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Sample records for jupiter mass planets

  1. Accretion of Jupiter-mass Planets in the Limit of Vanishing Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulagyi, Judit; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Crida, Aurelien; Masset, Frederic

    2013-07-01

    Motivation: the rate of gas accretion by the giant planets is crucial to understand their mass distribution. Too fast runaway accretion leads to too massive planets. Method: we investigated the characteristics of the circumplanetary disc (CPD) of a Jupiter-mass planet with a three-dimensional hydrodynamical nested grid code. We looked for the accretion mechanisms operating in inviscid (MRI inactive) CPD. Main results: 1) the main accretion mechanism from the CPD to the planet is the stellar tide 2) Jupiter's accretion rate could be >10x slower than previously thought 3) runaway growth could happen on a timescale comparable to the disc's lifetime

  2. Constraining the mass of a rotating extrasolar Jupiter-like planet from its shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keke; Kong, Dali; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-08-01

    We discuss, via an example of the planet beta Pictoris b, a theoretical method for constraining the mass of a rapidly rotating extrasolar Jupiter-like planet from its shape. This young extrasolar gaseous planet recently discovered in the beta Pictoris system spins substantially faster than the gas giant planets Jupiter and Saturn, but its mass remains highly uncertain. Based on the measured parameters (such as the rotation speed and the radius) of the planet, we are able to compute, via a hybrid inverse method, its non-spherical shape, internal density/pressure distribution and gravitational zonal coefficients. We show that, if the shape of an extrasolar gaseous planet can be measured or constrained like that of the exoplanet HD 189733b, the mass of the planet can be inferred through a theoretical relationship between the shape and the mass.

  3. Final Masses of Giant Planets II: Jupiter Formation in a Gas-Depleted Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-12-01

    Firstly, we study the final masses of giant planets growing in protoplanetary disks through capture of disk gas, by employing an empirical formula for the gas capture rate and a shallow disk gap model, which are both based on hydrodynamical simulations. The shallow disk gaps cannot terminate growth of giant planets. For planets less massive than 10 Jupiter masses, their growth rates are mainly controlled by the gas supply through the global disk accretion, rather than their gaps. The insufficient gas supply compared with the rapid gas capture causes a depletion of the gas surface density even at the outside of the gap, which can create an inner hole in the protoplanetary disk. Our model can also predict how deep the inner hole is for a given planet mass. Secondly, our findings are applied to the formation of our solar system. For the formation of Jupiter, a very low-mass gas disk with a few or several Jupiter masses is required at the beginning of its gas capture because of the non-stopping capture. Such a low-mass gas disk with sufficient solid material can be formed through viscous evolution from an initially 10AU-sized compact disk with the solar composition. By the viscous evolution with a moderate viscosity of ?10-3, most of disk gas accretes onto the sun and a widely spread low-mass gas disk remains when the solid core of Jupiter starts gas capture at t107 yrs. The depletion of the disk gas is suitable for explaining the high metallicity in giant planets of our solar system. A very low-mass gas disk also provides a plausible path where type I and II planetary migrations are both suppressed significantly. In particular, we also show that the type II migration of Jupiter-size planets becomes inefficient because of the additional gas depletion due to the rapid gas capture by themselves.

  4. Accretion of Jupiter-mass planets in the limit of vanishing viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Szulágyi, J.; Morbidelli, A.; Crida, A.; Masset, F.

    2014-02-20

    In the core-accretion model, the nominal runaway gas-accretion phase brings most planets to multiple Jupiter masses. However, known giant planets are predominantly Jupiter mass bodies. Obtaining longer timescales for gas accretion may require using realistic equations of states, or accounting for the dynamics of the circumplanetary disk (CPD) in the low-viscosity regime, or both. Here we explore the second way by using global, three-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamical simulations with eight levels of nested grids around the planet. In our simulations, the vertical inflow from the circumstellar disk (CSD) to the CPD determines the shape of the CPD and its accretion rate. Even without a prescribed viscosity, Jupiter's mass-doubling time is ∼10{sup 4} yr, assuming the planet at 5.2 AU and a Minimum Mass Solar Nebula. However, we show that this high accretion rate is due to resolution-dependent numerical viscosity. Furthermore, we consider the scenario of a layered CSD, viscous only in its surface layer, and an inviscid CPD. We identify two planet-accretion mechanisms that are independent of the viscosity in the CPD: (1) the polar inflow—defined as a part of the vertical inflow with a centrifugal radius smaller than two Jupiter radii and (2) the torque exerted by the star on the CPD. In the limit of zero effective viscosity, these two mechanisms would produce an accretion rate 40 times smaller than in the simulation.

  5. Accretion of Jupiter-mass Planets in the Limit of Vanishing Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulgyi, J.; Morbidelli, A.; Crida, A.; Masset, F.

    2014-02-01

    In the core-accretion model, the nominal runaway gas-accretion phase brings most planets to multiple Jupiter masses. However, known giant planets are predominantly Jupiter mass bodies. Obtaining longer timescales for gas accretion may require using realistic equations of states, or accounting for the dynamics of the circumplanetary disk (CPD) in the low-viscosity regime, or both. Here we explore the second way by using global, three-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamical simulations with eight levels of nested grids around the planet. In our simulations, the vertical inflow from the circumstellar disk (CSD) to the CPD determines the shape of the CPD and its accretion rate. Even without a prescribed viscosity, Jupiter's mass-doubling time is ~104 yr, assuming the planet at 5.2 AU and a Minimum Mass Solar Nebula. However, we show that this high accretion rate is due to resolution-dependent numerical viscosity. Furthermore, we consider the scenario of a layered CSD, viscous only in its surface layer, and an inviscid CPD. We identify two planet-accretion mechanisms that are independent of the viscosity in the CPD: (1) the polar inflowdefined as a part of the vertical inflow with a centrifugal radius smaller than two Jupiter radii and (2) the torque exerted by the star on the CPD. In the limit of zero effective viscosity, these two mechanisms would produce an accretion rate 40 times smaller than in the simulation.

  6. Jupiter: As a planet. [its physical characteristics and radio waves emitted from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The planet Jupiter, its planetary mass and atmosphere, radio waves emitted from Jupiter, thermal radiation, internal structure of Jupiter, and the possibility of life on Jupiter are discussed. Educational study projects are included.

  7. The planet Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, Thrse

    The exploration of Jupiter, the closest and biggest giant planet, has provided key information about the origin and evolution of the outer Solar system. Our knowledge has strongly benefited from the Voyager and Galileo space missions. We now have a good understanding of Jupiter's thermal structure, chemical composition and magnetospheric environment. There is still debate about the nature of the heating source responsible for the high thermospheric temperatures (precipitating particles and/or gravity waves). The measurement of elemental abundance ratios (C/H, N/H, S/H) gives strong support to the "nucleation" formation model, according to which giant planets formed from the accretion of an initial core and the collapse of the surrounding gaseous protosolar nebula. The D/H and 3He/4He ratios are found to be representative of their protosolar value. The helium abundance, in contrast, appears to be slightly depleted in the outer envelope with respect to the protosolar value; this departure is interpreted as an evolutionary effect, due to the condensation of helium droplets in the liquid hydrogen ocean inside Jupiter's interior. The cloud structure of Jupiter, characterized by the belt-zone system, is globally understood; also present are specific features like regions of strong infrared radiation ("hot spots"), colder regions ("white ovals") and the Great Red Spot (GRS). Clouds were surprisingly absent at the hot spot corresponding to the Galileo probe entry site, and the water abundance measured there was strongly depleted with respect to the solar O/H value. This probably implies that hot spots are dry, cloud-free regions of subsidence, while "normal" air, rich in condensibles, is transported upward by convective motions. As a result, the Jovian meteorology, still based on Halley-type cells, seems to be much more complex than a simple zone-belt system. The nature of the GRS, a giant anticyclonic storm, colder and higher than its environment, has been confirmed by the Galileo observations, but its internal structure appears to be very complex. Strong winds, probably driven by the Jovian internal source, were measured at deep tropospheric levels. The troposphere might be statically stable at pressures higher than 18 bars, but the extent of this putative radiative layer is still unknown.

  8. Formation of Jupiter-mass planets from hydrodynamic simulations -- the role of the circumplanetary disk in the accretion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulagyi, Judit; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Masset, Frederic; Lega, Elena; Crida, Aurelien; Guillot, Tristan

    2015-12-01

    In the era of observing young planetary systems with growing planets, it is necessary to study planet formation with numerical simulations to provide predictions for observations and also to update planet formation models. In this talk we are going to summarize a PhD thesis on the topic of accretion of giant planets with hydrodynamic simulations.One of the main problems with the core accretion formation model is that it predicts a runaway growth phase for the giant planets at the last stages of the formation process, which would indicate a presence of an unseen population of super-giants. We performed isothermal and radiative hydrodynamic simulations in 3D on a Jupiter-mass planet in an MMSN disk to simulate the fastest part of the runaway growth for our Jupiter. This massive planet can form a circumplanetary disk around it, which can limit the accretion in this late stage of planet formation, and is the focus point of our study. We have found that the 90% of the accreted gas by the planet is coming from the vertical direction, from the top layers of the circumstellar disk falling through the planetary gap, in an inflow hitting the circumplanetary disk and directly the planet as well. We will show that this vertical influx is part of a feedback loop -- a meridional circulation -- between the circumstellar and circumplanetary disks.We have also revisited the question of circumplanetary disk formation. Planets which are massive enough to open gaps (above ~Saturn's mass) were believed to form circumplanetary disk, while planets below this mass threshold were only capable to form an envelope. We will prove that the planetary surface temperature is also playing a large role in this question. We carried out a series of simulations with various planetary surface temperatures, and found that in the hottest case even a Jupiter-mass planet, which was capable to open a planetary gap, cannot form a circumplanetary disk, only an envelope, similarly to small mass planets. We will show the quantitative differences between the envelope and disk cases which have implications on the satellite formation and for the future observations of circumplanetary disks/envelopes around giant planets as well.

  9. Jupiter: Lord of the Planets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, William

    1984-01-01

    Presents a chapter from an introductory college-level astronomy textbook in which full-color photographs and numerous diagrams highlight an extensive description of the planet Jupiter. Topics include Jupiter's geology, rotation, magnetic field, atmosphere (including clouds and winds), and the Great Red Spot. (DH)

  10. ACCRETION OF ROCKY PLANETS BY HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Jacob A.; Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2011-11-01

    The observed population of Hot Jupiters displays a stunning variety of physical properties, including a wide range of densities and core sizes for a given planetary mass. Motivated by the observational sample, this Letter studies the accretion of rocky planets by Hot Jupiters, after the Jovian planets have finished their principal migration epoch and become parked in {approx}4 day orbits. In this scenario, rocky planets form later and then migrate inward due to torques from the remaining circumstellar disk, which also damps the orbital eccentricity. This mechanism thus represents one possible channel for increasing the core masses and metallicities of Hot Jupiters. This Letter determines probabilities for the possible end states for the rocky planet: collisions with the Jovian planets, accretion onto the star, ejection from the system, and long-term survival of both planets. These probabilities depend on the mass of the Jovian planet and its starting orbital eccentricity, as well as the eccentricity damping rate for the rocky planet. Since these systems are highly chaotic, a large ensemble (N {approx} 10{sup 3}) of simulations with effectively equivalent starting conditions is required. Planetary collisions are common when the eccentricity damping rate is sufficiently low, but are rare otherwise. For systems that experience planetary collisions, this work determines the distributions of impact velocities-both speeds and impact parameters-for the collisions. These velocity distributions help determine the consequences of the impacts, e.g., where energy and heavy elements are deposited within the giant planets.

  11. The planet Jupiter (1970)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.

    1971-01-01

    Data obtained through 1970, some materials published during the first half of 1971, and conclusions of the Jupiter Radiation Belt Workshop held in July 1971 are presented. All the information on Jupiter was derived from data obtained at angular and spectral resolutions possible with Earth-based instrumentation or with sensors on aircraft, rockets, and balloons. The observations were made primarily in the visible, near visible, infrared, and radio portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The information was assessed for the potential effects of the Jovian environment on spacecraft performance. The assessment was done independently for the three types of missions under consideration and formulated for overall spacecraft as well as for subsystem design.

  12. Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters: chemical reactions and a new hypothesis for the origin of water in habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Rafael; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa M.

    2015-08-01

    The chemistry along the mass loss of Hot Jupiters is generally considered to be simple, consisting mainly of atoms, prevented from forming more complex species by the intense radiation field from their host stars. However, the results of our chemical reaction simulations, involving 56 species and 566 reactions, indicate that many simple molecules, including H2O+ and OH+, are formed along the mass loss of HD 209458 b and analogs, in a region farther away from the planet, where the temperature is lower (T < 2000 K). Our simulations included benzene formation reactions; the results indicate that carbon chain species are not formed in the mass loss of HD 209458 b. We also formulate a new hypothesis for the origin of water on the surface of habitable planets in general: chemical interaction of their primordial atmospheres with hydrogen and oxygen ions from the atmospheric mass loss of primordial, low density Hot Jupiters. This mechanism could have possibly operated in the Solar System and accounted for the formation of the oceans of the Earth.

  13. Accretion of Rocky Planets By Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchum, Jake; Adams, F.; Bloch, A.

    2012-05-01

    The observed population of Hot Jupiters displays a stunning variety of physical properties, including a wide range of densities and core sizes for a given planetary mass. Motivated by the observational sample, this work studies the accretion of rocky planets by Hot Jupiters, after the Jovian planets have finished their principal migration epoch and become parked in 4 day orbits. In this scenario, rocky planets form later and then migrate inward due to torques from the remaining circumstellar disk, which also damps the orbital eccentricity. This mechanism thus represents one possible channel for increasing the core masses and metallicities of Hot Jupiters. This work determines probabilities for the possible end states for the rocky planet: collisions with the Jovian planets, accretion onto the star, ejection from the system, and long-term survival of both planet. These probabilities depend on the mass of the Jovian planet and its starting orbital eccentricity, as well as the eccentricity damping rate for the rocky planet. Since these systems are highly chaotic, a large ensemble (N 1000) of simulations with effectively equivalent starting conditions is required. Planetary collisions are common when the eccentricity damping rate is sufficiently low, but are rare otherwise. For systems that experience planetary collisions, this work determines the distributions of impact velocities -- both speeds and impact parameters -- for the collisions. These velocity distributions help determine the consequences of the impacts, e.g.,where energy and heavy elements are deposited within the giant planets. This work was supported by NSF grant DMS-0806756 from the Division of Applied Mathematics, NASA grant NNX11AK87G, and NSF grant DMS-0907949.

  14. There might be giants: unseen Jupiter-mass planets as sculptors of tightly packed planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, T. O.; Alexander, R. D.

    2016-03-01

    The limited completeness of the Kepler sample for planets with orbital periods ≳1 yr leaves open the possibility that exoplanetary systems may host undetected giant planets. Should such planets exist, their dynamical interactions with the inner planets may prove vital in sculpting the final orbital configurations of these systems. Using an N-body code with additional forces to emulate the effects of a protoplanetary disc, we perform simulations of the assembly of compact systems of super-Earth-mass planets with unseen giant companions. The simulated systems are analogous to Kepler-11 or Kepler-32 in that they contain four or five inner super-Earths, but our systems also contain longer-period giant companions which are unlikely to have been detected by Kepler. We find that giant companions tend to break widely spaced first-order mean-motion resonances, allowing the inner planets to migrate into tighter resonances. This leads to more compact architectures and increases the occurrence rate of Laplace resonant chains.

  15. Eccentric Jupiters via Disk-Planet Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.; Chiang, Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Numerical hydrodynamics calculations are performed to determine the conditions under which giant planet eccentricities can be excited by parent gas disks. Unlike in other studies, Jupiter-mass planets are found to have their eccentricities amplifiedprovided their orbits start off as eccentric. We disentangle the web of co-rotation, co-orbital, and external resonances to show that this finite-amplitude instability is consistent with that predicted analytically. Ellipticities can grow until they reach of order of the disk's aspect ratio, beyond which the external Lindblad resonances that excite eccentricity are weakened by the planet's increasingly supersonic epicyclic motion. Forcing the planet to still larger eccentricities causes catastrophic eccentricity damping as the planet collides into gap walls. For standard parameters, the range of eccentricities for instability is modest; the threshold eccentricity for growth (0.04) is not much smaller than the final eccentricity to which orbits grow (0.07). If this threshold eccentricity can be lowered (perhaps by non-barotropic effects), and if the eccentricity driving documented here survives in 3D, it may robustly explain the low-to-moderate eccentricities ?0.1 exhibited by many giant planets (including Jupiter and Saturn), especially those without planetary or stellar companions.

  16. KELT-10b and KELT-11b: Two Sub-Jupiter Mass Planets well-Suited for Atmospheric Characterization in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.

    2015-12-01

    The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a photometric survey in both the northern and southern hemispheres for transiting planets around bright stars (8 < V < 11), and has discovered 15 planets to date. Of these, several possess unique characteristics that make them especially well suited for study of planet atmospheres. Here, I present the first two discoveries from the KELT-South survey. KELT-10b is an inflated transiting sub-Jupiter mass planet (0.68 MJ) around a V=10.7 early G-star. It has the 3rd deepest transit (1.4%) in the southern hemisphere for a star V < 12.5, making it a great target for transmission spectroscopy. KELT-11b is a highly inflated transiting Saturn mass planet (0.22 MJ) orbiting one of the brightest planet-hosting stars in the southern hemisphere. Interestingly, KELT-11b's host star is a clear sub-giant star (log(g) ~ 3.7). I will discuss their impact for atmospheric characterization. For example, the highly inflated nature of the KELT-11b planet provides the ability to study a sub-Jupiter atmosphere at very low planetary gravity, while the sub-giant nature of its host star allows us to study the effects of post main sequence evolution of a host star on a hot Jupiter.

  17. RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC PLANET SEARCH. II. CONSTRAINTS ON SUB-JUPITER-MASS COMPANIONS TO GJ 896A

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Bolatto, Alberto; Ford, Eric B.; Fries, Adam; Kalas, Paul; Sanchez, Karol; Viscomi, Vincent; Sanderbeck, Phoebe

    2011-10-10

    We present results from the Radio Interferometric Planet search for companions to the nearby star GJ 896A. We present 11 observations over 4.9 yr. Fitting astrometric parameters to the data reveals a residual with peak-to-peak amplitude of {approx}3 mas in right ascension. This residual is well fit by an acceleration term of 0.458 {+-} 0.032 mas yr{sup -2}. The parallax is fit to an accuracy of 0.2 mas and the proper motion terms are fit to accuracies of 0.01 mas yr{sup -1}. After fitting astrometric and acceleration terms, residuals are 0.26 mas in each coordinate, demonstrating that stellar jitter does not limit the ability to carry out radio astrometric planet detection and characterization. The acceleration term originates in part from the companion GJ 896B, but the amplitude of the acceleration in declination is not accurately predicted by the orbital model. The acceleration sets a mass upper limit of 0.15 M{sub J} at a semimajor axis of 2 AU for a planetary companion to GJ 896A. For semimajor axes between 0.3 and 2 AU upper limits are determined by the maximum angular separation; the upper limits scale from the minimum value in proportion to the inverse of the radius. Upper limits at larger radii are set by the acceleration and scale as the radius squared. An improved solution for the stellar binary system could improve the exoplanet mass sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  18. Hot Jupiters from secular planet-planet interactions.

    PubMed

    Naoz, Smadar; Farr, Will M; Lithwick, Yoram; Rasio, Frederic A; Teyssandier, Jean

    2011-05-12

    About 25 per cent of 'hot Jupiters' (extrasolar Jovian-mass planets with close-in orbits) are actually orbiting counter to the spin direction of the star. Perturbations from a distant binary star companion can produce high inclinations, but cannot explain orbits that are retrograde with respect to the total angular momentum of the system. Such orbits in a stellar context can be produced through secular (that is, long term) perturbations in hierarchical triple-star systems. Here we report a similar analysis of planetary bodies, including both octupole-order effects and tidal friction, and find that we can produce hot Jupiters in orbits that are retrograde with respect to the total angular momentum. With distant stellar mass perturbers, such an outcome is not possible. With planetary perturbers, the inner orbit's angular momentum component parallel to the total angular momentum need not be constant. In fact, as we show here, it can even change sign, leading to a retrograde orbit. A brief excursion to very high eccentricity during the chaotic evolution of the inner orbit allows planet-star tidal interactions to rapidly circularize that orbit, decoupling the planets and forming a retrograde hot Jupiter. PMID:21562558

  19. Effects of Roche Lobe Overflow from Eccentric Hot Jupiters Created by Planet-Planet Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepinsky, Jeremy F.; Salmon, R. L.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-01-01

    As the number of extra solar planets and planet candidates increases, so does the number of systems that look strikingly different from our own. In this poster, we explore the creation of close-in eccentric Jupiter-mass planets. We show that planet-planet scattering can create a significant population of hot Jupiters that pass close enough to their parent stars to undergo Roche Lobe overflow (RLOF) at periastron. We investigate the distribution of these eccentric, Roche-Lobe-overfilling planets and study their subsequent orbital evolution. We find that depending on the mass accretion rate and tidal quality factor there are regimes where changes in the orbital properties due to RLOF at periastron is comparable or even higher than to those due to static tides. Our results suggest that RLOF from planets in such eccentric orbits may be a contributing factor in the creation of some long-lived eccentric Hot Jupiters.

