, Felix E; Krantz, David E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple populations of aminergic neurons are affected in Parkinson's disease (PD), with serotonergic and noradrenergic loci responsible for some non-motor symptoms. Environmental toxins, such as the dithiocarbamate fungicide ziram, significantly increase the risk of developing PD and the attendant spectrum of both motor and non-motor symptoms. The mechanisms by which ziram and other environmental toxins increase the risk of PD, and the potential effects of these toxins on aminergic neurons, remain unclear. To determine the relative effects of ziram on the synaptic function of aminergic versus non-aminergic neurons, we used live-imaging at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In contrast to nearly all other studies of this model synapse, we imaged presynaptic function at both glutamatergic Type Ib and aminergic Type II boutons, the latter responsible for storage and release of octopamine, the invertebrate equivalent of noradrenalin. To quantify the kinetics of exo- and endo-cytosis, we employed an acid-sensitive form of GFP fused to the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (DVMAT-pHluorin). Additional genetic probes were used to visualize intracellular calcium flux (GCaMP) and voltage changes (ArcLight). We find that at glutamatergic Type Ib terminals, exposure to ziram increases exocytosis and inhibits endocytosis. By contrast, at octopaminergic Type II terminals, ziram has no detectable effect on exocytosis and dramatically inhibits endocytosis. In contrast to other reports on the neuronal effects of ziram, these effects do not appear to result from perturbation of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) or calcium homeostasis. Unexpectedly, ziram also caused spontaneous and synchronized bursts of calcium influx (measured by GCaMP) and electrical activity (measured by ArcLight) at aminergic Type II, but not glutamatergic Type Ib, nerve terminals. These events are sensitive to both tetrodotoxin and cadmium chloride, and thus appear

  16. AAV9-mediated central nervous system–targeted gene delivery via cisterna magna route in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lukashchuk, Vera; Lewis, Katherine E; Coldicott, Ian; Grierson, Andrew J; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2016-01-01

    Current barriers to the use of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) in clinical trials for treating neurological disorders are its high expression in many off-target tissues such as liver and heart, and lack of cell specificity within the central nervous system (CNS) when using ubiquitous promoters such as human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or chicken-β-actin hybrid (CAG). To enhance targeting the transgene expression in CNS cells, self-complementary (sc) AAV9 vectors, scAAV9-GFP vectors carrying neuronal Hb9 and synapsin 1, and nonspecific CMV and CAG promoters were constructed. We demonstrate that synapsin 1 and Hb9 promoters exclusively targeted neurons in vitro, although their strengths were up to 10-fold lower than that of CMV. In vivo analyses of mouse tissue after scAAV9-GFP vector delivery via the cisterna magna revealed a significant advantage of synapsin 1 promoter over both Hb9 variants in targeting neurons throughout the brain, since Hb9 promoters were driving gene expression mainly within the motor-related areas of the brain stem. In summary, this study demonstrates that cisterna magna administration is a safe alternative to intracranial or intracerebroventricular vector delivery route using scAAV9, and introduces a novel utility of the Hb9 promoter for the targeted gene expression for both in vivo and in vitro applications. PMID:26942208

  17. Interplay of Rashba spin orbit coupling and disorder in the conductance properties of a four terminal junction device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sudin; Basu, Saurabh

    2016-04-01

    We report a thorough theoretical investigation on the quantum transport of a disordered four terminal device in the presence of Rashba spin orbit coupling (RSOC) in two dimensions. Specifically we compute the behaviour of the longitudinal (charge) conductance, spin Hall conductance and spin Hall conductance fluctuation as a function of the strength of disorder and Rashba spin orbit interaction using the Landauer Büttiker formalism via Green's function technique. Our numerical calculations reveal that both the conductances diminish with disorder. At smaller values of the RSOC parameter, the longitudinal and spin Hall conductances increase, while both vanish in the strong RSOC limit. The spin current is more drastically affected by both disorder and RSOC than its charge counterpart. The spin Hall conductance fluctuation does not show any universality in terms of its value and it depends on both disorder as well as on the RSOC strength. Thus the spin Hall conductance fluctuation has a distinct character compared to the fluctuation in the longitudinal conductance. Further one parameter scaling theory is studied to assess the transition to a metallic regime as claimed in literature and we find no confirmation about the emergence of a metallic state induced by RSOC.

  18. InP/Ga0.47In0.53As monolithic, two-junction, three-terminal tandem solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanlaas, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Horner, G. S.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The work presented has focussed on increasing the efficiency of InP-based solar cells through the development of a high-performance InP/Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As two-junction, three-terminal monolithic tandem cell. Such a tandem is particularly suited to space applications where a radiation-hard top cell (i.e., InP) is required. Furthermore, the InP/Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As materials system is lattice matched and offers a top cell/bottom cell bandgap differential (0.60 eV at 300 K) suitable for high tandem cell efficiencies under AMO illumination. A three-terminal configuration was chosen since it allows for independent power collection from each subcell in the monolithic stack, thus minimizing the adverse impact of radiation damage on the overall tandem efficiency. Realistic computer modeling calculations predict an efficiency boost of 7 to 11 percent from the Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As bottom cell under AMO illumination (25 C) for concentration ratios in the 1 to 1000 range. Thus, practical AMO efficiencies of 25 to 32 percent appear possible with the InP/Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As tandem cell. Prototype n/p/n InP/Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As monolithic tandem cells were fabricated and tested successfully. Using an aperture to define the illuminated areas, efficiency measurements performed on a non-optimized device under standard global illumination conditions (25 C) with no antireflection coating (ARC) give 12.2 percent for the InP top cell and 3.2 percent for the Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As bottom cell, yielding an overall tandem efficiency of 15.4 percent. With an ARC, the tandem efficiency could reach approximately 22 percent global and approximately 20 percent AMO. Additional details regarding the performance of individual InP and Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As component cells, fabrication and operation of complete tandem cells and methods for improving the tandem cell performance, are also discussed.

  19. Gate-tunable zero-frequency current cross correlations of the quartet state in a voltage-biased three-terminal Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélin, Régis; Sotto, Moïse; Feinberg, Denis; Caputo, Jean-Guy; Douçot, Benoît

    2016-03-01

    A three-terminal Josephson junction biased at opposite voltages can sustain a phase-sensitive dc current carrying three-body static phase coherence, known as the "quartet current." We calculate the zero-frequency current noise cross correlations and answer the question of whether this current is noisy (like a normal current in response to a voltage drop) or noiseless (like an equilibrium supercurrent in response to a phase drop). A quantum dot with a level at energy ɛ0 is connected to three superconductors Sa,Sb, and Sc with gap Δ , biased at Va=V ,Vb=-V , and Vc=0 , and with intermediate contact transparencies. At zero temperature, nonlocal quartets (in the sense of four-fermion correlations) are noiseless at subgap voltage in the nonresonant dot regime ɛ0/Δ ≫1 , which is demonstrated with a semianalytical perturbative expansion of the cross correlations. Noise reveals the absence of granularity of the superflow splitting from Sc towards (Sa,Sb) in the nonresonant dot regime, in spite of finite voltage. In the resonant dot regime ɛ0/Δ ≲1 , cross correlations measured in the (Va,Vb) plane should reveal an "anomaly" in the vicinity of the quartet line Va+Vb=0 , related to an additional contribution to the noise, manifesting the phase sensitivity of cross correlations under the appearance of a three-body phase variable. Phase-dependent effective Fano factors Fφ are introduced, defined as the ratio between the amplitudes of phase modulations of the noise and the currents. At low bias, the Fano factors Fφ are of order unity in the resonant dot regime ɛ0/Δ ≲1 , and they are vanishingly small in the nonresonant dot regime ɛ0/Δ ≫1 .

  20. Bacterial protein AvrA stabilizes intestinal epithelial tight junctions via blockage of the C-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongguo; Wu, Shaoping; Ma, Jun; Xia, Yinglin; Ai, Xun; Sun, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella type III secretory system secretes virulence proteins, called effectors. Effectors are responsible for the alteration of tight junctions (TJ) and epithelial functions in intestinal infection and inflammation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a bacterial effector AvrA plays a role in stabilizing TJs and balancing the opposing action of other bacterial effectors. However, the molecular mechanisms by which AvrA-modulates TJ protein expression remain unknown. AvrA possesses acetyltransferase activity toward specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKKs) and potently inhibits the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in inflammation. Inhibition of the JNK pathway is known to inhibit the TJ protein disassemble. Therefore, we hypothesize that AvrA stabilizes intestinal epithelial TJs via c-Jun and JNK pathway blockage. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we showed that AvrA targets the c-Jun and JNK pathway that in turn stabilizes TJ protein ZO-1. Inhibition of JNK abolished the effect of AvrA on ZO-1. We further determined that AvrA suppressed the transcription factor activator protein-1, which was regulated by activated JNK. Moreover, we identified the functional domain of AvrA that directly regulated TJs using a series of AvrA mutants. The role of AvrA represents a highly refined bacterial strategy that helps the bacteria survive in the host and dampens the inflammatory response of the host. Our findings have uncovered a novel role of the bacterial protein AvrA in suppressing the inflammatory response of the host through JNK-regulated blockage of epithelial cell barrier function. PMID:25838979

  1. Neogenesis and maturation of transient Golgi-like cisternae in a simple eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Stefanic, Sasa; Morf, Laura; Kulangara, Caroline; Regös, Attila; Sonda, Sabrina; Schraner, Elisabeth; Spycher, Cornelia; Wild, Peter; Hehl, Adrian B

    2009-08-15

    The highly reduced protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia has minimal machinery for cellular processes such as protein trafficking. Giardia trophozoites maintain diverse and regulated secretory pathways but lack an identifiable Golgi complex. During differentiation to cysts, however, they produce specialized compartments termed encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs). ESVs are hypothesized to be unique developmentally regulated Golgi-like organelles dedicated to maturation and export of pre-sorted cyst wall proteins. Here we present a functional analysis of this unusual compartment by direct interference with the functions of the small GTPases Sar1, Rab1 and Arf1. Conditional expression of dominant-negative variants revealed an essential role of Sar1 in early events of organelle neogenesis, whilst inhibition of Arf1 uncoupled morphological changes and cell cycle progression from extracellular matrix export. The latter led to development of ;naked cysts', which lacked water resistance and thus infectivity. Time-lapse microscopy and photobleaching experiments showed that putative Golgi-like cisternae in Giardia develop into a network capable of exchanging soluble cargo at a high rate via dynamic, tubular connections, presumably to synchronize maturation. The minimized and naturally pulsed trafficking machinery for export of the cyst wall biopolymer in Giardia is a simple model for investigating basic principles of neogenesis and maturation of Golgi compartments. PMID:19622633

  2. African Swine Fever Virus Is Enveloped by a Two-Membraned Collapsed Cisterna Derived from the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Germán; García-Escudero, Ramón; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; Viñuela, Eladio

    1998-01-01

    During the cytoplasmic maturation of African swine fever virus (ASFV) within the viral factories, the DNA-containing core becomes wrapped by two shells, an inner lipid envelope and an outer icosahedral capsid. We have previously shown that the inner envelope is derived from precursor membrane-like structures on which the capsid layer is progressively assembled. In the present work, we analyzed the origin of these viral membranes and the mechanism of envelopment of ASFV. Electron microscopy studies on permeabilized infected cells revealed the presence of two tightly apposed membranes within the precursor membranous structures as well as polyhedral assembling particles. Both membranes could be detached after digestion of intracellular virions with proteinase K. Importantly, membrane loop structures were observed at the ends of open intermediates, which suggests that the inner envelope is derived from a membrane cisterna. Ultraestructural and immunocytochemical analyses showed a close association and even direct continuities between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and assembling virus particles at the bordering areas of the viral factories. Such interactions become evident with an ASFV recombinant that inducibly expresses the major capsid protein p72. In the absence of the inducer, viral morphogenesis was arrested at a stage at which partially and fully collapsed ER cisternae enwrapped the core material. Together, these results indicate that ASFV, like the poxviruses, becomes engulfed by a two-membraned collapsed cisterna derived from the ER. PMID:9765444

  3. A technique for cannulating the Cisterna magna and sampling cerebrospinal fluid from socially housed birds.

    PubMed

    Moore, M S; Kuenzel, W J; Mench, J A

    1994-04-01

    The measurement of central levels of neurochemicals is an important approach to the understanding of the neurophysiological basis of behavior patterns in animals. Previous studies have utilized central sampling techniques developed for individually housed animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a cannulation technique and a method for sampling cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from socially housed birds to facilitate the study of the neurophysiological basis of social behaviors. The cannulation technique involved the surgical implantation of a 22-gauge concentric guide cannula into the cisterna magna of 16-wk-old, feed-restricted male broiler breeders (n = 6). Individual-specific coordinates and optimum angle and depth of implantation of the cannula were determined in order to place the cannula correctly in the designated site. Once implanted, the guide cannula proved to be unobtrusive and secure and did not attract aggressive pecking from other birds in the pen. Two methods of CSF sampling were then examined. The first method required the use of a push-pull perfusion pump to withdraw CSF at a rate of 1 to 2 microL/min. The second method (passive), which did not use a pump, involved simply removing a "dummy" cannula from the guide cannula to release the CSF, which was then collected with a glass Hamilton syringe. Samples ranging from 100 to 500 microL were collected using the passive method. The combination of the cannulation technique described and the passive sampling method proved to be the most simple, efficient, and reliable method for measuring central levels of neurochemicals in socially housed broiler breeder males. PMID:8202435

  4. Maturation of late Golgi cisternae into RabE(RAB11) exocytic post-Golgi carriers visualized in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pantazopoulou, Areti; Pinar, Mario; Xiang, Xin; Peñalva, Miguel A

    2014-08-15

    The mechanism(s) by which proteins traverse and exit the Golgi are incompletely understood. Using Aspergillus nidulans hyphae, we show that late Golgi cisternae undergo changes in composition to gradually lose Golgi identity while acquiring post-Golgi RabE(RAB11) identity. This behavior of late Golgi cisternae is consistent with the cisternal maturation model. Post-Golgi RabE(RAB11) carriers travel to, and accumulate at, the apex, indicating that fusion is rate limiting for exocytosis. These carriers, which are loaded with kinesin, dynein, and MyoE(MYO5), move on a microtubule-based bidirectional conveyor belt relaying them to actin, which ultimately focuses exocytosis at the apex. Dynein drags RabE(RAB11) carriers away if engagement of MyoE(MYO5) to actin cables fails. Microtubules seemingly cooperating with F-actin capture can sustain secretion if MyoE(MYO5) is absent. Thus, filamentous fungal secretion involving post-Golgi carriers is remarkably similar, mechanistically, to the transport of melanosomes in melanocyte dendrites, even though melanosome biogenesis involves lysosomes rather than Golgi. PMID:24943841

  5. Widespread gene transfer in the central nervous system of cynomolgus macaques following delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Vite, Charles H; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Grant, Rebecca; Bote, Erin; Yu, Hongwei; Pukenas, Bryan; Hurst, Robert; Wilson, James M

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors have recently been shown to transduce cells throughout the central nervous system of nonhuman primates when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a finding which could lead to a minimally invasive approach to treat genetic and acquired diseases affecting the entire CNS. We characterized the transduction efficiency of two routes of vector administration into the CSF of cynomolgus macaques-lumbar puncture, which is typically used in clinical practice, and suboccipital puncture, which is more commonly used in veterinary medicine. We found that delivery of vector into the cisterna magna via suboccipital puncture is up to 100-fold more efficient for achieving gene transfer to the brain. In addition, we evaluated the inflammatory response to AAV9-mediated GFP expression in the nonhuman primate CNS. We found that while CSF lymphocyte counts increased following gene transfer, there were no clinical or histological signs of immune toxicity. Together these data indicate that delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna is an effective method for achieving gene transfer in the CNS, and suggest that adapting this uncommon injection method for human trials could vastly increase the efficiency of gene delivery. PMID:26052519

  6. Computed Tomography-Guided Access to the Cisterna Chyli: Introduction of a Technique for Direct Lymphangiography to Evaluate and Treat Chylothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Maybody, Majid; Getrajdman, George I.; Bains, Manjit S.; Finley, David J.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this report is to introduce a technique of direct lymphangiography to enable chylothorax treatment. Using a hybrid computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy imaging system, a 21-gauge needle was placed under CT guidance into the cisterna chyli to allow contrast lymphangiography and CT lymphangiography in two patients with presumed postoperative chylothorax. Water-soluble contrast media injection demonstrated the thoracic duct anatomy in both patients. Further successful needle disruption of the cisterna chyli was performed in one patient to interrupt lymph flow and stop the chylous leak, with subsequent resolution of the chylothorax.

  7. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin1

    PubMed Central

    Litkouhi, Babak; Kwong, Joseph; Lo, Chun-Min; Smedley, James G; McClane, Bruce A; Aponte, Margarita; Gao, Zhijian; Sarno, Jennifer L; Hinners, Jennifer; Welch, William R; Berkowitz, Ross S; Mok, Samuel C; Garner, Elizabeth I O

    2007-01-01

    Background Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ) protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4-expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. Methods Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular) resistance (Rb) in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. Results Claudin-4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. Conclusions C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies. PMID:17460774

  8. An improved junction capacitance model for junction field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Liou, Juin J.; Cirba, Claude R.; Green, Keith

    2006-07-01

    A new junction capacitance model for the four-terminal junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is presented. With a single expression, the model, which is valid for different temperatures and a wide range of bias conditions, describes correctly the JFET junction capacitance behavior and capacitance drop-off phenomenon. The model has been verified using experimental data measured at Texas Instruments.

  9. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  10. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  11. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  12. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  13. Bimetallic junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcella, F. G.; Lessmann, G. G.; Lindberg, R. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The formation of voids through interdiffusion in bimetallic welded structures exposed to high operating temperatures is inhibited by utilizing an alloy of the parent materials in the junction of the parent materials or by preannealing the junction at an ultrahigh temperature. These methods are also used to reduce the concentration gradient of a hardening agent.

  14. Insights into the C-terminal Peptide Binding Specificity of the PDZ Domain of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INTERACTION WITH THE TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEIN CLAUDIN-3.

    PubMed

    Merino-Gracia, Javier; Costas-Insua, Carlos; Canales, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2016-05-27

    Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, unlike its endothelial and inducible counterparts, displays a PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domain located at its N terminus involved in subcellular targeting. The C termini of various cellular proteins insert within the binding groove of this PDZ domain and determine the subcellular distribution of neuronal NOS (nNOS). The molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions are poorly understood because the PDZ domain of nNOS can apparently exhibit class I, class II, and class III binding specificity. In addition, it has been recently suggested that the PDZ domain of nNOS binds with very low affinity to the C termini of target proteins, and a necessary simultaneous lateral interaction must take place for binding to occur. We describe herein that the PDZ domain of nNOS can behave as a bona fide class III PDZ domain and bind to C-terminal sequences with acidic residues at the P-2 position with low micromolar binding constants. Binding to C-terminal sequences with a hydrophobic residue at the P-2 position plus an acidic residue at the P-3 position (class II) can also occur, although interactions involving residues extending up to the P-7 position mediate this type of binding. This promiscuous behavior also extends to its association to class I sequences, which must display a Glu residue at P-3 and a Thr residue at P-2 By means of site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy, we have been able to identify the residues involved in each specific type of binding and rationalize the mechanisms used to recognize binding partners. Finally, we have analyzed the high affinity association of the PDZ domain of nNOS to claudin-3 and claudin-14, two tight junction tetraspan membrane proteins that are essential components of the paracellular barrier. PMID:27030110

  15. Sphingomyelin synthesis in rat liver occurs predominantly at the cis and medial cisternae of the Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Futerman, A.H.; Stieger, B.; Hubbard, A.L.; Pagano, R.E. )

    1990-05-25

    The intracellular site of sphingomyelin (SM) synthesis was examined in subcellular fractions from rat liver using a radioactive ceramide analog N-((1-14C)hexanoyl)-D-erythro-sphingosine. This lipid readily transferred from a complex with bovine serum albumin to liver fractions without disrupting the membranes, and was metabolized to radioactive SM. To prevent degradation of the newly synthesized SM to ceramide, all experiments were performed in the presence of EDTA to minimize neutral sphingomyelinase activity and at neutral pH to minimize acid sphingomyelinase activity. An intact Golgi apparatus fraction gave an 85-98-fold enrichment of SM synthesis and a 58-83-fold enrichment of galactosyltransferase activity. Controlled trypsin digestion demonstrated that SM synthesis was localized to the lumen of intact Golgi apparatus vesicles. Although small amounts of SM synthesis were detected in plasma membrane and rough microsome fractions, after accounting for contamination by Golgi apparatus membranes, their combined activity contributed less than 13% of the total SM synthesis in rat liver. Subfractions of the Golgi apparatus were obtained and characterized by immunoblotting and biochemical assays using cis/medial (mannosidase II) and trans (sialyltransferase and galactosyltransferase) Golgi apparatus markers. The specific activity of SM synthesis was highest in enriched cis and medial fractions but far lower in a trans fraction. We conclude that SM synthesis in rat liver occurs predominantly in the cis and medial cisternae of the Golgi apparatus and not at the plasma membrane or endoplasmic reticulum as has been previously suggested.

  16. Transition of Galactosyltransferase 1 from Trans-Golgi Cisterna to the Trans-Golgi Network Is Signal Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Beat E.; Berger, Bea; Berger, Eric G.

    2006-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus (GA) is the organelle where complex glycan formation takes place. In addition, it is a major sorting site for proteins destined for various subcellular compartments or for secretion. Here we investigate β1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 (galT) and α2,6-sialyltransferase 1 (siaT), two trans-Golgi glycosyltransferases, with respect to their different pathways in monensin-treated cells. Upon addition of monensin galT dissociates from siaT and the GA and accumulates in swollen vesicles derived from the trans-Golgi network (TGN), as shown by colocalization with TGN46, a specific TGN marker. We analyzed various chimeric constructs of galT and siaT by confocal fluorescence microscopy and time-lapse videomicroscopy as well as Optiprep density gradient fractionation. We show that the first 13 amino acids of the cytoplasmic tail of galT are necessary for its localization to swollen vesicles induced by monensin. We also show that the monensin sensitivity resulting from the cytoplasmic tail can be conferred to siaT, which leads to the rapid accumulation of the galT–siaT chimera in swollen vesicles upon monensin treatment. On the basis of these data, we suggest that cycling between the trans-Golgi cisterna and the trans-Golgi network of galT is signal mediated. PMID:17021253

  17. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  18. A comparative study of three-terminal Hanle signals in CoFe/SiO2/n+-Si and Cu/SiO2/n+-Si tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hyeon; He, Shumin; Grünberg, Peter; Jin, Mi-Jin; Yoo, Jung-Woo; Cho, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    We performed three-terminal (3T) Hanle measurement for two types of sample series, CoFe/SiO2/n+-Si and Cu/SiO2/n+-Si, with various tunnel resistances. Clear Hanle signal and anomalous scaling between spin resistance-area product and tunnel resistance-area product were observed in CoFe/SiO2/n+-Si devices. In order to explore the origin of the Hanle signal and the impurity-assisted tunneling effect on the Hanle signal in our devices, Hanle measurement in Cu/SiO2/n+-Si devices was performed as well. However, no detectable Hanle signal was observed in Cu/SiO2/n+-Si, even though a lot of samples with various tunnel resistances were studied in wide temperature and bias voltage ranges. Through a comparative study, it is found that the impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance mechanism would not play a dominant role in the 3T Hanle signal in CoFe/SiO2/n+-Si tunnel junctions, where the SiO2 was formed by plasma oxidation to minimize impurities.

  19. A model for the termination of the Ryukyu subduction zone against Taiwan: A junction of collision, subduction/separation, and subduction boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, F.T.; Liang, W.-T.; Lee, J.-C.; Benz, H.; Villasenor, A.

    2009-01-01

    The NW moving Philippine Sea plate (PSP) collides with the Eurasian plate (EUP) in the vicinity of Taiwan, and at the same time, it subducts toward the north along SW Ryukyu. The Ryukyu subduction zone terminates against eastern Taiwan. While the Ryukyu Trench is a linear bathym??trie low about 100 km east of Taiwan, closer to Taiwan, it cannot be clearly identified bathymetrically owing to the deformation related to the collision, making the location of the intersection of the Ryukyu with Taiwan difficult to decipher. We propose a model for this complex of boundaries on the basis of seismicity and 3-D velocity structures. In this model the intersection is placed at the latitude of about 23.7??N, placing the northern part of the Coastal Range on EUP. As PSP gets deeper along the subduction zone it collides with EUP on the Taiwan side only where they are in direct contact. Thus, the Eurasian plate on the Taiwan side is being pushed and compressed by the NW moving Philippine Sea plate, at increasing depth toward the north. Offshore of northeastern Taiwan the wedge-shaped EUP on top of the Ryukyu subducting plate is connected to the EUP on the Ryukyu side and coupled to the NW moving PSP by friction at the plate interface. The two sides of the EUP above the western end of the subduction zone are not subjected to the same forces, and a difference in motions can be expected. The deformation of Taiwan as revealed by continuous GPS measurements, geodetic movement along the east coast of Taiwan, and the formation of the Hoping Basin can be understood in terms of the proposed model. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  1. Bone marrow stem cells delivered into the subarachnoid space via cisterna magna improve repair of injured rat spinal cord white matter

    PubMed Central

    Marcol, Wiesław; Slusarczyk, Wojciech; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Koryciak-Komarska, Halina; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The influence of bone marrow stem cells on regeneration of spinal cord in rats was investigated. Young adult male Wistar rats were used (n=22). Focal injury of spinal cord white matter at Th10 level was produced using our original non-laminectomy method by means of high-pressured air stream. Cells from tibial and femoral bone marrow of 1-month old rats (n=3) were cultured, labeled with BrdU/Hoechst and injected into cisterna magna (experimental group) three times: immediately after spinal cord injury and 3 as well as 7 days later. Neurons in brain stem and motor cortex were labeled with FluoroGold (FG) delivered caudally from the injury site a week before the end of experiment. Functional outcome and morphological features of regeneration were analyzed during 12-week follow-up. The lesions were characterized by means of MRI. Maximal distance of expansion of implanted cells in the spinal cord was measured and the number of FG-positive neurons in the brain was counted. Rats treated with stem cells presented significant improvement of locomotor performance and spinal cord morphology when compared to the control group. Distance covered by stem cells was 7 mm from the epicenter of the injury. Number of brain stem and motor cortex FG-positive neurons in experimental group was significantly higher than in control. Obtained data showed that bone marrow stem cells are able to induce the repair of injured spinal cord white matter. The route of cells application via cisterna magna appeared to be useful for their delivery in spinal cord injury therapy. PMID:26628950

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Intrinsic Josephson junctions: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurgens, A. A.

    2000-08-01

    Some recent developments in the fabrication of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) and their application for studying high-temperature superconductors are discussed. The major advantages of IJJ and unsolved problems are outlined. The feasibility of three-terminal devices based on the stacked IJJ is briefly evaluated.

  3. Termination Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Mike; Hill, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined 11 workplaces to determine how they handle termination documentation, an empirically unexplored area in technical communication and rhetoric. We found that the use of termination documentation is context dependent while following a basic pattern of infraction, investigation, intervention, and termination. Furthermore,…

  4. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  5. Solitons in Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. V.

    1998-11-01

    Magnetic flux quanta in Josephson junctions, often called fluxons, in many cases behave as solitons. A review of recent experiments and modelling of fluxon dynamics in Josephson circuits is presented. Classic quasi-one-dimensional junctions, stacked junctions (Josephson superlattices), and discrete Josephson transmission lines (JTLs) are discussed. Applications of fluxon devices as high-frequency oscillators and digital circuits are also addressed.

  6. Differences between liver gap junction protein and lens MIP 26 from rat: implications for tissue specificity of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B J; Takemoto, L J; Hunkapiller, M W; Hood, L E; Revel, J P

    1983-03-01

    Liver gap junctions and gap-junction-like structures from eye lenses are each comprised of a single major protein (Mr 28,000 and 26,000, respectively). These proteins display different two-dimensional peptide fingerprints, distinct amino acid compositions, nonhomologous N-terminal amino acid sequences and different sensitivities to proteases when part of the intact junction. However, the junctional protein of each tissue is well conserved between species, as demonstrated previously for lens and now for liver in several mammalian species. The possiblity of tissue-specific gap junction proteins is discussed in the light of data suggesting that rat heart gap junctions are comprised of yet a third protein. PMID:6299583

  7. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE BIN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. REMAINS OF A PRIVY ARE LOCATED IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. A WATER SHAFT IS COVERED WITH A PROTECTIVE NET IN THE LOWER RIGHT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  10. Switching and Rectification in Carbon-Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Menon, Madhu; Chernozatonskii, Leonid

    2003-01-01

    Multi-terminal carbon-nanotube junctions are under investigation as candidate components of nanoscale electronic devices and circuits. Three-terminal "Y" junctions of carbon nanotubes (see Figure 1) have proven to be especially interesting because (1) it is now possible to synthesize them in high yield in a controlled manner and (2) results of preliminary experimental and theoretical studies suggest that such junctions could exhibit switching and rectification properties. Following the preliminary studies, current-versus-voltage characteristics of a number of different "Y" junctions of single-wall carbon nanotubes connected to metal wires were computed. Both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes of various chiralities were considered. Most of the junctions considered were symmetric. These computations involved modeling of the quantum electrical conductivity of the carbon nanotubes and junctions, taking account of such complicating factors as the topological defects (pentagons, heptagons, and octagons) present in the hexagonal molecular structures at the junctions, and the effects of the nanotube/wire interfaces. A major component of the computational approach was the use of an efficient Green s function embedding scheme. The results of these computations showed that symmetric junctions could be expected to support both rectification and switching. The results also showed that rectification and switching properties of a junction could be expected to depend strongly on its symmetry and, to a lesser degree, on the chirality of the nanotubes. In particular, it was found that a zigzag nanotube branching at a symmetric "Y" junction could exhibit either perfect rectification or partial rectification (asymmetric current-versus-voltage characteristic, as in the example of Figure 2). It was also found that an asymmetric "Y" junction would not exhibit rectification.

  11. Bank Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, employees of the UAB Bank, Knoxville, Tennessee, are using Teller Transaction Terminals manufactured by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, an electronics firm which has worked on a number of space projects under contract with NASA. The terminals are part of an advanced, computerized financial transaction system that offers high efficiency in bank operations. The key to the system's efficiency is a "multiplexing" technique developed for NASA's Space Shuttle. Multiplexing is simultaneous transmission of large amounts of data over a single transmission link at very high rates of speed. In the banking application, a small multiplex "data bus" interconnects all the terminals and a central computer which stores information on clients' accounts. The data bus replaces the maze-of wiring that would be needed to connect each terminal separately and it affords greater speed in recording transactions. The SCI system offers banks real-time data management through constant updating of the central computer. For example, a check is immediately cancelled at the teller's terminal and the computer is simultaneously advised of the transaction; under other methods, the check would be cancelled and the transaction recorded at the close of business. Teller checkout at the end of the day, conventionally a time-consuming matter of processing paper, can be accomplished in minutes by calling up a summary of the day's transactions. SCI manufactures other types of terminals for use in the system, such as an administrative terminal that provides an immediate printout of a client's account, and another for printing and recording savings account deposits and withdrawals. SCI systems have been installed in several banks in Tennessee, Arizona, and Oregon and additional installations are scheduled this year.

