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Sample records for jupiter icy moons

  1. The Icy Moons of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard

    The Galilean satellites formed in a nebula of dust and gas that surrounded Jupiter toward the end of the formation of the giant planet itself. Their diverse initial compositions were determined by conditions in the circum-jovian nebula, just as the planets' initial properties were governed by their formation within the circum-solar nebula. The Galilean satellites subsequently evolved under the complex interplay of orbital and geophysical processes, which included the effects of orbital resonances, tides, internal differentiation, and heat. The history and character of the satellites can be inferred from consideration of the formation of planets and the satellites, from studies of their plausible orbital evolution, from measurements of geophysical properties, especially gravitational and magnetic fields, from observations of the compositions and geological structure of their surfaces, and from geophysical modeling of the processes that can relate these lines of evidence. The three satellites with large water-ice components, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are very different from one another as a result of the ways that these processes have played out in each case. Europa has a deep liquid-water ocean with a thin layer of surface ice, Ganymede and Callisto likely have relatively thin liquid water layers deep below their surfaces, and Callisto remains only partially differentiated, with rock and ice mixed through much of its interior. A tiny inner satellite, Amalthea, also appears to be largely composed of ice. Each of these moons is fascinating in its own right, and the ensemble provides a powerful set of constraints on the processes that led to their formation and evolution.

  2. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter reference trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.; Lam, Try

    2006-01-01

    The proposed NASA Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission would have used a single spacecraft to orbit Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa in succession. The enormous Delta-Velocity required for this mission (nearly [25 km/s]) would necessitate the use of very high efficiency electric propulsion. The trajectory created for the proposed baseline JIMO mission may be the most complex trajectory ever designed. This paper describes the current reference trajectory in detail and describes the processes that were used to construct it.

  3. Forum on Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference primarily discuss instruments and techniques for conducting science on Jupiter's icy moons, and geologic processes on the moons themselves. Remote sensing of satellites, cratering on satellites, and ice on the surface of Europa are given particular attention. Some papers discuss Jupiter's atmosphere, or exobiology.

  4. JUICE: A European Mission to Jupiter and its Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witasse, O.; Altobelli, N.; Barabash, S.; Bruzzone, L.; Dougherty, M.; Erd, C.; Fletcher, L.; Gladstone, R.; Grasset, O.; Gurvits, L.; Hartogh, P.; Hussmann, H.; Iess, I.; Langevin, Y.; Palumbo, P.; Piccioni, G.; Sarri, G.; Titov, D.; Wahlund, J.-E.

    2015-10-01

    JUICE -JUpiter ICy moons Explorer -is the first large mission in the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme[1]. The mission was selected in May 2012 and adopted in November 2014. The implementation phase starts in July 2015, following the selection of the prime industrial contractor. Planned for launch in June 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in October 2029, it will spend at least three years making detailed observations of Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa.

  5. A Power Conversion Concept for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2003-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) is a bold new mission under development by the Office of Space Science at NASA Headquarters. ITMO is examining the potential of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology to efficiently deliver scientific payloads to three Jovian moons: Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. A critical element of the NEP vehicle is the reactor power system, consisting of the nuclear reactor, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD). The emphasis of this paper is on the non-nuclear elements of the reactor power system.

  6. Neutral atmosphere near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    The paper discusses the formation and dynamics of the rarefied gas envelope near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede. Being the most massive icy moon, Ganymede can form a rarefied exosphere with a relatively dense near-surface layer. The main parent component of the gas shell is water vapor, which enters the atmosphere due to thermal degassing, nonthermal radiolysis, and other active processes and phenomena on the moon's icy surface. A numerical kinetic simulation is performed to investigate, at the molecular level, the formation, chemical evolution, and dynamics of the mainly H2O- and O2-dominant rarefied gas envelopes. The ionization processes in these rarefied gas envelopes are due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the Sun and the magnetospheric plasma. The chemical diversity of the icy moon's gas envelope is attributed to the primary action of ultraviolet solar photons and plasma electrons on the rarefied gas in the H2O- or O2-dominant atmosphere. The model is used to calculate the formation and development of the chemical diversity in the relatively dense near-surface envelope of Ganymede, where an important contribution comes from collisions between parent molecules and the products of their photolysis and radiolysis.

  7. Jupiter Icy Moons Tidal Signatures and Ocean Mapping from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X.; Bar-Server, Y. E.; Folkner, W. M.; Williams, J. G.; Zumberge, J. F.

    2003-01-01

    Following the Galileo spacecraft encounters with Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, evidence emerged suggesting that these Galilean moons of Jupiter may have liquid oceans underneath their icy shells. Detection of the oceans on one or all three moons will have profound implications on probability of life beyond the Earth. The icy satellites also have tidal environments that are among the strongest in the solar system. The leading time-varying tidal forcing term on the surface of Europa is at least 9 times larger than those on the inner planets. Tidal forcing on the surfaces of Ganymede and Callisto are about 10% and 7%, respectively, of that on Europa. Since a planetary body with internal fluid deforms more than an otherwise solid body, tidal measurements offer exciting opportunities to detect the oceans.

  8. Radio Science Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Asmar, S. W.; Castillo, J. C.; Folkner, W. M.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schubert, G.; Spilker, T. R.; Tyler, G. L.

    2003-01-01

    Radio Science experiments have been conducted on most deep space missions leading to numerous scientific discoveries. A set of concepts and approaches are proposed for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) to apply Radio Science tools to investigate the interior structures of the Galilean Satellites and address key questions on their thermal and dynamical evolution. Measurements are identified that utilize the spacecraft's telecommunication system. Additional instruments can augment these measurements in order to leverage observational synergies. Experiments are also offered for the purpose of investigating the atmospheres and surfaces of the satellites.

  9. Ganymede Europa Neutral Imaging Experiment at the Jupiter's icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Plainaki, C.; DeAngelis, E.; Argan, A.; Fierro, D.; Vertolli, N.; Danduras, I.; Selci, S.; Leoni, R.; Sheer, J.

    2012-04-01

    GENIE (Ganymede Europa Neutral Imaging Experiment) (energy range 10 eV - 10 keV) is a high-angular-resolution detector, based on the ToF technique. Its objective is to map the origin sites of the most energetic neutral particles of the icy moons' exospheres, in order to investigate the interaction between the surface and the environment. The investigation of plasma interaction with the Jupiter's moons and the processes responsible for surface space weathering is one of the coolest topics of the proposed Cosmic Vision mission JUICE since it directly relates to energy exchange within the Jupiter's system, to the moon evolution and finally to the habitability in the harsh radiative environment. Icy surfaces of the Jupiter's moons are continuously irradiated by intense ion fluxes of H+, O+ and S+ in the energy range from keV to MeV. These ions are expected to impact the moon icy surface producing relevant and observable effects such as particles release and chemical and structural modifications of the surface. In particular, the plasma impacting onto the surface causes, via ion-sputtering, radiolysis and backscattering processes, release of neutrals that constitute the exospheres. The energy spectrum of this particle population peaks in the eV range with a non-negligible tail up to hundred eVs. The knowledge of the effectiveness of these processes in this environment is important in order to understand the evolution of the moons and their interactions within the Jupiter's system. The detection of neutral atoms above few 10 eVs (LENA) is a way to univocally relate the exosphere to surface features and to monitor instantaneously the effect of plasma precipitation onto the surface. Thus, GENIE is fully complementary to INM spectrometer, devoted to infer exospheric composition and density. Coupled measurements of LENA and gas composition will improve our knowledge in surface release mechanisms. The observation of LENA at different latitudes and longitudes, resulting in a 2

  10. Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Electrical Systems Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trapp, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will send a spacecraft to explore three of Jupiter s moons (Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa), all of which show evidence of containing vast subterranean oceans beneath their icy surfaces. The evidence of these oceans was discovered by Galileo, and the moons are believed to have the three essential ingredients for life: water, energy, and the necessary chemical elements. Galileo has shown that melted water on Europa has been in contact with the surface of the moon in geologically recent times, and may still lie relatively close to the surface. This project will also introduce a revolutionary new form of electric propulsion powered by a nuclear fission reactor. This electric propulsion is called ion propulsion. It was used on a previous mission called Deep Space 1, proving that ion propulsion works for interplanetary travel. Since JIMO will be traveling farther from the sun, solar power will be difficult to supply the electric energy demanded by the mission. Therefore a nuclear reactor and a thermo-electric converter system will be necessary. Besides making the trip to three of Jupiter's moons - one after the other - a realistic possibility, this new form of power and propulsion opens up the rest of the outer solar system for future exploration. JIMO will fulfill its goals by exploring Europa first, with subsequent trips to the moons Callisto and Ganymede in order to provide comparisons key to understanding the evolution of all three. In order to ensure the stability and proper preparation of the electrical system on JIMO, the High Power AC Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Test Bed is being developed. The testing on.this AC PMAD will consist of electrical performance verification of candidate power system components. Examples of these components are: high power AC switchgear, high power ACDC converters, AC power distribution units, DC power distribution units, etc. Throughout the course of the summer the over

  11. JUICE: a European mission to Jupiter and its icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, D.; Erd, C.; Duvet, L.; Wielders, A.; Torralba-Elipe, I.; Altobelli, N.

    2013-09-01

    JUICE (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer) is the first L-class mission selected for the ESA's Cosmic Vision programme 2015-2025 which has just entered the definition phase. JUICE will perform detailed investigations of Jupiter and its system in all their inter-relations and complexity with particular emphasis on Ganymede as a planetary body and potential habitat. Investigations of Europa and Callisto will complete a comparative picture of the Galilean moons. By performing detailed investigations of Jupiter's system, JUICE will address in depth two key questions of the ESA's Cosmic Vision programme: (1) What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life? and (2) How does the Solar System work? The overarching theme for JUICE has been formulated as: The emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. At Ganymede the mission will characterize in detail the ocean layers; provide topographical, geological and compositional mapping of the surface; study the physical properties of the icy crusts; characterize the internal mass distribution, investigate the exosphere; study Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field and its interactions with the Jovian magnetosphere. For Europa, the focus will be on the non-ice chemistry, understanding the formation of surface features and subsurface sounding of the icy crust over recently active regions. Callisto will be explored as a witness of the early solar system. JUICE will perform a comprehensive multidisciplinary investigation of the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants including exoplanets. The circulation, meteorology, chemistry and structure of the Jovian atmosphere will be studied from the cloud tops to the thermosphere. The focus in Jupiter's magnetosphere will include an investigation of the three dimensional properties of the magnetodisc and in-depth study of the coupling processes within the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Aurora and radio emissions and their response to the solar wind will be

  12. Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer: mission status after the Definition Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Dmitri; Barabash, Stas; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Dougherty, Michele; Erd, Christian; Fletcher, Leigh; Gare, Philippe; Gladstone, Randall; Grasset, Olivier; Gurvits, Leonid; Hartogh, Paul; Hussmann, Hauke; Iess, Luciano; Jaumann, Ralf; Langevin, Yves; Palumbo, Pasquale; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Sarri, Giuseppe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Witasse, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE), the ESA first large-class mission within the Cosmic Vision Program 2015-2025, was adopted in November 2014. The mission will perform detailed investigations of Jupiter and its system with particular emphasis on Ganymede as a planetary body and potential habitat. The overarching theme for JUICE is: The emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. At Ganymede, the mission will characterize in detail the ocean layers; provide topographical, geological and compositional mapping of the surface; study the physical properties of the icy crusts; characterize the internal mass distribution, investigate the exosphere; study Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field and its interactions with the Jovian magnetosphere. For Europa, the focus will be on the non-ice chemistry, understanding the formation of surface features and subsurface sounding of the icy crust over recently active regions. Callisto will be explored as a witness of the early solar system. JUICE will perform a multidisciplinary investigation of the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. The circulation, meteorology, chemistry and structure of the Jovian atmosphere will be studied from the cloud tops to the thermosphere. The focus in Jupiter's magnetosphere will include an investigation of the three dimensional properties of the magnetodisc and in-depth study of the coupling processes within the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Aurora and radio emissions will be elucidated. JUICE will study the moons' interactions with the magnetosphere, gravitational coupling and long-term tidal evolution of the Galilean satellites. JUICE highly capable scientific payload includes 10 state-of-the-art instruments onboard the spacecraft plus one experiment that uses the spacecraft telecommunication system with ground-based radio telescopes. The remote sensing package includes a high-resolution multi-band visible imager (JANUS) and spectro-imaging capabilities from the

  13. A Power Conversion Concept for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2003-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission is currently under study by the Office of Space Science under the Project Prometheus Program. JIMO is examining the use of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) to carry scientific payloads to three Jovian moons. A potential power system concept includes dual 100 kWe Brayton converters, a deployable pumped loop heat rejection subsystem, and a 400 Vac Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) bus. Many trades were performed in aniving at this candidate power system concept. System-level studies examined design and off-design operating modes, determined startup requirements, evaluated subsystem redundancy options, and quantified the mass and radiator area of reactor power systems from 20 to 200 kWe. In the Brayton converter subsystem, studies were performed to investigate converter packaging options, and assess the induced torque effects on spacecraft dynamics due to rotating machinery. In the heat rejection subsystem, design trades were conducted on heat transport approaches, material and fluid options, and deployed radiator geometries. In the PMAD subsystem, the overall electrical architecture was defined and trade studies examined distribution approaches, voltage levels, and cabling options.

  14. An Overview of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Mission, Environments, and Materials Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Congress authorized NASA's Prometheus Project in February 2003, with the first Prometheus mission slated to explore the icy moons of Jupiter with the following main objectives: (1) Develop a nuclear reactor that would provide unprecedented levels of power and show that it could be processed safely and operated reliably in space for long-duration. (2) Explore the three icy moons of Jupiter -- Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa -- and return science data that would meet the scientific goals as set forth in the Decadal Survey Report of the National Academy of Sciences.

  15. Radar Sounding for Planetary Subsurface Exploration: Translating the Mars Experience to Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration of the subsurface of Mars using radar sounding began with MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding) on Mars Express in 2005 and continued with SHARAD (Shallow Radar) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in 2006. These instruments have been operating continuously since, providing a rich legacy of science return and observational experience in the highly variable environments and target sets at Mars. New missions to the icy moons of Jupiter, ESA's JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) and NASA's Europa Mission, will both carry radar sounders to probe the subsurface of several of the icy moons (Ganymede, Europa and Callisto by JUICE; Europa by the Europa Mission). The success of the Mars sounders demonstrated the scientific value of the technique and provided confidence that sounding of the icy moons is a promising endeavor. Icy targets at Mars have proven especially amenable to penetration by radar sounding. The polar layered deposits of Mars have been probed to their base (2-4 km deep) by MARSIS, operating at frequencies of 1.3-5.5 MHz. SHARAD, operating with a wider bandwidth at 15-25 MHz, provides higher vertical resolution that allows detection and imaging of fine details of interior layering in the ice deposits. The sounder planned for the Europa mission, REASON (Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding, Ocean to Near-Surface), will utilize simultaneous dual frequency signals to obtain complementary deep sounding and high-vertical-resolution shallow observations. Co-located observations by MARSIS and SHARAD also demonstrate that high surface roughness (relative to the radar wavelength) affects the strength of the penetrating signals, and thus the capability to detect deep or low-contrast subsurface interfaces. The icy moon sounders' wavelengths were selected, in part, to mitigate against this degradation of signals by the anticipated rough surfaces of Jupiter's moons. This paper will discusss these and other examples of lessons

  16. Electric Propulsion Technology Development for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During 2004, the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter project, a part of NASA's Project Prometheus, continued efforts to develop electric propulsion technologies. These technologies addressed the challenges of propelling a spacecraft to several moons of Jupiter. Specific challenges include high power, high specific impulse, long lived ion thrusters, high power/high voltage power processors, accurate feed systems, and large propellant storage systems. Critical component work included high voltage insulators and isolators as well as ensuring that the thruster materials and components could operate in the substantial Jupiter radiation environment. A review of these developments along with future plans is discussed.

  17. JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (juice): AN ESA L-Class Mission Candidate to the Jupiter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, M. K.; Grasset, O.; Erd, C.; Titov, D.; Bunce, E. J.; Coustenis, A.; Blanc, M.; Coates, A. J.; Drossart, P.; Fletcher, L.; Hussmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; Krupp, N.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Tortora, P.; Tosi, F.; Van Hoolst, T.

    2012-04-01

    the first subsurface observations of this icy moon, including the first determination of the minimal thickness of the icy crust over the most recently active regions. JUICE will determine the characteristics of liquid-water oceans below the icy surfaces of the moons. This will lead to an understanding of the possible sources and cycling of chemical and thermal energy, allow investigation of the evolution and chemical composition of the surfaces and of the subsurface oceans, and enable an evaluation of the processes that have affected the satellites and their environments through time. The study of the diversity of the satellite system will be enhanced with additional information gathered remotely on Io and smaller moons. The mis-sion will also focus on characterising the diversity of processes in the Jupiter system which may be required in order to provide a stable environment at Ganymede, Europa and Callisto on geologic time scales, including gravitational coupling between the Galilean satellites and their long term tidal influence on the system as a whole. Focused stud-ies of Jupiter's atmosphere, and magnetosphere and their interaction with the Galilean satellites will further enhance our understanding of the evolution and dynamics of the Jovian system. The circulation, meteorology, chemistry and structure of Jupiter will be studied from the cloud tops to the thermosphere. These observations will be attained over a sufficiently long temporal baseline with broad latitudinal coverage to investigate evolving weather systems and the mechanisms of transporting energy, momentum and material between the different layers. The focus in Jupiter's magnetosphere will include an investigation of the three dimensional properties of the magnetodisc and in-depth study of the coupling processes within the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Aurora and radio emissions and their response to the solar wind will be elucidated.

  18. A passive probe for subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jupiter's icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Vance, Steve; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2015-03-01

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the ice shell thickness along with its dielectric properties. The interferometric reflectometer provides a simple solution to sub-jovian radio sounding of ice shells that is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements better suited to measurements in the anti-jovian hemisphere that shadows Jupiter's strong decametric emission. The passive nature of this technique also serves as risk reduction in case of radar transmitter failure. The interferometric reflectometer could operate with electrically short antennas, thus extending ice depth measurements to lower frequencies, and potentially providing a deeper view into the ice shells of jovian moons.

  19. Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO): An Element of the Prometheus Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    The Prometheus Program s Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Project is developing a revolutionary nuclear electric propulsion space system that would return scientific data from the icy Galilean satellites, Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. This space system could also be used for future solar system exploration missions. Several major achievements occurred during Fiscal Year 2004 (FY 04). These include the addition of Department of Energy Naval Reactors (DOENR) and Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) to the JIMO team, completion of the Science Definition Team s final report, generation of the Government and industry team trade studies and conceptual designs, and numerous technology demonstrations. The sections that follow detail these accomplishments.

  20. Cosmic ion bombardment of the icy moons of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzulla, G.

    2011-05-01

    A large number of experiments have been performed in many laboratories in the world with the aim to investigate the physico-chemical effects induced by fast ions irradiating astrophysical relevant materials. The laboratory in Catania (Italy) has given a contribution to some experimental works. In this paper I review the results of two class of experiments performed by the Catania group, namely implantation of reactive (H+, C+, N+, O+ and S+) ions in ices and the ion irradiation induced synthesis of molecules at the interface between water ice and carbonaceous or sulfurous solid materials. The results, discussed in the light of some questions concerning the surfaces of the Galilean moons, contribute to understand whether minor molecular species (CO2, SO2, H2SO4, etc.) observed on those objects are endogenic i.e. native from the satellite or are produced by exogenic processes, such as ion implantation.The results indicate that:C-ion implantation is not the dominant formation mechanism of CO2 on Europa, Ganimede and Callisto.Implantation of sulfur ions into water ice produces hydrated sulfuric acid with high efficiency such to give a very important contribution to the sulfur cycle on the surface of Europa and other satellites.Implantation of protons into carbon dioxide produces some species containing the projectile (H2CO3, and O-H in poly-water).Implantation of protons into sulfur dioxide produces SO3, polymers, and O3 but not H-S bonds.Water ice has been deposited on refractory carbonaceous materials: a general finding is the formation of a noteworthy quantity of CO2. We suggest that this is the primary mechanism to explain the presence of carbon dioxide on the surfaces of the Galilean satellites.Water ice has been deposited on refractory sulfurous materials originating from SO2 or H2S irradiation. No evidence for an efficient synthesis of SO2 has been found.

  1. Feasibility Study of Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Permanent Magnet Alternator Start Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Tokars, Roger P.

    2006-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission was a proposed, (recently cancelled) long duration science mission to study three moons of Jupiter: Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. One design of the JIMO spacecraft used a nuclear heat source in conjunction with a Brayton rotating machine to generate electrical power for the electric thrusters and the spacecraft bus. The basic operation of the closed cycle Brayton system was as follows. The working fluid, a heliumxenon gas mixture, first entered a compressor, then went through a recuperator and hot-side heat exchanger, then expanded across a turbine that drove an alternator, then entered the cold-side of the recuperator and heat exchanger and finally returned to the compressor. The spacecraft was to be launched with the Brayton system off-line and the nuclear reactor shut down. Once the system was started, the helium-xenon gas would be circulated into the heat exchangers as the nuclear reactors were activated. Initially, the alternator unit would operate as a motor so as to drive the turbine and compressor to get the cycle started. This report investigated the feasibility of the start up sequence of a permanent magnet (PM) machine, similar in operation to the alternator unit, without any position or speed feedback sensors ("sensorless") and with a variable load torque. It is found that the permanent magnet machine can start with sensorless control and a load torque of up to 30 percent of the rated value.

  2. Analysis of Thrust Vectoring Capabilities for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B .; Gromov, Konstantin; Murray, Emmanuell

    2005-01-01

    A strategy to mitigate the impact of the trajectory design of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) on the attitude control design is described in this paper. This paper shows how the thrust vectoring control torques, i.e. the torques required to steer the vehicle, depend on various parameters (thrust magnitude, thrust pod articulation angles, and thrust moment arms). Rather than using the entire reaction control system (RCS) system to steer the spacecraft, we investigate the potential utilization of only thrust vectoring of the main ion engines for the required attitude control to follow the representative trajectory. This study has identified some segments of the representative trajectory where the required control torque may exceed the designed ion engine capability, and how the proposed mitigation strategy succeeds in reducing the attitude control torques to within the existing capability.

  3. High-Power Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter Icy Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safaeinili, A.; Ostro, S.; Rodriquez, E.; Blankenship, D.; Kurth, W.; Kirchner, D.

    2005-01-01

    The high power and high data rate capability made available by a Prometheus class spacecraft could significantly enhance our ability to probe the subsurface of the planets/moons and asteroid/comets. The main technology development driver for our radar is the proposed Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter (or JIMO) mission due to its harsh radiation environment. We plan to develop a dual-band radar at 5 and 50 MHz in response to the two major science requirements identified by the JIMO Science Definition Team: studying the near subsurface (less than 2 km) at high resolution and detection of the ice/ocean interface for Europa (depth up to 30 km). The 50-MHz band is necessary to provide high spatial resolution (footprint and depth) as required by the JIMO mission science requirements as currently defined. Our preliminary assessment indicates that the 50-MHz system is not required to be as high-power as the 5-MHz system since it will be more limited by the surface clutter than the Jupiter or galactic background noise. The low frequency band (e.g. 5 MHz), which is the focus of this effort, would be necessary to mitigate the performance risks posed by the unknown subsurface structure both in terms of unknown attenuation due to volumetric scattering and also the detection of the interface through the attenuative transition region at the ice/ocean interface. Additionally, the 5-MHz band is less affected by the surface roughness that can cause loss of coherence and clutter noise. However, since the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) of the 5-MHz radar band is reduced due to Jupiter noise when operating in the Jupiter side of the moon, it is necessary to increase the radiated power. Our challenge is to design a high-power HF radar that can hnction in Jupiter's high radiation environment, yet be able to fit into spacecraft resource constraints such as mass and thermal limits. Our effort to develop the JIMO radar sounder will rely on our team's experience with planetary radar sounder design

  4. Compositional Impact of Io Volcanic Emissions on Jupiter's Magnetosphere and the Icy Galilean Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Fegley, Bruce; Lipatov, Alexander; Richardson, John; Sittler, Edward

    2011-01-01

    measured throughout the jovian magnetosphere and in the local moon environments can act as tracers if we know from direct measurements and models the distributions at the mostly likely sources, i.e. at IO. However, our knowledge of these abundances are very limited from earlier in-situ and remote measurements, mainly confined to major (S, O) and some minor (Na, K, Cl) species with abundances at or above a few percent relative to O. Future in-situ plasma measurements by the planned Jupiter Europa Orbiter and Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter missions should extend the abundance coverage to minor and even trace elemental species. For Europa astrobiological investigations it is also important to specify iogenic inputs and surface processing of isotopic species. We discuss the range of abundance distributions arising from models for IO hot volcanic emissions, and from the subsequent dynamics of ion injection, magnetospheric transport, and icy moon surface bombardment.

  5. Feasibility Study of a Nuclear-Stirling Power Plant for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2005-02-06

    NASA is undertaking the design of a new spacecraft to explore the planet Jupiter and its three moons Calisto, Ganymede and Europa. This proposed mission, known as Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) would use a nuclear reactor and an associated electrical generation system (Reactor Power Plant - RPP) to provide power to the spacecraft. The JIMO spacecraft is envisioned to use this power for science and communications as well as Electric Propulsion (EP). Among other potential power-generating concepts, previous studies have considered Thermoelectric and Brayton power conversion systems, coupled to a liquid metal reactor for the JIMO mission. This paper will explore trades in system mass and radiator area for a nuclear reactor power conversion system, however this study will focus on Stirling power conversion. Stirling convertors have a long heritage operating in both power generation and the cooler industry, and are currently in use in a wide variety of applications. The Stirling convertor modeled in this study is based upon the Component Test Power Convertor design that was designed and operated successfully under the Civil Space Technology Initiative for use with the SP-100 nuclear reactor in the 1980's and early 1990's. The baseline RPP considered in this study consists of four dual-opposed Stirling convertors connected to the reactor by a liquid lithium loop. The study design is such that two of the four convertors would operate at any time to generate the 100 kWe while the others are held in reserve. For this study the Stirling convertors hot-side temperature is 1050 K, would operate at a temperature ratio of 2.4 for a minimum mass system and would have a system efficiency of 29%. The Stirling convertor would generate high voltage (400 volt), 100 Hz single phase AC that is supplied to the Power Management and Distribution system. The waste heat is removed from the Stirling convertors by a flowing liquid sodium-potassium eutectic and then rejected by a shared

  6. Feasibility Study of a Nuclear-Stirling Power Plant for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2005-02-01

    NASA is undertaking the design of a new spacecraft to explore the planet Jupiter and its three moons Calisto, Ganymede and Europa. This proposed mission, known as Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) would use a nuclear reactor and an associated electrical generation system (Reactor Power Plant - RPP) to provide power to the spacecraft. The JIMO spacecraft is envisioned to use this power for science and communications as well as Electric Propulsion (EP). Among other potential power-generating concepts, previous studies have considered Thermoelectric and Brayton power conversion systems, coupled to a liquid metal reactor for the JIMO mission. This paper will explore trades in system mass and radiator area for a nuclear reactor power conversion system, however this study will focus on Stirling power conversion. Stirling convertors have a long heritage operating in both power generation and the cooler industry, and are currently in use in a wide variety of applications. The Stirling convertor modeled in this study is based upon the Component Test Power Convertor design that was designed and operated successfully under the Civil Space Technology Initiative for use with the SP-100 nuclear reactor in the 1980's and early 1990's. The baseline RPP considered in this study consists of four dual-opposed Stirling convertors connected to the reactor by a liquid lithium loop. The study design is such that two of the four convertors would operate at any time to generate the 100 kWe while the others are held in reserve. For this study the Stirling convertors hot-side temperature is 1050 K, would operate at a temperature ratio of 2.4 for a minimum mass system and would have a system efficiency of 29%. The Stirling convertor would generate high voltage (400 volt), 100 Hz single phase AC that is supplied to the Power Management and Distribution system. The waste heat is removed from the Stirling convertors by a flowing liquid sodium-potassium eutectic and then rejected by a shared

  7. Main Power Distribution Unit for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papa, Melissa R.

    2004-01-01

    Around the year 2011, the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) will be launched and on its way to orbit three of Jupiter s planet-sized moons. The mission goals for the JIMO project revolve heavily around gathering scientific data concerning ingredients we, as humans, consider essential: water, energy and necessary chemical elements. The JIM0 is an ambitious mission which will implore propulsion from an ION thruster powered by a nuclear fission reactor. Glenn Research Center is responsible for the development of the dynamic power conversion, power management and distribution, heat rejection and ION thrusters. The first test phase for the JIM0 program concerns the High Power AC Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Test Bed. The goal of this testing is to support electrical performance verification of the power systems. The test bed will incorporate a 2kW Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) to simulate the nuclear reactor as well as two ION thrusters. The first module of the PMAD Test Bed to be designed is the Main Power Distribution Unit (MPDU) which relays the power input to the various propulsion systems and scientific instruments. The MPDU involves circuitry design as well as mechanical design to determine the placement of the components. The MPDU consists of fourteen relays of four different variations used to convert the input power into the appropriate power output. The three phase system uses 400 Vo1ts(sub L-L) rms at 1000 Hertz. The power is relayed through the circuit and distributed to the scientific instruments, the ION thrusters and other controlled systems. The mechanical design requires the components to be positioned for easy electrical wiring as well as allowing adequate room for the main buss bars, individual circuit boards connected to each component and power supplies. To accomplish creating a suitable design, AutoCAD was used as a drafting tool. By showing a visual layout of the components, it is easy to see where there is extra room or where the

  8. Feasibility Study of a Nuclear-Stirling Plant for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2005-01-01

    NASA is undertaking the design of a new spacecraft to explore the planet Jupiter and its three moons Calisto, Ganymede and Europa. This proposed mission, known as Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) would use a nuclear reactor and an associated electrical generation system (Reactor Power Plant-RPP) to provide power to the spacecraft. The JIMO spacecraft is envisioned to use this power for science and communications as well as Electric Propulsion (EP). Among other potential power-generating concepts, previous studies have considered Thermoelectric and Brayton Power conversion systems, coupled to a liquid metal reactor for the JIMO mission. This paper will explore trades in system mass and radiator area for a nuclear reactor power conversion system, however this study will focus on Stirling power conversion. The Stirling convertor modeled in this study is based upon the Component Test Power Convertor design that was designed and operated successfully under the Civil Space Technology Initiative for use with the SP-100 nuclear reactor i the 1980's and early 1990's. The study design is such that two of the four convertors would operate at any time to generate the 100 kWe while the others are held in reserve. For this study the Stirling convertors hot-side temperature is 1050 K, would operate at a temperature ratio of 2.4 for a minimum mass system and would have a system efficiency of 29%. The Stirling convertor would generate high voltage (400 volt), 100 Hz single phase AC that is supplied to the Power Management and Distribution system. The waste hear is removed from the Stirling convertors by a flowing liquid sodium-potassium eutectic and then rejected by a shared radiator. The radiator consists of two coplanar wings, which would be deployed after the reactor is in space. System trades were performed to vary cycle state point temperatures and convertor design as well as power output. Other redundancy combinations were considered to understand the affects of convertor

  9. Theoretical studies of the radar properties of the icy Galilean moons of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1993-01-01

    The icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter - Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto - have unusual radar scattering properties compared with those of the terrestrial planets or Earth's Moon. There are three main features of the data that distinguish these targets: (1) the radar cross-section normalized by the geometrical cross-section is an order of magnitude larger than that of any terrestrial planet; (2) the reflected power is almost evenly distributed between two orthogonal polarizations with more power being returned in the same circular polarization as was transmitted whereas virtually all of the power returned from the terrestrial planets is contained in the opposite circular polarization to the one that was transmitted; and (3) the echo power spectra have a broad shape indicating a nearly uniformly radar-bright surface in contrast to the spectra from the terrestrial planets that contain a strong quasi-specular component from the vicinity of the sub-radar point and very little reflected power from the rest of the surface. The normalized radar cross-sections decrease as the areal water ice coverage decreases from Europa to Ganymede to Callisto. Recently, radar echoes from the polar caps of Mars and Mercury, and from Saturn's satellite Titan imply similarly strong cross-sections and have classically unexpected polarization properties and it is also thought that this is due to the presence of ice on the surface. A model called the radar glory model is analyzed and it is shown that the main features of the radar echoes calculated from this model agree well with the observations from all three icy Galilean satellites. This model involves long radar paths in the ice below the surface and special structures in which the refractive index decreases abruptly at a hemispherical boundary. It is not known whether such structures exist or how they could be created, but possible scenarios can be imagined such as the formation of an impact crater followed by deposition of a frost layer

  10. Energetic neutral particles detection in the environment of Jupiter's icy moons: Ganymede's and Europa's neutral imaging experiment (GENIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Plainaki, C.; Fierro, D.; Argan, A.; Vertolli, N.; Dandouras, I.; Leoni, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Scheer, J.; Selci, S.; Soffitta, P.; Baragiola, R. A.; Brienza, D.; Cassidy, T. A.; Chassela, O.; Colasanti, L.; D'Alessandro, M.; Daglis, I.; De Angelis, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Di Persio, G.; Fabiani, S.; Gaggero, A.; Ganushkina, N.; Garnier, P.; Gilbert, J. A.; Hansen, K. C.; Hsieh, K. C.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lepri, S. T.; Mangano, V.; Massetti, S.; Mattioli, F.; Mura, A.; Palumbo, M. E.; Rispoli, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubini, A.; Teolis, B.; Tosi, F.; Tosti, D.; Toublanc, D.

    2013-11-01

    The detection of Energetic Neutral Particles (ENP) above 10 eV can unequivocally relate a surface-bound exosphere to surface features and can monitor instantaneously the effect of plasma precipitation onto the surface. In the framework of a mission to Jupiter's moons, 2D imaging of plasma precipitation will provide important information on the plasma circulation at the orbits of the moons. Furthermore, a joint measurement of precipitating ions will permit an estimation of the efficiency of the release process. Coupled measurements of ENP and gas composition will improve our knowledge of surface release mechanisms. Ganymede's and Europa's Neutral Imaging Experiment (GENIE) is a high-angular-resolution detector, based on the ToF (Time of Flight) technique, that can detect ENP (energy range >10 eV-few keV) in the Jupiter environment thanks to an innovative design and technology. Its objective is to map the sites of origin of the ENP of the icy moons' exospheres to investigate the interaction between the surface and the environment. Finally, coupling GENIE with an ion sensor and a mass spectrometer will be an outstanding opportunity to better understand the magnetosphere-moon coupling within the Jupiter system and compare the surface interaction with plasma in the diverse moons. In this paper, the scientific objectives and requirements of ENP detection are summarized and the description of the innovative design concept of GENIE is given, together with the signal and background noise simulation.

  11. Energetic Neutral Particles detection in the environment of Jupiter's icy moons: Ganymede's and Europa's Neutral Imaging Experiment (GENIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Anna; Orsini, Stefano; Plainaki, Christina; Fierro, Davide; Argan, Andrea; Vertolli, Nello; Dandouras, Iannis; Leoni, Roberto; Liemohn, Michael; Scheer, Jurgen; Selci, Stefano; Soffitta, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The detection of Energetic Neutral Particles (ENP) above 10 eV can univocally relate a surface-bound exosphere to surface features and to monitor instantaneously the effect of plasma precipitation onto the surface. The 2D imaging of plasma precipitation will provide important information on the plasma circulation at the orbits of the moons. Furthermore, a joint measurement of precipitating ions will permit an estimation the efficiency of the release process. Coupled measurements of ENP and gas composition will improve our knowledge of surface release mechanisms. GENIE (Ganymede Europa Neutral Imaging Experiment) is a high-angular-resolution detector, based on the ToF (Time of Flight) technique able to detect ENP (energy range 10 eV - few keV) in the Jupiter environment thanks to an innovative design and technology. Its objective is to map the sites of origin of the ENP of the icy moons' exospheres, to investigate the interaction between the surface and the environment. Finally, GENIE jointly with an ion-sensor and a mass spectrometer in the JUICE mission will be an outstanding opportunity to better understand also the magnetosphere-moon coupling within the Jupiter's system. In particular, a comparison between the surface interaction with the intense radiation at Europa and with the plasma shielding by the internal magnetic field at Ganymede, will provide a unique opportunity to investigate different surface evolution scenarios of Jupiter's moons.