  20. Kepler-423b: a half-Jupiter mass planet transiting a very old solar-like star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, D.; Parviainen, H.; Deeg, H. J.; Lanza, A. F.; Fridlund, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Alonso, R.; Augusteijn, T.; Cabrera, J.; Evans, T.; Geier, S.; Hatzes, A. P.; Holczer, T.; Hoyer, S.; Kangas, T.; Mazeh, T.; Pagano, I.; Tal-Or, L.; Tingley, B.

    2015-04-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of the Kepler object of interest KOI-183.01 (Kepler-423b), a half-Jupiter mass planet transiting an old solar-like star every 2.7 days. Our analysis is the first to combine the full Kepler photometry (quarters 1-17) with high-precision radial velocity measurements taken with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. We simultaneously modelled the photometric and spectroscopic data-sets using Bayesian approach coupled with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. We found that the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curve of Kepler-423 exhibits quarter-to-quarter systematic variations of the transit depth, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of ~4.3% and seasonal trends reoccurring every four quarters. We attributed these systematics to an incorrect assessment of the quarterly variation of the crowding metric. The host star Kepler-423 is a G4 dwarf with M⋆ = 0.85 ± 0.04 M⊙, R⋆ = 0.95 ± 0.04 R⊙, Teff= 5560 ± 80 K, [M/H] = - 0.10 ± 0.05 dex, and with an age of 11 ± 2 Gyr. The planet Kepler-423b has a mass of Mp= 0.595 ± 0.081MJup and a radius of Rp= 1.192 ± 0.052RJup, yielding a planetary bulk density of ρp = 0.459 ± 0.083 g cm-3. The radius of Kepler-423b is consistent with both theoretical models for irradiated coreless giant planets and expectations based on empirical laws. The inclination of the stellar spin axis suggests that the system is aligned along the line of sight. We detected a tentative secondary eclipse of the planet at a 2σ confidence level (ΔFec = 14.2 ± 6.6 ppm) and found that the orbit might have asmall non-zero eccentricity of 0.019+0.028-0.014. With a Bond albedo of AB = 0.037 ± 0.019, Kepler-423b is one of the gas-giant planets with the lowest albedo known so far. Based on observations obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, in time allocated by OPTICON and the Spanish Time Allocation Committee (CAT).The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement number RG226604 (OPTICON) and 267251 (AstroFIt).

  1. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jason H; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-05-22

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 21 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history. PMID:22566651

  2. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Boss, Alan P.; Ciardi, David R.; Quinn, Samuel N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2∶1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history. PMID:22566651

  3. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Boss, Alan P.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  4. Exploring the diversity of Jupiter-class planets.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Irwin, Patrick G J; Barstow, Joanna K; de Kok, Remco J; Lee, Jae-Min; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2014-04-28

    Of the 900+ confirmed exoplanets discovered since 1995 for which we have constraints on their mass (i.e. not including Kepler candidates), 75% have masses larger than Saturn (0.3 MJ), 53% are more massive than Jupiter and 67% are within 1 AU of their host stars. When Kepler candidates are included, Neptune-sized giant planets could form the majority of the planetary population. And yet the term 'hot Jupiter' fails to account for the incredible diversity of this class of astrophysical object, which exists on a continuum of giant planets from the cool jovians of our own Solar System to the highly irradiated, tidally locked hot roasters. We review theoretical expectations for the temperatures, molecular composition and cloud properties of hydrogen-dominated Jupiter-class objects under a variety of different conditions. We discuss the classification schemes for these Jupiter-class planets proposed to date, including the implications for our own Solar System giant planets and the pitfalls associated with compositional classification at this early stage of exoplanetary spectroscopy. We discuss the range of planetary types described by previous authors, accounting for (i) thermochemical equilibrium expectations for cloud condensation and favoured chemical stability fields; (ii) the metallicity and formation mechanism for these giant planets; (iii) the importance of optical absorbers for energy partitioning and the generation of a temperature inversion; (iv) the favoured photochemical pathways and expectations for minor species (e.g. saturated hydrocarbons and nitriles); (v) the unexpected presence of molecules owing to vertical mixing of species above their quench levels; and (vi) methods for energy and material redistribution throughout the atmosphere (e.g. away from the highly irradiated daysides of close-in giants). Finally, we discuss the benefits and potential flaws of retrieval techniques for establishing a family of atmospheric solutions that reproduce the available data, and the requirements for future spectroscopic characterization of a set of Jupiter-class objects to test our physical and chemical understanding of these planets. PMID:24664910

  5. Could Jupiter or Saturn Have Ejected a Fifth Giant Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Tamayo, Daniel; Valencia, Diana

    2015-11-01

    Models of the dynamical evolution of the early solar system that follow the dispersal of the gaseous protoplanetary disk have been widely successful in reconstructing the current orbital configuration of the giant planets. Statistically, some of the most successful dynamical evolution simulations have initially included a hypothetical fifth giant planet, of ice giant (IG) mass, which gets ejected by a gas giant during the early solar systems proposed instability phase. We investigate the likelihood of an IG ejection (IGE) event by either Jupiter or Saturn through constraints imposed by the current orbits of their wide-separation regular satellites Callisto and Iapetus, respectively. We show that planetary encounters that are sufficient to eject an IG often provide excessive perturbations to the orbits of Callisto and Iapetus, making it difficult to reconcile a planet ejection event with the current orbit of either satellite. Quantitatively, we compute the likelihood of reconciling a regular Jovian satellite orbit with the current orbit of Callisto following an IGE by Jupiter of ?42%, and conclude that such a large likelihood supports the hypothesis of a fifth giant planets existence. A similar calculation for Iapetus reveals that it is much more difficult for Saturn to have ejected an IG and reconciled a Kronian satellite orbit with that of Iapetus (likelihood ?1%), although uncertainties regarding the formation of Iapetus, with its unusual orbit, complicates the interpretation of this result.

  6. Exploring the diversity of Jupiter-class planets

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Barstow, Joanna K.; de Kok, Remco J.; Lee, Jae-Min; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Of the 900+ confirmed exoplanets discovered since 1995 for which we have constraints on their mass (i.e. not including Kepler candidates), 75% have masses larger than Saturn (0.3 MJ), 53% are more massive than Jupiter and 67% are within 1 AU of their host stars. When Kepler candidates are included, Neptune-sized giant planets could form the majority of the planetary population. And yet the term ‘hot Jupiter’ fails to account for the incredible diversity of this class of astrophysical object, which exists on a continuum of giant planets from the cool jovians of our own Solar System to the highly irradiated, tidally locked hot roasters. We review theoretical expectations for the temperatures, molecular composition and cloud properties of hydrogen-dominated Jupiter-class objects under a variety of different conditions. We discuss the classification schemes for these Jupiter-class planets proposed to date, including the implications for our own Solar System giant planets and the pitfalls associated with compositional classification at this early stage of exoplanetary spectroscopy. We discuss the range of planetary types described by previous authors, accounting for (i) thermochemical equilibrium expectations for cloud condensation and favoured chemical stability fields; (ii) the metallicity and formation mechanism for these giant planets; (iii) the importance of optical absorbers for energy partitioning and the generation of a temperature inversion; (iv) the favoured photochemical pathways and expectations for minor species (e.g. saturated hydrocarbons and nitriles); (v) the unexpected presence of molecules owing to vertical mixing of species above their quench levels; and (vi) methods for energy and material redistribution throughout the atmosphere (e.g. away from the highly irradiated daysides of close-in giants). Finally, we discuss the benefits and potential flaws of retrieval techniques for establishing a family of atmospheric solutions that reproduce the available data, and the requirements for future spectroscopic characterization of a set of Jupiter-class objects to test our physical and chemical understanding of these planets. PMID:24664910

  7. JUPITER WILL BECOME A HOT JUPITER: CONSEQUENCES OF POST-MAIN-SEQUENCE STELLAR EVOLUTION ON GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Madhusudhan, Nikku E-mail: Nikku.Madhusudhan@yale.edu

    2012-09-10

    When the Sun ascends the red giant branch (RGB), its luminosity will increase and all the planets will receive much greater irradiation than they do now. Jupiter, in particular, might end up more highly irradiated than the hot Neptune GJ 436b and, hence, could appropriately be termed a 'hot Jupiter'. When their stars go through the RGB or asymptotic giant branch stages, many of the currently known Jupiter-mass planets in several-AU orbits will receive levels of irradiation comparable to the hot Jupiters, which will transiently increase their atmospheric temperatures to {approx}1000 K or more. Furthermore, massive planets around post-main-sequence stars could accrete a non-negligible amount of material from the enhanced stellar winds, thereby significantly altering their atmospheric chemistry as well as causing a significant accretion luminosity during the epochs of most intense stellar mass loss. Future generations of infrared observatories might be able to probe the thermal and chemical structure of such hot Jupiters' atmospheres. Finally, we argue that, unlike their main-sequence analogs (whose zonal winds are thought to be organized in only a few broad, planetary-scale jets), red-giant hot Jupiters should have multiple, narrow jets of zonal winds and efficient day-night redistribution.

  8. Pan-Planets: Searching for hot Jupiters around cool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeier, C.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Henning, Th.; Bender, R.; Kodric, M.; Deacon, N.; Riffeser, A.; Burgett, W.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-03-01

    The Pan-Planets survey observed an area of 42 sq deg. in the galactic disk for about 165 h. The main scientific goal of the project is the detection of transiting planets around M dwarfs. We establish an efficient procedure for determining the stellar parameters Teff and log g of all sources using a method based on SED fitting, utilizing a three-dimensional dust map and proper motion information. In this way we identify more than 60 000 M dwarfs, which is by far the largest sample of low-mass stars observed in a transit survey to date. We present several planet candidates around M dwarfs and hotter stars that are currently being followed up. Using Monte Carlo simulations we calculate the detection efficiency of the Pan-Planets survey for different stellar and planetary populations. We expect to find 3.0+3.3-1.6 hot Jupiters around F, G, and K dwarfs with periods lower than 10 days based on the planet occurrence rates derived in previous surveys. For M dwarfs, the percentage of stars with a hot Jupiter is under debate. Theoretical models expect a lower occurrence rate than for larger main sequence stars. However, radial velocity surveys find upper limits of about 1% due to their small sample, while the Kepler survey finds a occurrence rate that we estimate to be at least 0.17b(+0.67-0.04) %, making it even higher than the determined fraction from OGLE-III for F, G and K stellar types, 0.14 (+0.15-0.076) %. With the large sample size of Pan-Planets, we are able to determine an occurrence rate of 0.11 (+0.37-0.02) % in case one of our candidates turns out to be a real detection. If, however, none of our candidates turn out to be true planets, we are able to put an upper limit of 0.34% with a 95% confidence on the hot Jupiter occurrence rate of M dwarfs. This limit is a significant improvement over previous estimates where the lowest limit published so far is 1.1% found in the WFCAM Transit Survey. Therefore we cannot yet confirm the theoretical prediction of a lower occurrence rate for cool stars. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  9. Scientists Revise Thinking on Comets, Planet Jupiter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Discusses scientific information obtained from Pioneer 10's Jupiter flyby and the comet Kohoutek's first trip around the sun, including the high hydrogen emission of Jupiter's principal moon, Io. (CC)

  10. Planet Masses from Disk Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Young, forming planets can generate immense spiral structures within their protoplanetary disks. A recent study has shown that observations of these spiral structures may allow astronomers to measure the mass of the planets that create them.Spirals From WavesSnapshots of the surface density of a protoplanetary disk in a 2D simulation, 3D simulation, and synthesized scattered-light image. Click for a closer look! [Fung Dong, 2015]Recent studies have shown that a single planet, if it is massive enough, can excite multiple density waves within a protoplanetary disk as it orbits. These density waves can then interfere to produce a multiple-armed spiral structure in the disk inside of the planets orbit a structure which can potentially be observed in scattered-light images of the disk.But what do these arms look like, and what factors determine their structure? In a recently published study, Jeffrey Fung and Ruobing Dong, two researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, have modeled the spiral arms in an effort to answer these questions.Arms Provide AnswersA useful parameter for describing the structure is the azimuthal separation (sep) between the primary and secondary spiral arms. If you draw a circle within the disk and measure the angle between the two points where the primary and secondary arms cross it, thats sep.Azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary spiral arms, as a function of the planet-to-star mass ratio q. The different curves represent different disk aspect ratios. [Fung Dong, 2015]The authors find thatsep stays roughly constant for different radii, but its strongly dependent on the planets mass: for larger planets, sep increases. They discover that sep scales as a power of the planet mass for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses, orbiting around a solar-mass star. For larger, brown-dwarf-size companions, sep is a constant 180.If this new theory is confirmed, it could have very interesting implications for observations of protoplanetary disks: this would give us the ability to measure the mass of a planet in a disk without ever needing to directly observe the planet itself!Modeling ObservationsFung and Dong confirm their models by additionally running 3D simulations, which yield very similar outcomes. From these simulation results, they then synthesize scattered-light images similar to what we would expect to be able to observe with telescopes like the VLT, Gemini, or Subaru. The authors demonstrate that from these scattered-light images, they can correctly retrieve the planets mass to within 30%.Finally, as a proof-of-concept, the authors apply this modeling to an actual system: SAO 206462, a nearly face-on protoplanetary disk with an observed two-armed spiral within it. From the measured azimuthal separation of the two arms, the authors estimate that it contains a planet of about 6 Jupiter masses.CitationJeffrey Fung () and Ruobing Dong () 2015 ApJ 815 L21. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/815/2/L21

  11. Planet Masses from Disk Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Young, forming planets can generate immense spiral structures within their protoplanetary disks. A recent study has shown that observations of these spiral structures may allow astronomers to measure the mass of the planets that create them.Spirals From WavesSnapshots of the surface density of a protoplanetary disk in a 2D simulation, 3D simulation, and synthesized scattered-light image. Click for a closer look! [Fung Dong, 2015]Recent studies have shown that a single planet, if it is massive enough, can excite multiple density waves within a protoplanetary disk as it orbits. These density waves can then interfere to produce a multiple-armed spiral structure in the disk inside of the planets orbit a structure which can potentially be observed in scattered-light images of the disk.But what do these arms look like, and what factors determine their structure? In a recently published study, Jeffrey Fung and Ruobing Dong, two researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, have modeled the spiral arms in an effort to answer these questions.Arms Provide AnswersA useful parameter for describing the structure is the azimuthal separation (sep) between the primary and secondary spiral arms. If you draw a circle within the disk and measure the angle between the two points where the primary and secondary arms cross it, thats sep.Azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary spiral arms, as a function of the planet-to-star mass ratio q. The different curves represent different disk aspect ratios. [Fung Dong, 2015]The authors find thatsep stays roughly constant for different radii, but its strongly dependent on the planets mass: for larger planets, sep increases. They discover that sep scales as a power of the planet mass for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses, orbiting around a solar-mass star. For larger, brown-dwarf-size companions, sep is a constant 180.If this new theory is confirmed, it could have very interesting implications for observations of protoplanetary disks: this would give us the ability to measure the mass of a planet in a disk without ever needing to directly observe the planet itself!Modeling ObservationsFung and Dong confirm their models by additionally running 3D simulations, which yield very similar outcomes. From these simulation results, they then synthesize scattered-light images similar to what we would expect to be able to observe with telescopes like the VLT, Gemini, or Subaru. The authors demonstrate that from these scattered-light images, they can correctly retrieve the planets mass to within 30%.Finally, as a proof-of-concept, the authors apply this modeling to an actual system: SAO 206462, a nearly face-on protoplanetary disk with an observed two-armed spiral within it. From the measured azimuthal separation of the two arms, the authors estimate that it contains a planet of about 6 Jupiter masses.CitationJeffrey Fung () and Ruobing Dong () 2015 ApJ 815 L21. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/815/2/L21

  12. Investigation of hydrogen and helium pumping by sputter ion pumps for Jupiter and outer planets mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomena of ion pumping is reviewed with emphasis on the pumping mechanism for hydrogen and helium. The experimental tests measure the performance of a small, flight proven ion pump which has a nominal four liter/second pumping speed for air. The speed of this pump for hydrogen and helium, and for hydrogen/helium mixes, is presented with particular detail regarding the time dependence. Pump test results are related to anticipated performance of the mass spectrometer by the pumping speeds for the gases to the partial pressure in the ion source. From this analysis, the pump specifications are quantified in terms of mission goals and in terms of observed pumping speeds for the various gases, load levels, and time periods.

  13. MULTIPLE-PLANET SCATTERING AND THE ORIGIN OF HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Beauge, C.; Nesvorny, D.

    2012-06-01

    Doppler and transit observations of exoplanets show a pile-up of Jupiter-size planets in orbits with a 3 day period. A fraction of these hot Jupiters have retrograde orbits with respect to the parent star's rotation, as evidenced by the measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. To explain these observations we performed a series of numerical integrations of planet scattering followed by the tidal circularization and migration of planets that evolved into highly eccentric orbits. We considered planetary systems having three and four planets initially placed in successive mean-motion resonances, although the angles were taken randomly to ensure orbital instability in short timescales. The simulations included the tidal and relativistic effects, and precession due to stellar oblateness. Our results show the formation of two distinct populations of hot Jupiters. The inner population (Population I) is characterized by semimajor axis a < 0.03 AU and mainly formed in the systems where no planetary ejections occurred. Our follow-up integrations showed that this population was transient, with most planets falling inside the Roche radius of the star in <1 Gyr. The outer population of hot Jupiters (Population II) formed in systems where at least one planet was ejected into interstellar space. This population survives the effects of tides over >1 Gyr and fits nicely the observed 3 day pile-up. A comparison between our three-planet and four-planet runs shows that the formation of hot Jupiters is more likely in systems with more initial planets. Due to the large-scale chaoticity that dominates the evolution, high eccentricities and/or high inclinations are generated mainly by close encounters between the planets and not by secular perturbations (Kozai or otherwise). The relative proportion of retrograde planets seems of be dependent on the stellar age. Both the distribution of almost aligned systems and the simulated 3 day pile-up also fit observations better in our four-planet simulations. This may suggest that the planetary systems with observed hot Jupiters were originally rich in the number of planets, some of which were ejected. In a broad perspective, our work therefore hints on an unexpected link between the hot Jupiters and recently discovered free floating planets.

  14. Multiple-planet Scattering and the Origin of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaug, C.; Nesvorn, D.

    2012-06-01

    Doppler and transit observations of exoplanets show a pile-up of Jupiter-size planets in orbits with a 3 day period. A fraction of these hot Jupiters have retrograde orbits with respect to the parent star's rotation, as evidenced by the measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. To explain these observations we performed a series of numerical integrations of planet scattering followed by the tidal circularization and migration of planets that evolved into highly eccentric orbits. We considered planetary systems having three and four planets initially placed in successive mean-motion resonances, although the angles were taken randomly to ensure orbital instability in short timescales. The simulations included the tidal and relativistic effects, and precession due to stellar oblateness. Our results show the formation of two distinct populations of hot Jupiters. The inner population (Population I) is characterized by semimajor axis a < 0.03 AU and mainly formed in the systems where no planetary ejections occurred. Our follow-up integrations showed that this population was transient, with most planets falling inside the Roche radius of the star in <1 Gyr. The outer population of hot Jupiters (Population II) formed in systems where at least one planet was ejected into interstellar space. This population survives the effects of tides over >1 Gyr and fits nicely the observed 3 day pile-up. A comparison between our three-planet and four-planet runs shows that the formation of hot Jupiters is more likely in systems with more initial planets. Due to the large-scale chaoticity that dominates the evolution, high eccentricities and/or high inclinations are generated mainly by close encounters between the planets and not by secular perturbations (Kozai or otherwise). The relative proportion of retrograde planets seems of be dependent on the stellar age. Both the distribution of almost aligned systems and the simulated 3 day pile-up also fit observations better in our four-planet simulations. This may suggest that the planetary systems with observed hot Jupiters were originally rich in the number of planets, some of which were ejected. In a broad perspective, our work therefore hints on an unexpected link between the hot Jupiters and recently discovered free floating planets.