  12. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  13. Terminal structure

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frank; Allais, Arnaud; Mirebeau, Pierre; Ganhungu, Francois; Lallouet, Nicolas

    2009-10-20

    A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

  14. Switch in Gap Junction Protein Expression is Associated with Selective Changes in Junctional Permeability During Keratinocyte Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissette, Janice L.; Kumar, Nalin M.; Gilula, Norton B.; Hall, James E.; Dotto, G. Paolo

    1994-07-01

    Gap junctional communication provides a mechanism for regulating multicellular activities by allowing the exchange of small diffusible molecules between neighboring cells. The diversity of gap junction proteins may exist to form channels that have different permeability properties. We report here that induction of terminal differentiation in mouse primary keratinocytes by calcium results in a specific switch in gap junction protein expression. Expression of α_1 (connexin 43) and β_2 (connexin 26) gap junction proteins is down-modulated, whereas that of β_3 (connexin 31) and β_4 (connexin 31.1) proteins is induced. Although both proliferating and differentiating keratinocytes are electrically coupled, there are significant changes in the permeability properties of the junctions to small molecules. In parallel with the changes in gap junction protein expression during differentiation, the intercellular transfer of the small dyes neurobiotin, carboxyfluorescein, and Lucifer yellow is significantly reduced, whereas that of small metabolites, such as nucleotides and amino acids, proceeds unimpeded. Thus, a switch in gap junction protein expression in differentiating keratinocytes is accompanied by selective changes in junctional permeability that may play an important role in the coordinate control of the differentiation process.

  15. The adherens junction is lost during normal pregnancy but not during ovarian hyperstimulated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dowland, Samson N; Madawala, Romanthi J; Lindsay, Laura A; Murphy, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    During early pregnancy in the rat, the luminal uterine epithelial cells (UECs) must transform to a receptive state to permit blastocyst attachment and implantation. The implantation process involves penetration of the epithelial barrier, so it is expected that the transformation of UECs includes alterations in the lateral junctional complex. Previous studies have demonstrated a deepening of the tight junction (zonula occludens) and a reduction in the number of desmosomes (macula adherens) in UECs at the time of implantation. However, the adherens junction (zonula adherens), which is primarily responsible for cell-cell adhesion, has been little studied during early pregnancy. This study investigated the adherens junction in rat UECs during the early stages of normal pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulated (OH) pregnancy using transmission electron microscopy. The adherens junction is present in UECs at the time of fertilisation, but is lost at the time of blastocyst implantation during normal pregnancy. Interestingly, at the time of implantation after OH, adherens junctions are retained and may impede blastocyst penetration of the epithelium. The adherens junction anchors the actin-based terminal web, which is known to be disrupted in UECs during early pregnancy. However, artificial disruption of the terminal web, using cytochalasin D, did not cause removal of the adherens junction in UECs. This study revealed that adherens junction disassembly occurs during early pregnancy, but that this process does not occur during OH pregnancy. Such disassembly does not appear to depend on the disruption of the terminal web. PMID:26738975

  16. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  17. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowik, Ł.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Mélin, T.

    2013-11-01

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (ND≈1020-1021cm-3) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2-50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as ND-1/3, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as ND1/3. We thus establish a "nanocrystal counterpart" of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  18. Magic-T Junction using Microstrip/Slotline Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Doiron, Terence

    2008-01-01

    among all four ports, and to strong parasitic couplings at the microstrip/slotline T junction, where four microstrip lines and a slotline are combined. The present improved broadband magic-T junction (see figure) includes a microstrip ring structure and two microstrip- to-slotline transitions. One of the microstrip/slotline transitions is a small T junction between the ring and a slotline; the other microstrip/slotline transition effects coupling between the slotline and port E. The smallness of the T junction and the use of minimum-size slotline terminations help to minimize radiation loss. An impedance-transformation network that includes multiple quarter-wavelength sections is used to increase the operating bandwidth and minimize the parasitic coupling around the microstrip/slotline T junction. As a result, the improved junction has greater bandwidth and lower phase imbalance at the sum and difference ports than did the prior junction.

  19. The Onecut Transcription Factor HNF-6 Regulates in Motor Neurons the Formation of the Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Audouard, Emilie; Schakman, Olivier; René, Frédérique; Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Huber, Andrea B.; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Gailly, Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The neuromuscular junctions are the specialized synapses whereby spinal motor neurons control the contraction of skeletal muscles. The formation of the neuromuscular junctions is controlled by a complex interplay of multiple mechanisms coordinately activated in motor nerve terminals and in their target myotubes. However, the transcriptional regulators that control in motor neurons the genetic programs involved in neuromuscular junction development remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the Onecut transcription factor HNF-6 regulates in motor neurons the formation of the neuromuscular junctions. Indeed, adult Hnf6 mutant mice exhibit hindlimb muscle weakness and abnormal locomotion. This results from defects of hindlimb neuromuscular junctions characterized by an abnormal morphology and defective localization of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin at the motor nerve terminals. These defects are consequences of altered and delayed formation of the neuromuscular junctions in newborn mutant animals. Furthermore, we show that the expression level of numerous regulators of neuromuscular junction formation, namely agrin, neuregulin-2 and TGF-ß receptor II, is downregulated in the spinal motor neurons of Hnf6 mutant newborn animals. Finally, altered formation of neuromuscular junction-like structures in a co-culture model of wildtype myotubes with mutant embryonic spinal cord slices is rescued by recombinant agrin and neuregulin, indicating that depletion in these factors contributes to defective neuromuscular junction development in the absence of HNF-6. Thus, HNF-6 controls in spinal motor neurons a genetic program that coordinates the formation of hindlimb neuromuscular junctions. PMID:23227180

  20. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. PMID:22881834

  1. Stereoelectronic switching in single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Li, Haixing; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A new intersection between reaction chemistry and electronic circuitry is emerging from the ultraminiaturization of electronic devices. Over decades chemists have developed a nuanced understanding of stereoelectronics to establish how the electronic properties of molecules relate to their conformation; the recent advent of single-molecule break-junction techniques provides the means to alter this conformation with a level of control previously unimagined. Here we unite these ideas by demonstrating the first single-molecule switch that operates through a stereoelectronic effect. We demonstrate this behaviour in permethyloligosilanes with methylthiomethyl electrode linkers. The strong σ conjugation in the oligosilane backbone couples the stereoelectronic properties of the sulfur-methylene σ bonds that terminate the molecule. Theoretical calculations support the existence of three distinct dihedral conformations that differ drastically in their electronic character. We can shift between these three species by simply lengthening or compressing the molecular junction, and, in doing so, we can switch conductance digitally between two states.

  2. Carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhen; Postma, Henk W. Ch.; Balents, Leon; Dekker, Cees

    1999-11-01

    The ultimate device miniaturization would be to use individual molecules as functional devices. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising candidates for achieving this: depending on their diameter and chirality, they are either one-dimensional metals or semiconductors. Single-electron transistors employing metallic nanotubes and field-effect transistors employing semiconducting nanotubes have been demonstrated. Intramolecular devices have also been proposed which should display a range of other device functions. For example, by introducing a pentagon and a heptagon into the hexagonal carbon lattice, two tube segments with different atomic and electronic structures can be seamlessly fused together to create intramolecular metal-metal, metal-semiconductor, or semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. Here we report electrical transport measurements on SWNTs with intramolecular junctions. We find that a metal-semiconductor junction behaves like a rectifying diode with nonlinear transport characteristics that are strongly asymmetric with respect to bias polarity. In the case of a metal-metal junction, the conductance appears to be strongly suppressed and it displays a power-law dependence on temperatures and applied voltage, consistent with tunnelling between the ends of two Luttinger liquids. Our results emphasize the need to consider screening and electron interactions when designing and modelling molecular devices. Realization of carbon-based molecular electronics will require future efforts in the controlled production of these intramolecular nanotube junctions.

  3. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  4. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  5. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  6. T-Junction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Part 1: Two different volume renderings of fluid temperatures in a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000. Part 2: Volume rendering of fluid temperatures in a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000, simulated using Nek5000 at three different resolutions. Part 3: Temperature distribution for a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000, simulated using Nek5000 with 89056 spectral elements of order N=9 (65 million grid points). Credits: Science: Aleks Obabko and Paul Fisher, Argonne National Laboratory
 Visualization: Hank Childs, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357

  7. Wire Crimp Termination Verification Using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp terminations is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp termination and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which is a standard for assessing crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies such as undercrimping, missing wire strands, incomplete wire insertion, partial insulation removal, and incorrect wire gauge are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the nondestructive ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with destructive testing) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying this technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented. The instrument is based on a two-jaw type crimp tool suitable for butt-splice type connections. Finally, an approach for application to multipin indenter type crimps will be discussed.

  8. Probing Electronic and Thermoelectric Properties of Single Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widawsky, Jonathan R.

    In an effort to further understand electronic and thermoelectric phenomenon at the nanometer scale, we have studied the transport properties of single molecule junctions. To carry out these transport measurements, we use the scanning tunneling microscope-break junction (STM-BJ) technique, which involves the repeated formation and breakage of a metal point contact in an environment of the target molecule. Using this technique, we are able to create gaps that can trap the molecules, allowing us to sequentially and reproducibly create a large number of junctions. By applying a small bias across the junction, we can measure its conductance and learn about the transport mechanisms at the nanoscale. The experimental work presented here directly probes the transmission properties of single molecules through the systematic measurement of junction conductance (at low and high bias) and thermopower. We present measurements on a variety of molecular families and study how conductance depends on the character of the linkage (metal-molecule bond) and the nature of the molecular backbone. We start by describing a novel way to construct single molecule junctions by covalently connecting the molecular backbone to the electrodes. This eliminates the use of linking substituents, and as a result, the junction conductance increases substantially. Then, we compare transport across silicon chains (silanes) and saturated carbon chains (alkanes) while keeping the linkers the same and find a stark difference in their electronic transport properties. We extend our studies of molecular junctions by looking at two additional aspects of quantum transport -- molecular thermopower and molecular current-voltage characteristics. Each of these additional parameters gives us further insight into transport properties at the nanoscale. Evaluating the junction thermopower allows us to determine the nature of charge carriers in the system and we demonstrate this by contrasting the measurement of amine-terminated

  9. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  10. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  11. Josephson junction mixing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theory is presented which, though too simple to explain quantitative details in the Josephson junction mixing response, is sufficient for explaining qualitatively the results observed. Crucial to the theory presented, and that which differentiates it from earlier ones, is the inclusion of harmonic voltages across the ideal Josephson element.

  12. Squeezable electron tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, J.; Alexander, S.; Cox, M.; Sonnenfeld, R.; Hansma, P. K.

    1983-09-01

    We report a versatile new technique for constructing electron tunneling junctions with mechanically-adjusted artificial barriers. I-V curves are presented for tunneling between Ag electrodes with vacuum, gas, liquid or solid in the barrier. An energy gap is apparent in the measured I-V curve when tunneling occurs between superconducting Pb electrodes.

  13. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  14. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. PMID:26008742

  15. Aging, Terminal Decline, and Terminal Drop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmore, Erdman; Cleveland, William

    1976-01-01

    Data from a 20-year longitudinal study of persons over 60 were analyzed by step-wise multiple regression to test for declines in function with age, for terminal decline (linear relationship to time before death), and for terminal drop (curvilinear relationship to time before death). There were no substantial terminal drop effects. (Author)

  16. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  17. Holliday Junction Resolvases

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Haley D.M.; West, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. PMID:25183833

  18. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  19. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion. PMID:17303718

  20. Development and fabrication of a solar cell junction processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A processing system capable of producing solar cell junctions by ion implantation followed by pulsed electron beam annealing was developed and constructed. The machine was to be capable of processing 4-inch diameter single-crystal wafers at a rate of 10(7) wafers per year. A microcomputer-controlled pulsed electron beam annealer with a vacuum interlocked wafer transport system was designed, built and demonstrated to produce solar cell junctions on 4-inch wafers with an AMI efficiency of 12%. Experiments showed that a non-mass-analyzed (NMA) ion beam could implant 10 keV phosphorous dopant to form solar cell junctions which were equivalent to mass-analyzed implants. A NMA ion implanter, compatible with the pulsed electron beam annealer and wafer transport system was designed in detail but was not built because of program termination.

  1. Geometric phase in p -n junctions of helical edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhawan, Disha; Mehta, Poonam; Das, Sourin

    2016-02-01

    The quantum spin Hall effect is endowed with topologically protected edge modes with a gapless Dirac spectrum. Applying a magnetic field locally along the edge leads to a gapped edge spectrum with the opposite parity for winding of spin texture for conduction and valence bands. Using Pancharatnam's prescription for the geometric phase it is shown that mismatch of this parity across a p -n junction, which could be engineered into the edge by electrical gate induced doping, leads to a phase dependence in the two-terminal conductance which is quantized to either zero or π . It is further shown that application of a nonuniform magnetic field across the junction could lead to a nonquantized value of this geometric phase which is tunable between zero and π . A current asymmetry measurement which is shown to be robust against electron-electron interactions is proposed to infer the appearance of this Pancharatnam's geometric phase in transport across such junctions.

  2. Single Molecule Junctions: Probing Contact Chemistry and Fundamental Circuit Laws

    SciTech Connect

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-04-11

    By exploiting selective link chemistry, formation of single molecule junctions with reproducible conductance has become established. Systematic studies reveal the structure-conductance relationships for diverse molecules. I will draw on experiments from my collaborators at Columbia University, atomic-scale calculations and theory to describe progress in two areas. First, I will describe a novel route to form single molecule junctions, based on SnMe3 terminated molecules, in which gold directly bonds to carbon in the molecule backbone resulting in near ideal contact resistance [1]. Second, comparison of the conductance of junctions formed with molecular species containing either one backbone or two backbones in parallel allows demonstration of the role of quantum interference in the conductance superposition law at the molecular scale [2].

  3. RhoA-JNK Regulates the E-Cadherin Junctions of Human Gingival Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Kim, H J; Kim, H-M

    2016-03-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is unique with regard to its wide intercellular spaces and sparsely developed intercellular junctions. Thus, knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation of the intercellular junctions of the junctional epithelium may be essential to understand the pathophysiology of the JE. HOK-16B cells, a normal human gingival epithelial cell line, were used to identify the molecules involved in the regulation of the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions between human gingival epithelial cells. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) disrupted the intercellular junctions through the dissociation of E-cadherin. The role of JNK in the formation of these E-cadherin junctions was further confirmed by demonstrating that JNK inhibition induced the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions. The upstream signaling of JNK was also examined. Activation of the small GTPase RhoA disrupted the formation of E-cadherin junctions between HOK-16B cells, which was accompanied by JNK activation. Disruption of these intercellular junctions upon RhoA activation was prevented when JNK activity was inhibited. In contrast, RhoA inactivation led to HOK-16B cell aggregation and the formation of intercellular junctions, even under conditions in which the cellular junctions were naturally disrupted by growth on a strongly adhesive surface. Furthermore, the JE of mouse molars had high JNK activity associated with low E-cadherin expression, which was reversed in the other gingival epithelia, including the sulcular epithelium. Interestingly, JNK activity was increased in cells grown on a solid surface, where cells showed higher RhoA activity than those grown on soft surfaces. Together, these results indicate that the decreased formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions within the JE may be coupled to high JNK activity, which is activated by the upregulation of RhoA on solid tooth surfaces. PMID:26635280

  4. EAST ELEVATION OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL WITH SIX FOOT SCALE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL WITH SIX FOOT SCALE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE SCALE IS LOCATED AT CENTER RIGHT, AGAINST THE SECOND SUPPORT TIMBER FROM THE RIGHT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  5. EAST ELEVATION OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN, AND TRAM TRESTLE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. WINCHING ENGINE AND ITS FOUNDATION IS AT TOP CENTER. SEE CA-291-28 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  6. OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE JAW CRUSHER FOUNDATION CAN BE CLEARLY SEEN AT CENTER LEFT WITH A CONVEYOR TO CARRY CRUSHED ORE UP TO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN,LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  7. Reliable anchoring groups for single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. Teresa; Leary, Edmund; Evangeli, Charalambos; Arroyo, Carlos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraïit, Nicolás

    2012-02-01

    In the field of molecular electronics, thiols have been extensively used as the most common anchoring groups to bind molecules to gold electrodes. However, other anchoring groups as amines can provide interesting advantages. Recently, C-60 has been also proposed as a possible very efficient binding group. In this talk, I will present our studies on molecular junctions formed by thiol-, amine-, and C-60-terminated molecules. We use a STM (scanning tunneling microscope) break-junction technique to create and characterized single-molecule junctions both in ambient and liquid environment. We compare thiols and amines on the alkane family and an oligo(phenylene ethynylene). Our study of the molecular-junction stretching length allows us to conclude that thiols affect atomic rearrangement at the electrodes significantly more than amines. Using C-60-terminated molecules, we have recently introduced a new technique for controllably wiring one molecule at a time. We first get STM images to located isolated molecules on a gold substrate, which are then specifically targeted and contacted using a STM gold tip. This technique offers a significant improvement over other techniques, as it guaranties that one and only one molecule is contacted at a time between the electrodes.

  8. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  9. Terminals for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bork, Alfred M.

    The effectiveness of different types of computer terminals in programing learning is discussed with special reference to the experience of the Physics Computer Development Project. Experience with ten types of terminals including hardcopy terminals of several speeds, alphanumeric and graphic terminals is reviewed. Special consideration is given to…

  10. A Plasma Display Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    A graphics terminal designed for use as a remote computer input/output terminal is described. Although the terminal is intended for use in teaching applications, it has several features which make it useful in many other computer terminal applications. These features include: a 10-inch square plasma display panel, permanent storage of information…

  11. [Gap junction and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiao-rong; Tao, Jian; Wang, Yun-kai

    2015-11-01

    Gap junctions play a critical role in electrical synchronization and exchange of small molecules between neighboring cells; connexins are a family of structurally related transmembrane proteins that assemble to form vertebrate gap junctions. Hyperglycemia changes the structure gap junction proteins and their expression, resulting in obstruction of neural regeneration, vascular function and wound healing, and also promoting vascular atherosclerosis. These pathogenic factors would cause diabetic foot ulcers. This article reviews the involvement of connexins in pathogenesis of diabetic foot. PMID:26822053

  12. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  13. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Dan; Segall, Ken

    2010-07-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These “Josephson junction neurons” reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, large interconnected networks of Josephson junction neurons would operate fully in parallel. They would be orders of magnitude faster than both traditional computer simulations and biological neural networks. Josephson junction neurons provide a new tool for exploring long-term large-scale dynamics for networks of neurons.

  14. Terminal structure and heterogeneity in human cytomegalovirus strain AD169.

    PubMed Central

    Tamashiro, J C; Spector, D H

    1986-01-01

    We have characterized the heterogeneity occurring at the junction of the long (L) and short (S) segments and at the termini of the strain AD169 human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome by restriction endonuclease mapping and nucleotide sequence analyses. The HCMV a sequence was identified by its position at both termini and inverted orientation at the L-S junction. Heterogeneity at both termini and the L-S junction was generated by the presence of fused and tandem a sequences. Some S termini lacked an a sequence. In addition, near the L terminus and at the L-S junction there were a variable number of 217-base-pair (bp) XhoI fragments arranged in tandem. The 217-bp fragments consisted of a portion of the a and adjacent b sequences (in the L-segment repeat) bounded by the same direct repeats (DR1) found at the boundaries of the a sequence. A model for the generation of these heterogeneous fragments is presented. We also determined the sequence of seven cloned terminal fragments, five from the L terminus and two from the S terminus. All L termini contained identical terminal sequences ending with base 32 of a 33-bp DR1. The S termini differed from each other and from the L-segment termini. One S terminus lacked an a sequence and terminated within S-segment repeat (c) sequences. The second S terminus contained an a sequence and terminated with bases 20 to 33 of a 33-bp DR1. A comparison of the cloned L and S terminal sequences with cloned L-S junction sequences suggested that the termini contained 3' single base extensions which were removed during the cloning. We also show that the herpesvirus conserved sequence is in a similar position relative to the termini of HCMV and several other herpesviruses, thus adding further support for the role of the sequence in the maturation of viral DNA. Images PMID:3016322

  15. OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE AERIAL TRAMWAY BEGINS AT THE TERMINAL AND CONTINUES NORTH TO THE UPPER RIGHT. THE FIRST SUPPORT TOWER CAN BE SEEN. JUST BELOW THE WATER TANK IS A LOADING PLATFORM AND TRAM TRESTLE USED FOR THE TRANSPORT OF SUPPLIES THAT LEAD UP TO THE TRAM TERMINAL. ALL THREE LEVELS OF THE FORMER 20 STAMP MILL CAN BE SEEN AT CENTER. SEE CA-291-02 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE AERIAL TRAMWAY BEGINS AT THE TERMINAL AND CONTINUES NORTH TO THE UPPER RIGHT. THE FIRST SUPPORT TOWER CAN BE SEEN. JUST BELOW THE WATER TANK IS A LOADING PLATFORM AND TRAM TRESTLE USED FOR THE TRANSPORT OF SUPPLIES THAT LEAD UP TO THE TRAM TERMINAL. ALL THREE LEVELS OF THE FORMER 20 STAMP MILL CAN BE SEEN AT CENTER. SEE CA-291-46( CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  17. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  18. Neuromuscular junction disorders.

    PubMed

    Verschuuren, Jan; Strijbos, Ellen; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Diseases of the neuromuscular junction comprise a wide range of disorders. Antibodies, genetic mutations, specific drugs or toxins interfere with the number or function of one of the essential proteins that control signaling between the presynaptic nerve ending and the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Acquired autoimmune disorders of the neuromuscular junction are the most common and are described here. In myasthenia gravis, antibodies to acetylcholine receptors or to proteins involved in receptor clustering, particularly muscle-specific kinase, cause direct loss of acetylcholine receptors or interfere with the agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering necessary for efficient neurotransmission. In the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), loss of the presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels results in reduced release of the acetylcholine transmitter. The conditions are generally recognizable clinically and the diagnosis confirmed by serologic testing and electromyography. Screening for thymomas in myasthenia or small cell cancer in LEMS is important. Fortunately, a wide range of symptomatic treatments, immunosuppressive drugs, or other immunomodulating therapies is available. Future research is directed to understanding the pathogenesis, discovering new antigens, and trying to develop disease-specific treatments. PMID:27112691

  19. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells. PMID:26404354

  20. Development of Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions: maintaining synaptic strength.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Peng, X; Cooper, R L

    2002-01-01

    In spite of the available information about the development of Drosophila neuromuscular junctions, the correlation between nerve terminal morphology and maintenance of synaptic strength has still not been systematically addressed throughout larval development. We characterized the growth of the abdominal longitudinal muscle 6 (m6) and the motor terminals Ib and Is that innervate it within segment 4. In addition, we measured the evoked excitatory junction potential (EJP) amplitudes while the Ib and Is axons were selectively recruited. Regression analysis with natural log transformation of response variables indicated that the developmental curves for m6 and the motor axons Ib and Is were best fitted as second order polynomial regressions during larval development. Initially Is terminals are longer and possess more synaptic varicosities at the first instar stage. The Is terminals also grow faster in subsequent developmental stages. The growth of nerve terminals and their target m6 are not proportional although tightly correlated. This results in a larger average muscle area innervated by a single varicosity as the animal develops. The amplitudes of the EJPs of Ib and Is neurons show no developmental difference in their amplitudes from the first to the late third larval instar. The Is axon consistently produced larger EJPs than the Ib axon at each developmental stage. The time constants for both rising and decay phases of EJPs increase exponentially throughout larval development. The results presented not only help in quantifying the normal development of Drosophila neuromuscular junctions, but also provide a framework for future investigations to properly interpret developmental abnormalities that may occur in various mutants. PMID:12421617

  1. OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND RELATIONSHIP TO WATER TANK,LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND RELATIONSHIP TO WATER TANK,LOOKING NORTH FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD. THIS IS HOW THE TERMINAL AND MILL SITE FIRST APPEAR TO VISITORS WHEN APPROACHING FROM THE ROAD FROM THE SITE'S PARKING LOT. THIS IS CONSIDERED THE FRONT END OF THE TERMINAL. ORIGINALLY THERE WAS A SECOND WATER TANK NEAR THE ONE IN UPPER LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. The Mr 28,000 gap junction proteins from rat heart and liver are different but related.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B J; Gros, D B; Kent, S B; Hood, L E; Revel, J P

    1985-06-10

    The sequence of the amino-terminal 32 residues of the rat heart Mr 28,000 gap junction protein presented here allows, for the first time, a sequence comparison of gap junctional proteins from different tissues (heart and liver). Comparison of the rat heart gap junction protein sequence and that available from rat liver reveals 43% sequence identity and conservative changes at an additional 25% of the positions. Both proteins exhibit a hydrophobic domain which could represent a transmembrane span of the junction. This result unequivocally demonstrates the existence of at least two forms of the gap junction protein. As yet, no homology is evident between the gap junctional proteins of either heart or liver and main intrinsic protein from rat eye lens. PMID:2987225

  3. Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Laimer, Martin; Lanschuetzer, Christoph M; Diem, Anja; Bauer, Johann W

    2010-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa type Herlitz (JEB-H) is the autosomal recessively inherited, more severe variant of "lucidolytic" JEB. Characterized by generalized, extensive mucocutaneous blistering at birth and early lethality, this devastating condition is most often caused by homozygous null mutations in the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, each encoding for 1 of the 3 chains of the heterotrimer laminin-332. The JEB-H subtype usually presents as a severe and clinically diverse variant of the EB group of mechanobullous genodermatoses. This article outlines the epidemiology, presentation, and diagnosis of JEB-H. Morbidity and mortality are high, necessitating optimized protocols for early (including prenatal) diagnosis and palliative care. Gene therapy remains the most promising perspective. PMID:19945616

  4. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  5. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  6. Disordered graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, W. A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-02-01

    A tight-binding approach based on the Chebyshev-Bogoliubov-de Gennes method is used to describe disordered single-layer graphene Josephson junctions. Scattering by vacancies, ripples, or charged impurities is included. We compute the Josephson current and investigate the nature of multiple Andreev reflections, which induce bound states appearing as peaks in the density of states for energies below the superconducting gap. In the presence of single-atom vacancies, we observe a strong suppression of the supercurrent, which is a consequence of strong intervalley scattering. Although lattice deformations should not induce intervalley scattering, we find that the supercurrent is still suppressed, which is due to the presence of pseudomagnetic barriers. For charged impurities, we consider two cases depending on whether the average doping is zero, i.e., existence of electron-hole puddles, or finite. In both cases, short-range impurities strongly affect the supercurrent, similar to the vacancies scenario.

  7. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  8. CAI Terminal Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Peter

    The bewildering number of available terminals which are offered to CAI users presents a rather formidable problem of which one to choose. This article surveys what appear to be evolving standards for terminals. The usefulness of these terminals for CAI purposes is discussed, together with the best known prototype exhibiting the particular feature.…

  9. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  10. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  11. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  12. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  13. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  14. Heterotypic gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses are abundant in goldfish brain

    PubMed Central

    Rash, John E.; Kamasawa, Naomi; Vanderpool, Kimberly G.; Yasumura, Thomas; O'Brien, John; Nannapaneni, Srikant; Pereda, Alberto E.; Nagy, James I.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junctions provide for direct intercellular electrical and metabolic coupling. The abundance of gap junctions at “large myelinated club ending” synapses on Mauthner cells of the teleost brain provided a convenient model to correlate anatomical and physiological properties of electrical synapses. There, presynaptic action potentials were found to evoke short-latency electrical “pre-potentials” immediately preceding their accompanying glutamate-induced depolarizations, making these the first unambiguously identified “mixed” (i.e., chemical plus electrical) synapses in the vertebrate CNS. We recently showed that gap junctions at these synapses exhibit asymmetric electrical resistance (i.e., electrical rectification), which we correlated with total molecular asymmetry of connexin composition in their apposing gap junction hemiplaques, with Cx35 restricted to axon terminal hemiplaques and Cx34.7 restricted to apposing Mauthner cell plasma membranes. We now show that similarly heterotypic neuronal gap junctions are abundant throughout goldfish brain, with labeling exclusively for Cx35 in presynaptic hemiplaques and exclusively for Cx34.7 in postsynaptic hemiplaques. Moreover, the vast majority of these asymmetric gap junctions occur at glutamatergic axon terminals. The widespread distribution of heterotypic gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses throughout goldfish brain and spinal cord implies that pre- vs. postsynaptic asymmetry at electrical synapses evolved early in the chordate lineage. We propose that the advantages of the molecular and functional asymmetry of connexins at electrical synapses that are so prominently expressed in the teleost CNS are unlikely to have been abandoned in higher vertebrates. However, to create asymmetric coupling in mammals, where most gap junctions are composed of Cx36 on both sides, would require some other mechanism, such as differential phosphorylation of connexins on opposite sides of the same gap junction or

  15. Heterotypic gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses are abundant in goldfish brain.

    PubMed

    Rash, J E; Kamasawa, N; Vanderpool, K G; Yasumura, T; O'Brien, J; Nannapaneni, S; Pereda, A E; Nagy, J I

    2015-01-29

    Gap junctions provide for direct intercellular electrical and metabolic coupling. The abundance of gap junctions at "large myelinated club ending (LMCE)" synapses on Mauthner cells (M-cells) of the teleost brain provided a convenient model to correlate anatomical and physiological properties of electrical synapses. There, presynaptic action potentials were found to evoke short-latency electrical "pre-potentials" immediately preceding their accompanying glutamate-induced depolarizations, making these the first unambiguously identified "mixed" (i.e., chemical plus electrical) synapses in the vertebrate CNS. We recently showed that gap junctions at these synapses exhibit asymmetric electrical resistance (i.e., electrical rectification), which we correlated with total molecular asymmetry of connexin composition in their apposing gap junction hemiplaques, with connexin35 (Cx35) restricted to axon terminal hemiplaques and connexin34.7 (Cx34.7) restricted to apposing M-cell plasma membranes. We now show that similarly heterotypic neuronal gap junctions are abundant throughout goldfish brain, with labeling exclusively for Cx35 in presynaptic hemiplaques and exclusively for Cx34.7 in postsynaptic hemiplaques. Moreover, the vast majority of these asymmetric gap junctions occur at glutamatergic axon terminals. The widespread distribution of heterotypic gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses throughout goldfish brain and spinal cord implies that pre- vs. postsynaptic asymmetry at electrical synapses evolved early in the chordate lineage. We propose that the advantages of the molecular and functional asymmetry of connexins at electrical synapses that are so prominently expressed in the teleost CNS are unlikely to have been abandoned in higher vertebrates. However, to create asymmetric coupling in mammals, where most gap junctions are composed of connexin36 (Cx36) on both sides, would require some other mechanism, such as differential phosphorylation of connexins on

  16. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices. PMID:27277330

  17. Electronic properties of nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin, Ph.; Meunier, V.

    1998-08-01

    The possibility of realizing junctions between two different nanotubes has recently attracted a great interest, even though much remains to be done for putting this idea in concrete form. Pentagon-heptagon pair defects in the otherwise perfect graphitic network make such connections possible, with virtually infinite varieties. In this paper, the literature devoted to nanotube junctions is briefly reviewed. A special emphasize is put on the electronic properties of C nanotube junctions, together with an indication on how their current-voltage characteristics may look like.