  12. Planetary Protection for the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) Mission Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erd, Christian

    2012-07-01

    The JUICE mission is being studied by ESA in the framework of its Cosmic Vision programme, addressing the topical questions ``What are the conditions for planet formation and emergence of life?'' and ``How does the Solar System work?''. Jupiter can be seen as a paradigm of planetary systems forming a mini-solar system on its own. By investigating its diverse satellites, the understanding of the formation and evolution such of systems would be advanced. The question of whether possible habitats of life are provided underneath the surfaces of the icy satellites Callisto, Ganymede and Europa would be addressed by remote sensing and in situ observations of their surfaces, their compositions and their interiors, including the characterizations of subsurface liquid water oceans, including targeting of recently active regions on Europa for inferring the minimal thickness of the icy crust. JUICE would furthermore provide observations of Jupiter's atmosphere addressing open questions on the circulation at mid-latitudes, and also including coverage of the polar region from a distance of about 29~R_J (see also L. Fletcher et al. in meeting C3.1 "Planetary Atmospheres"). JUICE would study the properties of the magnetosphere and would provide extensive monitoring of Jupiter's plasma environment at distances ranging from more than 100 to 8.5~R_J, which is the distance of Europa. The unique magnetic and plasma interactions between the Jupiter environment and Ganymede would be target to focused investigations, from orbit around Ganymede (see also A. Coates et al in session C3.2 ``Planetary Upper Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Magnetospheres''). The magnetic field and its potential habitability of Ganymede makes it a unique target for specific investigation. The presentation will briefly describe the science objectives of the JUICE mission (see also C.~Erd et al. in session B0.3 ``Active Natural Satellites in the Solar System''), and will then discuss the baseline mission profile

  13. Development of radiative transfer code for JUICE/SWI mission toward the atmosphere of icy moons of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takayoshi; Kasai, Yasuko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-07-01

    The Submillimeter Wave Instrument (SWI) is one of the scientific instruments on the JUpiter Icy moon Explorer (JUICE). We plan to observe atmospheric compositions including water vapor and its isotopomers in Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto). The frequency windows of SWI are 530 to 625 GHz and 1080 to 1275 GHz with 100 kHz spectral resolution. We are developing a radiative transfer code in Japan with line-by-line method for Ganymede atmosphere in THz region (0 - 3 THz). Molecular line parameters (line intensity and partition function) were taken from JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) catalogue. The pencil beam was assumed to calculate a spectrum of H _{2}O and CO in rotational transitions at the THz region. We performed comparisons between our model and ARTS (Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator). The difference were less than 10% and 5% for H _{2}O and CO, respectively, under the condition of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Comparison with several models with non-LTE assumption will be presented.

  14. Exploring Jupiter's icy moons with old techniques and big facilities - new insights on sulfuric acid hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard-Casely, H. E.; Avdeev, M.; Brand, H.; Wallwork, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfuric acid hydrates have been proposed to be abundant on the surface of Europa [1], and hence would be important planetary forming materials for this moon and its companions Ganymede and Callisto. Understanding of the surface features and subsurface of these moons could be advanced by firmer knowledge of the icy materials that comprise them [2], insight into which can be drawn from firmer knowledge of physical properties and phase behaviour of the candidate materials. We wish to present results from a study that started with the question ';What form of sulfuric acid hydrate would form on the surface of Europa'. The intrinsic hydrogen-domination of planetary ices, makes studying these materials with laboratory powder diffraction very challenging. Insights into their crystalline phase behavior and the extraction of a number of thermal and mechanical properties is often only accessible with high-flux synchrotron x-ray diffraction and utilization of the large scattering cross section with neutron diffraction. We have used the Powder Diffraction beamline at Australian synchrotron [4] and the Echidna (High-resolution neutron powder diffraction) instrument of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, [5] to obtain an number of new insights into the crystalline phases formed from sulfruic acid and water mixtures. These instruments have enabled the discovery a new water-rich sulfuric acid hydrate form [6], improved structural characterisation of existing forms [7] and a charting the phase diagram of this fundamental binary system [8]. This has revealed exciting potential for understanding more about the surface of Europa from space, perhaps even providing a window into its past. [1] Carlson, R.W., R.E. Johnson, and M.S. Anderson, Science, 1999. 286(5437): p. 97-99. [2] Fortes, A.D. and M. Choukroun. Space Sci Rev, 2010. 153(1-4): p. 185-218. [3] Blake, D., et al., Space Sci Rev,, 2012. 170(1-4): p. 341-399. [4] Wallwork, K.S., Kennedy B. J. and Wang, D

  15. Environmental Change in Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Vance, S.

    2014-12-01

    There is strong evidence that subsurface oceans could exist within several of the outer solar system's ice-rich moons, at Jupiter (Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto), Saturn (Enceladus and Titan), and Neptune (Triton). If liquid water is indeed available in these subsurface environments, then the availability of chemical energy becomes the greatest limitation on whether icy worlds could harbor life. Of these moons, the largest (Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan) are expected to harbor oceans deep within, and high-pressure H2O ice phases are expected farther beneath those deep oceans. In contrast, the oceans of smaller icy worlds—Europa, Enceladus, and Triton—are plausibly in direct contact with rock below. Given that serpentinization or other water-rock geochemical activity could supply reductants directly to their oceans, these icy worlds have the greatest chance to support present-day microbial life. Each of these three icy worlds displays spectacular resurfaced terrains that are very young (crater retention ages ~10s Myr and younger), with their internal activity linked to extremes in tidal heating today and/or in the geologically recent past. However, the degree of their tidal heating may have changed greatly over time. Europa is believed to experience cyclical tidal heating and activity; Enceladus may have experienced cyclical activity or a geologically recent pulse of activity; Triton may have experienced extreme tidal heating upon its capture and orbital circularization. Such dynamic pasts would pose challenges for any life within. We consider the possible effects of severe swings in the activity level of icy worlds, specifically the implications for delivery of chemical energy to their subsurface oceans.

  16. Decimeter-Wavelength Polarimetric Radar Imaging of the Icy Moons of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Madsen, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Imaging radars with wavelengths in the range of 10 cm to 1 m can deeply penetrate the surface of an icy body, revealing details of the geomorphology, local structure, and electrical properties of the upper layers. Radar studies of icy surfaces on Earth have used the polarization state of backscatter echoes at multiple frequencies to characterize the surface and subsurface properties of glaciers, showing relatively smooth surfaces on the scale of radar wave-lengths, and subsurface scattering from volume scatterers consistent with ice pipes and lenses. These volume scattering effects are evident in enhanced polarization ratios over a limited range of backscatter incidence angles. The Galilean satellites exhibit similarly enhanced polarization ratios and volumetric scattering effects, but the observations are limited in angular resolution, leading to ambiguity in interpreting the scattering mechanisms and their structural implications.

  17. Jupiter's Moons: Family Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This montage shows the best views of Jupiter's four large and diverse 'Galilean' satellites as seen by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Jupiter in late February 2007. The four moons are, from left to right: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. The images have been scaled to represent the true relative sizes of the four moons and are arranged in their order from Jupiter.

    Io, 3,640 kilometers (2,260 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). The original image scale was 13 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 6 degrees south, 22 degrees west. Io is notable for its active volcanism, which New Horizons has studied extensively.

    Europa, 3,120 kilometers (1,938 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 01:28 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 3 million kilometers (1.8 million miles). The original image scale was 15 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Europa coordinates 6 degrees south, 347 degrees west. Europa's smooth, icy surface likely conceals an ocean of liquid water. New Horizons obtained data on Europa's surface composition and imaged subtle surface features, and analysis of these data may provide new information about the ocean and the icy shell that covers it.

    New Horizons spied Ganymede, 5,262 kilometers (3,268 miles) in diameter, at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles) away. The original scale was 17 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Ganymede coordinates 6 degrees south, 38 degrees west. Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system, has a dirty ice surface cut by fractures and peppered by impact craters. New Horizons' infrared observations may provide insight into the composition of the moon's surface and interior.

    Callisto, 4,820 kilometers (2,995 miles) in diameter, was imaged

  18. Traveling Wave Tube (TVT) RF Power Combining Demonstration for use in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) is set to launch between the years 2012 and 2015. It will possibly utilize a nuclear reactor power source and ion engines as it travels to the moons of Jupiter. The nuclear reactor will produce hundreds of kilowatts of power for propulsion, communication and various scientific instruments. Hence, the RF amplification devices aboard will be able to operate at a higher power level and data rate. The initial plan for the communications system is for an output of 1000 watts of RF power, a data rate of at least 10 megabits a second, and a frequency of 32 GHz. A higher data rate would be ideal to fully utilize the instruments aboard JIMO. At NASA Glenn, one of our roles in the JIMO project is to demonstrate RF power combining using multiple traveling wave tubes (TWT). In order for the power of separate TWT s to be combined, the RF output waves from each must be in-phase and have the same amplitude. Since different tubes act differently, we had to characterize each tube using a Network Analyzer. We took frequency sweeps and power sweeps to characterize each tube to ensure that they will behave similarly under the same conditions. The 200 watt Dornier tubes had been optimized to run at a lower power level (120 watts) for their extensive use in the ACTS program, so we also had to experiment with adjusting the voltage settings on several internal components (helix, anode, collector) of the tubes to reach the full 200 watt potential. from the ACTS program. Phase shifters and power attenuators were placed in the waveguide circuit at the inputs to the tubes so that adjustments could be made individually to match them exactly. A magic tee was used to route and combine the amplified electromagnetic RF waves on the tube output side. The demonstration of 200 watts of combined power was successful with efficiencies greater than 90% over a 500 MHz bandwidth. The next step will be to demonstrate the use of three amplifiers using two magic tees by

  19. The Earth transiting the Sun as seen from Jupiter's moons: detection of an inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect produced by the opposition surge of the icy Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.; Barbieri, M.; Monaco, L.; Zaggia, S.; Lovis, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a multiwavelength observational campaign which followed the Earth's transit on the Sun as seen from Jupiter on 2014 January 2014. Simultaneous observations of Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede obtained with high accuracy radial velocity planetary searcher (HARPS) from La Silla, Chile and HARPS-N from La Palma, Canary Islands were performed to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect due to the Earth's passage using the same technique successfully adopted for the 2012 Venus Transit. The expected modulation in radial velocities was of ≈20 cm s-1 but an anomalous drift as large as ≈38 m s-1, i.e. more than two orders of magnitude higher and opposite in sign, was detected instead. The consistent behaviour of the two spectrographs rules out instrumental origin of the radial velocity drift and Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network observations rule out the possible dependence on the Sun's magnetic activity. We suggest that this anomaly is produced by the opposition surge on Europa's icy surface, which amplifies the intensity of the solar radiation from a portion of the solar surface centred around the crossing Earth which can then be observed as a sort of inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. in fact, a simplified model of this effect can explain in detail most features of the observed radial velocity anomalies, namely the extensions before and after the transit, the small differences between the two observatories and the presence of a secondary peak closer to Earth passage. This phenomenon, observed here for the first time, should be observed every time similar Earth alignments occur with rocky bodies without atmospheres. We predict that it should be observed again during the next conjunction of Earth and Jupiter in 2026.

  20. The long-period librations of large synchronous icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yseboodt, Marie; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2014-11-01

    A moon in synchronous rotation has longitudinal librations because of its non-spherical mass distribution and its elliptical orbit around the planet. We study the long-period librations of the Galilean satellites and Titan and include deformation effects and the existence of a subsurface ocean. We take into account the fact that the orbit is not keplerian and has other periodicities than the main period of orbital motion around Jupiter or Saturn due to perturbations by the Sun, other planets and moons. An orbital theory is used to compute the orbital perturbations due to these other bodies. For Titan we also take into account the large atmospheric torque at the semi-annual period of Saturn around the Sun.We numerically evaluate the amplitude and phase of the long-period librations for many interior structure models of the icy moons constrained by the mass, radius and gravity field.

  1. Map of Jupiter's moon Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-04-01

    Map of Jupiter's moon Io The first global geologic map of the Jovian satellite Io has been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the agency announced on 19 March. “More than 130 years after the USGS first began producing quality geologic maps here on Earth, it is exciting to have the reach of our science extend across 400 million miles to this volcanically active moon of Jupiter,” said USGS director Marcia McNutt. “Somehow it makes the vast expanse of space seem less forbidding to know that similar geologic processes which have shaped our planet are active elsewhere.” The map illustrates the geologic character of the unique and active volcanoes on Io, a planetary body that has about 25 times more volcanic activity than Earth does, according to USGS.

  2. Surface radiation environment of Saturn's icy moon Mimas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Kollmann, P.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.; Krupp, N.

    2012-09-01

    The majority of the large icy satellites that orbit Jupiter and Saturn are embedded within the magnetospheres of their respective parent bodies. The inner regions of these magnetospheric environments are characterized by populations of trapped charged particles, from thermal plasma to high energy energetic ions and electrons. Moons orbiting within these magnetospheres are therefore often subject to continuous bombardment by multiple particle species over a wide range of energies. It is known that such bombardment may induce chemical alterations within icy surfaces through the process of radiolysis, an effect which has the potential to significantly change surface and near-surface composition over typical geological timescales. In order to make quantifiable predictions on the surface composition of these moons, it is therefore critical to have a detailed measure of deposited dose into the surface from the relevant magnetospheric particle species. Saturn's innermost large moon Mimas orbits within one of the harshest radiation environments of the Saturnian magnetosphere and remote sensing observations of the moon have revealed a surface that displays strong signs of magnetospheric weathering. It is therefore of great interest to further quantify the interaction of magnetospheric particles with the Mimantean surface, particularly with regards to determining which bombarding species dominate at different moon surface locations and surface depths and to compare this with remote sensing observations. We will present dose-depth profiles for the nearsurface which have been computed using a Monte Carlo particle transport code and representative energetic electron and proton spectra derived from measurements made by the MIMI-LEMMS particle instrument on the Cassini spacecraft.

  3. The radar-glory theory for icy moons with implications for radar mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1987-01-01

    The anomalous radar echoing properties of three ice-clad moons of Jupiter appear to be due to glory-like backscattering from buried craters. The enormous glare from these sources would impair geologic studies based on standard methods of radar mapping. It is not known whether similar or different problems will arise in the radar study of other icy surfaces in the outer solar system, or of the unseen surface of Titan. In any event, the results from the moons of Jupiter illustrate the role of exploratory measurements and the importance of possible bistatic radar-mapping techniques based on the use of separated transmitters and receivers.

  4. Habitability potential of icy moons: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Encrenaz, Thérèse; Sohl, Frank; Hussmann, Hauke; Bampasidis, Georgios; Wagner, Frank; Raulin, François; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Lopes, Rosaly

    2014-05-01

    environments to look for biomarkers. Currently, for Titan and Enceladus, geophysical models try to explain the possible existence of an oceanic layer that decouples the mantle from the icy crust. If the silicate mantles of Eu-ropa and Ganymede and the liquid sources of Titan and Enceladus are geologically active as on Earth, giving rise to the equivalent of hydrothermal systems, the simultaneous presence of water, geodynamic interactions, chemical en-ergy sources and a diversity of key chemical elements may fulfill the basic conditions for habitability. Titan has been suggested to be a possible cryovolcanic world due to the presence of local complex volcanic-like geomorphol-ogy and the indications of surface albedo changes with time [7,8]. Such dynamic activity that would most probably include tidal heating, possible internal convection, and ice tectonics, is believed to be a pre-requisite of a habitable planetary body as it allows the recycling of minerals and potential nutrients and provides localized energy sources. In a recent study by Sohl et al. [2013], we have shown that tidal forces are a constant and significant source of inter-nal deformation on Titan and the interior liquid water ocean can be relatively warm for reasonable amounts of am-monia concentrations, thus completing the set of parameters needed for a truly habitable planetary body. Such habi-tability indications from bodies at distances of 10 AU, are essential discoveries brought to us by space exploration and which have recently revolutionized our perception of habitability in the solar system. In the solar system's neighborhood, such potential habitats can only be investigated with appropriate designed space missions, like JUICE-Laplace (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) for Ganymede and Europa [9]. JUICE is an ESA mission to Jupiter and its icy moons, recently selected to launch in 2022. References: [1] Coustenis, A., Encrenaz, Th., in "Life Beyond Earth : the search for habitable worlds in the Universe

  5. Two Moons Meet over Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa was snapped by New Horizons' color Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 UT on March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter.

    The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for their artistic, rather than scientific value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet request by New Horizons scientists for evocative, artistic imaging opportunities at Jupiter.

    This image was taken from a range of 4.6 million kilometers (2.8 million miles) from Io and 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from Europa. Although the moons appear close in this view, a gulf of 790,000 kilometers (490,000 miles) separates them. The night side of Io is illuminated here by light reflected from Jupiter, which is out of the frame to the right. Europa's night side is completely dark, in contrast to Io, because that side of Europa faces away from Jupiter.

    Here, Io steals the show with its beautiful display of volcanic activity. Three volcanic plumes are visible. Most conspicuous is the enormous 300-kilometer (190-mile) -high plume from the Tvashtar volcano at the 11 o'clock position on Io's disk. Two much smaller plumes are barely visible: one from the volcano Prometheus, at the 9 o'clock position on the edge of Io's disk, and one from the volcano Amirani, seen between Prometheus and Tvashtar along Io's terminator (the line dividing day and night). The plumes appear blue because of the scattering of light by tiny dust particles ejected by the volcanoes, similar to the blue appearance of smoke. In addition, the contrasting red glow of hot lava can be seen at the source of the Tvashtar plume.

    The images are centered at 1 degree north, 60 degrees west on Io, and 0 degrees north, 149 degrees west on Europa. The color in this

  6. Surfaces and exospheres of the icy Galilean moons - an integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, André; Wurz, Peter; Vorburger, Audrey; Tulej, Marek; Pommerol, Antoine; Scheer, Jürgen; Thomas, Nicolas; Mousis, Olivier; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Lammer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    The JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) will investigate Jupiter and its system with particular emphasis on Ganymede as a planetary body and potential habitat. Europa and Callisto flybys will allow for a comparative picture of the icy Galilean moons. As part of the scientific preparation work for JUICE, we examine the requirements and expected science results related to the Neutral gas and Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM), which belongs to the Particle Environment Package on board JUICE. Models of the exosphere profiles at Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto allow us to optimize the design of NIM, but the reliability of the models is limited because the properties of icy surfaces, in particular sputtering and sublimation parameters for icy regolith mixed with carbonates or salts, are not well known. We therefore have started a series of lab experiments with icy regolith subjected to ion and UV irradiation in a cold vacuum. Currently, we perform irradiation experiments of pure water ice with H+ and O+ ions. In the coming years, we will expand the experiments to more complex cases (including UV-radiation, temperature cycles and chemical impurities such as O2, C, S, CO2, SO2, and Na) relevant for Galilean moons. The results will constrain exosphere models and will enable the scientific community to better link exosphere measurements with processes in the ice and observed surface features.

  7. Geologic Evolution of Saturn's Icy Moon Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Stephan, K.; Schmedemann, N.; Roatsch, T.; Kersten, E.; Neukum, G.; Porco, C. C.

    2013-10-01

    Tethys, 1072 km in diameter, is a mid-sized icy moon of Saturn imaged for the first time in two Voyager flybys [1][2][3]. Since July 2004, its surface has been imaged by the Cassini ISS cameras at resolutions between 200 and 500 m/pxl. We present results from our ongoing work to define and map geologic units in camera images obtained preferentially during Cassini’s Equinox and Solstice mission phases. In the majority of Tethys’ surface area a densely cratered plains unit [1][2][3][this work] is abundant. The prominent graben system of Ithaca Chasma is mapped as fractured cratered plains. Impact crater and basin materials can be subdivided into three degradational classes. Odysseus is a fresh large impact basin younger than Ithaca Chasma according to crater counts [4]. Heavily degraded craters and basins occur in the densely cratered plains unit. A smooth, less densely cratered plains unit in the trailing hemisphere was previously identified by [2] but mapping of its boundaries is difficult due to varying viewing geometries of ISS images. To the south of Odysseus, we identified a cratered plains unit not seen in Voyager data, characterized by remnants of highly degraded large craters superimposed by younger fresher craters with a lower crater density compared to the densely cratered plains unit. Its distinct linear northern contact with the densely cratered plains suggests a tectonic origin. Sets of minor fractures can be distinguished in the densely cratered plains, and locally, features of mass wasting can be observed. References: [1] Smith B. A. et al. (1981), Science 212, 163-191. [2] Smith B. A. et al. (1982), Science 215, 504-537. [3] Moore J. M. and Ahern J. L. (1983), JGR 88 (suppl.), A577-A584. [4] Giese B. et al. (2007), GRL 34, doi:10.1029/2007GL031467.

  8. The Radar for Icy Moon Exploration (RIME) on the JUICE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzone, L.; Plaut, J.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Bovolo, F.; Campbell, B. A.; Castelletti, D.; Gim, Y.; Ilisei, A. M.; Kofman, W. W.; Komatsu, G.; McKinnon, W. B.; Mitri, G.; Moussessian, A.; Notarnicola, C.; Orosei, R.; Patterson, G. W.; Pettinelli, E.; Plettemeier, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Radar for Icy Moon Exploration (RIME) is one of the main instruments included in the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) ESA mission. It is a radar sounder designed for studying the subsurface geology and geophysics of Galilean icy moons (i.e., Ganymede, Europa and Callisto) and for detecting possible subsurface water. RIME is designed for penetration of the icy moons up to a depth of 9 km. Two main operation scenarios are foreseen for RIME: i) flyby observations of Europa, Ganymede and Callisto (from a distance of 1000 km to the closest approach of about 400 km); and ii) circular orbital observations around Ganymede at 500 km of altitude. According to these scenarios, RIME is designed to explore the icy shell of the Galilean icy satellites by characterizing the wide range of compositional, thermal, and structural variation found in the subsurface of these moons. RIME observations will profile the ice shells of the Galilean icy satellites with specific focus on Ganymede given the circular orbital phase. The acquired measures will provide geological context on hemispheric (thousands of km), regional (hundreds of km with multiple overlaps), and targeted (tens of km) scales appropriate for a variety of hypothesis tests. RIME will operate in a single frequency band, centred at 9 MHz. The frequency was selected as the result of extensive study of penetration capabilities, surface roughness of the moons, Jovian radio noise, antenna accommodation, and system design. The 9 MHz frequency provides penetration capabilities and mitigation of surface scattering (which can cause signal loss and clutter issues), at the expense of mapping coverage, as it is likely to obtain high SNR observations only on the anti-Jovian side of the target moons. The RIME antenna is a 16 m dipole. The chirp pulse bandwidth is up to 3 MHz, which provides vertical resolution of about 50 m in ice after side lobe weighting. RIME will also operate with 1 MHz bandwidth to reduce data volume when

  9. Inverse theory resolution analysis in planning radio science gravity investigations of icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganse, A.; Vance, S.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of an icy satellite's interior relates fundamentally to its composition, thermal structure, formation and evolution history, and prospects for supporting life. Gravity measurements via radio Doppler information during spacecraft flybys constitute an important tool to infer gross interior structure. Liquid water and ice layers have previously been inferred for the interiors of Jupiter's icy satellites Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto on the basis of magnetic field measurements by the Galileo probe. On Europa and Callisto induced magnetic field signatures measured by the Galileo probe provided strong evidence for an ionic aqueous ocean. Among the chief goals of the proposed Europa Clipper mission in returning to Europa is characterizing the structure of the moon's icy shell. A geophysical inverse theory resolution analysis can be calculated at the pre-measurement mission planning stage, contributing planning considerations from the point of view of the search for mass anomalies in the ice shell (meteorites or diapiric upwellings) or near the H2O/rock interface (seamounts). The analysis allows us to assess the location-varying resolution of an icy moon's interior density anomaly distribution that can be estimated from radio Doppler measurements. It considers the tradeoff between the resolution of the estimated density anomaly distribution and its estimation uncertainty, and investigates issues in distinguishing between ocean anomalies (e.g., seamounts) and mass anomalies within or near the surface of the ice layer. We apply the resolution analysis to proposed Europa Clipper trajectories and past Galileo spacecraft trajectories about Europa and Ganymede.

  10. Exobiology and Planetary Protection of icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, François; Hand, Kevin P.; McKay, Christopher P.; Viso, Michel

    2010-06-01

    The outer solar system is an important area of investigation for exobiology, the study of life in the universe. Several moons of the outer planets involve processes and structures comparable to those thought to have played an important role in the emergence of life on Earth, such as the formation and exchange of organic materials between different reservoirs. The study of these prebiotic processes on, and in, outer solar system moons is a key goal for exobiology, together with the question of habitability and the search for evidence of past or even present life. This chapter reviews the aspects of prebiotic chemistry and potential presence of life on Europa, Enceladus and Titan, based on the most recent data obtained from space missions as well as theoretical and experimental laboratory models. The habitability of these extraterrestrial environments, which are likely to include large reservoirs of liquid water in their internal structure, is discussed as well as the particular case of Titan’s hydrocarbon lakes. The question of planetary protection, especially in the case of Europa, is also presented.

  11. Crustal failure on icy Moons from a strong tidal encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Giannella, David; Shaw, John G.; Ebinger, Cynthia

    2016-09-01

    Close tidal encounters among large planetesimals and Moons should have been more common than grazing or normal impacts. Using a mass spring model within an N-body simulation, we simulate the deformation of the surface of an elastic spherical body caused by a close parabolic tidal encounter with a body that has similar mass as that of the primary body. Such an encounter can induce sufficient stress on the surface to cause brittle failure of an icy crust and simulated fractures can extend a large fraction of the radius of body. Strong tidal encounters may be responsible for the formation of long graben complexes and chasmata in ancient terrain of icy Moons such as Dione, Tethys, Ariel and Charon.

  12. Compositional Remote Sensing of Icy Planets and Satellites Beyond Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.

    2002-01-01

    The peak of the solar energy distribution occurs at visual wavelengths and falls off rapidly in the infrared. This fact, improvements in infrared detector technology, and the low surface temperatures for most icy objects in the outer solar system have resulted in the bulk of telescopic and spacecraft observations being performed at visual and near-infrared wavelengths. Such observations, begun in the early 1970's and continuing to present, have provided compositional information regarding the surfaces of the satellites of Saturn and Uranus, Neptune's moon Triton, Pluto, Pluto's moon Charon, Centaur objects, and Kuiper belt objects. Because the incident sunlight penetrates the surface and interacts with the materials present there, the measured reflected sunlight contains information regarding the surface materials, and the ratio of the reflected to incident sunlight provides a mechanism of identifying the materials that are present.

  13. Radio Sounding Techniques for the Galilean Icy Moons and their Jovian Magnetospheric Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Markus, Thursten; Fung, Shing F.; Benson, Robert F.; Reinich, Bodo W.; Song, Paul; Gogineni, S. Prasad; Cooper, John F.; Taylor, William W. L.; Garcia, Leonard

    2004-01-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's topside ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to Jupiter's icy moons and the surrounding Jovian magnetosphere will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments and the subsurface conductivities, of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the surfaces of the moons vary in response to magnetic-field perturbations from (1) magnetospheric plasma flows, (2) ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and (3) induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans and from the plasma flows and ionospheric currents themselves. Radio sounding from 3 kHz to 10 MHz can provide the global electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and supplements in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. While radio sounding requires high transmitter power for subsurface sounding, little power is needed to probe the electron density and magnetic field intensity near the spacecraft. For subsurface sounding, reflections occur at changes in the dielectric index, e.g., at the interfaces between two different phases of water or between water and soil. Variations in sub-surface conductivity of the icy moons can be investigated by radio sounding in the frequency range from 10 MHz to 50 MHz, allowing the determination of the presence of density and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts. The detection of subsurface oceans underneath the icy crusts of the Jovian moons is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. Preliminary modeling results show that return signals are clearly distinguishable be&een an ice crust with a thickness of

  14. Cassini finds an oxygen-carbon dioxide atmosphere at Saturn's icy moon Rhea.

    PubMed

    Teolis, B D; Jones, G H; Miles, P F; Tokar, R L; Magee, B A; Waite, J H; Roussos, E; Young, D T; Crary, F J; Coates, A J; Johnson, R E; Tseng, W-L; Baragiola, R A

    2010-12-24

    The flyby measurements of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn's moon Rhea reveal a tenuous oxygen (O(2))-carbon dioxide (CO(2)) atmosphere. The atmosphere appears to be sustained by chemical decomposition of the surface water ice under irradiation from Saturn's magnetospheric plasma. This in situ detection of an oxidizing atmosphere is consistent with remote observations of other icy bodies, such as Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede, and suggestive of a reservoir of radiolytic O(2) locked within Rhea's ice. The presence of CO(2) suggests radiolysis reactions between surface oxidants and organics or sputtering and/or outgassing of CO(2) endogenic to Rhea's ice. Observations of outflowing positive and negative ions give evidence for pickup ionization as a major atmospheric loss mechanism. PMID:21109635

  15. Habitability of the giant icy moons: current knowledge and future insights from the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasset, O.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Titov, D.; Erd, C.; Bunce, E.; Coustenis, A.; Blanc, M.; Coates, A.; Fletcher, L.; van Hoolst, T.; Hussmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; Krupp, N.; Tortora, P.; Tosi, F.; Wielders, A.

    2012-09-01

    Large satellites of gas giants, at orbits beyond the snow-line, such as Jupiter or Saturn, can contain a large amount of water (almost 45% in mass). Hydrospheres are extremely thick, ~600 km for Ganymede and Callisto, and may possess liquid layers below the icy crust. Thus, the Galilean satellites provide a conceptual basis within which new theories for understanding habitability can be constructed. Measurements from the Voyager and Galileo spacecraft revealed the potential of these satellites in this context. The JUpiter Icy moons Explorer (JUICE) will greatly enhance our understanding of their potential habitability. It is known, even at Earth where life mostly depends on solar energy, that habitats exist deep in the oceans in eternal darkness feeding on chemical energy. Aqueous layers are suspected below the icy crusts of the moons, which possess similar physical characteristics than Earth's deep oceans. Since they are certainly very stable through time, and because complex chemistry and energy sources may be available, life may have originated within such subsurface habitats despite the hostile surface conditions. Liquid water reservoirs have been proposed on Ganymede, Europa and Callisto from geophysical models, based on Galileo observations. These oceans that are covered by ice shells exist independently of the input of stellar energy, and are located well outside the conventional habitable zone of the Sun. Considering the pressure range encountered within the icy moons, four different scenarios can be defined. These result from varying thicknesses of the water ice layers and the liquid ocean with respect to the silicate floor (Figure 1). Case 2 in Figure 1 is highly probable for the largest moons (Ganymede and Callisto), while case 3 is more probable for Europa and smaller icy moons if they host liquid reservoirs such as has been discovered at Enceladus. Europa's ocean is unique because it may be in contact with the rock layer. This substrate may be

  16. ESO Observations of New Moon of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-08-01

    Two astronomers, both specialists in minor bodies in the solar system, have performed observations with ESO telescopes that provide important information about a small moon, recently discovered in orbit around the solar system's largest planet, Jupiter. Brett Gladman (of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and working at Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, France) and Hermann Boehnhardt ( ESO-Paranal) obtained detailed data on the object S/1999 J 1 , definitively confirming it as a natural satellite of Jupiter. Seventeen Jovian moons are now known. The S/1999 J 1 object On July 20, 2000, the Minor Planet Center (MPC) of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) announced on IAU Circular 7460 that orbital computations had shown a small moving object, first seen in the sky in 1999, to be a new candidate satellite of Jupiter. The conclusion was based on several positional observations of that object made in October and November 1999 with the Spacewatch Telescope of the University of Arizona (USA). In particular, the object's motion in the sky was compatible with that of an object in orbit around Jupiter. Following the official IAU procedure, the IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams designated the new object as S/1999 J 1 (the 1st candidate Satellite of Jupiter to be discovered in 1999). Details about the exciting detective story of this object's discovery can be found in an MPC press release and the corresponding Spacewatch News Note. Unfortunately, Jupiter and S/1999 J 1 were on the opposite side of the Sun as seen from the Earth during the spring of 2000. The faint object remained lost in the glare of the Sun in this period and, as expected, a search in July 2000 through all available astronomical data archives confirmed that it had not been seen since November 1999, nor before that time. With time, the extrapolated sky position of S/1999 J 1 was getting progressively less accurate. New observations were thus urgently needed to "recover

  17. X-Ray Probes of Jupiter's Auroral Zones, Galilean Moons, and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Swartz, D. A.; Rehak, P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Cooper, J. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    Remote observations from the Earth orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown the the Jovian system is a rich and complex source of x-ray emission. The planet's auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission, though with different origins. Chandra observations discovered x-ray emission from the Io plasma torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is due to bombardment of their surfaces by highly energetic magnetospheric protons, and oxygen and sulfur ions, producing fluorescent x-ray emission lines from the elements in their surfaces against an intense background continuum. Although very faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around the icy Galilean moons would provide a detail mapping of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we review the results of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the Jovian system and describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer undergoing study for possible application to future missions to Jupiter such as JIMO. X-MIME has the ultimate goal of providing detailed high-resolution maps of the elemental abundances of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as detailed study of the x-ray mission from the Io plasma torus, Jupiter's auroral zones, and the planetary disk.

  18. Moons over Jupiter: transits and shadow transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.; et al.

    2003-06-01

    There is no more beautiful illustration of orbital motions than the movements of Jupiter's satellites. Every six years, their movements are most strikingly displayed, when the jovian system is presented edge-on to Earth. This means that there is a higher frequency of multiple transits over the face of the planet, as all the moons transit across the equatorial zone, whereas in other years Ganymede and Callisto transit near the poles or not at all. Also, for a few months, the satellites pass in front of each other, displaying mutual eclipses and occultations. In 2002/2003 we have been able to observe a fine series of these multiple and mutual events. On the cover, and on these pages, are some of the highest-resolution images received.

  19. Absorption of trapped particles by Jupiter's moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption effects of the four innermost moons in the radial transport equations for electrons and protons in Jupiter's magnetosphere are presented. The phase space density n at 2 R sub J for electrons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg is reduced by a factor of 4.2 x 1000 when lunar absorption is included in the calculation. For protons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg, the corresponding reduction factor is 3.2 x 100000. The effect of the satellites becomes progressively weaker for both electrons and protons as equatorial pitch angles of pi/2 are approached, because the likelihood of impacting a satellite becomes progressively smaller. The large density decreases which we find at the orbits of Io, Europa, and Ganymede result in corresponding particle flux decreases that should be observed by spacecraft making particle measurements in Jupiter's magnetosphere. The characteristic signature of satellite absorption should be a downward pointing cusp in the flux versus radius curve at the L-value corresponding to each satellite.