  15. Tilting Saturn without Tilting Jupiter: Constraints on Giant Planet Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasser, R.; Lee, Man Hoi

    2015-11-01

    The migration and encounter histories of the giant planets in our solar system can be constrained by the obliquities of Jupiter and Saturn. We have performed secular simulations with imposed migration and N-body simulations with planetesimals to study the expected obliquity distribution of migrating planets with initial conditions resembling those of the smooth migration model, the resonant Nice model and two models with five giant planets initially in resonance (one compact and one loose configuration). For smooth migration, the secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism can tilt Saturns spin axis to the current obliquity if the product of the migration timescale and the orbital inclinations is sufficiently large (exceeding 30 Myr deg). For the resonant Nice model with imposed migration, it is difficult to reproduce todays obliquity values, because the compactness of the initial system raises the frequency that tilts Saturn above the spin precession frequency of Jupiter, causing a Jupiter spin-orbit resonance crossing. Migration timescales sufficiently long to tilt Saturn generally suffice to tilt Jupiter more than is observed. The full N-body simulations tell a somewhat different story, with Jupiter generally being tilted as often as Saturn, but on average having a higher obliquity. The main obstacle is the final orbital spacing of the giant planets, coupled with the tail of Neptunes migration. The resonant Nice case is barely able to simultaneously reproduce the orbital and spin properties of the giant planets, with a probability 0.15%. The loose five planet model is unable to match all our constraints (probability <0.08%). The compact five planet model has the highest chance of matching the orbital and obliquity constraints simultaneously (probability 0.3%).

  16. DISCOVERING HABITABLE EARTHS, HOT JUPITERS, AND OTHER CLOSE PLANETS WITH MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, R.

    2012-06-20

    Searches for planets via gravitational lensing have focused on cases in which the projected separation, a, between planet and star is comparable to the Einstein radius, R{sub E} . This paper considers smaller orbital separations and demonstrates that evidence of close-orbit planets can be found in the low-magnification portion of the light curves generated by the central star. We develop a protocol for discovering hot Jupiters as well as Neptune-mass and Earth-mass planets in the stellar habitable zone. When planets are not discovered, our method can be used to quantify the probability that the lens star does not have planets within specified ranges of the orbital separation and mass ratio. Nearby close-orbit planets discovered by lensing can be subject to follow-up observations to study the newly discovered planets or to discover other planets orbiting the same star. Careful study of the low-magnification portions of lensing light curves should produce, in addition to the discoveries of close-orbit planets, definite detections of wide-orbit planets through the discovery of 'repeating' lensing events. We show that events exhibiting extremely high magnification can effectively be probed for planets in close, intermediate, and wide distance regimes simply by adding several-time-per-night monitoring in the low-magnification wings, possibly leading to gravitational lensing discoveries of multiple planets occupying a broad range of orbits, from close to wide, in a single planetary system.

  17. The Solar Twin Planet Search. II. A Jupiter twin around a solar twin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedell, M.; Meléndez, J.; Bean, J. L.; Ramírez, I.; Asplund, M.; Alves-Brito, A.; Casagrande, L.; Dreizler, S.; Monroe, T.; Spina, L.; Tucci Maia, M.

    2015-09-01

    Context. With high-precision radial velocity surveys reaching a sufficiently long time baseline, the domain of long-period planet detections has recently opened up. The search for Jupiter-like planets is especially important if we wish to investigate the prevalence of solar system analogs, but their detection is complicated by the existence of stellar activity cycles on similar timescales. Radial velocity data with sufficiently long-term instrumental precision and robust methods of diagnosing activity are crucial to the detection of extrasolar Jupiters. Aims: Through our HARPS survey for planets around solar twin stars, we have identified a promising Jupiter twin candidate around the star HIP11915. We characterize this Keplerian signal and investigate its potential origins in stellar activity. Methods: We carry out a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of the radial velocity data. To examine the signal's origin, we employ a variety of statistical tests using activity diagnostics such as the Ca II H and K lines and line asymmetry tracers. Results: Our analysis indicates that HIP11915 hosts a Jupiter-mass planet with a 3800-day orbital period and low eccentricity. Although we cannot definitively rule out an activity cycle interpretation, we find that a planet interpretation is more likely based on a joint analysis of radial velocity and activity index data. Conclusions: The challenges of long-period radial velocity signals addressed in this paper are critical for the ongoing discovery of Jupiter-like exoplanets. If planetary in nature, the signal investigated here represents a very close analog to the solar system in terms of both Sun-like host star and Jupiter-like planet. Table 3 and Fig. 5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Analyzing Mass Loss and Tidal Circularization as a Source for Sustained Eccentric Orbits in Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Rachel L.; Sepinsky, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of extrasolar planets and planet candidates increases, so does the number of systems that look strikingly different from our own. Hot Jupiters are such a system and are characterized by a Jupiter mass planet with a close-in orbit. Because of the proximity of the planet to its parent star, we would expect these systems to be tidally circularized. However, we observe many with significant eccentricities, suggesting that a mechanism must exist to account for sustained eccentric orbits. Previous analyses found that, in a population of eccentric hot Jupiters generated by planet-planet scattering, a significant fraction will overfill their Roche lobe at periastron. Other work has noted that mass loss in systems similar to hot Jupiters can act to increase the eccentricity of the orbit of a binary system. Here, we consider the effects of tidal circularization and mass loss on the orbital evolution of the hot Jupiters. By analyzing the balance between the tidal circularization and mass loss, we can determine an equilibrium eccentricity as a function of planet mass and the tidal quality factor, Q. If such an equilibrium value exists, then it is possible for this mechanism to be responsible for the sustained eccentric orbits of hot Jupiters that we observe. We present the orbital parameters for these equilibrium orbits over a broad parameter space and compare those results to the current population of observed extrasolar planets.

  19. A Hot Jupiter for Breakfast? Early Stellar Ingestion of Planets May Be Common

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, Titos; Königl, Arieh

    2015-08-01

    Models of planet formation and evolution predict that giant planets form efficiently in protoplanetary disks, that most of these migrate rapidly to the disk’s inner edge, and that, if the arriving planet’s mass is ≲ Jupiter’s mass, then it could remain stranded near that radius. We argue that such planets would be ingested by tidal interaction with the host star on a timescale ≲ 1 Gyr, and that, in the case of a solar-type host, this would cause the stellar spin to approach the direction of the ingested planet’s orbital axis even if the two were initially highly misaligned. Primordially misaligned stars whose effective temperatures are ≳ 6250 K cannot be realigned in this way because, in contrast with solar-type hosts, their angular momenta are typically higher than the orbital angular momentum of the ingested planet as a result of inefficient magnetic braking and of a comparatively large moment of inertia. Hot Jupiters located farther out from the star can contribute to this process, but their effect is weaker because the tidal interaction strength decreases rapidly with increasing semimajor axis. We demonstrate that, if ∼ 50% of planetary systems harbored a stranded hot Jupiter, this scenario can in principle account for (1) the good alignment exhibited by planets around cool stars irrespective of the planet’s mass or orbital period, (2) the prevalence of misaligned planets around hot stars, (3) the apparent upper bound on the mass of hot Jupiters on retrograde orbits, and (4) the inverse correlation between stellar spin periods and hot-Jupiter masses.

  20. A Moderate Migration Scenario for Jupiter to form the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2015-01-01

    The early solar system contained a gas-dominated protoplanetary disk that could cause the migration of the giant planets. This migration can be in the form of a two-stage migration, including an inward and then outward migration. One of the current favored theories, the Grand Tack theory, states that Jupiter migrates in to 1.5 AU, creating a planetesimal disk truncated at 1 AU to then form the terrestrial planets during the subsequent outward migration of Jupiter. There are reasons to believe that such a large movement by Jupiter may be impractical, namely the disk would need to be massive and long-lived. An exploration of migration parameters that involve smaller migration distances and shorter timescales can shed light on whether such extreme displacements are necessary for the formation of the solar system. We examine more moderate migration simulations, where Jupiter starts near the conjectured location of the ice line and migrates a moderate radial distance inward for a variety of distances and times. After the inward migration, Jupiter moves outwards to its final orbital configuration today. We find that the planetesimal disk need not be truncated at 1 AU to form planets with similar characteristics to those in the solar system. We vary the number and mass of planetesimals in the disk to see how this affects the characteristics of the forming terrestrial planets. We find a number of scenarios that provide systems of terrestrial planets similar to those in the solar system. We thus propose an alternative to the Grand Tack theory where Jupiter's migration is less extreme than proposed in the Grand Tack theory.

  1. Study of the Universe via Planets Phenomena: Jupiter contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchiara, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    Since the beginning of the studies regarding Space, astronomers have been interested not only in what happens in the surroundings of our Planet, but they wanted to look further in order to understand the "reasons of the Universe". As such, the European Mars Express and Venus Express are still working giving back interesting results regarding Mars and Venus, and in the same way, Cassini is giving us results regarding Saturn. Of greatest importance is the study of Jupiter, and scientists are pushing towards a deeper knowledge of this planet. Jupiter and his system can give a large contribution to the study of our Solar System, especially because of its difference comparing to the other planets. As a matter of fact, contrary of what is always though, Jupiter teaches that not only the Sun is the key of our System, instead, many factors can be determined by different bodies, such as its moons. Moreover, the idea of moons, regarding Jupiter, should be considered under a different point of view.

  2. Discovery of Low Mass Binary with Super Jupiter Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthes Rich, Evan; Wisniewski, John P.; Hashimoto, Jun; Brandt, Timothy; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-12-01

    Transit and radial velocity surveys have been prolific in detecting ~2000 confirmed planets to date. While few directly imaged planets have detected, such systems provide a unique scientific opportunity to probe exoplanets at larger angular separation, younger ages, and study their atmospheres. We present new L- and M-band AO observations, obtained with IRCS on Subaru, of a super Jupiter companion orbiting a cool dwarf. We show that the central object is likely a binary, thereby making this system the first likely directly imaged planetary mass companion surrounding a low mass binary system.

  3. Hot Jupiter breezes: time-dependent outflows from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Adams, Fred C.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the dynamics of magnetically controlled outflows from hot Jupiters, where these flows are driven by UV heating from the central star. In these systems, some of the open field lines do not allow the flow to pass smoothly through the sonic point, so that steady-state solutions do not exist in general. This paper focuses on this type of magnetic field configuration, where the resulting flow becomes manifestly time-dependent. We consider the case of both steady heating and time-variable heating, and find the time-scales for the corresponding time variations of the outflow. Because the flow cannot pass through the sonic transition, it remains subsonic and leads to so-called breeze solutions. One manifestation of the time variability is that the flow samples a collection of different breeze solutions over time, and the mass outflow rate varies in quasi-periodic fashion. Because the flow is subsonic, information can propagate inwards from the outer boundary, which determines, in part, the time-scale of the flow variability. This work finds the relationship between the outer boundary scale and the time-scale of flow variations. In practice, the location of the outer boundary is set by the extent of the sphere of influence of the planet. The measured time variability can be used, in principle, to constrain the parameters of the system (e.g. the strengths of the surface magnetic fields).

  4. Simulated Photoevaporative Mass Loss from Hot Jupiters in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Anjali; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2015-08-01

    Ionizing stellar photons heat the upper regions of planetary atmospheres, driving atmospheric mass loss. Gas escaping from several hot, hydrogen-rich planets has been detected using UV and X-ray transmission spectroscopy. Because these planets are tidally locked, and thus asymmetrically irradiated, escaping gas is unlikely to be spherically symmetric. In this paper, we focus on the effects of asymmetric heating on local outflow structure. We use the Athena code for hydrodynamics to produce 3D simulations of hot Jupiter mass loss that jointly model wind launching and stellar heating via photoionization. Our fiducial planet is an inflated, hot Jupiter with radius {R}{{p}}=2.14{R}{Jup} and mass {M}{{p}}=0.53{M}{Jup}. We irradiate the initially neutral, atomic hydrogen atmosphere with 13.6 eV photons and compute the outflows ionization structure. There are clear asymmetries in the atmospheric outflow, including a neutral shadow on the planets nightside. Given an incident ionizing UV flux comparable to that of the Sun, we find a steady-state mass loss rate of 2 {10}10 g s-1. The total mass loss rate and the outflow substructure along the substellar ray show good agreement with earlier 1D models, for two different fluxes. Our 3D data cube can be used to generate the outflows extinction spectrum during transit. As a proof of concept, we find absorption of stellar Ly? at Doppler-shifted velocities of up to 50 km s-1. Our work provides a starting point for further 3D models that can be used to predict observable signatures of hot Jupiter mass loss.

  5. WASP-94 A and B planets: hot-Jupiter cousins in a twin-star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Queloz, D.; Anderson, D. R.; Charbonnel, C.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Sgransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Southworth, J.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    We report the discovery of two hot-Jupiter planets, each orbiting one of the stars of a wide binary system. WASP-94A (2MASS 20550794-3408079) is an F8 type star hosting a transiting planet with a radius of 1.72 0.06 RJup, a mass of 0.452 0.034 MJup, and an orbital period of 3.95 days. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect is clearly detected, and the measured projected spin-orbit angle indicates that the planet occupies a retrograde orbit. WASP-94B (2MASS 20550915-3408078) is an F9 stellar companion at an angular separation of 15'' (projected separation 2700 au), hosting a gas giant with a minimum mass of 0.618 0.028 MJup with a period of 2.008 days, detected by Doppler measurements. The orbital planes of the two planets are inclined relative to each other, indicating that at least one of them is inclined relative to the plane of the stellar binary. These hot Jupiters in a binary system bring new insights into the formation of close-in giant planets and the role of stellar multiplicity. The radial-velocity and photometric data used for this work are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A49

  6. WASP-47: A Hot Jupiter System with Two Additional Planets Discovered by K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette C.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Adams, Fred C.; Rappaport, Saul A.; Schwengeler, Hans Martin

    2015-10-01

    Using new data from the K2 mission, we show that WASP-47, a previously known hot Jupiter host, also hosts two additional transiting planets: a Neptune-sized outer planet and a super-Earth inner companion. We measure planetary properties from the K2 light curve and detect transit timing variations (TTVs), confirming the planetary nature of the outer planet. We performed a large number of numerical simulations to study the dynamical stability of the system and to find the theoretically expected TTVs. The theoretically predicted TTVs are in good agreement with those observed, and we use the TTVs to determine the masses of two planets, and place a limit on the third. The WASP-47 planetary system is important because companion planets can both be inferred by TTVs and are also detected directly through transit observations. The depth of the hot Jupiter's transits make ground-based TTV measurements possible, and the brightness of the host star makes it amenable for precise radial velocity measurements. The system serves as a Rosetta Stone for understanding TTVs as a planet detection technique.

  7. Alternate multiple-outer-planet missions using a Saturn-Jupiter flyby sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.; Hannah, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    A study has been made of a method for providing more frequent launch opportunities for multiple-planet Grand Tour type missions to the outer solar system. A Saturn-Jupiter flyby sequence was used in the analysis to initiate the mission instead of the normal Jupiter-Saturn sequence. The Saturn-first approach is shown to yield several new launch opportunities following the 1980 cutoff date for Jupiter-first missions. Results are given for various two-planet, three-planet, and four-planet Jupiter-first and Saturn-first missions. A unique five-planet Saturn-first mission and a Saturn-Jupiter flyby which returns to earth are also discussed. Mission performance is evaluated for each flyby technique by comparing Saturn-first and Jupiter-first missions with respect to launch energy requirements, available launch windows, planetary encounter conditions, and total mission times.

  8. N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation under the influence of a hot Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: ogihara@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of multiple-planet systems in the presence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using extended N-body simulations that are performed simultaneously with semianalytic calculations. Our primary aims are to describe the planet formation process starting from planetesimals using high-resolution simulations, and to examine the dependences of the architecture of planetary systems on input parameters (e.g., disk mass, disk viscosity). We observe that protoplanets that arise from oligarchic growth and undergo type I migration stop migrating when they join a chain of resonant planets outside the orbit of an HJ. The formation of a resonant chain is almost independent of our model parameters, and is thus a robust process. At the end of our simulations, several terrestrial planets remain at around 0.1 AU. The formed planets are not equal mass; the largest planet constitutes more than 50% of the total mass in the close-in region, which is also less dependent on parameters. In the previous work of this paper, we have found a new physical mechanism of induced migration of the HJ, which is called a crowding-out. If the HJ opens up a wide gap in the disk (e.g., owing to low disk viscosity), crowding-out becomes less efficient and the HJ remains. We also discuss angular momentum transfer between the planets and disk.

  9. THE HEAVY-ELEMENT MASSES OF EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS, REVEALED

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Neil; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate a population of transiting planets that receive relatively modest stellar insolation, indicating equilibrium temperatures <1000 K, and for which the heating mechanism that inflates hot Jupiters does not appear to be significantly active. We use structural evolution models to infer the amount of heavy elements within each of these planets. There is a correlation between the stellar metallicity and the mass of heavy elements in its transiting planet(s). It appears that all giant planets possess a minimum of {approx}10-15 Earth masses of heavy elements, with planets around metal-rich stars having larger heavy-element masses. There is also an inverse relationship between the mass of the planet and the metal enrichment (Z{sub pl}/Z{sub star}), which appears to have little dependency on the metallicity of the star. Saturn- and Jupiter-like enrichments above solar composition are a hallmark of all the gas giants in the sample, even planets of several Jupiter masses. These relationships provide an important constraint on planet formation and suggest large amounts of heavy elements within planetary H/He envelopes. We suggest that the observed correlation can soon also be applied to inflated planets, such that the interior heavy-element abundance of these planets could be estimated, yielding better constraints on their interior energy sources. We point to future directions for planetary population synthesis models and suggest future correlations. This appears to be the first evidence that extrasolar giant planets, as a class, are enhanced in heavy elements.

  10. Inferring Planet Mass from Spiral Structures in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations of protoplanetary disk have reported spiral structures that are potential signatures of embedded planets, and modeling efforts have shown that a single planet can excite multiple spiral arms, in contrast to conventional disk-planet interaction theory. Using two and three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations to perform a systematic parameter survey, we confirm the existence of multiple spiral arms in disks with a single planet, and discover a scaling relation between the azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary arm, {? }{{sep}}, and the planet-to-star mass ratio q: {? }{{sep}}=102^\\circ {(q/0.001)}0.2 for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses around a 1 solar mass star, and {? }{{sep}}=180^\\circ for brown dwarf mass companions. This relation is independent of the disk's temperature, and can be used to infer a planet's mass to within an accuracy of about 30% given only the morphology of a face-on disk. Combining hydrodynamics and Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we verify that our numerical measurements of {? }{{sep}} are accurate representations of what would be measured in near-infrared scattered light images, such as those expected to be taken by Gemini/GPI, Very Large Telescope/SPHERE, or Subaru/SCExAO in the future. Finally, we are able to infer, using our scaling relation, that the planet responsible for the spiral structure in SAO 206462 has a mass of about 6 Jupiter masses.

  11. Giant Planets on Resonant Orbits: The Effect of Mass Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, Francesco; D'Angelo, Gennaro

    Two giant planets that undergo convergent migration, driven by tidal interactions with their gaseous disk, may become locked into a mean motion resonance (MMR). For planet masses similar to those of Jupiter (the internal planet) and Saturn and for typical post-formation (i.e., after planets have formed) disk conditions, capture occurs in the 2:1 MMR (D'Angelo and Marzari 2012). Capture in the 3:2 MMR may occur if the post-formation gas density around the planet locations is large enough (e.g., > ~2000 g/cm2 at ~1AU). This scenario, however, neglects the effects of ongoing gas accretion on the planets, which may be significant especially at large disk gas densities. In fact, recent work (Gressel et al. 2013; Keith and Wardle 2014), suggests that even if turbulence in the proximity of the planets is caused by MRI, gas accretion may still be vigorous. In particular, the MHD calculations of Gressel et al. (2013) resulted in accretion rates compatible to those derived from hydrodynamical calculations (D'Angelo et al. 2003; Bate et al. 2003). In order to address this issue, we perform hydrodynamical models of the evolution of a pair of planets that interact with each other and with the disk. The planets are initially locked in the 2:1 or 3:2 MMR. Gas accretion depends on the local disk mass. The large gas densities required for capture in the 3:2 MMR rapidly change the planet masses and mass ratio. Ensuing planet-planet interactions affect orbital eccentricities, leading to scattering and ejection episodes. The conditions required by 2:1 MMR locking can also produce a significant mass growth, if the local disk is sufficiently massive. For planets orbiting in the 1 AU region, however, the resonant configuration appears stable up to several Jupiter's masses.