  18. Highly Conducting pi-Conjugated Molecular Junctions Covalently Bonded to Gold Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Hybertsen, M.; Widawsky, J.R.; Vazquez, H.; Schneebeli, S.T.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-11-02

    We measure electronic conductance through single conjugated molecules bonded to Au metal electrodes with direct Au-C covalent bonds using the scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction technique. We start with molecules terminated with trimethyltin end groups that cleave off in situ, resulting in formation of a direct covalent {sigma} bond between the carbon backbone and the gold metal electrodes. The molecular carbon backbone used in this study consist of a conjugated {pi} system that has one terminal methylene group on each end, which bonds to the electrodes, achieving large electronic coupling of the electrodes to the {pi} system. The junctions formed with the prototypical example of 1,4-dimethylenebenzene show a conductance approaching one conductance quantum (G{sub 0} = 2e{sup 2}/h). Junctions formed with methylene-terminated oligophenyls with two to four phenyl units show a 100-fold increase in conductance compared with junctions formed with amine-linked oligophenyls. The conduction mechanism for these longer oligophenyls is tunneling, as they exhibit an exponential dependence of conductance on oligomer length. In addition, density functional theory based calculations for the Au-xylylene-Au junction show near-resonant transmission, with a crossover to tunneling for the longer oligomers.

  19. Effect of Length and Contact Chemistry on the Electronic Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Molecular Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Aaron; Balachandran, Janakiraman; Sadat, Seid; Gavini, Vikram; Dunietz, Barry D.; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Reddy, Pramod

    2011-06-15

    We present a combined experimental and computational study that probes the thermoelectric and electrical transport properties of molecular junctions. Experiments were performed on junctions created by trapping aromatic molecules between gold electrodes. The end groups (-SH, -NC) of the aromatic molecules were systematically varied to study the effect of contact coupling strength and contact chemistry. When the coupling of the molecule with one of the electrodes was reduced by switching the terminal chemistry from -SH to -H, the electrical conductance of molecular junctions decreased by an order of magnitude, whereas the thermopower varied by only a few percent. This has been predicted computationally in the past and is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Further, our experiments and computational modeling indicate the prospect of tuning thermoelectric properties at the molecular scale. In particular, the thiol-terminated aromatic molecular junctions revealed a positive thermopower that increased linearly with length. This positive thermopower is associated with charge transport primarily through the highest occupied molecular orbital, as shown by our computational results. In contrast, a negative thermopower was observed for a corresponding molecular junction terminated by an isocyanide group due to charge transport primarily through the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital.

  20. Properties of Edge States at the Graphene P-N Junction Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Son; Klimov, Nikolai; Newell, David; Yan, Jun; Lee, Ji Ung; Richter, Curt

    The Landau level edge states from the p- and the n-section of a graphene P/N junction (pnJ) interact with each other differently across the junction depending upon the properties of the junction and the graphene. Full equilibration was reported for a two terminal graphene pnJ device in Williams et al.. In our four-terminal device, however, only the lowest Landau level edge state is equilibrated across the pnJ. When the two devices are compared, the LL energy spacings, the length of the edge states along the pnJ interface, and the carrier mobility are similar. Electrostatic simulations for our device geometry and that of contrast the rate of change of the electrostatic potential across the pnJs. Edge states at an electrostatically smooth junction are spatially further apart than those at a relatively abrupt junction, which decreases the probability of edge states mixing. Thus, we attribute the difference in equilibration in our device and that of to the dramatic difference in the shape of the electrostatic junction.

  1. Theoretical study of the charge transport through C60-based single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilan, S.; Zotti, L. A.; Pauly, F.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2012-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the conductance and thermopower of single-molecule junctions based on C60 and C60-terminated molecules. We first analyze the transport properties of gold-C60-gold junctions and show that these junctions can be highly conductive (with conductances above 0.1G0, where G0=2e2/h is the quantum of conductance). Moreover, we find that the thermopower in these junctions is negative due to the fact that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital dominates the charge transport, and its magnitude can reach several tens of microvolts per kelvin, depending on the contact geometry. On the other hand, we study the suitability of C60 as an anchoring group in single-molecule junctions. For this purpose, we analyze the transport through several dumbbell derivatives using C60 as anchors, and we compare the results with those obtained with thiol and amine groups. Our results show that the conductance of C60-terminated molecules is rather sensitive to the binding geometry. Moreover, the conductance of the molecules is typically reduced by the presence of the C60 anchors, which in turn makes the junctions more sensitive to the functionalization of the molecular core with appropriate side groups.

  2. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  3. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  4. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  5. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  6. Neuromuscular junctional disorders.

    PubMed

    Girija, A S; Ashraf, V V

    2008-07-01

    Neuromuscular junctional disorders (NMJ) in children are distinct entity. They may be acquired or hereditary. They pose problem in diagnosis because of the higher occurrence of sero negative Myasthenia Gravis (MG) cases in children. The identity of MusK antibody positivity in a good percentage of sero negative cases further adds to problems in diagnosis. The Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome (CMS) which are rare disorders of hereditary neuromuscular transmission (NMT) has to be differentiated because immunotherapy has no benefit in this group. Molecular genetic studies of these diseases helps to identify specific type of CMS which is important as other drugs like Fluoxetine, Quinidine are found to be effective in some. In infancy, all can manifest as floppy infant syndrome. The important key to diagnosis is by detailed electrophysiological studies including repetitive nerve stimulation at slow and high rates and its response to anticholinesterases and estimation of Acetyl choline receptor antibodies. Other causes of neuromuscular transmission defects viz. snake venom poisoning and that due to drugs are discussed. PMID:18716738

  7. N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuping; Minaisah, Rose-Marie; Ferraro, Elisa; Li, Chen; Porter, Lauren J; Zhou, Can; Gao, Fang; Zhang, Junyi; Rajgor, Dipen; Autore, Flavia; Shanahan, Catherine M; Warren, Derek T

    2016-07-15

    The spatial compartmentalisation of biochemical signalling pathways is essential for cell function. Nesprins are a multi-isomeric family of proteins that have emerged as signalling scaffolds, herein, we investigate the localisation and function of novel nesprin-2 N-terminal variants. We show that these nesprin-2 variants display cell specific distribution and reside in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that nesprin-2 N-terminal variants colocalised with β-catenin at cell-cell junctions in U2OS cells. Calcium switch assays demonstrated that nesprin-2 and β-catenin are lost from cell-cell junctions in low calcium conditions whereas emerin localisation at the NE remained unaltered, furthermore, an N-terminal fragment of nesprin-2 was sufficient for cell-cell junction localisation and interacted with β-catenin. Disruption of these N-terminal nesprin-2 variants, using siRNA depletion resulted in loss of β-catenin from cell-cell junctions, nuclear accumulation of active β-catenin and augmented β-catenin transcriptional activity. Importantly, we show that U2OS cells lack nesprin-2 giant, suggesting that the N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling independently of the NE. Together, these data identify N-terminal nesprin-2 variants as novel regulators of β-catenin signalling that tether β-catenin to cell-cell contacts to inhibit β-catenin transcriptional activity. PMID:27321956

  8. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  9. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  10. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  11. Oscillations in the current-voltage characteristic of an asymmetric ballistic junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gence, L.; Hackens, B.; Faniel, S.; Gustin, C.; Bayot, V.; Wallart, X.; Bollaert, S.; Cappy, A.

    2004-03-01

    Nonlinear effects in three- and four-terminal ballistic devices have attracted growing interest in the last few years. We fabricated a four-terminal asymmetric junction from a two-dimensional electron system confined in an InGaAs quantum well. Two contacts are available at each branch of the junction, allowing for four-contacts measurements of the resistances of each branch. Measurements are performed at low temperature, in the ballistic regime of transport. We apply a (longitudinal) current between opposite branches of the junction and measure the resulting transverse voltage between the two other contacts, as well as the change of longitudinal resistance. When the longitudinal current grows, we observe changes of slope and even oscillations in the transverse voltage, coinciding with abrupt changes of the longitudinal resistance. We discuss our results in light of Landauer-Büttikker simulations of the device (H.Q. Xu, Appl. Phys. Lett., 78, 2064 (2001)).

  12. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support. PMID:21694407

  13. Terminal automation system maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Coffelt, D.; Hewitt, J.

    1997-01-01

    Nothing has improved petroleum product loading in recent years more than terminal automation systems. The presence of terminal automation systems (TAS) at loading racks has increased operational efficiency and safety and enhanced their accounting and management capabilities. However, like all finite systems, they occasionally malfunction or fail. Proper servicing and maintenance can minimize this. And in the unlikely event a TAS breakdown does occur, prompt and effective troubleshooting can reduce its impact on terminal productivity. To accommodate around-the-clock loading at racks, increasingly unattended by terminal personnel, TAS maintenance, servicing and troubleshooting has become increasingly demanding. It has also become increasingly important. After 15 years of trial and error at petroleum and petrochemical storage and transfer terminals, a number of successful troubleshooting programs have been developed. These include 24-hour {open_quotes}help hotlines,{close_quotes} internal (terminal company) and external (supplier) support staff, and {open_quotes}layered{close_quotes} support. These programs are described.

  14. Probe of local impurity states by bend resistance measurements in graphene cross junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Li, J. Y.; Kang, N.; Lin, Li; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We report on low-temperature transport measurements on four-terminal cross junction devices fabricated from high-quality graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. At high magnetic fields, the bend resistance reveals pronounced peak structures at the quantum Hall plateau transition, which can be attributed to the edge state transport through the junctions. We further demonstrate that the bend resistance is drastically affected by the presence of local impurity states in the junction regions, and exhibits an unusual asymmetric behavior with respect to the magnetic field direction. The observations can be understood in a model taking into account the combination of the edge transport and an asymmetric scatterer. Our results demonstrate that a graphene cross junction may serve as a sensitive probe of local impurity states in graphene at the nanoscale.

  15. Probe of local impurity states by bend resistance measurements in graphene cross junctions.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Li, J Y; Kang, N; Lin, Li; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Xu, H Q

    2016-06-17

    We report on low-temperature transport measurements on four-terminal cross junction devices fabricated from high-quality graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. At high magnetic fields, the bend resistance reveals pronounced peak structures at the quantum Hall plateau transition, which can be attributed to the edge state transport through the junctions. We further demonstrate that the bend resistance is drastically affected by the presence of local impurity states in the junction regions, and exhibits an unusual asymmetric behavior with respect to the magnetic field direction. The observations can be understood in a model taking into account the combination of the edge transport and an asymmetric scatterer. Our results demonstrate that a graphene cross junction may serve as a sensitive probe of local impurity states in graphene at the nanoscale. PMID:27159926

  16. Three-terminal heterojunction bipolar transistor solar cell for high-efficiency photovoltaic conversion

    PubMed Central

    Martí, A.; Luque, A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose, for the first time, a solar cell characterized by a semiconductor transistor structure (n/p/n or p/n/p) where the base–emitter junction is made of a high-bandgap semiconductor and the collector is made of a low-bandgap semiconductor. We calculate its detailed-balance efficiency limit and prove that it is the same one than that of a double-junction solar cell. The practical importance of this result relies on the simplicity of the structure that reduces the number of layers that are required to match the limiting efficiency of dual-junction solar cells without using tunnel junctions. The device naturally emerges as a three-terminal solar cell and can also be used as building block of multijunction solar cells with an increased number of junctions. PMID:25902374

  17. Three-terminal heterojunction bipolar transistor solar cell for high-efficiency photovoltaic conversion.

    PubMed

    Martí, A; Luque, A

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose, for the first time, a solar cell characterized by a semiconductor transistor structure (n/p/n or p/n/p) where the base-emitter junction is made of a high-bandgap semiconductor and the collector is made of a low-bandgap semiconductor. We calculate its detailed-balance efficiency limit and prove that it is the same one than that of a double-junction solar cell. The practical importance of this result relies on the simplicity of the structure that reduces the number of layers that are required to match the limiting efficiency of dual-junction solar cells without using tunnel junctions. The device naturally emerges as a three-terminal solar cell and can also be used as building block of multijunction solar cells with an increased number of junctions. PMID:25902374

  18. Charge transport through dicarboxylic-acid-terminated alkanes bound to graphene-gold nanogap electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Longlong; Zhang, Qian; Tao, Shuhui; Zhao, Cezhou; Almutib, Eman; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Bailey, Steven W. D.; Grace, Iain; Lambert, Colin J.; Du, Jun; Yang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Graphene-based electrodes are attractive for single-molecule electronics due to their high stability and conductivity and reduced screening compared with metals. In this paper, we use the STM-based matrix isolation I(s) method to measure the performance of graphene in single-molecule junctions with one graphene electrode and one gold electrode. By measuring the length dependence of the electrical conductance of dicarboxylic-acid-terminated alkanes, we find that the transport is consistent with phase-coherent tunneling, but with an attenuation factor of βN = 0.69 per methyl unit, which is lower than the value measured for Au-molecule-Au junctions. Comparison with density-functional-theory calculations of electron transport through graphene-molecule-Au junctions and Au-molecule-Au junctions reveals that this difference is due to the difference in Fermi energies of the two types of junction, relative to the frontier orbitals of the molecules. For most molecules, their electrical conductance in graphene-molecule-Au junctions is higher than that in Au-molecule-Au junctions, which suggests that graphene offers superior electrode performance, when utilizing carboxylic acid anchor groups.Graphene-based electrodes are attractive for single-molecule electronics due to their high stability and conductivity and reduced screening compared with metals. In this paper, we use the STM-based matrix isolation I(s) method to measure the performance of graphene in single-molecule junctions with one graphene electrode and one gold electrode. By measuring the length dependence of the electrical conductance of dicarboxylic-acid-terminated alkanes, we find that the transport is consistent with phase-coherent tunneling, but with an attenuation factor of βN = 0.69 per methyl unit, which is lower than the value measured for Au-molecule-Au junctions. Comparison with density-functional-theory calculations of electron transport through graphene-molecule-Au junctions and Au

  19. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE BIN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. REMAINS OF A BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK CAN BE SEEN JUST BELOW THE ORE BIN (SEE CA-291-32 FOR DETAIL). ROCK FOUNDATIONS LOCATED JUST ABOVE THE ORE BIN AND ALONG THE FIRST RIDGELINE ARE TENT PADS. SEE CA-291-49 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  20. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE BIN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. REMAINS OF A BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK CAN BE SEEN JUST BELOW THE ORE BIN (SEE CA-291-32 FOR DETAIL). ROCK FOUNDATIONS LOCATED JUST ABOVE THE ORE BIN AND ALONG THE FIRST RIDGELINE ARE TENT PADS. SEE CA-291-24 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  1. EAST ELEVATION OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. TRAM CARS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. TRAM CARS ENTERED AND EXITED FROM RIGHT,AND DUMPED INTO THE ORE BIN SEEN AT LOWER LEFT. BELOW THE ORE BIN IS A JAW CRUSHER FOUNDATION. THE WOODEN BOX AT CENTER IS FILLED WITH ROCKS, PROVIDING THE COUNTERWEIGHT TO THE TRAMWAY CABLE, WHICH KEEPS IT TAUGHT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. Terminal Air Flow Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) will be the basis for air traffic planning and control in the terminal area. The system accepts arriving traffic within an extended terminal area and optimizes the flow based on current traffic and airport conditions. The operational use of CTAS will be presented together with results from current operations.

  3. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Uday K.; Tolbert, Jerry

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  4. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  5. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  6. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  7. Netrin and Frazzled regulate presynaptic gap junctions at a Drosophila giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brian O; Borgen, Melissa A; Caruccio, Phyllis M; Murphey, Rodney K

    2014-04-16

    Netrin and its receptor, Frazzled, dictate the strength of synaptic connections in the giant fiber system (GFS) of Drosophila melanogaster by regulating gap junction localization in the presynaptic terminal. In Netrin mutant animals, the synaptic coupling between a giant interneuron and the "jump" motor neuron was weakened and dye coupling between these two neurons was severely compromised or absent. In cases in which Netrin mutants displayed apparently normal synaptic anatomy, half of the specimens exhibited physiologically defective synapses and dye coupling between the giant fiber (GF) and the motor neuron was reduced or eliminated, suggesting that gap junctions were disrupted in the Netrin mutants. When we examined the gap junctions with antibodies to Shaking-B (ShakB) Innexin, they were significantly decreased or absent in the presynaptic terminal of the mutant GF. Frazzled loss of function mutants exhibited similar defects in synaptic transmission, dye coupling, and gap junction localization. These data are the first to show that Netrin and Frazzled regulate the placement of gap junctions presynaptically at a synapse. PMID:24741033

  8. GLIAL ANKYRINS FACILITATE PARANODAL AXOGLIAL JUNCTION ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L.; Makara, Michael A.; Brophy, Peter J.; Cooper, Edward C.; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J.; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions, and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, are essential for rapid saltatory conduction, and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na+ channel clustering in neurons and important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here, we show that ankyrinB, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrinG, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing central nervous system. PMID:25362471

  9. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  10. Glial ankyrins facilitate paranodal axoglial junction assembly.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L; Makara, Michael A; Brophy, Peter J; Cooper, Edward C; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J; Rasband, Matthew N

    2014-12-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, and they are essential for rapid saltatory conduction and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na(+) channel clustering in neurons and are important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here we show that ankyrin-B, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrin-G, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing CNS. PMID:25362471

  11. Linker Dependent Bond Rupture Force Measurements in Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Frei M.; Hybertsen M.; Aradhya S.V.; Venkataraman L.

    2012-02-16

    We use a modified conducting atomic force microscope to simultaneously probe the conductance of a single-molecule junction and the force required to rupture the junction formed by alkanes terminated with four different chemical link groups which vary in binding strength and mechanism to the gold electrodes. Molecular junctions with amine, methylsulfide, and diphenylphosphine terminated molecules show clear conductance signatures and rupture at a force that is significantly smaller than the measured 1.4 nN force required to rupture the single-atomic gold contact. In contrast, measurements with a thiol terminated alkane which can bind covalently to the gold electrode show conductance and force features unlike those of the other molecules studied. Specifically, the strong Au-S bond can cause structural rearrangements in the electrodes, which are accompanied by substantial conductance changes. Despite the strong Au-S bond and the evidence for disruption of the Au structure, the experiments show that on average these junctions also rupture at a smaller force than that measured for pristine single-atom gold contacts.

  12. Phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Four phenylethynyl amine compounds - 3 and 4-aminophenoxy-4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, and 3 and 4-amino-4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone - were readily prepared and were used to endcap imide oligomers. Phenylethynyl-terminated amide acid oligomers and phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers with various molecular weights and compositions were prepared and characterized. These oligomers were cured at 300 to 400 C to provide crosslinked polyimides with excellent solvent resistance, high strength and modulus, and good high temperature properties. Adhesive panels, composites, films, and moldings from these phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers gave excellent mechanical performance.

  13. Nonleaking battery terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, W. E.; Nagle, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Three different terminals were designed for usage in a 40 ampere/hour silver zinc battery which has a 45 percent KOH by weight electrolyte in a plastic battery case. Life tests, including thermal cycling, electrical charge and discharge for up to three years duration, were conducted on these three different terminal designs. Tests for creep rate and tensile strength were conducted on the polyphenylene oxide (PPO) plastic battery cases. Some cases were unused and others containing KOH electrolyte were placed on life tests. The design and testing of nonleaking battery terminals for use with a potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte in a plastic case are discussed.

  14. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  15. Measurement of tunnel junction resistance during formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, W.C.; Johnson, R.T.; Lee, J.S.; Laws, K.E.; Bland, R.W. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have measured the characteristics of aluminum tunnel junctions during and immediately after the formation of the junction. This has permitted us to observe changes in the oxide barrier, in vacuum and in air. By observing the barrier resistance during sputtering, they were able to diagnose and correct problems due to plasma discharges which were damaging the junctions. They report preliminary results from junctions passivated with a silicon nitride cap layer.

  16. GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION AND CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gap Junctions (GJs) provide cell-to-cell communication (GJIC) of essential metabolites and ions. Js allow tissues to average responses, clear waste products, and minimize the effects of xenobiotics by dilution and allowing steady-state catabolism. any chemicals can adversely affe...

  17. The Yolla Bolly junction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, M.C.; Jayko, A.S. ); Jones, D.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Engebretson, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    West of Red Bluff, California, rocks of the northern Coast Ranges, Klamath-Sierra Nevada, and Great Valley provinces come together at what has been called the Yolla Bolly junction. Mapping of the Red Bluff and Willows 1:100,000 quadrangles has greatly clarified the enigmatic features of this complex area. Terranes of the Klamath Mountains and their Cretaceous sedimentary cover have been thrust northwestward over the Elder Creek terrane and Franciscan rocks, north of the left-lateral Cold Fork fault zone. The Condrey Mountain window (Franciscan Pickett Peak terrane) provides a measure of the magnitude of this thrusting (ca 90 km). South of the Cold Fork fault zone, the Franciscan and Elder Creek terranes were driven southeastward as tectonic wedges onto Sierran-Klamath basement. Timing of this scissor-tectonics is not constrained near the junction, but further north in southwest Oregon, Lower Eocene strata were deformed by overthrusting of the Klamath block whereas Upper Eocene strata overlap the thrust, indicating that thrusting occurred between about 52 and 60 Ma. Plate reconstructions for this time interval indicate the close proximity of the Kula-Farallon-North America triple junction and that old (ca 100 m.y.) Farallon lithosphere was being subducted north of the junction whereas to the south, very young (ca 10 m.y.) Kula plate was presumably obducted onto North America.

  18. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  19. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  20. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  1. PLEKHA7 Recruits PDZD11 to Adherens Junctions to Stabilize Nectins.

    PubMed

    Guerrera, Diego; Shah, Jimit; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Sluysmans, Sophie; Méan, Isabelle; Jond, Lionel; Poser, Ina; Mann, Matthias; Hyman, Anthony A; Citi, Sandra

    2016-05-20

    PLEKHA7 is a junctional protein implicated in stabilization of the cadherin protein complex, hypertension, cardiac contractility, glaucoma, microRNA processing, and susceptibility to bacterial toxins. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the functions of PLEKHA7, we looked for new PLEKHA7 interactors. Here, we report the identification of PDZ domain-containing protein 11 (PDZD11) as a new interactor of PLEKHA7 by yeast two-hybrid screening and by mass spectrometry analysis of PLEKHA7 immunoprecipitates. We show that PDZD11 (17 kDa) is expressed in epithelial and endothelial cells, where it forms a complex with PLEKHA7, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation analysis. The N-terminal Trp-Trp (WW) domain of PLEKHA7 interacts directly with the N-terminal 44 amino acids of PDZD11, as shown by GST-pulldown assays. Immunofluorescence analysis shows that PDZD11 is localized at adherens junctions in a PLEKHA7-dependent manner, because its junctional localization is abolished by knock-out of PLEKHA7, and is rescued by re-expression of exogenous PLEKHA7. The junctional recruitment of nectin-1 and nectin-3 and their protein levels are decreased via proteasome-mediated degradation in epithelial cells where either PDZD11 or PLEKHA7 have been knocked-out. PDZD11 forms a complex with nectin-1 and nectin-3, and its PDZ domain interacts directly with the PDZ-binding motif of nectin-1. PDZD11 is required for the efficient assembly of apical junctions of epithelial cells at early time points in the calcium-switch model. These results show that the PLEKHA7-PDZD11 complex stabilizes nectins to promote efficient early junction assembly and uncover a new molecular mechanism through which PLEKHA7 recruits PDZ-binding membrane proteins to epithelial adherens junctions. PMID:27044745

  2. Sail intelligent terminal evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruitt, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Engineering assessments, recommendations, and equipment necessary to solve the operational problems are described, and operational flexibility of the intelligent terminal facility are extended. The following capabilities were considered: (1) the operation of at least two D/D stations and one remote graphics terminal simultaneously; (2) the capability to run plotter, AIDS and FORTRAN programs simultaneously; (3) simultaneous use of system utility routines of D/D stations and remote graphics terminal; (4) the capability to provide large volume hardcopy of data and graphics; and (5) the capability to eliminate or at least ease the current operation/programming problems with related labor costs. The overall intelligent terminal development, and plans guiding the analysis and equipment acquisitions were studied, and the assessments and analyses performed are also summarized.

  3. Nearest Alignment Space Termination

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-07-13

    Near Alignment Space Termination (NAST) is the Greengenes algorithm that matches up submitted sequences with the Greengenes database to look for similarities and align the submitted sequences based on those similarities.

  4. Spin-crossover molecule based thermoelectric junction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-05-11

    Using ab-initio numerical methods, we explore the spin-dependent transport and thermoelectric properties of a spin-crossover molecule (i.e., iron complex of 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)pyridine) based nano-junction. We demonstrate a large magnetoresistance, efficient conductance-switching, and spin-filter activity in this molecule-based two-terminal device. The spin-crossover process also modulates the thermoelectric entities. It can efficiently switch the magnitude as well as spin-polarization of the thermocurrent. We find that thermocurrent is changed by ∼4 orders of magnitude upon spin-crossover. Moreover, it also substantially affects the thermopower and consequently, the device shows extremely efficient spin-crossover magnetothermopower generation. Furthermore, by tuning the chemical potential of electrodes into a certain range, a pure spin-thermopower can be achieved for the high-spin state. Finally, the reasonably large values of figure-of-merit in the presence and absence of phonon demonstrate a large heat-to-voltage conversion efficiency of the device. We believe that our study will pave an alternative way of tuning the transport and thermoelectric properties through the spin-crossover process and can have potential applications in generation of spin-dependent current, information storage, and processing.

  5. Probing the rupture of a Ag atomic junction in a Ag-Au mixed electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We probed that the atomic junction in Ag part ruptures during stretching of atomic sized contacts of Ag-Au mixed electrodes, resulting in Ag-Ag electrodes through a scanning tunneling microscope breaking junction (STM-BJ) technique. We observed that the conductance and tunneling decay constant for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions are essentially the same for the Ag-Au mixed and the Ag-Ag electrodes. We also found the molecular plateau length and the evolution patterns with the Ag-Au mixed electrodes are similar to those with Ag-Ag electrodes rather than the Au-Au electrodes in the molecular junction elongation. This result is attributed to the smaller binding energy of Ag atoms compared to that of Au atoms, so the Ag junction part is more easily broken than that of Au part in stretching of Ag-Au mixed electrodes. Furthermore, we successfully observed that the rupture force of the atomic junction for the Ag-Au mixed electrodes was identical to that for the Ag-Ag electrodes and smaller than that for the Au-Au electrodes. This study may advance the understanding of the electrical and the mechanical properties in molecular devices with Ag and Au electrodes in future.

  6. Recent Progress and Spectral Robustness Study for Mechanically Stacked Multi-junction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lu; Flamand, Giovanni; Poortmans, Jef

    2010-10-01

    Multi-terminal mechanically stacked multi-junction solar cells are an attractive candidate for terrestrial concentrator photovoltaics applications. Unlike monolithically integrated multi-junction solar cells which require current matching, all the available photon currents can be fully extracted from each junction of a mechanically stacked solar cell. Therefore, it has a high performance potential, and more importantly is less sensitive to spectrum variations. Lower losses due to current mismatch translate into a higher annual energy output for the mechanical stack. This paper presents the baseline processing developed at imec for the mechanical stacking process, and the most recent cell results by means of this technology. A GaAs-Ge dual-junction mechanically stacked multi-junction solar cell is demonstrated, with 24.7% plus 2.52% under AM1.5g, and 27.7% plus 4.42% under 30Suns concentration. In addition, spectral sensitivity is studied for both monolithically stacked and mechanically stacked solar cells, to learn the influence of spectrum variations on multi-junction solar cell performance. SMARTS model is used to predict the spectral irradiances, with solar radiation and meteorological elements from typical meteorological year 3 (TMY3) data set. The generated spectra are then fed into TCAD numerical simulation tool, to simulate the device performance. The simulation results show a reduced spectral sensitivity for mechanically stacked cell, and there is a 6% relative gain in annual energy production for the site studied (Las Vegas), compared with the monolithic stack.

  7. Kinase programs spatiotemporally regulate gap junction assembly and disassembly: Effects on wound repair.

    PubMed

    Solan, Joell L; Lampe, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    Gap junctions are highly ordered plasma membrane domains that are constantly assembled, remodeled and turned over due to the short half-life of connexins, the integral membrane proteins that form gap junctions. Connexin 43 (Cx43), by far the most widely expressed connexin, is phosphorylated at multiple serine residues in the cytoplasmic, C-terminal region allowing for exquisite cellular control over gap junctional communication. This is evident during epidermal wounding where spatiotemporal changes in connexin expression occur as cells are instructed whether to die, proliferate or migrate to promote repair. Early gap junctional communication is required for initiation of keratinocyte migration, but accelerated Cx43 turnover is also critical for proper wound healing at later stages. These events are controlled via a "kinase program" where sequential phosphorylation of Cx43 leads to reductions in Cx43's half-life and significant depletion of gap junctions from the plasma membrane within several hours. The complex regulation of gap junction assembly and turnover affords several steps where intervention might speed wound healing. PMID:26706150

  8. From Terminal to Terminal with Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esslinger, Tilman

    2014-05-01

    We study fundamental concepts of particle and heat transport in a model system using ultracold atoms. It consists of a channel connecting two macroscopic reservoirs of fermionic lithium atoms. The channel can be switched from ballistic to diffusive, and it can be structured to form a quantum point contact or a quantum wire. Measurements of the thermoelectric effect and particle transport in the quantum regime will be presented. Our measurements find an ideal description in the Landauer-Buttiker formalism, which views conduction as the transport of carriers from one terminal to another.

  9. Conductance and Geometry of Pyridine-Linked Single Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenetska, M.; Hybertsen, M.; Quek, S.Y.; Whalley, A.C.; Steigerwald, M.L.; Choi, H.J.; Louie, S.G.; Nuckolls, C.; Neaton, J.B.; Venkataraman, L.

    2010-05-19

    We have measured the conductance and characterized molecule-electrode binding geometries of four pyridine-terminated molecules by elongating and then compressing gold point contacts in a solution of molecules. We have found that all pyridine-terminated molecules exhibit bistable conductance signatures, signifying that the nature of the pyridine-gold bond allows two distinct conductance states that are accessed as the gold-molecule-gold junction is elongated. We have identified the low-conductance state as corresponding to a molecule fully stretched out between the gold electrodes, where the distance between contacts correlates with the length of the molecule; the high-conductance state is due to a molecule bound at an angle. For all molecules, we have found that the distribution of junction elongations in the low-conductance state is the same, while in the high-conductance state, the most likely elongation length increases linearly with molecule length. The results of first-principles conductance calculations for the four molecules in the low-conductance geometry agree well with the experimental results and show that the dominant conducting channel in the conjugated pyridine-linked molecules is through the {pi}* orbital.