  20. Icy moon exospheres: the interface between Jovian environment and satellite surfaces as a key scientific target for JUICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Milillo, Anna; Grassi, Davide; Mura, Alessandro; Massetti, Stefano; Orsini, Stefano; Mangano, Valeria; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Rispoli, Rosanna

    2016-04-01

    The exospheres of Jupiter's icy satellites -often referred to as tenuous atmospheres- represent the actual interface between the surfaces of these moons and the giant planet's environment. In this perspective, their characterization is of key importance to achieve a fully understanding of the alteration processes induced on the icy surfaces by the radiation environment. Therefore, a full interpretation of the surface data and a thorough understanding of the surface evolution history, have as a necessary prerequisite the accurate determination of the role of the exospheres in the interactions between the icy moons and the Jupiter's magnetospheric environment. Moreover, in order to understand the mass and energy exchange between satellites and Jovian environment, the detailed characterization of the exosphere as a boundary region between the moon and the giant planet's magnetosphere, is fundamental. In this paper, we show that the achievement of the science objectives of the JUICE mission related to the icy satellites exospheres will be feasible only through an interdisciplinary approach characterized by coordinated observation scenarios and joint campaigns in payload operations. It is evidenced that it is of key importance to measure - in the larger possible extent - the following quantities: density of neutral species; density of ionosphere and charged particles fluxes; efficiency of interactions of the exosphere with particle and photon radiation fields. Through the planning of potential synergies between different datasets to be obtained during different mission phases, the current paper aims to contribute to the achievement of both of the JUICE mission's Key Science Goals, i.e. 1) the characterization of Ganymede, Europa and Callisto as planetary objects and potential habitats and 2) the exploration of the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. The suggested planning for joint observations by different JUICE payload instruments could be extended later in

  1. Fitting Orbits to Jupiter's Moons with a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Describes how a spreadsheet is used to fit a circular orbit model to observations of Jupiter's moons made with a small telescope. Kepler's Third Law and the inverse square law of gravity are observed. (AIM)

  2. High energy electron processing of icy regoliths on Saturn's moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaible, Micah; Johnson, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    A unique space weathering phenomenon has been identified on several icy Saturnian moons. Cassini revealed anomalous lens shaped regions in both optical and thermal wavelengths, colloquially known as the 'PacMan' feature, which are centered on the leading hemispheres and approximately symmetric about the equators. In particular, the Cassini InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) measurements of thermal emission in the mid-IR showed that surface temperature variations during a diurnal cycle were smaller inside the anomalous regions. The locations of the anomalies were shown to closely match the expected deposition profile of high energy (~ MeV) electrons moving counter rotational to the moons, suggesting an energetic source to drive their formation. However, the mechanisms by which thermal conductivity enhancement occur lack quantitative comparison with theoretical and experimental results.Electron interactions with the grains can excite molecules, which, if near enough to an intergrain contact, can cause atoms or molecules to migrate into the contact region, thus increasing the contact volume or 'sintering' the grains. Sintering improves the thermal contact between grains, leading to increased effective thermal conductivity of the regolith. Equations previously developed to describe material behavior in nuclear reactor were used to estimate the timescale for the energetic electrons to increase the contact volume sufficiently to describe the enhanced thermal conductivity of the anomalous regions. In order to properly constrain the sintering calculations, the unique electron energy distribution measured in the vicinity of each of the moons was used in the calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations of excited electrons in water ice were carried out to determine the length scale for an average electron excitation or ionization event. This length scale determines the distance from the primary reaction at which electrons can still be mobilized to move into the contact region

  3. Investigating Saturn's Icy Moons using HST/STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Noll, K. S.; Spencer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The inner moons of Saturn - Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea - exhibit remarkable large-scale albedo and color variations. These trends can be linked to a combination of the unique exogenic processes occurring the Saturn system, including E-ring grain bombardment and charged particle bombardment. One of the fascinating characteristics of the Saturn system is that the icy satellites, though their surface compositions are dominated by water ice, are spectrally red - they are absorbing in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength region (wavelengths <~550 nm) - a spectral feature not typical of pure water ice. In fact, the existing data show that in the UV, absorptions appear to be present superimposed on the overall red slope. Thus, though Cassini instruments have learned much about the surfaces of the icy moons, a basic question that remains is: What is their surface composition and what are the species or processes that cause these UV absorptions? Cassini's spectral coverage is lacking in precisely the near-UV wavelength regime in which the satellites appear to absorb most strongly. To resolve this issue and determine some understanding of the surface species present, we have obtained data using HST/STIS (Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph). We have utilized the STIS G230L detector to obtain high SNR spectra in the 180-320 nm region along with short G430L exposures to obtain spectra in the 320-570 nm range, to completely fill in the Cassini gap in spectral coverage. Full-disk measurements have been made of the trailing and leading hemispheres of Mimas, Dione and Rhea; a spectrum of Enceladus was also obtained. We report on the results. In particular, we discuss implications for the presence of ammonia, ozone and organics.

  4. Automated Estimation of the Orbital Parameters of Jupiter's Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Western, Emma; Ruch, Gerald T.

    2016-01-01

    Every semester the Physics Department at the University of St. Thomas has the Physics 104 class complete a Jupiter lab. This involves taking around twenty images of Jupiter and its moons with the telescope at the University of St. Thomas Observatory over the course of a few nights. The students then take each image and find the distance from each moon to Jupiter and plot the distances versus the elapsed time for the corresponding image. Students use the plot to fit four sinusoidal curves of the moons of Jupiter. I created a script that automates this process for the professor. It takes the list of images and creates a region file used by the students to measure the distance from the moons to Jupiter, a png image that is the graph of all the data points and the fitted curves of the four moons, and a csv file that contains the list of images, the date and time each image was taken, the elapsed time since the first image, and the distances to Jupiter for Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. This is important because it lets the professor spend more time working with the students and answering questions as opposed to spending time fitting the curves of the moons on the graph, which can be time consuming.

  5. Onset of convection and differentiation in the hydrated cores of icy moons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Reynard, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    The Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn have revealed that the three large Jovian icy moons and Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, are at least partly differentiated. Their normalized moments of inertia are smaller than 2/5, which is the value for undifferentiated moons. We present new simulations of the thermal evolution, dehydration process, differentiation, and onset of convection in the hydrated cores of large icy satellites. The motivation is to investigate whether convection can start before dehydration starts in the cores. Such a process would prevent differentiation. The viscosity of antigorite, the hydrated silicate supposed to compose the hydrated cores, is strongly non-Newtonian and weakly temperature-dependent. The cores are volumetrically heated by natural radioactivity. We have adapted the theory developed for non-Newtonian fluids heated from below [1] to the case of volumetrically heated fluids. A recent review [2] of the physical parameters relevant to the thermal evolution of hydrated cores made of antigorite provides values quite different from those used in previous studies [3,4], which seriously modifies the results of previous simulations including the predicted present interior structure of the large icy satellites. The numerical simulations presented in this study suggest that the inner part of the hydrated core of icy moons would dehydrate for a large range of parameters, the most important of which is the amount of 40K. The outer core would remain hydrated. It is shown that convection could start in the outer core for large values of internal heating. Implications for subsequent thermal evolution are being investigated. [1] Solomatov V.S. (1995) Scaling of temperature and stressdependent viscosity convection; Phys. Fluids 7, 266; doi: 10.1063/1.868624. [2] Reynard B. (2012) Serpentine in active subduction zones. Lithos, doi: 10.1016/j.lithos.2012.10.012 [3] Grinrod P.M., A.D. Fortes, F. Nimmo, D.L. Feltham

  6. Iceless Icy Moons: Is the Nice Model In Trouble?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Levison, H. F.

    2012-05-01

    Nimmo and Korycansky (2012; henceforth NK12) stated that if the outer Solar System underwent a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) in the Nice model, the mass striking the icy satellites at speeds up to tens of km/s would have vaporized so much ice that moons such as Mimas, Enceladus, and Miranda would have been devolatilized. NK12's possible explanations of this apparent discrepancy with observations include (1) the mass influx was a factor of 10 less than that in the Nice model; (2) the mass distribution of the impactors was top-heavy, so that luck might have saved some of the moons from suffering large, vapor-removing impacts; or (3) the inner moons formed after the LHB. NK12 calculated the mass influx onto the satellites from the lunar impact rate estimated by Gomes et al. (2005) and scaling factors calculated by Zahnle et al. (1998, 2003; also see Barr and Canup 2010). Production of vapor in hypervelocity impacts is calculated from Kraus et al. (2011). Our preliminary results show that there is about an order-of-magnitude uncertainty in the mass striking the satellites during the LHB, with NK12's estimate at the upper end of the range. We will discuss how the mass influx depends on the velocity and mass distributions of the impactors. The Nice model lives. We thank the NASA Lunar Science Institute (http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/) for support. Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M., Nature Geoscience 3, 164-167 (2010). Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A., Nature 435, 466-469 (2005). Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.E., Stewart, S.T., Icarus 214, 724-738 (2011). Nimmo, F., Korycansky, D.G., Icarus, in press, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103512000310 (2012). Zahnle, K., Dones, L., Levison, H.F., Icarus 136, 202-222 (1998). Zahnle, K., Schenk, P., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., Icarus 163, 263-289 (2003).

  7. Earth and Moon encounters by the Galileo Jupiter orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, T. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Galileo Venus-Earth-Earth-Gravity-Assist trajectory to Jupiter is discussed. It includes two encounters from deep space with the Earth and the Earth-Moon system. Fortuitous and unique opportunities therefore exist to observe and study the Earth and Earth's moon during both of these encounters. Given the Galileo science payload, a candidate set of Earth and Moon science objectives is presented. The conditions and constraints of the Earth and Moon encounters, which define the observing opportunity, and which bound the objectives, are reviewed.

  8. Animation: 'Great Lake' on Jupiter's Moon Europa

    NASA Video Gallery

    Data from a NASA planetary mission have provided scientists evidence of what appears to be a body of liquid water, equal in volume to the North American Great Lakes, beneath the icy surface of Jupi...

  9. Polymerization of Building Blocks of Life on Europa and Other Icy Moons.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Jun; Kitadai, Norio

    2015-06-01

    The outer Solar System may provide a potential habitat for extraterrestrial life. Remote sensing data from the Galileo spacecraft suggest that the jovian icy moons--Europa, Ganymede, and possibly Callisto--may harbor liquid water oceans underneath their icy crusts. Although compositional information required for the discussion of habitability is limited because of significantly restricted observation data, organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Universe. Recently, in situ spacecraft measurements and experiments suggest that amino acids can be formed abiotically on interstellar ices and comets. These amino acids could be continuously delivered by meteorite or comet impacts to icy moons. Here, we show that polymerization of organic monomers, in particular amino acids and nucleotides, could proceed spontaneously in the cold environment of icy moons, in particular the jovian icy moon Europa as a typical example, based on thermodynamic calculations, though kinetics of formation are not addressed. Observed surface temperature on Europa is 120 and 80 K in the equatorial region and polar region, respectively. At such low temperatures, Gibbs energies of polymerization become negative, and the estimated thermal structure of the icy crust should contain a shallow region (i.e., at a depth of only a few kilometers) favorable for polymerization. Investigation of the possibility of organic monomer polymerization on icy moons could provide good constraints on the origin and early evolution of extraterrestrial life. PMID:26060981

  10. Polymerization of Building Blocks of Life on Europa and Other Icy Moons

    PubMed Central

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The outer Solar System may provide a potential habitat for extraterrestrial life. Remote sensing data from the Galileo spacecraft suggest that the jovian icy moons—Europa, Ganymede, and possibly Callisto—may harbor liquid water oceans underneath their icy crusts. Although compositional information required for the discussion of habitability is limited because of significantly restricted observation data, organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Universe. Recently, in situ spacecraft measurements and experiments suggest that amino acids can be formed abiotically on interstellar ices and comets. These amino acids could be continuously delivered by meteorite or comet impacts to icy moons. Here, we show that polymerization of organic monomers, in particular amino acids and nucleotides, could proceed spontaneously in the cold environment of icy moons, in particular the jovian icy moon Europa as a typical example, based on thermodynamic calculations, though kinetics of formation are not addressed. Observed surface temperature on Europa is 120 and 80 K in the equatorial region and polar region, respectively. At such low temperatures, Gibbs energies of polymerization become negative, and the estimated thermal structure of the icy crust should contain a shallow region (i.e., at a depth of only a few kilometers) favorable for polymerization. Investigation of the possibility of organic monomer polymerization on icy moons could provide good constraints on the origin and early evolution of extraterrestrial life. Key Words: Planetary science—Europa—Planetary habitability and biosignatures—Extraterrestrial life—Extraterrestrial organic compounds. Astrobiology 15, 430–441. PMID:26060981

  11. Looking for planetary moons in the spectra of distant Jupiters.

    PubMed

    Williams, D M; Knacke, R F

    2004-01-01

    More than 100 nearby stars are known to have at least one Jupiter-sized planet. Whether any of these giant gaseous planets has moons is unknown, but here we suggest a possible way of detecting Earth-sized moons with future technology. The planned Terrestrial Planet Finder observatory, for example, will be able to detect objects comparable in size to Earth. Such Earth-sized objects might orbit their stars either as isolated planets or as moons to giant planets. Moons of Jovian-sized planets near the habitable zones of main-sequence stars should be noticeably brighter than their host planets in the near-infrared (1-4 microm) if their atmospheres contain methane, water, and water vapor, because of efficient absorption of starlight by these atmospheric components. By taking advantage of this spectral contrast, future space observatories will be able to discern which extrasolar giant planets have Earth-like moons capable of supporting life. PMID:15383243

  12. Galilean Moons, Kepler's Third Law, and the Mass of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Alan

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of physical systems are widely available online, with no cost, and are ready to be used in our classrooms. ,2 Such simulations offer an accessible tool that can be used for a range of interactive learning activities. The Jovian Moons Applet2 allows the user to track the position of Jupiter's four Galilean moons with a variety of viewing options. For this activity, data are obtained from the orbital period and orbital radii charts. Earlier experiments have used telescopes to capture the orbital motion of the Galilean moons,3 although observation of astronomical events and the measurement of quantities may be difficult to achieve due to a combination of cost, training, and observing conditions. The applet allows a suitable set of data to be generated and data analysis that verifies Kepler's third law of planetary motion, which leads to a calculated value for the mass of Jupiter.

  13. MAJIS, the Moons And Jupiter Imaging Spectrometer, designed for the future ESA/JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccioni, Giuseppe; Langevin, Yves; Filacchione, Gianrico; Poulet, Francois; Tosi, Federico; Eng, Pascal; Dumesnil, Cydalise; Zambelli, Massimo; Saggin, Bortolino; Fonti, Sergio; Grassi, Davide; Altieri, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    The Moons And Jupiter Imaging Spectrometer (MAJIS) is the VIS-IR spectral mapper selected for JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer), the first Large-class mission in the ESA Cosmic Vision Programme. Scheduled for a launch in 2022, JUICE will perform a comprehensive exploration of the Jovian system thanks to several flybys of Callisto, Ganymede and Europa, before finally entering orbit around Ganymede. During these phases, MAJIS will acquire hyperspectral data necessary to unveil and map the surface composition of different geologic units of the satellites. Transfers between successive satellites' flybys shall be devoted to remote observations of Jupiter's atmosphere and auroras. MAJIS' instrument design relies on a 75 mm pupil, f/3.2 aperture TMA telescope matching two Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometers. A dichroic element is used to split the beam between the two spectral channels. The VIS-NIR spectral channel covers the 0.4-1.9 μm range with a sampling of 2.3 nm/band. The IR channel works in the 1.5-5.7 μm range with a 6.6 nm/band sampling. The entire optical structure is passively cooled at cryogenic temperature

  14. Energetic particle fluxes in vicinity of Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzolko, Mikhail; Getselev, Igor; Gubar, Yuriy; Veselovsky, Igor

    Currently several projects of sending research space vehicles to Jupiter and its Galilean moons in 2020 are being developed. In particular, Russian Space Agency proposed the project of Europa lander. During the mission the spacecraft will be affected by charged particles of various origins. The greatest hazard will originate from powerful Jupiter's radiation belts, especially during the time of spacecraft operation near Europa and on its surface. The absorbed radiation dose during 2 months in Europa's orbit under shielding compared to that for "Galileo" spacecraft will amount to almost 1 megarad, the major contribution to it will originate from relativistic electrons. However, near Europa part of the charged particle flux will be shaded by the moon. Obviously, fluxes of particles of all energies on its surface will be lower by at least 2 times, than in the same point of space without Europa. But furthermore, the reduction of the fluxes in vicinity of Europa is nonuniform, and differs for the surface and the low-altitude orbit. This is caused by several factors: the complexity of particle trajectories near Europa and in Jupiter's magnetosphere in general, difference of Europa's orbital plane from Jupiter's geomagnetic equator plane, certain disturbance of Jupiter's magnetic field in vicinity of Europa, possible influence of electric fields and Europa's tenuous atmosphere. In the current study computations of energetic particle flux distribution near Europa and on its surface are made, taking into account several of the above-mentioned factors.

  15. Is Jupiter's Moon Amalthea a Captured Trojan Asteroid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Andrew J.

    In 2002 the Galileo spacecraft discovered that the small irregular Jovian moon Amalthea is a porous assemblage of rock and ice. Its bulk density is ~1 g/cc. This is much less than the value ~3.8 g/cc expected of the mixture of rock and metal that would form at this Jovian orbit had Amalthea moon condensed from a gas ring shed by the proto-Jovian cloud (Prentice 2001 Earth Moon Planets 87 11). Thus rather than being a native moon of Jupiter and especially because of its small size relative to the Galilean satellites Amalthea is probably a captured asteroid. Prentice and ter Haar (1979 Nature 280 300) had predicted Amalthea to be a C-type asteroid. Galileo has found Amalthea to be even less dense than the porous main-belt C-asteroid Mathilde so suggesting the presence of ice. Most likely therefore Amalthea originally condensed as a planetesimal within the gas ring shed by the proto-Solar cloud at the orbit of Jupiter. The predicted bulk chemical composition by mass is asteroidal rock (65%) graphite (1%) and water ice (34%) [see Prentice in URL: www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/mercury01]. The zero-porosity density is 1.8 g/cc. Amalthea is simply a first cousin of the Trojan asteroids of Jupiter.

  16. Project GALILEO: Farewell to the Major Moons of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilig, E.

    2002-01-01

    After a six year odyssey, Galileo has completed its survey of the large moons of Jupiter. In the four years since the end of the primary mission, Galileo provided new insights into the fundamental questions concerning Jupiter and its moons and magnetosphere. Longevity, changing orbital geometry, and multiple flybys afforded the opportunity to distinguish intrinsic versus induced magnetic fields on the Galilean moons, to characterize the dusk side of the magnetosphere, to acquire high resolution observations supporting the possibility of subsurface water within Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, and to monitor the highly dynamic volcanic activity of Io. In January 2002, a final gravity assist placed the spacecraft on a two-orbit trajectory culminating in a Jupiter impact in September 2003. With the successful completion of the Io encounters, plans are being made for the final encounter of the mission. In November 2002, the spacecraft will fly one Jupiter radius above the planet's cloud-tops, sampling the inner magnetosphere and the gossamer rings. The trajectory will take Galileo close enough to Amalthea, (a small inner moon) to obtain the first gravity data for this body. Because a radiation dose of 73 krads is expected on this encounter, which will bring the total radiation dose to greater than four times the spacecraft design limits, the command sequence has to account for the possibility of subsystem failure and the loss of spacecraft control after this perijove passage. One of the primary objectives this year has been to place the spacecraft on a trajectory to impact Jupiter on orbit 35. Galileo's discovery of water beneath the frozen surface of Europa raised concerns about forward contamination by inadvertently impacting that moon and resulted in an end of mission requirement to dispose of the spacecraft. A risk assessment of the final two Io encounters was performed to manage the project's ability to meet this requirement. Radiation affected the extended mission

  17. Numerical investigation of mapping orbits about Jupiter's icy moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, John

    2005-01-01

    A proposed mission that would orbit Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa will require low altitude, high inclination orbits for gravity and surface mapping. This paper explores the dynamics of these orbits by direct propagation against an ephemeris model. Initial conditions within the context of a mapping mission's likely requirements are considered. The results complement the analytical studies and reveal additional dependencies.

  18. Regional geology and stratigraphy of Saturn's icy moon Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Stephan, Katrin; Schmedemann, Nico; Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Neukum, Gerhard; Porco, Carolyn C.

    2013-04-01

    Tethys, with a diameter of 1060 km one of the 6 mid-sized icy moons of Saturn, was imaged for the first time in the early 1980ies by the cameras aboard the two Voyager spacecraft at resolutions of 1 km/pxl and lower [1][2][3]. These images show that most of Tethys is densely cratered and displays two major landmarks: the ~ 400 km large impact structure Odysseus and the huge graben system of Ithaca Chasma [1][2]. Since July 2004, Cassini has been in orbit about Saturn and has made several close passes at Tethys, providing an almost complete global image coverage at regional scale (200 - 500 m/pxl). However, varying viewing geometries between images taken during different orbits still impede the identification and mapping of geologic units. In this work we present an update of Tethys' regional geology and stratigraphy, based on Cassini ISS images. Crater distribution measurements, by us and in comparison with measurements of other groups [4], are used to support stratigraphic findings. Most of Tethys' surface consists of a hilly, rugged, heavily cratered plains unit, as identified in Voyager images [1][2][3]. A smooth, less densely cratered plains unit in the trailing hemisphere was previously observed by [2] which is also identifiable in Cassini ISS, but its exact boundaries are difficult to map due to varying viewing geometries of ISS observations. Another sparsely cratered plains unit not seen in Voyager images can be located to the south of Odysseus. It features remnants of highly degraded large craters superimposed by younger fresher craters with a lower crater density compared to the heavily cratered plains. Its distinct linear northern contact with the heavily cratered plains suggests an origin related to tectonism. Again, varying viewing conditions hamper to map the exact boundaries of this unit. The prominent graben system of Ithaca Chasma represents fractured cratered plains. The high resolution of Cassini ISS images reveals that tectonism on Tethys is more

  19. Moon-magnetosphere interactions in the Jupiter and Saturn systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. H.

    2013-05-01

    Most of the larger moons of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn are continuously immersed in their parent planets' extensive magnetospheres. Because of this, these tidally-locked bodies are permanently exposed to magnetospheric plasma. An overview is given of the many modes of interaction between the magnetospheres and moons. The largest moon, Ganymede, possesses its own magnetic field that forms a miniature magnetosphere within the Jovian magnetosphere. Saturn's largest moon, Titan, with its extensive atmosphere, has a unique interaction with the plasma, which plays a key role in the complex chemical reactions occurring in its ionosphere and at lower altitudes. We review key processes occurring at other moons, such as the production of sputter-induced exospheres, surface charging processes, and the electrodynamic induction that has revealed so much about the Galilean moons' interior structures. There are key parallels, and differences, between the active moons Io and Enceladus, and the roles that they play in their respective planets' magnetospheres. We close with a summary of some key questions that remain to be answered by the Cassini-Huygens mission at Saturn, and those to be addressed by future missions to the Jovian system.

  20. Hubble Provides Infrared View of Jupiter's Moon, Ring, and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Probing Jupiter's atmosphere for the first time, the Hubble Space Telescope's new Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) provides a sharp glimpse of the planet's ring, moon, and high-altitude clouds.

    The presence of methane in Jupiter's hydrogen- and helium-rich atmosphere has allowed NICMOS to plumb Jupiter's atmosphere, revealing bands of high-altitude clouds. Visible light observations cannot provide a clear view of these high clouds because the underlying clouds reflect so much visible light that the higher level clouds are indistinguishable from the lower layer. The methane gas between the main cloud deck and the high clouds absorbs the reflected infrared light, allowing those clouds that are above most of the atmosphere to appear bright. Scientists will use NICMOS to study the high altitude portion of Jupiter's atmosphere to study clouds at lower levels. They will then analyze those images along with visible light information to compile a clearer picture of the planet's weather. Clouds at different levels tell unique stories. On Earth, for example, ice crystal (cirrus) clouds are found at high altitudes while water (cumulus) clouds are at lower levels.

    Besides showing details of the planet's high-altitude clouds, NICMOS also provides a clear view of the ring and the moon, Metis. Jupiter's ring plane, seen nearly edge-on, is visible as a faint line on the upper right portion of the NICMOS image. Metis can be seen in the ring plane (the bright circle on the ring's outer edge). The moon is 25 miles wide and about 80,000 miles from Jupiter.

    Because of the near-infrared camera's narrow field of view, this image is a mosaic constructed from three individual images taken Sept. 17, 1997. The color intensity was adjusted to accentuate the high-altitude clouds. The dark circle on the disk of Jupiter (center of image) is an artifact of the imaging system.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are

  1. Interior Models and Gravity Field of Jupiter's Moon Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinwurm, G.; Weber, R.

    2003-12-01

    Before its final plunge into Jupiter in September 2003, GALILEO made a last visit to Jupiters moon Amalthea. This final flyby of the spacecrafts successful mission occurred on November 5, 2002. In order to analyse the spacecraft data with respect to Amaltheas gravity field, interior models of the moon had to be provided. The method used for this approach is based on the numerical integration of infinitesimal volume elements, which are calculated by the scale factors of a three-axial ellipsoid (elliptic coordinates). To derive the gravity field coefficients of the body, the second method of Neumann was applied. Based on the spacecraft trajectory data provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, GALILEOs velocity perturbations at closest approach could be calculated. We have derived the harmonic coefficients of Amaltheas gravity field up to degree and order six, for both homogeneous and reasonable heterogeneous cases. Based on these numbers we calculated the impact on the trajectory of GALILEO and compared it to existing Doppler data. Although no two-way Doppler-data was available during the flyby and the harmonic coefficients of the gravity field are buried in the one-way Doppler-noise, the calculated gravity field models of Amalthea can be a basis for further exploration of the Jupiter system. Furthermore, the model approach can be used for any planetary body.

  2. Remote Sensing of Icy Galilean Moon Surface and Atmospheric Composition Using Low Energy (1 eV-4 keV) Neutral Atom Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, M. R.; Sittler, E.; Chornay, D.; Cooper, J. F.; Coplan, M.; Johnson, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a low energy neutral atom imager suitable for composition measurements Europa and other icy Galilean moons in the Jovian magnetosphere. This instrument employs conversion surface technology and is sensitive to either neutrals converted to negative ions, neutrals converted to positive ions and the positive ions themselves depending on the power supply. On a mission such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), two back-to-back sensors would be flown with separate power supplies fitted to the neutral atom and iodneutral atom sides. This will allow both remote imaging of 1 eV < E < 4 keV neutrals from icy moon surfaces and atmospheres, and in situ measurements of ions at similar energies in the moon ionospheres and Jovian magnetospheric plasma. The instrument provides composition measurements of the neutrals and ions that enter the spectrometer with a mass resolution dependent on the time-of-flight subsystem and capable of resolving molecules. The lower energy neutrals, up to tens of eV, arise from atoms and molecules sputtered off the moon surfaces and out of the moon atmospheres by impacts of more energetic (keV to MeV) ions from the magnetosphere. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) models are used to convert measured neutral abundances to compositional distributions of primary and trace species in the sputtered surfaces and atmospheres. The escaping neutrals can also be detected as ions after photo- or plasma-ionization and pickup. Higher energy, keV neutrals come from charge exchange of magnetospheric ions in the moon atmospheres and provide information on atmospheric structure. At the jovicentric orbits of the icy moons the presence of toroidal gas clouds, as detected at Europa's orbit, provide M e r opportunities to analyze both the composition of neutrals and ions originating from the moon surfaces, and the characteristics of magnetospheric ions interacting with neutral cloud material. Charge exchange of low energy ions near the moons, and

  3. The dust halo of Saturn's largest icy moon, Rhea.

    PubMed

    Jones, G H; Roussos, E; Krupp, N; Beckmann, U; Coates, A J; Crary, F; Dandouras, I; Dikarev, V; Dougherty, M K; Garnier, P; Hansen, C J; Hendrix, A R; Hospodarsky, G B; Johnson, R E; Kempf, S; Khurana, K K; Krimigis, S M; Krüger, H; Kurth, W S; Lagg, A; McAndrews, H J; Mitchell, D G; Paranicas, C; Postberg, F; Russell, C T; Saur, J; Seiss, M; Spahn, F; Srama, R; Strobel, D F; Tokar, R; Wahlund, J-E; Wilson, R J; Woch, J; Young, D

    2008-03-01

    Saturn's moon Rhea had been considered massive enough to retain a thin, externally generated atmosphere capable of locally affecting Saturn's magnetosphere. The Cassini spacecraft's in situ observations reveal that energetic electrons are depleted in the moon's vicinity. The absence of a substantial exosphere implies that Rhea's magnetospheric interaction region, rather than being exclusively induced by sputtered gas and its products, likely contains solid material that can absorb magnetospheric particles. Combined observations from several instruments suggest that this material is in the form of grains and boulders up to several decimetres in size and orbits Rhea as an equatorial debris disk. Within this disk may reside denser, discrete rings or arcs of material. PMID:18323452

  4. Natural radio emission of Jupiter as interferences for radar investigations of the icy satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Hérique, A.; Santovito, M. R.; Santos-Costa, D.; Zarka, P.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D.; Bougeret, J. L.; Bruzzone, L.; Kofman, W.

    2011-10-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the two Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are under study for radar, which ranges between 5MHz and 50MHz. Part of this frequency range overlaps with that of the natural Jovian radio emissions, which are very intense in the decametric range, below 40 MHz. Radio observations above 40 MHz are free of interferences, whereas below this threshold, careful observation strategies have to be investigated. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emission are strongly beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. We present radio sources visibility products (dynamic spectra and radio source location maps, on still frames or movies), which can be used for operation planning. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation. We show that this radio noise has to be taken into account very early in the observation planning and strategies for both JGO and JEO. We also point out possible synergies with RPW (Radio and Plasma Waves) instrumentations.

  5. Natural radio emission of Jupiter as interferences for radar investigations of the icy satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Hérique, A.; Santovito, M. R.; Santos-Costa, D.; Zarka, P.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bruzzone, L.; Kofman, W.

    2012-02-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the two Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are under study for radar, which ranges between 5 and 50 MHz. Part of this frequency range overlaps with that of the natural jovian radio emissions, which are very intense in the decametric range, below 40 MHz. Radio observations above 40 MHz are free of interferences, whereas below this threshold, careful observation strategies have to be investigated. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emissions are strongly beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. We present radio sources visibility products (dynamic spectra and radio source location maps, on still frames or movies), which can be used for operation planning. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation. We show that this radio noise has to be taken into account very early in the observation planning and strategies for both JGO and JEO. We also point out possible synergies with RPW (Radio and Plasma Waves) instrumentations.

  6. Carbonic Acid as a Reserve of Carbon Dioxide on Icy Moons: The Formation of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in a Polar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν3 band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO2 band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H2O)-carbon dioxide (CO2) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν3 band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  7. Mission Techniques for Exploring Saturn's icy moons Titan and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reh, Kim; Coustenis, Athena; Lunine, Jonathan; Matson, Dennis; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Vargas, Andre; Beauchamp, Pat; Spilker, Tom; Strange, Nathan; Elliott, John

    2010-05-01

    The future exploration of Titan is of high priority for the solar system exploration community as recommended by the 2003 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey [1] and ESA's Cosmic Vision Program themes. Cassini-Huygens discoveries continue to emphasize that Titan is a complex world with very many Earth-like features. Titan has a dense, nitrogen atmosphere, an active climate and meteorological cycles where conditions are such that the working fluid, methane, plays the role that water does on Earth. Titan's surface, with lakes and seas, broad river valleys, sand dunes and mountains was formed by processes like those that have shaped the Earth. Supporting this panoply of Earth-like processes is an ice crust that floats atop what might be a liquid water ocean. Furthermore, Titan is rich in very many different organic compounds—more so than any place in the solar system, except Earth. The Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) concept that followed the 2007 TandEM ESA CV proposal [2] and the 2007 Titan Explorer NASA Flagship study [3], was examined [4,5] and prioritized by NASA and ESA in February 2009 as a mission to follow the Europa Jupiter System Mission. The TSSM study, like others before it, again concluded that an orbiter, a montgolfiѐre hot-air balloon and a surface package (e.g. lake lander, Geosaucer (instrumented heat shield), …) are very high priority elements for any future mission to Titan. Such missions could be conceived as Flagship/Cosmic Vision L-Class or as individual smaller missions that could possibly fit within NASA's New Frontiers or ESA's Cosmic Vision M-Class budgets. As a result of a multitude of Titan mission studies, several mission concepts have been developed that potentially fit within various cost classes. Also, a clear blueprint has been laid out for early efforts critical toward reducing the risks inherent in such missions. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of potential Titan (and Enceladus) mission

  8. Applications of High Etendue Line-Profile Spectro-Polarimetry to the Study of the Atmospheric and Magnetospheric Environments of the Jovian Icy Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Walter M.; Roesler, Fred L.; Jaffel, Lotfi Ben; Ballester, Gilda E.; Oliversen, Ronald J.; Morgenthaler, Jeffrey P.; Mierkiewicz, Edwin

    2003-01-01

    Electrodynamic effects play a significant, global role in the state and energization of the Earth's ionosphere/magnetosphere, but even more so on Jupiter, where the auroral energy input is four orders of magnitude greater than on Earth. The Jovian magnetosphere is distinguished from Earth's by its rapid rotation rate and contributions from satellite atmospheres and internal plasma sources. The electrodynamic effects of these factors have a key role in the state and energization of the ionosphere-corona- plasmasphere system of the planet and its interaction with Io and the icy satellites. Several large scale interacting processes determine conditions near the icy moons beginning with their tenuous atmospheres produced from sputtering, evaporative, and tectonic/volcanic sources, extending out to exospheres that merge with ions and neutrals in the Jovian magnetosphere. This dynamic environment is dependent on a complex network of magnetospheric currents that act on global scales. Field aligned currents connect the satellites and the middle and tail magnetospheric regions to the Jupiter's poles via flux tubes that produce as bright auroral and satellite footprint emissions in the upper atmosphere. This large scale transfer of mass, momentum, and energy (e.g. waves, currents) means that a combination of complementary diagnostics of the plasma, neutral, and and field network must be obtained near simultaneously to correctly interpret the results. This presentation discusses the applicability of UV spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS) to the broad study of this system on scales from satellite surfaces to Jupiter's aurora and corona.

  9. Fuzzy Boundary Jupiter Moon Tour Trajectories using the Bifurcation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, M.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Sanchez, M.; Janin, G.

    The consideration of transfers to the Fuzzy Boundary region represents one of the more advanced concepts when trying to reduce the propellant requirements to obtain an interplanetary goal. DEIMOS Space, under ESA contract, has developed a tool to generate such transfers to inner planets, giant planets and natural moons of giant planets. The method is based on the Systematic Scan Search of Bifurcations, with a three-step approach consisting on: selection of strategy, generation of initial solutions and numerical optimisation. The generation of the initial solution by systematic search of bifurcations is accomplished by splitting the trajectory into smaller arcs. The initial guess of the trajectories must be obtained always by backwards propagation from the final targeting conditions. Forward propagation is used from the initial conditions to match the backwards propagation previously derived. Different values of the orbit eccentricity are used when propagating (typically ranging between 0.9 and 1.1, close to the parabolic orbit). This leads to three different types of trajectory: close orbits below the Fuzzy region, escape trajectories and trajectories reaching maximum and minimum distances within the Fuzzy region. The actual change of nature in the resulting orbit corresponds to a bifurcation. Matching of forwards and backwards propagation will take place within the Fuzzy region, using in general a manoeuvre or a low-thrust arc. Finally, an optimisation process is started to obtain a full continuous numerically integrated trajectory, with minimum required propellant consumption. One of the key advantages of this new method is the large number of solutions found, thanks to its systematic scan approach. In particular, it has been applied to systematically explore trajectories between the different moons of a giant planet by using the Fuzzy Regions of those moons. A Tour of the Jupiter Galilean Moons has been created, allowing a spacecraft to visit a sequence of moons

  10. Discovering New Compounds on Icy Moon Surfaces with Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. L.; Wray, J. J.; Hand, K. P.; Poston, M.; Carlson, R. W.; Clark, R. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Jennings, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Spectroscopy of icy satellite surfaces can aid us in understanding sources and sinks of material in the outer solar system. The spectral complexity of the Saturnian satellite system as seen in reflected sunlight suggests additional complexity may be present at mid-infrared wavelengths from which unique compositional information can be gleaned [1]. Yet to date, Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) surface compositional studies have received little attention. We are investigating the value of mid-infrared spectroscopy for identifying non-H2O constituents of icy moon surfaces. On Iapetus' dark terrain, we find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts [2]. We attribute the 855 cm-1feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths [3]. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn's icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Because peaks can shift depending on temperature, pressure, and grain size, measurements at Iapetus-like conditions are necessary for more positive feature identifications [e.g., 4]. We measured the vacuum (P<3x10-8 torr) and low temperature (125 K) mid-infrared spectra of various fine-grained powdered silicates. We find that some of these materials do have emissivity features near 855 cm-1and match the doublet. Identifying a specific silicate would provide clues into the origin and implications of the dark material in the Saturnian system. We also report on our ongoing exploration of the CIRS icy moon dataset and plans for additional future measurements in JPL's Icy Worlds Simulation Lab. [1] Flasar, F. M., et al. (2004), Space Sci Rev, 115, 169. [2] Young, C.L., et al. (in review), ApJ Lett. [3] Christensen, P. R., et al. (2004), Sci, 306, 1733. [4] Wray, J. J., et al. (2014), DPS 46th Meeting, Vol. 46.