  12. XO-5b: A Transiting Jupiter-sized Planet with a 4 day Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; McCullough, P. R.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Long, Doug; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Machalek, P.; Janes, Kenneth A.; Taylor, B.; Fleenor, Michael L.; Foote, C. N.; Gary, Bruce L.; Garca-Melendo, Enrique; Gregorio, J.; Vanmunster, T.

    2008-10-01

    The star XO-5 (GSC 02959-00729, V=12.1, G8 V) hosts a Jupiter-sized, Rp=1.15+/-0.12 RJ, transiting extrasolar planet, XO-5b, with an orbital period of 4.2 days. The planet's mass, Mp=1.15+/-0.08 MJ, and surface gravity, gp=22+/-5 m s-2, are large for its orbital period compared to most other transiting planets. However, the deviation from the Mp-P relationship for XO-5b is not as large as for GJ 436b, HAT-P-2b, and XO-3b. By coincidence, XO-5 overlies the extreme H I plume that emanates from the interacting galaxy pair NGC 2444/NGC 2445 (Arp 143).

  13. ON THE ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF A GIANT PLANET PAIR EMBEDDED IN A GASEOUS DISK. II. A SATURN-JUPITER CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2010-08-10

    We carry out a series of high-resolution (1024 x 1024) hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the orbital evolution of a Saturn-Jupiter pair embedded in a gaseous disk. This work extends the results of our previous work by exploring a different orbital configuration-Jupiter lies outside Saturn (q < 1, where q {identical_to} M{sub i} /M{sub o} is the mass ratio of the inner planet and the outer one). We focus on the effects of different initial separations (d) between the two planets and the various surface density profiles of the disk, where {sigma} {proportional_to} r {sup -}{alpha}. We also compare the results of different orbital configurations of the planet pair. Our results show that (1) when the initial separation is relatively large (d>d {sub iLr}, where d {sub iLr} is the distance between Jupiter and its first inner Lindblad resonance), the two planets undergo divergent migration. However, the inward migration of Saturn could be halted when Jupiter compresses the inner disk in which Saturn is embedded. (2) Convergent migration occurs when the initial separation is smaller (d < d {sub iLr}) and the density slope of the disk is nearly flat ({alpha} < 1/2). Saturn is then forced by Jupiter to migrate inward where the two planets are trapped into mean motion resonances (MMRs), and Saturn may get very close to the central star. (3) In the case of q < 1, the eccentricity of Saturn could be excited to a very high value (e{sub S} {approx} 0.4-0.5) by the MMRs and the system could maintain stability. These results explain the formation of MMRs in the exoplanet systems where the outer planet is more massive than the inner one. It also helps us to understand the origin of the 'hot Jupiter/Saturn' with a highly eccentric orbit.

  14. The helium mass fraction in Jupiter's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    von Zahn, U; Hunten, D M

    1996-05-10

    On 7 December 1995, the NASA Galileo probe provided in situ measurements of the helium abundance in the atmosphere of Jupiter. A Jamin interferometer measured the refractive index of the jovian atmosphere in the pressure region from 2 to 14 bars. These measurements indicate that the atmospheric helium mole fraction is 0.136 +/- 0.004. The corresponding helium mass fraction is slightly below the presolar value, which suggests that separation of helium from hydrogen in Jupiter's interior is only in its early stages. PMID:8629017

  15. AN INTERPRETATION OF THE ORBITAL PERIOD DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HOT JUPITERS AND GIANT PLANETS ON LONG-PERIOD ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Liping

    2010-09-10

    It is believed that a hot Jupiter (giant planet with a short period less than 10 days) forms in the outer region of a protoplanetary disk, then migrates inward to an orbit with a short period around 3 days, and stops there by a final stopping mechanism. The prominent problem is why hot Jupiters migrate inward to short-period orbits, while other extrasolar giant planets and Jovian planets in our solar system exist on long-period orbits. Here we show that this difference in orbital periods is caused by two populations of protoplanetary disks. One population experiences gravitational instability during some periods of their lifetime (GI disks), while the other does not (No-GI disks). In GI disks, planets can quickly migrate inward to short-period orbits to become hot Jupiters. In No-GI disks, the migration is so slow that planets can exist on long-period orbits. Protoplanetary disks are classified into the two populations because of the differences in properties of molecular cloud cores, from which disks from. We specifically compare our theory with observations. Our theory is supported by observations of extrasolar planets. We analyze the current status of our solar system and find that our solar nebula belongs to the population with a low migration rate. This is consistent with the observation that Jupiter and Saturn are indeed on long-period orbits. Our results further suggest that, in the future observations, a hot Jupiter cannot be found around a star with mass below a critical mass (0.14-0.28 M {sub sun}).

  16. ON THE FUNDAMENTAL MASS-PERIOD FUNCTIONS OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, I.-G.; Yeh, L.-C.; Chang, Y.-C.; Hung, W.-L.

    2010-01-01

    Employing a catalog of 175 extrasolar planets (exoplanets) detected by the Doppler-shift method, we constructed the independent and coupled mass-period functions. It is the first time in this field that the selection effect is considered in the coupled mass-period functions. Our results are consistent with those of Tabachnik and Tremaine in 2002, with the major difference that we obtain a flatter mass function but a steeper period function. Moreover, our coupled mass-period functions show that about 2.5% of stars would have a planet with mass between Earth Mass and Neptune Mass, and about 3% of stars would have a planet with mass between Neptune Mass and Jupiter Mass.

  17. Mass-Radius Relationships for Low-Mass Planets: From Iron Planets to Water Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Transit observations, and radial velocity measurements, have begun to populate the mass radius diagram for extrasolar planets; fubture astrometric measurements and direct images promise more mass and radius information. Clearly, the bulk density of a planet indicates something about a planet s composition--but what? I will attempt to answer this question in general for low-mass planets (mass) using a combination of analytic and numerical calculations, and I will show that all low-mass planets obey a kind of universal mass-radius relationship: an expansion whose first term is M approx. R(sup 3).

  18. Hot Jupiters with relatives: discovery of additional planets in orbit around WASP-41 and WASP-47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Queloz, D.; Anderson, D. R.; Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Díaz, R. F.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lister, T.; Pepe, F.; Rojo, P.; Ségransan, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Turner, O. D.; Udry, S.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of two additional planetary companions to WASP-41 and WASP-47. WASP-41 c is a planet of minimum mass 3.18 ± 0.20 MJup and eccentricity 0.29 ± 0.02, and it orbits in 421 ± 2 days. WASP-47 c is a planet of minimum mass 1.24 ± 0.22 MJup and eccentricity 0.13 ± 0.10, and it orbits in 572 ± 7 days. Unlike most of the planetary systems that include a hot Jupiter, these two systems with a hot Jupiter have a long-period planet located at only ~1 au from their host star. WASP-41 is a rather young star known to be chromospherically active. To differentiate its magnetic cycle from the radial velocity effect induced by the second planet, we used the emission in the Hα line and find this indicator well suited to detecting the stellar activity pattern and the magnetic cycle. The analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect induced by WASP-41 b suggests that the planet could be misaligned, though an aligned orbit cannot be excluded. WASP-47 has recently been found to host two additional transiting super Earths. With such an unprecedented architecture, the WASP-47 system will be very important for understanding planetary migration. Using data collected at ESO's La Silla Observatory, Chile: HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m (Prog ID 087.C-0649 & 089.C-0151), the Swiss Euler Telescope, TRAPPIST, the 1.54-m Danish telescope (Prog CN2013A-159), and at the LCOGT's Faulkes Telescope South.Photometric lightcurve and RV tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/586/A93

  19. Helping students understand planet categories using "sensing" personification: Jupiter as want-to-be star, Earth as want-to-be Jupiter, etc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor-Morris, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Students often, in learning about the classification of planets, consider the planets to be in strict categories (such as gas giants and terrestrial planets) and assume that these categories are drastically different in nature. This is not the case. Small objects such as asteroids have a weak gravitational pull such that they cannot hold an atmosphere, while terrestrial planets are capable of holding a gaseous (often transparent) atmosphere according to their larger mass. However, asteroids and terrestrial planets are very similar in composition (though not necessarily in homogeneity due to varying presence of collisional heating during formation). Meanwhile, gas giant planets (also often referred to as Jovian planets) such as Jupiter have been theorized to contain super-sized rocky terrestrial-like planets interior to their dense cloud covering. Hence, due then to their similar natures, the categorization of the terrestrial and gas giant planets is made not due to fundamental differences in the nature of the planets, a concept often ill-understood by students. Examining this further, the gas giants are planets whose masses, and hence gravitational ability to condense their gases, especially those close to their core, is less than those of stars wherein thermonuclear fusion initiates. This implies that stars also have terrestrial cores (albeit likely extremely densely packed), but the gaseous environments of hydrogen are dense enough to start and sustain this process of thermonuclear fusion. It is proposed here that seeing planets as fundamentally related to each other in composition though differing in size allows students to better understand the variety of planet types AND describing these as want-to-be (or wanna-be) in terms of ranking and according to a “sensing” personification that eschews anthropomorphism, animism, or teleology [see A. E. Tabor-Morris, “Thinking in terms of sensors: personification of self as an object in physics problem solving” Physics Education, 50.2 (Feb 2015) 203-209] to assist in putting this into perspective for students.

  20. Orbital Stability of Multi-Planet Systems: Behavior at High Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sarah J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the relationships between planet separation, mass, and stability timescale in high mass multi-planet systems containing planet masses and multiplicities relevant for planetary systems detectable via direct imaging. Extrapolating empirically derived relationships between planet mass, separation, and stability timescale derived from lower mass planetary systems misestimate the stability timescales for higher mass planetary systems by more than an order of magnitude at close separations near the two body Hill stability limit. We also find that characterizing critical separations in terms of period ratio produces a linear relationship between log-timescale and separation with the same slope for planet-star mass ratios comparable to or exceeding Jupiters, but this slope steepens for lower mass planetary systems. We discuss possible mechanisms for instability that result in this behavior including perturbing adjacent planet pairs into an overlap regime between 1st and sometimes 2nd order mean motion resonances.

  1. Jupiter and Planet Earth. [planetary and biological evolution and natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of Jupiter and Earth are discussed along with their atmospheres, the radiation belts around both planets, natural satellites, the evolution of life, and the Pioneer 10. Educational study projects are also included.

  2. A common mass scaling for satellite systems of gaseous planets.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M; Ward, William R

    2006-06-15

    The Solar System's outer planets that contain hydrogen gas all host systems of multiple moons, which notably each contain a similar fraction of their respective planet's mass (approximately 10(-4)). This mass fraction is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of the largest satellites of the solid planets (such as the Earth's Moon), and its common value for gas planets has been puzzling. Here we model satellite growth and loss as a forming giant planet accumulates gas and rock-ice solids from solar orbit. We find that the mass fraction of its satellite system is regulated to approximately 10(-4) by a balance of two competing processes: the supply of inflowing material to the satellites, and satellite loss through orbital decay driven by the gas. We show that the overall properties of the satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus arise naturally, and suggest that similar processes could limit the largest moons of extrasolar Jupiter-mass planets to Moon-to-Mars size. PMID:16778883

  3. The Dynamics of the WASP-47 Planetary System: A Hot Jupiter, Two Additional Planets, and Observable Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Becker, Juliette C.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Rappaport, Saul; Schwengeler, Hans Martin

    2015-12-01

    New data from the K2 mission indicate that WASP-47, a previously known Hot Jupiter host, also hosts two additional transiting planets: a Neptune-sized outer planet and a super-Earth inner companion. The measured period ratios and size ratios for these planets are unusual (extreme) for Hot Jupiter systems. We measure the planetary properties from the K2 light curve and detect transit timing variations, thereby confirming the planetary nature of the outer planet. We performed a large ensemble of numerical simulations to study the dynamical stability of the system and to find the theoretically expected transit timing variations (TTVs). The system is stable provided that the orbital eccentricities are small. The theoretically predicted TTVs are in good agreement with those observed, and we use the TTVs to determine the masses of two planets, and place a limit on the third. The WASP-47 planetary system is important because the companion planets can both be inferred by TTVs and are also detected directly through transit observations. The depth of the Hot Jupiter’s transits make ground-based TTV measurements possible, and the brightness of the host star makes it amenable for precise radial velocity measurements. The system thus serves as a Rosetta Stone for understanding TTVs as a planet detection technique. Moreover, this compact set of planets in nearly circular, coplanar orbits demonstrates that at least a subset of Jupiter-size planets can migrate in close to their host star in a dynamically quiet manner. As final curiosity, WASP-47 hosts one of few extrasolar planetary systems that can observe Earth in transit.

  4. A Low Mass for Mars from Jupiter's Early Gas-Driven Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin J.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Raymond, Sean N.; O'Brien, David P.; Mandell, Avi M.

    2011-01-01

    Jupiter and Saturn formed in a few million years from a gas-dominated protoplanetary disk, and were susceptible to gas-driven migration of their orbits on timescales of only approximately 100,000 years. Hydrodynamic simulations show that these giant planets can undergo a two-stage, inward-then-outward, migration. The terrestrial planets finished accreting much later and their characteristics, including Mars' small mass, are best reproduced by starting from a planetesimal disk with an outer edge at about one astronomical unit from the Sun (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance). Here we report simulations of the early Solar System that show how the inward migration of Jupiter to 1.5 AU, and its subsequent outward migration, lead to a planetesimal disk truncated at 1 AU; the terrestrial planets then form from this disk over the next 30-50 million years, with an Earth/Mars mass ratio consistent with observations. Scattering by Jupiter initially empties but then repopulates the asteroid belt, with inner-belt bodies originating between 1 and 3 AU and outer-belt bodies originating between and beyond the giant planets. This explains the significant compositional differences across the asteroid belt. The key aspect missing from previous models of terrestrial planet formation is the substantial radial migration of the giant planets, which suggests that their behaviour is more similar to that inferred for extrasolar planets than previously thought.

  5. A low mass for Mars from Jupiter's early gas-driven migration.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kevin J; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Raymond, Sean N; O'Brien, David P; Mandell, Avi M

    2011-07-14

    Jupiter and Saturn formed in a few million years (ref. 1) from a gas-dominated protoplanetary disk, and were susceptible to gas-driven migration of their orbits on timescales of only ?100,000 years (ref. 2). Hydrodynamic simulations show that these giant planets can undergo a two-stage, inward-then-outward, migration. The terrestrial planets finished accreting much later, and their characteristics, including Mars' small mass, are best reproduced by starting from a planetesimal disk with an outer edge at about one astronomical unit from the Sun (1 au is the Earth-Sun distance). Here we report simulations of the early Solar System that show how the inward migration of Jupiter to 1.5 au, and its subsequent outward migration, lead to a planetesimal disk truncated at 1 au; the terrestrial planets then form from this disk over the next 30-50 million years, with an Earth/Mars mass ratio consistent with observations. Scattering by Jupiter initially empties but then repopulates the asteroid belt, with inner-belt bodies originating between 1 and 3 au and outer-belt bodies originating between and beyond the giant planets. This explains the significant compositional differences across the asteroid belt. The key aspect missing from previous models of terrestrial planet formation is the substantial radial migration of the giant planets, which suggests that their behaviour is more similar to that inferred for extrasolar planets than previously thought. PMID:21642961

  6. Direct Exoplanet Imaging with JWST NIRCam: Low-Mass Stars, Low-Mass Planets, and Critical Constraints on Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Meyer, Michael; Reggiani, Maddalena; Quanz, Sascha; Beichman, Charles A.; Greene, Thomas P.; Burrows, Adam Seth

    2016-01-01

    As next generation exoplanet imagers are making their first discoveries, the largest population of stars in the Galaxy, the M dwarfs, are largely unaccounted for in their surveys. However, RV trends and micro lensing have revealed that M dwarfs host a substantial population of Neptune to Jupiter mass planets between ~1-10 AU. The unprecedented sensitivity of NIRCam on the JWST provides direct access to this population of gas-giants. A NIRCam 3 - 5 ?m survey for such planets will place critical constraints on planet formation by: 1) measuring the luminosities of young, sub-Jupiter mass planets, 2) providing constraints on the peak in the companion surface density vs. separation distribution, and 3) measuring the frequency of ?Jupiter mass giants in the outskirts of these systems (>10 AU). We have carefully constructed a sample of nearby, young, late-type stars, performed NIRCam survey simulations, and will report on the expected yield and advantages of JWST compared to current ground based capabilities.

  7. The anglo-australian planet search. XXIII. Two new Jupiter analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C. G.; Salter, G. S.; Bailey, J.; Wright, D.; Butler, R. P.; Jones, H. R. A.; Tuomi, Mikko; Carter, B. D.; Koch, F. Elliott; O'Toole, S. J.

    2014-03-10

    We report the discovery of two long-period giant planets from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search. HD 154857c is in a multiple-planet system, while HD 114613b appears to be solitary. HD 114613b has an orbital period P = 10.5 yr, and a minimum mass msin i of 0.48 M {sub Jup}; HD 154857c has P = 9.5 yr and msin i = 2.6 M {sub Jup}. These new data confirm the planetary nature of the previously unconstrained long-period object in the HD 154857 system. We have performed detailed dynamical stability simulations which show that the HD 154857 two-planet system is stable on timescales of at least 10{sup 8} yr. These results highlight the continued importance of 'legacy' surveys with long observational baselines; these ongoing campaigns are critical for determining the population of Jupiter analogs, and hence of those planetary systems with architectures most like our own solar system.

  8. The Now Frontier. Pioneer to Jupiter. Man Links Earth and Planets. Issue No. 1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1973

    This packet of space science instructional materials includes five issues related to the planet Jupiter. Each issue presents factual material about the planet, diagramatic representations of its movements and positions relative to bright stars or the earth, actual photographs and/or tables of data collected relevant to Pioneer 10, the spacecraft

  9. The Now Frontier. Pioneer to Jupiter. Man Links Earth and Planets. Issue No. 1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1973

    This packet of space science instructional materials includes five issues related to the planet Jupiter. Each issue presents factual material about the planet, diagramatic representations of its movements and positions relative to bright stars or the earth, actual photographs and/or tables of data collected relevant to Pioneer 10, the spacecraft…

  10. The Anglo-Australian Planet Search XXIV: The Frequency of Jupiter Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Butler, R. P.; Tinney, C. G.; Horner, Jonathan; Carter, B. D.; Wright, D. J.; Jones, H. R. A.; Bailey, J.; O’Toole, Simon J.

    2016-03-01

    We present updated simulations of the detectability of Jupiter analogs by the 17-year Anglo-Australian Planet Search. The occurrence rate of Jupiter-like planets that have remained near their formation locations beyond the ice line is a critical datum necessary to constrain the details of planet formation. It is also vital in our quest to fully understand how common (or rare) planetary systems like our own are in the Galaxy. From a sample of 202 solar-type stars, and correcting for imperfect detectability on a star-by-star basis, we derive a frequency of {6.2}-1.6+2.8% for giant planets in orbits from 3 to 7 au. When a consistent definition of “Jupiter analog” is used, our results are in agreement with those from other legacy radial-velocity surveys.

  11. WASP-41b: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Planet Orbiting a Magnetically Active G8V Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Hellier, C.; Queloz, D.; Smalley, B.; Street, R. A.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; West, R. G.; Gillon, M.; Lister, T. A.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Sgransan, D.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.

    2011-05-01

    We report the discovery of a transiting planet with an orbital period of 3.05 days orbiting the star TYC 7247-587-1. The star, WASP-41, is a moderately bright G8 V star (V=11.6) with a metallicity close to solar ([Fe/H]=-0.080.09). The star shows evidence of moderate chromospheric activity, both from emission in the cores of the Ca ii H and K ines and photometric variability with a period of 18.4 days and an amplitude of about 1%. We use a new method to show quantitatively that this periodic signal has a low false-alarm probability. The rotation period of the star implies a gyrochronological age for WASP-41 of 1.8 Gyr with an error of about 15%. We have used a combined analysis of the available photometric and spectroscopic data to derive the mass and radius of the planet (0.920.06 M, 1.200.06 R). Further observations of WASP-41 can be used to explore the connections between the properties of hot Jupiter planets and the level of chromospheric activity in their host stars.

  12. A SHORT-PERIOD CENSOR OF SUB-JUPITER MASS EXOPLANETS WITH LOW DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, Gy. M.; Kiss, L. L.