  10. Analysis of the Intrinsically Disordered N-Terminus of the DNA Junction-Resolving Enzyme T7 Endonuclease I: Identification of Structure Formed upon DNA Binding.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Alasdair D J; Stevens, Michael; Declais, Anne-Cecile; Leahy, Adam; Mackay, Katherine; El Mkami, Hassane; Lilley, David M J; Norman, David G

    2016-08-01

    The four-way (Holliday) DNA junction of homologous recombination is processed by the symmetrical cleavage of two strands by a nuclease. These junction-resolving enzymes bind to four-way junctions in dimeric form, distorting the structure of the junction in the process. Crystal structures of T7 endonuclease I have been determined as free protein, and the complex with a DNA junction. In neither crystal structure was the N-terminal 16-amino acid peptide visible, yet deletion of this peptide has a marked effect on the resolution process. Here we have investigated the N-terminal peptide by inclusion of spin-label probes at unique sites within this region, studied by electron paramagnetic resonance. Continuous wave experiments show that these labels are mobile in the free protein but become constrained on binding a DNA junction, with the main interaction occurring for residues 7-10 and 12. Distance measurements between equivalent positions within the two peptides of a dimer using PELDOR showed that the intermonomeric distances for residues 2-12 are long and broadly distributed in the free protein but are significantly shortened and become more defined on binding to DNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal peptides become more organized on binding to the DNA junction and nestle into the minor grooves at the branchpoint, consistent with the biochemical data indicating an important role in the resolution process. This study demonstrates the presence of structure within a protein region that cannot be viewed by crystallography. PMID:27387136

  11. Analysis of the Intrinsically Disordered N-Terminus of the DNA Junction-Resolving Enzyme T7 Endonuclease I: Identification of Structure Formed upon DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The four-way (Holliday) DNA junction of homologous recombination is processed by the symmetrical cleavage of two strands by a nuclease. These junction-resolving enzymes bind to four-way junctions in dimeric form, distorting the structure of the junction in the process. Crystal structures of T7 endonuclease I have been determined as free protein, and the complex with a DNA junction. In neither crystal structure was the N-terminal 16-amino acid peptide visible, yet deletion of this peptide has a marked effect on the resolution process. Here we have investigated the N-terminal peptide by inclusion of spin-label probes at unique sites within this region, studied by electron paramagnetic resonance. Continuous wave experiments show that these labels are mobile in the free protein but become constrained on binding a DNA junction, with the main interaction occurring for residues 7–10 and 12. Distance measurements between equivalent positions within the two peptides of a dimer using PELDOR showed that the intermonomeric distances for residues 2–12 are long and broadly distributed in the free protein but are significantly shortened and become more defined on binding to DNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal peptides become more organized on binding to the DNA junction and nestle into the minor grooves at the branchpoint, consistent with the biochemical data indicating an important role in the resolution process. This study demonstrates the presence of structure within a protein region that cannot be viewed by crystallography. PMID:27387136

  12. Strength and precision of neurotransmission at mammalian presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Classically, the basic concept of chemical synaptic transmission was established at the frog neuromuscular junction, and direct intracellular recordings from presynaptic terminals at the squid giant presynaptic terminal have further clarified principles of neurotransmitter release. More recently, whole-cell patch-camp recordings from the calyx of Held in rodent brainstem slices have extended the classical concept to mammalian synapses providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying strength and precision of neurotransmission and developmental changes therein. This review summarizes findings from our laboratory and others on these subjects, mainly at the calyx of Held, with a particular focus on precise, high-fidelity, fast neurotransmission. The mechanisms by which presynaptic terminals acquire strong, precise neurotransmission during postnatal development are also discussed. PMID:26194855

  13. TOP VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN, AND ORE CHUTE,LOOKING SOUTHWEST. TRAM MACHINERY AND GEARS ARE AT LOWER CENTER. A SMALL ELECTRIC MOTOR AT THE REAR LEFT OF THE TERMINAL PROBABLY WAS ADDED AFTER THE ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION. THE MOVING CABLE OF THE TRAM WAS DRIVEN BY THESE GEARS AND THE LARGE WHEEL UNDERNEATH (SEE CA-291-31 FOR DETAIL). EMPTY TRAM BUCKETS CAME IN FROM THE LEFT, SWINGING AROUND TO THE CHUTES FROM THE ORE BIN TO BE LOADED FOR THE TRIP DOWN TO THE MILL (SEE CA-291-35 FOR DETAIL). THE BREAK OVER TOWER CAN BE SEEN IN THE DISTANCE AT TOP LEFT. THE SUPPORT TOWER BETWEEN THE UPPER TERMINAL AND THE BREAK OVER TOWER IS COLLAPSED. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. The effects of exercise training of different intensities on neuromuscular junction morphology.

    PubMed

    Deschenes, M R; Maresh, C M; Crivello, J F; Armstrong, L E; Kraemer, W J; Covault, J

    1993-08-01

    Little is known about the effects of exercise training on neuromuscular junction morphology in skeletal muscle. The objectives of this investigation were: 1) to determine if exercise training would elicit changes in neuromuscular junction morphology, 2) to determine if exercise training of different intensities would evoke specific changes in neuromuscular junction morphology, and 3) to determine whether changes in neuromuscular junction structure occur independently of changes in muscle fibre type and size. Twenty-four age and size matched male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: high-intensity trained (HIT), low-intensity trained (LIT), or untrained. Neuromuscular junction morphology of the soleus muscle was determined via immunofluorescent staining. Presynaptic acetylcholine vesicles were visualized with SV-2 antibody in conjunction with fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled secondary secondary antibody. Postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors were identified with rhodamine labelled alpha-bungarotoxin. Laser scanning microscopy was used to produce images of synapses, which were used to quantitate the following: total area of SV-2 and alpha-bungarotoxin staining, density of acetylcholine vesicles and receptors, structural complexity, and synaptic coupling. To visualize nerve terminal branching, a smaller number of neuromuscular junctions were stained with C-2 antibody, which reacts with a neurofilament epitope, in conjunction with fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled secondary antibody. Total length of branching, number of branches, average length of branches, and ratio of secondary to primary branches per neuromuscular junction were determined. Citrate synthase activity, fibre type composition and fibre cross-sectional areas of the soleus muscle were assessed to determine the presence of a training effect in that muscle. Results indicate that training did induce hypertrophy of the neuromuscular junction that was independent of muscle

  15. Documents from malicious terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Istvan Z.; Vajda, Istvan

    2003-04-01

    The user wishes to communicate with a remote partner over an insecure network. Since the user is a human being, a terminal is needed for communication. Cryptographic algorithms running on the terminal may provide authenticity for the user's messages. In this paper the problem of sending authentic messages from insecure or untrusted terminals is analyzed. In this case attackers are able to gain total control over the terminal, so the user must consider the terminal a potential attacker. Smart cards are often considered the ultimate tool for secure messaging from untrusted terminals. However, their lack of user interface enables man-in-the middle attack from the terminal. The authors assume, that user is a human being with limited memory and computational power, and also makes mistakes in his calculations. They demnostrate, that only exceptional useres are able to authenticate messages without a trusted device. Several biometric media encapsulate the content of the message and the identity of the sender, such as speech, video and handwriting. The authors suggest, that such media is far more difficult to counterfeit than plaintext. Thus, the user must rely on his other resources, like biometric ones. In the protocol proposed by the authors, the user sends messages in a biometric format, strengthened by simple algorithmic authenticators. The smart card functions as a secure time gate ensuring, that the attacker has extremely little time to counterfeit both the biometric and the algorithmic protection on the message. The authors claim, that with the proper calibration of the biometric method and the time gate of the smart card, their protocol is strong enough for practical use.

  16. TRANSPORTATION TERMINAL - DYNAMAP V.12.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    GDT Transportation Terminals represents locations within United States for transportation terminals such as bus terminals, train stations, marine terminals, and other significant transportation nodes.

  17. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β. PMID:25871745

  18. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  19. 29 CFR 4043.24 - Termination or partial termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Termination or partial termination. 4043.24 Section 4043.24 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.24 Termination or partial...

  20. Na+ current in presynaptic terminals of the crayfish opener cannot initiate action potentials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Action potential (AP) propagation in presynaptic axons of the crayfish opener neuromuscular junction (NMJ) was investigated by simultaneously recording from a terminal varicosity and a proximal branch. Although orthodromically conducting APs could be recorded in terminals with amplitudes up to 70 mV, depolarizing steps in terminals to -20 mV or higher failed to fire APs. Patch-clamp recordings did detect Na(+) current (INa) in most terminals. The INa exhibited a high threshold and fast activation rate. Local perfusion of Na(+)-free saline showed that terminal INa contributed to AP waveform by slightly accelerating the rising phase and increasing the peak amplitude. These findings suggest that terminal INa functions to "touch up" but not to generate APs. PMID:26561611

  1. EAST ELEVATION OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN,AND TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN,AND TRAM TRESTLE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. WINCHING ENGINE AND ITS FOUNDATION IS AT TOP CENTER. SEE CA-291-50 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, PRIMARY ORE BIN,OVERBURDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, PRIMARY ORE BIN,OVERBURDEN PILE, AND DEBRIS SCATTER,LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. THE MAIN ACCESS TRAIL BETWEEN THE LOWER MILL AREA GOES ACROSS THE CENTER LEFT TO RIGHT. WINCHING ENGINE AND FOUNDATION IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER (SEE CA-291-37). - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, PRIMARY ORE BIN,OVERBURDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, PRIMARY ORE BIN,OVERBURDEN PILE, AND DEBRIS SCATTER,LOOKING EAST. THE MAIN ACCESS TRAIL BETWEEN THE LOWER MILL AREA IS IN THE FOREGROUND. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. Ureteropelvic junction disease: diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Giulia; Maggi, Fabio; Valentini, Viola

    2002-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction disease is very frequent in pediatric age. Diagnosis is usually established on sonography; in most cases it is prenatal and confirmed at birth. On sonography, hydronephrosis and the site of obstruction is identified with morphofunctional information on renal parenchyma. In the past, urography was the reference examination for ureteropelvic junction disease, but its use is limited in pediatrics especially in prenatal study for radioprotection as well as for the limited glomerular filtration of neonatal kidney. CT and MRI as second level examinations do not find many indications, while angioscintigraphy is largely used to acquire functional data and, in combination with sonography, is basic for diagnosis as well as in follow-up of operated patients. PMID:12696256

  5. Gap junctions as electrical synapses.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M V

    1997-06-01

    Gap junctions are the morphological substrate of one class of electrical synapse. The history of the debate on electrical vs. chemical transmission is instructive. One lesson is that Occam's razor sometimes cuts too deep; the nervous system does its operations in a number of different ways and a unitarian approach can lead one astray. Electrical synapses can do many things that chemical synapses can do, and do them just as slowly. More intriguing are the modulatory actions that chemical synapses can have on electrical synapses. Voltage dependence provides an important window on structure function relations of the connexins, even where the dependence may have no physiological role. The new molecular approaches will greatly advance our knowledge of where gap junctions occur and permit experimental manipulation with high specificity. PMID:9278865

  6. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements.

  7. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. PMID:27073108

  8. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  9. The last glacial termination.

    PubMed

    Denton, G H; Anderson, R F; Toggweiler, J R; Edwards, R L; Schaefer, J M; Putnam, A E

    2010-06-25

    A major puzzle of paleoclimatology is why, after a long interval of cooling climate, each late Quaternary ice age ended with a relatively short warming leg called a termination. We here offer a comprehensive hypothesis of how Earth emerged from the last global ice age. A prerequisite was the growth of very large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, whose subsequent collapse created stadial conditions that disrupted global patterns of ocean and atmospheric circulation. The Southern Hemisphere westerlies shifted poleward during each northern stadial, producing pulses of ocean upwelling and warming that together accounted for much of the termination in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica. Rising atmospheric CO2 during southern upwelling pulses augmented warming during the last termination in both polar hemispheres. PMID:20576882

  10. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  11. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron–vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  12. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions. PMID:27420149

  13. ALSEP termination report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. R.; Lauderdale, W. W.; Kernaghan, H.

    1979-01-01

    The Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) final report was prepared when support operations were terminated September 30, 1977, and NASA discontinued the receiving and processing of scientific data transmitted from equipment deployed on the lunar surface. The ALSEP experiments (Apollo 11 to Apollo 17) are described and pertinent operational history is given for each experiment. The ALSEP data processing and distribution are described together with an extensive discussion on archiving. Engineering closeout tests and results are given, and the status and configuration of the experiments at termination are documented. Significant science findings are summarized by selected investigators. Significant operational data and recommendations are also included.

  14. Electrical termination techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakey, W. E.; Schleicher, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A technical review of high reliability electrical terminations for electronic equipment was made. Seven techniques were selected from this review for further investigation, experimental work, and preliminary testing. From the preliminary test results, four techniques were selected for final testing and evaluation. These four were: (1) induction soldering, (2) wire wrap, (3) percussive arc welding, and (4) resistance welding. Of these four, induction soldering was selected as the best technique in terms of minimizing operator errors, controlling temperature and time, minimizing joint contamination, and ultimately producing a reliable, uniform, and reusable electrical termination.

  15. Power terminal protection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yung K.

    1994-07-01

    Metal oxide varistors are connected in parallel with grounded capacitors to load outlet terminals coupled to a power source through inductor coils forming a low pass filter with the capacitors to delay propagation of a voltage increasing transient pulse to the power source until ground shunting paths of low resistance are developed in the varistors. Electromagnetic shielding partitions the inductor from the capacitors and varistors within a power outlet box mounting the load outlet terminals to prevent interference with absorption of transient energy by the varistors during the delay in establishing the ground shunting paths.

  16. Calcium-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-c-Src Signaling Cascade Mediates Disruption of Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junctions by Dextran Sulfate Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with the symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of Ask1 or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased Tyr-phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced Tyr-phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto phosphorylation of c-Src. This study demonstrates that Ca2+-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-cSrc signaling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. PMID:25377781

  17. Charge transport through dicarboxylic-acid-terminated alkanes bound to graphene-gold nanogap electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longlong; Zhang, Qian; Tao, Shuhui; Zhao, Cezhou; Almutib, Eman; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Bailey, Steven W D; Grace, Iain; Lambert, Colin J; Du, Jun; Yang, Li

    2016-08-14

    Graphene-based electrodes are attractive for single-molecule electronics due to their high stability and conductivity and reduced screening compared with metals. In this paper, we use the STM-based matrix isolation I(s) method to measure the performance of graphene in single-molecule junctions with one graphene electrode and one gold electrode. By measuring the length dependence of the electrical conductance of dicarboxylic-acid-terminated alkanes, we find that the transport is consistent with phase-coherent tunneling, but with an attenuation factor of βN = 0.69 per methyl unit, which is lower than the value measured for Au-molecule-Au junctions. Comparison with density-functional-theory calculations of electron transport through graphene-molecule-Au junctions and Au-molecule-Au junctions reveals that this difference is due to the difference in Fermi energies of the two types of junction, relative to the frontier orbitals of the molecules. For most molecules, their electrical conductance in graphene-molecule-Au junctions is higher than that in Au-molecule-Au junctions, which suggests that graphene offers superior electrode performance, when utilizing carboxylic acid anchor groups. PMID:27412865

  18. The Versatile Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, C. D.

    This paper describes the experiences of the industrial research laboratory of Kodak Ltd. in finding and providing a computer terminal most suited to its very varied requirements. These requirements include bibliographic and scientific data searching and access to a number of worldwide computing services for scientific computing work. The provision…

  19. Prematurely terminated slug tests

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K. )

    1990-07-01

    A solution of the well response to a prematurely terminated slug test (PTST) is presented. The advantages of a PTST over conventional slug tests are discussed. A systematized procedure of a PTST is proposed, where a slug test is terminated in the midpoint of the flow point, and the subsequent shut-in data is recorded and analyzed. This method requires a downhole shut-in device and a pressure transducer, which is no more than the conventional deep-well slug testing. As opposed to slug tests, which are ineffective when a skin is present, more accurate estimate of formation permeability can be made using a PTST. Premature termination also shortens the test duration considerably. Because in most cases no more information is gained by completing a slug test to the end, the author recommends that conventional slug tests be replaced by the premature termination technique. This study is part of an investigation of the feasibility of geologic isolation of nuclear wastes being carried out by the US Department of Energy and the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland.

  20. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  1. Settings for Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corless, Inge B.

    1988-01-01

    Examines topics related to delivery of terminal care services: ability of various hospice programs to survive financially, contributions of various models of hospice care, impact of Medicare legislation on hospice movement, demonstration of unique hospice intervention, integration of spiritual care into hospice, and role of hospice in care of…

  2. Terminal C, Gate 23.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Christian D

    2016-03-01

    This poem focuses on 19-year-old Anthony. At an airport terminal, his head is slumped and he reeks of alcohol. Anthony is unresponsive and has a pulse of 58. The author calls the paramedics and Anthony pulls through. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26963784

  3. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  4. Snake and Spider Toxins Induce a Rapid Recovery of Function of Botulinum Neurotoxin Paralysed Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Duregotti, Elisa; Zanetti, Giulia; Scorzeto, Michele; Megighian, Aram; Montecucco, Cesare; Pirazzini, Marco; Rigoni, Michela

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and some animal neurotoxins (β-Bungarotoxin, β-Btx, from elapid snakes and α-Latrotoxin, α-Ltx, from black widow spiders) are pre-synaptic neurotoxins that paralyse motor axon terminals with similar clinical outcomes in patients. However, their mechanism of action is different, leading to a largely-different duration of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) blockade. BoNTs induce a long-lasting paralysis without nerve terminal degeneration acting via proteolytic cleavage of SNARE proteins, whereas animal neurotoxins cause an acute and complete degeneration of motor axon terminals, followed by a rapid recovery. In this study, the injection of animal neurotoxins in mice muscles previously paralyzed by BoNT/A or /B accelerates the recovery of neurotransmission, as assessed by electrophysiology and morphological analysis. This result provides a proof of principle that, by causing the complete degeneration, reabsorption, and regeneration of a paralysed nerve terminal, one could favour the recovery of function of a biochemically- or genetically-altered motor axon terminal. These observations might be relevant to dying-back neuropathies, where pathological changes first occur at the neuromuscular junction and then progress proximally toward the cell body. PMID:26670253

  5. A synaptic vesicle antigen is restricted to the junctional region of the presynaptic plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, K M; Schweitzer, E S; Miljanich, G P; Clift-O'Grady, L; Kushner, P D; Reichardt, L F; Kelly, R B

    1983-01-01

    The plasma membrane of electric organ nerve terminals has two domains that can be distinguished by monoclonal antibodies. A library of 111 mouse monoclonal antibodies raised to nerve terminals from Torpedo californica contains 4 antibodies that bind specifically to the outside of intact synaptosomes. The distribution of the binding sites of these monoclonal antibodies on the outside of intact nerve terminals was examined by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. The binding sites of 3 (tor23, 25, and 132) are distributed uniformly over nerve trunks and fine terminal branches. The binding site of the fourth (tor70) is restricted to synaptic junctional regions. This antibody, but not the other 3, recognizes a major component of synaptic vesicles, a proteoglycan associated with the inner surface of the vesicle membrane. The difference in the pattern of binding of these monoclonal antibodies suggests that the region of the plasma membrane containing active zones is antigenically distinguishable from other nerve terminal plasma membrane. We suggest that the antigen recognized by tor70 is externalized by exocytosis of synaptic vesicles while other plasma antigens take a different route to the surface. The unexpected observation that the vesicle antigen remains on the surface after exocytosis and is prevented from diffusion from the synaptic junctional region would be consistent with an interaction between the vesicle proteoglycan and elements of the synaptic cleft. Images PMID:6359167

  6. NPOESS Field Terminal Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckmann, G.; Route, G.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products (aka, Environmental Data Records or EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process EDRs beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. IDPS also provides the software and requirements for the Field Terminal Segment (FTS). NPOESS provides support to deployed field terminals by providing mission data in the Low Rate and High Rate downlinks (LRD/HRD), mission support data needed to generate EDRs and decryption keys needed to decrypt mission data during Selective data Encryption (SDE). Mission support data consists of globally relevant data, geographically constrained data, and two line element sets. NPOESS provides these mission support data via the Internet accessible Mission Support Data Server and HRD/LRD downlinks. This presentation will illustrate and describe the NPOESS capabilities in support of Field Terminal users. This discussion will include the mission support data available to Field Terminal users, content of the direct broadcast HRD and LRD

  7. A superconducting-nanowire three-terminal electrothermal device.

    PubMed

    McCaughan, Adam N; Berggren, Karl K

    2014-10-01

    Superconducting electronics based on Josephson junctions are used to sense and process electronic signals with minimal loss; however, they are ultrasensitive to magnetic fields, limited in their amplification capabilities, and difficult to manufacture. We have developed a 3-terminal, nanowire-based superconducting electrothermal device which has no Josephson junctions. This device, which we call the nanocryotron, can be patterned from a single thin film of superconducting material with conventional electron-beam lithography. The nanocryotron has a demonstrated gain of >20, can drive impedances of 100 kΩ, and operates in typical ambient magnetic fields. We have additionally applied it both as a digital logic element in a half-adder circuit, and as a digital amplifier for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors pulses. The nanocryotron has immediate applications in classical and quantum communications, photon sensing, and astronomy, and its input characteristics are suitable for integration with existing superconducting technologies. PMID:25233488

  8. String junction as a baryonic constituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    1996-02-01

    We extend the model for QCD string with quarks to consider the Mercedes Benz string configuration describing the three-quark baryon. Under the assumption of adiabatic separation of quark and string junction motion we formulate and solve the classical equation of motion for the junction. We dare to quantize the motion of the junction, and discuss the impact of these modes on the baryon spectra.

  9. String junctions and holographic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chiodaroli, Marco; Gutperle, Michael; Hung, Ling-Yan; Krym, Darya

    2011-01-15

    In this paper we study half-BPS type IIB supergravity solutions with multiple AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xM{sub 4} asymptotic regions, where M{sub 4} is either T{sup 4} or K{sub 3}. These solutions were first constructed in [M. Chiodaroli, M. Gutperle, and D. Krym, J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2010) 066.] and have geometries given by the warped product of AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 2}xM{sub 4} over {Sigma}, where {Sigma} is a Riemann surface. We show that the holographic boundary has the structure of a star graph, i.e. n half-lines joined at a point. The attractor mechanism and the relation of the solutions to junctions of self-dual strings in six-dimensional supergravity are discussed. The solutions of [M. Chiodaroli, M. Gutperle, and D. Krym, J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2010) 066.] are constructed introducing two meromorphic and two harmonic functions defined on {Sigma}. We focus our analysis on solutions corresponding to junctions of three different conformal field theories and show that the conditions for having a solution charged only under Ramond-Ramond three-form fields reduce to relations involving the positions of the poles and the residues of the relevant harmonic and meromorphic functions. The degeneration limit in which some of the poles collide is analyzed in detail. Finally, we calculate the holographic boundary entropy for a junction of three CFTs and obtain a simple expression in terms of poles and residues.

  10. Graphics Software For VT Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Caroline

    1991-01-01

    VTGRAPH graphics software tool for DEC/VT computer terminal or terminals compatible with it, widely used by government and industry. Callable in FORTRAN or C language, library program enabling user to cope with many computer environments in which VT terminals used for window management and graphic systems. Provides PLOT10-like package plus color or shade capability for VT240, VT241, and VT300 terminals. User can easily design more-friendly user-interface programs and design PLOT10 programs on VT terminals with different computer systems. Requires ReGis graphics set terminal and FORTRAN compiler.

  11. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions. PMID:19072125

  12. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  13. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  14. Ice age terminations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S; Denton, George H; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-01

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2. PMID:19815769

  15. Ice Age Terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-01

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2.

  16. Shipboard fisheries management terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, R. G.; Sager, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    The needs of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMGS), National Weather Service, and the U.S. Coast Guard for locational, biological, and environmental data were assessed. The fisheries conservation zones and the yellowfin tuna jurisdiction of the NMFS operates observer programs on foreign and domestic fishing vessels. Data input terminal and data transfer and processing technology are reviewed to establish available capability. A matrix of implementation options is generated to identify the benefits of each option, and preliminary cost estimates are made. Recommendations are made for incremental application of available off the shelf hardware to obtain improved performance and benefits within a well bounded cost. Terminal recommendations are made for three interdependent shipboard units emphasizing: (1) the determination of location and fishing activity; (2) hand held data inputting and formatting in the fishing work areas; and (3) data manipulation, merging, and editing.

  17. Dusty Termination Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.H.

    2004-09-15

    In astrophysical settings, termination shocks where strong stellar wind outflows interact with the surrounding environments tend to take place in dusty regions. Just to name a few, star formation regions, planetary nebulae, supernova remnants and active galactic nuclei are all good examples. Dynamics and evolution of the associated dust clouds could have important influences on the acceleration and composition of energetic particles resulting from the diffusive shock acceleration at the termination shocks. In this note we provide a brief review of previous work predating the recent detection of ACR Mg, Na, Si and S ions which might have originated from the Kuiper belt dust. Their compositional abundance might be diagnostic of the collisional history of the Kupier belt objects.

  18. Mobile Phone Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, an employee of a real estate firm is contacting his office by means of HICOM, an advanced central terminal for mobile telephones. Developed by the Orlando Division of Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Florida, and manufactured by Harris Corporation's RF Division, Rochester, N.Y., HICOM upgrades service to users, provides better system management to telephone companies, and makes more efficient use of available mobile telephone channels through a computerized central control terminal. The real estate man, for example, was able to dial his office and he could also have direct-dialed a long distance number. Mobile phones in most areas not yet served by HICOM require an operator's assistance for both local and long distance calls. HICOM improves system management by automatically recording information on all calls for accurate billing, running continual performance checks on its own operation, and reporting any malfunctions to a central office.

  19. Remote terminal system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. L.; Grams, H. L.; Lindenlaub, J. C.; Schwingendorf, S. K.; Swain, P. H.; Simmons, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    An Earth Resources Data Processing System was developed to evaluate the system for training, technology transfer, and data processing. In addition to the five sites included in this project two other sites were connected to the system under separate agreements. The experience of these two sites is discussed. The results of the remote terminal project are documented in seven reports: one from each of the five project sites, Purdue University, and an overview report summarizing the other six reports.

  20. Development of the sigma-1 receptor in C-terminals of motoneurons and colocalization with the N,N'-dimethyltryptamine forming enzyme, indole-N-methyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Mavlyutov, T A; Epstein, M L; Liu, P; Verbny, Y I; Ziskind-Conhaim, L; Ruoho, A E

    2012-03-29

    The function of the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) has been linked to modulating the activities of ion channels and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). In the CNS, the S1R is expressed ubiquitously but is enriched in mouse motoneurons (MN), where it is localized to subsurface cisternae of cholinergic postsynaptic densities, also known as C-terminals. We found that S1R is enriched in mouse spinal MN at late stages of embryonic development when it is first visualized in the endoplasmic reticulum. S1Rs appear to concentrate at C-terminals of mouse MN only on the second week of postnatal development. We found that indole-N-methyl transferase (INMT), an enzyme that converts tryptamine into the sigma-1 ligand dimethyltryptamine (DMT), is also localized to postsynaptic sites of C-terminals in close proximity to the S1R. This close association of INMT and S1Rs suggest that DMT is synthesized locally to effectively activate S1R in MN. PMID:22265729

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SIGMA-1 RECEPTOR IN C-TERMINALS OF MOTONEURONS AND COLOCALIZATION WITH THE N,N’-DIMETHYLTRYPTAMINE FORMING ENZYME, INDOLE-N-METHYL TRANSFERASE

    PubMed Central

    Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Epstein, Miles L.; Liu, Patricia; Verbny, Yakov I.; Ziskind-Conhaim, Lea; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2012-01-01

    The function of the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) has been linked to modulating the activities of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). In the CNS the S1R is expressed ubiquitously but is enriched in mouse motoneurons (MN), where it is localized to subsurface cisternae of cholinergic postsynaptic densities, also known as C-terminals. We found that S1R is enriched in mouse spinal MN at late stages of embryonic development when it is first visualized in the endoplasmic reticulum. S1Rs appear to concentrate at C-terminals of mouse MN only on the second week of postnatal development. We found that Indole-N-methyl transferase (INMT), an enzyme that converts tryptamine into the sigma-1 ligand dimethyltryptamine (DMT), is also localized to postsynaptic sites of C-terminals in close proximity to the S1R. This close association of INMT and SIRs suggest that DMT is synthesized locally to effectively activate S1R in MN. PMID:22265729

  2. The Sinai triple junction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, Vincent; Armijo, Rolando; Tapponnier, Paul

    1987-09-01

    This paper is a summary of a more detailed analysis of the kinematics of the Sinai triple junction (Courtillot et al., 1987). Accurate kinematic data are lacking along the Red Sea and they can be supplemented by bathymetric, topographic and geological data pertaining to the three arms of the entirely continental Sinai triple junction. Motions across the northern Red Sea and along the Gulf of Elat are an order of magnitude larger than across the Gulf of Suez. The direction of motion there remains a major uncertainty. A possible kinematic model is highlighted, in which right-lateral strike-slip motion and small pull-apart basins occur along the Gulf of Suez, in agreement with recent field observations in Egypt. Early Miocene is marked by major geodynamical changes all along the northern boundaries of the African and Indian plates. We suggest that rifting in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and Gulf of Suez was initiated at the end of the first phase of continental extrusion of Indochina, when the Tibetan plateau began to rise and spreading in the South China Sea came to a halt.

  3. Electron transport through molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2011-12-01

    At present, metal-molecular tunnel junctions are recognized as important active elements in molecular electronics. This gives a strong motivation to explore physical mechanisms controlling electron transport through molecules. In the last two decades, an unceasing progress in both experimental and theoretical studies of molecular conductance has been demonstrated. In the present work we give an overview of theoretical methods used to analyze the transport properties of metal-molecular junctions as well as some relevant experiments and applications. After a brief general description of the electron transport through molecules we introduce a Hamiltonian which can be used to analyze electron-electron, electron-phonon and spin-orbit interactions. Then we turn to description of the commonly used transport theory formalisms including the nonequilibrium Green’s functions based approach and the approach based on the “master” equations. We discuss the most important effects which could be manifested through molecules in electron transport phenomena such as Coulomb, spin and Frank-Condon blockades, Kondo peak in the molecular conductance, negative differential resistance and some others. Bearing in mind that first principles electronic structure calculations are recognized as the indispensable basis of the theory of electron transport through molecules, we briefly discuss the main equations and some relevant applications of the density functional theory which presently is often used to analyze important characteristics of molecules and molecular clusters. Finally, we discuss some kinds of nanoelectronic devices built using molecules and similar systems such as carbon nanotubes, various nanowires and quantum dots.

  4. Magnetoresistance in Boron Carbide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Ellen; Sokolov, A.; Baruth, A.; Robertson, B. W.; Adenwalla, S.

    2007-03-01

    The properties of thin insulator layers are crucial to the performance of magnetic tunnel junctions. Commercial requirements are a device with a high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) with low cost and high stability. At present the vast majority of barriers are made from amorphous Al2O3 and crystalline MgO. The TMR value depends not only on the spin-dependent electronic structure of the electrodes, but on the metal-insulator interface. Oxide-type barriers may suffer from local vacancies and other type of defects, resulting in oxygen diffusion, making the TMR value unstable with time. We present TMR results obtained on a non-oxide barrier, boron carbide (B10C2) for applications in magnetic tunnel junctions. This low Z inorganic material can be grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) without pinholes in the ultra thin film regime. PECVD grown boron carbide is an excellent dielectric with resistivities in the range of 10^7 ohm-cm, with a band gap that can be adjusted from 0.7 eV to 1.9 eV by altering the boron to carbon ratio and to band gap values well above 2.7 eV by adding phosphorus. This creates a unique opportunity for experimental study of a broad spectrum of phenomena, related to the dielectric properties of the barrier.