  11. Identifying new surface constituents of icy moons using mid-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Cindy L.; Wray, James J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Poston, Michael J.; Carlson, Robert W.; Clark, Roger N.; Spencer, John R.; Jennings, Donald E.

    2015-11-01

    Spectroscopic compositional studies of the icy satellites can help us to better understand the formation and evolution of material in the outer solar system. The spectral complexity of the Saturnian satellite system as seen in reflected visible light suggests additional complexity may be present at mid-infrared wavelengths from which unique compositional information can be gleaned [1]. In addition, the mid-infrared is the region of the stronger fundamental diagnostic vibrational modes of many compounds. However, Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) surface compositional studies have received little attention to date.We are exploring the suitability of mid-infrared spectroscopy for discovering non-H2O compounds on icy moon surfaces. On the dark terrain of Iapetus, we find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a potential doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts [2]. We attribute the 855 cm-1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths [3]. Although silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn’s icy moons have been suspected for decades, there have been no definitive prior detections. Serpentines measured at ambient conditions have features near 855 cm-1 and 660 cm-1 [4]. However, peaks can shift depending on temperature, pressure, and grain size, so measurements at Iapetus-like conditions are necessary for more positive identifications [e.g., 5].We measured the vacuum, low temperature (125 K) spectra of various fine-grained powdered silicates. We find that some of these materials do have emissivity features near 855 cm-1 and match the doublet. Identifying a specific silicate would provide clues into the sources and sinks of the dark material in the Saturnian system. We report on our ongoing exploration of the CIRS icy moon dataset and plans for future measurements in JPL’s Icy Worlds Simulation Lab.[1] Flasar, F

  12. Interactions Between Neutral Gas Clouds and Plasma Near the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M. H.

    2007-05-01

    Neutral gas clouds associated with icy satellites are intimately tied to the magnetospheric plasma in which they are formed and reside. Plasma interactions can create the clouds, remove material from them, and make it possible for us to observe them. At Europa, for example, energetic ions incident on the icy surface eject hydrogen and oxygen formed from the dissociation of water (Johnson et al. 1982). The hydrogen escapes, but the O2remains gravitationally bound, forming an atmosphere. This atmosphere then interacts with the thermal plasma in Jupiter's magneotpshere: the O2is dissociated by the electrons resulting in emissions from atomic oxygen which have been observed by HST and Cassini (Hall et al. 1995; Hansen et al. 2005). Charge exchange with magnetospheric ions and electron-impact ionization removes atoms and molecules from Europa's atmosphere and exosphere, and contributes fresh ions to the plasma (Saur et al. 1998; Shematovich et al 2005). At Enceladus, where 150-300 kg/s of H2O gas is supplied by the south pole plume (Hansen et al. 2006; Burger et al. 2007), charge exchange reactions between the plasma and H2O produce fresh pickup ions which slow and deflect the plasma (Tokar et al. 2006; Pontius and Hill 2006) and induce perturbations in Saturn's magnetic field (Dougherty et al. 2006; Khurana et al. 2006). The neutrals created in these charge exchange reactions either escape from Saturn entirely or are redistributed throughout the inner magnetosphere forming gas clouds which have been observed by HST and Cassini (Johnson et al. 2006). I will describe the interaction processes between the neutral atoms and molecules in icy satellite atmospheres and exospheres, and discuss differences between the processes imporant in Jupiter's magnetosphere, where the plasma content is greater than the neutral content, and Saturn's magnetosphere, which is dominated by neutrals. References: Burger et al., JGR, 2007, in press. Dougherty et al., Science, 311, 1406, 2006

  13. Constraints on the nanoscale minerals on the surface of Saturnian icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.; Hsu, H.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Nano-phase iron particles embedded into the surfaces of Saturn's icy moons as well as in the ring material have been proposed to explain the infrared spectra obtained by Cassini VIMS. Because the continuous influx of interplanetary fast impactors into the Saturnian system erodes any exposed surface, a certain amount of the embedded nano-particles will be ejected into the Saturnian magnetosphere and speed up to velocities high enough to be detected by the Cassini dust detector CDA. Thus, the analysis of the so-called stream particles provides constraints on the amount and the composition of any nano-phase material within the surfaces of the icy moons. Nanoparticles registered by the Cassini dust detector are most likely composed of silica (SiO2). Their dynamical properties indicate that they are relics of E ring dust grains. In this talk we will show that the Cassini stream particle measurements provide strong constraints for the composition and size distribution of any embedded nano-material.

  14. Galilean Moons, Kepler's Third Law, and the Mass of Jupiter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of physical systems are widely available online, with no cost, and are ready to be used in our classrooms. Such simulations offer an accessible tool that can be used for a range of interactive learning activities. The Jovian Moons Apple allows the user to track the position of Jupiter's four Galilean moons with a variety of…

  15. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in a polar environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-06-20

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν{sub 3} band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO{sub 2} band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H{sub 2}O)-carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν{sub 3} band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  16. IR reflectance spectroscopy of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates. Implications for Saturn's icy moons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oancea, A.; Grasset, O.; Le Menn, E.; Bezacier, L.; Bollengier, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Tobie, G.

    2012-04-01

    A CO2 spectral band was discovered by VIMS on the Saturn's satellites Dione, Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe [1]. The band position on the three first satellites corresponds to CO2 trapped in a complex material, but no indication exists whether this latter is water ice or some mineral or complex organic compound [1]. On Phoebe, the CO2 spectral band is consistent with solid CO2 or CO2 molecules trapped in the small cages of a clathrate hydrate structure [2]. It is thought that clathrate hydrates could play a significant role in the chemistry of the solar nebula [3] and in the physical evolution of astrophysical objects [4]. But so far, no clathrate hydrate structure has been observed in astrophysical environments. Moreover, identification of molecules trapped in a clathrate hydrate structure is extremely difficult because of the strong IR vibration modes of the water ice matrix. In this work, experimental IR reflectance spectra for CO2 clathrate hydrates are studied on grains and films. Clathrates are synthesized in a high pressure autoclave at low temperatures. IR spectral analysis is made with a low pressure and low temperature cryostat. These experimental conditions - 80 < T < 110 K, P~10-5 bar - are relevant to icy moons' surfaces. We have observed that the IR reflectance, in the spectral region (3 - 5 μm) characterized by H2O and CO2 high absorption coefficients, is strongly dependent on physical (size, surface) and optical (n and k) properties of the samples. The impact of these parameters on the CO2 clathrate IR reflectance spectrum will be presented. A comparison between the absorption bands of CO2 clathrate hydrates obtained in our lab and CO2 absorption bands as detected by VIMS on the icy satellites of Saturn will be shown. This experimental work confirms that VIMS data are not consistent with the presence of structure I CO2 clathrate hydrates on the surface of the icy moons. Possibility of having metastable structure II still remains unsolved and will be

  17. Ionization chemistry in the H2O-dominant atmospheres of the icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    2007-08-01

    The main pathways of the ionization chemistry for pure H2O- and mixed H2O+O2+CO2+NH3+CH4 atmospheres which are representative for neutral and ionized atmospheres of the icy bodies in the Jovian and Saturnian systems are discussed. The gaseous envelopes of the icy moons of the giant planets are formed usually due to the surface radiolysis by the solar UV radiation and energetic magnetospheric plasma (Johnson, 1990). The standard astrochemical UMIST2005 (UDFA05) network is used to infer the main chemical pathways of ionization chemistry in the pure or with admixtures of other volatile molecules water vapor atmospheres. In case of the H2O- dominant atmosphere the parent H2O molecules are easily dissociated and ionized by the solar UVradiation and the energetic magnetospheric electrons. These impact processes result in the formation of the secondary neutral and ionized products - chemically active radicals O and OH, and H+, H2+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions. Secondary ions have admixture abundances in the H2O-dominant atmospheres, because they are efficiently transformed to H3O+ hydroxonium ions in the fast ion-molecular reactions. The major H3O+ hydroxonium ion does not chemically interact with other neutrals, and is destroyed in the dissociative recombination with thermal electrons mainly reproducing the chemically simple H, H2, O, and OH species. In case of the mixed H2O+O2-dominant atmosphere corresponding to the near-surface atmospheres of icy moons (Shematovich et al., 2005), the ionization chemistry results in the formation of the second major ion O2+ - because ion of molecular oxygen has the lower ionization potential comparing with other parent species -H2, H2O, CO2. The H+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions can be easily converted to O2+ ions through the ion-molecular reactions. In case of significant admixture of molecular hydrogen it is possible to transfer the O2+ ions to the O2H+ ions through the fast reaction with H2 and further to the H3O+ ions through the ion

  18. Tectonics of Icy Moons: A Tale of Oceans and Orbital Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    2010-05-01

    Icy moons of the outer solar system commonly experience eccentric orbits that impart daily tidal stresses to the outer ice layer. Depending on the orbital dynamics and configuration of the moons and their host planets, these stresses may or may not be sufficiently large to deform the ice layer. Although the stresses are typically very small, many icy moons exhibit pervasively tectonized surfaces, replete with fractures, faults, and significant topography (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus, Dione, Titan, Miranda, Ariel, Titania, Triton). Deformation may be driven by various means (e.g., orbital recession, polar wander, ice shell thickening), but tidal deformation is particularly important and is enhanced if an outer ice layer is decoupled from an underlying liquid ocean. The tidal response of the ocean creates tidal bulges in the ice layer that oscillate longitudinally and in amplitude during the orbital period. The resultant diurnal tidal stress field (perhaps 10s of kPa) rotates throughout the orbit. Any fractures growing in this time frame should thus be curved (e.g., Europa's cycloidal cracks, which have been cited as the smoking gun for a subsurface ocean). Long lineaments should accumulate strike-slip offsets in such a stress field, as occurs on Europa and perhaps Enceladus. The progressive development of ice ridges to either side of central cracks may result from this shearing process. A decoupled ice layer also permits faster than synchronous rotation of the ice layer, which may allow several MPa of stress to accrue, perhaps explaining long lineaments on Europa. It is unclear if Europa continues to be tectonically active, especially given apparent ice shell thickening that would have muted the tidal response through time. Nonetheless, subtle troughs across Europa's surface crosscut all other features and may indicate some degree of ongoing activity. In contrast, active tectonics on Enceladus is implied by ongoing geyser-like eruptions of water-ice from

  19. Global geologic mapping of Jupiter's moon Io: First steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Keszthelyi, L.; Crown, D.; Geissler, P.; Rathbun, J.; Jaeger, W.

    We have been funded by NASA's Outer Planets Research program to produce a global geologic map of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, that takes advantage of the complementary global coverage obtained by the 1979 Voyager flybys and by repeated flybys of the 1995-2003 Galileo orbiter. To this end the USGS produced a series of global mosaics (completed February 2006), with a spatial resolution of 1 km/px, that combine the Galileo and Voyager data. These mosaics include the highest quality global color imaging by Galileo at uniform phase angle, and highest quality monochrome imaging (both high and low sun observations) of the subjovian (Voyager) and antijovian (Galileo) hemispheres. We have formatted these mosaics (in various projections) in ArcGIS software (by ESRI) to produce the map. Based on image analyses, Io has 5 primary types of surface materials: plains (various textures and colors), patera floors (dark and bright), flows (dark and bright), mountains (lineated, mottled, tholus), and diffuse deposits (yellow, white, black, red, and green). A range of structural features are visible only in low-sun images, including ridges, grooves, scarps, lineaments, graben, and pits. No impact craters have been seen on Io at any resolution. Based on our previous experience mapping Io using medium resolution (few 100 m/px) Galileo images, we have developed the following strategy for mapping Io using the new global mosaics: 1) Map diffuse deposits first using the Galileo global color data; 2) Map mountains, surrounding plateaus, and structural features using the monochrome mosaics supplemented by available low-sun images; 3) Map vents and paterae using the monochrome mosaics; 4) Map lava flow fields using the monochrome mosaics; 5) Map plains last. An additional complication for Io are the changes caused by active volcanism, which have been observed between the Voyager and Galileo missions and between individual Galileo flybys of Io. To address this complication we are assembling a

  20. Between ice and gas: CO2 on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 exists in the surfaces of the icy Galilean and Saturnian satellites [1-6], yet despite its discovery over a decade ago on Ganymede, and five years ago on the Saturnian satellites, its nature is still debated [7]. On the Galilean satellites Callisto and Ganymede, the CO2 that is detected is bound to, or trapped within, the non-ice materials that prevent it from sublimating or otherwise escaping from the surface. On Europa, it resides within both the ice and nonice materials [8,9]. While greater abundances of CO2 may exist in the interiors of these moons, or small amounts may be continually created through particle bombardment of the surface, the observed CO2 is only a trace material, with a few hundred molecules responsible for the deepest absorption features and an estimated molar abundance of 0.1% [2; 10-12]. Yet its presence may provide essential clues to processes that shape the surfaces of the moon [13] and potentially key to understanding the composition of potential oceans in the subsurfaces. We continue measurements of the infrared properties associated with CO2 adsorbed onto nonice materials under pressures and at temperatures relevant to these icy satellites using bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy from ~ 1.5 to 5.5 μm. Previous measurements, using transmission spectroscopy, demonstrated both a compositional and a temperature dependence on the spectral signature of adsorbed CO2 [14]. Bidirectional spectroscopy enables detection of lower concentrations of adsorbate on fine-grained materials such as clays due to their large surface area to volume ratios and thus large surface areas that may be covered by adsorbate [15]. The effectiveness of transmission spectroscopy was also limited by the strong absorption of light within the pressed sample and its impermeability, which limited the coverage by adsorbate to the pellet’s outer surface. All measurements demonstrate that CO2 adsorbs onto montmorillonite clays, possibly due to its quadrupole moment

  1. Laboratory Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify New Compounds on Icy Moon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, James J.; Young, Cindy L.; Hand, Kevin P.; Poston, Michael J.; Carlson, Robert W.; Clark, Roger N.; Spencer, John R.; Jennings, Donald E.

    2014-11-01

    We are exploring the value of mid-infrared spectroscopy for identifying non-H2O constituents of icy moon surfaces. Recently we reported evidence for a new emissivity feature identified on Iapetus using Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer [1]. This 11.7 μm feature is consistent with emissivity minima (transparency features) of very fine-grained silicates. Its position and shape may be diagnostic of silicate type, but most lab data at these wavelengths have been acquired using coarser grains and/or at Earth surface pressures and temperatures. Infrared spectra can change substantially under low-temperature, vacuum conditions [e.g., 2,3].We prepared sieved (<0.4 mm) and very fine-grained (few μm) powders of six different silicates and measured their VNIR (0.35-2.5 μm) reflectance spectra under ambient air, and mid-IR (1.2-20 μm) spectra in a purged N2 glovebox. All silicates exhibited mid-IR transparency features (and loss of other features) in micronized form that were not observed for the coarser grain sizes. Muscovite, a phyllosilicate mineral possibly similar to those tentatively identified on Europa [4], provided the closest match to Iapetus in the mid-IR--although clear VNIR features of muscovite have not been identified on Iapetus [5]--and therefore we measured muscovite across the same wavelength range under Iapetus-like conditions (T=125 K, P<3x10^-8 torr). We will report on our ongoing analysis and plans for additional future measurements in JPL’s Icy Worlds Simulation Lab. [1] Young, C.L., et al. (2014), Workshop on the Habitability of Icy Worlds, Abstract #4038.[2] Logan, L.M., et al. (1973), J. Geophys. Res., 78(23), 4983-5003.[3] Donaldson Hanna, K.L., et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00H05.[4] Shirley, J.H., et al. (2013), AGU Fall Meeting, Abstract #P54A-07.[5] Clark, R.N., et al. (2012), Icarus, 218, 831-860.

  2. Dielectric characterization of ice/MgSO4ṡ11H2O mixtures as Jovian icy moon crust analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinelli, Elena; Lauro, Sebastian Emanuel; Cosciotti, Barbara; Mattei, Elisabetta; Di Paolo, Federico; Vannaroni, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    One of the main objectives of proposed missions to the icy Jovian moons is to prove the existence of the postulated subsurface ocean on Europa using radar sounders. The success of these missions will rely on the ability of the radar signals to penetrate ten kilometers of icy material that could potentially contain various types of impurities. In this work we quantify the impact of magnesium sulfate hydrates on the electrical properties of water ice by performing a series of dielectric measurements on different ice/MgSO4ṡ11H2O mixtures as a function of frequency and at temperatures comparable with those expected on the icy satellite surfaces. Our results indicate that the salt only affects the real part of permittivity of the mixtures, whereas the imaginary part, hence the attenuation, does not significantly differ from that of pure ice. This means that in some regions signal penetration may be better than previously thought.

  3. Resonance locking as the source of rapid tidal migration in the Jupiter and Saturn moon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Luan, Jing; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-06-01

    The inner moons of Jupiter and Saturn migrate outwards due to tidal energy dissipation within the planets, the details of which remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that resonance locking between moons and internal oscillation modes of the planet can produce rapid tidal migration. Resonance locking arises due to the internal structural evolution of the planet and typically produces an outward migration rate comparable to the age of the Solar system. Resonance locking predicts a similar migration time-scale but a different effective tidal quality factor Q governing the migration of each moon. The theory also predicts nearly constant migration time-scales a function of semimajor axis, such that effective Q values were larger in the past. Recent measurements of Jupiter and Saturn's moon systems find effective Q values that are smaller than expected (and are different between moons), and which correspond to migration time-scales of ˜10 Gyr. If confirmed, the measurements are broadly consistent with resonance locking as the dominant source of tidal dissipation in Jupiter and Saturn. Resonance locking also provides solutions to several problems posed by current measurements: it naturally explains the exceptionally small Q governing Rhea's migration, it allows the large heating rate of Enceladus to be achieved in an equilibrium eccentricity configuration, and it resolves evolutionary problems arising from present-day migration/heating rates.

  4. Io-Jupiter system: a unique case of moon-planet interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Michael, M.

    2002-10-01

    Io and Jupiter constitute a moon-planet system that is unique in our solar system. Io is the most volcanically active planetary body, while Jupiter is the first among the planets in terms of size, mass, magnetic field strength, spin rate, and volume of the magnetosphere. That Io is electrodynamically linked to Jupiter is known for nearly four decades from the radio emissions. Io influences Jupiter by supplying heavy ions to its magnetosphere, which dominates its energetic and dynamics. Jupiter influences Io by tidally heating its interior, which in turn drives the volcanic activity on Io. The role of Io and Jupiter in their mutual interaction and the nature of their coupling were first elaborated in greater detail by the two Voyagers flybys in 1979. Subsequent exploration of this system by ground-based and Earth-satellite-borne observatories and by the Galileo orbiter mission has improved our understanding of the highly complex electrodynamical interaction between Io and Jupiter many fold. A distinct feature of this interaction has been discovered in Jupiter's atmosphere as a auroral-like bright emission spot along with a comet-like tail in infrared, ultraviolet (UV), and visible wavelengths at the foot of Io flux tube (IFT). The HST and Galileo and Cassini imagining experiments have observed emissions from Io's atmosphere at UV and visible wavelengths. which could be produced by energetic electrons in the IFT. In this paper an overview on these aspects of the Io-Jupiter system is presented, which by virtue of the nature of its electrodynamical coupling, has implications for the extra-solar planetary systmes and binary stars.

  5. Clump detections and limits on moons in Jupiter's ring system.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Mark R; Cheng, Andrew F; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan; Spencer, John R; Throop, Henry B; Birath, Emma M; Rose, Debi; Moore, Jeffrey M

    2007-10-12

    The dusty jovian ring system must be replenished continuously from embedded source bodies. The New Horizons spacecraft has performed a comprehensive search for kilometer-sized moons within the system, which might have revealed the larger members of this population. No new moons were found, however, indicating a sharp cutoff in the population of jovian bodies smaller than 8-kilometer-radius Adrastea. However, the search revealed two families of clumps in the main ring: one close pair and one cluster of three to five. All orbit within a brighter ringlet just interior to Adrastea. Their properties are very different from those of the few other clumpy rings known; the origin and nonrandom distribution of these features remain unexplained, but resonant confinement by Metis may play a role. PMID:17932287

  6. Development and Testing of a Laser-Powered Cryobot for Outer Planet Icy Moon Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, V.; Stone, W.; Hogan, B.; Lelievre, S.; Flesher, C.

    2013-12-01

    Project VALKYRIE (Very-deep Autonomous Laser-powered Kilowatt-class Yo-yoing Robotic Ice Explorer) is a NASA-funded effort to develop the first laser powered cryobot - a self-contained intelligent ice penetrator capable of delivering science payloads through ice caps of the outer planet icy moons. The long range objective is to enable a full-scale Europa lander mission in which an autonomous life-searching underwater vehicle is transported by the cryobot and launched into the sub-surface Europan ocean. Mission readiness testing will involve an Antarctic sub-glacial lake cryobot sample return through kilometers of ice cap thickness. A key element of VALKYRIE's design is the use of a high energy laser as the primary power source. 1070 nm laser light is transmitted at a power level of 5 kW from a surface-based laser and injected into a custom-designed optical waveguide that is spooled out from the descending cryobot. Light exits the downstream end of the fiber, travels through diverging optics, and strikes a beam dump, which channels thermal power to hot water jets that melt the descent hole. Some beam energy is converted, via photovoltaic cells, to electricity for running onboard electronics and jet pumps. Since the vehicle can be sterilized prior to deployment and the melt path freezes behind it, preventing forward contamination, expansions on VALKYRIE concepts may enable cleaner and faster access to sub-glacial Antarctic lakes. Testing at Stone Aerospace between 2010 and 2013 has already demonstrated high power optical energy transfer over relevant (kilometer scale) distances as well as the feasibility of a vehicle-deployed optical waveguide (through which the power is transferred). The test vehicle is equipped with a forward-looking synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that can detect obstacles out to 1 kilometer from the vehicle. The initial ASTEP test vehicle will carry a science payload consisting of a DUV flow cytometer and a water sampling sub-system that will be

  7. The effect of viscosity on impact cratering and possible application to the icy satellites of Saturn and Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, J.; Greeley, R.; Gault, D.

    1984-01-01

    Impact experiments in Newtonian fluids with a range of viscosities of 0.001 to 60 Pa s demonstrate that transient crater volume and shape depend on target viscosity as well as on gravity. Volume is reduced, and depth-to-diameter ratio is increased for cratering events in which viscosity plays a dominant role. In addition to being affected by target kinematic viscosity, viscous scaling is most strongly influenced by projectile diameter, less strongly by projectile velocity, and least strongly by gravity. In a planetary context, viscous effects can occur for craters formed by small or slow moving impacting bodies, low planetary surface densities, high surface viscosities, and low gravity values; conditions all likely for certain impacts into the icy satellites of Saturn and Jupiter, especially if liquid mantles were still present beneath solid crusts. Age dating based on crater counts and size-frequency distributions for these icy bodies may have to be modified to account for the possibility that viscosity-dominated craters were initially smaller and deeper than their gravity-controlled counterparts.

  8. Tidal reorientation and the fracturing of Jupiter's moon Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The most striking characteristic of Europa is the network of long linear albedo markings over the surface, suggestive of global-scale tectonic processes. Various explanations for the fractures have been proposed: Freezing and expansion of an early liquid water ocean1, planetary expansion due to dehydration of hydrated silicates2, localization by weak points in the crust generated by impacts3, and a combination of stresses due to planetary volume change and tidal distortions from orbital recession and orbital eccentricity4,5. Calculations by Yoder6 and Greenberg and Weidenschilling7 have shown that Europa may rotate slightly more rapidly than the synchronous rate, with a rotation period (reorientation through 360??) ranging from 20 to >103 yr if a liquid mantle is present, or up to 1010 yr if the satellite is essentially solid7. Helfen-stein and Parmentier8 modelled the stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation, and concluded that this could explain the long fractures in part of the anti-jovian hemisphere. In this note, I present a global map of lineaments with long arc lengths (>20?? or 550 km), and compare the lineament orientations to the tensile stress trajectories due to tidal distortions (changes in the lengths of three principal semiaxes) and to nonsynchronous rotation (longitudinal reorientation of two of the principal semiaxes). An excellent orthogonal fit to the lineaments is achieved by the stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation with the axis radial to Jupiter located 25?? east of its present position. This fit suggests that nonsynchronous rotation occurred at some time in Europa's history. ?? 1986 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Shock vaporization and the accretion of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Okeefe, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The known properties of water and ice over a wide range of pressures and temperatures are applied to describe constraints on the shock vaporization processes for water and ice in the solar system. In particular, the role of impact vaporization acting during the formation of the Jovian and Saturnian satellites is examined in an attempt to explain the observed density in terms of composition of these rock and ice objects. A possible model of accretion of icy satellites is considered which predicts that the amount of ice devolatilization is related to planetary size.

  10. Gravity field of Jupiter's moon Amalthea and the implication on a spacecraft trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinwurm, G.; Weber, R.

    Before its final plunge into Jupiter in September 2003, GALILEO made a last 'visit' to one of Jupiter's moons - Amalthea. This final flyby of the spacecraft's successful mission occurred on November 5, 2002. In order to analyse the spacecraft data with respect to Amalthea's gravity field, interior models of the moon had to be provided. The method used for this approach is based on the numerical integration of infinitesimal volume elements, which are calculated by the scale factors of a three-axial ellipsoid (elliptic coordinates). Within this routine the shape information of Amalthea can be included as well. To derive the gravity field coefficients of the body, the second method of Neumann was applied. Based on the spacecraft trajectory data provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, GALILEO's velocity perturbations at closest approach could be calculated. We have derived the harmonic coefficients of Amalthea's gravity field up to degree and order six, for both homogeneous and reasonable heterogeneous cases. Founded on these numbers we calculated the impact on the trajectory of GALILEO, compared it to existing Doppler data and made predictions for future spacecraft flybys. Although no two-way Doppler-data was available during the flyby and the harmonic coefficients of the gravity field are buried in the one-way Doppler-noise, the gravity field models of Amalthea show the possible interior structure of the moon and can be a basis for further exploration of the Jovian system. In order to get valuable information about the gravity field of this tiny rocky moon, a much closer flyby than that of GALILEO should be anticipated. The above stated model approach can be used for any planetary body.

  11. The H_2O and O_2 exospheres of Jupiter's moon Ganymede.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, C.; Milillo, A.; Massetti, S.; Mura, A.; Jia, X.; Orsini, S.; Mangano, V.; De Angelis, E.; Lazzarotto, F.; Rispoli, R.

    A simulation of the H_2O and O_2 exospheres of Jupiter' moon Ganymede, through the application of a 3D Monte Carlo modeling technique, is presented. Our model takes into consideration the combined effect on the exosphere generation of the main surface release processes (i.e. sputtering, sublimation and radiolysis) and the surface precipitation of the energetic ions of Jupiter's magnetosphere constrained strongly by Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field. In order to model the magnetospheric ion precipitation to Ganymede's surface, we used as an input the electric and magnetic fields from the global MHD model of Ganymede's magnetosphere (Jia et al., 2009). The exospheric model described in this paper is based on EGEON, a single-particle Monte Carlo model already applied for a Galilean satellite \\citep{PC10,PC12,PC13}. We find that at small altitudes above the moon.s subsolar point the main contribution to the neutral environment comes from sublimated H_2O whereas the spatial distribution of the directly sputtered-H_2O molecules exhibits a close correspondence with the plasma precipitation region and extends at high altitudes, being, therefore, well differentiated from the sublimated water. Moreover, we find that the O_2 exosphere comprises two different regions: the first one is an homogeneous, relatively dense, thermal-O_2 region extending to some 100s of km above the surface, whereas the second one is less homogeneous and consists of more energetic O_2 molecules sputtered directly from the surface after water-dissociation by ions has taken place; the spatial distribution of the energetic surface-released O_2 molecules depends both on the impacting plasma properties and the moon's surface temperature distribution.

  12. High-powered Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safaeinili, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Edelstein, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    This talk will address the main drivers in the design of a radar sounder for the JIMO mission and provide a potential solution that will optimize the chances of success in the detection of ice/water interface and sub-surface stratigraphy.

  13. A disk of scattered icy objects and the origin of Jupiter-family comets.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Levison, H F

    1997-06-13

    Orbital integrations carried out for 4 billion years produced a disk of scattered objects beyond the orbit of Neptune. Objects in this disk can be distinguished from Kuiper belt objects by a greater range of eccentricities and inclinations. This disk was formed in the simulations by encounters with Neptune during the early evolution of the outer solar system. After particles first encountered Neptune, the simulations show that about 1 percent of the particles survive in this disk for the age of the solar system. A disk currently containing as few as approximately 6 x 10(8) objects could supply all of the observed Jupiter-family comets. Two recently discovered objects, 1996 RQ20 and 1996 TL66, have orbital elements similar to those predicted for objects in this disk, suggesting that they are thus far the only members of this disk to be identified. PMID:9180070

  14. Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, Fran; Dowling, Timothy E.; McKinnon, William B.

    2007-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction F. Bagenal, T. E. Dowling and W. B. McKinnon; 2. The origin of Jupiter J. I. Lunine, A. Corandini, D. Gautier, T. C. Owen and G. Wuchterl; 3. The interior of Jupiter T. Guillot, D. J. Stevenson, W. B. Hubbard and D. Saumon; 4. The composition of the atmosphere of Jupiter F. W. Taylor, S. K. Atreya, Th. Encrenaz, D. M. Hunten, P. G. J. Irwin and T. C. Owen; 5. Jovian clouds and haze R. A. West, K. H. Baines, A. J. Friedson, D. Banfield, B. Ragent and F. W. Taylor; 6. Dynamics of Jupiter's atmosphere A. P. Ingersoll, T. E. Dowling, P. J. Gierasch, G. S. Orton, P. L. Read, A. Sánchez-Lavega, A. P. Showman, A. A. Simon-Miller and A. R. Vasavada; 7. The stratosphere of Jupiter J. I. Moses, T. Fouchet, R. V. Yelle, A. J. Friedson, G. S. Orton, B. Bézard, P. Drossart, G. R. Gladstone, T. Kostiuk and T. A. Livengood; 8. Lessons from Shoemaker-Levy 9 about Jupiter and planetary impacts J. Harrington, I. de Pater, S. H. Brecht, D. Deming, V. Meadows, K. Zahnle and P. D. Nicholson; 9. Jupiter's thermosphere and ionosphere R. V. Yelle and S. Miller; 10. Jovian dust: streams, clouds and rings H. Krüger, M. Horányi, A. V. Krivov and A. L. Graps; 11. Jupiter's ring-moon system J. A. Burns, D. P. Simonelli, M. R. Showalter, D. P. Hamilton, C. C. Porco, H. Throop and L. W. Esposito; 12. Jupiter's outer satellites and trojans D. C. Jewitt, S. Sheppard and C. Porco; 13. Interior composition, structure and dynamics of the Galilean satellites G. Schubert, J. D. Anderson, T. Spohn and W. B. McKinnon; 14. The lithosphere and surface of Io A. S. McEwen, L. P. Keszthelyi, R. Lopes, P. M. Schenk and J. R. Spencer; 15. Geology of Europa R. Greeley, C. F. Chyba, J. W. Head III, T. B. McCord, W. B. McKinnon, R. T. Pappalardo and P. Figueredo; 16. Geology of Ganymede R. T. Pappalardo, G. C. Collins, J. W. Head III, P. Helfenstein, T. B. McCord, J. M. Moore, L. M. Procktor, P. M. Shenk and J. R. Spencer; 17. Callisto J. M. Moore, C. R. Chapman. E. B. Bierhaus, R

  15. Two-phase convection in the high-pressure ice layer of the large icy moons: geodynamical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousova, K.; Sotin, C.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.; Grasset, O.

    2015-12-01

    The H2O layers of large icy satellites such as Ganymede, Callisto, or Titan probably include a liquid water ocean sandwiched between the deep high-pressure ice layer and the outer ice I shell [1]. It has been recently suggested that the high-pressure ice layer could be decoupled from the silicate core by a salty liquid water layer [2]. However, it is not clear whether accumulation of liquids at the bottom of the high-pressure layer is possible due to positive buoyancy of water with respect to high-pressure ice. Numerical simulation of this two-phase (i.e. ice and water) problem is challenging, which explains why very few studies have self-consistently handled the presence and transport of liquids within the solid ice [e.g. 3]. While using a simplified description of water production and transport, it was recently showed in [4] that (i) a significant fraction of the high-pressure layer reaches the melting point and (ii) the melt generation and its extraction to the overlying ocean significantly influence the global thermal evolution and interior structure of the large icy moons.Here, we treat the high-pressure ice layer as a compressible mixture of solid ice and liquid water [5]. Several aspects are investigated: (i) the effect of the water formation on the vigor of solid-state convection and its influence on the amount of heat that is transferred from the silicate mantle to the ocean; (ii) the fate of liquids within the upper thermal boundary layer - whether they freeze or reach the ocean; and (iii) the effect of salts and volatile compounds (potentially released from the rocky core) on the melting/freezing processes. Investigation of these aspects will allow us to address the thermo-chemical evolution of the internal ocean which is crucial to evaluate the astrobiological potential of large icy moons. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. [1] Hussmann et al. (2007), Treatise of

  16. Experimental investigation of the radiation shielding efficiency of a MCP detector in the radiation environment near Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Meyer, S.; Lüthi, M.; Lasi, D.; Galli, A.; Piazza, D.; Desorgher, L.; Reggiani, D.; Hajdas, W.; Karlsson, S.; Kalla, L.; Wurz, P.

    2016-09-01

    Neutral Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM) is one of the instruments in the Particle Environmental Package (PEP) designed for the JUICE mission of ESA to the Jupiter system. NIM, equipped with a sensitive MCP ion detector, will conduct detailed measurements of the chemical composition of Jovian icy moons exospheres. To achieve high sensitivity of the instrument, radiation effects due to the high radiation background (high-energy electrons and protons) around Jupiter have to be minimised. We investigate the performance of an Al-Ta-Al composite stack as a potential shielding against high-energy electrons. Experiments were performed at the PiM1 beam line of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities located at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland. The facility delivers a particle beam containing e-, μ- and π- with momentum from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c (Hajdas et al., 2014). The measurements of the radiation environment generated during the interaction of primary particles with the Al-Ta-Al material were conducted with dedicated beam diagnostic methods and with the NIM MCP detector. In parallel, modelling studies using GEANT4 and GRAS suites were performed to identify products of the interaction and predict ultimate fluxes and particle rates at the MCP detector. Combination of experiment and modelling studies yields detailed characterisation of the radiation fields produced by the interaction of the incident e- with the shielding material in the range of the beam momentum from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c. We derived the effective MCP detection efficiency to primary and secondary radiation and effective shielding transmission coefficients to incident high-energy electron beam in the range of applied beam momenta. This study shows that the applied shielding attenuates efficiently high-energy electrons. Nevertheless, owing to nearly linear increase of the bremsstrahlung production rate with incident beam energy, above 130 MeV their detection rates measured by the MCP

  17. Thermophysical Property Variations on Saturn's icy moons: A system-wide perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C. J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Verbiscer, A.