    2011-02-01

    Despite the existence of many short-period hot Jupiters, there is not one hot Neptune with an orbital period less than 2.5 days. Here, we discuss a cluster analysis of the currently known 106 transiting exoplanets to investigate a possible explanation for this observation. We find two distinct clusters in the mass-density space, one with hot Jupiters with a wide range of orbital periods (0.8-114 days) and a narrow range of planet radii (1.2 {+-} 0.2 R{sub J} ) and another one with a mixture of super-Earths, hot Neptunes, and hot Jupiters, exhibiting a surprisingly narrow period distribution (3.7 {+-} 0.8 days). These two clusters follow strikingly different distributions in the period-radius parameter plane. The branch of sub-Jupiter mass exoplanets is censored by the orbital period at the large-radius end: no planets with mass between 0.02 and 0.8 M{sub J} or with radius between 0.25 and 1.0 R{sub J} are known with P{sub orb} < 2.5 days. This clustering is not predicted by current theories of planet formation and evolution, which we also review briefly.

  13. Study of spin-scan imaging for outer planets missions. [imaging techniques for Jupiter orbiter missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, E. E.; Chandos, R. A.; Kodak, J. C.; Pellicori, S. F.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The constraints that are imposed on the Outer Planet Missions (OPM) imager design are of critical importance. Imager system modeling analyses define important parameters and systematic means for trade-offs applied to specific Jupiter orbiter missions. Possible image sequence plans for Jupiter missions are discussed in detail. Considered is a series of orbits that allow repeated near encounters with three of the Jovian satellites. The data handling involved in the image processing is discussed, and it is shown that only minimal processing is required for the majority of images for a Jupiter orbiter mission.

  14. Jupiter Observation Campaign - Citizen Science At The Outer Planets: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston Jones, J.; Dyches, P.

    2012-12-01

    Amateur astronomers and astrophotographers diligently image Mars, Saturn and Jupiter in amazing detail. They often capture first views of storms on Saturn, impacts on Jupiter and changes in the planet's atmospheres. Many of the worldwide cadre of imagers share their images with each other and with planetary scientists. This new Jupiter focused citizen science program seeks to collect images and sort them into categories useful to scientists. In doing so, it provides a larger population of amateur astronomers with the opportunity to contribute their observations to NASA's JUNO Mission.

  15. CROWDING-OUT OF GIANTS BY DWARFS: AN ORIGIN FOR THE LACK OF COMPANION PLANETS IN HOT JUPITER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-11-20

    We investigate the formation of close-in terrestrial planets from planetary embryos under the influence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using gravitational N-body simulations that include gravitational interactions between the gas disk and the terrestrial planet (e.g., type I migration). Our simulations show that several terrestrial planets efficiently form outside the orbit of the HJ, making a chain of planets, and all of them gravitationally interact directly or indirectly with the HJ through resonance, which leads to inward migration of the HJ. We call this mechanism of induced migration of the HJ ''crowding-out''. The HJ is eventually lost through collision with the central star, and only several terrestrial planets remain. We also find that the efficiency of the crowding-out effect depends on the model parameters; for example, the heavier the disk is, the more efficient the crowding-out is. When planet formation occurs in a massive disk, the HJ can be lost to the central star and is never observed. On the other hand, for a less massive disk, the HJ and terrestrial planets can coexist; however, the companion planets may be below the detection limit of current observations. In both cases, systems with a HJ and terrestrial planets have little chance of detection. Therefore, our model naturally explains the lack of companion planets in HJ systems regardless of the disk mass. In effect, our model provides a theoretical prediction for future observations; additional planets can be discovered just outside the HJ, and their masses should generally be small.

  16. Crowding-out of Giants by Dwarfs: An Origin for the Lack of Companion Planets in Hot Jupiter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the formation of close-in terrestrial planets from planetary embryos under the influence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using gravitational N-body simulations that include gravitational interactions between the gas disk and the terrestrial planet (e.g., type I migration). Our simulations show that several terrestrial planets efficiently form outside the orbit of the HJ, making a chain of planets, and all of them gravitationally interact directly or indirectly with the HJ through resonance, which leads to inward migration of the HJ. We call this mechanism of induced migration of the HJ "crowding-out." The HJ is eventually lost through collision with the central star, and only several terrestrial planets remain. We also find that the efficiency of the crowding-out effect depends on the model parameters; for example, the heavier the disk is, the more efficient the crowding-out is. When planet formation occurs in a massive disk, the HJ can be lost to the central star and is never observed. On the other hand, for a less massive disk, the HJ and terrestrial planets can coexist; however, the companion planets may be below the detection limit of current observations. In both cases, systems with a HJ and terrestrial planets have little chance of detection. Therefore, our model naturally explains the lack of companion planets in HJ systems regardless of the disk mass. In effect, our model provides a theoretical prediction for future observations; additional planets can be discovered just outside the HJ, and their masses should generally be small.

  17. Total mass of the Jupiter Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, T. A.; Chernetenko, Yu. A.

    2015-12-01

    The total mass of the Jupiter Trojans is estimated at (0.30 ± 0.19) × 10-10 M Sun using all available physical characteristics of these asteroids. The mass of asteroids in the L4 swarm ((0.19 ± 0.11) × 10-10 M Sun) is higher than that in the L5 swarm ((0.11 ± 0.07) × 10-10 M Sun) by a factor of 1.7. The obtained estimates include the hidden mass of asteroids that are not discovered yet. This hidden component constitutes 7% of the total mass. The number of Trojans with diameters larger than 1 km is estimated at 6 × 105. The number of such asteroids at the L4 Lagrangian point ( N L4 = 4 × 105) is two times higher than that at the L5 Lagrangian point ( N L5 = 2 × 105). It is found that the N L4/ N L5 ratio is increased at smaller asteroid sizes or higher absolute magnitudes H. This ratio equals just 1.3 for asteroids with H <11m (i.e., asteroids with diameters D > 30 km). The effect of gravitational perturbations from Trojans on the motion of Hildian asteroids and centaurs is evaluated. This effect turned out to be at the limit of accuracy of modern observations.

  18. Mass-loss evolution of close-in exoplanets: Evaporation of hot Jupiters and the effect on population

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, H.; Nakamoto, T.

    2014-03-01

    During their evolution, short-period exoplanets may lose envelope mass through atmospheric escape owing to intense X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from their host stars. Roche-lobe overflow induced by orbital evolution or intense atmospheric escape can also contribute to mass loss. To study the effects of mass loss on inner planet populations, we calculate the evolution of hot Jupiters considering mass loss of their envelopes and thermal contraction. Mass loss is assumed to occur through XUV-driven atmospheric escape and the following Roche-lobe overflow. The runaway effect of mass loss results in a dichotomy of populations: hot Jupiters that retain their envelopes and super Earths whose envelopes are completely lost. Evolution primarily depends on the core masses of planets and only slightly on migration history. In hot Jupiters with small cores (≅ 10 Earth masses), runaway atmospheric escape followed by Roche-lobe overflow may create sub-Jupiter deserts, as observed in both mass and radius distributions of planetary populations. Comparing our results with formation scenarios and observed exoplanets populations, we propose that populations of closely orbiting exoplanets are formed by capturing planets at/inside the inner edges of protoplanetary disks and subsequent evaporation of sub-Jupiters.

  19. From Dust to Dust: Protoplanetary Disk Accretion, Hot Jupiter Climates, and the Evaporation of Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel Alonso

    2013-12-01

    This dissertation is composed of three independent projects in astrophysics concerning phenomena that are concurrent with the birth, life, and death of planets. In Chapters 1 & 2, we study surface layer accretion in protoplanetary disks driven stellar X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. In Chapter 3, we identify the dynamical mechanisms that control atmospheric heat redistribution on hot Jupiters. Finally, in Chapter 4, we characterize the death of low-mass, short-period rocky planets by their evaporation into a dusty wind. Chapters 1 & 2: Whether protoplanetary disks accrete at observationally significant rates by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) depends on how well ionized they are. We find that disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays are susceptible to charge neutralization by condensates---ranging from mum-sized dust to angstrom-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ion densities in X-ray-irradiated surfaces are so low that ambipolar diffusion weakens the MRI. In contrast, ionization by stellar FUV radiation enables full-blown MRI turbulence in disk surface layers. Far-UV ionization of atomic carbon and sulfur produces a plasma so dense that it is immune to ion recombination on grains and PAHs. Even though the FUV-ionized layer is ˜10--100 times more turbulent than the X-ray-ionized layer, mass accretion rates of both layers are comparable because FUV photons penetrate to lower surface densities than do X-rays. We conclude that surface layer accretion occurs at observationally significant rates at radii ≳ 1--10 AU. At smaller radii, both X-ray- and FUV-ionized surface layers cannot sustain the accretion rates generated at larger distance and an additional means of transport is needed. In the case of transitional disks, it could be provided by planets. Chapter 3: Infrared light curves of transiting hot Jupiters present a trend in which the atmospheres of the hottest planets are less efficient at redistributing the stellar energy absorbed on their daysides than colder planets. Here we present a shallow water model of the atmospheric dynamics on synchronously rotating planets that explains why heat redistribution efficiency drops as stellar insolation rises. To interpret the model, we develop a scaling theory which shows that the timescale for gravity waves to propagate horizontally over planetary scales, tauwave, plays a dominant role in controlling the transition from small to large temperature contrasts. This implies that heat redistribution is governed by a wave-like process, similar to the one responsible for the weak temperature gradients in the Earth's tropics. When atmospheric drag can be neglected, the transition from small to large day-night temperature contrasts occurs when tauwave ˜ (taurad /o)1/2, where taurad is the radiative relaxation time of the atmosphere and o is the planetary rotation frequency. Our results subsume the more widely used timescale comparison for estimating heat redistribution efficiency between taurad and the horizontal day-night advection timescale, tauadv. Chapter 4: Short-period exoplanets can have dayside surface temperatures surpassing 2000 K, hot enough to vaporize rock and drive a thermal wind. Small enough planets evaporate completely. Here we construct a radiative-hydrodynamic model of atmospheric escape from strongly irradiated, low-mass rocky planets, accounting for dust-gas energy exchange in the wind. Rocky planets with masses ≲ 0.1 MEarth (less than twice the mass of Mercury) and surface temperatures ≳ 2000 K are found to disintegrate entirely in ≲ 10 Gyr. When our model is applied to Kepler planet candidate KIC 12557548b---which is believed to be a rocky body evaporating at a rate of dM/dt ≳ 0.1 MEarth/Gyr---our model yields a present-day planet mass of ≲ 0.02 MEarth or less than about twice the mass of the Moon. Mass loss rates depend so strongly on planet mass that bodies can reside on close-in orbits for Gyrs with initial masses comparable to or less than that of Mercury, before entering a final short-lived phase of catastrophic mass loss (which KIC 12557548b has entered). We estimate that for every object like KIC 12557548b, there should be 10--100 close-in quiescent progenitors with sub-day periods whose hard-surface transits may be detectable by Kepler---if the progenitors are as large as their maximal, Mercury-like sizes. KIC 12557548b may have lost ˜70% of its formation mass; today we may be observing its naked iron core.

  20. TrES-5: A MASSIVE JUPITER-SIZED PLANET TRANSITING A COOL G DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Mandushev, Georgi; Dunham, Edward W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Latham, David W.; Charbonneau, David; Buchhave, Lars A.; Rabus, Markus; Oetiker, Brian; Brown, Timothy M.; Belmonte, Juan A.

    2011-11-10

    We report the discovery of TrES-5, a massive hot Jupiter that transits the star GSC 03949-00967 every 1.48 days. From spectroscopy of the star we estimate a stellar effective temperature of T{sub eff} = 5171 {+-} 36 K, and from high-precision B, R, and I photometry of the transit we constrain the ratio of the semimajor axis a and the stellar radius R{sub *} to be a/R{sub *} = 6.07 {+-} 0.14. We compare these values to model stellar isochrones to obtain a stellar mass of M{sub *} = 0.893 {+-} 0.024 M{sub Sun }. Based on this estimate and the photometric time series, we constrain the stellar radius to be R{sub *} = 0.866 {+-} 0.013 R{sub Sun} and the planet radius to be R{sub p} = 1.209 {+-} 0.021 R{sub J}. We model our radial-velocity data assuming a circular orbit and find a planetary mass of 1.778 {+-} 0.063 M{sub J}. Our radial-velocity observations rule out line-bisector variations that would indicate a specious detection resulting from a blend of an eclipsing binary system. TrES-5 orbits one of the faintest stars with transiting planets found to date from the ground and demonstrates that precise photometry and followup spectroscopy are possible, albeit challenging, even for such faint stars.

  1. Characterizing Low-Mass Planets in Kepler's Multi-Planet Systems with Transit Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack; Rowe, Jason; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed an abundance of planets in a regime of mass and size that is absent from the Solar System. This includes systems of high multiplicity within 1 AU, where low-mass volatile-rich planets have been observed in compact orbital configurations. Smaller, rocky planets have also been observed in such systems. The existing sample of characterized planets on the mass-radius diagram shows no abrupt transition from rocky planets to those that must be volatile-rich, but characteristic trends are beginning to emerge. More precise characterizations of planets by mass, radius, and incident flux will aid in revealing fundamental properties of a common class of exoplanets. There is a small sample of exoplanets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can be used to measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modelling with Kepler data probes planetary masses over orbital periods ranging from ~5-100 days, complementing the sample of RV detections. Furthermore, in select cases, dynamical fits to observed TTVs can tightly constrain the orbital eccentricity vectors, which can, alongside the transit light curve, tightly constrain the density and radius of the host star, and hence reduce the uncertainty on planetary radius. TTV studies have revealed a class of low-mass low-density objects with a substantial mass fraction in the form of a voluminous H-rich atmosphere. To these we add precise mass measurements of the outer planets of Kepler-33, a compact system with five known transiting planets, three of which show detectable transit timing variations. These results will be placed in the context of other mass-radius measurements for planets of similar size and orbital periods to provide a summary of our knowledge to date.

  2. Planets of the solar system. [Jupiter and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondratyev, K. Y.; Moskalenko, N. I.

    1978-01-01

    Venera and Mariner spacecraft and ground based radio astronomy and spectroscopic observations of the atmosphere and surface of venus are examined. The composition and structural parameters of the atmosphere are discussed as the basis for development of models and theories of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, atmospheric circulation and cloud cover. Recommendations for further meteorological studies are given. Ground based and Pioneer satellite observation data on Jupiter are explored as well as calculations and models of the cloud structure, atmospheric circulation and thermal emission field of Jupiter.

  3. The architecture of the multi-planet system of ? And: ? And b - a super-inflated hot Jupiter in a cosmic ping-pong game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodler, Florian

    2015-12-01

    The gas giant Upsilon Andromeda b (? And b) was one of the first discovered exoplanets. This planet orbits around a bright, similar to the Sun star only 13.5 parsecs away from us. ? And b is also the innermost planet of a confirmed three-planet system, all of them non-transiting. As with all non-transiting planets, their exact masses and sizes are unknown, with their orbital inclination being the key parameter to unveil those values. Astrometric measurements have placed constraints to the orbital inclinations of the two outer planets in this system, indicating that we look almost 'face-on' on the system (McArthur et al. 2010). However, the orbital inclination for the innermost planet remained unknown.Photometric monitoring of ? And b orbit at infrared wavelengths has revealed significant brightness changes between the day-side and the night-side of the planet (Crossfield et al. 2010). The amplitude of those brightness variations depends on the orbital inclination of the planet and on its radius, therefore we can tightly constrain the size of the planet if its inclination is known.Here we present the measurement of the orbital inclination for the innermost planet ? And b, 23 deg, obtained by monitoring the Doppler shift of carbon monoxide (CO) lines on the atmospheric day-side of the planet with Keck/NIRSPEC. From this measurement we establish a planet mass of 1.7 times the mass of Jupiter and a minimum planet radius of 1.8 times the size of Jupiter. This result reveals that ? And b is likely to be one of the most inflated giant planets discovered to date. In addition, the observed strong CO absorption suggests an atmosphere with temperature uniformly decreasing towards higher altitudes, which suggests the absence of an atmospheric thermal inversion (Rodler et al. 2015).

  4. An Absence of Hot Jupiter Planets in 47 Tucanae: Results of a Wide-Field Transit Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldrake, David T. F.; Sackett, Penny D.; Bridges, Terry J.; Freeman, Kenneth C.

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive wide-field search for transiting ``hot Jupiter'' planets (gas giant planets with an orbital period in the range 1day<=P<=16days) in the globular cluster 47 Tuc. Motivated by the detection of the transit in HD 209458 and the apparent lack of planetary detections in the core of 47 Tuc by Gilliland and coworkers, this work further addresses the question of giant planet frequency in 47 Tuc by observing from the ground a 52'52' field centered on the cluster. Hence, this work is most sensitive to the uncrowded outer regions, where the stellar densities are significantly lower than in the core, and concentrates on 21,920 main-sequence stars within 2.5 mag of the cluster turnoff (hence approaching the solar value in mass). Our work comprises the largest ground-based transit search of a globular cluster to date, incorporating a 33 night time series that allows us excellent sensitivity to detect hot Jupiter planets. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations incorporating the actual temporal sampling and photometric precision of the data predict that seven planets with orbital periods in the range 1-16 days should be present in our data set if 47 Tuc has the same planetary frequency as that observed in the solar neighborhood. A detailed search utilizing a matched filter algorithm, developed specifically for this project, found no transit events. This 3.3 ? result is consistent with the Hubble Space Telescope cluster core null detection of Gilliland and coworkers. Our result indicates that system metallicity rather than crowding is the dominant effect inhibiting hot Jupiter formation in this environment. The 33 night data set used for this result also led to the detection of 100 variable stars, including 69 new discoveries, which are presented in a companion paper.

  5. Transit thermal control design for Galileo entry probe for planet Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haverly, G. C.; Pitts, W.

    1982-01-01

    A totally passive design was completed for the thermal control of the Galileo entry probe during its transit to the planet Jupiter. The design utilizes radio isotope heater units, multilayer insulation blankets and a thermal radiator in conjunction with a design conductance support structure to achieve both the required storage and critical initial planet atmosphere entry temperatures. The probe transit thermal design was completed and verified based on thermal vacuum testing of a prototype probe thermal test model.

  6. Optical Ground-Based Spectra of Jupiter and Saturn: An Exploration of Giant Planet Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Hudson, R. L.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present and interpret ground-based optical spectra of Jupiter and Saturn recently acquired in an effort to characterize candidate coloring agents, or chromophores, in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets of our solar system. Surprisingly, despite hundreds of years of observations, we still do not know the identity of the trace chemical compounds that color the atmospheres of the giant planets. Previous analyses have attempted to identify a specific chemical that is responsible for the colors, but none has yet been conclusively proven. We acquired spatially resolved optical spectra of various regions in the atmospheres of both Jupiter and Saturn in February 2013 using the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) on the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The spectra cover the range of 300-1000 nm, with a spectral resolution of R ~ 1200. For the observations of both Jupiter and Saturn, we used DIS with the 6 arcminute long slit aligned with the planets' latitudinal bands and stepped the slit north-south to build up a spectral image cube with spectra at all locations on the planet. This enables the extraction of subapertures within the slit corresponding to specific locations, e.g. the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, during the data reduction process. We compare the optical spectra of various colored regions in the giant planet atmospheres to laboratory data of candidate chromophores. The characterization of chromophore materials will provide insight into the upper tropospheric dynamics and circulation patterns on Jupiter and Saturn that provide a stable environment for the creation and/or sustenance of chromophores. This will help further our understanding of the different evolutionary pathways of the gas giant planets of our solar system, providing a process-oriented view of their variations in cloud colors.

  7. A Venus-mass Planet Orbiting a Brown Dwarf: A Missing Link between Planets and Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Jung, Y. K.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Mróz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hwang, K.-H.; Choi, J.-Y.; Shin, I.-G.; Park, H.; Bozza, V.

    2015-10-01

    The co-planarity of solar system planets led Kant to suggest that they formed from an accretion disk, and the discovery of hundreds of such disks around young stars as well as hundreds of co-planar planetary systems by the Kepler satellite demonstrate that this formation mechanism is extremely widespread. Many moons in the solar system, such as the Galilean moons of Jupiter, also formed out of the accretion disks that coalesced into the giant planets. Here we report the discovery of an intermediate system, OGLE-2013-BLG-0723LB/Bb, composed of a Venus-mass planet orbiting a brown dwarf, which may be viewed either as a scaled-down version of a planet plus a star or as a scaled-up version of a moon plus a planet orbiting a star. The latter analogy can be further extended since they orbit in the potential of a larger, stellar body. For ice-rock companions formed in the outer parts of accretion disks, like Uranus and Callisto, the scaled masses and separations of the three types of systems are similar, leading us to suggest that the formation processes of companions within accretion disks around stars, brown dwarfs, and planets are similar.