  5. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD THE REAR OF THE STRUCTURE. THE WHEELS AT THE TOP OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE OFF THE STATIONARY CABLES ONTO THE TRACK SUPPORTED BY THE "C" IRONS SUSPENDED FROM THE TOP TIMBERS, CLEARLY SEEN AT THE TOP OF THE FRAME. THE ANCHOR POINTS FOR THE TWO STATIONARY CABLES ARE AT BOTTOM CENTER, JUST BELOW THE CABLE WHEEL. THE MAIN CABLE WHEEL IS IN THE DISTANCE AT CENTER LEFT. THE ORE CHUTES COMING FROM THE ORE BIN ARE AT LEFT CENTER EDGE. TRAM BUCKETS WERE CHARGED HERE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  6. Eternal inflation with arrival terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltenberg, Henry; Albrecht, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the cosmological role of terminal vacua in the string theory landscape, and point out that existing work on this topic makes very strong assumptions about the properties of the terminal vacua. We explore the implications of relaxing these assumptions (by including "arrival" as well as "departure" terminals) and demonstrate that the results in earlier work are highly sensitive to their assumption of no arrival terminals. We use our discussion to make some general points about tuning and initial conditions in cosmology.

  7. Solar Cells With Multiple Small Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Concept for improving efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells based on decreasing p/n junction area in relation to total surface area of cell. Because of reduced junction area, surface leakage drops and saturation current density decreases. Surface passivation helps to ensure short-circuit current remains at high value and response of cells to blue light increases.

  8. The tight junction: a multifunctional complex.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Eveline E; Lynch, Robert D

    2004-06-01

    Multicellular organisms are separated from the external environment by a layer of epithelial cells whose integrity is maintained by intercellular junctional complexes composed of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, whereas gap junctions provide for intercellular communication. The aim of this review is to present an updated overview of recent developments in the area of tight junction biology. In a relatively short time, our knowledge of the tight junction has evolved from a relatively simple view of it being a permeability barrier in the paracellular space and a fence in the plane of the plasma membrane to one of it acting as a multicomponent, multifunctional complex that is involved in regulating numerous and diverse cell functions. A group of integral membrane proteins-occludin, claudins, and junction adhesion molecules-interact with an increasingly complex array of tight junction plaque proteins not only to regulate paracellular solute and water flux but also to integrate such diverse processes as gene transcription, tumor suppression, cell proliferation, and cell polarity. PMID:15151915

  9. Correlations between molecular structure and single-junction conductance: a case study with oligo(phenylene-ethynylene)-type wires.

    PubMed

    Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Moreno-García, Pavel; Valkenier, Hennie; Hong, Wenjing; García-Suárez, Víctor M; Buiter, Petra; Otten, Jelmer L H; Hummelen, Jan C; Lambert, Colin J; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2012-03-21

    The charge transport characteristics of 11 tailor-made dithiol-terminated oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE)-type molecules attached to two gold electrodes were studied at a solid/liquid interface in a combined approach using an STM break junction (STM-BJ) and a mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) setup. We designed and characterized 11 structurally distinct dithiol-terminated OPE-type molecules with varied length and HOMO/LUMO energy. Increase of the molecular length and/or of the HOMO-LUMO gap leads to a decrease of the single-junction conductance of the linearly conjugate acenes. The experimental data and simulations suggest a nonresonant tunneling mechanism involving hole transport through the molecular HOMO, with a decay constant β = 3.4 ± 0.1 nm(-1) and a contact resistance R(c) = 40 kΩ per Au-S bond. The introduction of a cross-conjugated anthraquinone or a dihydroanthracene central unit results in lower conductance values, which are attributed to a destructive quantum interference phenomenon for the former and a broken π-conjugation for the latter. The statistical analysis of conductance-distance and current-voltage traces revealed details of evolution and breaking of molecular junctions. In particular, we explored the effect of stretching rate and junction stability. We compare our experimental results with DFT calculations using the ab initio code SMEAGOL and discuss how the structure of the molecular wires affects the conductance values. PMID:22352944

  10. [Experimental and pathological changes of the neuromuscular junction].

    PubMed

    Koenig, J; Bauché, S; Ben Ammar, A; Nicolle, D; Rigoard, P; Eymard, B; Hantaï, D

    2009-03-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the cellular communication between the axon and its postsynaptic targets in the synapse. We used the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) model, which is a highly specialized structure between the nerve, the muscle, and the Schwann cell terminal where the motor neuron orders the muscle to contract. We used experimental models of motor nerve reimplantation in a denervated muscle to determine whether 1) the formation of new NMJ could participate in reinnervation of the muscle necessary to contraction or 2) the blockage of neurotransmitter release using botulinum toxin could be compensated by the formation of new NMJ. We also studied human genetic diseases that affect neuromuscular transmission--congenital myasthenic syndromes--to identify the mutations in the genes coding for synaptic molecules and to analyze the compensatory processes involved in NMJ dysfunction so that muscle contraction can occur in these conditions. PMID:19211115

  11. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  12. Design of immobile nucleic acid junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, N C; Kallenbach, N R

    1983-01-01

    Nucleic acids that interact to generate structures in which three or more double helices emanate from a single point are said to form a junction. Such structures arise naturally as intermediates in DNA replication and recombination. It has been proposed that stable junctions can be created by synthesizing sets of oligonucleotides of defined sequence that can associate by maximizing Watson-Crick complementarity (Seeman N. C., 1981, Biomolecular Stereodynamics. Adenine Press, New York. 1: 269-278; Seeman, N. C., 1982, J. Theor. Biol. 99:237-247.) To make it possible to design molecules that will form junctions of specific architecture, we present here an efficient algorithm for generating nucleic acid sequences that optimize two fundamental properties: fidelity and stability. Fidelity refers to the relative probability of forming the junction complex relative to all alternative paired structures. Calculations are described that permit approximate prediction of the melting curves for junction complexes. PMID:6197102

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotube based molecular switch tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Michael R; Steuerman, David W; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Vignon, Scott A; Star, Alexander; Celestre, Paul C; Stoddart, J Fraser; Heath, James R

    2003-12-15

    This article describes two-terminal molecular switch tunnel junctions (MSTJs) which incorporate a semiconducting, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) as the bottom electrode. The nanotube interacts noncovalently with a monolayer of bistable, nondegenerate [2]catenane tetracations, self-organized by their supporting amphiphilic dimyristoylphosphatidyl anions which shield the mechanically switchable tetracations from a two-micrometer wide metallic top electrode. The resulting 0.002 micron 2 area tunnel junction addresses a nanometer wide row of approximately 2000 molecules. Active and remnant current-voltage measurements demonstrated that these devices can be reconfigurably switched and repeatedly cycled between high and low current states under ambient conditions. Control compounds, including a degenerate [2]catenane, were explored in support of the mechanical origin of the switching signature. These SWNT-based MSTJs operate like previously reported silicon-based MSTJs, but differently from similar devices incorporating bottom metal electrodes. The relevance of these results with respect to the choice of electrode materials for molecular electronics devices is discussed. PMID:14714382

  14. Reduction in gap junction intercellular communication promotes glioma migration.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Qurratulain; Sin, Wun-Chey; Naus, Christian C

    2015-05-10

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), an aggressive form of adult brain tumor, is difficult to treat due to its invasive nature. One of the molecular changes observed in GBM is a decrease in the expression of the gap junction protein Connexin43 (Cx43); however, how a reduction in Cx43 expression contributes to glioma malignancy is still unclear. In this study we examine whether a decrease in Cx43 protein expression has a role in enhanced cell migration, a key feature associated with increased tumorigenicity. We used a 3D spheroid migration model that mimics the in vivo architecture of tumor cells to quantify migration changes. We found that down-regulation of Cx43 expression in the U118 human glioma cell line increased migration by reducing cell-ECM adhesion, and changed the migration pattern from collective to single cell. In addition gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) played a more prominent role in mediating migration than the cytoplasmic interactions of the C-terminal tail. Live imaging revealed that reducing Cx43 expression enhanced relative migration by increasing the cell speed and affecting the direction of migration. Taken together our findings reveal an unexplored role of GJIC in facilitating collective migration. PMID:25926558

  15. JNK phosphorylates β-catenin and regulates adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Horng; Koria, Piyush; Qu, Jun; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2009-01-01

    The c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) is an important player in inflammation, proliferation, and apoptosis. More recently, JNK was found to regulate cell migration by phosphorylating paxillin. Here, we report a novel role of JNK in cell adhesion. Specifically, we provide evidence that JNK binds to E-cadherin/β-catenin complex and phosphorylates β-catenin at serine 37 and threonine 41, the sites also phosphorylated by GSK-3β. Inhibition of JNK kinase activity using dominant-negative constructs reduces phosphorylation of β-catenin and promotes localization of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex to cell-cell contact sites. Conversely, activation of JNK induces β-catenin phosphorylation and disruption of cell contacts, which are prevented by JNK siRNA. We propose that JNK binds to β-catenin and regulates formation of adherens junctions, ultimately controlling cell-to-cell adhesion.—Lee, M.-H., Koria, P., Qu, J., Andreadis, S. T. JNK phosphorylates β-catenin and regulates adherens junctions. PMID:19667122

  16. Mechanically Stacked Four-Junction Concentrator Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Ward, J. Scott; Garcia, Ivan; Friedman, Daniel J.; King, Richard R.; Chiu, Philip T.; France, Ryan M.; Duda, Anna; Olavarria, Waldo J.; Young, Michelle; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-06-14

    Multijunction solar cells can be fabricated by bonding together component cells that are grown separately. Because the component cells are each grown lattice-matched to suitable substrates, this technique allows alloys of different lattice constants to be combined without the structural defects introduced when using metamorphic buffers. Here we present results on the fabrication and performance of four-junction mechanical stacks composed of GaInP/GaAs and GaInAsP/GaInAs tandems, grown on GaAs and InP substrates, respectively. The two tandems were bonded together with a low-index, transparent epoxy that acts as an omni-directional reflector to the GaAs bandedge luminescence, while simultaneously transmitting nearly all of the sub-bandgap light. As determined by electroluminescence measurements and optical modeling, the GaAs subcell demonstrates a higher internal radiative limit and thus higher subcell voltage, compared with GaAs subcells without enhanced internal optics; all four subcells exhibit excellent material quality. The device was fabricated with four contact terminals so that each tandem can be operated at its maximum power point, which raises the cumulative efficiency and decreases spectral sensitivity. Efficiencies exceeding 38% at one-sun have been demonstrated. Eliminating the series resistance is the key challenge for the concentrator cells. We will discuss the performance of one-sun and concentrator versions of the device, and compare the results to recently fabricated monolithic four-junction cells.

  17. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  18. [Genetic defects and disorders at the neuromuscular junction].

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kinji

    2011-07-01

    Genetic defects in molecules expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) cause congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), which are characterized by muscle weakness, abnormal fatigability, amyotrophy, and minor facial anomalies. Muscle weakness mostly develops under 2 years but is also sometimes seen in adults. Mutations identified to date include (i) muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits, (ii) rapsyn that anchors and clusters AChRs at the neuromuscular junction, (iii) agrin that is released from the nerve terminal and induces AChR clustering by stimulating the downstream LRP4/MuSK/Dok-7/rapsyn/AChR pathway, (iv) muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) that transmits the AChR-clustering signal from agrin/LRP4 to rapsyn/AChR, (v) Dok-7 that transmits the AChR-clustering signal from agrin/LRP4/MuSK to rapsyn/AChR, (vi) skeletal muscle sodium channel type 1.4 (Nav1.4) that spreads the depolarization potential from the endplate throughout muscle fibers, (vii) collagen Q that anchors acetylcholinesterase to the synaptic basal lamina, and (viii) choline acetyltransferase that resynthesizes acetylcholine from recycled choline at the nerve terminal. In addition, mutations in the heparin sulfate proteoglycan perlecan, which binds to many molecules including collagen Q and dystroglycan, causes Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Interestingly, mutations in LRP4 cause Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome but not CMS. AChR, MuSK, and LRP4 are also targets of auto-antibodies in myasthenia gravis. In addition, molecules at the NMJ are targets of many other disease states AChRs are blocked by the snake toxin alpha-bungarotoxin and the plant poison curare. The presynaptic SNARE complex is attacked by botulinum toxin. Acetylcholinesterase is inhibited by the nerve gas sarin and by organophosphate pesticides. This review focuses on the molecular bases underlying defects of AChR, rapsyn, Nav1.4, collagen Q, and choline acetyltransferase. PMID:21747136

  19. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER FOUNDATION, AND BALL MILL FOUNDATIONS, LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. ORE FROM THE MINES WAS DUMPED FROM THE TRAM BUCKETS INTO THE PRIMARY ORE BIN UNDER THE TRAM TERMINAL. A SLIDING CONTROL DOOR INTRODUCED THE INTO THE JAW CRUSHER (FOUNDATIONS,CENTER). THE CRUSHED ORE WAS THEN CONVEYED INTO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN AT CENTER LEFT. A HOLE IN THE FLOOR OF THE ORE BIN PASSED ORE ONTO ANOTHER CONVEYOR THAT BROUGHT IT OUT TO THE BALL MILL(FOUNDATIONS,CENTER BOTTOM). THIS SYSTEM IS MOST LIKELY NOT THE ORIGINAL SET UP, PROBABLY INSTALLED IN THE MINE'S LAST OCCUPATION IN THE EARLY 1940s. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  20. Terminal weather information management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1990-01-01

    Since the mid-1960's, microburst/windshear events have caused at least 30 aircraft accidents and incidents and have killed more than 600 people in the United States alone. This study evaluated alternative means of alerting an airline crew to the presence of microburst/windshear events in the terminal area. Of particular interest was the relative effectiveness of conventional and data link ground-to-air transmissions of ground-based radar and low-level windshear sensing information on microburst/windshear avoidance. The Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator located at Ames Research Center was employed in a line oriented simulation of a scheduled round-trip airline flight from Salt Lake City to Denver Stapleton Airport. Actual weather en route and in the terminal area was simulated using recorded data. The microburst/windshear incident of July 11, 1988 was re-created for the Denver area operations. Six experienced airline crews currently flying scheduled routes were employed as test subjects for each of three groups: (1) A baseline group which received alerts via conventional air traffic control (ATC) tower transmissions; (2) An experimental group which received alerts/events displayed visually and aurally in the cockpit six miles (approx. 2 min.) from the microburst event; and (3) An additional experimental group received displayed alerts/events 23 linear miles (approx. 7 min.) from the microburst event. Analyses of crew communications and decision times showed a marked improvement in both situation awareness and decision-making with visually displayed ground-based radar information. Substantial reductions in the variability of decision times among crews in the visual display groups were also found. These findings suggest that crew performance will be enhanced and individual differences among crews due to differences in training and prior experience are significantly reduced by providing real-time, graphic display of terminal weather hazards.

  1. Role of N-terminal extension of Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 and C-terminal extension of Thermotoga maritima RNase H2.

    PubMed

    Permanasari, Etin-Diah; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Koga, Yuichi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2013-10-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 (BstRNH2) and Thermotoga maritima RNase H2 (TmaRNH2) have N-terminal and C-terminal extensions, respectively, as compared with Aquifex aeolicus RNase H2 (AaeRNH2). To analyze the role of these extensions, BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2 without these extensions were constructed, and their biochemical properties were compared with those of their intact partners and AaeRNH2. The far-UV CD spectra of all proteins were similar, suggesting that the protein structure is not significantly altered by removal of these extensions. However, both the junction ribonuclease and RNase H activities of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2, as well as their substrate-binding affinities, were considerably decreased by removal of these extensions. The stability of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2 was also decreased by removal of these extensions. The activity, substrate binding affinity and stability of TmaRNH2 without the C-terminal 46 residues were partly restored by the attachment of the N-terminal extension of BstRNH2. These results suggest that the N-terminal extension of BstRNH2 functions as a substrate-binding domain and stabilizes the RNase H domain. Because the C-terminal extension of TmaRNH2 assumes a helix hairpin structure and does not make direct contact with the substrate, this extension is probably required to make the conformation of the substrate-binding site functional. AaeRNH2 showed comparable junction ribonuclease activity to those of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2, and was more stable than these proteins, indicating that bacterial RNases H2 do not always require an N-terminal or C-terminal extension to increase activity, substrate-binding affinity, and/or stability. PMID:23937561

  2. Distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide in vertebrate neuromuscular junctions: relationship to the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Csillik, B; Tajti, L; Kovács, T; Kukla, E; Rakic, P; Knyihár-Csillik, E

    1993-10-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), regarded by several authors to be involved in maintenance of the acetylcholine receptor, is present in the motor axons of various striated rat muscles. It is present, however, only in motor endplates of several selected striated muscles, where it is located in presynaptic axon terminals of neuromuscular junctions. No immunoreactivity could be seen within synaptic vesicles themselves. In the non-human primate Macaca fasciculata, neuromuscular junctions, including those in the diaphragm, display an intense CGRP reaction. The structure of the simian motor endplates is more elaborate than that of the rat. Amphibian motor nerve endings, both in tetanic and tonic muscles, display CGRP immunoreactivity. In tetanic muscles the CGRP reaction outlines "terminaisons en placque" (true motor end plates) and weakly reacting "terminaisons en grappe" (grape-like endings) in tonic muscles. On supramaximal stimulation of the motor nerve, CGRP is depleted from the affected neuromuscular junctions. Wallerian degeneration of the motor axon results in complete disappearance of CGRP. In most rat muscles in which motor endplates do not normally exhibit CGRP immunoreactivity, e.g., the diaphragm and buccinator muscles, the pre-terminal motor axons are CGRP-positive. After immobilization of such muscles by local bupivacaine injection to rats under brief chloral hydrate anesthesia, CGRP immunoreactivity of the neuromuscular junctions can be elicited because blockade of neuromuscular transmission results in accumulation of CGRP in the endplates. Even more striking is the appearance of CGRP immunoreactivity in normally non-reactive motor endplates during axon regeneration after an experimentally induced Wallerian degeneration of the motor axons. We conclude that CGRP is a regular, genotypically determined component of neuromuscular junctions, present either in a manifest or in a latent form. The latter can be elicited by various experimental approaches

  3. Terminal Doppler weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, M.; Shrader, W. W.; Wieler, J. G.

    1990-02-01

    The terminal Doppler weather radar (TDWR) system, now under development, will provide automatic detection of microbursts and low-level wind shear. This paper discusses the TDWR performance parameters and describes its structural elements, including the antenna subsystem, the transmitter, the receiver/exciter, the digital signal processor, and the radar product generator/remote monitoring subsystem. Attention is also given to the processes of the base data formation, point target removal, signal-to-noise thresholding, and velocity de-aliasing and to the TDWR algorithms and displays. A schematic diagram of the TDWR system is presented.

  4. Josephson effect in multiterminal superconductor-ferromagnet junctions coupled via triplet components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, Andreas; Volkov, Anatoly F.; Efetov, Konstantin B.

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of the Usadel equation we study a multiterminal Josephson junction. This junction is composed by "magnetic" superconductors Sm, which have singlet pairing and are separated from the normal n wire by spin filters so that the Josephson coupling is caused only by fully polarized triplet components. We show that there is no interaction between triplet Cooper pairs with antiparallel total spin orientations. The presence of an additional singlet superconductor S attached to the n wire leads to a finite Josephson current IQ with an unusual current-phase relation. The density of states in the n wire for different orientations of spins of Cooper pairs is calculated. We derive a general formula for the current IQ in a multiterminal Josephson contact and apply this formula for analysis of two four-terminal Josephson junctions of different structures. It is shown in particular that both the "nematic" and the "magnetic" cases can be realized in these junctions. In a two-terminal structure with parallel filter orientations and in a three-terminal structure with antiparallel filter orientations of the "magnetic" superconductors with attached additional singlet superconductor, we find a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the critical current. Also, in these structures, the critical current shows a Riedel peak like dependence on the exchange field in the "magnetic" superconductors. Although there is no current through the S/n interface due to orthogonality of the singlet and triplet components, the phase of the order parameter in the superconuctor S is shown to affect the Josephson current in a multiterminal structure.

  5. Correlation between amplitude of spin accumulation signals investigated by Hanle effect measurement and effective junction barrier height in CoFe/MgO/n{sup +}-Si junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y. Ishikawa, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Inokuchi, T.; Hamaya, K.; Tezuka, N.

    2015-05-07

    Correlation between the amplitude of the spin accumulation signals and the effective barrier height estimated from the slope of the log (RA) - t{sub MgO} plot (RA: resistance area product, t{sub MgO}: thickness of MgO tunnel barrier) in CoFe/MgO/n{sup +}-Si junctions was investigated. The amplitude of spin accumulation signals increases with increasing effective barrier heights. This increase of the amplitude of spin accumulation is originated from the increase of the spin polarization (P{sub Si}) in Si. The estimated absolute values of P{sub Si} using three-terminal Hanle signals are consistent with those estimated by four-terminal nonlocal-magnetoresistance (MR) and two-terminal local-MR. To demonstrate large spin accumulation in Si bulk band and enhance the local-MR through Si channel, these results indicate that the increase of the effective barrier height at ferromagnet/(tunnel barrier)/n{sup +}-Si junction electrode is important.

  6. Differential facilitation of high- and low-output nerve terminals from a single motoneuron.

    PubMed

    Crider, M E; Cooper, R L

    2000-03-01

    In the crayfish opener neuromuscular preparation, regional differences in synaptic transmission are observed among the terminals of a single motoneuron. With a single stimulus, the high-output terminals of the proximal region of the muscle produce a larger excitatory postsynaptic potential than do the low-output terminals of the central region of the muscle. We tested the hypothesis that the low-output terminals exhibit more facilitation than do high-output terminals for twin-pulse, train, and continuous-stimulation paradigms. Previous studies have not employed several stimulation paradigms to induce facilitation among high- and low-output terminals of a single motoneuron. We found that the high-output terminals on the proximal fibers facilitate more than the low-output terminals on the central muscle fibers, in contrast with previous studies on similar muscles. The difference in measured facilitation is dependent on the stimulation paradigm. These results are important because ultrastructural differences between these high- and low-output terminals are known and can be used for correlation with physiological measurements. Short-term facilitation is a form of short-term memory at the synaptic level, and the processes understood at the crayfish neuromuscular junction may well be applicable to all chemical synapses. PMID:10710395

  7. Termination: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed. PMID:26583444

  8. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  9. Effect of disorder on longitudinal resistance of a graphene p-n junction in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiang-Chai; Yeung, T. C. Au; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2010-06-01

    The longitudinal resistances of a six-terminal graphene p-n junction under a perpendicular magnetic field are investigated. Because of the chirality of the Hall edge states, the longitudinal resistances on top and bottom edges of the graphene ribbon are not equal. In the presence of suitable disorder, the top-edge and bottom-edge resistances well show the plateau structures in the both unipolar and bipolar regimes, and the plateau values are determined by the Landau filling factors only. These plateau structures are in excellent agreement with the recent experiment. For the unipolar junction, the resistance plateaus emerge in the absence of impurity and they are destroyed by strong disorder. But for the bipolar junction, the resistances are very large without the plateau structures in the clean junction. The disorder can strongly reduce the resistances and leads the formation of the resistance plateaus due to the mixture of the Hall edge states in virtue of the disorder. In addition, the size effect of the junction on the resistances is studied and some extra resistance plateaus are found in the long graphene junction case. This is explained by the fact that only part of the edge states participate in the full mixing.

  10. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-01

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/2, the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  11. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-15

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/{radical}(2), the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  12. Channel and terminal description of the ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, B. S.; Agan, M. J.; Girardey, C. C.; Jedrey, T. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) is a proof-of-concept K/Ka-band mobile satellite communications terminal under development by NASA at JPL. Currently the AMT is undergoing system integration and test in preparation for a July 1993 ACTS launch and the subsequent commencement of mobile experiments in the fall of 1993. The AMT objectives are presented followed by a discussion of the AMT communications channel and mobile terminal design and performance.

  13. Channel and terminal description of the ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, B. S.; Agan, M. J.; Girardey, C. C.; Jedrey, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) is a proof-of-concept K/Ka-band mobile satellite communications terminal under development by NASA at JPL. Currently the AMT is undergoing systems integration and testing in preparation for a July 1993 ACTS launch and the subsequent commencement of mobile experiments in the fall of 1993. The AMT objectives are presented, followed by a discussion of the AMT communications channel and the mobile terminal's design and performance.

  14. The myoendothelial junction: breaking through the matrix?

    PubMed Central

    Heberlein, Katherine; Straub, Adam; Isakson, Brant E

    2009-01-01

    Within the vasculature, specialized cellular extensions from endothelium (and sometimes smooth muscle) protrude through the extracellular matrix where they interact with the opposing cell type. These structures, termed myoendothelial junctions, have been cited as a possible key element in the control of several vascular physiologies and pathologies. This review will discuss observations that have led to a focus on the myoendothelial junction as a cellular integration point in the vasculature for both homeostatic and pathological conditions and as a possible independent signaling entity. We will also highlight the need for novel approaches to studying the myoendothelial junction in order to comprehend the cellular biology associated with this structure. PMID:19330678

  15. Temperature dependence of thermopower in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsang; Lenert, Andrej; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2016-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions are of considerable interest due to their promise for efficient energy conversion. While the dependence of thermoelectric properties of junctions on molecular structure has been recently studied, their temperature dependence remains unexplored. Using a custom built variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope, we measured the thermopower and electrical conductance of individual benzenedithiol junctions over a range of temperatures (100 K-300 K). We find that while the electrical conductance is independent of temperature, the thermopower increases linearly with temperature, confirming the predictions of the Landauer theory.

  16. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuai; Sen, Suman; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng, Hongbo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2012-10-26

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. PMID:23037952

  17. New Phenomena in Josephson SINIS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    We analyze the dc and ac Josephson effects in SaINISb junctions in which an additional bias current flows in the N layer. The case of low temperatures and voltages \\(eV, T<<Δ\\) is considered in the dirty limit. We show that the critical Josephson current may change sign, and the considered SINIS junction may become a π junction if the voltage drop across the N/Sa interface exceeds a certain value \\(eVN>Δ/2\\). The ac Josephson effect may arise even if the current flows only through the N/Sa interface, whereas the current through the Sb/N interface is absent.

  18. Plasticity of single-atom Pb junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Salgado, C.; Néel, N.; Palacios, J. J.; Kröger, J.

    2016-06-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was used to fabricate atomic contacts on Pb(111). Conductance characteristics of the junctions were simultaneously recorded with forming and subsequent breaking of the contacts. A pronounced hysteresis effect in conductance traces was observed from junctions comprising the clean Pb(111) surface. The hysteretic behavior was less profound in contacts to single Pb atoms adsorbed to Pb(111). Density-functional calculations reproduced the experimental results by performing a full ab initio modeling of plastic junction deformations. A comprehensive description of the experimental findings was achieved by considering different atomic tip apex geometries.

  19. Distributed deformation ahead of the Cocos-Nazca Rift at the Galapagos triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Zhu, Wen-lu; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Cann, Johnson R.

    2011-11-01

    The Galapagos triple junction is not a simple ridge-ridge-ridge (RRR) triple junction. The Cocos-Nazca Rift (C-N Rift) tip does not meet the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Instead, two secondary rifts form the link: Incipient Rift at 2°40‧N and Dietz Deep volcanic ridge, the southern boundary of the Galapagos microplate (GMP), at 1°10‧N. Recently collected bathymetry data are used to investigate the regional tectonics prior to the establishment of the GMP (∼1.5 Ma). South of C-N Rift a band of northeast-trending cracks cuts EPR-generated abyssal hills. It is a mirror image of a band of cracks previously identified north of C-N Rift on the same age crust. In both areas, the western ends of the cracks terminate against intact abyssal hills suggesting that each crack initiated at the EPR spreading center and cut eastward into pre-existing topography. Each crack formed a short-lived triple junction until it was abandoned and a new crack and triple junction initiated nearby. Between 2.5 and 1.5 Ma, the pattern of cracking is remarkably symmetric about C-N Rift providing support for a crack interaction model in which crack initiation at the EPR axis is controlled by stresses associated with the tip of the westward-propagating C-N Rift. The model also shows that offsets of the EPR axis may explain times when cracking is not symmetric. South of C-N Rift, cracks are observed on seafloor as old as 10.5 Ma suggesting that this triple junction has not been a simple RRR triple junction during that time.

  20. [Terminal ballistics. 3].

    PubMed

    Marini, F; Mangiante, G; Dagradi, V; Radin, S; Carolo, F; Giarolli, M; Della Giacoma, G; Tosi, D; Merico, G; Tenci, A

    1993-01-01

    This brief chapter, focusing essentially on a single topic, has been written in homage to Emile Theodor Kocker, a masterful exponent of the art of surgery and founder of the culture of terminal ballistics. For most of the literature we are indebted to Fackler and Dougherty, who, with the particular grasp, and fair of historians, act as guides on a trial which is only apparently retrograde, but which actually bears eloquent witness to the fact that even in the most physically tangible of arts, namely the art of surgery, inspired curiosity may help us to go well beyond the limits of our day and age. This chapter is also dedicated to the memory of another great surgeon, Vittorio Pettinari, who for one of the authors was an incomparable mentor and past-master of such curiosity. PMID:7923495

  1. Synaptic dynamics at the neuromuscular junction: mechanisms and models.

    PubMed

    Van Essen, D C; Gordon, H; Soha, J M; Fraser, S E

    1990-01-01

    During development, the neuromuscular junction passes through a stage of extensive polyinnervation followed by a period of wholesale synapse elimination. In this report we discuss mechanisms and interactions that could mediate many of the key aspects of these important developmental events. Our emphasis is on (1) establishing an overall conceptual framework within which the role of many distinct cellular interactions and molecular factors can be evaluated, and (2) generating computer simulations that systematically test the adequacy of different models in accounting for a wide range of biological data. Our analysis indicates that several relatively simple mechanisms are each capable of explaining a variety of experimental observations. On the other hand, no one mechanism can account for the full spectrum of experimental results. Thus, it is important to consider models that are based on interactions among multiple mechanisms. A potentially powerful combination is one based on (1) a scaffold within the basal lamina or in the postsynaptic membrane which is induced by nerve terminals and which serves to stabilize terminals by a positive feedback mechanism; (2) a sprouting factor whose release by muscle fibers is down-regulated by activity and perhaps other factors; and (3) an intrinsic tendency of motor neurons to withdraw some connections while allowing others to grow. PMID:2181065

  2. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  3. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  4. A Conserved Functional Domain of Drosophila Coracle Is Required for Localization at the Septate Junction and Has Membrane-organizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ward IV, Robert E.; Lamb, Rebecca S.; Fehon, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    The protein 4.1 superfamily is comprised of a diverse group of cytoplasmic proteins, many of which have been shown to associate with the plasma membrane via binding to specific transmembrane proteins. Coracle, a Drosophila protein 4.1 homologue, is required during embryogenesis and is localized to the cytoplasmic face of the septate junction in epithelial cells. Using in vitro mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the amino-terminal 383 amino acids of Coracle define a functional domain that is both necessary and sufficient for proper septate junction localization in transgenic embryos. Genetic mutations within this domain disrupt the subcellular localization of Coracle and severely affect its genetic function, indicating that correct subcellular localization is essential for Coracle function. Furthermore, the localization of Coracle and the transmembrane protein Neurexin to the septate junction display an interdependent relationship, suggesting that Coracle and Neurexin interact with one another at the cytoplasmic face of the septate junction. Consistent with this notion, immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding studies demonstrate that the amino-terminal 383 amino acids of Coracle and cytoplasmic domain of Neurexin interact directly. Together these results indicate that Coracle provides essential membrane-organizing functions at the septate junction, and that these functions are carried out by an amino-terminal domain that is conserved in all protein 4.1 superfamily members. PMID:9508778

  5. 46 CFR 525.2 - Terminal schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE MARINE TERMINAL OPERATOR SCHEDULES § 525.2 Terminal schedules. (a) Marine terminal operator schedules. A marine terminal operator, at..., or storing property at the marine terminal contained in a terminal schedule must be consistent...