    2013-09-01

    Thermal inertia variations have been observed on icy satellite surfaces throughout the Saturnian system, causing night and daytime temperature variations across the satellites. The most notable are the two 'Pac-Man' anomalies on Mimas and Tethys: distinct regions of high thermal inertia at low latitudes on the leading hemisphere of both satellites, which results in warmer nighttime and cooler daytime temperatures (by ~15 K) than their surroundings. Only subtle differences in surface color had previously been observed in the same region [1]. It is believed that the bombardment of the surface by high-energy electrons alters the surface of Mimas and Tethys, resulting in these high thermal inertia regions. Subtler differences in thermal inertia across other icy satellite surfaces have also been observed. For example: preliminary investigations show Dione may also display a thermal inertia variation that is similar to, but weaker than, Mimas and Tethys' anomalies. Initial investigations have also reveled that the ejecta from Rhea's bright crater Inktomi (14.1 S and 112.1 W) displays higher thermal inertia than its surroundings.

  18. Model of spatial distribution of relativistic electron fluxes in vicinity of Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzolko, Mikhail; Veselovsky, Igor; Getselev, Igor; Gubar, Yury

    This research was made as a part of a project of future space mission to the system of Jupiter, being developed by Russian Federal Space Agency. Currently several mission strategies are being considered, including placing the spacecraft into the low-altitude orbit around Jupiter’s moon Europa and possibly landing on its surface. In the region of Europa’s orbit the spacecraft will be affected by very strong radiation from the Jupiter’s radiation belts. The absorbed dose during 2 months under shielding compared to that for “Galileo” spacecraft will amount to almost 1 megarad. The major contribution to the dose will originate from relativistic electrons. However, near Europa part of the charged particle flux will be shaded by the moon. This reduction of the fluxes is nonuniform, depends on the particle energy and pitch-angle and differs for the surface and the low-altitude orbit. It is caused by a number of factors: complexity of particle trajectories relative to Europa, the flux anisotropy, variations of Europa’s position relative to Jupiter’s magnetic equator plane, magnetic and electric field disturbance in vicinity of Europa, the tenuous atmosphere of the moon. In the current study modeling of relativistic electron flux spatial distribution near Europa and on its surface and computation of the radiation doses have been made, taking into account several of mentioned above factors.

  19. Life detection strategy for Jovian's icy moons: Lessons from subglacial Lake Vostok exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulat, Sergey; Alekhina, Irina; Marie, Dominique; Petit, Jean-Robert

    2010-05-01

    The objective was to estimate the microbial content of accretion ice originating from the subglacial Lake Vostok buried beneath 4-km thick East Antarctic ice sheet with the ultimate goal to discover microbial life in this extreme icy environment. The DNA study constrained by Ancient DNA research criteria was used as a main approach. The flow cytometry was implemented in cell enumerating. As a result, both approaches showed that the accretion ice contains the very low unevenly distributed biomass indicating that the water body should also be hosting a highly sparse life. Up to now, the only accretion ice featured by mica-clay sediments presence allowed the recovery a pair of bacterial phylotypes. This unexpectedly included the chemolithoautotrophic thermophile Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus and one more unclassified phylotype both passing numerous contaminant controls. In contrast, the deeper and cleaner accretion ice with no sediments presence and near detection limit gas content gave no reliable signals. Thus, the results obtained testify that the search for life in the Lake Vostok is constrained by a high chance of forward-contamination. The subglacial Lake Vostok seems to represent the only extremely clean giant aquatic system on the Earth providing a unique test area for searching for life on icy worlds. The life detection strategy for (sub)glacial environments elsewhere (e.g., Jovian's Europa) should be based on stringent decontamination procedures in clean-room facilities, establishment of on-site contaminant library, implementation of appropriate methods to reach detection level for signal as low as possible, verification of findings through ecological settings of a given environment and repetition at an independent laboratory within the specialized laboratory network.

  20. A multifluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between Jupiter's magnetosphere and its moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Jia, X.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M.; Tenishev, V.; Toth, G.; van der Holst, B.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa is believed to contain a subsurface water ocean whose finite electrical conductance imposes clear induction signatures on the magnetic field in its surroundings. The evidence rests heavily on measurements performed by the magnetometer on board the Galileo spacecraft during multiple flybys of the moon. Europa's interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere has become a major target of research in planetary science, partly because of the potential of a salty ocean to harbor life outside our own planet. Thus it is of considerable interest to develop numerical simulations of the Europa-Jupiter interaction that can be compared with data in order to refine our knowledge of Europa's subsurface structure. In this presentation we show aspects of Europa's interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere extracted from a multifluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code BATS-R-US recently developed at the University of Michigan. The model dynamically separates magnetospheric and pick-up ions and is capable of capturing some of the physics previously accessible only to kinetic approaches. The model utilizes an adaptive grid to maintain the high spatial resolution on the surface required to resolve the portion of Europa's neutral atmosphere with a scale height of a few tens of kilometers that is in thermal equilibrium. The model also derives the electron temperature, which is crucial to obtain the local electron impact ionization rates and hence the plasma mass loading in Europa's atmosphere. We compare our results with observations made by the plasma particles and fields instruments on the Galileo spacecraft to validate our model. We will show that multifluid MHD is able to reproduce the basic features of the plasma moments and magnetic field observations obtained during the Galileo E4 and E26 flybys at Europa.

  1. Bacterial Motility As a Biosignature: Tests at Icy Moon Analogue Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, J. L.; Lindensmith, C.; Deming, J. W.; Stocker, R.; Graff, E.; Serabyn, E.; Wallace, J. K.; Liewer, K.; Kuhn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Extraterrestrial life in our Solar System, if present, is almost certain to be microbial. Methods and technologies for unambiguous detection of living or extinct microorganisms are needed for life-detection missions to the Jovian and Saturnian moons, where liquid water is known to exist. Our research focuses specifically on microbial meaningful motion as a biosignature—"waving crowds" at the micron scale. Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) is an excellent tool for unambiguous identification of bacterial and protozoal swimming, even in the presence of turbidity, drift, and currents. The design of a holographic instrument with bacteria scale resolution was described in the previous talk. In this presentation, we will illustrate the design challenges for construction of a field instrument for extreme environments and space, and present plans for scientific investigations at analogue sites for the coming season. The challenges of creating a field instrument involve performance trade-offs, the ability to operate at extreme temperatures, and handling large volumes of data. A fully autonomous instrument without external cables or power is also desirable, and this is something that previous holographic instruments have not achieved. The primary issues for space exploration are identification of a laser and drive electronics that are qualified for the expected radiation environments of the moons around gas giant planets. Tests in Earth analogue environments will establish performance parameters as well as answer scientific questions that traditional microscopic techniques cannot. Specifically, we will visit a Greenland field site to determine whether or not microorganisms are motile within the brine-filled interior network of sea ice, and if they can be autonomously tracked using the instrument. Motility within the liquid phase of a frozen matrix has been hypothesized to explain how bacteria contribute to the biogeochemical signatures detected in ice, but observational

  2. Opposition Surges on Icy Moons: Observations by Cassini VIMS and ISS between 0.2 and five microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie; Dalba, Paul; Brown, Robert; Clark, Roger; Hillier, John; Mosher, Joel; Baines, Kevin; Nicholson, Phillip

    2013-04-01

    The opposition effect is the surge in brightness that most airless bodies exhibit as they become fully illuminated to an observer. Important information about the physical nature of the surface, including the constituent particle sizes and their size distribution, the compaction state of the upper regolith, and composition are embedded in the effect. Models that describe the surge in terms of physical parameters have been developed during recent decades. The acquisition of "true opposition" is rare and fleeting (and for objects in inclined orbits, nearly unattainable), so testing and application of the models has been hampered. During the 9 years of the Cassini-Huygens mission, a wealth of data at and near opposition has been collected for the 6 main icy satellites of Saturn: Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Iapetus, including some recently obtained key data for Enceladus and Mimas. Furthermore, the combined spectral range of the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Visible Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) cameras spans 0.20-5.1 microns, which includes many spectral regions not observable from the ground. This extraordinary coverage in solar phase angle and in spectral range provides in essence a laboratory in which to test models of the opposition effect. Although these moons are bright in the visible region, where multiple scattering complicates the modeling, they are dark in many regions of the infrared, enabling a more robust analysis. Some satellites have data for both leading and trailing sides, allowing an investigation of alteration effects such as meteoritic and magnetospheric bombardment and accretion of E-ring particles. Small particles accreted onto their surfaces from the E-ring appear to become "invisible" at the longer wavelengths. All of the moons exhibit a very steep curve at solar phase angles less than one degree, suggesting that coherent backscatter is present. However, this "supersurge" is present even at wavelengths where there is

  3. Roemer Redux: A Virtual Observational Exercise on Jupiter's Moons and the Speed of Light from Project CLEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Jan Paul; Snyder, G. A.; Marschall, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    Project CLEA announces a new laboratory exercise which allows students to determine the speed of light by timing eclipses of Jupiter's moon Io. The experiment is similar to Ole Roemer's classic 17th Century work which established, for the first time, that light did not travel through space instantaneously. Students view a simulated telescopic view of Jupiter and its satellites, similar to that used in the CLEA exercise, The Revolution of the Moons of Jupiter. After identifying Io, they record the precise time when the moon enters Jupiter's shadow at a date about two months after conjunction. Using the recorded time of this eclipse and the known period of Io, students predict the time of an eclipse near opposition and then record the observed time of that eclipse. The discrepancy between the predicted and observed times, along with the difference in the distance between Earth and Jupiter at the two eclipses yields a value of the speed of light accurate to about 10%. Software provided with the exercise enables students to calculate predicted times and Earth/Jupiter distances, as well as to analyze the time discrepancy and to visualize the logic of the analysis. A student manual, including historical and scientific background of the exercise is provided. Our poster will present examples of the screens and manuals for the exercise and will discuss the limits of accuracy of the method and sources of error. For further information on CLEA exercises, please visit http://www.gettysburg.edu/ marschal/clea/CLEAhome.html This research was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Gettysburg College.

  4. Earth-based and Cassini-spacecraft Observations of Irregular Moons of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.; Roatsch, T.; Rosenberg, H.; Neukum, G.

    2010-10-01

    We observed irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn with the ISS camera of the Cassini spacecraft [1] and with the 1.23-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory in Spain [2]. Scientific goals are the determination of rotation periods, rotation-axis orientations, spin directions, size parameters, color properties, phase curves, and searches for binaries. Himalia (J6), the largest of the irregular jovian moons, has been imaged by Cassini on 18 Dec 2000; a body size of 120±5 km x 150±10 km and an albedo of 0.05±0.01 have been measured [3,4]. Earth-based observations revealed that Himalia's rotation period is probably 9.3 h, which is in agreement with the 9.2 to 9.8 h suggested by [5], although periods of 7.8 or 11.7 h cannot be ruled out yet. In the saturnian system, 10 irregular moons were scheduled for Cassini ISS observations over time spans >9 hrs until end-of-August, 2010. Observation distances vary between 5.6 and 22 million km, corresponding to ISS pixel scales of 34 to 130 km. For the objects measured so far, the rotation periods vary significantly. For instance, Siarnaq (S/2000 S3; size 40 km) and Ymir (S/2000 S1; 18 km) exhibit rotation periods of 6.7 h and 7.3 h, respectively, while Kiviuq (S/2000 S5; 16 km) might take about 22 h for one rotation. First results from the observation campaigns will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Porco, C.C., et al. (2004), Space Sci. Rev. 115, 363; [2] http://www.caha.es/CAHA/Telescopes/1.2m.html; [3] Denk, T. et al. (2001), Conference on Jupiter (Planet, Satellites & Magnetosphere), Boulder, CO, 25-30 June 2001, abstracts book p. 30-31; [4] Porco, C.C., et al. (2003), Science 299, 1541; [5] Degewij, J., et al. (1980), Icarus 44, 520. We gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Space Agency (DLR) Bonn through grant no. 50 OH 0305.

  5. Analysis of Cassini UVIS Far Ultraviolet Reflectance Spectra to Constrain the Non-Ice Material in Saturn’s Rings and Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Eric Todd; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2012-10-01

    The FUV spectra of Saturn’s icy ring particles and moons show the presence of an absorbing constituent that presumably is delivered to the system via micrometeoroid bombardment. Understanding the properties of the non-icy material plays into broader questions regarding the age and evolution of the rings. The FUV spectrum contains a water ice absorption edge at 165 nm. The reflectance shortward of the water ice absorption edge is determined by the composition and abundance of the non-icy material whereas the reflectance longward of the absorption edge is determined by both water ice and non-icy material. We have taken two approaches to constrain the properties of the non-ice component of the rings using FUV spectra taken by the Cassini UVIS. In one approach we compare the ring particle Bond albedo, A0, to spectral models with varying abundances and compositions of non-ice components. We first determine A0, across the water ice absorption edge using the classical Chandrasekhar radiative transfer model for the C Ring and Cassini Division with the scattering function replaced by a self-gravity wake model for the A and B rings. We then compare the retrieved values of A0, to spectral models of intimate mixtures where the free parameters are the fractional abundances of the ice and non-ice constituents, grain size, and grain asymmetry parameter for scattering. In the second approach we compare FUV color ratios (180/155 nm) across Saturn’s rings, as well as to icy moons, in order to investigate relative variations in water ice abundance in these objects. We find that A0, longward of the absorption edge peaks in the outer B ring and reaches a minimum in the C Ring and Cassini Division, consistent with the purest water ice being found in the B Ring and the most polluted in the C Ring and Cassini Division.

  6. Analysis of Periodic Orbits about the Triangular Solutions of the Restricted Sum-Jupiter and Earth-Moon Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Young; Jo, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Sun; Choi, Kyu-Hong

    1988-12-01

    Using the numerical solution in the plane restricted problem of three bodies, about 490 periodic orbits are computed numerically around the L5 of Sun-Jupiter and about 1600 periodic orbits also be done around the L5 of Earth-Moon system. As period increase, the energy and the shape of periodic orbits increase around the L5 of Sun-Jupiter system. But, in Earth-Moon system, the complex shapes and dents appear around the L5 and periodic orbits intersect one another in the place where dents are shown. And there is a region that three different periodic orbits exist with the same period in this region. The regions can exist around the L5 of Sun-Jupiter system where periodic orbit can be unstable by perturbation of other force besides the gravitational force of Jupiter. These regions which is close to L5 are a ¡­ 5.29 AU. The Trojan asteroids that have a small eccentricity and inclination can not exist in this region.

  7. Electric Properties of Water Ice doped with Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2): Implications for Icy Moons such as Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, C.; Freund, F. T.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Large floats of ice on Jupiter's moon Europa drift and collide. The float boundaries are marked by brownish-reddish colors. The origin of these colors is poorly understood. Maybe upwelling of water along the active float boundaries brings finely divided suspended matter or organic compounds from the ocean below to the surface, where the intense, high energy environment in Jupiter's radiation belt would lead to photochemical oxidation. At the same time it has been suggested that Europa's ice contains traces of H2O2, presumably due to micro-meteorite impacts and other processes. We measured the electric currents generated in pure and H2O2-doped water ice when we subjected one end of ice blocks to uniaxial stress. Ice samples with 0%, 0.3% and 0.03% H2O2 were formed in polyethylene troughs, 4.1 x 13.5 x 3.8 cm, with Cu contacts at both ends, at 263K (-10°C), 190K (-78°C, dry ice) and 77K (-196°C,liquid N2). At 77K the ice samples detached themselves from at least one of the Cu contacts, due to thermal contraction. At 190K, when stressing one end, essentially no currents were produced in the pure water ice. By contrast, H2O2-doped ices produced several hundred picoamperes (pA) of positive currents, indicating defect electrons (holes) flowing down the stress gradient. At 263K the results are ambiguous. These (as yet preliminary) results indicate that stresses might break the peroxy bonds of imbedded H2O2 molecules, releasing the same type of positive hole charge carriers as observed during stress experiments with silicate rocks. Since positive holes are defect electrons associated with O 2sp levels at the upper edge of the valence band, they seem to have the capability to spread through the ices. Chemically positive holes are equivalent to highly oxidizing oxygen radicals. They may be responsible for oxidation reactions along the boundaries of active ice floats on Europa.

  8. Development of 2-D Array of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) for Far-IR Investigations of the Outer Planets and Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakew, Brook

    2009-09-01

    A 2-D array of superconducting Magnesium Diboride(MgB2) far -IR thermal detectors has been fabricated. Such an array is intended to be at the focal plane of future generation thermal imaging far-IR instruments that will investigate the outer planets and their icy moons. Fabrication and processing of the pixels of the array as well as noise characterization of architectured MgB2 thin films will be presented. Challenges and solutions for improving the performance of the array will be discussed.

  9. Project CLEA - The Moons of Jupiter: Understanding the Kepler's Laws in Astronomy 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhitskaya, Lanika; Speck, A.

    2008-05-01

    We report results on a study of impact of Project CLEA - Contemporary Laboratory Experiences in Astronomy software on students’ understanding of the Kepler's Third Law. The study was conducted at the University of Missouri among 26 non-science major students enrolled in an introductory astronomy course. There were 16 female and 15 male students participants between age of 18 and 24. The study was designed to find out whether students had different attitudes toward the simulation: its visual design and its intuitiveness and easiness to use. The study tested whether these attitudes reflected on the students’ learning outcomes of the discussed astronomy topic. To measure students’ computer proficiency and how comfortable they were using computers they were given a computer attitude inventory. The participants took a pretest and a posttest designed by the Project CLEA developers for the Moons of Jupiter module. The students also filled out a questionnaire where they reflected on their experience of using the software. Two weeks later the research participants took a final astronomy course examination which included a question on the Kepler's Third Law. Our research shows that students who indicated that they liked the simulation performed better on the posttest.. At the same time, we found that there was no relationship between the students’ attitude towards the simulation and their performance on the final exam. Students, who used CLEA simulation regardless of their attitudes towards it, significantly outperformed their classmates during the final exam on the Kepler's third law question. It is also interesting to note that students performed better on five out of six posttest questions - there was no change on a question involved mathematical application of the Kepler's Third Law formula.

  10. Gravity is the Key Experiment to Address the Habitability of the Ocean in Jupiter's Moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessa, A. M.; Dombard, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Life requires three constituents: a liquid solvent (i.e., water), a chemical system that can form large molecules to record genetic information (e.g., carbon based) as well as chemical nutrients (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorous), and a chemical disequilibrium system that can provide metabolic energy. While it is believed that there is a saline water layer located between the rock and ice layers in Jupiter's moon Europa, which would satisfy the first requirement, it is unknown if the other conditions are currently met. The likelihood that Europa is a haven for life in our Solar System skyrockets, however, if there is currently active volcanism at the rock-water interface, much the same that volcanic processes enable the chemosynthetic life that forms the basis of deep sea-vent communities at the bottom of Earth's oceans. Exploring the volcanic activity on this interface is challenging, as direct observation via a submersible or high-resolution indirect observations via a dense global seismic network on the surface is at present technically (and fiscally!) untenable. Thus, gravity studies are the best way to explore currently the structure of this all-important interface. Though mostly a silicate body with only a relatively thin (~100 km) layer of water, Europa is different from the terrestrial planets in that this rock-water interface, and not the surface, represents the largest density contrast across the moon's near-surface layers, and thus topography on this interface could conceivably dominate the gravity. Here, we calculate the potential anomalies that arise from topography on the surface, the water-ice interface (at 20 km depth), and the rock-water interface, finding that the latter dominates the free-air gravity at the longest wavelengths (spherical harmonic degrees < 10) and the Bouguer gravity at intermediate wavelengths (degrees ~10-50), and only for the shortest wavelengths (degrees > 50) does the water-ice interface (and presumably mass-density anomalies

  11. Engineering a Solution to Jupiter Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Karla; Magner, Thomas; Lisano, Michael; Pappalardo, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) explore Europa to investigate its habitability, (2) characterize Ganymede as a planetary object including its potential habitability and (3) explore the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with conceptual orbiters developed by NASA and ESA. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating simultaneously in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most importantly, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM baseline architecture would provide opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and stand

  12. Magnetospheric Interaction at Jupiter's Galilean Moons Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto: Galileo in-Situ Measurements Compared with Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, N.; Jia, X.; Roussos, E.; Fraenz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Between 1995 and 2003 the Galileo spacecraft orbited Jupiter and flew-by multiple times at the Galilean satellites Io (7), Europa (12), Ganymede (5), and Callisto (8). The wealth of new unprecedented data from Galileo in-situ measurements in comparison to hybrid- and MHD simulation results enhanced our view of the understanding of the interaction between the moons (or in the case of Ganymede's own magnetosphere) and the surrounding highly dynamic Jovian magnetosphere. In this paper the in-situ particles and fields measurements are reviewed in the context of the future ESA-mission JUICE to arrive in the Jovian system in 2030.

  13. Impact chemistry of methanol: Implications for volatile evolution on icy satellites and dwarf planets, and cometary delivery to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Genda, Hidenori; Muto, Yuta; Sugita, Seiji; Kadono, Toshihiko; Matsui, Takafumi

    2014-11-01

    Methanol (CH3OH) is one of the primordial volatiles contained within icy solids in the outer solar nebula. This paper investigates the impact chemistry of CH3OH ice through a series of impact experiments. We discuss its fate during the accretion and evolution stages of large icy bodies, and assess the possibility of intact delivery of cometary volatiles to the lunar surface. Our experimental results show that the peak shock pressures for initial and complete dissociation of CH3OH ice are approximately 9 and 28 GPa, respectively. We also found that CO is more abundant than CH4 in the gas-phase products of impact-induced CH3OH dissociation. Our results further show that primordial CH3OH within icy planetesimals could have survived low-velocity impacts during accretion of icy satellites and dwarf planets. These results suggest that CH3OH may have been a source of soluble reducing carbon and that it may have acted as antifreeze in liquid interior oceans of large icy bodies. In contrast, CH3OH acquired by accretion on icy satellites and Ceres would have been dissociated efficiently by subsequent impacts, perhaps during the heavy bombardment period, owing to the expected high impact velocities. For example, if Callisto originally contained CH3OH, cometary impacts during the late heavy bombardment period would have resulted in the formation of a substantial atmosphere (ca. ⩾10-4 bar) composed of CO, H2, and CH4. To account for the current CO levels in Titan's atmosphere, the CH3OH content in its crust may have been much lower than that typical of comets. Our numerical simulations also indicate that intact delivery of cometary CH3OH to the lunar surface would not have occurred, which suggests that CH3OH found in a persistently-shadowed lunar region probably formed through low-temperature surface chemistry on regolith.

  14. Infrared Spectra of Hydrated Magnesium Salts and their Role in the Search for Possible Life Conditions on Jupiter Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina; Huo, Winifred M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent observations from the Galileo satellite indicate that three of the Jupiter moons, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, may have subsurface oceans. Possible existence of such ocean and the nature of its composition are of great interest to astrobiologists. Data from Galileo's NIMS spectrometer indicate the possibility of hydrated salts on Europa's surface. To aid in the design of future missions, we investigated infrared spectra of MgSO4-nH20, n=1-3 using ab initio calculations. Geometry, energetics, dipole moments, vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of pure and hydrated MgSO4 salts were determined. Significant differences are found between vibrational spectra of water molecules in complexes with MgSO4 and pure water. Some of the O-H stretching frequencies in the complexes are shifted to the red by up to 1,500 - 2,000 per cm. In addition, the SO2 stretching vibrations are found at lower frequency regions than the water vibrations. The calculated bands of water and SO2 fragments can serve as markers for the existence of the salt-water complexes on the surface of Jupiter's moon.

  15. Water Ice Lines and the Formation of Giant Moons around Super-Jovian Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, René; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Most of the exoplanets with known masses at Earth-like distances to Sun-like stars are heavier than Jupiter, which raises the question of whether such planets are accompanied by detectable, possibly habitable moons. Here we simulate the accretion disks around super-Jovian planets and find that giant moons with masses similar to Mars can form. Our results suggest that the Galilean moons formed during the final stages of accretion onto Jupiter, when the circumjovian disk was sufficiently cool. In contrast to other studies, with our assumptions, we show that Jupiter was still feeding from the circumsolar disk and that its principal moons cannot have formed after the complete photoevaporation of the circumsolar nebula. To counteract the steady loss of moons into the planet due to type I migration, we propose that the water ice line around Jupiter and super-Jovian exoplanets acted as a migration trap for moons. Heat transitions, however, cross the disk during the gap opening within ≈104 years, which makes them inefficient as moon traps and indicates a fundamental difference between planet and moon formation. We find that icy moons larger than the smallest known exoplanet can form at about 15-30 Jupiter radii around super-Jovian planets. Their size implies detectability by the Kepler and PLATO space telescopes as well as by the European Extremely Large Telescope. Observations of such giant exomoons would be a novel gateway to understanding planet formation, as moons carry information about the accretion history of their planets.

  16. Ganymede and Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The solar system's largest moon, Ganymede, is captured here alongside the planet Jupiter in a color picture taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Dec. 3, 2000.

    Ganymede is larger than the planets Mercury and Pluto and Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Both Ganymede and Titan have greater surface area than the entire Eurasian continent on our planet. Cassini was 26.5 million kilometers (16.5 million miles) from Ganymede when this image was taken. The smallest visible features are about 160 kilometers (about 100 miles) across.

    The bright area near the south (bottom) of Ganymede is Osiris, a large, relatively new crater surrounded by bright icy material ejected by the impact, which created it. Elsewhere, Ganymede displays dark terrains that NASA's Voyager and Galileo spacecraft have shown to be old and heavily cratered. The brighter terrains are younger and laced by grooves. Various kinds of grooved terrains have been seen on many icy moons in the solar system. These are believed to be the surface expressions of warm, pristine, water-rich materials that moved to the surface and froze.

    Ganymede has proven to be a fascinating world, the only moon known to have a magnetosphere, or magnetic environment, produced by a convecting metal core. The interaction of Ganymede's and Jupiter's magnetospheres may produce dazzling variations in the auroral glows in Ganymede's tenuous atmosphere of oxygen.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  17. The H2O and O2 exospheres of Ganymede: The result of a complex interaction between the jovian magnetospheric ions and the icy moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Milillo, Anna; Massetti, Stefano; Mura, Alessandro; Jia, Xianzhe; Orsini, Stefano; Mangano, Valeria; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Rispoli, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    The H2O and O2 exospheres of Jupiter's moon Ganymede are simulated through the application of a 3D Monte Carlo modeling technique that takes into consideration the combined effect on the exosphere generation of the main surface release processes (i.e. sputtering, sublimation and radiolysis) and the surface precipitation of the energetic ions of Jupiter's magnetosphere. In order to model the magnetospheric ion precipitation to Ganymede's surface, we used as an input the electric and magnetic fields from the global MHD model of Ganymede's magnetosphere (Jia, X., Walker, R.J., Kivelson, M.G., Khurana, K.K., Linker, J.A. [2009]. J. Geophys. Res. 114, A09209). The exospheric model described in this paper is based on EGEON, a single-particle Monte Carlo model already applied for a Galilean satellite (Plainaki, C., Milillo, A., Mura, A., Orsini, S., Cassidy, T. [2010]. Icarus 210, 385-395; Plainaki, C., Milillo, A., Mura, A., Orsini, S., Massetti, S., Cassidy, T. [2012]. Icarus 218 (2), 956-966; Plainaki, C., Milillo, A., Mura, A., Orsini, S., Saur [2013]. Planet. Space Sci. 88, 42-52); nevertheless, significant modifications have been implemented in the current work in order to include the effect on the exosphere generation of the ion precipitation geometry determined strongly by Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field (Kivelson, M.G. et al. [1996]. Nature 384, 537-541). The current simulation refers to a specific configuration between Jupiter, Ganymede and the Sun in which the Galilean moon is located close to the center of Jupiter's Plasma Sheet (JPS) with its leading hemisphere illuminated. Our results are summarized as follows: (a) at small altitudes above the moon's subsolar point the main contribution to the neutral environment comes from sublimated H2O; (b) plasma precipitation occurs in a region related to the open-closed magnetic field lines boundary and its extent depends on the assumption used to mimic the plasma mirroring in Jupiter's magnetosphere; (c) the

  18. Jupiter's and Saturn's ice moons: geophysical aspects and opportunities of geophysical survey of the planetary geoelectrical markers and oreols of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozorovich, Yuri; Linkin, Vacheslav; Kosov, Alexandr; Fournier-Sicre, Alain; Klimov, Stanislav; Novikov, Denis; Ivanov, Anton; Skulachev, Dmitriy; Menshenin, Yaroslav

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new conceptual and methodological approach for geophysical survey of the planetary geoelectrical markers and oreols of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons on the base "conceptual design phase" of the future space missions on the ice moons. At the design stage of such projects is considered the use of various space instruments and tools for the full the complex geophysical studies of the manifestations and planetary processes of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons. The existence of various forms of the cryolithozone on terrestrial planets and their moons: advanced Martian permafrost zone in the form of existing of the frozen polar caps, subsurface frozen horizons, geological markers and oreols of the martian ancient (relict) ocean, subsurface oceans of Jupiter's and Saturn's moons-Europe and Enceladus, with the advanced form of permafrost freezes planetary caps, it allows to develop a common methodological basis and operational geophysical instruments (tools) for the future space program and planning space missions on these unique objects of the solar system, specialized for specific scientific problems of planetary missions. Geophysical practices and methodological principles, used in 1985-2015 by aurthors [ 1-5 ], respectively, as an example of the comprehensive geophysical experiment MARSES to study of the Martian permafrost zone and the martian ancient (relict) ocean, creating the preconditions for complex experimental setting and geo-physical monitoring of operational satellites of Jupiter and Saturn- Europe and Enceladus. This range of different planetary (like) planets with its geological history and prehistory of the common planetology formation processes of the planets formation and to define the role of a liquid ocean under the ice as a climate indicator of such planets, which is extremely important for the future construction of the geological and climatic history of the Earth. Main publications: [1

  19. Ground-based near infrared spectroscopy of Jupiter's ring and moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; de Pater, Imke; Showalter, Mark R.; Roe, Henry G.; Macintosh, Bruce; Verbanac, Giuli

    2006-12-01

    The backscattered reflectivity of Jupiter's ring has been previously measured over distinct visible and near infrared wavelength bands by a number of ground-based and spaceborne instruments. We present spectra of Jupiter's main ring from 2.21-2.46 μm taken with the NIRSPEC spectrometer at the W.M. Keck observatory. At these wavelengths, scattered light from Jupiter is minimal due to the strong absorption of methane in the planet's atmosphere. We find an overall flat spectral slope over this wavelength interval, except for a possible red slope shortward of 2.25 μm. We extended the spectral coverage of the ring to shorter wavelengths by adding a narrow-band image at 1.64 μm, and show results from 2.27-μm images over phase angles of 1.2°-11.0°. Our images at 1.64 and 2.27 μm reveal that the halo contribution is stronger at the shorter wavelength, possibly due to the redder spectrum of the ring parent bodies as compared with the halo dust component. We find no variation in main ring reflectivity over the 1.2°-11.0° phase angle range at 2.27 μm. We use adaptive optics imaging at the longer wavelength L' band (3.4-4.1 μm) to determine a 2- σ upper limit of 22 m of vertically-integrated I/F. Our observing campaign also produced an L' image of Callisto, showing a darker leading hemisphere, and a spectrum of Amalthea over the 2.2-2.5 and 2.85-3.03 μm ranges, showing deep 3-μm absorption.

  20. RADIATION SYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN ICE-COATED CARBON: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR GRAINS AND ICY MOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, U.; Fulvio, D.; Baragiola, R. A.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2012-06-20

    We report the synthesis of carbon dioxide on an amorphous carbon-13 substrate coated with amorphous water ice from irradiation with 100 keV protons at 20 K and 120 K. The quantitative studies show that the CO{sub 2} is dispersed in the ice; its column density increases with ion fluence to a maximum value (in 10{sup 15} molecules cm{sup -2}) of {approx}1 at 20 K and {approx}3 at 120 K. The initial yield is 0.05 (0.1) CO{sub 2} per incident H{sup +} at 20 (120) K. The CO{sub 2} destruction process, which limits the maximum column density, occurs with an effective cross section of {approx}2.5 (4.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} at 20 (120) K. We discuss radiation-induced oxidation by reactions of radicals in water with the carbon surface and demonstrate that these reactions can be a significant source of condensed carbon dioxide in interstellar grains and in icy satellites in the outer solar system.

  1. On the state of water ice on saturn's moon Titan and implications to icy bodies in the outer solar system.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weijun; Jewitt, David; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2009-10-22

    The crystalline state of water ice in the Solar System depends on the temperature history of the ice and the influence of energetic particles to which it has been exposed. We measured the infrared absorption spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice in the 10-50 K and 10-140 K temperature ranges, respectively, and conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline water ice via ionizing radiation irradiation at doses of up to 160 +/- 30 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted only partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. The experiments showed that a fraction of the 1.65 microm band, which is characteristic for crystalline water ice, survived the irradiation, to a degree that strongly depends on the temperature. Quantitative kinetic fits of the temporal evolution of the 1.65 mum band clearly demonstrate that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. Our experiments show the amorphization at 40 K was incomplete, in contradiction to Mastrapa and Brown's conclusion (Icarus 2006, 183, 207.). At 50 K, the recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most icy objects in the Solar System, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites (including Titan), and Kuiper Belt Objects, are equal to or above 50 K; this explains why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline. PMID:19827849

  2. Sounding of Icy Galilean Satellites by Surface Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Banerdt, W. B.; Johnson, T. V.; Russell, C. T.; Kivelson, M. G.; Davis, P. M.; Vidale, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Several independent geological and geophysical investigations suggest that Europa and Ganymede contain subsurface oceans. Using Jupiter's rotating magnetic field as a primary signal, the magnetometer experiment onboard Galileo has measured secondary induction signals emanating from Europa, Ganymede, and surprisingly Callisto. The strong electromagnetic induction from these moons suggests that large global electrical conductors are located just below their icy crusts. A detailed analysis reveals that global salty oceans with salinity similar to the Earth's ocean and thicknesses in the range of approx. 6-100 kms can explain the induction observed by the Galileo magnetometer. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. JIMO Delivery and Support of a Jupiter Deep Entry Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.; Young, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Solar System Exploration Decadal Survey ('SSEDS') emphasizes the significant science available from Jupiter deep entry probes. Studies performed at JPL this year identified a mission design that would allow JIMO to deliver and support one or more entry probes that reach the 100-bar level in Jupiter's atmosphere, with relatively minor modifications to JIMO s preliminary mission design. Notably, the icy moon tour mission design, beginning with Callisto approach, is unaffected. This proposed mission design would offer the option of adding a rich new set of high-priority SSEDS science objectives to the planned JIMO mission for a relatively small investment.

  4. Large impacts and tectonism: the relative ages of the basin Odysseus and Ithaca Chasma on Saturn's icy moon Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Stephan, Katrin; Schmedemann, Nico; Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Neukum, Gerhard; Denk, Tilmann; Porco, Carolyn C.