  8. Little Stars Don't Like Big Planets: An Astrometric Search for Super-Jupiters Around Red Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, John C.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.; Koerner, D. W.; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J.; RECONS

    2013-01-01

    The astrometric detection and characterization of extrasolar planets presents considerable technical challenges, but also promises to greatly enhance our understanding of these systems. Nearly all currently confirmed exoplanets have been discovered using transit or radial velocity techniques. The former is geometrically biased towards planets with small orbits, while the latter is biased towards massive planets with short periods that exert large gravitational accelerations on their host stars. Astrometric techniques are limited by the minimum detectable perturbation of a star's position due to a planet, but allow for the determination of orbit inclination and an accurate planetary mass. Here we present astrometric solutions for five nearby stars with known planets: four M dwarfs (GJ 317, GJ 581, GJ 849, and GJ 1214) and one K dwarf (BD -10 3166). Observations have baselines of three to thirteen years, and were made using the 0.9 m telescope at CTIO as part of the RECONS long-term astrometry program. We provide improved parallaxes for the stars and find that there are no planets of several Jupiter masses or brown dwarfs orbiting these stars with periods up to twice the length of the astrometric coverage. In the broader context, these results are consistent with the paucity of super-Jupiter and brown dwarf companions we find among the roughly 200 red dwarfs searched in our astrometric program. This effort has been supported by the National Science Foundation via grant AST 09-08402 and the long-term cooperative efforts of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories and the members of the SMARTS Consortium.

  9. Close encounters of a rotating star with planets in parabolic orbits of varying inclination and the formation of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. B.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we extend the theory of close encounters of a giant planet on a parabolic orbit with a central star developed in our previous work (Ivanov and Papaloizou in MNRAS 347:437, 2004; MNRAS 376:682, 2007) to include the effects of tides induced on the central star. Stellar rotation and orbits with arbitrary inclination to the stellar rotation axis are considered. We obtain results both from an analytic treatment that incorporates first order corrections to normal mode frequencies arising from stellar rotation and numerical treatments that are in satisfactory agreement over the parameter space of interest. These results are applied to the initial phase of the tidal circularisation problem. We find that both tides induced in the star and planet can lead to a significant decrease of the orbital semi-major axis for orbits having periastron distances smaller than 5-6 stellar radii with tides in the star being much stronger for retrograde orbits compared to prograde orbits. Assuming that combined action of dynamic and quasi-static tides could lead to the total circularisation of orbits this corresponds to observed periods up to 4-5 days. We use the simple Skumanich law to characterise the rotational history of the star supposing that the star has its rotational period equal to one month at the age of 5 Gyr. The strength of tidal interactions is characterised by circularisation time scale, t ev , which is defined as a typical time scale of evolution of the planet's semi-major axis due to tides. This is considered as a function of orbital period P obs , which the planet obtains after the process of tidal circularisation has been completed. We find that the ratio of the initial circularisation time scales corresponding to prograde and retrograde orbits, respectively, is of order 1.5-2 for a planet of one Jupiter mass having P obs ~ 4 days. The ratio grows with the mass of the planet, being of order five for a five Jupiter mass planet with the same P orb . Note, however, this result might change for more realistic stellar rotation histories. Thus, the effect of stellar rotation may provide a bias in the formation of planetary systems having planets on close orbits around their host stars, as a consequence of planet-planet scattering, which favours systems with retrograde orbits. The results reported in the paper may also be applied to the problem of tidal capture of stars in young stellar clusters.

  10. Mass Spectrometry in Jupiter's Atmosphere: Vertical Variation of Volatile Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-05-01

    The Galileo Probe made the first and only in situ measurements of composition in Jupiter's atmosphere, led by the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer, or GPMS [1]. The major contribution from this instrument was the measurement of abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases, as well as the volatile gases CH4, NH3, H2O, and H2S [2,3]. These initial results were further refined by detailed laboratory calibrations for the noble gases [4] and the volatiles [5]. The probe measurements resulted in the first determination of the heavy element abundances (except carbon that was known previously) and He/H ratio, which provide critical constraints to models of the formation of Jupiter and the origin of its atmosphere [6,7]. The condensable volatiles, or CVs (ammonia, H2S, and water), increased with depth in the probe entry site. This vertical variation was observed at levels much deeper than the modeled cloud bases, as predicted by one-dimensional chemical equilibrium models. The discrepancy is due to the probe's entry into a dry region known as a 5-?m hot spot. The 5-?m hot spots are part of an atmospheric wave system that encircles Jupiter just north of the equator. Despite the anomalous meteorology, the bulk abundances of NH3 and H2S were measured by the probe, and found to be enriched with respect to solar composition (similarly to the non-condensable volatile CH4). The deepest water mixing ratio, however, was observed to be depleted relative to solar composition. We review an updated context for the CV vertical profiles measured by the GPMS, based on the latest results from remote sensing, simulation, and reinterpretation of Galileo Probe measurements. In particular, we find that (1) the bulk abundance of water in Jupiter's atmosphere must be greater than the subsolar abundance derived from the deepest GPMS measurements [8], and that (2) CV mixing ratios are controlled by a range of processes in addition to condensation of the ices NH3, NH4SH, and H2O [5-9]. Both bulk abundances and spatial variation of these species will be further constrained by the Juno mission, scheduled to arrive at Jupiter in 2016. References: [1] Niemann, H.B. et al. 1992, SSRv 60, 111-142 [2] Niemann, H.B. et al. 1996, Science 272, 846-849 [3] Niemann, H.B. et al. 1998, JGR 103, 22831-22845 [4] Mahaffy, P.R. et al. 2000, JGR 105, 15061-15071 [5] Wong, M.H. et al. 2004, Icarus 171, 153-170 [6] Atreya, S.K. et al., 1999, Planet. Space Sci. 47, 1243-1262 [7] Atreya, S.K. et al., 2003, Planet. Space Sci. 451, 105-112 [8] Wong, M.H. et al., 2008, in Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry, vol. 68. Mineralogical Society of America, Chantilly, VA, pp. 219-246 [9] Wong, M.H., 2009, Icarus 199, 231-235

  11. THE PHOTOECCENTRIC EFFECT AND PROTO-HOT JUPITERS. I. MEASURING PHOTOMETRIC ECCENTRICITIES OF INDIVIDUAL TRANSITING PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Johnson, John Asher

    2012-09-10

    Exoplanet orbital eccentricities offer valuable clues about the history of planetary systems. Eccentric, Jupiter-sized planets are particularly interesting: they may link the 'cold' Jupiters beyond the ice line to close-in hot Jupiters, which are unlikely to have formed in situ. To date, eccentricities of individual transiting planets primarily come from radial-velocity measurements. Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting Jupiters spanning a range of periods, but the faintness of the host stars precludes radial-velocity follow-up of most. Here, we demonstrate a Bayesian method of measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its transit light curve using prior knowledge of its host star's density. We show that eccentric Jupiters are readily identified by their short ingress/egress/total transit durations-part of the 'photoeccentric' light curve signature of a planet's eccentricity-even with long-cadence Kepler photometry and loosely constrained stellar parameters. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploration of parameter posteriors naturally marginalizes over the periapse angle and automatically accounts for the transit probability. To demonstrate, we use three published transit light curves of HD 17156 b to measure an eccentricity of e = 0.71{sup +0.16}{sub -0.09}, in good agreement with the discovery value e = 0.67 {+-} 0.08 based on 33 radial-velocity measurements. We present two additional tests using Kepler data. In each case, the technique proves to be a viable method of measuring exoplanet eccentricities and their confidence intervals. Finally, we argue that this method is the most efficient, effective means of identifying the extremely eccentric, proto-hot Jupiters predicted by Socrates et al.

  12. Scorched Planets: Understanding the Structure and Climate of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole; Martioli, Eder; Angerhausen, Daniel; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Zhou, George; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan; Gaudi, B. Scott; James, David; Eastman, Jason; Beatty, Thomas G.; Bayliss, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity and transit surveys have revealed that hot Jupiters are intrinsically rare in the Galaxy. These extreme examples of extrasolar planets have been the subject of many studies to date, but their formation and evolution are still shrouded in mystery. I will present results from a large ground-based survey to study the atmospheres of hot Jupiters via their secondary eclipses in the near-infrared. Such observations provide us with a direct measurement of thermal emission from a planet’s day-side, allowing us to probe the connection between the atmospheric structure and climate deep in their atmospheres, as well as the irradiation from their host star. I will present results obtained for several hot Jupiters using the wide-field camera WIRCam on the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope (CFHT). The sample of hot Jupiters observed to date in the CFHT survey spans a range of planetary parameters (e.g. temperatures and densities) and also includes several new exotic discoveries from the KELT transit survey, such as a planet in a hierarchical triple stellar system as well as a planet with a very rapidly rotating host star. Results from the CFHT survey will be combined with those from an ongoing survey of hot Jupiter eclipses in the southern hemisphere using the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope as well as an upcoming survey using the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. The combined survey will be the largest homogeneous study of this kind to date, and it will provide us with the congruent observations of a significant number of unique planets in eclipse. These observations will ultimately allow a comprehensive statistical analysis of the diversity of hot Jupiter atmospheres via their near-infrared eclipses. In addition, this project will identify legacy targets for comparative exoplanetology using next-generation facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Minor planets and comets in libration about the 2:1 resonance with Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Marsden, B. G.; Williams, J. G.; Bardwell, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    We examine the orbits of minor planets in a search for objects librating about the 2:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter. Some 30 candidates are found among the Palomar-Leiden Survey and other unnumbered minor planets. Although almost all the orbits are very uncertain, there does seem to be an indication that librators of low orbital eccentricity do exist, contrary to the hypothesis by Giffen. We also tabulate data describing 12 comets that are temporarily librating about the 2:1 resonance. Finally, we present a discussion of what are apparently 'apocentric' librations. This type of libration, of which we find seven representatives among the numbered minor planets, can occur only for sufficiently small eccentricity. For such bodies, the role of Jupiter's eccentricity is vital; it is associated with a continuing alternation between apocentric libration and an oscillation of the line of apsides.

  14. WASP-77 Ab: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Planet in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Fumel, A.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D. L.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Southworth, K.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a transiting planet with an orbital period of 1.36 days orbiting the brighter component of the visual binary star BD -07 436. The host star, WASP-77 A, is a moderately bright G8 V star (V = 10.3) with a metallicity close to solar ([Fe/H] = 0.0 ± 0.1). The companion star, WASP-77 B, is a K-dwarf approximately 2 mag fainter at a separation of approximately 3''. The spectrum of WASP-77 A shows emission in the cores of the Caii H and K lines, indicative of moderate chromospheric activity. The Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) light curves show photometric variability with a period of 15.3 days and an amplitude of about 0.3% that is probably due to the magnetic activity of the host star. We use an analysis of the combined photometric and spectroscopic data to derive the mass and radius of the planet (1.76 ± 0.06 MJup, 1.21 ± 0.02 RJup). The age of WASP-77 A estimated from its rotation rate (~1 Gyr) agrees with the age estimated in a similar way for WASP-77 B (~0.6 Gyr) but is in poor agreement with the age inferred by comparing its effective temperature and density to stellar models (~8 Gyr). Follow-up observations of WASP-77 Ab will make a useful contribution to our understanding of the influence of binarity and host star activity on the properties of hot Jupiters. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 088.C-0011.

  15. PLANET HUNTERS. V. A CONFIRMED JUPITER-SIZE PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE AND 42 PLANET CANDIDATES FROM THE KEPLER ARCHIVE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Barclay, Thomas; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Jek, Kian J.; Hoekstra, Abe J.; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; LaCourse, Daryll; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; and others

    2013-10-10

    We report the latest Planet Hunter results, including PH2 b, a Jupiter-size (R{sub PL} = 10.12 ± 0.56 R{sub ⊕}) planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. PH2 b was elevated from candidate status when a series of false-positive tests yielded a 99.9% confidence level that transit events detected around the star KIC 12735740 had a planetary origin. Planet Hunter volunteers have also discovered 42 new planet candidates in the Kepler public archive data, of which 33 have at least 3 transits recorded. Most of these transit candidates have orbital periods longer than 100 days and 20 are potentially located in the habitable zones of their host stars. Nine candidates were detected with only two transit events and the prospective periods are longer than 400 days. The photometric models suggest that these objects have radii that range between those of Neptune and Jupiter. These detections nearly double the number of gas-giant planet candidates orbiting at habitable-zone distances. We conducted spectroscopic observations for nine of the brighter targets to improve the stellar parameters and we obtained adaptive optics imaging for four of the stars to search for blended background or foreground stars that could confuse our photometric modeling. We present an iterative analysis method to derive the stellar and planet properties and uncertainties by combining the available spectroscopic parameters, stellar evolution models, and transiting light curve parameters, weighted by the measurement errors. Planet Hunters is a citizen science project that crowd sources the assessment of NASA Kepler light curves. The discovery of these 43 planet candidates demonstrates the success of citizen scientists at identifying planet candidates, even in longer period orbits with only two or three transit events.

  16. Terrestrial planet and asteroid formation in the presence of giant planets. I. Relative velocities of planetesimals subject to Jupiter and Saturn perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortenkamp, S. J.; Wetherill, G. W.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the orbital evolution of 10(13)- to 10(25) -g planetesimals near 1 AU and in the asteroid belt (near 2.6 AU) prior to the stage of evolution when the mutual perturbations between the planetesimals become important. We include nebular gas drag and the effects of Jupiter and Saturn at their present masses and in their present orbits. Gas drag introduces a size-dependent phasing of the secular perturbations, which leads to a pronounced dip in encounter velocities (Venc) between bodies of similar mass. Plantesimals of identical mass have Venc approximately 1 and approximately 10 m s-1 (near 1 and 2.6 AU, respectively) while bodies differing by approximately 10 in mass have Venc approximately 10 and approximately 100 m s-1 (near 1 and 2.6 AU, respectively). Under these conditions, growth, rather than erosion, will occur only by collisions of bodies of nearly the same mass. There will be essentially no gravitational focusing between bodies less than 10(22) to 10(25) g, allowing growth of planetary embryos in the terrestrial planet region to proceed in a slower nonrunaway fashion. The environment in the asteroid belt will be even more forbidding and it is uncertain whether even the severely depleted present asteroid belt could form under these conditions. The perturbations of Jupiter and Saturn are quite sensitive to their semi-major axes and decrease when the planets' heliocentric distances are increased to allow for protoplanet migration. It is possible, though not clearly demonstrated, that this could produce a depleted asteroid belt but permit formation of a system of terrestrial planet embryos on a approximately 10(6)-year timescale, initially by nonrunaway growth and transitioning to runaway growth after approximately 10(5) years. The calculations reported here are valid under the condition that the relative velocities of the bodies are determined only by Jupiter and Saturn perturbations and by gas drag, with no mutual perturbations between planetesimals. If, while subject to these conditions, the bodies become large enough for their mutual perturbations to influence their velocity and size evolution significantly, the problem becomes much more complex. This problem is under investigation.

  17. Simulating Photoevaporative Mass Loss from Hot Jupiters in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Anjali; Kratter, Kaitlin; Krumholz, Mark; Murray-Clay, Ruth

    2013-07-01

    Escaping planetary winds have been observed with UV transmission spectra from several transiting hot Jupiters. To find other observational signatures of these winds, we are developing a global model of atmospheric escape from hot Jupiters. Our goal is to model the full, asymmetric structure of the wind, which is driven by photoionizing stellar flux and shaped by stellar winds and orbital motion. This poster presents the current status of our model, which simultaneously includes photoionization heating and is done in three dimensions, unlike previous models. Using the Athena code for hydrodynamics, we model the planet as a static potential with a hydrostatic atmosphere, at the center of a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. We self-consistently treat the planetary wind's production by introducing a planar source of stellar UV flux and evolving it with ionizing radiative transfer coupled to the hydrodynamics. We have implemented our ionization algorithm to include Static Mesh Refinement (SMR) and parallelization with MPI, to resolve the planet's exosphere. Tests of the evolution of a planar ionization front in our code match analytic expectations for the propagation rate of a D-type ionization front. Further code development is in progress, and we plan to include the major contributions to the outflow's asymmetry - the stellar wind, which can confine the planetary wind structure, and the Coriolis force, which captures the planet's orbital motion. Since Athena and our radiative transfer code are compatible with MHD, extensions to the model can further include the planet's magnetic field.

  18. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, James P.

    2013-09-01

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  19. COUPLED EVOLUTIONS OF THE STELLAR OBLIQUITY, ORBITAL DISTANCE, AND PLANET'S RADIUS DUE TO THE OHMIC DISSIPATION INDUCED IN A DIAMAGNETIC HOT JUPITER AROUND A MAGNETIC T TAURI STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Ling; Gu, Pin-Gao; Bodenheimer, Peter H.

    2012-10-01

    We revisit the calculation of the ohmic dissipation in a hot Jupiter presented by Laine et al. by considering more realistic interior structures, stellar obliquity, and the resulting orbital evolution. In this simplified approach, the young hot Jupiter of one Jupiter mass is modeled as a diamagnetic sphere with a finite resistivity, orbiting across tilted stellar magnetic dipole fields in vacuum. Since the induced ohmic dissipation occurs mostly near the planet's surface, we find that the dissipation is unable to significantly expand the young hot Jupiter. Nevertheless, the planet inside a small corotation orbital radius can undergo orbital decay by the dissipation torque and finally overfill its Roche lobe during the T Tauri star phase. The stellar obliquity can evolve significantly if the magnetic dipole is parallel/antiparallel to the stellar spin. Our results are validated by the general torque-dissipation relation in the presence of the stellar obliquity. We also run the fiducial model of Laine et al. and find that the planet's radius is sustained at a nearly constant value by the ohmic heating, rather than being thermally expanded to the Roche radius as suggested by the authors.

  20. Delay of planet formation at large radius and the outward decrease in mass and gas content of Jovian planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Li-Ping; Liu, Chun-Jian; Zhang, Yu

    2015-09-01

    A prominent observation of the solar system is that the mass and gas content of Jovian planets decrease outward with orbital radius, except that, in terms of these properties, Neptune is almost the same as Uranus. In previous studies, the solar nebula was assumed to preexist and the formation process of the solar nebula was not considered. It was therefore assumed that planet formation at different radii started at the same time in the solar nebula. We show that planet formation at different radii does not start at the same time and is delayed at large radii. We suggest that this delay might be one of the factors that causes the outward decrease in the masses of Jovian planets. The nebula starts to form from its inner part because of the inside-out collapse of its progenitorial molecular cloud core. The nebula then expands outward due to viscosity. Material first reaches a small radius and then reaches a larger radius, so planet formation is delayed at the large radius. The later the material reaches a planet's location, the less time it has to gain mass and gas content. Hence, the delay tends to cause the outward decrease in mass and gas content of Jovian planets. Our nebula model shows that the material reaches Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune at t = 0.40, 0.57, 1.50 and 6.29 × 106 yr, respectively. We discuss the effects of time delay on the masses of Jovian planets in the framework of the core accretion model of planet formation. Saturn's formation is not delayed by much time relative to Jupiter so that they both reach the rapid gas accretion phase and become gas giants. However, the delay in formation of Uranus and Neptune is long and might be one of the factors that cause them not to reach the rapid gas accretion phase before the gas nebula is dispersed. Saturn has less time to go through the rapid gas accretion, so Saturn's mass and gas content are significantly less than those of Jupiter.

  1. EMBRYO IMPACTS AND GAS GIANT MERGERS. I. DICHOTOMY OF JUPITER AND SATURN's CORE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shulin; Agnor, C.B.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2010-09-10

    Interior to the gaseous envelopes of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, there are high-density cores with masses larger than 10 Earth masses. According to the conventional sequential accretion hypothesis, such massive cores are needed for the onset of efficient accretion of their gaseous envelopes. However, Jupiter's gaseous envelope is more massive and its core may be less massive than those of Saturn. In order to account for this structural diversity and the super-solar metallicity in the envelope of Jupiter and Saturn, we investigate the possibility that they may have either merged with other gas giants or consumed several Earth-mass protoplanetary embryos during or after the rapid accretion of their envelope. In general, impinging sub-Earth-mass planetesimals disintegrate in gas giants' envelopes, deposit heavy elements well outside the cores, and locally suppress the convection. Consequently, their fragments sediment to promote the growth of cores. Through a series of numerical simulations, we show that it is possible for colliding super-Earth-mass embryos to reach the cores of gas giants. Direct parabolic collisions also lead to the coalescence of gas giants and merging of their cores. In these cases, the energy released from the impact leads to vigorous convective motion throughout the envelope and the erosion of the cores. This dichotomy contributes to the observed dispersion in the internal structure and atmospheric composition between Jupiter and Saturn and other gas giant planets and elsewhere.