  6. 46 CFR 525.2 - Terminal schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE MARINE TERMINAL OPERATOR SCHEDULES § 525.2 Terminal schedules. (a) Marine terminal operator schedules. A marine terminal operator, at..., or storing property at the marine terminal contained in a terminal schedule must be consistent...

  7. 46 CFR 525.2 - Terminal schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE MARINE TERMINAL OPERATOR SCHEDULES § 525.2 Terminal schedules. (a) Marine terminal operator schedules. A marine terminal operator, at..., or storing property at the marine terminal contained in a terminal schedule must be consistent...

  8. 46 CFR 525.2 - Terminal schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE MARINE TERMINAL OPERATOR SCHEDULES § 525.2 Terminal schedules. (a) Marine terminal operator schedules. A marine terminal operator, at..., or storing property at the marine terminal contained in a terminal schedule must be consistent...

  9. Ferromagnetic planar Josephson junction with transparent interfaces: a φ junction proposal.

    PubMed

    Heim, D M; Pugach, N G; Kupriyanov, M Yu; Goldobin, E; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R

    2013-05-29

    We calculate the current-phase relation of a planar Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic weak link located on top of a thin normal metal film. Following experimental observations we assume transparent superconductor-ferromagnet interfaces. This provides the best interlayer coupling and a low suppression of the superconducting correlations penetrating from the superconducting electrodes into the ferromagnetic layer. We show that this Josephson junction is a promising candidate for experimental φ junction realization. PMID:23636963

  10. Deep-Space Optical Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Farr, W. H.; Biswas, A.; Birnbaum, K. M.; Roberts, W. T.; Quirk, K.; Townes, S.

    2011-01-01

    We eport on engineering trades that led to the conceptual design of a laser communications terminal for spacecraft probing Mars. The flight terminal, the ground receiver and the ground transmitter subsystems are described. The flight terminal point design has 0.25 Gb/s downlink data-rate capability from the Mars close distance (0.42 AU). Capability for uplink data-rate of 0.3 Mb/s and ranging with 30 cm precision are also addressed.

  11. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  12. Four Terminal Gallium Nitride MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veety, Matthew Thomas

    All reported gallium nitride (GaN) transistors to date have been three-terminal devices with source, drain, and gate electrodes. In the case of GaN MOSFETs, this leaves the bulk of the device at a floating potential which can impact device threshold voltage. In more traditional silicon-based MOSFET fabrication a bulk contact can be made on the back side of the silicon wafer. For GaN grown on sapphire substrates, however, this is not possible and an alternate, front-side bulk contact must be investigated. GaN is a III-V, wide band gap semiconductor that as promising material parameters for use in high frequency and high power applications. Possible applications are in the 1 to 10 GHz frequency band and power inverters for next generation grid solid state transformers and inverters. GaN has seen significant academic and commercial research for use in Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors (HFETs). These devices however are depletion-mode, meaning the device is considered "on" at zero gate bias. A MOSFET structure allows for enhancement mode operation, which is normally off. This mode is preferrable in high power applications as the device has lower off-state power consumption and is easier to implement in circuits. Proper surface passivation of seminconductor surface interface states is an important processing step for any device. Preliminary research on surface treatments using GaN wet etches and depletion-mode GaN devices utilizing this process are discussed. Devices pretreated with potassium pursulfate prior to gate dielectric deposition show significant device improvements. This process can be applied to any current GaN FET. Enhancement-mode GaN MOSFETs were fabricated on magnesium doped p-type Wurtzite gallium nitride grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Devices utilized ion implant source and drain which was activated under NH3 overpressure in MOCVD. Also, devices were fabricated with a SiO2 gate dielectric

  13. Molecular junctions: Single-molecule contacts exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-05-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based method it is now possible to get an atomistic-level description of the most probable binding and contact configuration for single-molecule electrical junctions.

  14. Computing Scattering Characteristics Of Waveguide Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Manshadi, Farzin

    1994-01-01

    Rectangular WaveGuide Junction SCATtering RWGSCAT computer program solves scattering properties of waveguide device. Modeled as assembly of rectangular waveguides of different cross sections. RWGSCAT written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  16. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  17. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  18. Local Frame Junction Trees in SLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, Frank O.

    2005-11-01

    Junction trees (JT) is a general purpose tool for exact inference on graphical models. Many of the existing algorithms for building junction trees require a fixed static graphical model. The construction process is not unique, finding the one with the best computational structure (smallest clique size) is also a hard problem. For large scale inference problems, such as Geo-referencing using triangular geodetic networks or equivalent, the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem in robotics pose some challenges to junction tree applications. Incremental junction tree techniques for dynamic graphical models prescribe heuristic methods for growing the tree structure, and are applicable to large scale graphical models. Of concern are the proliferative widening of the tree, which makes message passing expensive. In the context of SLAM we present a new apporach that exploits the local frame dependence of novel observation variables.

  19. Superconducting switch made of graphene nanoribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qifeng; Dong, Jinming

    2008-09-01

    The transmission of superconductor-graphene nanoribbon-superconductor junctions (SGS) has been studied by the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the on-site potential U in the center zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) of the SGS junction plays an important role in the magnitude of the supercurrent Ic. As the effective Fermi energy μeff (μeff = μF-U) goes from negative to positive, the SGS junction would suddenly transform from an 'OFF' state to an 'ON' state. And, as μeff increases further, the Ic will continue to increase. This switching behavior of the SGS junction shares the same origin with the zigzag GNR valley-isospin valve (Rycerz et al 2007 Nat. Phys. 3 172). Besides the valley-isospin, the density of states will also have an effect on the suppression of Ic.

  20. Electronic transport properties of molecular junctions based on the direct binding of aromatic ring to electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tran Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    We have used the non-equilibrium Green's function in combination with the density functional theory to investigate the quantum transport properties of the molecular junctions including a terminated benzene ring directly coupled to surface of metal electrodes (physisorption). The other side of molecule was connected to electrode via thiolate bond (chemisorption). Two different electrodes have been studied, namely Cu and Al. Rectification and negative differential resistance behavior have been observed. We found that the electron transport mechanism is affected by the nature of benzene-electrode coupling. In other words, the transport mechanism depends on the nature of metallic electrode. Changing from sp- to sd-metallic electrode, the molecular junction changes from the Schottky to p-n junction-like diode. The transmission spectra, projected density of state, molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian, transmission eigenchannel, and Muliken population have been analyzed for explanation of electronic transport properties. Understanding the transport mechanism in junction having direct coupling of π-conjugate to electrode will be useful to design the future molecular devices.

  1. Reliable Formation of Single Molecule Junctions with Air-Stable Diphenylphosphine Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Parameswaran, R.; Hybertsen, M.; Widawsky, J.R.; Vázquez H.; Park, Y.S.; Boardman, B.M.; Nuckolls, C.; Steigerwald, M.L.; Venkataraman, L.

    2010-07-15

    We measure the conductance of single Au-molecule-Au junctions with a series of air-stable diphenylphosphine-terminated molecules using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction technique. Thousands of conductance versus displacement traces collected for each molecule are used to statistically analyze junction conductance and evolution upon elongation. Measured conductances for a series of alkane-based molecules exhibit an exponential decrease with increasing length, as expected for saturated molecules, with a tunneling decay constant of 0.98 {+-} 0.04. Measurements of junction elongation indicate strong metal-molecule binding, with a length that increases with the number of methylene groups in the backbone. Measured conductance histograms for four molecules with short, unsaturated backbones (e.g., benzene) are much broader with less well-defined peaks. These measurements are supported by density function theory calculations. The phosphine binds selectively to under-coordinated gold atoms through a donor-acceptor bond with a binding energy of about 1 eV. The calculated tunnel coupling correlates very well with experiment.

  2. Mode of action of claudin peptidomimetics in the transient opening of cellular tight junction barriers.

    PubMed

    Staat, Christian; Coisne, Caroline; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Stamatovic, Svetlana M; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Wolburg, Hartwig; Engelhardt, Britta; Blasig, Ingolf E

    2015-06-01

    In epithelial/endothelial barriers, claudins form tight junctions, seal the paracellular cleft, and limit the uptake of solutes and drugs. The peptidomimetic C1C2 from the C-terminal half of claudin-1's first extracellular loop increases drug delivery through epithelial claudin-1 barriers. However, its molecular and structural mode of action remains unknown. In the present study, >100 μM C1C2 caused paracellular opening of various barriers with different claudin compositions, ranging from epithelial to endothelial cells, preferentially modulating claudin-1 and claudin-5. After 6 h incubation, C1C2 reversibly increased the permeability to molecules of different sizes; this was accompanied by redistribution of claudins and occludin from junctions to cytosol. Internalization of C1C2 in epithelial cells depended on claudin-1 expression and clathrin pathway, whereby most C1C2 was retained in recyclosomes >2 h. In freeze-fracture electron microscopy, C1C2 changed claudin-1 tight junction strands to a more parallel arrangement and claudin-5 strands from E-face to P-face association - drastic and novel effects. In conclusion, C1C2 is largely recycled in the presence of a claudin, which explains the delayed onset of barrier and junction loss, the high peptide concentration required and the long-lasting effect. Epithelial/endothelial barriers are specifically modulated via claudin-1/claudin-5, which can be targeted to improve drug delivery. PMID:25907035

  3. Mitochondrial alarmins released by degenerating motor axon terminals activate perisynaptic Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Duregotti, Elisa; Negro, Samuele; Scorzeto, Michele; Zornetta, Irene; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Chang, Christopher J.; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2015-01-01

    An acute and highly reproducible motor axon terminal degeneration followed by complete regeneration is induced by some animal presynaptic neurotoxins, representing an appropriate and controlled system to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying degeneration and regeneration of peripheral nerve terminals. We have previously shown that nerve terminals exposed to spider or snake presynaptic neurotoxins degenerate as a result of calcium overload and mitochondrial failure. Here we show that toxin-treated primary neurons release signaling molecules derived from mitochondria: hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial DNA, and cytochrome c. These molecules activate isolated primary Schwann cells, Schwann cells cocultured with neurons and at neuromuscular junction in vivo through the MAPK pathway. We propose that this inter- and intracellular signaling is involved in triggering the regeneration of peripheral nerve terminals affected by other forms of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25605902

  4. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  5. Spectroscopy Measurements of Magnesium Diboride Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlack, J. T.; Lambert, J. G.; Carabello, S. A.; Thrailkill, Z. E.; Galwaduge, P. T.; Ramos, R. C.

    2010-03-01

    MgB2 has the highest Tc of the conventional superconductors at 39K and exhibits two superconducting energy bands. This material is also inexpensive to produce and has been utilized in new designs for MRI, RF cavities, and Josephson junctions. We report results of recent spectroscopy and transport measurements of Josephson junctions made of MgB2 obtained from our collaborators. We investigate its transport characteristics at sub-kelvin temperatures as well as its responses to resonant microwave activation.

  6. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  7. Quantum Coherence in a Superfluid Josephson Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Supradeep; Sato, Yuki

    2011-02-04

    We report a new kind of experiment in which we take an array of nanoscale apertures that form a superfluid {sup 4}He Josephson junction and apply quantum phase gradients directly along the array. We observe collective coherent behaviors from aperture elements, leading to quantum interference. Connections to superconducting and Bose-Einstein condensate Josephson junctions as well as phase coherence among the superfluid aperture array are discussed.

  8. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  9. Supercurrent switch in graphene pi junctions.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Sudbø, Asle

    2008-05-01

    We study the supercurrent in a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor graphene junction. In contrast to its metallic counterpart, the oscillating critical current in our setup decays only weakly upon increasing the exchange field and junction width. We find an unusually large residual value of the supercurrent at the oscillatory cusps due to a strong deviation from a sinusoidal current-phase relationship. Our findings suggest a very efficient device for dissipationless supercurrent switching. PMID:18518411

  10. Supercurrent Switch in Graphene π Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Sudbø, Asle

    2008-05-01

    We study the supercurrent in a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor graphene junction. In contrast to its metallic counterpart, the oscillating critical current in our setup decays only weakly upon increasing the exchange field and junction width. We find an unusually large residual value of the supercurrent at the oscillatory cusps due to a strong deviation from a sinusoidal current-phase relationship. Our findings suggest a very efficient device for dissipationless supercurrent switching.

  11. Shalbatana/Simud Vallis Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The sinuous channels and streamlined islands at the junction of Shalbatana and Simud Vallis present an erosional history of the catastrophic floods that scoured the Martian surface hundreds of millions of years ago.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16, Longitude 317.4 East (42.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  12. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csáki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron.

  13. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csaki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.; Department of Physics, University of Wales Swansea, Swansea, SA2 8PP,

    2000-08-15

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. 29 CFR 4043.24 - Termination or partial termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.24 Termination or partial termination. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the... within the meaning of section 411(d)(3) of the Code. (b) Waivers. Notice is waived for this event....

  15. 29 CFR 4043.24 - Termination or partial termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.24 Termination or partial termination. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the... within the meaning of section 411(d)(3) of the Code. (b) Waivers. Notice is waived for this event....

  16. 29 CFR 4043.24 - Termination or partial termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.24 Termination or partial termination. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the... within the meaning of section 411(d)(3) of the Code. (b) Waivers. Notice is waived for this event....

  17. 29 CFR 4043.24 - Termination or partial termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.24 Termination or partial termination. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the... within the meaning of section 411(d)(3) of the Code. (b) Waivers. Notice is waived for this event....

  18. Long Josepshon Junction in a Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornes, Ivan

    2005-03-01

    We present a model for an underdamped long Josephson junction coupled to a single-mode electromagnetic cavity, and carry out numerical calculations using this model in various regimes. The coupling may occur through either the electric or the magnetic field of the cavity mode. When a current is injected into the junction, we find that the time-averaged voltage exhibits self-induced resonant steps due to coupling between the current in the junction and the electric field of the cavity mode. These steps are similar to those observed and calculated in small Josephson junctions. When a soliton is present in the junction (corresponding to a quantum of magnetic flux parallel to the junction plates), the SIRS's disappear if the electric field in the cavity is spatially uniform. If the cavity mode has a spatially varying electric field, there is a strong coupling between the soliton and the cavity mode. This coupling causes the soliton to become phase-locked to the cavity mode, and produces step-like anomalies on the soliton branch of the IV characteristics. If the coupling is strong enough, the frequency of the cavity mode is greatly red-shifted from its uncoupled value. We present simple geometrical arguments and a simple analytical model which account for this behavior. This work was supported by NSF grant DMR04-13395.

  19. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise. PMID:23134759

  20. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  1. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support.

  2. Is Lake Tahoe Terminal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, R. N.; Reuter, J.; Heyvaert, A.; Lewis, J.; Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, G.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    ) the climatic water deficit will increase, especially at high elevations that will be most affected by the loss of snow, with likely consequences for existing vegetation and fire frequency. Hydrologically, Lake Tahoe is intermittently terminal; in a medical sense it is not yet terminal, but its condition—especially its valued clarity and deep blue color--is serious.

  3. SCATHA mission termination report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakkestad, Kjell; Fennessey, Richard

    1993-01-01

    nearly complete lack of available telemetry data, large undamped motion of the long booms, inadequacies in attitude determination software, and an error in the fuel level calculation software. This paper discusses the various proposed termination plans and execution of the selected one. Attitude determination methodologies, nutation from maneuvers, and effects of the flexible booms on the termination mission are presented and analyzed from a satellite analyst point of view.

  4. The junctional complex in the intestine of Sagitta setosa (Chaetognatha): the paired septate junction.

    PubMed

    Duvert, M; Gros, D; Salat, C

    1980-04-01

    The junctional complex of the intestine of Sagitta setosa has been studied in tissues stained with uranyl acetate or after lanthanum impregnation, and by freeze-cleavage. All types of junctions have been characterized in both perpendicular and tangential planes. From the apex to the base of the cell the following junctions occur in this order: a zonula adhaerens; a septate junction where the septa occur in pairs; a pleated sheet septate junction; and numerous gap junctions of the A-type. From the upper part of the cells inwards to the septate junction, the membranes follow a relatively straight path. In the lower part of the cells the membranes are deeply interdigitating. At the intersection between 3 cells a very different junction is to be observed where small units, periodically disposed, bind the membranes of the 3 adjoining cells. Each unit is composed of 3 short segments which bind the cell membranes to a central ring 16.6 +/- 2.3 nm in outer diameter. The paired septate junction constitutes a new type. Its main features are that the septa are paired and occur in 2 formations, one the 'loose formation', with elements between the septa of each pair, and the other, a 'tight formation'. After lanthanum impregnation, the thickness of each septum is seen to be about 3 nm and the undulation period 12.6 +/- 1.6 nm. On freeze-fractures 10-nm particles are found on crests on the PF face and in furrows on the EF face. The possible significance of this type of junction is discussed. The junctional complex described is analogous to those found in various invertebrate epithelia. PMID:6105159

  5. Terminal Descent Sensor Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis W.

    2009-01-01

    Sulcata software simulates the operation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) radar terminal descent sensor (TDS). The program models TDS radar antennas, RF hardware, and digital processing, as well as the physics of scattering from a coherent ground surface. This application is specific to this sensor and is flexible enough to handle end-to-end design validation. Sulcata is a high-fidelity simulation and is used for performance evaluation, anomaly resolution, and design validation. Within the trajectory frame, almost all internal vectors are represented in whatever coordinate system is used to represent platform position. The trajectory frame must be planet-fixed. The platform body frame is specified relative to arbitrary reference points relative to the platform (spacecraft or test vehicle). Its rotation is a function of time from the trajectory coordinate system specified via dynamics input (file for open loop, callback for closed loop). Orientation of the frame relative to the body is arbitrary, but constant over time. The TDS frame must have a constant rotation and translation from the platform body frame specified at run time. The DEM frame has an arbitrary, but time-constant, rotation and translation with respect to the simulation frame specified at run time. It has the same orientation as sigma0 frame, but is possibly translated. Surface sigma0 has the same arbitrary rotation and translation as DEM frame.

  6. Termination Shock Surfing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, R. H.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Voyager 2 (V2) observations of the termination shock (TS) indicate that it is a plasma shock like no other in the heliosphere with dynamics and structure heavily influenced by the presence of an energized population of pickup ions (PUIs). The `unexpected' finding of a cold plasma in the heliosheath with very little heating of the solar wind suggests that the energy dissipated by the shock could be dominated by the acceleration of PUIs at the TS. We examine the 'shock surfing' mechanism at the test particle level, where multiply reflected ions (MRIs) gain energy from the motional electric field as a consequence of reflection from the cross-shockpotential, for a specific model of the TS3 (the third TS crossing measured by V2). The energization of PUI shell distributions at a stationary, perpendicular model of the TS3 indicate that shock surfing can provide substantial PUI acceleration and a dissipation mechanism at the TS. For a strong enough cross-shock potential and sufficiently narrow shock ramp MRI acceleration can account for the `missing' energy of the downstream solar wind plasma.

  7. [Terminal ballistics. 1].

    PubMed

    Mangiante, G; Dagradi, V; Radin, S; Carolo, F; Giarolli, M; Tenci, A; Merico, G; Tosi, D; Acerbi, A; Della Giacoma, G

    1993-01-01

    We have chosen to conceive of terminal ballistics as a violent and extremely rapid confrontation between two forms of resistance before the final state of rest is reached. This definition, which cannot help but don the admittedly loud and outlandish garb of physics, is the most promising for the purposes of biological interpretation. The main characters on this stage are two, but only one of these really plays the lead, namely the human target, which acts out the basic roles inherent in its physical make-up; the other, the bullet, remains a background figure, frozen in its walk-on part, and ready for the next performance. This modus operandi, which is no simplification, but rather an academic necessity, enables us to focus on images which stand out more clearly as a result of an intensive macroscopic spotlight which brings out the features of the individual phenomena, broken down into a succession of close-ups, and subtracts them from the cold physical nature of this or that form of inert matter, which here is merely an occasional, disagreeable witness, or even more, a standing from time to time for but one of the infinite facets of the biological composite being. Here, then, faced with a kind of exploded macrophotograph of a complex kaleidoscope, we see the animal universe, of which we capture so far the plasticity, the subdivisibility, the anisotropy and the cavitation. PMID:7923493

  8. Characterization of deep electron traps in 4H-SiC Junction Barrier Schottky rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelczuk, Ł.; Dąbrowska-Szata, M.; Sochacki, M.; Szmidt, J.

    2014-04-01

    Conventional deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique was used to study deep electron traps in 4H-SiC Junction Barrier Schottky (JBS) rectifiers. 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, doped with nitrogen and grown on standard n+-4H-SiC substrates were exposed to low-dose aluminum ion implantation process under the Schottky contact in order to form both JBS grid and junction termination extension (JTE), and assure good rectifying properties of the diodes. Several deep electron traps were revealed and attributed to impurities or intrinsic defects in 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, on the basis of comparison of their electrical parameters (i.e. activation energies, apparent capture cross sections and concentrations) with previously published results.

  9. C-Au Covalently Bonded Molecular Junctions Using Nonprotected Alkynyl Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Olavarria-Contreras, Ignacio José; Perrin, Mickael L; Chen, Zhi; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2016-07-13

    We report on an approach to realize carbon-gold (C-Au) bonded molecular junctions without the need for an additive to deprotect the alkynyl carbon as endstanding anchor group. Using the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) technique, we determine the most probable conductance value of a family of alkynyl terminated oligophenylenes (OPA(n)) connected to gold electrodes through such an akynyl moiety in ambient conditions. The molecules bind to the gold leads through an sp-hybridized carbon atom at each side. Comparing our results with other families of molecules that present organometallic C-Au bonds, we conclude that the conductance of molecules contacted via an sp-hybridized carbon atom is lower than the ones using sp(3) hybridization due to strong differences in the coupling of the conducting orbitals with the gold leads. PMID:27266477

  10. Electron Transport, Energy Transfer, and Optical Response in Single Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Alexander James

    interactions quantum mechanically within nonequilibrium molecular junctions. Finally we perform preliminary calculations of the Raman spectrum of a three-ring oligophenylene vinylene terminating in amine functional groups molecule in a molecular junction and compare our results to experimental measurements. This work is the rst steps towards full calculations of the optical response of current-carrying molecular junction, which should combine classical calculations of the plasmon enhanced electric field with quantum calculations for the plasmon-molecular exciton interaction and nonequilibrium Raman scattering.

  11. Side mount universal battery terminal

    SciTech Connect

    Byfield, D. Jr.

    1987-06-16

    An automobile battery is described of the type having side mounted, threaded bolt hole terminal connectors, battery cables having bored disc shaped terminals with peripheral insulating covers and, an improved terminal connector bolt adapted to accommodate the battery cable terminals and other electrical accessory terminals comprising: an elongated body of electrically conducting material having a longitudinal axis and an inner end and an outer end; a first generally cylindrical threaded stud formed on the inner end of the body. The first stud has a length and diameter disposed to permit thread engagement of the stud with one of the side mounted terminal connectors on the battery in electrical connection therewith, and pass through the bore in one of the battery cable terminals; a central portion on the body adjacent to and outwardly from the first stud, the central portion has a peripheral diameter greater than the first stud portion and has a first shoulder surface generally normal to the longitudinal axis of the body facing toward the inner end of the body and disposed to engage the face surface of one of the battery cable terminals in an electrically conducting relationship.

  12. Acetylene-Terminated Polyimide Siloxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L.; Maudgal, Shubba

    1987-01-01

    Siloxane-containing addition polyimides yield toughened high-temperature adhesives and matrix resins. Addition polyimide made by reaction of aromatic tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride with aromatic diamine in presence of ethynyl-substituted aromatic monoamine. Acetylene-terminated siloxane imide cured by heating to yield acetylene-terminated polyimide siloxane.

  13. Good Endings: Managing Employee Terminations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnie, Robert A., Jr.; Sniffin, Paul B.

    A guide to managing employee terminations and resulting changes is presented for administrators. Three reasons for termination that are legitimate, nondiscriminatory, and acceptable in today's marketplace and courts are: cause (serious misconduct, dishonesty, unethical, or dangerous behavior); job elimination (reduction in force, economic…

  14. Nicole: Suicide and Terminal Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Judith M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents case summary of 58-year-old woman, terminally ill with cancer, who is contemplating suicide. Includes comments from Kjell Rudestam from the Fielding Institute and from Margaret Battin from the University of Utah who debate appropriate responses to people who contemplate suicide because of terminal illness. (NB)

  15. Molecular junctions of self-assembled monolayers with conducting polymer contacts.

    PubMed

    Neuhausen, Alexander B; Hosseini, Ali; Sulpizio, Joseph A; Chidsey, Christopher E D; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2012-11-27

    We present a method to fabricate individually addressable junctions of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that builds on previous studies which have shown that soft conductive polymer top contacts virtually eliminate shorts through the SAMs. We demonstrate devices with nanoscale lateral dimensions, representing an order of magnitude reduction in device area, with high yield and relatively low device-to-device variation, improving several features of previous soft contact devices. The devices are formed in pores in an inorganic dielectric layer with features defined by e-beam lithography and dry etching. We replace the aqueous PEDOT:PSS conductive polymer used in prior devices with Aedotron P, a low-viscosity, amphiphilic polymer, allowing incorporation of self-assembled monolayers with either hydrophobic or hydrophilic termination with the same junction geometry and materials. We demonstrate the adaptability of this new design by presenting transport measurements on SAMs composed of alkanethiols with methyl, thiol, carboxyl, and azide terminations. We establish that the observed room-temperature tunnel barrier is primarily a function of monolayer thickness, independent of the terminal group's hydrophilicity. Finally, we investigate the temperature dependence of transport and show that the low-temperature behavior is based on the energy distribution of sites from which carriers can tunnel between the polymer and gold contacts, as described by a model of variable-range hopping transport in a disordered conductor. PMID:23035989

  16. Impedance Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cells upon Challenge with C-terminal Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Geoffrey; Lo, Chun-Min

    2007-03-01

    Both in vitro and animal studies in breast, prostate, and ovarian cancers have shown that clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), which binds to CLDN4, may have an important therapeutic benefit, as it is rapidly cytotoxic in tissues overexpressing CLDN4. This study sought to evaluate the ability of C-terminal clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), a CLDN4-targetting molecule, to disrupt tight junction barrier function. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) was used to measure both junctional resistance and average cell-substrate separation of ovarian cancer cell lines after exposure to C-CPE. A total of 14 ovarian cancer cell lines were used, and included cell lines derived from serous, mucinous, and clear cells. Our results showed that junctional resistance increases as CLDN4 expression increases. In addition, C-CPE is non-cytotoxic in ovarian cancer cells expressing CLDN4. However, exposure to C-CPE results in a significant (p<0.05) dose- and CLDN4-dependent decrease in junctional resistance and an increase in cell-substrate separation. Treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with C-CPE disrupts tight junction barrier function.

  17. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  18. Junctional Adhesion Molecule A Promotes Epithelial Tight Junction Assembly to Augment Lung Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Quintero, David A.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.; Koval, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A−/− mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A−/− mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  19. Esophagogastric junction distensibility in hiatus hernia.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, C; McMahon, B P; Ejstrud, P; Ostapiuk, M A; Funch-Jensen, P; Drewes, A M

    2016-07-01

    Hiatus hernia is known to be an important risk factor for developing gastroesophageal reflux disease. We aimed to use the endoscopic functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) to evaluate the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. EndoFLIP assessments were made in 30 patients with hiatus hernia and Barrett's esophagus, and in 14 healthy controls. The EndoFLIP was placed straddling the esophagogastric junction and the bag distended stepwise to 50 mL. Cross-sectional areas of the bag and intra-bag pressures were recorded continuously. Measurements were made in the separate sphincter components and hiatus hernia cavity. EndoFLIP measured functional aspects such as sphincter distensibility and pressure of all esophagogastric junction components and visualized all hiatus hernia present at endoscopy. The lower esophageal sphincter in hiatus hernia patients had a lower pressure (e.g. 47.7 ± 13.0 vs. 61.4 ± 19.2 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the common esophagogastric junction in controls. In hiatus hernia patients, the crural diaphragm had a lower pressure (e.g. 29.6 ± 10.1 vs. 47.7 ± 13.0 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the lower esophageal sphincter. There was a significant association between symptom scores in patients and EndoFLIP assessment. Conclusively, EndoFLIP was a useful tool. To evaluate the presence of a hiatus hernia and to measure the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. Furthermore, EndoFLIP distinguished the separate esophagogastric junction components in hiatus hernia patients, and may help us understand the biomechanics of the esophagogastric junction and the mechanisms behind hiatal herniation. PMID:25789842

  20. Nonlocal tunnel magnetoresistance and thermal rectification effect in a nanoscale three-terminal junction.

    PubMed

    Ying, Yibo; Jin, Guojun

    2012-12-12

    We investigate thermally driven electronic transport through a quantum dot (QD) coupled to two ferromagnetic leads and one normal-metallic lead. The effect of spin accumulation and temperature bias on the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) is examined. We obtain a nonlocal negative TMR, which also exhibits a rectification effect as a function of the QD level modulated by a gate voltage. For a negative QD level, the TMR is zero, and the TMR is negative for a positive QD level. This effect arises from the interplay of the spin accumulation and thermoelectric transport, which detects the sign reversal of spin accumulation in the QD. In addition, our system can also be used as a spin current generator. PMID:23148042

  1. Understanding electronic structure and transport properties in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Kamal B.

    Understanding the electronic structure and the transport properties of nanoscale materials are pivotal for designing future nano-scale electronic devices. Nanoscale materials could be individual or groups of molecules, nanotubes, semiconducting quantum dots, and biomolecules. Among these several alternatives, organic molecules are very promising and the field of molecular electronics has progressed significantly over the past few decades. Despite these progresses, it has not yet been possible to achieve atomic level control at the metal-molecule interface during a conductance measurement, which hinders the progress in this field. The lack of atomic level information of the interface also makes it much harder for theorist to interpret the experimental results. To identify the junction configuration that possibly exists during the experimental measurement of conductance in molecular junction, we created an ensemble of Ruthanium-bis(terpyridine) molecular devices, and studied the transport behavior in these molecular junctions. This helps us identifying the junction geometry that yields the experimentally measured current-voltage characteristics. Today's electronic devices mostly ignore the spin effect of an electron. The inclusion of spin effect of an electron on solid-state transistor allows us to build more efficient electronic devices; this also alleviates the problem of huge heat dissipation in the nanoscale electronic devices. Different materials have been utilized to build three terminals spin transistor since its inception in 1950. In search of suitable candidates for the molecular spin transistor, we have recently designed a spin-valve transistor based on an organometallic molecule; a large amplification (320 %) in tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) is found to occur at an experimentally accessible gate field. This suggests that the organic molecules can be utilized for making the next generation three terminal spintronic devices. Similarly, we have designed a

  2. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  3. Calcium transients in cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, W G; Atluri, P P

    1995-01-01

    Calcium ions act presynaptically to modulate synaptic strength and to trigger neurotransmitter release. Here we detect stimulus-evoked changes in residual free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in rat cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals. Granule cell axons, known as parallel fibers, and their associated boutons, were labeled with several calcium indicators. When parallel fibers were extracellularly activated with stimulus trains, calcium accumulated in the terminals, producing changes in the fluorescence of the indicators. During the stimulus train, the fluorescence change per pulse became progressively smaller with the high affinity indicators Fura-2 and calcium green-2 but remained constant with the low affinity dyes BTC and furaptra. In addition, fluorescence transients of high affinity dyes were slower than those of low affinity indicators, which appear to accurately report the time course of calcium transients. Simulations show that differences in the observed transients can be explained by the different affinities and off rates of the fluorophores. The return of [Ca2+]i to resting levels can be approximated by an exponential decay with a time constant of 150 ms. On the basis of the degree of saturation in the response of high affinity dyes observed during trains, we estimate that each action potential increases [Ca2+]i in the terminal by several hundred nanomolar. These findings indicate that in these terminals [Ca2+]i transients are much larger and faster than those observed in larger boutons, such as those at the neuromuscular junction. Such rapid [Ca2+]i dynamics may be found in many of the terminals in the mammalian brain that are similar in size to parallel fiber boutons. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7612860

  4. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup error–induced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of ± 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans.