    2014-05-01

    Large impact events forming craters of basin size (> 200 - 300 km in diameter) on planets, asteroids or planetary satellites can cause intense tectonic deformation on their surfaces, indicated by concentric and/or radial troughs or ridges [e.g., 1]. Recently, sets of parallel grooves on asteroid (4) Vesta have been discussed to be the result of impact-related deformation in connection with basin-forming events on Vesta's south polar area [2]. On Saturn's mid-sized icy satellites Tethys, 1072 km in diameter, major landforms are the 445 km large impact basin Odysseus and the huge graben system of Ithaca Chasma which were first imaged during the Voyager encounters in 1980 and 1981 [3][4]. Ithaca Chasma is a ~100 km wide terraced trough. It has been discussed that Ithaca Chasma could be the result of structural deformation caused by the impact event that created Odysseus [4][5]. Preliminary mapping and crater counts using Cassini ISS imaging data on Odysseus and Ithaca Chasma, however, infer that this has not been the case [6]. Cassini VIMS spectral data show that Ithaca Chasma has less ice compared to Odysseus which supports this finding that it is older than the basin [7]. Major problems to exactly define the stratigraphic position of Ithaca Chasma with respect to the basin Odysseus are (1) that only those craters are allowed to be used for crater counts which clearly superimpose the tectonic structures (e.g., the terraced scarps) across the chasm, and (2) further geologic processes that affected the chasm interior caused obliteration of craters which results in lower crater frequencies. Our preliminary crater counts [6] were carried out on lower-resolution Cassini imaging data. During Cassini's orbital tour since July 2004, the ISS cameras have provided almost complete global image coverage of Tethys at resolutions of 100 - 300 m/pxl. In this work we present results from our ongoing studies on Tethys' geology, based on these new imaging data, primarily focused on

  5. Volatile Cycles and Glaciation: Earth and Mars (Now and Near a Red Giant Sun), and Moons of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Fegley, M. B.

    2003-05-01

    Glaciers are classically defined as perennial masses of ice showing geomorphic evidence of flow. This definition is expanded to include any flowing mass of solid volatiles condensed on planetary surfaces. Glacier-forming volatiles in this solar system may include water ice on Earth and Mars, carbon dioxide on Mars, sulfur on Io, and, in the future red giant phase of solar evolution, may encompass silicon monoxide or metallic magnesium and sodium glaciers on Earth and Mars. Comparable glaciers may occur on large rocky moons of hot Jupiters and comparably close-in "terrestrial" type planets. We have modeled the temperature distribution across the surfaces of red-giant phase Earth and Mars, without considering radiative effects of the gases and clouds, to illustrate these points. We have assumed alternate conditions of asynchronous and synchronous rotation and calculated the temperatures during the run-up along the red giant evolutionary branch. Near red giant solar maximum, Earth's subsolar temperature will exceed 2400 K for about a million years. A magma ocean will exist but will not be continuous across the globe; for a tidally locked Earth, solid continents will consist largely of atmospheric condensates of the more volatile metals and metal oxides, with shorelines and some buoyant 'bergs' composed of refractory Ca-Al-oxide residues, whereas some residues and condensates will sink to the core. Atmospheric partial pressures of Mg, MgO, SiO, SiO2, Fe, and FeO will total nearly 0.3 mbars. O and O2 partial pressures will sum to 1 mbar, and alkalis would initially be over 3 mbars. Condensation will occur by fractional chemical distillation. A chemical sequence of deposits will occur toward the pole and terminator. Some condensate deposits will flow glacier-like into the magma ocean, where they will redissolve, closing the cycle in a quasi-steady state familiar to glaciologists.

  6. Laboratory permittivity measurements of icy planetary analogs in the millimeter and submillimeter domains, in relation with JUICE mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Y.; Jacob, K.; Murk, A.; Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency's JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) spacecraft is planned for launch in 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in 2030. It will observe the planet Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. One instrument on the JUICE spacecraft is the Sub-millimeter Wave Instrument (SWI), which will measure brightness temperatures from Jupiter's stratosphere and troposphere, and from subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons. In the baseline configuration SWI consists of two tunable sub-millimeter wave receivers operating from 530 to 625 GHz. As an alternative one of the receivers could cover the range of 1080 and 1275 GHz. Inversion models are strongly dependent on the knowledge of the complex relative permittivity (hereafter permittivity) of the target material to retrieve the physical properties of the subsurface (e.g. [1][2]). We set up a laboratory experiment allowing us to perform reproducible measurements of the complex scattering parameters S11 and S21 in the ranges of 70 to 110 GHz, of 100 to 160 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz and of 510 to 715 GHz. These scattering parameters can be used to retrieve the permittivity of icy analogs of the surfaces and subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons in order to prepare the data interpretation of SWI [3]. The measurements are performed under laboratory conditions with a quasi-optical bench (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). The icy analogs that we prepare in the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy, Physics Institute, University of Bern), include two different porous water ice samples composed of fine-grained ice particles with a size range of 4 to 6 microns and ice particles with a size range of 50 to 100 microns [4][5]; and possibly CO2 ice. We will present the general experimental set-up and the first results in the context to prepare the data interpretation of SWI. [1] Ulaby, F. T., Long, D. G., 2014. Microwave radar and radiometric remote

  7. Jupiter's Moon Ganymede

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a video clip of what Ganymede looks like, based on images from NASA's Galileo orbiter. The US Geological Survey has classified the surface of Ganymede into the types of terrain. The brown r...

  8. Shepherd Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Shepherd Moons

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter in February 2007. This sequence of pictures from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) shows the well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings; labels point out how these narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons (Metis and Adrastea).

  9. The Europa Jupiter System Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Clark, K.; Erd, C.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R. R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.; van Houten, T.

    2009-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) will be an international mission that will achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission has been selected by NASA as the next Flagship mission to the out solar system. JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM will fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision for exploration of the outer solar system. The Decadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission target. EJSM would uniquely address several of the central themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM will investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geological and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the

  10. The Europa Jupiter system mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K.; Stankov, A.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Greeley, R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.; van Houten, T.

    2009-04-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM)— would be an international mission that would achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System be-fore settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupi-ter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and charac-terize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM would fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Coun-cil's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vi-sion for exploration of the outer solar system. The De-cadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission tar-get. EJSM would uniquely addresse several of the cen-tral themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM would investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Gany-mede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geo-logical, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupi-ter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant plan-ets and their satellites would be

  11. Jupiter Atmospheric Science with JIMO: Linking Science Objectives and Measurement Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanover, N. J.; Glenar, D. A.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Although the primary focus of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will be the characterization and study of Jupiter's icy moons, there will be opportunities throughout the mission for unprecendented observations of Jupiter. With an adaptable suite of payload instruments, the atmospheric data collected by JIMO can help to answer fundamental questions about the largest planet in our solar system that remain after (or were generated by) previous spacecraft reconnaissance (e.g. Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini). Near-IR (0.7-4 micron) spectral imaging will most likely be used to identify mineralogies and ices on the Jovian satellites by virtue of their spectral signatures. This same capability is very well tailored for studies of Jovian atmospheric dynamics and structure. Near-IR methane absorption bands allow 2-D mapping of the horizontal wind field at size scales to tens of kms, as well as the height dependence of this field above the ammonia cloud deck (700 to a few mbar), constraining current models of atmospheric vertical structure. Likewise, atmospheric ice aerosols with unique spectroscopic signatures (ammonia ice near 1.5, 2.0, and 2.8 microns and water ice between 3.0 - 3.5 microns) can be detected and mapped using spectral difference imaging or spectrally inclusive principal-component methods. Spectral imaging of the Jovian aurora via (3)H(+) emission lines between 3 - 4 microns can be used to spatially map the interplay between the satellites) Jupiter's magnetosphere, and Jupiter's atmosphere. Each of these measurements addresses one or more fundamental questions related to the energy balance in Jupiter's atmosphere. All of these tunable imaging objectives can be achieved using acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF's), which have been used for years in ground-based observing instruments and which have been proposed for numerous planetary missions. The application of this technology to the science objectives of both the icy satellites and Jovian

  12. Experimental determination of salt partition coefficients between aqueous fluids, ice VI and ice VII: implication for the composition of the deep ocean and the geodynamics of large icy moons and water rich planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journaux, Baptiste; Daniel, Isabelle; Cardon, Hervé; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Caracas, Razvan; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    The potential habitability of extraterrestrial large aqueous reservoir in icy moons and exoplanets requires an input of nutrients and chemicals that may come from the rocky part of planetary body. Because of the presence of high pressure (HP) water ices (VI, VII, etc.) between the liquid ocean and the silicates, such interactions are considered to be limited in large icy moons, like Ganymede and Titan, and water rich exoplanets. In the case of salty-rich oceans, recent experimental and modeling works have shown that aqueous fluids can be stable at higher pressures [1, 2]. This can ultimately allow direct interaction with the rocky core of icy moons. This effect is nevertheless limited and for larger bodies such as water rich exoplanets with much higher pressures in their hydrosphere, HP ice should be present between the rocky core and a putative ocean. Salts are highly incompatible with low pressure ice Ih, but recent experimental work has shown that alkali metal and halogen salts are moderately incompatible with ice VII, that can incorporate up to several mol/kg of salts [3, 4, 5]. As far as we know, no similar study has been done on ice VI, a HP ice phase expected inside large icy moons. We present here the first experimental data on the partition coefficient of RbI salt between aqueous fluids, ice VI and ice VII using in-situ synchrotron X-Ray single crystal diffraction and X-Ray fluorescence mapping (ESRF - ID-27 beam line [6]). Our experiment enable us to observe a density inversion between ice VI and the salty fluid, and to measure the values of salt partition coefficients between the aqueous fluid and ice VI (strongly incompatible) and ice VII (moderately incompatible). Using the volumes determined with X-Ray diffraction, we were able to measure the density of salty ice VI and ice VII and determine that salty ice VI is lighter than pure H2O ice VI. These results are very relevant for the study of water rich planetary bodies interior because the partition

  13. Jupiter Ahoy!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on NASA's New Horizons spacecraft took this photo of Jupiter on Sept. 4, 2006, from a distance of 291 million kilometers (nearly 181 million miles) away.

    Visible in the image are belts, zones and large storms in Jupiter's atmosphere, as well as the Jovian moons Europa (at left) and Io and the shadows they cast on Jupiter.

    LORRI snapped this image during a test sequence to help prepare for the Jupiter encounter observations. It was taken close to solar opposition, meaning that the Sun was almost directly behind the camera when it spied Jupiter. This makes Jupiter appear about 40 times brighter than Pluto will be for LORRI's primary observations when New Horizons encounters the Pluto system in 2015.

    To avoid saturation, the camera's exposure time was kept to 6 milliseconds. This image was, in part, a test to see how well LORRI would operate with such a short exposure time.

  14. Coupling of the Matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields of the Sun with Jupiter and its Moons Together in Nearest Portion of Jupiter's Orbit to the Sun as the Main Cause of the Peak of Approximately 11 Yearly Solar Cycles and Hazards from Solar Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, Kazem; Gholibeigian, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    On March 13, 1989 the entire province of Quebec Blackout by solar storm during solar cycle 22. The solar storm of 1859, also known as the Carrington event, was a powerful geomagnetic solar storm during solar cycle 10. The solar storm of 2012 during solar cycle 24 was of similar magnitude, but it passed Earth's orbit without striking the plane. All of these solar storms occurred in the peak of 11 yearly solar cycles. In this way, the White House in its project which is focusing on hazards from solar system, in a new strategy and action plan to increase protection from damaging solar emissions, should focus on coupling of the matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields)GEFs) of the Sun with Jupiter and its moons together. On the other hand, in solar system, the Jupiter's gravity has largest effect to the Sun's core and its dislocation, because the gravity force between the Jupiter and the Sun is 11.834 times, In addition overlapping of the solar cycles with the Jupiter's orbit period is 11.856 years. These observable factors lead us to the effect of the Jupiter and Sun gravity fields coupling as the main cause of the approximately 11 years duration for solar cycles. Its peak in each cycle is when the Jupiter is in nearest portion to the Sun in its orbit. In this way, the other planets in their coupling with Sun help to the variations and strengthening solar cycles. [Gholibeigian, 7/24/2015http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGU]. In other words, the both matched GEFs are generating by the large scale forced convection system inside the stars and planets [Gholibeigian et. al, AGU Fall Meeting 2015]. These two fields are couple and strengthening each other. The Jupiter with its 67 moons generate the largest coupled and matched GEFs in its core and consequently strongest effect on the Sun's core. Generation and coupling of the Jupiter's GEFs with its moons like Europa, Io and Ganymede make this planet of thousands of times brighter and many times bigger than Earth as the

  15. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION OF COMET P/SHOEMAKER-LEVY 9 and PLANET JUPITER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite photo, assembled from separate images of Jupiter and comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9, as imaged by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC-2), aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Jupiter was imaged on May 18, 1994, when the giant planet was at a distance of 420 million miles (670 million km) from Earth. This 'true-color' picture was assembled from separate HST exposures in red, blue, and green light. Jupiter's rotation between exposures creates the blue and red fringe on either side of the disk. HST can resolve details in Jupiter's magnificent cloud belts and zones as small as 200 miles (320 km) across (wide field mode). This detailed view is only surpassed by images from spacecraft that have traveled to Jupiter. The dark spot on the disk of Jupiter is the shadow of the inner moon Io. This volcanic moon appears as an orange and yellow disk just to the upper right of the shadow. Though Io is approximately the size of Earth's Moon (but 2,000 times farther away), HST can resolve surface details. When the comet was observed on May 17, its train of 21 icy fragments stretched across 710 thousand miles (1.1 million km) of space, or 3 times the distance between Earth and the Moon. This required six WFPC exposures along the comet train to include all the nuclei. The image was taken in red light. The apparent angular size of Jupiter relative to the comet, and its angular separation from the comet when the images were taken, have been modified for illustration purposes. Credit: H.A. Weaver, T.E. Smith (Space Telescope Science Institute) and J.T. Trauger, R.W. Evans (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), and NASA

  16. Realistic ice sputtering experiments for the surfaces of Galilean moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Pommerol, A.; Wurz, P.; Jost, B.; Scheer, J. A.; Vorburger, A.; Tulej, M.; Thomas, N.; Wieser, M.; Barabash, S.

    2015-10-01

    We use an existing laboratory facility for space hardware calibration in vacuum to study the impact of energetic ions on water ice. The experiment is intended to simulate the conditions on the surface of Jupiter's icy moons. The first results of hydrogen, oxygen, and sulphur ions sputtering a sample of porous salty ice confirmed extrapolations from previous sputtering experiments obtained at different impact angles for nonporous water ice [3]. Here, we present additional measurements for a larger range of ion impact angles and different ice samples.

  17. Melting probes as a means to access the subsurface of Mars' polar caps and Jupiter's ice moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biele, J.; Ulamec, S.; Funke, O.; Engelhardt, M.

    There is a high scientific interest in exploring certain planetary icy environments in the solar system (Mars' polar caps, Europa and other icy satellites) motivated by the search for traces of life in these extreme environments as well as interest in planetary climate history as in the case of Mars. A promising technique to penetrate thick ice layers with small and reliable probes which do not require the heavy, complex and expensive equipment of a drilling rig is by melting. Contamination avoidance with respect to planetary protection requirements can be fulfilled using melting probes, since the melting channel refreezes behind the probe and shuts off the contact to the surface; also, in-situ decontamination of the probe is possible. Melting probes can be equipped with a suite of scientific instruments that are capable e.g. of determining the chemical and isotopic composition of the embedded or dissolved materials, of the ices themselves, of the dust content and possible traces of indigenous biological activity. Due to the still rather high energy demand to overcome the melting enthalpy, in case of extraterrestrial application (e.g. Europa or polar caps of Mars), only heating with radioactive isotopes seems feasible for reaching greater depths. The necessary power is driven by the desired penetration velocity (linearly) and the dimensions of the probe (proportional to the cross section). On Mars, however, solar cells could be used to power small tethered melting probes in polar summer. While such probes have successfully been used for terrestrial applications, e.g., in Antarctica in the 1990ies, the technology is not yet mature for space applications; for example, the behaviour in vacuum (below the triple point pressure of water, i.e., 611 Pa) needs to be assessed. We will report briefly on our laboratory tests with melting probes in vacuum and under very low temperatures to this end. Practical issues (impact of dust on the performance, gravity dependence

  18. Scientists Revise Thinking on Comets, Planet Jupiter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Discusses scientific information obtained from Pioneer 10's Jupiter flyby and the comet Kohoutek's first trip around the sun, including the high hydrogen emission of Jupiter's principal moon, Io. (CC)

  19. The icy Jovian satellites after the Galileo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard

    2010-03-01

    The icy satellites of Jupiter, Callisto, Ganymede, Europa and Amalthea have diverse and remarkable characteristics. Their initial compositions were determined by conditions in the circum-Jovian nebula, just as the planets' initial properties were governed by their formation within the circumsolar nebula. The satellites subsequently evolved under the complex interplay of orbital and geophysical processes, especially the effects of orbital resonances, tides, internal differentiation and heat. The history and character of the satellites can be inferred from consideration of the formation of planets and the satellites, from studies of their plausible orbital evolution, from measurements of geophysical properties, especially gravitational and magnetic fields, from observations of the compositions and geological structure of their surfaces and from theoretical modeling of the processes that connect these lines of evidence. The three large icy satellites probably contain significant liquid water: Europa has a deep liquid water ocean under a thin surface layer of ice; Ganymede and Callisto likely have relatively thin liquid water layers deep below their surfaces. Models of formation are challenged by the surprising properties of the outermost and innermost of the group: Callisto is partially differentiated, with rock and ice mixed through much of its interior; and tiny Amalthea also appears to be largely composed of ice. Each of the four moons is fascinating in its own right, and the ensemble provides a powerful set of constraints on the processes that led to their formation and evolution.

  20. Very High Resolution Image of Icy Cliffs on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image, taken by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, is a very high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa. It shows an area where icy plates have been broken apart and moved around laterally. The top of this image is dominated by corrugated plateaus ending in icy cliffs over a hundred meters (a few hundred feet) high. Debris piled at the base of the cliffs can be resolved down to blocks the size of a house. A fracture that runs horizontally across and just below the center of the Europa image is about the width of a freeway.

    North is to the top right of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The image is centered at approximately 9 degrees north latitude and 274 degrees west longitude. The image covers an area approximately 1.7 kilometers by 4 kilometers (1 mile by 2.5 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  1. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  2. Ion processing of ices and the origin of SO2 and O3 on the icy surfaces of the icy jovian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boduch, P.; Brunetto, R.; Ding, J. J.; Domaracka, A.; Kaňuchová, Z.; Palumbo, M. E.; Rothard, H.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present new experimental results relative to 144 keV S9+ or Ar9+ ion implantation in targets made of oxygen rich frozen gases (O2, CO2) and mixtures with water ice. Spectra in the UV (200-400 nm) range have been obtained before and after implantation. The targets have been selected because they can be representative of the parent molecules from which SO2 and O3, observed to be present on the surfaces of Jupiter's icy Moons, could be formed due to radiolysis induced by the abundant magnetospheric ions. The results indicate that sulfur dioxide is not detectable after sulfur implantation in oxygen bearing species. Ozone is formed after argon and sulfur ion implantation. Sulfur implantation in O2 and CO2 targets also induces the formation of a band centered at about 255 nm (that we tentatively attribute to SO3- radicals). In the mixtures with water the band appears initially at the same wavelength and shifts to about 247 nm at higher ion fluences possibly indicating the formation of sulfite (HSO3-) ions. An absorption band observed on Ganymede is well fitted by using three components: ozone, sulfite ions and a not identified component having an absorption band centered at 298 nm. In all of the studied cases ion implantation produces a spectral reddening over the investigated spectral range (200-400 nm) that well mimics the observed spectral slopes of Jupiter's icy satellites.

  3. Measuring the speed of light using Jupiter's moons: a global citizen science project for International Year of Light 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Martin A.; Hammond, Giles; Simmons, Mike

    2015-08-01

    2015 represents both the centenary of General Relativity and International Year of Light - the latter marking the 150th anniversary of James Clerk Maxwell's ground-breaking paper on "A dynamical theory of the electromagnetic field". These landmark dates provide an exciting opportunity to set up a global citizen science project that re-enacts the seminal 1675 experiment of Ole Romer: to measure the speed of light by observing the time eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter. This project - which has been set up by astronomers at the University of Glasgow, UK in partnership with Astronomers without Borders - is an ideal platform for engaging the amateur astronomy community, schools and the wider public across the globe. It requires only simple observations, with a small spotting scope or telescope, and can be carried out straightforwardly in both cities and dark-sky locations. It highlights a fascinating chapter in astronomical history, as well as the ongoing importance of accurate astrometry, orbital motion, the concept of longitude and knowing one's position on the Earth. In the context of the GR centenary, it also links strongly to the science behind GPS satellites and a range of important topics in the high school curriculum - from the electromagnetic spectrum to the more general principles of the scientific method.In this presentation we present an overview of our global citizen science project for IYL2015: its scope and motivation, the total number and global distribution of its participants to date and how astronomers around the world can get involved. We also describe the intended legacy of the project: a extensive database of observations that can provide future astronomy educators with an accessible and historically important context in which to explore key principles for analysing large astronomical datasets.

  4. Larger Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Steven; Buratti, B. J.; Hansen, C.; Hurford, T.; McKinnon, W. B.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Turtle, E. P.

    2009-09-01

    Outer planets exploration in the past three decades has revealed a diverse host of large icy bodies undergoing a myriad of geological and chemical processes remarkably similar yet alien to those occurring on Earth. The most active of these, including the Galilean satellites and Saturn's moons Enceladus and Titan, are obvious targets for future robotic exploration. The broader host of satellites larger than 100 km should also figure into NASA's goals, owing to their abundance and insights they offer into past and present geological processes, Solar System formation and planetary evolution. Included in this class are the enigmatic objects Dione, with its smooth planes and fractured regions; Mimas with its giant crater Herschel; Iapetus, which has an odd shape and a mysterious equatorial ridge; Miranda, which has been subjected to drastic geologic reconfiguration; and Triton, with its geyser-like plumes. Many bodies in this class are of sufficient size and density to have hosted internal liquid water oceans in their early history, or even in the present epoch, making them targets of astrobiological interest. We discuss the importance of larger icy satellites to NASA's objectives, their importance for understanding, geology, chemistry and dynamics in the Solar System, and observational and experimental challenges that need to be addressed in the next decade.

  5. The Jupiter System Observer: Probing the Foundations of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senske, D.; Prockter, L.; Collins, G.; Cooper, J.; Hendrix, A.; Hibbitts, K.; Kivelson, M.; Orton, G.; Schubert, G.; Showman, A.; Turtle, E.; Williams, D.; Kwok, J.; Spilker, T.; Tan-Wang, G.

    2007-12-01

    Galileo's observations in the 1600's of the dynamic system of Jupiter and its moons launched a revolution in understanding the way planetary systems operate. Now, some 400 years later, the discovery of extra solar planetary systems with Jupiter-sized bodies has led to a similar revolution in thought regarding how these systems form and evolve. From the time of Galileo, the Jovian system has been viewed as a solar system in miniature, providing a laboratory to study, diverse and dynamic processes in a single place. The icy Galilean satellites provide a window into solar system history by preserving in their cratering records a chronology dating back nearly 4.5 By and extending to the present. The continuously erupting volcanoes of Io may provide insight into the era when magma oceans were common. The discovery of an internally generated magnetic field at Ganymede, one of only three terrestrial bodies to possess such a field, is a place to gain insight as to how dynamos work. The confirmation and characterization of icy satellite subsurface oceans impacts the way habitability is considered. Understanding the composition and volatile inventory of Jupiter can shed light into how planets accrete from the solar nebulae. Finally, like our sun, Jupiter influences its system through its extensive magnetic field. In early 2007, NASA's Science Mission Directorate formed four Science Definition Teams (SDTs) to formulate science goals and objectives in anticipation of the initiation of a flagship-class mission to the outer solar system (Europa, Jupiter system, Titan and Enceladus). The Jupiter System Observer (JSO) mission concept emphasizes overall Jupiter system science: 1) Jupiter and its atmosphere, 2) the geology and geophysics of the Galilean satellites (Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto), 3) the magnetosphere environment - both Jupiter's and Ganymede's&pand 4) interactions within the system. Focusing on the unique geology, presence of an internal magnetic field and

  6. Search of Binary Jupiter-Trojan Asteroids with Laser Guide Star AO systems: a moon around 624 Hektor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, Franck; Berthier, J.; Wong, M. H.; Descamps, P.; Hestroffer, D.; Colas, F.; de Pater, I.; Vachier, F.

    2006-09-01

    In 2006, we initiated a search for multiple asteroids in Jupiter Trojan L4 population with Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGS AO) technology on 8-10m class telescopes. To maximize the chance of detecting companion, we prioritized Trojan asteroids that could be member of collisional families in our search (see the PeTrA project and Beaugé and Roig (A&A, 2001)). Our first night was performed on July 17 2006 UT with the Keck LGS AO system. Twenty targets up to the 18th magnitude in R band were observed mostly in Kp broadband filter with an angular resolution 0.06 arcsec. Images of 624 Hektor, our brightest target (predicted V=14.4) revealed the presence of a moonlet companion (Marchis et al., IAU, 2006, provisional designation S/2006(624)1) located at 0.36” ( 1150 km) from the primary with a peak SNR 25. The resolved primary has a bilobated shape, but it is unclear if the primary is a contact or separated binary. It can be approximated as an ellipse with major and minor axes 2a = 350 km and 2b = 210 km (108 and 65 milli-arcseconds). The pole solution λ=329°, β=-25° in ecliptic B1950 (Magnusson 1989, and updated table) is in agreement with the observations. Based on the integrated brightness ratio between the moonlet and the primary of about 6.5, the diameter of S/2006(624)1 is estimated to be about 15 km. Additional observations will be recorded using the Keck and Gemini LGS AO system in Aug-Sept. 2006 aiming to estimate the orbit of the moonlet. The conditions of observations seem optimal since the system will be seen pole-on during this period. 624 Hektor is the first binary asteroid found in the L4 point and the first Trojan possessing a moonlet companion. The result of this campaign of observations, including Aug-Sept. observations, will be discussed.

  7. Plume Collection Strategies for Icy World Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neveu, M.; Glavin, D. P.; Tsou, P.; Anbar, A. D.; Williams, P.

    2015-01-01

    Three icy worlds in the solar system display evidence of pluming activity. Water vapor and ice particles emanate from cracks near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The plume gas contains simple hydrocarbons that could be fragments of larger, more complex organics. More recently, observations using the Hubble and Herschel space telescopes have hinted at transient water vapor plumes at Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres. Plume materials may be ejected directly from possible sub-surface oceans, at least on Enceladus. In such oceans, liquid water, organics, and energy may co-exist, making these environments habitable. The venting of habitable ocean material into space provides a unique opportunity to capture this material during a relatively simple flyby mission and return it to Earth. Plume collection strategies should enable investigations of evidence for life in the returned samples via laboratory analyses of the structure, distribution, isotopic composition, and chirality of the chemical components (including biomolecules) of plume materials. Here, we discuss approaches for the collection of dust and volatiles during flybys through Enceladus' plume, based on Cassini results and lessons learned from the Stardust comet sample return mission. We also highlight areas where sample collector and containment technology development and testing may be needed for future plume sample return missions.

  8. Jupiter Torus Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A cut-away schematic of Jupiter's space environment shows magnetically trapped radiation ions (in red), the neutral gas torus of the volcanic moon Io (green) and the newly discovered neutral gas torus of the moon Europa (blue). The white lines represent magnetic field lines.

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENA) are emitted from the Europa torus regions because of the interaction between the trapped ions and the neutral gases. The Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument on NASA's Cassini spacecraft imaged those energetic neutral atoms in early 2001 during Cassini's flyby of Jupiter. Energetic neutral atoms also come from Jupiter when radiation ions impinge onto Jupiter's upper atmosphere.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  9. Thickness Constraints on the Icy Shells of the Galilean Satellites from a Comparison of Crater Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    2002-01-01

    A thin outer ice shell on Jupiter's large moon Europa would imply easy exchange between the surface and any organic or biotic material in its putative subsurface ocean. The thickness of the outer ice shell is poorly constrained, however, with model-dependent estimates ranging from a few kilometers of depths of impact craters on Europa, Ganymede and Callisto that reveal two anomalous transitions in crater shape with diameter. The first transition is probably related to temperature-dependent ductility of the crust at shallow depths (7-8 km on Europa). The second transition is attributed to the influence of subsurface oceans on all three satellites, which constrains Europa's icy shell to be at least 19 km thick. The icy lithospheres of Ganymede and Callisto are equally ice-rich, but Europa's icy shell has a thermal structure about 0.25-0.5 times the thickness of Ganymede's or Callisto's shells, depending on epoch. The appearances of the craters on Europa are inconsistent with thin-ice-shell models and indicate that exchange of oceanic and surface material could be difficult.

  10. Rubble around Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has announced that Amalthea, a 270-km-long, potato-shaped inner moon of Jupiter, "apparently is a loosely packed pile of rubble," with empty space where the rubble does not fit well together.This is among the new findings about the moon announced by JPL astronomer John Anderson and his colleagues on 9 December at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

  11. Rubble around Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has announced that Amalthea, a 270-km-long, potato-shaped inner moon of Jupiter, “apparently is a loosely packed pile of rubble,” with empty space where the rubble does not fit well together.This is among the new findings about the moon announced by JPL astronomer John Anderson and his colleagues on 9 December at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

  12. The Jupiter System Observer: Exploring the Origins of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, Louise; Senske, D.; Collins, G. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hendrix, A.; Hibbitts, C.; Kivelson, M.; Schubert, G.; Showman, A.; Turtle, E.; Williams, D.

    2007-10-01

    The Jupiter System Observer (JSO) is one of four studies commissioned by NASA's Science Mission Directorate to examine the potential science return from a flagship-class mission to the outer solar system. JSO is a long-duration mission that will study the entire Jupiter system, focusing on both its individual components, including Jupiter's atmosphere, rocky and icy moons, rings, and magnetospheric phenomena, and the interactions between them. The wealth of data to be returned by JSO will enable a fuller understanding of a variety of magnetospheric, atmospheric, and geological processes, and will illuminate the question of how planetary systems form and evolve. The science team has outlined a number of significant science goals that can be accomplished by a spacecraft that tours the Jovian system for several years before ultimately ending up in Ganymede orbit. Ganymede was selected as the final destination for JSO because of its unique place in the Jovian system and the solar system - it is only the third body known to have its own dynamo-generated magnetic field. Ganymede is thought to contain a subsurface ocean and exhibits a surface with a variety of older and younger terrains, making it an excellent target for understanding the formation and evolution of icy satellites. Long-term monitoring of Jupiter's atmosphere and rings, Io's volcanism and torus, and high-resolution flyby imaging of Europa, Callisto and Io will enable an unprecedented study of the Jovian system as a solar system analog, and enables cross-cutting scientific objectives in the fields of atmospheres, geology, magnetospheres, and geophysics.

  13. Cost-Effective Icy Bodies Exploration using Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Jonas; Mauro, David; Stupl, Jan; Nayak, Michael; Aziz, Jonathan; Cohen, Aaron; Colaprete, Anthony; Dono-Perez, Andres; Frost, Chad; Klamm, Benjamin; McCafferty, Julian; McKay, Chris; Sears, Derek; Soulage, Michael; Swenson, Jason; Weston, Sasha; Yang Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that Saturn's moon Enceladus is expelling water-rich plumes into space, providing passing spacecraft with a window into what is hidden underneath its frozen crust. Recent discoveries indicate that similar events could also occur on other bodies in the solar system, such as Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres in the asteroid belt. These plumes provide a possible giant leap forward in the search for organics and assessing habitability beyond Earth, stepping stones toward the long-term goal of finding extraterrestrial life. The United States Congress recently requested mission designs to Europa, to fit within a cost cap of $1B, much less than previous mission designs' estimates. Here, innovative cost-effective small spacecraft designs for the deep-space exploration of these icy worlds, using new and emerging enabling technologies, and how to explore the outer solar system on a budget below the cost horizon of a flagship mission, are investigated. Science requirements, instruments selection, rendezvous trajectories, and spacecraft designs are some topics detailed. The mission concepts revolve around a comparably small-sized and low-cost Plume Chaser spacecraft, instrumented to characterize the vapor constituents encountered on its trajectory. In the event that a plume is not encountered, an ejecta plume can be artificially created by a companion spacecraft, the Plume Maker, on the target body at a location timed with the passage of the Plume Chaser spacecraft. Especially in the case of Ceres, such a mission could be a great complimentary mission to Dawn, as well as a possible future Europa Clipper mission. The comparably small volume of the spacecraft enables a launch to GTO as a secondary payload, providing multiple launch opportunities per year. Plume Maker's design is nearly identical to the Plume Chaser, and fits within the constraints for a secondary payload launch. The cost-effectiveness of small spacecraft missions enables the

  14. ICI Showcase House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-16

    Building Science Corporation collaborated with ICI Homes in Daytona Beach, FL on a 2008 prototype Showcase House that demonstrates the energy efficiency and durability upgrades that ICI currently promotes through its in-house efficiency program called EFactor.

  15. Potential Biospheres of the icy world in our solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre Paul; Baqué, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    The challenge in astrobiology and planetary research in the near future is to realize space missions to study the habitability of Mars and the icy moons of the Jovian and Saturnian systems. Mars is an interesting object to search for habitable environments and for fossilized (and potentially present) life because of its past water driven wet history. On the other hand the Jovian moon Europa and the Saturnian moon Enceladus are promising candidates, where liquid water oceans beneath the surface are expected. These oceans can be habitable environments and the next challenge is to search there for present life. Some examples on potential biospheres and their biosignatures in Mars-like environments and in environmental conditions with reference to the icy moons will be given, which might exist in such kind of icy environments.

  16. Building Small Icy Bodies: the Process of Icy Grain Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Helen Jane; Hill, Catherine Rachel; Blum, Jurgen; Heisselmann, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The material remaining in proto-planetary disks provides the ingredients from which planetessimals, and eventually comets, asteroids and planets (including their ring and moon systems) evolve. Aggregation processes are thought to proceed much more rapidly beyond snow-lines in such disks, aided by icy mantles on dust grains, but we do not know nano- and micron-scale dust combines to kilometer-sizes. Recent ALMA observations have proven the existence of snow lines in other proto-planetary systems (Qi et al Science (2013)), so it is by studying icy collisions in the laboratory that we can begin to understand the assembly of the icy bodies in our Solar System.Icy particles (between 4.7 and 10.8 mm in diameter) were collided at relative collision velocities of 0.27 - 0.51 m s-1, at 131 - 160 K, under microgravity conditions using a purpose-built experiment (Salter et al Rev Sci Inst (2010)). Bouncing was observed in the majority of collisions, across a full range of normalized impact parameters (b/R = 0.0-1.0). Coefficients of restitution were evenly spread between 0.08 and 0.65 with an average value of 0.36, leading to a minimum of 58% of translational energy being lost in the collision. The range of coefficients of restitution was attributed to the surface roughness of the particles. Analysis of particle rotation showed that up to 17% of the energy of the particles before the collision was converted into rotational energy. Temperature did not affect the coefficients of restitution over the range studied (Hill et all A&A (2015a)). The effects of chemical composition on the collisional outcomes were also studied, at relative particle impact velocities between 0.01 and 0.19 ms-1, temperatures between 131 and 160 K and a pressure of around 10-5 mbar. Overall the collisional properties of the icy particles were unchanged (Hill et al A&A (2015b)).The implications of these experimental results will be discussed in terms of our understanding of the formation and evolution of

  17. A Secondary Ion Mass Analyzer for Remote Surface Composition Analysis of the Galilean Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, H.; Srama, R.; Johnson, T. V.; Henkel, H.; vonHoerner, H.; Koch, A.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Kissel, J.; Krueger, F.