  2. Using Jupiter's Volatile Inventory to Trace the History Of Ices During Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Galileo probe's measurement of a uniform enrichment of Jupiter's atmosphere in volatiles, including noble gases, relative to a gas of solar composition has proven to be a challenge to models of planet formation. This uniform enrichment requires that Jupiter accreted planetesimals with solar ratios in all elements, except for hydrogen and helium. Given the very low temperatures needed to achieve such compositions if all elements behaved chemically as pure substances, efforts have focused on understanding how extremely volatile elements could be physically incorporated into ices and organics at low temperatures. Two primary methods for incorporation of these volatiles have emerged: formation of clathrate hydrates and trapping of gases during the formation of amorphous ice. These modes for incorporating volatiles make different predictions about the amount of water that would be contained within Jupiter, an issue that will be addressed by the Juno Mission. Either mode for incorporating volatiles will reveal details about the dynamical behavior of ices during planet formation and the environments in which planetary materials were formed. For example, Ciesla (2014) showed that amorphous ice formation, and thus trapping of volatiles in this manner, can occur as water molecules are photodesorbed and freeze-out again on grain surfaces, thus requiring high UV flux environments at the birth of the solar system or significant vertical lofting of grains in the disk by turbulence. I will review the conditions that are required for amorphous trapping and clathrate hydrate formation to have occurred in the solar nebula and discuss the implications for the compositions of the other giant planets and cometary bodies, as well as the relation of these materials to the sources of volatiles on terrestrial planets.

  3. Dynamics of the Jupiter Trojans with Saturn's perturbation in the present configuration of the two planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiyun; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Liu, Lin

    2014-06-01

    The dynamics of the two Jupiter triangular libration points perturbed by Saturn is studied in this paper. Unlike some previous works that studied the same problem via the pure numerical approach, this study is done in a semianalytic way. Using a literal solution, we are able to explain the asymmetry of two orbits around the two libration points with symmetric initial conditions. The literal solution consists of many frequencies. The amplitudes of each frequency are the same for both libration points, but the initial phase angles are different. This difference causes a temporary spatial asymmetry in the motions around the two points, but this asymmetry gradually disappears when the time goes to infinity. The results show that the two Jupiter triangular libration points should have symmetric spatial stable regions in the present status of Jupiter and Saturn. As a test of the literal solution, we study the resonances that have been extensively studied in Robutel and Gabern (Mon Not R Astron Soc 372:1463-1482, 2006). The resonance structures predicted by our analytic theory agree well with those found in Robutel and Gabern (Mon Not R Astron Soc 372:1463-1482, 2006) via a numerical approach. Two kinds of chaotic orbits are discussed. They have different behaviors in the frequency map. The first kind of chaotic orbits (inner chaotic orbits) is of small to moderate amplitudes, while the second kind of chaotic orbits (outer chaotic orbits) is of relatively larger amplitudes. Using analytical theory, we qualitatively explain the transition process from the inner chaotic orbits to the outer chaotic orbits with increasing amplitudes. A critical value of the diffusion rate is given to separate them in the frequency map. In a forthcoming paper, we will study the same problem but keep the planets in migration. The time asymmetry, which is unimportant in this paper, may cause an observable difference in the two Jupiter Trojan groups during a very fast planet migration process.

  4. Solar nebula constraints derived from the masses and formation times of Earth, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, Ignacio; Lichtig, Ryan

    2014-11-01

    Terrestrial planets accreted from the late-stage collisional evolution of planetary embryos (roughly Mars-sized) and leftover planetesimals (Chambers 2013). Since the timescale to produce Earth-like analogues is on the order of ~ 100 My, the solar nebula gas would have dissipated by then. On the other hand, Hf-W chronology yields a short accretion timescale for Mars ~9 My (Dauphas and Pourmand 2011), which is similar to the gas dissipation time (Haisch et al. 2011). The Grand-Tack model proposes that Jupiter and Saturn migrated inward until Saturn was caught in a 2:3 mean motion resonance then migrated outward, truncating the disk in the process and accounting for Mars orbit, accretion timescale, and small mass (Walsh et al. 2011). However, in order to power the migration of the giant planets this model assumes the presence of a massive (compared to Jupiter) viscously evolving gas disk. This means that the giant planets themselves would not have completed their growth. Thus, the Grand-Tack model provides an explanation for the small mass of Mars at the cost of ignoring the resulting problematic large mass of Saturn. Here we fix the locations and masses of Jupiter and Saturn and develop a model in which the depleted region is due to three key mechanisms: one, removal of collisional fragments by gas drag; two, coalescence of planetary embryos by sweeping secular resonances during gas disk dispersal; three, removal of planetary embryos by Type I tidal interaction with the gas disk. We use analytical and numerical N-body results to evaluate the consequences of the above processes for the disk of solids. We focus on the variables controlling the extent of the depleted region. We stress that the static giant planets nevertheless play a determining role: first, by filtering-out outer disk planetesimal fragments that would otherwise replenish the inner disk; second, by increasing the (phased) eccentricities of planetary embryos thereby allowing larger objects to form; third, by opening gaps in the gas disk and thus setting the boundary conditions for the Type I tidal interaction of the planetary embryos with the nebula gas. In particular, the embryos Type I migration depends on the location of Jupiter.

  5. Scaling from Jupiter to pulsars and mass spectrum of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.; Hang, H.; Wu, J.

    1982-01-01

    Following the principle of similitude, the energy loss of Jupiter was scaled through the acceleration of high energy particles to that of Crab pulsar. The agreement suggests a classification scheme for all pulsars in which the pulsar angular velocity and its decrease with time are related to the pulsar moment of inertia divided by its radius and its mass is determined according to neutron star models. The mass spectrum of 194 pulsars is found to be approximately 1/sq m.

  6. The mass disruption of Jupiter Family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2015-01-01

    I show that the size-distribution of small scattered-disk trans-neptunian objects when derived from the observed size-distribution of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) and other observational constraints implies that a large percentage (94-97%) of newly arrived active comets within a range of 0.2-15.4 km effective radius must physically disrupt, i.e., macroscopically disintegrate, within their median dynamical lifetime. Additional observational constraints include the numbers of dormant and active nuclei in the near-Earth object (NEO) population and the slope of their size distributions. I show that the cumulative power-law slope (-2.86 to -3.15) of the scattered-disk TNO hot population between 0.2 and 15.4 km effective radius is only weakly dependent on the size-dependence of the otherwise unknown disruption mechanism. Evidently, as JFC nuclei from the scattered disk evolve into the inner Solar System only a fraction achieve dormancy while the vast majority of small nuclei (e.g., primarily those with effective radius <2 km) break-up. The percentage disruption rate appears to be comparable with that of the dynamically distinct Oort cloud and Halley type comets (Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Jedicke, R., Wiegert, P.A., Bottke Jr., W.F. [2002]. Science 296, 2212-2215) suggesting that all types of comet nuclei may have similar structural characteristics even though they may have different source regions and thermal histories. The typical disruption rate for a 1 km radius active nucleus is ?5 10-5 disruptions/year and the dormancy rate is typically 3 times less. We also estimate that average fragmentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.04 events/year/comet, somewhat above the lower limit of 0.01 events/year/comet observed by Chen and Jewitt (Chen, J., Jewitt, D.C. [1994]. Icarus 108, 265-271).

  7. Earth, Jupiter and Saturn as guides for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs: a lightning climatology study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodosán, Gabriella; Asensio Torres, Rubén; Helling, Christiane; Vorgul, Irena

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale electrostatic discharges (i.e. lightning) have been observed in the Solar System. Apart from Earth there are direct detections from Jupiter and Saturn and indirect (only radio) detection from Uranus and Neptune. Recent observations made by the Venus Explorer revealed radio signals that may be related to lightning. Observations indicate that clouds form on extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. The conditions in these clouds may be good for lightning to occur, which can be a main ionization process in these atmospheres (lightning in mineral clouds e.g.: Bailey et al. 2014, ApJ, 784, 43; Helling at al. 2013, ApJ, 767, 136; Helling et al. 2013, P&SS, 77, 152). In this study our aim is to compare lightning climatology from Earth, Jupiter and Saturn and use these statistics as a guide to study potential lightning on extrasolar planetary objects. Earth is a fair analogy for rocky or ocean planets while Jupiter and Saturn resemble giant planets and brown dwarfs. To give an estimate on the total lightning energy (or power) that can reach us from a particular extrasolar body, we need to know how much lightning can occur on the object globally. We will show the possibilities in the number and quality of the giant planet data sets, which may give a fine comparison of future observations of extrasolar giant gas planets and even brown dwarfs. Data were obtained from Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS)/Optical Transient Detector (OTD) (e.g.: Cecil et al. 2014, Atmospheric Research, 135, 404), Sferics Timing and Ranging Network (STARNET) (e.g.: Morales Rodrigues et al. 2011, 2014, XIV and XV International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity) and World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) (e.g.: Hutchins et al. 2012, Radio Science, 47, RS6005), four major lightning detecting networks, which monitor lightning occurrence in the optical or radio range on Earth. We compare flash/stroke rates in space and time and use the data to refer to Earth as a transiting exoplanet. We analyze flash rates from a certain celestial direction (as if looked at Earth from outside the Solar System from a fixed location) to see how they vary as the planet orbits the star. The same comparison studies are conducted for Jupiter and Saturn from Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons data. The comparison of Earth-data shows the importance of the networks' detection efficiency (detected lightning over the total amount of lightning in percentages) and the location of the individual instruments of the networks. Characterizing exoplanets is a difficult task, however, there are planets in our Solar System, which are better studied. Here we show how using the knowledge we have on these planets is a key aspect of exoplanetary sciences. Acknowledgement: We thank Daniel J. Cecil from LIS/OTD, Carlos Augusto Morales Rodrigues from STARNET and Robert H. Holzworth from WWLLN who kindly helped us obtaining data from the lightning detecting networks. The authors wish to thank the World Wide Lightning Location Network (http://wwlln.net), a collaboration among over 50 universities and institutions, for providing the lightning location data used in this work.

  8. THE MASS OF KOI-94d AND A RELATION FOR PLANET RADIUS, MASS, AND INCIDENT FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Kolbl, Rea; Rowe, Jason F.; Howell, Steve B.; Howard, Andrew W.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Miller, Neil; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara; Fischer, Debra A.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Johnson, John Asher; Horch, Elliott P.; Everett, Mark E.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2013-05-01

    We measure the mass of a modestly irradiated giant planet, KOI-94d. We wish to determine whether this planet, which is in a 22 day orbit and receives 2700 times as much incident flux as Jupiter, is as dense as Jupiter or rarefied like inflated hot Jupiters. KOI-94 also hosts at least three smaller transiting planets, all of which were detected by the Kepler mission. With 26 radial velocities of KOI-94 from the W. M. Keck Observatory and a simultaneous fit to the Kepler light curve, we measure the mass of the giant planet and determine that it is not inflated. Support for the planetary interpretation of the other three candidates comes from gravitational interactions through transit timing variations, the statistical robustness of multi-planet systems against false positives, and several lines of evidence that no other star resides within the photometric aperture. We report the properties of KOI-94b (M{sub P} = 10.5 {+-} 4.6 M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P} = 1.71 {+-} 0.16 R{sub Circled-Plus }, P = 3.74 days), KOI-94c (M{sub P} = 15.6{sup +5.7}{sub -15.6} M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P} = 4.32 {+-} 0.41 R{sub Circled-Plus }, P = 10.4 days), KOI-94d (M{sub P} = 106 {+-} 11 M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P} = 11.27 {+-} 1.06 R{sub Circled-Plus }, P = 22.3 days), and KOI-94e (M{sub P} = 35{sup +18}{sub -28} M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P} = 6.56 {+-} 0.62 R{sub Circled-Plus }, P = 54.3 days). The radial velocity analyses of KOI-94b and KOI-94e offer marginal (>2{sigma}) mass detections, whereas the observations of KOI-94c offer only an upper limit to its mass. Using the KOI-94 system and other planets with published values for both mass and radius (138 exoplanets total, including 35 with M{sub P} < 150 M{sub Circled-Plus }), we establish two fundamental planes for exoplanets that relate their mass, incident flux, and radius from a few Earth masses up to 13 Jupiter masses: (R{sub P}/R{sub Circled-Plus }) = 1.78(M{sub P}/M{sub Circled-Plus }){sup 0.53}(F/erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}){sup -0.03} for M{sub P} < 150 M{sub Circled-Plus }, and R{sub P}/R{sub Circled-Plus} = 2.45(M{sub P}/M{sub Circled-Plus }){sup -0.039}(F/erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}){sup 0.094} for M{sub P} > 150 M{sub Circled-Plus }. These equations can be used to predict the radius or mass of a planet.

  9. Probing clouds in planets with a simple radiative transfer model: the Jupiter case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendikoa, Iñigo; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín

    2012-11-01

    Remote sensing of planets evokes using expensive on-orbit satellites and gathering complex data from space. However, the basic properties of clouds in planetary atmospheres can be successfully estimated with small telescopes even from an urban environment using currently available and affordable technology. This makes the process accessible for undergraduate students while preserving most of the physics and mathematics involved. This paper presents the methodology for carrying out a photometric study of planetary atmospheres, focused on the planet Jupiter. The method introduces the basics of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres, some notions on inverse problem theory and the fundamentals of planetary photometry. As will be shown, the procedure allows the student to derive the spectral reflectivity and top altitude of clouds from observations at different wavelengths by applying a simple but enlightening ‘reflective layer model’. In this way, the planet's atmospheric structure is estimated by students as an inverse problem from the observed photometry. Web resources are also provided to help those unable to obtain telescopic observations of the planets.

  10. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR VERY LOW MASS GASEOUS PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Stevenson, David J.

    2013-05-20

    Recently, the Kepler spacecraft has detected a sizable aggregate of objects, characterized by giant-planet-like radii and modest levels of stellar irradiation. With the exception of a handful of objects, the physical nature, and specifically the average densities, of these bodies remain unknown. Here, we propose that the detected giant planet radii may partially belong to planets somewhat less massive than Uranus and Neptune. Accordingly, in this work, we seek to identify a physically sound upper limit to planetary radii at low masses and moderate equilibrium temperatures. As a guiding example, we analyze the interior structure of the Neptune-mass planet Kepler-30d and show that it is acutely deficient in heavy elements, especially compared with its solar system counterparts. Subsequently, we perform numerical simulations of planetary thermal evolution and in agreement with previous studies, show that generally, 10-20 M{sub Circled-Plus }, multi-billion year old planets, composed of high density cores and extended H/He envelopes can have radii that firmly reside in the giant planet range. We subject our results to stability criteria based on extreme ultraviolet radiation, as well as Roche-lobe overflow driven mass-loss and construct mass-radius relationships for the considered objects. We conclude by discussing observational avenues that may be used to confirm or repudiate the existence of putative low mass, gas-dominated planets.

  11. Effects of mass loss for highly-irradiated giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Hattori, M. F.; Burrows, A.; Hubeny, I.; Sudarsky, D.

    2007-04-01

    We present calculations for the evolution and surviving mass of highly-irradiated extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) at orbital semimajor axes ranging from 0.023 to 0.057 AU using a generalized scaled theory for mass loss, together with new surface-condition grids for hot EGPs and a consistent treatment of tidal truncation. Theoretical estimates for the rate of energy-limited hydrogen escape from giant-planet atmospheres differ by two orders of magnitude, when one holds planetary mass, composition, and irradiation constant. Baraffe et al. [Baraffe, I., Selsis, F., Chabrier, G., Barman, T.S., Allard, F., Hauschildt, P.H., Lammer, H., 2004. Astron. Astrophys. 419, L13-L16] predict the highest rate, based on the theory of Lammer et al. [Lammer, H., Selsis, F., Ribas, I., Guinan, E.F., Bauer, S.J., Weiss, W.W., 2003. Astrophys. J. 598, L121-L124]. Scaling the theory of Watson et al. [Watson, A.J., Donahue, T.M., Walker, J.C.G., 1981. Icarus 48, 150-166] to parameters for a highly-irradiated exoplanet, we find an escape rate 10 lower than Baraffe's. With the scaled Watson theory we find modest mass loss, occurring early in the history of a hot EGP. In this theory, mass loss including the effect of Roche-lobe overflow becomes significant primarily for masses below a Saturn mass, for semimajor axes ?0.023 AU. This contrasts with the Baraffe model, where hot EGPs are claimed to be remnants of much more massive bodies, originally several times Jupiter and still losing substantial mass fractions at present.

  12. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: FOUR TRANSITING PLANETS MORE MASSIVE THAN JUPITER ORBITING MODERATELY BRIGHT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Torres, G.; Beky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenar, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Kovacs, G.; Shporer, A.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; and others

    2012-07-15

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M{sub J} and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M{sub J}), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 {+-} 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 {+-} 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters.

  13. Galilean Moons, Kepler's Third Law, and the Mass of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Alan

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of physical systems are widely available online, with no cost, and are ready to be used in our classrooms. ,2 Such simulations offer an accessible tool that can be used for a range of interactive learning activities. The Jovian Moons Applet2 allows the user to track the position of Jupiter's four Galilean moons with a variety of viewing options. For this activity, data are obtained from the orbital period and orbital radii charts. Earlier experiments have used telescopes to capture the orbital motion of the Galilean moons,3 although observation of astronomical events and the measurement of quantities may be difficult to achieve due to a combination of cost, training, and observing conditions. The applet allows a suitable set of data to be generated and data analysis that verifies Kepler's third law of planetary motion, which leads to a calculated value for the mass of Jupiter.

  14. ``Hot Jupiter," a Hydrodynamically Unstable and Haze-free Giant Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.-C.; Parkinson, C.; Yung, Y.

    2004-11-01

    The tentative detection of atomic hydrogen near HD 209458b, a Jupiter-size planet located at 0.05 AU from its parent star, suggests that the atmosphere is hydrodynamically unstable. This hydrogen in the atmosphere of HD 209458b can readily escape by a process that is similar to that responsible for the loss of an ocean on the early Venus. The ongoing hydrodynamic loss in the atmospheres of planets similar to HD 209458b would tell us for the first time how this process is triggered, as well as how the planets evolve. A photochemical study suggests that the hydrogen is produced via an H2O-mediated process, and the mixing ratio of atomic hydrogen in the upper atmosphere can be as high as unity, suggesting that the upper atmosphere is unstable. This is the direct consequence of high temperature in the atmosphere, where the H2O can be present in gas phase. Because of the high abundance of atomic hydrogen in such high temperature conditions, the production of aerosols is unfavorable. The aerosols can be formed only locally. A possible candidate is poly-sulfur. To study this possibility, we explore a three-dimensional circulation model. Using the EPIC model, we rule out this possibility. Therefore, we would be able to detect the atmospheric constituents down to the Rayleigh limit or cloud tops of high temperature condensates.

  15. ON THE MIGRATION OF JUPITER AND SATURN: CONSTRAINTS FROM LINEAR MODELS OF SECULAR RESONANT COUPLING WITH THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Agnor, Craig B.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2012-02-01

    We examine how the late divergent migration of Jupiter and Saturn may have perturbed the terrestrial planets. Using a modified secular model we have identified six secular resonances between the {nu}{sub 5} frequency of Jupiter and Saturn and the four apsidal eigenfrequencies of the terrestrial planets (g{sub 1-4}). We derive analytic upper limits on the eccentricity and orbital migration timescale of Jupiter and Saturn when these resonances were encountered to avoid perturbing the eccentricities of the terrestrial planets to values larger than the observed ones. Because of the small amplitudes of the j = 2, 3 terrestrial eigenmodes the g{sub 2} - {nu}{sub 5} and g{sub 3} - {nu}{sub 5} resonances provide the strongest constraints on giant planet migration. If Jupiter and Saturn migrated with eccentricities comparable to their present-day values, smooth migration with exponential timescales characteristic of planetesimal-driven migration ({tau} {approx} 5-10 Myr) would have perturbed the eccentricities of the terrestrial planets to values greatly exceeding the observed ones. This excitation may be mitigated if the eccentricity of Jupiter was small during the migration epoch, migration was very rapid (e.g., {tau} {approx}< 0.5 Myr perhaps via planet-planet scattering or instability-driven migration) or the observed small eccentricity amplitudes of the j = 2, 3 terrestrial modes result from low probability cancellation of several large amplitude contributions. Results of orbital integrations show that very short migration timescales ({tau} < 0.5 Myr), characteristic of instability-driven migration, may also perturb the terrestrial planets' eccentricities by amounts comparable to their observed values. We discuss the implications of these constraints for the relative timing of terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and the origin of the so-called Late Heavy Bombardment of the Moon 3.9 {+-} 0.1 Ga ago. We suggest that the simplest way to satisfy these dynamical constraints may be for the bulk of any giant planet migration to be complete in the first 30-100 Myr of solar system history.