  5. PLEKHA7 modulates epithelial tight junction barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Paschoud, Serge; Jond, Lionel; Guerrera, Diego; Citi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    PLEKHA7 is a recently identified protein of the epithelial zonula adhaerens (ZA), and is part of a protein complex that stabilizes the ZA, by linking it to microtubules. Since the ZA is important in the assembly and disassembly of tight junctions (TJ), we asked whether PLEKHA7 is involved in modulating epithelial TJ barrier function. We generated clonal MDCK cell lines in which one of four different constructs of PLEKHA7 was inducibly expressed. All constructs were localized at junctions, but constructs lacking the C-terminal region were also distributed diffusely in the cytoplasm. Inducible expression of PLEKHA7 constructs did not affect the expression and localization of TJ proteins, the steady-state value of transepithelial resistance (TER), the development of TER during the calcium switch, and the flux of large molecules across confluent monolayers. In contrast, expression of three out of four constructs resulted both in enhanced recruitment of E-cadherin and associated proteins at the apical ZA and at lateral puncta adherentia (PA), a decreased TER at 18 h after assembly at normal calcium, and an attenuation in the fall in TER after extracellular calcium removal. This latter effect was inhibited when cells were treated with nocodazole. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that PLEKHA7 forms a complex with the cytoplasmic TJ proteins ZO-1 and cingulin, and this association does not depend on the integrity of microtubules. These results suggest that PLEKHA7 modulates the dynamics of assembly and disassembly of the TJ barrier, through E-cadherin protein complex- and microtubule-dependent mechanisms. PMID:24843844

  6. Probing the nature and resistance of the molecule-electrode contact in SAM-based junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchand Sangeeth, C. S.; Wan, Albert; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2015-07-01

    It is challenging to quantify the contact resistance and to determine the nature of the molecule-electrode contacts in molecular two-terminal junctions. Here we show that potentiodynamic and temperature dependent impedance measurements give insights into the nature of the SAM-electrode interface and other bottlenecks of charge transport (the capacitance of the SAM (CSAM) and the resistance of the SAM (RSAM)), unlike DC methods, independently of each other. We found that the resistance of the top-electrode-SAM contact for junctions with the form of AgTS-SCn//GaOx/EGaIn with n = 10, 12, 14, 16 or 18 is bias and temperature independent and hence Ohmic (non-rectifying) in nature, and is orders of magnitude smaller than RSAM. The CSAM and RSAM are independent of the temperature, indicating that the mechanism of charge transport in these SAM-based junctions is coherent tunneling and the charge carrier trapping at the interfaces is negligible.It is challenging to quantify the contact resistance and to determine the nature of the molecule-electrode contacts in molecular two-terminal junctions. Here we show that potentiodynamic and temperature dependent impedance measurements give insights into the nature of the SAM-electrode interface and other bottlenecks of charge transport (the capacitance of the SAM (CSAM) and the resistance of the SAM (RSAM)), unlike DC methods, independently of each other. We found that the resistance of the top-electrode-SAM contact for junctions with the form of AgTS-SCn//GaOx/EGaIn with n = 10, 12, 14, 16 or 18 is bias and temperature independent and hence Ohmic (non-rectifying) in nature, and is orders of magnitude smaller than RSAM. The CSAM and RSAM are independent of the temperature, indicating that the mechanism of charge transport in these SAM-based junctions is coherent tunneling and the charge carrier trapping at the interfaces is negligible. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedure, Nyquist

  7. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis: Diagnosis, Pathogenesis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaewon

    2016-01-01

    Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a common radiographic finding after long spinal fusion. A number of studies on the causes, risk factors, prevention, and treatment of PJK have been conducted. However, no clear definition of PJK has been established. In this paper, we aimed to clarify the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of PJK by reviewing relevant papers that have been published to date. A literature search was conducted on PubMed using "proximal junctional", "proximal junctional kyphosis", and "proximal junctional failure" as search keywords. Only studies that were published in English were included in this study. The incidence of PJK ranges from 5% to 46%, and it has been reported that 66% of cases occur 3 months after surgery and approximately 80% occur within 18 months. A number of studies have reported that there is no significantly different clinical outcome between PJK patients and non-PJK patients. One study showed that PJK patients expressed more pain than non-PJK patients. However, recent studies focused on proximal junctional failure (PJF), which is accepted as a severe form of PJK. PJF showed significant adverse impact in clinical aspect such as pain, neurologic deficit, ambulatory difficulties, and social isolation. Numerous previous studies have identified various risk factors and reported on the treatment and prevention of PJK. Based on these studies, we determined the clinical significance and impact of PJK. In addition, it is important to find a strategic approach to the proper treatment of PJK. PMID:27340542

  8. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  9. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  10. HPV oncoprotein E6 is a structure-dependent DNA-binding protein that recognizes four-way junctions.

    PubMed

    Ristriani, T; Masson, M; Nominé, Y; Laurent, C; Lefevre, J F; Weiss, E; Travé, G

    2000-03-10

    E6 is an oncoprotein implicated in cervical cancers, produced by "high-risk" human papillomaviruses. E6 is thought to promote tumorigenesis by stimulating cellular degradation of the tumour suppressor p53, but it might display other activities. Sequence similarity was recently detected between E6 and endonuclease VII, a protein of phage T4 that recognizes and cleaves four-way DNA junctions. Here, we purified recombinant E6 proteins and demonstrated that high-risk E6 s bind selectively to four-way junctions in a structure-dependent manner. Several residues in the C-terminal zinc-binding domain, the region of E6 similar to endonuclease VII, are necessary for the junction-binding activity. E6 binds to the junction as a monomer. Comparative electrophoresis shows that E6-bound junctions migrate in an extended square conformation. Magnesium inhibits the electrophoretic migration of the complexes but does not seem to influence their formation at equilibrium. This work is the first demonstration of specific binding of purified active E6 to a well-characterized DNA ligand, and suggests new modes of action of E6 in oncogenesis. PMID:10698626

  11. GEN1 from a Thermophilic Fungus Is Functionally Closely Similar to Non-Eukaryotic Junction-Resolving Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Alasdair D.J.; Liu, Yijin; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Gartner, Anton; Lilley, David M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Processing of Holliday junctions is essential in recombination. We have identified the gene for the junction-resolving enzyme GEN1 from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum and expressed the N-terminal 487-amino-acid section. The protein is a nuclease that is highly selective for four-way DNA junctions, cleaving 1 nt 3′ to the point of strand exchange on two strands symmetrically disposed about a diagonal axis. CtGEN1 binds to DNA junctions as a discrete homodimer with nanomolar affinity. Analysis of the kinetics of cruciform cleavage shows that cleavage of the second strand occurs an order of magnitude faster than the first cleavage so as to generate a productive resolution event. All these properties are closely similar to those described for bacterial, phage and mitochondrial junction-resolving enzymes. CtGEN1 is also similar in properties to the human enzyme but lacks the problems with aggregation that currently prevent detailed analysis of the latter protein. CtGEN1 is thus an excellent enzyme with which to engage in biophysical and structural analysis of eukaryotic GEN1. PMID:25315822

  12. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  13. Smart sensor for terminal homing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, D.; Aggarwal, R.; Hummel, R.

    1980-01-01

    The practical scene matching problem is considered to present certain complications which must extend classical image processing capabilities. Certain aspects of the scene matching problem which must be addressed by a smart sensor for terminal homing are discussed. First a philosophy for treating the matching problem for the terminal homing scenario is outlined. Then certain aspects of the feature extraction process and symbolic pattern matching are considered. It is thought that in the future general ideas from artificial intelligence will be more useful for terminal homing requirements of fast scene recognition and pattern matching.

  14. Low Earth Orbiter: Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremer, Steven E.; Bundick, Steven N.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the current government budgetary environment that requires the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to do more with less, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility has developed and implemented a class of ground stations known as a Low Earth Orbiter-Terminal (LEO-T). This development thus provides a low-cost autonomous ground tracking service for NASA's customers. More importantly, this accomplishment provides a commercial source to spacecraft customers around the world to purchase directly from the company awarded the NASA contract to build these systems. A few years ago, NASA was driven to provide more ground station capacity for spacecraft telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) services with a decreasing budget. NASA also made a decision to develop many smaller, cheaper satellites rather than a few large spacecraft as done in the past. In addition, university class missions were being driven to provide their own TT&C services due to the increasing load on the NASA ground-tracking network. NASA's solution for this ever increasing load was to use the existing large aperture systems to support those missions requiring that level of performance and to support the remainder of the missions with the autonomous LEO-T systems. The LEO-T antenna system is a smaller, cheaper, and fully autonomous unstaffed system that can operate without the existing NASA support infrastructure. The LEO-T provides a low-cost, reliable space communications service to the expanding number of low-earth orbiting missions around the world. The system is also fostering developments that improve cost-effectiveness of autonomous-class capabilities for NASA and commercial space use. NASA has installed three LEO-T systems. One station is at the University of Puerto Rico, the second system is installed at the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks, Alaska, and the third system is installed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. This paper

  15. Magnetic electron focusing and tuning of the electron current with a pn-junction

    SciTech Connect

    Milovanović, S. P. Ramezani Masir, M. Peeters, F. M.

    2014-01-28

    Transverse magnetic focusing properties of graphene using a ballistic four terminal structure are investigated. The electric response is obtained using the semiclassical billiard model. The transmission exhibits pronounced peaks as a consequence of skipping orbits at the edge of the structure. When we add a pn-junction between the two probes, snake states along the pn-interface appear. Injected electrons are guided by the pn-interface to one of the leads depending on the value of the applied magnetic field. Oscillations in the resistance are found depending on the amount of particles that end up in each lead.

  16. Temperature-dependent characteristics of 4H—SiC junction barrier Schottky diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Men; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Hu; Chen, Wen-Hao

    2012-03-01

    The current—voltage characteristics of 4H—SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) diodes terminated by an offset field plate have been measured in the temperature range of 25-300 °C. An experimental barrier height value of about 0.5 eV is obtained for the Ti/4H—SiC JBS diodes at room temperature. A decrease in the experimental barrier height and an increase in the ideality factor with decreasing temperature are shown. Reverse recovery testing also shows the temperature dependence of the peak recovery current density and the reverse recovery time. Finally, a discussion of reducing the reverse recovery time is presented.

  17. Magnetic electron focusing and tuning of the electron current with a pn-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, S. P.; Ramezani Masir, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Transverse magnetic focusing properties of graphene using a ballistic four terminal structure are investigated. The electric response is obtained using the semiclassical billiard model. The transmission exhibits pronounced peaks as a consequence of skipping orbits at the edge of the structure. When we add a pn-junction between the two probes, snake states along the pn-interface appear. Injected electrons are guided by the pn-interface to one of the leads depending on the value of the applied magnetic field. Oscillations in the resistance are found depending on the amount of particles that end up in each lead.

  18. Holographic Josephson junction from massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Li, Huai-Fan; Zeng, Hua-Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2016-05-01

    We study the holographic superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity. If the boundary theory is independent of spatial directions, i.e., if the chemical potential is homogeneous in spatial directions, we find that the graviton mass parameter will make it more difficult for the normal metal-superconductor phase transition to take place. In the holographic model of the Josephson junction, it is found that the maximal tunneling current will decrease according to the graviton mass parameter. Besides, the coherence length of the junction decreases as well with respect to the graviton mass parameter. If one interprets the graviton mass parameter as the effect of momentum dissipation in the boundary field theory, this indicates that the stronger the momentum dissipation is, the smaller the coherence length is.

  19. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  20. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  1. Electronic Veselago lensing in graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Cory

    Ballistic electrons in a uniform 2D electron gas (2DEG) behave in close analogy to light propagating through an optical medium. In the absence of impurity scattering, electrons follow straight-line trajectories, while the associated de Broglie wavelength can give rise to interference and diffraction. Here we present measurements of ballistic graphene devices in which a graphite gate is used to realize an atomically-smooth junction. We demonstrate unambiguous signatures of negative refraction across a PN junction, paving the way for electron optics inspired by Veselago lensing. Comparison with theoretical simulations reveals the importance of the junction profile towards this effort. Opportunities for future device designs that may take advantage of these effects will be discussed.

  2. Molecular organization of tricellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mikio; Izumi, Yasushi; Oda, Yukako; Higashi, Tomohito; Iwamoto, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    When the apicolateral border of epithelial cells is compared with a polygon, its sides correspond to the apical junctional complex, where cell adhesion molecules assemble from the plasma membranes of two adjacent cells. On the other hand, its vertices correspond to tricellular contacts, where the corners of three cells meet. Vertebrate tricellular contacts have specialized structures of tight junctions, termed tricellular tight junctions (tTJs). tTJs were identified by electron microscopic observations more than 40 years ago, but have been largely forgotten in epithelial cell biology since then. The identification of tricellulin and angulin family proteins as tTJ-associated membrane proteins has enabled us to study tTJs in terms of not only the paracellular barrier function but also unknown characteristics of epithelial cell corners via molecular biological approaches. PMID:25097825

  3. Synchronized Switching in a Josephson Junction Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity.

  4. Tunneling Magnetothermopower in Magnetic Tunnel Junction Nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebing, N.; Serrano-Guisan, S.; Rott, K.; Reiss, G.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2011-10-01

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%.

  5. Tunneling magnetothermopower in magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Liebing, N; Serrano-Guisan, S; Rott, K; Reiss, G; Langer, J; Ocker, B; Schumacher, H W

    2011-10-21

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10  μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100  μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%. PMID:22107572

  6. Synchronized switching in a josephson junction crystal.

    PubMed

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity. PMID:24949766

  7. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  8. Oxidative Stress, Lens Gap Junctions, and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The eye lens is constantly subjected to oxidative stress from radiation and other sources. The lens has several mechanisms to protect its components from oxidative stress and to maintain its redox state, including enzymatic pathways and high concentrations of ascorbate and reduced glutathione. With aging, accumulation of oxidized lens components and decreased efficiency of repair mechanisms can contribute to the development of lens opacities or cataracts. Maintenance of transparency and homeostasis of the avascular lens depend on an extensive network of gap junctions. Communication through gap junction channels allows intercellular passage of molecules (up to 1 kDa) including antioxidants. Lens gap junctions and their constituent proteins, connexins (Cx43, Cx46, and Cx50), are also subject to the effects of oxidative stress. These observations suggest that oxidative stress-induced damage to connexins (and consequent altered intercellular communication) may contribute to cataract formation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 339–353. PMID:18831679

  9. Phonon Josephson junction with nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Shabir; Vitali, David

    2016-03-01

    We study coherent phonon oscillations and tunneling between two coupled nonlinear nanomechanical resonators. We show that the coupling between two nanomechanical resonators creates an effective phonon Josephson junction, which exhibits two different dynamical behaviors: Josephson oscillation (phonon-Rabi oscillation) and macroscopic self-trapping (phonon blockade). Self-trapping originates from mechanical nonlinearities, meaning that when the nonlinearity exceeds its critical value, the energy exchange between the two resonators is suppressed, and phonon Josephson oscillations between them are completely blocked. An effective classical Hamiltonian for the phonon Josephson junction is derived and its mean-field dynamics is studied in phase space. Finally, we study the phonon-phonon coherence quantified by the mean fringe visibility, and show that the interaction between the two resonators may lead to the loss of coherence in the phononic junction.

  10. Defect junctions and domain wall dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P.P.; Oliveira, J.C.R.E.; Martins, C.J.A.P.; Menezes, J.; Menezes, R.

    2006-06-15

    We study a number of domain wall forming models where various types of defect junctions can exist. These illustrate some of the mechanisms that will determine the evolution of defect networks with junctions. Understanding these mechanisms is vital for a proper assessment of a number of cosmological scenarios: we will focus on the issue of whether or not cosmological frustrated domain wall networks can exist at all, but our results are also relevant for the dynamics of cosmic (super)strings, where junctions are expected to be ubiquitous. We also define and discuss the properties that would make up the ideal model in terms of hypothetical frustrated wall networks, and provide an explicit construction for such a model. We carry out a number of numerical simulations of the evolution of these networks, analyze and contrast their results, and discuss their implications for our no-frustration conjecture.

  11. 77 FR 38128 - Withdrawal of TORP Terminal LP, Bienville Offshore Energy Terminal Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Maritime Administration Withdrawal of TORP Terminal LP, Bienville Offshore Energy Terminal Liquefied... Terminal LP's (TORP) withdrawal of the deepwater port license application for the proposed Bienville Offshore Energy Terminal (BOET). All actions related to the processing and agency coordination...

  12. Magnesium gating of cardiac gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Kurata, Yasutaka; Oka, Chiaki; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Noma, Akinori

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to study kinetics of modulation by intracellular Mg(2+) of cardiac gap junction (Mg(2+) gate). Paired myocytes of guinea-pig ventricle were superfused with solutions containing various concentrations of Mg(2+). In order to rapidly apply Mg(2+) to one aspect of the gap junction, the non-junctional membrane of one of the pair was perforated at nearly the connecting site by pulses of nitrogen laser beam. The gap junction conductance (G(j)) was measured by clamping the membrane potential of the other cell using two-electrode voltage clamp method. The laser perforation immediately increased G(j), followed by slow G(j) change with time constant of 3.5 s at 10 mM Mg(2+). Mg(2+) more than 1.0 mM attenuated dose-dependently the gap junction conductance and lower Mg(2+) (0.6 mM) increased G(j) with a Hill coefficient of 3.4 and a half-maximum effective concentration of 0.6 mM. The time course of G(j) changes was fitted by single exponential function, and the relationship between the reciprocal of time constant and Mg(2+) concentration was almost linear. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model of Mg(2+) gate with one open state and three closed states well reproduced experimental results. One-dimensional cable model of thirty ventricular myocytes connected to the Mg(2+) gate model suggested a pivotal role of the Mg(2+) gate of gap junction under pathological conditions. PMID:20553744

  13. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  14. Balanced Branching in Transcription Termination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, K. J.; Laughlin, R. B.; Liang, S.

    2001-01-01

    The theory of stochastic transcription termination based on free-energy competition requires two or more reaction rates to be delicately balanced over a wide range of physical conditions. A large body of work on glasses and large molecules suggests that this should be impossible in such a large system in the absence of a new organizing principle of matter. We review the experimental literature of termination and find no evidence for such a principle but many troubling inconsistencies, most notably anomalous memory effects. These suggest that termination has a deterministic component and may conceivably be not stochastic at all. We find that a key experiment by Wilson and von Hippel allegedly refuting deterministic termination was an incorrectly analyzed regulatory effect of Mg(2+) binding.

  15. Terminal attractors in neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1989-01-01

    A new type of attractor (terminal attractors) for content-addressable memory, associative memory, and pattern recognition in artificial neural networks operating in continuous time is introduced. The idea of a terminal attractor is based upon a violation of the Lipschitz condition at a fixed point. As a result, the fixed point becomes a singular solution which envelopes the family of regular solutions, while each regular solution approaches such an attractor in finite time. It will be shown that terminal attractors can be incorporated into neural networks such that any desired set of these attractors with prescribed basins is provided by an appropriate selection of the synaptic weights. The applications of terminal attractors for content-addressable and associative memories, pattern recognition, self-organization, and for dynamical training are illustrated.

  16. 50 CFR 14.110 - Terminal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Wild Mammals and Birds to the United States § 14.110 Terminal facilities. (a) Any terminal facility... or bird in a terminal facility shall provide the following: (1) A holding area cleaned and...

  17. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  18. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J; Dana, Syamal K

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions. PMID:26723143

  19. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Electronic properties of electrodeposited semiconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatman, Shawn Michael Edward

    This thesis describes the synthesis, structural properties, optical properties, and electronic properties of semiconductor junctions based on electrochemically deposited ZnO and CU2O thin films. The first focus is characterizing the effect of deposition conditions (including applied potential and electrolyte composition) on the fundamental properties of these materials (including carrier concentration, band gap, and microstructure). Subsequent discussion addresses electrical conduction to and through ZnO/substrate junctions as a function of these deposition conditions. Finally, three device applications for these ZnO-based junction are explored: Schottky rectifiers, humidity sensors, and photovoltaic cells. Since electrical conduction to and through heterojunction interfaces is very important for maximizing the functionality of semiconductor devices, this thesis work is an essential step towards increasing the functionality of multi-layer ZnO-based heterojunction devices prepared by electrodeposition. Capacitive Mott-Schottky analyses showed that the carrier concentrations of our ZnO electrodeposits are dependent upon deposition potential, with higher net carrier concentration at more positive potentials. UV/Visible diffuse reflectance data indicates that band gap increases with more positive deposition potentials. Together, these results suggest that hydrogen is the dominant, yet unintentional, Moss-Burstein like dopant in our n-type ZnO. Furthermore, the range of carrier concentrations we can achieve (10 18 -- 1021 cm-3) is comparable to that obtained with intentional doping. This is significant because using deposition potential to change growth rate or morphology will simultaneously change electronic properties. The deposition potential studies evolved into a procedure for selective, one-step production of either ohmic or rectifying (Schottky) ZnO/metal junctions (Chatman et al., Appi.Phys.Lett., 2008, 92, 012103/1-3). Rectifying ratio and soft

  1. Electrostatic model of radial pn junction nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2013-08-01

    Poisson's equation is solved for a radial pn junction nanowire (NW) with surface depletion. This resulted in a model capable of giving radial energy band and electric field profiles for any arbitrary core/shell doping density, core/shell dimensions, and surface state density. Specific cases were analyzed to extract pertinent underlying physics, while the relationship between NW specifications and the depletion of the NW were examined to optimize the built-in potential across the junction. Additionally, the model results were compared with experimental results in literature to good agreement. Finally, an optimum device design is proposed to satisfy material, optical, and electrostatic constraints in high efficiency NW solar cells.

  2. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  3. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  4. Alternating current driven instability in magnetic junctions.

    PubMed

    Epshtein, E M; Zilberman, P E

    2009-04-01

    An effect is considered of alternating (high-frequency) current on the spin-valve-type magnetic junction configuration. The stability with respect to small fluctuations is investigated in the macrospin approximation. When the current frequency is close to the eigenfrequency (precession frequency) of the free layer, parametric resonance occurs. Both collinear configurations, antiparallel and parallel, can become unstable under resonance conditions. The antiparallel configuration can also become unstable under non-resonant conditions. The threshold current density amplitude is of the order of the dc current density for switching of the magnetic junction. PMID:21825350

  5. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions.

  6. Propagation Terminal Design and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James

    2015-01-01

    The NASA propagation terminal has been designed and developed by the Glenn Research Center and is presently deployed at over 5 NASA and partner ground stations worldwide collecting information on the effects of the atmosphere on Ka-band and millimeter wave communications links. This lecture provides an overview of the fundamentals and requirements of the measurement of atmospheric propagation effects and, specifically, the types of hardware and digital signal processing techniques employed by current state-of-the-art propagation terminal systems.

  7. Off line ion source terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamanna, K.

    2014-01-01

    The off-line ion source (OLIS) terminal provides beams from stable isotopes to ISAC (see Fig. 1) experiments as well as for accelerator commissioning and for pilot beams for radioactive beam experiments. The OLIS terminal (see Fig. 2) is equipped with a microwave driven cusp source for single and double charge ions, a surface ion source for low energy spread alkali beams, and a multi-charge ion source.

  8. Terminal Model Of Newtonian Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents study of theory of Newtonian dynamics of terminal attractors and repellers, focusing on issues of reversibility vs. irreversibility and deterministic evolution vs. probabilistic or chaotic evolution of dynamic systems. Theory developed called "terminal dynamics" emphasizes difference between it and classical Newtonian dynamics. Also holds promise for explaining irreversibility, unpredictability, probabilistic behavior, and chaos in turbulent flows, in thermodynamic phenomena, and in other dynamic phenomena and systems.

  9. Electronic transport in graphene: p-n junctions, shot noise, and nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James Ryan

    2009-12-01

    Novel, two-dimensional materials have allowed for the inception and elucidation of a plethora of physical phenomena. On such material, a hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms called graphene, is a unique, truly two-dimensional molecular conductor. This thesis describes six experiments that elucidate some interesting physical properties and technological applications of graphene, with an emphasis on graphene-based p-n junctions. A technique for the creation of high-quality p-n junctions of graphene is described. Transport measurements at zero magnetic field demonstrate local control of the carrier type and density bipolar graphene-based junctions. In the quantum Hall regime, new plateaus in the conductance are observed and explained in terms of mode mixing at the p-n interface. Shot noise in unipolar and bipolar graphene devices is measured. A density-independent Fano factor is observed, contrary to theoretical expectations. Further, an independence on device geometry is also observed. The role of disorder on the measured Fano factor is discussed, and comparison to recent theory for disordered graphene is made. The effect of a two-terminal geometry, where the device aspect ratio is different from unity, is measured experimentally and analyzed theoretically. A method for extracting layer number from the conductance extrema is proposed. A method for a conformal mapping of a device with asymmetric contacts to a rectangle is demonstrated. Finally, possible origins of discrepancies between theory and experiment are discussed. Transport along p-n junctions in graphene is reported. Enhanced transport along the junction is observed and attributed to states that exist at the p-n interface. A correspondence between the observed phenomena at low-field and in the quantum Hall regime is observed. An electric field perpendicular to the junction is found to reduce the enhanced conductance at the p-n junction. A corollary between the p-n interface states and "snake states" in an

  10. Forearc Deformation, Arc Volcanism, and Landscape Evolution near the Cocos-Nazca-Caribbean Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, K. D.; Fisher, D.; Gardner, T.; Protti, M.

    2005-12-01

    New geologic mapping in SE Costa Rica and SW Panama reveals a system of structures and landscape features that are actively propagating with the Cocos-Nazca-Caribbean Triple Junction. The triple junction migrates to the SE at ~50 km/my, so the upper plate inboard of the Nazca plate experiences a rapid change from steep, slow subduction of the Nazca plate to shallow, rapid subduction of the Cocos plate. High plate boundary coupling for ~100 km NW of the triple junction has led to the development of the Fila Costena Thrust Belt. Balanced cross-sections indicate that shortening rates are highest near the center of the thrust belt, and decrease to the SE nearest the triple junction, where the thrust belt abruptly terminates. Right lateral tear faults cut the thrusts of the Fila Costena and allow for a sharp gradient in upper plate shortening above the subducted projection of the Panama Fracture Zone (PFZ), or the Cocos-Nazca boundary. East of the triple junction, a ridge exposes a fault-related anticline that may represent the incipient propagation of the Fila Costena into Panama. The volcanic arc is active just to the east of the onland projection of the subducting PFZ (e.g., Volcan Baru), with the extinct Talamanca arc lying to the west of this projection. Lahar fans on the slopes of the active Volcan Baru are analogous to the backtilted lahars now restricted to the rear of the Fila Costena. The spatial and temporal distribution of arc volcanism is consistent with a mantle wedge restricted to the east of the PFZ that migrates eastward with the triple junction. The Rio Chiriqui drainage system is currently the only river that carries arc volcanics to the eastern thrust front. The river skirts the southeast edge of the thrust belt and is inset into lahar fans on the slopes of Volcan Baru. Uplifted Quaternary fluvial terraces, located several kilometers west from the current drainage system, are offset at the thrust front by about 100-150 m. Andesite clasts in these

  11. Color tunable monolithic InGaN/GaN LED having a multi-junction structure.

    PubMed

    Kong, Duk-Jo; Kang, Chang-Mo; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Kim, James; Lee, Dong-Seon

    2016-03-21

    In this study, we have fabricated a blue-green color-tunable monolithic InGaN/GaN LED having a multi-junction structure with three terminals. The device has an n-p-n structure consisting of a green and a blue active region, i.e., an n-GaN / blue-MQW / p-GaN / green-MQW / n-GaN / Al2O3 structure with three terminals for independently controlling the two active regions. To realize this LED structure, a typical LED consisting of layers of n-GaN, blue MQW, and p-GaN is regrown on a conventional green LED by using a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method. We explain detailed mechanisms of three operation modes which are the green, blue, and cyan mode. Moreover, we discuss optical properties of the device. PMID:27136884

  12. Experimental and numerical analyses of high voltage 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky rectifiers with linearly graded field limiting ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Dong; Deng, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Yong-Wei; Wang, Yong; Wen, Yi; Zhang, Bo

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the successful fabrication of 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) rectifiers with a linearly graded field limiting ring (LG-FLR). Linearly variable ring spacings for the FLR termination are applied to improve the blocking voltage by reducing the peak surface electric field at the edge termination region, which acts like a variable lateral doping profile resulting in a gradual field distribution. The experimental results demonstrate a breakdown voltage of 5 kV at the reverse leakage current density of 2 mA/cm2 (about 80% of the theoretical value). Detailed numerical simulations show that the proposed termination structure provides a uniform electric field profile compared to the conventional FLR termination, which is responsible for 45% improvement in the reverse blocking voltage despite a 3.7% longer total termination length.

  13. Atomic-scaled characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Wang, Dennis; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    Graphene p-n junctions are essential devices for studying relativistic Klein tunneling and the Veselago lensing effect in graphene. We have successfully fabricated graphene p-n junctions using both lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. We then use our 4-probe STM system to characterize the junctions. The ability to carry out scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in our STM instrument is essential for us to locate and measure the junction interface. We obtain both the topography and dI/dV spectra at the junction area, from which we track the shift of the graphene chemical potential with position across the junction interface. This allows us to directly measure the spatial width and roughness of the junction and its potential barrier height. We will compare the junction properties of devices fabricated by the aforementioned two methods and discuss their effects on the performance as a Veselago lens.

  14. Ballistic bipolar junctions in chemically gated graphene ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Baringhaus, Jens; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The realization of ballistic graphene pn-junctions is an essential task in order to study Klein tunneling phenomena. Here we show that intercalation of Ge under the buffer layer of pre-structured SiC-samples succeeds to make truly nano-scaled pn-junctions. By means of local tunneling spectroscopy the junction width is found to be as narrow as 5 nm which is a hundred times smaller compared to electrically gated structures. The ballistic transmission across the junction is directly proven by systematic transport measurements with a 4-tip STM. Various npn- and pnp-junctions are studied with respect to the barrier length. The pn-junctions are shown to act as polarizer and analyzer with the second junction becoming transparent in case of a fully ballistic barrier. This can be attributed to the almost full suppression of electron transmission through the junction away from normal incidence. PMID:25898259

  15. 7 CFR 1206.22 - Terminate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.22 Terminate. Terminate...

  16. 7 CFR 1206.22 - Terminate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.22 Terminate. Terminate...

  17. 7 CFR 1206.22 - Terminate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.22 Terminate. Terminate...

  18. 7 CFR 1206.22 - Terminate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.22 Terminate. Terminate...