    2003-01-01

    Galileo in-situ dust measurements have shown that the Galilean moons are surrounded by tenuous dust clouds formed by collisional ejecta from their icy surfaces, kicked up by impacts of interplanetary micrometeoroids. The majority of the ejecta dust particles have been sensed at altitudes below five between 0.5 and 1 micron, just above the detector threshold, indicating a size distribution decreasing towards bigger particles. their parent bodies. They carry information about the properties of the surface from which they have been kicked up. In particular, these grains may carry organic compounds and other chemicals of biological relevance if they exist on the icy Galilean moons. In-situ analysis of the grain composition with a sophisticated dust analyzer instrument flying on a Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter can provide important information about geochemical and geophysical processes during the evolutionary histories of these moons which are not accessible with other techniques from an orbiter spacecraft. Thus, spacecraft-based in-situ dust measurements can be used as a diagnostic tool for the analysis of the surface composition of the moons. This way, the in-situ measurements turn into a remote sensing technique by using the dust instrument like a telescope for surface investigation. An instrument capable of very high resolution composition analysis of dust particles is the Cometary Secondary Ion Mass Analyzer (COSIMA). The instrument was originally developed for the Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission and has now been built for ESA'S comet orbiter Rosetta. Dust particles are collected on a target and are later located by an optical microscope camera. A pulsed primary indium ion gun partially ionizes the dust grains. The generated secondary ions are accelerated in an electric field and travel through a reflectron-type time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer.

  18. Origin of Saturn's rings and inner moons by mass removal from a lost Titan-sized satellite.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M

    2010-12-16

    The origin of Saturn's rings has not been adequately explained. The current rings are more than 90 to 95 per cent water ice, which implies that initially they were almost pure ice because they are continually polluted by rocky meteoroids. In contrast, a half-rock, half-ice mixture (similar to the composition of many of the satellites in the outer Solar System) would generally be expected. Previous ring origin theories invoke the collisional disruption of a small moon, or the tidal disruption of a comet during a close passage by Saturn. These models are improbable and/or struggle to account for basic properties of the rings, including their icy composition. Saturn has only one large satellite, Titan, whereas Jupiter has four large satellites; additional large satellites probably existed originally but were lost as they spiralled into Saturn. Here I report numerical simulations of the tidal removal of mass from a differentiated, Titan-sized satellite as it migrates inward towards Saturn. Planetary tidal forces preferentially strip material from the satellite's outer icy layers, while its rocky core remains intact and is lost to collision with the planet. The result is a pure ice ring much more massive than Saturn's current rings. As the ring evolves, its mass decreases and icy moons are spawned from its outer edge with estimated masses consistent with Saturn's ice-rich moons interior to and including Tethys. PMID:21151108

  19. Habitability potential of satellites around Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Raulin, Francois; Encrenaz, Therese; Grasset, Olivier; Solomonidou, Anezina

    2016-07-01

    biomarkers. Currently, for Titan and Enceladus, geophysical models try to explain the possible existence of an oceanic layer that decouples the mantle from the icy crust. Titan has further been suggested to be a possible cryovolcanic world due to the presence of local complex volcanic-like geomorphology and the indications of surface albedo changes with time [7,8]. Such dynamic activity that would most probably include tidal heating, possible internal convection, and ice tectonics, is believed to be a pre-requisite of a habitable planetary body as it allows the recycling of minerals and potential nutrients and provides localized energy sources. In one of our geophysical studies [4], we have showed that tidal forces are a constant and significant source of internal deformation on Titan and the interior liquid water ocean can be relatively warm for reasonable amounts of ammonia concentrations, thus completing the set of parameters needed for a truly habitable planetary body. If the silicate mantles of Europa and Ganymede and the liquid sources of Titan and Enceladus are geologically active as on Earth, giving rise to the equivalent of hydrothermal systems, the simultaneous presence of water, geodynamic interactions, chemical energy sources and a diversity of key chemical elements may fulfill the basic conditions for habitability. Such habitability indications from bodies at distances of 10 AU, are essential discoveries brought to us by space exploration and which have recently revolutionized our perception of habitability in the solar system. In the solar system's neighborhood, such potential habitats can only be investigated with appropriate designed space missions, like JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) for Ganymede and Europa [9]. JUICE is an ESA mission to Jupiter and its icy moons, recently selected to launch in 2022. Other future mission concepts are being studied for exploring the moons around Saturn. References: [1] Coustenis, A., Encrenaz, Th., in "Life Beyond Earth

  20. Jupiter Eye to Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Dec. 1, 2000, shows details of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and other features that were not visible in images taken earlier, when Cassini was farther from Jupiter.

    The picture is a color composite, with enhanced contrast, taken from a distance of 28.6 million kilometers (17.8 million miles). It has a resolution of 170 kilometers (106 miles) per pixel. Jupiter's closest large moon, Io, is visible at left.

    The edges of the Red Spot are cloudier with ammonia haze than the spot's center is. The filamentary structure in the center appears to spiral outward toward the edge. NASA's Galileo spacecraft has previously observed the outer edges of the Red Spot to be rotating rapidly counterclockwise, while the inner portion was rotating weakly in the opposite direction. Whether the same is true now will be answered as Cassini gets closer to Jupiter and interior cloud features become sharper. Cassini will make its closest approach to Jupiter, at a distance of about 10 million kilometers (6 million miles), on Dec. 30, 2000.

    The Red Spot region has changed in one notable way over the years: In images from NASA's Voyager and Galileo spacecraft, the area surrounding the Red Spot is dark, indicating relatively cloud-free conditions. Now, some bright white ammonia clouds have filled in the clearings. This appears to be part of a general brightening of Jupiter's cloud features during the past two decades.

    Jupiter has four large moons and an array of tiny ones. In this picture, Io is visible. The white and reddish colors on Io's surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials while the black areas are due to silicate rocks. Like the other large moons, Io always keeps the same hemisphere facing Jupiter, called the sub-Jupiter hemisphere. The opposite side, much of which we see here, is the anti-Jupiter hemisphere. Io has more than 100 active volcanoes spewing very hot lava and giant plumes of gas and dust. Its

  1. X-ray Probes of Magnetospheric Interactions with Jupiter's Auroral zones, the Galilean Satellites, and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed fiom Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we describe the physical processes leading to x-ray emission fiom the surfaces of Jupiter's moons and the instrumental properties, as well as energetic ion flux models or measurements, required to map the elemental composition of their surfaces. We discuss the proposed scenarios leading to possible surface compositions. For Europa, the two most extreme are (1) a patina produced by exogenic processes such as meteoroid bombardment and ion implantation, and (2) upwelling of material fiom the subsurface ocean. We also describe the characteristics of X - m , an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIM0 mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  2. OASIS: Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M.; Zheng, Y.; Balvin, M.; Southard, A. E.; Ferrance, J.; Malespin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a well established laboratory technique for detecting and analyzing organic molecules. This approach has been especially fruitful in the analysis of nucleobases, amino acids, and establishing chirol ratios [1 -3]. We are developing OASIS, Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces, for future in situ landed missions to astrochemically important icy bodies, such as asteroids, comets, and icy moons. The OASIS design employs a microfabricated, on-chip analytical column to chromatographically separate liquid ana1ytes using known LC stationary phase chemistries. The elution products are then interfaced through electrospray ionization (ESI) and analyzed by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). A particular advantage of this design is its suitability for microgravity environments, such as for a primitive small body.

  3. From Galileo's telescope to the Galileo spacecraft: our changing views of the Jupiter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    In four centuries, we have gone from the discovery of the four large moons of Jupiter - Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto - to important discoveries about these four very different worlds. Galileo's telescopic discovery was a major turning point in the understanding of science. His observations of the moons' motion around Jupiter challenged the notion of an Earth-centric Universe. A few months later, Galileo discovered the phases of Venus, which had been predicted by the heliocentric model of the Solar System. Galileo also observed the rings of Saturn (which he mistook for planets) and sunspots, and was the first person to report mountains and craters on the Moon, whose existence he deduced from the patterns of light and shadow on the Moon's surface, concluding that the surface was topographically rough. Centuries later, the Galileo spacecraft's discoveries challenged our understanding of outer planet satellites. Results included the discovery of an icy ocean underneath Europa's surface, the possibility of life on Europa, the widespread volcanism on Io, and the detection of a magnetic field around Ganymede. All four of these satellites revealed how the major geologic processes - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering and erosion - operate in these different bodies, from the total lack of impact craters on Io to the heavily cratered, ancient surface of Callisto. The Galileo spacecraft's journey also took it to Venus and the Moon, making important scientific observations about these bodies. The spacecraft discovered the first moon orbiting around an asteroid which, had Galileo the man observed, would have been another major blow for the geocentric model of our Solar System.

  4. Jupiter small satellite montage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A montage of images of the small inner moons of Jupiter from the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the best views obtained of these moons during Galileo's 11th orbit around the giant planet in November 1997. At that point, Galileo was completing its first two years in Jupiter orbit--known as the Galileo 'prime mission'--and was about to embark on a successful two-year extension, called the Galileo Europa Mission.

    The top two images show the moon Thebe. Thebe rotates by approximately 50 degrees between the time these two images were taken, so that the same prominent impact crater is seen in both views; this crater, which has been given the provisional name Zethus, is near the point on Thebe that faces permanently away from Jupiter.

    The next two images show the moon Amalthea; they were taken with the Sun directly behind the observer, an alignment that emphasizes patterns of intrinsically bright or dark surface material. The third image from the top is a view of Amalthea's leading side, the side of the moon that 'leads' as Amalthea moves in its orbit around Jupiter. This image looks 'noisy' because it was obtained serendipitously during an observation of the Jovian satellite Io (Amalthea and Io shared the same camera frame but the image was exposed for bright Io rather than for the much darker Amalthea). The fourth image from the top emphasizes prominent 'spots' of relatively bright material that are located near the point on Amalthea that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The bottom image is a view of the tiny moon Metis.

    In all the images, north is approximately up, and the moons are shown in their correct relative sizes. The images are, from top to bottom: Thebe taken on November 7, 1997 at a range of 504,000 kilometers (about 313,000 miles); Thebe on November 7, 1997 at a range of 548,000 kilometers (about 340,000 miles); Amalthea on November 6, 1997 at a range of about 650,000 kilometers (about 404,000 miles); Amalthea on November

  5. Making Space Travel to Jupiter Possible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Samuel P.

    2004-01-01

    From man landing on the moon to a simple satellite being launched into orbit, many incredible space accomplishments have been witnessed by us all. However, what goes un-noticed to the common man is the extensive research and testing that lasts months, years, and even decades. Much of this required research just so happens to take place in the corridors of the Glen Research Center building number 49. In the Advanced Materials division of G.R.C., a number of researchers have the responsibility of discovering which metal, ceramic, or polymer is best for a specific application. Under the guidance of mentor extraordinaire Frank Ritzert, I am involved in many critical projects dealing with refractory metals, two of which I will mention in this report. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project actually was under full swing back in the 50's and early 60's. To enable the 14 year trek to the icy moons of Europa, Callisto, and Ganymede, nuclear propulsion methods were selected. Due to the extreme temperature of the reactor and the extended time period, a refractory metal would need to be implemented. After years of research and progress, the program was suddenly canceled. About a decade ago, the JIMO project was re-instated and now has a goal for departure around 2014. However, a few obstacles lie in our way concerning the use of refractory metals. In certain areas of the orbiter a joint is required between the refractories and other less dense metals. Two of these joints are with nickel based super alloys. Being an intern for Frank Ritzert, the refractory metals expert, I have the opportunity to develop the best method to braze refractory metals to Nickel 201. This involves the actual brazing, electron microscopy and reporting the results. My second project involves a certain part of the orbiter where Niobium 1Zirconium, a refractory metal, is joined with Hastelloy-X a Ni based metal. Small quantities of oxygen, helium and other impurities in the Ni alloy could diffuse

  6. Sharpening Up Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    New image-correction technique delivers sharpest whole-planet ground-based picture ever A record two-hour observation of Jupiter using a superior technique to remove atmospheric blur has produced the sharpest whole-planet picture ever taken from the ground. The series of 265 snapshots obtained with the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) prototype instrument mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal changes in Jupiter's smog-like haze, probably in response to a planet-wide upheaval more than a year ago. Sharpening Up Jupiter ESO PR Photo 33/08 Sharpening Up Jupiter Being able to correct wide field images for atmospheric distortions has been the dream of scientists and engineers for decades. The new images of Jupiter prove the value of the advanced technology used by MAD, which uses two or more guide stars instead of one as references to remove the blur caused by atmospheric turbulence over a field of view thirty times larger than existing techniques [1]. "This type of adaptive optics has a big advantage for looking at large objects, such as planets, star clusters or nebulae," says lead researcher Franck Marchis, from UC Berkeley and the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, USA. "While regular adaptive optics provides excellent correction in a small field of view, MAD provides good correction over a larger area of sky. And in fact, were it not for MAD, we would not have been able to perform these amazing observations." MAD allowed the researchers to observe Jupiter for almost two hours on 16 and 17 August 2008, a record duration, according to the observing team. Conventional adaptive optics systems using a single Jupiter moon as reference cannot monitor Jupiter for so long because the moon moves too far from the planet. The Hubble Space Telescope cannot observe Jupiter continuously for more than about 50 minutes, because its view is regularly blocked by the Earth during Hubble's 96-minute orbit. Using MAD, ESO astronomer Paola Amico

  7. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  8. Jupiter and the Voyager mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.

    1980-01-01

    In 1977, the United States launched two unmanned Voyager spacecraft that were to take part in an extensive reconnaissance of the outer planets over a 12-year period visiting the environs of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Their first encounter was with the complex Jupiter planetary system 400 million miles away. Sweeping by Jupiter and its five moons in 1979, the two spacecraft have sent back to Earth an enormous amount of data that will prove to be vital in understanding our solar system. Voyager 1 is scheduled to fly past Saturn on November 13 of this year; Voyager 2, in August of the following year. 

  9. Moon Rise, Moon Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Points out the potential of the moon as a rich teaching resource for subject areas like astronomy, physics, and biology. Presents historical, scientific, technological, and interesting facts about the moon. Includes suggestions for maximizing student interest and learning about the moon. (YDS)

  10. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Icy Satellite Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Aurya; Barmatz, Martin; Zhong, Fang; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    With regard to planetary science, NASA aspires to: "Advance scientific knowledge of the origin and history of the solar system, the potential for life elsewhere, and the hazards and resources present as humans explore space". In pursuit of such an end, the Galileo and Cassini missions garnered spectral data of icy satellite surfaces implicative of the satellites' structure and material composition. The potential for geophysical modeling afforded by this information, coupled with the plausibility of life on icy satellites, has pushed Jupiter's Europa along with Saturn's Enceladus and Titan toward the fore of NASA's planetary focus. Understanding the evolution of, and the present processes at work on, the aforementioned satellites falls squarely in-line with NASA's cited goal.

  11. A permanent, asymmetric dust cloud around the Moon.

    PubMed

    Horányi, M; Szalay, J R; Kempf, S; Schmidt, J; Grün, E; Srama, R; Sternovsky, Z

    2015-06-18

    Interplanetary dust particles hit the surfaces of airless bodies in the Solar System, generating charged and neutral gas clouds, as well as secondary ejecta dust particles. Gravitationally bound ejecta clouds that form dust exospheres were recognized by in situ dust instruments around the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn, but have hitherto not been observed near bodies with refractory regolith surfaces. High-altitude Apollo 15 and 17 observations of a 'horizon glow' indicated a putative population of high-density small dust particles near the lunar terminators, although later orbital observations yielded upper limits on the abundance of such particles that were a factor of about 10(4) lower than that necessary to produce the Apollo results. Here we report observations of a permanent, asymmetric dust cloud around the Moon, caused by impacts of high-speed cometary dust particles on eccentric orbits, as opposed to particles of asteroidal origin following near-circular paths striking the Moon at lower speeds. The density of the lunar ejecta cloud increases during the annual meteor showers, especially the Geminids, because the lunar surface is exposed to the same stream of interplanetary dust particles. We expect all airless planetary objects to be immersed in similar tenuous clouds of dust. PMID:26085272

  12. A permanent, asymmetric dust cloud around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horányi, M.; Szalay, J. R.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.; Grün, E.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-06-01

    Interplanetary dust particles hit the surfaces of airless bodies in the Solar System, generating charged and neutral gas clouds, as well as secondary ejecta dust particles. Gravitationally bound ejecta clouds that form dust exospheres were recognized by in situ dust instruments around the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn, but have hitherto not been observed near bodies with refractory regolith surfaces. High-altitude Apollo 15 and 17 observations of a `horizon glow' indicated a putative population of high-density small dust particles near the lunar terminators, although later orbital observations yielded upper limits on the abundance of such particles that were a factor of about 104 lower than that necessary to produce the Apollo results. Here we report observations of a permanent, asymmetric dust cloud around the Moon, caused by impacts of high-speed cometary dust particles on eccentric orbits, as opposed to particles of asteroidal origin following near-circular paths striking the Moon at lower speeds. The density of the lunar ejecta cloud increases during the annual meteor showers, especially the Geminids, because the lunar surface is exposed to the same stream of interplanetary dust particles. We expect all airless planetary objects to be immersed in similar tenuous clouds of dust.

  13. Pioneer F mission to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaway, H. G.; Waller, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    The experimental designs for the Pioneer F mission to Jupiter are described. The spacecraft is designed to make measurements of the planet's atmosphere, radiation belts, heat balance, magnetic fields, moons, and other related phenomena. The mission also characterizes the heliosphere, the interstellar gas, cosmic rays, asteroids, and meteoroids between the earth and 2.4 billion kilometers from the sun.

  14. Morphology and Scaling of Ejecta Deposits on Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.; Ridolfi, Francis J.; Bredekamp, Joe (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Continuous ejecta deposits on Ganymede consist of two major units, or facies: a thick inner hummocky pedestal facies, and a relatively thin outer radially scoured facies defined also by the inner limit of the secondary crater field. Both ejecta facies have a well-defined power-law relationship to crater diameter for craters ranging from 15 to approx. 600 km across. This relationship can be used to estimate the nominal crater diameter for impact features on icy satellites (such as palimpsests and multiring basins) for which the crater rim is no longer recognizable. Ejecta deposits have also been mapped on 4 other icy satellites. Although morphologically similar to eject deposits on the Moon, ejecta deposits for smaller craters are generally significantly broader in extent on the icy satellites, in apparent defiance of predictions of self-similarity. A greater degree of rim collapse and enlargement on the Moon may explain the observed difference.

  15. The Saturn System's Icy Satellites: New Results from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly M.; Buratti, Bonnie; Hendrix, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens is a multidisciplinary, international planetary mission consisting of an orbiting spacecraft and a probe. The Huygens probe successfully landed on Titan's surface on January 14, 2005, while the orbiter has performed observations of Saturn, its rings, satellites, and magnetosphere since it entered orbit around Saturn on July 1, 2004. The Cassini mission has been prolific in its scientific discoveries about the Saturn system. In this special section, we present new mission results with a focus on the 'icy satellites,' which we define as all Saturn's moons with the exception of Titan. The results included in this section have come out of the Cassini SOST--Satellites Orbiter Science Team--a multi-instrument and multidiscipline group that works together to better understand the icy satellites and their interactions with Saturn and its rings. Other papers included in this issue present ground-based observations and interior modeling of these icy moons.

  16. Phase transitions and convection in icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of solid-solid phase changes on subsolidus convection in the large icy moons of the outer solar system are considered. Phase transitions affect convection via processes that distort the phase change boundary and/or influence buoyancy through thermal expansion. Linear stability analyses are carried out for ice layers with a phase change at the midplane. Two exothermic phase transitions (ice I - ice II, ice VI - ice VIII) and two endothermic transitions (ice I - ice III, ice II - ice V) are considered. For the exothermic cases, the phase change can either impede or enhance whole-layer convection. For the endothermic cases, the phse change always inhibits whole-layer convective overturn and tends to enforce two-layer convection. These results play some constraints on possible models of icy satellite evolution and structure.

  17. Virtual observatory tools and amateur radio observations supporting scientific analysis of Jupiter radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Hess, Sebastien; Le Sidaner, Pierre; Savalle, Renaud; Stéphane, Erard; Coffre, Andrée; Thétas, Emmanuel; André, Nicolas; Génot, Vincent; Thieman, Jim; Typinski, Dave; Sky, Jim; Higgins, Chuck; Imai, Masafumi

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol, as well as data from the Iitate Low Frquency Radio Antenna, in Japan. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. The attached figure shows data from those three providers. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  18. Virtual Observatory tools and Amateur Radio Observations Supporting Scientific Analysis of Jupiter Radio Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S. L. G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Savalle, R.; Erard, S.; Coffre, A.; Thétas, E.; André, N.; Génot, V.; Thieman, J.; Typinski, D.; Sky, J.; Higgins, C.

    2015-10-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets. A preliminary study based on January-February 2014 data will also be presented

  19. Galileo Science Update: Observing Changes on Europa and in Jupiter's System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents a news briefing from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) featuring video presentations by Dr. Alfred McEwen (Univ. of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Lab.), Dr. Ronald Greeley (Arizona St. Univ.), Dr. Andrew Ingersoll (California Inst. of Tech.,), and Dr. Diana Blaney (Jet Propulsion Lab.). Discussions center on the atmospheric and surface features of Jupiter and two of its moons, Europa and Io. Possible energy mechanisms that create atmospheric features of Jupiter, such as the Great Red Spot, as well as possible thunderstorm and lightning activity associated with these features are included. Discussions of the craters and fractures on the icy surface of Europa, surface features of Io, two of which are named Loki and Pele, believed to be of volcanic origin, as well infrared observations of volcanism on Io are presented. The individual presentations are followed by a question and answer period with questions posed by scientific journalists from JPL and other NASA centers. The video ends with computer animations, as well as actual footage, of features on Jupiter and its satellites taken from the Galileo spacecraft. Some of these images were seen previously in the individual presentations.

  20. Virtual Jupiter - Real Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhitskaya, Lanika; Speck, A.; Laffey, J.

    2010-01-01

    How many earthlings went to visit Jupiter? None. How many students visited virtual Jupiter to fulfill their introductory astronomy courses’ requirements? Within next six months over 100 students from University of Missouri will get a chance to explore the planet and its Galilean Moons using a 3D virtual environment created especially for them to learn Kepler's and Newton's laws, eclipses, parallax, and other concepts in astronomy. The virtual world of Jupiter system is a unique 3D environment that allows students to learn course material - physical laws and concepts in astronomy - while engaging them into exploration of the Jupiter's system, encouraging their imagination, curiosity, and motivation. The virtual learning environment let students to work individually or collaborate with their teammates. The 3D world is also a great opportunity for research in astronomy education to investigate impact of social interaction, gaming features, and use of manipulatives offered by a learning tool on students’ motivation and learning outcomes. Use of 3D environment is also a valuable source for exploration of how the learners’ spatial awareness can be enhanced by working in 3-dimensional environment.

  1. Seeding Life on the Moons of the Outer Planets via Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, R. J.; Sigurdsson, Steinn; House, Christopher H.

    2013-12-01

    Material from the surface of a planet can be ejected into space by a large impact, and could carry primitive life forms with it. We performed n-body simulations of such ejecta to determine where in the Solar System rock from Earth and Mars may end up. We find that, in addition to frequent transfer of material among the terrestrial planets, transfer of material from Earth and Mars to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn is also possible, but rare. We expect that such transfer is most likely during the Late Heavy Bombardment or during the next one or two billion years. At this time, the icy moons were warmer and likely had little or no icy shell to prevent meteorites from reaching their liquid interiors. We also note significant rates of re-impact in the first million years after ejection. This could re-seed life on a planet after partial or complete sterilization by a large impact, which would aid the survival of early life during the Late Heavy Bombardment.

  2. Seeding Life on the Moons of the Outer Planets via Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Rachel; Sigurdsson, S.; House, C.

    2014-01-01

    Material from the surface of a planet can be ejected into space by a large impact, and could carry primitive life forms with it. We performed n-body simulations of such ejecta to determine where in the Solar System rock from Earth and Mars may end up. We find that, in addition to frequent transfer of material among the terrestrial planets, transfer of material from Earth and Mars to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn is also possible, but rare. We expect that such transfer is most likely during the Late Heavy Bombardment or during the next one or two billion years. At this time, the icy moons were warmer and likely had little or no icy shell to prevent meteorites from reaching their liquid interiors. We also note significant rates of re-impact in the first million years after ejection. This could re-seed life on a planet after partial or complete sterilization by a large impact, which would aid the survival of early life during the Late Heavy Bombardment.

  3. Galileo's Telescopy and Jupiter's Tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    2003-12-01

    A previous paper (BAAS 33:4, 1363, 2001) reported on the dramatic scene in Shakespeare's Cymbeline that features the descent of the deity Jupiter. The paper suggested that the four ghosts circling the sleeping Posthumus denote the four Galilean moons of Jupiter. The god Jupiter commands the ghosts to lay a tablet upon the prone Posthumus, but says that its value should not be overestimated. When Posthumus wakens he notices the tablet, which he calls a "book." Not only has the deity's "tablet" become the earthling's "book," but it appears that the book has covers which Posthumus evidently recognizes because without even opening the book he ascribes two further properties to it: rarity, and the very property that Jupiter had earlier attributed, viz. that one must not read too much into it. The mystery deepens when the Jovian gift undergoes a second metamorphosis, to "label." With the help of the OED, the potentially disparate terms "tablet," "book," and "label," may be explained by terms appropriate either to supernatural or worldly beings. "Tablet" may recognize the Mosaic artifact, whereas "book" and "label" are probably mundane references to Galileo's Sidereus Nuncius which appeared shortly before Cymbeline. The message of the Olympian god indicates therefore that the book is unique even as its contents have limited value. The first property celebrates the fact that Galileo's book is the first of its kind, and the second advises that all results except the discovery of Jupiter's moons have been reported earlier, in Hamlet.

  4. Galileo Earth Moon Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This video has five sections. The first is a live discussion of the information that scientists hope to gain by the Galileo flyby of the Moon. This section has no introduction. There is a great deal of the discussion about the lunar craters and lunar volcanism. There is also some discussion of the composition of the far side of the moon. The second section is a short animation that shows the final step to Jupiter with particular emphasis on the gravitational assisted velocity boost, which was planned to give the spacecraft the requisite velocity to make the trip to Jupiter. The next section is an update of the status of the flyby of the Moon, and the Earth, with an explanation of the trajectory around the earth, and the moon. A photograph of the tracking station in Canberra, Australia is included. The next section is a tour of a full-scale model of the spacecraft. The last section is a discussion with the person charged with the procurement of the instrumentation aboard the spacecraft; the importance of the lunar flyby to assist in the calibration of the instruments is discussed.

  5. Spatial distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter from observations with the Herschel space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, T.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; de Val-Borro, M.; Jarchow, C.; Moreno, R.; Hartogh, P.; Orton, G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Billebaud, F.; Dobrijevic, M.; Lara, L. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    distributions of water in Jupiter's stratosphere, we rule out interplanetary dust particles as its main source. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Jupiter's stratospheric water was delivered by the SL9 comet and that more than 95% of the observed water comes from the comet according to our models. On the longer term, this study can be regarded as a preparation of the observations to be performed by the SubmillimetreWave Instrument (SWI) [12]. SWI is an instrument proposed for the payload of the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE). This instrument will observe water and the other SL9-derived species in Jupiter with a higher spatiotemporal resolution than Herschel to constrain its 3D stratospheric circulation.

  6. Degradation and hydrogen and oxygen release via electron bombardment of icy Jovian satellite surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, T. M.; Grieves, G.; Alexandrov, A.; Paty, C.

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the low-energy (5-100 eV) electron-induced degradation of low temperature ice characteristic of icy Jovian satellite surfaces. Specifically, we examined the yields and energy distributions of the primary neutral and cationic fragments leaving the surface as a function of impinging electron energy, ice phase and surface temperature. We find a large proton yield and formation and desorption of H (2S) and H2 (^{1}Σg+). These neutrals were detected using laser resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization. The threshold electron energy is 6.5 eV and the energy distributions of the desorption products are non-thermal indicating surface exciton decay. Proton production and release has a threshold energy of 22 eV and involves two-hole states which Coulomb explode. Other desorption products include O (3P), O (1D) and O2. The formation of O2 is enhanced in porous media and involves a molecular precursor. The overall cross sections for producing the above mentioned products, particularly O2, increase as the ice temperature rises from 90 to 150 K. This is due to the increased excited state lifetimes associated with the disrupted hydrogen bonding network at elevated temperatures and enhanced precursor formation at temperatures above 120 K. In general, the yields of protons are high enough to provide a significant source of ions to the near space environments of Jupiter's icy moons and potentially to the Jovian magnetosphere. In the case of direct proton ejection, this source term may be as effective as hydrogen atom emission followed by gas-phase ionization. No oxygen ions are emitted from the ice due to the high solvation forces. These results, in conjunction with modeling studies of Ganymede's magnetospheric interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere, indicate that oxygen ions are likely present in Ganymede's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  7. Jupiter Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover

    Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers.

    This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter.

    Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena.

    According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  8. Radar-Sounding of Icy Mantles and Comets Using Natural Radio Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Sahr, J. D.

    2011-10-01

    Radar-sounding of ice sheets on Earth yields crucial information on ice history and dynamics, including discoveries of subglacial lakes beneath 3-4 km of ice [1]. Mars Express and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have now demonstrated the corresponding power of orbital radar sounding for planetary exploration, in particular by imaging structures within and beneath kilometers of Martian water ice [2-4]. Based on this experience, a sophisticated orbital radar sounder is planned for a flagship mission to Europa, with the aim of imaging stratigraphy, faults, diapirs and other geological structure in the upper few kilometers of the water-ice mantle there, and possibly even detecting the upper surface of the (likely) underlying ocean [5]. Recent modeling of the formation and evolution of volatilerich bodies suggests that oceans or lakes of liquid water occur beneath water-ice mantles in a surprising variety of places, including Ceres in the outer asteroid belt [6], 3 of the 4 Galilean moons of Jupiter as well as Enceladus and Titan in the Saturnian system [7], and possibly even Pluto [8]. Thus there is now a wide scope for low-cost missions to bodies of exceptional interest, and for radar sounding of icy mantles to image near-surface structural geology related to underlying water (whether past or present).

  9. Considerations for a Radar System to Detect an Ocean Underneath the Icy Shell of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Thorsten; Gogineni, Prasad; Green, James; Cooper, John; Fung, Shing; Taylor, William; Benson, Robert; Reinisch, Bodo; Song, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The detection of an ocean underneath Europa is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. An orbiting surface penetrating radar has the potential of providing that measurement thus yielding information regarding the possibility of life support on Europa. Radars in the MHz range have successfully monitored the kilometer-deep ice shelves of Greenland and Antarctica, including the detection of Lake Vostok (and others) below an ice sheet thickness of about 4 km. The performance of a radar system orbiting Europa will be subject to several potential complications and unknowns. Besides ionospheric dispersion and the actual depth of the ocean, which is estimated between 2 and 30 km, major unknowns affecting radar performance are the temperature profile, the amount of salt and other impurities within the ice crust as well as the surface roughness. These impurities can in part be produced at the highly irradiated surface by magnetospheric interactions and transported downward into the ice crust by geologic processes. The ionospheric interference must also be modeled from effects of these interactions on production of the thin neutral atmosphere and subsequent ionization of the neutrals. We investigated these uncertainties through radar simulations using different surface and ice characteristics over a frequency range from 10 to 50 MHz. The talk will present results from these simulations discussing potential limitations.

  10. Compositions of Oceans on Icy Solar System Bodies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2010-12-01

    Interior oceans may exist on at least several solar system bodies: Europa, Enceladus, Ganymede, Titan and Triton. Compositions of the oceans could reflect bulk chemistries on the bodies, degree and timing of differendentition, current temperature and pressure conditions, and chemical exchanges between icy shells, liquid layers, and suboceanic solids (rocks, sediments, ices and clathrates). Observational signs are sparse and modeling is the major approach to evaluate oceanic compositions. On Europa, a presence of S(VI) species and CO2 at endogenic surface features [1] suggests sulfates and C species (organic and/or inorganic) in the ocean. The detection of NaCl and Na2CO3/NaHCO3-bearing grains emitted from Enceladus [2] implies the dominance of Na, Cl and carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the past and/or present alkaline fluids in the interior. These observations are consistent with independent models for water-rock interaction [3]. Evaluated low contents of other elements (Mg, Fe, Ca, K, S, P, etc.) in initial oceanic waters [3] are accounted for by low solubilities of minerals deposited from water solutions (serpentine, saponite, magnetite, carbonates, sulfides and phosphates). Oceanic redox states are affected by the composition of accreted ices and rocks, hydrogen production through oxidation of solids (mainly Fe-Ni metal) by water and an efficiency of H2 escape. Formation of a sulfate-bearing ocean (as on Europa) through oxidation of sulfides could have been driven by radiolytically-formed oxidants (H2O2, O2), high-temperature (>500 K) hydrothermal activity and H2 escape. Formation of sulfate facilitates leaching of Mg from minerals leading to the Mg-SO4-Na-Cl ocean. Although some of these factors could have played roles on the Galilean satellites, formation of sulfate-bearing oceans beyond Jupiter is unlikely. Accretion of cometary-type ices on moons allows an existence of water-methanol-ammonia liquids at ~153 K, although ammonia could have been sequestered in

  11. Ulysses dust measurements near Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Grün, E; Zook, H A; Baguhl, M; Fechtig, H; Hanner, M S; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I B

    1992-09-11

    Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized particles were recorded by the Ulysses dust detector within 40 days of the Jupiter flyby. Nine impacts were recorded within 50 Jupiter radii with most of them recorded after closest approach. Three of these impacts are consistent with particles on prograde orbits around Jupiter and the rest are believed to have resulted from gravitationally focused interplanetary dust. From the ratio of the impact rate before the Jupiter flyby to the impact rate after the Jupiter flyby it is concluded that interplanetary dust particles at the distance of Jupiter move on mostly retrograde orbits. On 10 March 1992, Ulysses passed through an intense dust stream. The dust detector recorded 126 impacts within 26 hours. The stream particles were moving on highly inclined and apparently hyperbolic orbits with perihelion distances of >5 astronomical units. Interplanetary dust is lost rather quickly from the solar system through collisions and other mechanisms and must be almost continuously replenished to maintain observed abundances. Dust flux measurements, therefore, give evidence of the recent rates of production from sources such as comets, asteroids, and moons, as well as the possible presence of interstellar grains. PMID:11538054

  12. Moon Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    When teaching Moon phases, the focus seems to be on the sequence of Moon phases and, in some grade levels, how Moon phases occur. Either focus can sometimes be a challenge, especially without the use of models and observations of the Moon. In this month's column, the author describes some of the lessons that he uses to teach the phases of the Moon…

  13. Jupiter, Tether, and Lenz's Law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Russell

    1999-01-01

    Jupiter has a large, complex, and intense magnetic field that is thought to arise from electrical currents in the rapidly spinning metallic hydrogen interior. The strong magnetic field can induce currents when the conductive tether is directed toward or away from Jupiter. The currents can be stored and used for both propulsion and power generation. Therefore, our spacecraft might be able to visit several Jovian moons or maintain in the orbit around Jupiter. In our future space traveling, we also can use this technical skill to travel to other planets without any fuel. First-year physics textbooks describe Lenz's Law in which current is induced in a conductor moving through a stationary magnetic field. A demonstration of induced current in a stationary conductor and moving magnetic field is described, which may have space-tether application.

  14. Overview of the Project Prometheus Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdick, G. M.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will give an overview of the Project Prometheus Program (PPP, formerly the Nuclear Systems Initiative, NSI) and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Project (a component of PPP), a mission to the three icy Galilean moons of Jupiter.

  15. Alice Views Jupiter and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This graphic illustrates the pointing and shows the data from one of many observations made by the New Horizons Alice ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) instrument during the Pluto-bound spacecraft's recent encounter with Jupiter. The red lines in the graphic show the scale, orientation, and position of the combined 'box and slot' field of view of the Alice UVS during this observation.