  19. 7 CFR 1206.22 - Terminate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.22 Terminate. Terminate...

  20. Endomicroscopy and electromyography of neuromuscular junctions in situ

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rosalind; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Skehel, Paul A; Ribchester, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electromyography (EMG) is used routinely to diagnose neuromuscular dysfunction in a wide range of peripheral neuropathies, myopathies, and neuromuscular degenerative diseases including motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Definitive neurological diagnosis may also be indicated by the analysis of pathological neuromuscular innervation in motor-point biopsies. Our objective in this study was to preempt motor-point biopsy by combining live imaging with electrophysiological analysis of slow degeneration of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in vivo. Methods We combined conventional needle electromyography with fiber-optic confocal endomicroscopy (CEM), using an integrated hand-held, 1.5-mm-diameter probe. We utilized as a test bed, various axotomized muscles in the hind limbs of anaesthetized, double-homozygous thy1.2YFP16: WldS mice, which coexpress the Wallerian-degeneration Slow (WldS) protein and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in motor neurons. We also tested exogenous vital stains, including Alexa488-α-bungarotoxin; the styryl pyridinium dye 4-Di-2-Asp; and a GFP conjugate of botulinum toxin Type A heavy chain (GFP-HcBoNT/A). Results We show that an integrated EMG/CEM probe is effective in longitudinal evaluation of functional and morphological changes that take place over a 7-day period during axotomy-induced, slow neuromuscular synaptic degeneration. EMG amplitude declined in parallel with overt degeneration of motor nerve terminals. EMG/CEM was safe and effective when nerve terminals and motor endplates were selectively stained with vital dyes. Interpretation Our findings constitute proof-of-concept, based on live imaging in an animal model, that combining EMG/CEM may be useful as a minimally invasive precursor or alternative to motor-point biopsy in neurological diagnosis and for monitoring local administration of potential therapeutics. PMID:25540801

  1. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  2. Ballistic transport in InSb Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasco, John Jeffrey; Gill, Stephen; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    We present transport measurements on Josephson junctions consisting of InSb nanowires contacted by Al at various junction lengths. Junction behavior as a function of gate voltage, electric field, and magnetic field is discussed. We show that short junctions behave as 1D quantum wires, exhibiting quantized conductance steps. In addition, we show how Josephson behavior changes as transport evolves from ballistic to diffusive as a function of contact spacing.

  3. A three-terminal semiconductor-superconductor transimpedance amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, T.; Leung, M.; Dalrymple, B.; Abelson, L.; Spargo, J.; Ou, S.; Chan, H.; Silver, A.

    1993-03-01

    The authors report an improved hybrid three-terminal transimpedance amplifier (TIA) with significant current gain. The TIA consists of a semiconductor diode configured for injection of electrons into a thin base electrode superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction, whose response is read out by low-impedance superconductive electronics. An input dynamic impedance greater than 10 exp 11 ohms, an output dynamic impedance of approximately 10 exp -3 ohm, a current gain of 20, and an effective input noise current less than 10 exp -14 A/sq rt Hz were achieved. The TIA was operated in a sensor test bed with an extrinsic silicon infrared (IR) detector and superconductive analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. This device permits matching state-of-the-art semiconductor IR detectors with superconductive A/D converters, enabling a fully digital cryogenic focal plane array sensor with high sensitivity and speed but reduced power consumption.

  4. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD THE FRONT OF THE STRUCTURE. THE WHEELS AT THE TOP OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE OFF THE STATIONARY CABLES ONTO THE TRACK SUPPORTED BY THE "C" IRONS SUSPENDED FROM THE TOP TIMBERS ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT. THE BUCKET OPENING MECHANISM IS ON THE LEFT, AND PART OF THE CLOSING MECHANISM ON THE RIGHT EDGE OF THE FRAME. THE TWO CABLES AT CENTER ARE THE STATIONARY TRAM CABLES THAT RUN ALONG THE TOP OF THE SUPPORT TOWERS ON WHICH THE WHEELS OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE. THEY ARE ANCHORED AT GROUND LEVEL JUST OFF FRAME TO THE LOWER LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  5. Localization of the N-terminal and C-terminal ends of triadin with respect to the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane of rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Marty, I; Robert, M; Ronjat, M; Bally, I; Arlaud, G; Villaz, M

    1995-01-01

    Antibodies were raised against synthetic peptides corresponding to the N-terminal (residues 2-17) and C-terminal (residues 691-706) ends of rabbit skeletal muscle triadin, a 95 kDa protein located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane at the triad junction. The specificity of the antibodies generated was tested by ELISA and Western blot analysis. These tests demonstrated the ability of the antibodies to react specifically with the proteins. The anti-N-terminus antibodies bound to sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, indicating that the N-terminal end of the membrane-embedded triadin is exposed on the cytoplasmic side of the vesicles. In contrast, the anti-C-terminus antibodies were able to react with sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles only after permeabilization of the vesicles with a detergent, indicating that the C-terminal end is exposed on the luminal side of the vesicles. These immunological data were complemented by proteolysis experiments using carboxypeptidases and endoproteinase Arg C. A mixture of carboxypeptidases A, B and Y was used to induce degradation of the C-terminal end of triadin in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. This degradation, and a concomitant loss of reactivity of the anti-C-terminus antibodies in Western blots, was observed only when the vesicles were permeabilized, providing further evidence for the luminal localization of the C-terminal end of triadin. Treatment of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles with endoproteinase Arg C resulted in the removal of the N-terminal end of triadin, probably due to cleavage after Arg-34. This is a further indication of the cytoplasmic localization of the N-terminal end of triadin (and of its first 34 amino acids). When the proteolysis with endoproteinase Arg C was carried out with permeabilized vesicles, the cleavage occurred after Arg-141 or Arg-157, indicating that at least one of these residues is luminal. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7741707

  6. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  7. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-21

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a π-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  8. Semiconductor liquid-junction solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, B.A.

    1982-10-29

    A semiconductor liquid junction photocell in which the photocell is in the configuration of a light concentrator and in which the electrolytic solution both conducts current and facilitates the concentration of incident solar radiation onto the semiconductor. The photocell may be in the configuration of a non-imaging concentrator such as a compound parabolic concentrator, or an imaging concentrator such as a lens.

  9. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    PubMed Central

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  10. PECAM-1: regulator of endothelial junctional integrity.

    PubMed

    Privratsky, Jamie R; Newman, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    PECAM-1 (also known as CD31) is a cellular adhesion and signaling receptor comprising six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like homology domains, a short transmembrane domain and a 118 amino acid cytoplasmic domain that becomes serine and tyrosine phosphorylated upon cellular activation. PECAM-1 expression is restricted to blood and vascular cells. In circulating platelets and leukocytes, PECAM-1 functions largely as an inhibitory receptor that, via regulated sequential phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain, limits cellular activation responses. PECAM-1 is also highly expressed at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions as a mechanosensor, as a regulator of leukocyte trafficking and in the maintenance of endothelial cell junctional integrity. In this review, we will describe (1) the functional domains of PECAM-1 and how they contribute to its barrier-enhancing properties, (2) how the physical properties of PECAM-1 influence its subcellular localization and its ability to influence endothelial cell barrier function, (3) various stimuli that initiate PECAM-1 signaling and/or function at the endothelial junction and (4) cross-talk of PECAM-1 with other junctional molecules, which can influence endothelial cell function. PMID:24435645

  11. Superfluid density through 2D superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Shih, Chih-Kang

    As S. Qin et al. reported, two monolayer (2 ML) lead film on a silicon (111) substrate has one of two different atomic structures on the silicon substrate: the unstrained 1x1 and the psedumorphically strained √3x √3 (i.e. the same lattice constant as the Si √3x √3 lattice). Most interestingly, although these two different regions show the same quantum well state features, they have different Tc's (5 K and 4 K). These two different regions of 2 ML film naturally form superconductor-superconductor (SS or SS') junctions along silicon step edges. Physical connection of the junction is only 1 ML thickness because of the step height difference of substrate. We will present this study of SS (or SS') junction system using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and in-situ double-coil mutual inductance measurement. The transition of superconducting gaps across either SS or SS' junctions should show how to locally affect each other. Double coil measurement show a global Tc close to the lower Tc region with sizable superfluid density. We will discuss the phase rigidity and its relationship to the superfluid density in this ultra-thin Pb film that is only 2 ML thick.

  12. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass (Beck, 2013). Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electrical current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of (110±2) μeV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  13. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  14. Axial p-n-junctions in nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C; Shik, A; Byrne, K; Lynall, D; Blumin, M; Saveliev, I; Ruda, H E

    2015-02-27

    The charge distribution and potential profile of p-n-junctions in thin semiconductor nanowires (NWs) were analyzed. The characteristics of screening in one-dimensional systems result in a specific profile with large electric field at the boundary between the n- and p- regions, and long tails with a logarithmic drop in the potential and charge density. As a result of these tails, the junction properties depend sensitively on the geometry of external contacts and its capacity has an anomalously large value and frequency dispersion. In the presence of an external voltage, electrons and holes in the NWs can not be described by constant quasi-Fermi levels, due to small values of the average electric field, mobility, and lifetime of carriers. Thus, instead of the classical Sah-Noice-Shockley theory, the junction current-voltage characteristic was described by an alternative theory suitable for fast generation-recombination and slow diffusion-drift processes. For the non-uniform electric field in the junction, this theory predicts the forward branch of the characteristic to have a non-ideality factor η several times larger than the values 1 < η < 2 from classical theory. Such values of η have been experimentally observed by a number of researchers, as well as in the present work. PMID:25656461

  15. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Erik O.; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices. PMID:25553192

  16. Graphene-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobas, Enrique

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's in-plane transport has been widely researched and has yielded extraordinary carrier mobilities of 105 cm2/Vs and spin diffusion lengths of exceeding 100 μm. These properties bode well for graphene in future electronics and spintronics technologies. Its out-of-plane transport has been far less studied, although its parent material, graphite, shows a large conductance anisotropy. Recent calculations show graphene's interaction with close-packed ferromagnetic metal surfaces should produce highly spin-polarized transport out-of-plane, an enabling breakthrough for spintronics technology. In this work, we fabricate and measure FM/graphene/FM magnetic tunnel junctions using CVD-grown single-layer graphene. The resulting juctions show non-linear current-voltage characteristics and a very weak temperature dependence consistent with charge tunneling transport. Furthermore, we study spin transport across the junction as a function of bias voltage and temperature. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) peaks at two percent for single-layer graphene junctions and exhibits the expected bias asymmetry and a temperature dependence that fits well with established spin-polarized tunneling models. Results of mutli-layer graphene tunnel junctions will also be discussed.

  17. Miniaturized symmetrization optics for junction laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Jacob M. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor); Neil, Clyde C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Miniaturized optics comprising transverse and lateral cylindrical lenses composed of millimeter-sized rods with diameters, indices-of-refraction and spacing such that substantially all the light emitted as an asymmetrical beam from the emitting junction of the laser is collected and translated to a symmetrical beam.

  18. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency.

  19. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  20. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  1. Overdamped Josephson junctions for digital applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febvre, P.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.; Belogolovskii, M.; Collot, R.; Lacquaniti, V.

    2013-01-01

    An interesting feature of Superconductor-Normal metal-Superconductor Josephson junctions for digital applications is due to their non-hysteretic current-voltage characteristics in a broad temperature range below Tc. This allows to design Single-Flux-Quantum (SFQ) cells without the need of external shunts. Two advantages can be drawn from this property: first the SFQ cells can be more compact which leads to a more integrated solution towards nano-devices and more complex circuits; second the absence of electrical parasitic elements associated with the wiring of resistors external to the Josephson junctions increases the performance of SFQ circuits, in particular regarding the ultimate speed of operation. For this purpose Superconductor-Normal metal-Insulator-Superconductor Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions have been recently developed at INRiM with aluminum layer thicknesses between 30 and 100 nm. They exhibit non-hysteretic current-voltage characteristics with IcRn values higher than 0.5 mV in a broad temperature range and optimal Stewart McCumber parameters at 4.2 K for RSFQ applications. The main features of obtained SNIS junctions regarding digital applications are presented.

  2. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  3. Tight junction, selective permeability, and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Krug, Susanne M; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The tight junction forms a barrier against unlimited paracellular passage but some of the tight junction proteins just do the opposite, they form extracellular channels zigzagging between lateral membranes of neighboring cells. All of these channel-forming proteins and even some of the barrier formers exhibit selectivity, which means that they prefer certain substances over others. All channel formers exhibit at least one of the three types of selectivity: for cations (claudin-2, -10b, -15), for anions (claudin-10a, -17) or for water (claudin-2). Also some, but not all, barrier-forming claudins are charge-selective (claudin-4, -8, -14). Moreover, occludin and tricellulin turned out to be relevant for barrier formation against macromolecule passage. Tight junction proteins are dysregulated or can be genetically defective in numerous diseases, which may lead to three effects: (i) impaired paracellular transport e.g. causing magnesium loss in the kidney, (ii) increased paracellular transport of solutes and water e.g. causing leak-flux diarrhea in the intestine, and (iii) increased permeability to large molecules e.g. unwanted intestinal pathogen uptake fueling inflammatory processes. This review gives an overview on the properties of tight junction proteins featuring selective permeability, and in this context explains how these proteins induce or aggravate diseases. PMID:25220018

  4. Electric Field Effect in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.

    The electric field effect in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks (IJJ's) is investigated on the basis of the capacitively-coupled IJJ model. We clarify the current-voltage characteristics of the IJJ's in the presence of an external electric field. It is predicted that the IJJ's show a dynamical transition to the voltage state as the external electric field is increased.

  5. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  6. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  7. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  8. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  9. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  10. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  11. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  12. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  13. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  14. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  15. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  16. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  17. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  18. A power balance model for converging and diverging flow junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Guffey, S.E. ); Fraser, D.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors propose that pressures across a junction of flows are best described by potential, kinetic, and dissipated (lost) power. It is demonstrated that differences in Bernoulli constants up- and downstream of junctions are not proportional to energy losses even in the trivial case of zero junction losses.

  19. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  20. Dependence of proximity-induced supercurrent on junction length in multilayer-graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, A.; Sato, T.; Goto, H.; Tomori, H.; Takana, S.; Ootuka, Y.; Tsukagoshi, K.

    2010-11-01

    We report experimental observation of the proximity-induced supercurrent in superconductor-multilayer graphene-superconductor junctions. We find that the supercurrent is a linearly decreasing function of the junction length (separation of the superconducting electrodes), which is quite different from the usual behavior of exponential dependence. We suggest that this behavior originates from the intrinsic large contact resistance between the multilayer and the superconducting electrodes.

  1. 75 FR 6094 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Grand Junction, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace at Grand Junction, CO (74 FR... Junction, CO Grand Junction Regional, Grand Junction, CO (Lat. 39 07'21'' N., long. 108 31'36'' W.) Grand Junction VORTAC (Lat. 39 03'34'' N., long. 108 47'33'' W.) Grand Junction Localizer (Lat. 39 07'04''...

  2. Motor nerve terminal restoration after focal destruction in young and old mice.

    PubMed

    Robbins, N; Kuchynski, M; Polak, J; Grasso, A

    1990-01-01

    Regeneration of soleus motor nerve terminals after focal destruction by black widow spider venom (BWSV) or its active factor alpha-latrotoxin (LTx) was compared in young and old CBF-1 mice. The object was to determine whether previously reported delayed regeneration after nerve injury in old rodents was due to altered removal of debris, or delay or aberrancy in structural or functional restoration of the neuromuscular junction. In addition, the use of a new fluorescent technique permitted for the first time quantitation of the accuracy of early nerve terminal regeneration in mammalian muscle. Immunohistochemical and electron micrographic studies showed no age difference in destruction of terminals and removal of debris 2 days after toxin application. The indirect twitch and structural reinnervation (measured with flourescent techniques) returned to an equal extent in young and old mice beginning at 3 days after LTx treatment. BWSV (as opposed to LTx) delayed regeneration 1 day in young but not in old mice. On the first day of reinnervation, there was perisynaptic outgrowth in both young and old mice, although in the latter, there was a higher incidence of aberrant outgrowth. The relation between return of twitch strength and recovery of nerve terminal area (measured in teased zinc iodide-stained preparations) showed no age dependency. We conclude that factors cited to explain altered reactive sprouting in the aging CNS do not apply to regeneration of peripheral motor nerve terminals. However, it is possible that the aberrant regrowth observed at the neuromuscular junction in old mice will pertain to the aging CNS. Altered axonal rather than nerve terminal regeneration is the likely source of delayed peripheral nerve regeneration in old animals. PMID:2288242

  3. Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An InGaAs-based three-junction (3J) tandem thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell has been investigated to utilize more of the blackbody spectrum (from a 1,100 C general purpose heat source GPHS) efficiently. The tandem consists of three vertically stacked subcells, a 0.74-eV InGaAs cell, a 0.6- eV InGaAs cell, and a 0.55-eV InGaAs cell, as well as two interconnecting tunnel junctions. A greater than 20% TPV system efficiency was achieved by another group with a 1,040 C blackbody using a single-bandgap 0.6- eV InGaAs cell MIM (monolithic interconnected module) (30 lateral junctions) that delivered about 12 V/30 or 0.4 V/junction. It is expected that a three-bandgap tandem MIM will eventually have about 3 this voltage (1.15 V) and about half the current. A 4 A/cm2 would be generated by a single-bandgap 0.6-V InGaAs MIM, as opposed to the 2 A/cm2 available from the same spectrum when split among the three series-connected junctions in the tandem stack. This would then be about a 50% increase (3xVoc, 0.5xIsc) in output power if the proposed tandem replaced the single- bandgap MIM. The advantage of the innovation, if successful, would be a 50% increase in power conversion efficiency from radioisotope heat sources using existing thermophotovoltaics. Up to 50% more power would be generated for radioisotope GPHS deep space missions. This type of InGaAs multijunction stack could be used with terrestrial concentrator solar cells to increase efficiency from 41 to 45% or more.

  4. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  5. [Molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of neuromuscular junction].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Osamu; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2011-07-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between a motor neuron and skeletal muscle. The contraction of skeletal muscle is controlled by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), which is released from the motor nerve terminal. To achieve efficient neuromuscular transmission, acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) must be densely clustered on the muscle membrane of the NMJ. Failure of AChR clustering is associated with disorders of neuromuscular transmission such as congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) and myasthenia gravis (MG). Motoneuronal agrin and muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) are known to play essential roles in the formation and maintenance of NMJs in the central region of each muscle. However, it had been unclear how agrin activates MuSK. Recent studies have elucidated the roles of several key molecules, including the cytoplasmic adaptor protein Dok-7 and LDL receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), in agrin-induced MuSK activation. Moreover, new evidence indicates that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) regulates postsynaptic differentiation. In this review, we summarize the latest developments in molecular mechanisms underlying NMJ formation in vertebrates. PMID:21747134

  6. The effects of junction depth and impurity concentration on ion-implanted, junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, R.C.

    1980-12-01

    This paper presents data resulting from tests on the experimental optimization of the ion-implanted region of horizontal junction, silicon, ion-implanted P+N and N+P solar cells. The experimental data are compared to theoretical predictions based on a simple model and to data obtained with diffused junction solar cells (1). Optimum junction depth and average ion-implanted layer concentration for ion-implanted, silicon, PN junction solar cells under non-concentrated sunlight (approximately AMI conditions) appear to be 0.5..mu..m and 5X10/sup 18/ atoms/cm/sup 3/, respectively. Variation in solar cell efficiency with junction depth is rapid between 0.1 and 0.5..mu..m. Variations of efficiency in response to changes in concentration are minimal over the range tested. Experiments under various illumination conditions indicate increasing efficiency as insolation increases from 83mw/cm/sup 2/ to 100 mw/cm/sup 2/. Comparison with diffused junction, silicon solar cells indicates a potentially greater efficiency for ion-implanted solar cells. However, variation in efficiency between individual solar cells is sufficiently great to warrant further experimentation before reaching any final conclusions.

  7. Thermopower measurements of atomic and molecular junctions using microheater-embedded mechanically-controllable break junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-03-01

    There has been growing interest in developing high-performance thermoelectric materials for realizing thermoelectric power generation. Quantum confinement effects in low-dimensional structures are expected to provide high electronic density of states for enhanced thermopower, and thus considered as a promising approach for achieving a high figure of merit (M. S. Dresselhaus et al., Adv. Mat. 19 (2007) 1043-1053). From this respect, it is interesting to study thermoelectric properties of atomic and molecular junctions and evaluate their potential as a thermoelectric material. Recently, we have developed a heater-embedded micro-fabricated mechanically-controllable break junction (MCBJ) for investigating the thermoelectric transport in single-atom and -molecule junctions. Using the MCBJ devices, we could repeatedly form stable junctions at room temperatures via a self-breaking mechanism with one side being heated by the adjacent microheater. In my presentation, I will show the results of simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and the electrical conductance of atom-sized Au junctions and Au-benzenedithiol-Au junctions and discuss on the geometrical dependence of thermoelectric transport.

  8. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016. PMID:26899144

  9. Effect of single-strand break on branch migration and folding dynamics of Holliday junctions.

    PubMed

    Palets, Dmytro; Lushnikov, Alexander Y; Karymov, Mikhail A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2010-09-22

    The Holliday junction (HJ), or four-way junction, is a central intermediate state of DNA for homologous genetic recombination and other genetic processes such as replication and repair. Branch migration is the process by which the exchange of homologous DNA regions occurs, and it can be spontaneous or driven by proteins. Unfolding of the HJ is required for branch migration. Our previous single-molecule fluorescence studies led to a model according to which branch migration is a stepwise process consisting of consecutive migration and folding steps. Folding of the HJ in one of the folded conformations terminates the branch migration phase. At the same time, in the unfolded state HJ rapidly migrates over entire homology region of the HJ in one hop. This process can be affected by irregularities in the DNA double helical structure, so mismatches almost terminate a spontaneous branch migration. Single-stranded breaks or nicks are the most ubiquitous defects in the DNA helix; however, to date, their effect on the HJ branch migration has not been studied. In addition, although nicked HJs are specific substrates for a number of enzymes involved in DNA recombination and repair, the role of this substrate specificity remains unclear. Our main goal in this work was to study the effect of nicks on the efficiency of HJ branch migration and the dynamics of the HJ. To accomplish this goal, we applied two single-molecule methods: atomic force microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The atomic force microscopy data show that the nick does not prevent branch migration, but it does decrease the probability that the HJ will pass the DNA lesion. The single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer approaches were instrumental in detailing the effects of nicks. These studies reveal a dramatic change of the HJ dynamics. The nick changes the structure and conformational dynamics of the junctions, leading to conformations with geometries that are different from those

  10. Effect of Single-Strand Break on Branch Migration and Folding Dynamics of Holliday Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Palets, Dmytro; Lushnikov, Alexander Y.; Karymov, Mikhail A.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2010-01-01

    The Holliday junction (HJ), or four-way junction, is a central intermediate state of DNA for homologous genetic recombination and other genetic processes such as replication and repair. Branch migration is the process by which the exchange of homologous DNA regions occurs, and it can be spontaneous or driven by proteins. Unfolding of the HJ is required for branch migration. Our previous single-molecule fluorescence studies led to a model according to which branch migration is a stepwise process consisting of consecutive migration and folding steps. Folding of the HJ in one of the folded conformations terminates the branch migration phase. At the same time, in the unfolded state HJ rapidly migrates over entire homology region of the HJ in one hop. This process can be affected by irregularities in the DNA double helical structure, so mismatches almost terminate a spontaneous branch migration. Single-stranded breaks or nicks are the most ubiquitous defects in the DNA helix; however, to date, their effect on the HJ branch migration has not been studied. In addition, although nicked HJs are specific substrates for a number of enzymes involved in DNA recombination and repair, the role of this substrate specificity remains unclear. Our main goal in this work was to study the effect of nicks on the efficiency of HJ branch migration and the dynamics of the HJ. To accomplish this goal, we applied two single-molecule methods: atomic force microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The atomic force microscopy data show that the nick does not prevent branch migration, but it does decrease the probability that the HJ will pass the DNA lesion. The single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer approaches were instrumental in detailing the effects of nicks. These studies reveal a dramatic change of the HJ dynamics. The nick changes the structure and conformational dynamics of the junctions, leading to conformations with geometries that are different from those

  11. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia: a disease apparently of desmosome and gap junction formation.

    PubMed Central

    Witkop, C J; White, J G; King, R A; Dahl, M V; Young, W G; Sauk, J J

    1979-01-01

    A previously unrecognized autosomal dominant syndrome affecting oral, nasal, vaginal, urethral, anal, bladder, and conjunctival mucosa with cataracts, follicular keratosis, nonscarring alopecia, and terminal lung disease is described in a four-generation kindred of German extraction. Severe photophobia, tearing, and nystagmus in infancy heralds the development of keratitis, corneal vascularization, and lens cataracts. Repeated corneal transplants have failed. Red, periorificial mucosal lesions involving the above structures are noted by 1 year of age and may persist throughout life. Chronic rhinorrhea and repeated upper respiratory infections frequently progress to bilateral pneumonia accompanied by loss of hair, diarrhea, occasional melena, enuresis, pyuria, and hematuria. Spontaneous pneumothorax is frequent, terminating in fibrocystic-type lung disease and cor pulmonale. Women have had repeated abnormal vaginal PAP smears. Histologically the mucosal epithelium shows dyshesion, thinning of the epithelial layer, and dyskeratosis. Mucosal PAP smears show lack of epithelial maturation, cytoplasmic vacuoles and inclusions, and individual cell dyskeratosis. Histochemically there is a lack of cornification and keratinization. Ultrastructural studies show lack of keratohyalin granules, a paucity of desmosomes, intercellular accumulations, cytoplasmic vacuolization, and formation of bands and aggregates of filamentous fibers and structures in the cytoplasm resembling desmosomes and gap junctions. The condition is probably a panepithelial cell defect of desmosomal and gap junction structure most prominently affecting mucosal epithelia associated with an increased susceptibility to a variety of adventitious organisms. Images Fig. 2-5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:484550

  12. Wave reflections from duct terminations.

    PubMed

    Selamet, A; Ji, Z L; Kach, R A

    2001-04-01

    The reflection coefficients and inertial end corrections of several duct terminations, including finite length duct extensions perpendicular to an infinite wall, as well as at a number of angles, curved interface surfaces, and annular cavities, are determined and analyzed in the absence of flow by employing the boundary element method. Predictions for the classical unflanged and flanged circular ducts show good agreement with analytical and computational results available in the literature. The predictions for curved interface surfaces (bellmouth or horn) are also consistent with the available experimental data. In view of its high reflection coefficient, the duct termination with an annular cavity may be suggested for the suppression of noise radiation in a specific frequency band or for an effective wave reflection from the termination. PMID:11325101

  13. Digital autonomous terminal access communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novacki, S.

    1987-01-01

    A significant problem for the Bus Monitor Unit is to identify the source of a given transmission. This problem arises from the fact that the label which identifies the source of the transmission as it is put into the bus is intercepted by the Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communications (DATAC) terminal and removed from the transmission. Thus, a given subsystem will see only data associated with a label and never the identifying label itself. The Bus Monitor must identify the source of the transmission so as to be able to provide some type of error identification/location in the event that some problem with the data transmission occurs. Steps taken to alleviate this problem by modifications to the DATAC terminal are discussed.

  14. Airborne Satcom Terminal Research at NASA Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoder, Doug; Zakrajsek, Robert

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn has constructed an airborne Ku-band satellite terminal, which provides wideband full-duplex ground-aircraft communications. The terminal makes use of novel electronically-steered phased array antennas and provides IP connectivity to and from the ground. The satcom terminal communications equipment may be easily changed whenever a new configuration is required, enhancing the terminal's versatility.

  15. 32 CFR 34.51 - Termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Termination. 34.51 Section 34.51 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS... Termination and Enforcement § 34.51 Termination. (a) Awards may be terminated in whole or in part only...

  16. 10 CFR 781.64 - Termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Termination. 781.64 Section 781.64 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE PATENT LICENSING REGULATIONS Procedures § 781.64 Termination. (a) The Department may terminate... the Department's intention to terminate, in whole or in part, the license, with reasons therefor,...

  17. The critical current of point symmetric Josephson tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations. The shape of the junction determines the specific form of the magnetic-field dependence of its Josephson current. Here we address the magnetic diffraction patterns of specially shaped planar Josephson tunnel junctions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations. We focus on a wide ensemble of junctions whose shape is invariant under point reflection. We analyze the implications of this type of isometry and derive the threshold curves of junctions whose shape is the union or the relative complement of two point symmetric plane figures.

  18. Indentation Tests Reveal Geometry-Regulated Stiffening of Nanotube Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Yang, Yang; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Asif, Syed; Penev, Evgeni S; Yakobson, Boris I; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-01-13

    Here we report a unique method to locally determine the mechanical response of individual covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in various configurations such as "X", "Y", and "Λ"-like. The setup is based on in situ indentation using a picoindenter integrated within a scanning electron microscope. This allows for precise mapping between junction geometry and mechanical behavior and uncovers geometry-regulated junction stiffening. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the dominant contribution to the nanoindentation response is due to the CNT walls stretching at the junction. Targeted synthesis of desired junction geometries can therefore provide a "structural alphabet" for construction of macroscopic CNT networks with tunable mechanical response. PMID:26618517

  19. Two terminal line voltage thermostat

    SciTech Connect

    Stalsberg, K.J.; Ingalls, J.E.; Hoglund, S.R.

    1995-10-10

    A two terminal line voltage thermostat includes a switch which effectively connects line voltage to a heater load. The entire process is controlled by an integrated circuit microcontroller which is powered by a rectified voltage from a transformer secondary connected to a primary which is in series with the heater load. Backup battery power is provided to maintain limited functions of the microcontroller in the event of overall power loss. The microcontroller is programmed to meet the temperature sensing and control requirements specific to a two terminal electric baseboard heating installation. 7 figs.

  20. Secondary structural analysis of the carboxyl-terminal domain from different connexin isoforms.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Gaëlle; Al-Mugotir, Mona; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Zach, Sydney; Li, Hanjun; Trease, Andrew J; Stauch, Kelly L; Grosely, Rosslyn; Cervantes, Matthew; Sorgen, Paul L

    2016-03-01

    The connexin carboxyl-terminal (CxCT) domain plays a role in the trafficking, localization, and turnover of gap junction channels, as well as the level of gap junction intercellular communication via numerous post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions. As a key player in the regulation of gap junctions, the CT presents itself as a target for manipulation intended to modify function. Specific to intrinsically disordered proteins, identifying residues whose secondary structure can be manipulated will be critical toward unlocking the therapeutic potential of the CxCT domain. To accomplish this goal, we used biophysical methods to characterize CxCT domains attached to their fourth transmembrane domain (TM4). Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance were complementary in demonstrating the connexin isoforms that form the greatest amount of α-helical structure in their CT domain (Cx45 > Cx43 > Cx32 > Cx50 > Cx37 ≈ Cx40 ≈ Cx26). Studies compared the influence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, pH, phosphorylation, and mutations (Cx32, X-linked Charcot-Marie Tooth disease; Cx26, hearing loss) on the TM4-CxCT structure. While pH modestly influences the CT structure, a major structural change was associated with phosphomimetic substitutions. Since most connexin CT domains are phosphorylated throughout their life cycle, studies of phospho-TM4-CxCT isoforms will be critical toward understanding the role that structure plays in regulating gap junction function. PMID:26542351