    The positions of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, the torus of ionized gas from Io, and Jupiter are shown relative to the Alice field of view. Like a prism, the spectrometer separates light from these targets into its constituent wavelengths.

    Io's volcanoes produce an extremely tenuous atmosphere made up primarily of sulfur dioxide gas, which, in the harsh plasma environment at Io, breaks down into its component sulfur and oxygen atoms. Alice observed the auroral glow from these atoms in Io's atmosphere and their ionized counterparts in the Io torus.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

  16. Focus: Reaching for the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Emily; Chadha, Kulvinder Singh

    2008-05-01

    The man in the moon. Blue moon. Heavy bombardment era. Black moon. Mechanics of the moon. Perigee/apogee. Blood moon. Harvest moon. Destination moon. Wet moon. Moon Britannia. Moon rocks come down to Earth. Fairy moon.

  17. Jupiter-Io Montage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is a montage of New Horizons images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io, taken during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby in early 2007. The Jupiter image is an infrared color composite taken by the spacecraft's near-infrared imaging spectrometer, the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) at 1:40 UT on Feb. 28, 2007. The infrared wavelengths used (red: 1.59 um, green: 1.94 um, blue: 1.85 um) highlight variations in the altitude of the Jovian cloud tops, with blue denoting high-altitude clouds and hazes, and red indicating deeper clouds. The prominent bluish-white oval is the Great Red Spot. The observation was made at a solar phase angle of 75 degrees but has been projected onto a crescent to remove distortion caused by Jupiter's rotation during the scan. The Io image, taken at 00:25 UT on March 1st 2007, is an approximately true-color composite taken by the panchromatic Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), with color information provided by the 0.5 um ('blue') and 0.9 um ('methane') channels of the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). The image shows a major eruption in progress on Io's night side, at the northern volcano Tvashtar. Incandescent lava glows red beneath a 330-kilometer high volcanic plume, whose uppermost portions are illuminated by sunlight. The plume appears blue due to scattering of light by small particles in the plume

    This montage appears on the cover of the Oct. 12, 2007, issue of Science magazine.

  18. Hubble Images Reveal Jupiter's Auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, reveal changes in Jupiter's auroral emissions and how small auroral spots just outside the emission rings are linked to the planet's volcanic moon, Io. The images represent the most sensitive and sharply-detailed views ever taken of Jovian auroras.

    The top panel pinpoints the effects of emissions from Io, which is about the size of Earth's moon. The black-and-white image on the left, taken in visible light, shows how Io and Jupiter are linked by an invisible electrical current of charged particles called a 'flux tube.' The particles - ejected from Io (the bright spot on Jupiter's right) by volcanic eruptions - flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which thread through Io, to the planet's north and south magnetic poles. This image also shows the belts of clouds surrounding Jupiter as well as the Great Red Spot.

    The black-and-white image on the right, taken in ultraviolet light about 15 minutes later, shows Jupiter's auroral emissions at the north and south poles. Just outside these emissions are the auroral spots. Called 'footprints,' the spots are created when the particles in Io's 'flux tube' reach Jupiter's upper atmosphere and interact with hydrogen gas, making it fluoresce. In this image, Io is not observable because it is faint in the ultraviolet.

    The two ultraviolet images at the bottom of the picture show how the auroral emissions change in brightness and structure as Jupiter rotates. These false-color images also reveal how the magnetic field is offset from Jupiter's spin axis by 10 to 15 degrees. In the right image, the north auroral emission is rising over the left limb; the south auroral oval is beginning to set. The image on the left, obtained on a different date, shows a full view of the north aurora, with a strong emission inside the main auroral oval.

    The images were taken by the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 between May 1994 and September 1995.

    This image and

  19. Energetic Neutral Atoms from the Moon: Populations, physics, applications, and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Bhardwaj, Anil; Wurz, Peter

    the effective protection of the surface from the solar wind proton. Recently, we also developed a new method to obtain the electrostatic surface potential inside the anomaly from ENA observations. Improved ENA sensor will fly to Mercury by a Europe-Japan joint Mercury exploration, BepiColombo, as a part of Mercury Plasma Particle Experiment on board Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter. The ENA experiment will image precipitating plasma at the surface of Mercury. Field-aligned potential in the precipitating regions is also to be derived. European Jupiter mission, JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE), will also equip an ENA sensor. ENA environment of the icy moons will be addressed as well.

  20. The Formation Environment of Jupiter's Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Neal; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Do circumjovian disk models have conductivities consistent with the assumed accretion stresses? Broadly, YES, for both minimum-mass and gas-starved models: magnetic stresses are weak in the MM models, as needed to keep the material in place. Stresses are stronger in the gas-starved models, as assumed in deriving the flow to the planet. However, future minimum-mass modeling may need to consider the loss of dust-depleted gas from the surface layers to the planet. The gas-starved models should have stress varying in radius. Dust evolution is a key process for further study, since the recombination occurs on the grains.

  1. On Approach: Jupiter and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of On Approach: Jupiter and Io

    This sequence of images was taken on Jan. 8, 2007, with the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), while the spacecraft was about 81 million kilometers (about 50 million miles) from Jupiter. Jupiter's volcanic moon Io is to the right; the planet's Great Red Spot is also visible. The image was one of 11 taken during the Jan. 8 approach sequence, which signaled the opening of the New Horizons Jupiter encounter.

    Even in these early approach images, Jupiter shows different face than what previous visiting spacecraft -- such as Voyager 1, Galileo and Cassini -- have seen. Regions around the equator and in the southern tropical latitudes seem remarkably calm, even in the typically turbulent 'wake' behind the Great Red Spot.

    The New Horizons science team will scrutinize these major meteorological features -- including the unexpectedly calm regions -- to understand the diverse variety of dynamical processes on the solar system's largest planet. These include the newly formed Little Red Spot, the Great Red Spot and a variety of zonal features.

  2. JUICE/RPWI/JENRAGE: a low frequency radio imager at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Kasaba, Y.; Bergman, J. E. S.; Zarka, P.; Lamy, L.; Hess, S. L. G.; Rothkaehl, H.

    2015-10-01

    The JENRAGE (Jovian Environment Radio Astronomy and Ganymede Exploration) experiment of the Radio and Plasma Waves Instrument (RPWI) on-board JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) is a sensitive, and versatile radio instrument. It will observe radio waves ranging from 80 kHz to 45 MHz at a 100 Msample per second aquisition rate. The instrument is composed of set of 3 electrical dipoles (developed by the Polish team), connected to low noise preamplifiers and conditioning analog filters (built by the Japanese team), then sampled and digitally filtererd into ~300 kHz bands (digital part developed by the Swedish team). This international project is coordinated by B. Cecconi and Y. Kasaba, both co-PI of JUICE/RPWI. Although the radio antenna connected to this instrument have no intrinsic directivity, the JENRAGE measurements can provide instantaneous direction of arrival, flux density and polarization degree of the observed radio waves. Hence, the JENRAGE can be described as an full-sky radio imager. As the instrument provides direction of arrival, radio sources can be located with some assumption on the propagation between the source and the observer. Hence, it is possible to produce radio source maps and correlate them with observations at other wavelengths, such as UV or IR observations of the auroral regions of Jupiter. The flux and polarization measurements together with the time- frequency shape of the radio emissions can also be used to identify the radio emission processes. These features have shown their capabilities on Cassini, with the RPWS/HFR instrument. We will present the JUICE/RPWI/JENRAGE design and the science objectives. Additional science topics linked to the icy satellites, which are currently being assessed, will also be presented.

  3. Studying the Surfaces of the Icy Galilean Satellites With JIMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L.; Schenk, P.; Pappalardo, R.

    2003-12-01

    The Geology subgroup of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Science Definition Team (SDT) has been working with colleagues within the planetary science community to determine the key outstanding science goals that could be met by the JIMO mission. Geological studies of the Galilean satellites will benefit from the spacecraft's long orbital periods around each satellite, lasting from one to several months. This mission plan allows us to select the optimal viewing conditions to complete global compositional and morphologic mapping at high resolution, and to target geologic features of key scientific interest at very high resolution. Community input to this planning process suggests two major science objectives, along with corresponding measurements proposed to meet them. Objective 1: Determine the origins of surface features and their implications for geological history and evolution. This encompasses investigations of magmatism (intrusion, extrusion, and diapirism), tectonism (isostatic compensation, and styles of faulting, flexure and folding), impact cratering (morphology and distribution), and gradation (erosion and deposition) processes (impact gardening, sputtering, mass wasting and frosts). Suggested measurements to meet this goal include (1) two dimensional global topographic mapping sufficient to discriminate features at a spatial scale of 10 m, and with better than or equal to 1 m relative vertical accuracy, (2) nested images of selected target areas at a range of resolutions down to the submeter pixel scale, (3) global (albedo) mapping at better than or equal to 10 m/pixel, and (4) multispectral global mapping in at least 3 colors at better than or equal to 100 m/pixel, with some subsets at better than 30 m/pixel. Objective 2. Identify and characterize potential landing sites for future missions. A primary component to the success of future landed missions is full characterization of potential sites in terms of their relative age, geological interest, and

  4. Habitability potential of satellites around Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Raulin, Francois; Encrenaz, Therese; Grasset, Olivier; Solomonidou, Anezina

    2016-07-01

    biomarkers. Currently, for Titan and Enceladus, geophysical models try to explain the possible existence of an oceanic layer that decouples the mantle from the icy crust. Titan has further been suggested to be a possible cryovolcanic world due to the presence of local complex volcanic-like geomorphology and the indications of surface albedo changes with time [7,8]. Such dynamic activity that would most probably include tidal heating, possible internal convection, and ice tectonics, is believed to be a pre-requisite of a habitable planetary body as it allows the recycling of minerals and potential nutrients and provides localized energy sources. In one of our geophysical studies [4], we have showed that tidal forces are a constant and significant source of internal deformation on Titan and the interior liquid water ocean can be relatively warm for reasonable amounts of ammonia concentrations, thus completing the set of parameters needed for a truly habitable planetary body. If the silicate mantles of Europa and Ganymede and the liquid sources of Titan and Enceladus are geologically active as on Earth, giving rise to the equivalent of hydrothermal systems, the simultaneous presence of water, geodynamic interactions, chemical energy sources and a diversity of key chemical elements may fulfill the basic conditions for habitability. Such habitability indications from bodies at distances of 10 AU, are essential discoveries brought to us by space exploration and which have recently revolutionized our perception of habitability in the solar system. In the solar system's neighborhood, such potential habitats can only be investigated with appropriate designed space missions, like JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) for Ganymede and Europa [9]. JUICE is an ESA mission to Jupiter and its icy moons, recently selected to launch in 2022. Other future mission concepts are being studied for exploring the moons around Saturn. References: [1] Coustenis, A., Encrenaz, Th., in "Life Beyond Earth

  5. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when the picture was taken. The photo was made from three images taken through color filters, then processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the Moon, the Moon was artificially brightened by a factor of three relative to the Earth by computer enhancement so that both bodies would show clearly in the print. Voyager 2 was launched Aug. 20, 1977, followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5, 1977, en route to encounters at Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980 and 1981. JPL manages the Voyager mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  6. The Earth & Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. The Galileo spacecraft took the images in 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The image shows a partial view of the Earth centered on the Pacific Ocean about latitude 20 degrees south. The west coast of South America can be observed as well as the Caribbean; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms in the southeast Pacific. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the Moon is the Tycho impact basin. The lunar dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins. This picture contains same scale and relative color/albedo images of the Earth and Moon. False colors via use of the 1-micron filter as red, 727-nm filter as green, and violet filter as blue. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  7. The Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. The Galileo spacecraft took the images in 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The image shows a partial view of the Earth centered on the Pacific Ocean about latitude 20 degrees south. The west coast of South America can be observed as well as the Caribbean; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms in the southeast Pacific. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the Moon is the Tycho impact basin. The lunar dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins. This picture contains same scale and relative color/albedo images of the Earth and Moon. False colors via use of the 1-micron filter as red, 727-nm filter as green, and violet filter as blue. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Icy Tendrils from Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, C. J.; Porco, C.; Weiss, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    We extend our previous work (Mitchell et al., 2015) in simulating thelarge-scale, sinuous structures, dubbed 'tendrils', observed inCassini ISS images of the E ring near Enceladus. We follow thetrajectories of particles launched from the geyser sources locatedacross the moon's south polar terrain (Porco et al., 2014), assumingthe velocity distribution of Ingersoll and Ewald, (2011), andincluding forces due to the gravity of Saturn and Enceladus, as wellas Saturn's magnetic and electric fields. Charging currents arisingfrom interactions with magnetospheric plasma and Solar UV radiationare also included. The simulations are used to produce syntheticimages which we compare to Cassini ISS tendril images taken in 2006and 2013. We found that specific subsets of geysers appear to be thesources of identifiable tendril features present in the images.However, there remained features not captured by our initialsimulations: a shift in longitude for the brightest part of thetendrils and two features which only appear in some images.In this initial work, we neglected Enceladus' orbital eccentricity aswell as the periodicity and phase of the variability in geyseringactivity recently discovered and attributed to a ~5-hour delay in thediurnally variable tidal stresses at the surface (Nimmo et al. 2014).And we made no attempt to do a photometric determination of the masslost from the moon into orbit around Saturn.We will report on our progress in rectifying these inadequacies. Wewill present the result of including Enceladus's orbital eccentricity,as well as a diurnally variable particle flux out of each geyser, inaccord with the observed plume variability. Eventually, we will usethe absolute brightness of the tendrils, together with a photometricmodel and information on the particle size distribution from our work,and the work of other Cassini teams on E ring particles, to arrive atthe amount of mass leaving the moon and entering Saturn orbit.Mitchell et al., 2015, AJ, 149, 156

  9. Geosciences at the Galilean Moons With the Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delory, G. T.; Lipps, J. H.; de Pater, I.; Manga, M.; Rieboldt, S.; Dalton, J. B.; Bierhaus, E. B.; Pitman, J.; Duncan, A.

    2004-05-01

    Geosciences at the Galilean Moons With the Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS) The Voyager and Galileo missions have revealed the Galilean Icy Moons and Io to be dynamic worlds, possessing possible subsurface oceans, magnetism, spectacular volcanic activity, and potentially extinct or extant life. While our knowledge of the Galilean moons has indeed been revolutionized by the missions conducted to date, modest spectral and spatial resolution data sets achieved on Galileo due to high gain antenna problems, difficulties in coordinated instrument operations, and inherent instrument design limits leave many unanswered questions: What is the state and distribution of ice and liquid water on Europa? What processes control the distribution and composition of the non-icy material on the surface? What is the extent of tectonic and volcanic activity? These and other questions have an important bearing not only on our knowledge of the geology and origin of these moons, but are also highly relevant to an assessment of their past or present habitability. A limited number of flybys have yielded km-scale and some m-scale images that provide some context for these and other questions, but it is unlikely we will be able to apply all of these lessons learned to the numerous features that are almost certain to exist at or below the current detection limits. To advance our understanding of these moons to the next step, global coverage at spatial scales ranging from ~cm to m combined with simultaneous spectral measurements with ~nm precision over long timescales are required. Here we describe how these science objectives can be fulfilled on the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission by the Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS). MIDAS is a unique distributed aperture imaging spectrometer capable of high spectral and spatial resolutions using less mass, volume, and power than systems with similar capabilities, and is compatible with the Prometheus

  10. Geology and Composition of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; et al.

    The Galileo spacecraft has provided tremendous insight into the geologies and compositions of the icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter. Callisto's surface is covered by smooth dark material that may be sublimation-derived. Ganymede's ancient dark terrain is heterogeneous in albedo at small scales and is modified by tectonism, ejecta blanketing, and mass wasting. Compositional data from the NIMS infra-red spectrometer indicate the presence of CO, SO, and S-H species and tholins in the dark materials on Callisto and Ganymede. Ganymede's ice-rich grooved terrain is pervasively deformed by extensional tectonism along with horizontal shearing. Europa's icy surface is young and potentially geologically active today, and may hide a subsurface ocean. Chaotic features are probably due to diapirically driven disruption along with localized partial melting, consistent with solid-state convection within a floating ice shell. NIMS analyses reveal asymmetric ice absorption bands which imply hydrated minerals (salts and/or sulfuric acid) in Europa's darker areas.

  11. Europa planetary protection for Juno Jupiter Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Douglas E.; Abelson, Robert D.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Lam, Try; McAlpine, William J.; Newlin, Laura E.

    2013-08-01

    NASA's Juno mission launched in 2011 and will explore Jupiter and its near environment starting in 2016. Planetary protection requirements for avoiding the contamination of Europa have been taken into account in the Juno mission design. In particular Juno's polar orbit, which enables scientific investigations of parts of Jupiter's environment never before visited, also greatly assist avoiding close flybys of Europa and the other Galilean satellites. The science mission is designed to conclude with a deorbit burn that disposes of the spacecraft in Jupiter's atmosphere. Compliance with planetary protection requirements is verified through a set of analyses including analysis of initial bioburden, analysis of the effect of bioburden reduction due to the space and Jovian radiation environments, probabilistic risk assessment of successful deorbit, Monte-Carlo orbit propagation, and bioburden reduction in the event of impact with an icy body.

  12. Distribution of CO2 ice on the large moons of Uranus and evidence for compositional stratification of their near-surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, R. J.; Emery, J. P.; Rivkin, A. S.; Trilling, D. E.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.

    2015-09-01

    The surfaces of the large uranian satellites are characterized by a mixture of H2O ice and a dark, potentially carbon-rich, constituent, along with CO2 ice. At the mean heliocentric distance of the uranian system, native CO2 ice should be removed on timescales shorter than the age of the Solar System. Consequently, the detected CO2 ice might be actively produced. Analogous to irradiation of icy moons in the Jupiter and Saturn systems, we hypothesize that charged particles caught in Uranus' magnetic field bombard the surfaces of the uranian satellites, driving a radiolytic CO2 production cycle. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the distribution of CO2 ice by analyzing near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these moons, gathered using the SpeX spectrograph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) (2000-2013). Additionally, we made spectrophotometric measurements using images gathered by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (2003-2005). We find that the detected CO2 ice is primarily on the trailing hemispheres of the satellites closest to Uranus, consistent with other observations of these moons. Our band parameter analysis indicates that the detected CO2 ice is pure and segregated from other constituents. Our spectrophotometric analysis indicates that IRAC is not sensitive to the CO2 ice detected by SpeX, potentially because CO2 is retained beneath a thin surface layer dominated by H2O ice that is opaque to photons over IRAC wavelengths. Thus, our combined SpeX and IRAC analyses suggest that the near-surfaces (i.e., top few 100 μm) of the uranian satellites are compositionally stratified. We briefly compare the spectral characteristics of the CO2 ice detected on the uranian moons to icy satellites elsewhere, and we also consider the most likely drivers of the observed distribution of CO2 ice.

  13. Icy Satellite Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Mission has turned our view of Saturn's icy moons from scientific sketches to fully realized worlds. Among the major discoveries are: Activity on Enceladus and associated plumes that originate in small hot spots on its south pole and that appear to be modulated by tidal forces; a liquid subsurface water ocean on Enceladus that is a habitable environment; several new moons; debris rings associated with moons; a unique equatorial ridge on Iapetus; the identity of new constituents on the moons including carbon dioxide ice on most of them and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)on Iapetus; differentiated or partially differentiated interiors; nano-iron on the surfaces of the moons and in the rings; volatile segregation on Iapetus and Hyperion; and a bewildering array of geologic processes on the small moons. But our new view of these icy worlds has spawned new questions. Among these unanswered questions are: How variable are the plumes? Have any other moons had activity similar to that on Enceladus and did it continue up to the recent past? How much dust do the moons contribute to the region around Saturn? What caused the ridge on Iapetus? What are the interiors of the moons like? How differentiated and compensated are they? Five additional targeted flybys, two of Dione and three of Enceladus, have been designed to answer these questions and will be implemented during the remainder of the Solstice Mission. The Dione flybys both include gravity passes to determine its state of differentiation. One of the flybys is optimized to measure the fields and particle environment around Dione. One of the two remote-sensing flybys of Enceladus will scrutinize the south polar region to further understand the size, temperature, and variability of the emitting areas, while the other will observe the north pole to determine why it is so different from the south. The third Enceladus flyby involves an unprecedented pass less than 50 km above the surface into the midst of

  14. Seeding life on the moons of the outer planets via lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Worth, R J; Sigurdsson, Steinn; House, Christopher H

    2013-12-01

    Material from the surface of a planet can be ejected into space by a large impact and could carry primitive life-forms with it. We performed n-body simulations of such ejecta to determine where in the Solar System rock from Earth and Mars may end up. We found that, in addition to frequent transfer of material among the terrestrial planets, transfer of material from Earth and Mars to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn is also possible, but rare. We expect that such transfers were most likely to occur during the Late Heavy Bombardment or during the ensuing 1-2 billion years. At this time, the icy moons were warmer and likely had little or no ice shell to prevent meteorites from reaching their liquid interiors. We also note significant rates of re-impact in the first million years after ejection. This could re-seed life on a planet after partial or complete sterilization by a large impact, which would aid the survival of early life during the Late Heavy Bombardment. PMID:24341459

  15. Seeding Life on the Moons of the Outer Planets via Lithopanspermia

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Steinn; House, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Material from the surface of a planet can be ejected into space by a large impact and could carry primitive life-forms with it. We performed n-body simulations of such ejecta to determine where in the Solar System rock from Earth and Mars may end up. We found that, in addition to frequent transfer of material among the terrestrial planets, transfer of material from Earth and Mars to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn is also possible, but rare. We expect that such transfers were most likely to occur during the Late Heavy Bombardment or during the ensuing 1–2 billion years. At this time, the icy moons were warmer and likely had little or no ice shell to prevent meteorites from reaching their liquid interiors. We also note significant rates of re-impact in the first million years after ejection. This could re-seed life on a planet after partial or complete sterilization by a large impact, which would aid the survival of early life during the Late Heavy Bombardment. Key Words: Panspermia—Impact—Meteorites—Titan—Europa. Astrobiology 13, 1155–1165. PMID:24341459

  16. The cryo-penetrator: an approach to exploration of icy bodies in the solar system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Reinert, R. P.

    The nuclei of comets and the small icy moons of the outer planets are thought to be the most primitive objects in the solar system. Because of their pristine nature, in-situ measurements of composition, temperature, and mechanical properties will be a powerful tool in realization of one of NASA's major objectives: determination of the Solar System's origins and evolution. Cryo penetrators are specifically optimized for penetration and operation in icy bodies at temperatures below 150K. The CRAF studies were directed at investigation of comet nuclei, but the same design should be applicable to the icy moons of the outer planets and, with appropriate delivery systems, to the Martian polar caps. The paper describes the design of a cryopenetrator based on the CRAF configuration and designed for in-situ measurements of a comet nucleus as part of the Comet Nucleus Penetrator Discovery mission. The ROSETTA nucleus rendezvous mission is another potential cryo penetrator application.

  17. The inner satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Synott, S.

    1981-01-01

    The Jupiter moon Amalthea and the smaller satellites J1, J2, and J3, discovered by Voyagers 1 and 2, are discussed under the collective appellation of 'inner satellites', which distinguishes them from the Galilean satellites and the outer satellites, J6-J13. Amalthea is a dark, irregular body on which two large craters are visible, with an estimated surface gravity of 5-7 cm/sec-squared. It is speculated that Amalthea's unique color/reflectance characteristics are due to prolonged charged particle and high-velocity micrometeoroid exposure. Dimensional data are presented for J1-3.

  18. Hubble Gallery of Jupiter's Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is a Hubble Space Telescope 'family portrait' of the four largest moons of Jupiter, first observed by the Italian scientist Galileo Galilei nearly four centuries ago. Located approximately one-half billion miles away, the moons are so small that, in visible light, they appear as fuzzy disks in the largest ground-based telescopes. Hubble can resolve surface details seen previously only by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. While the Voyagers provided close-up snapshots of the satellites, Hubble can now follow changes on the moons and reveal other characteristics at ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths.

    Over the past year Hubble has charted new volcanic activity on Io's active surface, found a faint oxygen atmosphere on the moon Europa, and identified ozone on the surface of Ganymede. Hubble ultraviolet observations of Callisto show the presence of fresh ice on the surface that may indicate impacts from micrometeorites and charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere.

    Hubble observations will play a complementary role when the Galileo spacecraft arrives at Jupiter in December of this year.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  19. Re-Analysis of the Solar Phase Curves of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingue, Deborah; Verbiscer, Anne

    1997-01-01

    Re-analysis of the solar phase curves of the icy Galilean satellites demonstrates that the quantitative results are dependent on the single particle scattering function incorporated into the photometric model; however, the qualitative properties are independent. The results presented here show that the general physical characteristics predicted by a Hapke model (B. Hapke, 1986, Icarus 67, 264-280) incorporating a two parameter double Henyey-Greenstein scattering function are similar to the predictions given by the same model incorporating a three parameter double Henyey-Greenstein scattering function as long as the data set being modeled has adequate coverage in phase angle. Conflicting results occur when the large phase angle coverage is inadequate. Analysis of the role of isotropic versus anisotropic multiple scattering shows that for surfaces as bright as Europa the two models predict very similar results over phase angles covered by the data. Differences arise only at those phase angles for which there are no data. The single particle scattering behavior between the leading and trailing hemispheres of Europa and Ganymede is commensurate with magnetospheric alterations of their surfaces. Ion bombardment will produce more forward scattering single scattering functions due to annealing of potential scattering centers within regolith particles (N. J. Sack et al., 1992, Icarus 100, 534-540). Both leading and trailing hemispheres of Europa are consistent with a high porosity model and commensurate with a frost surface. There are no strong differences in predicted porosity between the two hemispheres of Callisto, both are consistent with model porosities midway between that deduced for Europa and the Moon. Surface roughness model estimates predict that surface roughness increases with satellite distance from Jupiter, with lunar surface roughness values falling midway between those measured for Ganymede and Callisto. There is no obvious variation in predicted surface

  20. Jupiter's Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is one of the highest resolution images ever recorded of Jupiter's temperature field. It was obtained by NASA's Galileo mission, with its Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) experiment, during the sixth of its 10 orbits around Jupiter to date. This map, shown in the lower panel, indicates the forces powering Jovian winds, and differentiates between areas of strongest upwelling and downwelling winds in the upper part of the atmosphere where winds are strong. The map is based on measurements from the PPR's 27-micron wavelength channel. A ground-based image from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii, showing thermal emission from holes in clouds at 4.85 microns, is shown in the middle panel for reference, with the outline of the area covered by the PPR. The upper panel shows the area covered by the Galileo Solid State Imager (SSI) also during the sixth orbit.

    Galileo's observations of the atmosphere targeted specific Jovian features, including the Great Red Spot and similar, but smaller, 'storms

  1. Convection-Driven Resurfacing on Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy

    2015-04-01

    Ridge and trough terrain, characterized by kilometer-scale sub-parallel ridges and troughs, is found in a variety of settings on the icy satellites of the solar system. Examples include Ganymede's grooved terrain [1], Europa's bands [2,3], Miranda's coronae [4,5], and swaths of ridges and troughs in the northern plains of Enceladus [6]. The fault spacing implies a shallow brittle/ductile depth and thus, a high thermal gradient at the time of formation [e.g., 7]. I will show that similar rheological parameters can give rise to the heat flows and deformation rates inferred for the formation of many examples of ridge and trough terrain. These results suggest that convection in ice mantles with weak surfaces can explain the formation of these terrains, just as convection in Earth's mantle, beneath a weakened crust, can drive surface deformation. References: [1] Pappalardo, R. T. et al., 2004. in Jupiter, Cambridge Univ. Press, pp.363. [2] Prockter, L. M. et al., 2002. JGR 107, 5028. [3] Stempel, M. M. et al., 2005. Icarus 177, 297. [4] Pappalardo, R. T. et al., 1997. JGR 102, 13369. [5] Hammond, N. P. and A. C. Barr, 2014. Geology 42, 931-934. [6] Bland, M. et al., 2007. Icarus 192, 92. [7] Nimmo, F. et al., 2002. GRL 29 62-1.

  2. Photon-counting lidars for contiguous high resolution topographic mapping of planets and moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, John J.

    2007-08-01

    moon Europa, and the Saturnian moons, Titan and Enceladus. A recently completed study for NASA's Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission concluded that the three primary Jovian moons (Ganymede, Callisto, and Europa) could be contiguously and globally mapped, at few meter horizontal resolutions, by a photon-counting lidar in a matter of months from orbital altitudes of 100 km. Work is also underway to include a technical demonstration of a photon-counting lidar ("Swath Mapper") on NASA's ICESat-II mission, which is scheduled for a 2011 launch into a 600 km orbit. Swath Mapper would use a single low energy, high repetition rate laser (nominally 1 mJ@ 10 kHz = 10W) to measure surface topography along 16 uniformly spaced ground tracks spread over roughly 2.1 km.

  3. Radiation belts of jupiter: a second look.

    PubMed

    Fillius, R W; McIlwain, C E; Mogro-Campero, A

    1975-05-01

    The outbound leg of the Pioneer 11 Jupiter flyby explored a region farther from the equator than that traversed by Pioneer 10, and the new data require modification or augmentation of the magnetodisk model based on the Pioneer 10 flyby. The inner moons of Jupiter are sinks of energetic particles and sometimes sources. A large spike of particles was found near lo. Multiple peaks occurred in the particle fluxes near closest approach to the planet; this structure may be accounted for by a complex magnetic field configuration. The decrease in proton flux observed near minimum altitude on the Pioneer 10 flyby appears attributable to particle absorption by Amalthea. PMID:17734363

  4. Very High Resolution Image of Icy Cliffs on Europa and Similar Scales on Earth (Providence, RI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The top image is a very high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa, showing an area where icy plates have been broken apart and moved around laterally. The top of this image is dominated by corrugated plateaus ending in icy cliffs over a hundred meters (a few hundred feet) high. Debris piled at the base of the cliffs. The bottom image is an aerial photograph of downtown Providence, Rhode Island at the same scale. The bright white circular feature in the top center of the Providence image is an indoor hockey rink, and one can find many craters in the Europa image about the same size. Blocks of debris which have fallen from the cliffs on the Europa image are about the same size as houses seen in the Providence image, and the largest blocks are almost as large as the Rhode Island state capitol building (large white building in upper left of Providence image). A fracture that runs horizontally across the center of the Europa image is about the same width as the freeway which runs along the bottom of the Providence image.

    North is to the top right of the Europa image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The Europa image is centered at approximately 9 degrees north latitude and 274 degrees west longitude. The images each cover an area approximately 1.7 kilometers by 4 kilometers (1 mile by 2.5 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element. The Europa image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by the solid state imaging system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  5. Io in Front of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.

    Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.

    This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.

    The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  6. Magnetospheres: Jupiter, Satellite Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, F.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Most of the satellites of Jupiter, notably the large Galilean satellites Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto (see JUPITER: SATELLITES), orbit deep inside the magnetosphere of Jupiter (see JUPITER: MAGNETOSPHERE) and are therefore immersed in the flow of magnetospheric plasma (made of a mixture of electrons and ions) and subjected to an interaction with the strong Jovian magnetic field. These intera...

  7. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-09-01

    The aurorae on Jupiter are like the Aurorae Borealis and Australis on the Earth, although visible only by ultraviolet light. They flicker in a similar way in response to variations in the solar wind of charged particles blowing from the Sun. While Galileo monitored the changing environment of particles and magnetism in Jupiter's vicinity, IUE recorded surprisingly large and rapid variations in the overall strength of the auroral activity. IUE's main 45-centimetre telescope did not supply images,but broke up the ultraviolet rays into spectra, like invisible rainbows, from which astrophysicists could deduce chemical compositions, motions and temperatures in the cosmic objects under examination. In the case of Jupiter's aurorae, the strongest emission came from activated hydrogen atoms at a wavelength of 1216 angstroms. The Hubble Space Telescope's contributions to the International Jupiter Watch included images showing variations in the form of the aurorae, and "close-up" spectra of parts of the auroral ovals. Astronomers will compare the flickering aurorae on Jupiter with concurrent monitoring of the Sun and the solar wind by the ESA-NASA SOHO spacecraft and several satellites of the Interagency Solar-Terrestrial Programme. It is notable that changes in auroral intensity by a factor of two or three occurred during the 1996 observational period, even though the Sun was in an exceptionally quiet phase, with very few sunspots. In principle, a watch on Jupiter's aurorae could become a valuable means of checking the long-range effects of solar activity, which also has important consequences for the Earth. The situation at Jupiter is quite different from the Earth's, with the moons strongly influencing the planet's space environment. But with Hubble busy with other work, any such Jupiter-monitoring programme will have to await a new ultraviolet space observatory. IUE observed Jupiter intensively in 1979-80 in conjunction with the visits of NASA's Voyager spacecraft, and

  8. The interactions of Europa and Callisto with the magnetosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K.; Kivelson, M.; Volwerk, M.

    GalileoSs observations of magnetic field in the vicinity of Europa and Callisto have shown that both of these moons do not possess appreciable internal magnetic fields. However, the two moons strongly modify the plasma and magnetic field in their environments by directly interacting with the magnetosphere of Jupiter. The plasma interactions cause the absorption of Jovian plasma by the moons, pick-up of newly formed ions from the exospheres of the moons, plasma diversion by electrodynamic (Alfvén wing) interaction and the formation of wakes in the downstream region. In addition to the electrodynamic interactions, the moons also display electromagnetic induction responses to the rotating field of Jupiter presumably from the conducting presence of global salty liquid oceans inside the moons. Galileo has successfully encountered Europa 10 times and Callisto 7 times during its mission. We have built quantitative models of the interactions of the moons with JupiterSs magnetosphere. In these models we include the effects of plasma pick-up, Alfvén wings and electromagnetic induction. We will present results of these quantitative models and place upper limits on the internal magnetic fields of the moons. We will show that for both of the moons, the plasma interaction is strongest when the moons are located in JupiterSs current sheet. Plasma mass loading rates between 2 and 50 Kg/s are required to explain the observed magnetic signatures near Europa. The mass-loading rate is negligible near Callisto.

  9. Moon Rise

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station in May 2012, Expedition 31 astronaut Don Pettit opened the shutters covering the cupola observation windows in time to watch the moon rise. The time-lapse sce...

  10. What do the compositions of the regular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Podolak, M.

    2012-12-01

    Models for the formation of the regular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn are hampered by our lack of understanding of the turbulent state of the subnebula and the gas-inflow rate [1]. Fortunately, it is possible to construct regular satellite formation models that are not dependent on specific choices for these parameters [2,3]. These two approaches treat planetesimal dynamics explicitly (which is a model requirement [1]), and also account for the angular momentum budget of the regular satellites. The inner satellites of Jupiter, Io and Europa, are depleted of volatiles either due to the temperature gradient in the subnebula [4,5], collisional processes involving differentiated objects [6], and/or the Laplace resonance. The observed densities of the Saturnian regular satellites are not compatible with solar compositions [7]. The inner satellites of Saturn (inside of Titan) include a stochastic compositional component (e.g., Tethys vs. Enceladus) due to collisional processes deep in the kronian gravitational-potential well; however, such an argument can not be applied to faraway and isolated Iapetus. ([8] consider a collisional scattering origin for Iapetus, but we favor the model we present here.) The bulk compositional and size similarities between Ganymede, Callisto and Titan argue strongly in favor of non-stochastic processes for these satellites. Therefore, the non-stochastic masses and densities of the large, outer regular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn (Ganymede, Callisto, Titan and Iapetus) provide the most directly useful constraints for satellite formation models. Observations indicate that Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are of different composition than the regular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. The simplest explanation of the observations is that the subnebulae of these giant planets are enriched in water-ice compared to the outer solar nebula [7]. The contrast between icy Iapetus and rocky Phoebe reinforces the interpretation of Phoebe as a moon