  16. The effects of the formation of a giant planet on the evolution of the protoplanetary disk: the case of Jupiter in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrini, Diego

    2015-11-01

    The formation of a giant planet is one of the milestones in the life of a planetary system, as it plays a leading role in shaping its subsequent evolution. Once the core of the forming giant planet reaches the critical mass needed to trigger the hydrodynamical instability in the surrounding nebular gas and start the rapid phase of gas accretion, the planetary system in which the planet is embedded suddenly experience the appearance of a strong gravitational perturber. Even in absence of migration, this event will trigger a 0.5-1 Myr-long phase of violent remixing and enhanced collisional evolution of the planetary bodies in the protoplanetary disk. For what it concerns the giant planet itself, this primordial bombardment will result in the capture of high-Z material from a wide orbital range, including the inner regions of the planetary system. For what it concerns the other bodies of the protoplanetary disk, this phase of remixing and bombardment will result in the collisional erosion of the smallest planetesimals in the dynamically-excited orbital regions and in the delivery of water and volatile elements to the inner regions of the planetary system. While the mass growth of the giant planet is necessary and sufficient condition to trigger this primordial bombardment, planetary migration plays a major role in determining its intensity. Using the formation of Jupiter in the Solar System as our case study, we will illustrate how this event affects the Jovian system and the asteroid belt. Concerning the latter, we will also discuss how the composition of asteroid Vesta, whose formation and differentiation predate the formation of Jupiter, supplies information on the primordial dynamical evolution of the giant planet.

  17. Extrasolar Planets and Prospects for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, Steven S.; Fischer, Debra A.

    2004-06-01

    Examination of 2000 sun--like stars has revealed 97 planets (as of 2002 Nov), all residing within our Milky Way Galaxy and within 200 light years of our Solar System. They have masses between 0.1 and 10 times that of Jupiter, and orbital sizes of 0.05--5 AU. Thus planets occupy the entire detectable domain of mass and orbits. News &summaries about extrasolar planets are provided at: http://exoplanets.org. These planets were all discovered by the wobble of the host stars, induced gravitationally by the planets, causing a periodicity in the measured Doppler effect of the starlight. Earth--mass planets remain undetectable, but space--based missions such as Kepler, COROT and SIM may provide detections of terrestrial planets within the next decade. The number of planets increases with decreasing planet mass, indicating that nature makes more small planets than jupiter--mass planets. Extrapolation, though speculative, bodes well for an even larger number of earth--mass planets. These observations and the theory of planet formation suggests that single sun--like stars commonly harbor earth--sized rocky planets, as yet undetectable. The number of planets increases with increasing orbital distance from the host star, and most known planets reside in non--circular orbits. Many known planets reside in the habitable zone (albeit being gas giants) and most newly discovered planets orbit beyond 1 AU from their star. A population of Jupiter--like planets may reside at 5--10 AU from stars, not easily detectable at present. The sun--like star 55 Cancri harbors a planet of 4--10 Jupiter masses orbiting at 5.5 AU in a low eccentricity orbit, the first analog of our Jupiter, albeit with two large planets orbiting inward. To date, 10 multiple--planet systems have been discovered, with four revealing gravitational interactions between the planets in the form of resonances. GJ 876 has two planets with periods of 1 and 2 months. Other planetary systems are ``hierarchical'', consisting of widely separated orbits. These two system architectures probably result from gravitational interactions among the planets and between the planets and the protoplanetary disk out of which they formed.

  18. Low-mass star and planet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    Low-mass star and planet formation is reviewed through a brief comparison of the results of cosmogonical models with observations ranging from studies of star-forming regions to searches for planetary companions to low-mass stars. Five key phases are described, starting from the dense, interstellar cloud cores that form low-mass stars, through the protostellar collapse and fragmentation phase, to the formation of a protostellar object accreting gas from the surrounding protostellar disk and cloud envelope. Descriptions are given for the phase where planets are formed in the protostellar disk, and the dissipation of the bulk of the protostellar disk and the appearance of an optically visible, premain-sequence star.

  19. WFIRST PLANET MASSES FROM MICROLENS PARALLAX

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, J. C.

    2013-06-20

    I present a method using only a few ground-based observations of magnified microlensing events to routinely measure the parallaxes of WFIRST events if WFIRST is in an L2 orbit. This could be achieved for all events with A{sub max} > 30 using target-of-opportunity observations of select WFIRST events, or with a complementary, ground-based survey of the WFIRST field, which can push beyond this magnification limit. When combined with a measurement of the angular size of the Einstein ring, which is almost always measured in planetary events, these parallax measurements will routinely give measurements of the lens masses and hence the absolute masses of the planets. They can also lead to mass measurements for dark, isolated objects such as brown dwarfs, free-floating planets, and stellar remnants if the size of the Einstein ring is measured.

  20. WFIRST Planet Masses from Microlens Parallax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. C.

    2013-06-01

    I present a method using only a few ground-based observations of magnified microlensing events to routinely measure the parallaxes of WFIRST events if WFIRST is in an L2 orbit. This could be achieved for all events with A max > 30 using target-of-opportunity observations of select WFIRST events, or with a complementary, ground-based survey of the WFIRST field, which can push beyond this magnification limit. When combined with a measurement of the angular size of the Einstein ring, which is almost always measured in planetary events, these parallax measurements will routinely give measurements of the lens masses and hence the absolute masses of the planets. They can also lead to mass measurements for dark, isolated objects such as brown dwarfs, free-floating planets, and stellar remnants if the size of the Einstein ring is measured.

  1. High-energy irradiation and mass loss rates of hot Jupiters in the solar neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-04-01

    Giant gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience strong irradiation. In extreme cases photoevaporation causes a transonic, planetary wind and the persistent mass loss can possibly affect the planetary evolution. We have identified nine hot Jupiter systems in the vicinity of the Sun, in which expanded planetary atmospheres should be detectable through Ly? transit spectroscopy according to predictions. We use X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of seven of these targets to derive the high-energy irradiation level of the planetary atmospheres and the resulting mass loss rates. We further derive improved Ly? luminosity estimates for the host stars including interstellar absorption. According to our estimates WASP-80 b, WASP-77 b, and WASP-43 b experience the strongest mass loss rates, exceeding the mass loss rate of HD 209458 b, where an expanded atmosphere has been confirmed. Furthermore, seven out of nine targets might be amenable to Ly? transit spectroscopy. Finally, we check the possibility of angular momentum transfer from the hot Jupiters to the host stars in the three binary systems among our sample, but find only weak indications for increased stellar rotation periods of WASP-77 and HAT-P-20.

  2. DETERMINATION OF THE MINIMUM MASSES OF HEAVY ELEMENTS IN THE ENVELOPES OF JUPITER AND SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Marboeuf, Ulysse; Alibert, Yann; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, Glenn S.; Pauzat, Francoise; Ellinger, Yves

    2009-05-10

    We calculate the minimum mass of heavy elements required in the envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn to match the observed oversolar abundances of volatiles. Because the clathration efficiency remains unknown in the solar nebula, we have considered a set of sequences of ice formation in which the fraction of water available for clathration is varied between 0 and 100%. In all the cases considered, we assume that the water abundance remains homogeneous whatever the heliocentric distance in the nebula and directly derives from a gas phase of solar composition. Planetesimals then form in the feeding zones of Jupiter and Saturn from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure condensates in proportions fixed by the clathration efficiency. A fraction of Kr and Xe may have been sequestrated by the H{sup +} {sub 3} ion in the form of stable XeH{sup +} {sub 3} and KrH{sup +} {sub 3} complexes in the solar nebula gas phase, thus implying the formation of at least partly Xe- and Kr-impoverished planetesimals in the feeding zones of Jupiter and Saturn. These planetesimals were subsequently accreted and vaporized into the hydrogen envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn, thus engendering volatiles enrichments in their atmospheres, with respect to hydrogen. Taking into account both refractory and volatile components, and assuming plausible molecular mixing ratios in the gas phase of the outer solar nebula, we show that it is possible to match the observed enrichments in Jupiter and Saturn, whatever the clathration efficiency. Our calculations predict that the O/H enrichment decreases from {approx} 5.5 to 5.1 times (O/H){sub sun} in the envelope of Jupiter and from 15.2 to 14.1 times (O/H){sub sun} in the envelope of Saturn with the growing clathration efficiency in the solar nebula. As a result, the minimum mass of ices needed to be injected in the envelope of Jupiter decreases from {approx} 20.0 to 18.6 M {sub +}, including a mass of water diminishing from 10.4 to 9.3 M {sub +}. In the same conditions, the minimum mass of ices needed in the envelope of Saturn decreases from {approx} 16.7 to 15.6 M {sub +}, including a mass of water diminishing from 8.6 to 7.7 M {sub +}. The accretion of planetesimals with ices to rocks ratios {approx} 1 in the envelope of Jupiter, namely a value derived from the bulk densities of Ganymede and Callisto, remains compatible with the mass of heavy elements predicted by interior models. On the other hand, the accretion of planetesimals with similar ice-to-rock in the envelope of Saturn implies a mass of heavy elements greater than the one predicted by interior models, unless a substantial fraction of the accreted rock and water sedimented onto the core of the planet during its evolution.

  3. Friends of Hot Jupiters. III. An Infrared Spectroscopic Search for Low-mass Stellar Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskorz, Danielle; Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Muirhead, Philip S.; Batygin, Konstantin; Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Morton, Timothy D.

    2015-12-01

    Surveys of nearby field stars indicate that stellar binaries are common, yet little is known about the effects that these companions may have on planet formation and evolution. The Friends of Hot Jupiters project uses three complementary techniques to search for stellar companions to known planet-hosting stars: radial velocity monitoring, adaptive optics imaging, and near-infrared spectroscopy. In this paper, we examine high-resolution K band infrared spectra of fifty stars hosting gas giant planets on short-period orbits. We use spectral fitting to search for blended lines due to the presence of cool stellar companions in the spectra of our target stars, where we are sensitive to companions with temperatures between 3500 and 5000 K and projected separations less than 100 AU in most systems. We identify eight systems with candidate low-mass companions, including one companion that was independently detected in our AO imaging survey. For systems with radial velocity accelerations, a spectroscopic non-detection rules out scenarios involving a stellar companion in a high inclination orbit. We use these data to place an upper limit on the stellar binary fraction at small projected separations, and show that the observed population of candidate companions is consistent with that of field stars and also with the population of wide-separation companions detected in our previous AO survey. We find no evidence that spectroscopic stellar companions are preferentially located in systems with short-period gas giant planets on eccentric and/or misaligned orbits.

  4. Multiple planets or exomoons in Kepler hot Jupiter systems with transit timing variations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szab, R.; Szab, Gy. M.; Dlya, G.; Simon, A. E.; Hodosn, G.; Kiss, L. L.

    2013-05-01

    Aims: Hot Jupiters are thought to belong to single-planet systems. Somewhat surprisingly, some hot Jupiters have been reported to exhibit transit timing variations (TTVs). The aim of this paper is to identify the origin of these observations, identify possible periodic biases leading to false TTV detections, and refine the sample to a few candidates with likely dynamical TTVs. Methods: We present TTV frequencies and amplitudes of hot Jupiters in Kepler Q0-6 data with Fourier analysis and a frequency-dependent bootstrap calculation to assess the false alarm probability levels of the detections. Results: We identified 36 systems with TTV above four standard deviation confidence, about half of them exhibiting multiple TTV frequencies. Fifteen of these objects (HAT-P-7b, KOI-13, 127, 183, 188, 190, 196, 225, 254, 428, 607, 609, 684, 774, 1176) probably show TTVs due to a systematic observational effect: long cadence data sampling is regularly shifted transit-by-transit, interacting with the transit light curves, introducing a periodic bias, and leading to a stroboscopic period. For other systems, the activity and rotation of the host star can modulate light curves and explain the observed TTVs. By excluding the systems that were inadequately sampled, showed TTV periods related to the stellar rotation, or turned out to be false positives or suspects, we ended up with seven systems. Three of them (KOI-186, 897, 977) show the weakest stellar rotation features, and these are our best candidates for dynamically induced TTV variations. Conclusions: Those systems with periodic TTVs that we cannot explain with systematics from observation, stellar rotation, activity, or inadequate sampling, may be multiple systems or even exomoon hosts. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Transit detections of extrasolar planets around main-sequence stars. I. Sky maps for hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.; Mislis, D.; Antoniadis, J.

    2009-12-01

    Context: The findings of more than 350 extrasolar planets, most of them nontransiting Hot Jupiters, have revealed correlations between the metallicity of the main-sequence (MS) host stars and planetary incidence. This connection can be used to calculate the planet formation probability around other stars, not yet known to have planetary companions. Numerous wide-field surveys have recently been initiated, aiming at the transit detection of extrasolar planets in front of their host stars. Depending on instrumental properties and the planetary distribution probability, the promising transit locations on the celestial plane will differ among these surveys. Aims: We want to locate the promising spots for transit surveys on the celestial plane and strive for absolute values of the expected number of transits in general. Our study will also clarify the impact of instrumental properties such as pixel size, field of view (FOV), and magnitude range on the detection probability. Methods: We used data of the Tycho catalog for ?1 million objects to locate all the stars with 0^m~?~m_V~?~11.5m on the celestial plane. We took several empirical relations between the parameters listed in the Tycho catalog, such as distance to Earth, m_V, and (B-V), and those parameters needed to account for the probability of a star to host an observable, transiting exoplanet. The empirical relations between stellar metallicity and planet occurrence combined with geometrical considerations were used to yield transit probabilities for the MS stars in the Tycho catalog. Magnitude variations in the FOV were simulated to test whether this fluctuations would be detected by BEST, XO, SuperWASP and HATNet. Results: We present a sky map of the expected number of Hot Jupiter transit events on the basis of the Tycho catalog. Conditioned by the accumulation of stars towards the galactic plane, the zone of the highest number of transits follows the same trace, interrupted by spots of very low and high expectation values. The comparison between the considered transit surveys yields significantly differing maps of the expected transit detections. While BEST provides an unpromising map, those for XO, SuperWASP, and HATNet show FsOV with up to 10 and more expected detections. The sky-integrated magnitude distribution predicts 20 Hot Jupiter transits with orbital periods between 1.5 d and 50 d and mV < 8^m, of which two are currently known. In total, we expect 3412 Hot Jupiter transits to occur in front of MS stars within the given magnitude range. The most promising observing site on Earth is at latitude =-1. Sky maps (Figs. 1 and 3) can be downloaded in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/508/1509

  6. Orbital circularization of a planet accreting disk gas: the formation of distant jupiters in circular orbits based on a core accretion model

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Arika; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: higuchia@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2014-12-10

    Recently, gas giant planets in nearly circular orbits with large semimajor axes (a ∼ 30-1000 AU) have been detected by direct imaging. We have investigated orbital evolution in a formation scenario for such planets, based on a core accretion model. (1) Icy cores accrete from planetesimals at ≲ 30 AU, (2) they are scattered outward by an emerging nearby gas giant to acquire highly eccentric orbits, and (3) their orbits are circularized through the accretion of disk gas in outer regions, where they spend most of their time. We analytically derived equations to describe the orbital circularization through gas accretion. Numerical integrations of these equations show that the eccentricity decreases by a factor of more than 5 while the planetary mass increases by a factor of 10. Because runaway gas accretion increases planetary mass by ∼10-300, the orbits are sufficiently circularized. On the other hand, a is reduced at most only by a factor of two, leaving the planets in the outer regions. If the relative velocity damping by shock is considered, the circularization slows down, but is still efficient enough. Therefore, this scenario potentially accounts for the formation of observed distant jupiters in nearly circular orbits. If the apocenter distances of the scattered cores are larger than the disk sizes, their a shrink to a quarter of the disk sizes; the a-distribution of distant giants could reflect the outer edges of the disks in a similar way that those of hot jupiters may reflect inner edges.

  7. Mass Transfer Stability of Hot Jupiters at Their Roche Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixelle, Joshua; Hwang, Jason; Valsecchi, Francesca; Rasio, Fred

    2015-12-01

    Many exoplanets have been detected in orbits close to their Roche limit. Through tidal dissipation, it is expected that their orbits will decay, initiating mass transfer via Roche lobe Overflow (RLO). Previous studies have looked at the RLO evolution of these planets, suggesting a Neptune or Earth mass remnant will remain after concluding mass transfer. However, a critical assumption entering such calculations is that the RLO mass transfer of these systems is stable. We present numerical calculations using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics to investigate the details of this mass transfer.

  8. Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, Fran; Dowling, Timothy E.; McKinnon, William B.

    2007-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction F. Bagenal, T. E. Dowling and W. B. McKinnon; 2. The origin of Jupiter J. I. Lunine, A. Corandini, D. Gautier, T. C. Owen and G. Wuchterl; 3. The interior of Jupiter T. Guillot, D. J. Stevenson, W. B. Hubbard and D. Saumon; 4. The composition of the atmosphere of Jupiter F. W. Taylor, S. K. Atreya, Th. Encrenaz, D. M. Hunten, P. G. J. Irwin and T. C. Owen; 5. Jovian clouds and haze R. A. West, K. H. Baines, A. J. Friedson, D. Banfield, B. Ragent and F. W. Taylor; 6. Dynamics of Jupiter's atmosphere A. P. Ingersoll, T. E. Dowling, P. J. Gierasch, G. S. Orton, P. L. Read, A. Sánchez-Lavega, A. P. Showman, A. A. Simon-Miller and A. R. Vasavada; 7. The stratosphere of Jupiter J. I. Moses, T. Fouchet, R. V. Yelle, A. J. Friedson, G. S. Orton, B. Bézard, P. Drossart, G. R. Gladstone, T. Kostiuk and T. A. Livengood; 8. Lessons from Shoemaker-Levy 9 about Jupiter and planetary impacts J. Harrington, I. de Pater, S. H. Brecht, D. Deming, V. Meadows, K. Zahnle and P. D. Nicholson; 9. Jupiter's thermosphere and ionosphere R. V. Yelle and S. Miller; 10. Jovian dust: streams, clouds and rings H. Krüger, M. Horányi, A. V. Krivov and A. L. Graps; 11. Jupiter's ring-moon system J. A. Burns, D. P. Simonelli, M. R. Showalter, D. P. Hamilton, C. C. Porco, H. Throop and L. W. Esposito; 12. Jupiter's outer satellites and trojans D. C. Jewitt, S. Sheppard and C. Porco; 13. Interior composition, structure and dynamics of the Galilean satellites G. Schubert, J. D. Anderson, T. Spohn and W. B. McKinnon; 14. The lithosphere and surface of Io A. S. McEwen, L. P. Keszthelyi, R. Lopes, P. M. Schenk and J. R. Spencer; 15. Geology of Europa R. Greeley, C. F. Chyba, J. W. Head III, T. B. McCord, W. B. McKinnon, R. T. Pappalardo and P. Figueredo; 16. Geology of Ganymede R. T. Pappalardo, G. C. Collins, J. W. Head III, P. Helfenstein, T. B. McCord, J. M. Moore, L. M. Procktor, P. M. Shenk and J. R. Spencer; 17. Callisto J. M. Moore, C. R. Chapman. E. B. Bierhaus, R. Greeley, F. C. Chuang, J. Klemaszewski, R. N. Clark, J. B. Dalton, C. A. Hibbitts, P. M. Schenk, J. R. Spencer and R. Wagner; 18. Ages and interiors: the cratering record of the Galilean satellites P. M. Schenk, C. R. Chapman, K. Zahnle and J. M. Moore; 19. Satellite atmospheres M. A. McGrath, E. Lellouch, D. F. Strobel, P. D. Feldman and R. E. Johnson; 20. Radiation effects on the surfaces of the Galilean satellites R. E. Johnson, R. W. Carlson, J. F. Cooper, C. Paranicas, M. H. Moore and M. C. Wong; 21. Magnetospheric interactions with satellites M. G. Kivelson, F. Bagenal, W. S. Kurth, F. M. Neubauer, C. Paranicas and J. Saur; 22. Plasma interactions of Io with its plasma torus J. Saur, F. M. Neubauer, J. E. P. Connerney, P. Zarka and M. G. Kivelson; 23. The Io neutral clouds and plasma torus N. Thomas, F. Bagenal, T. W. Hill and J. K. Wilson; 24. The configuration of Jupiter's magnetosphere K. K. Khurana, M. G. Kivelson, V. M. Vasyliunas, N. Krupp, J. Woch, A. Lagg, B. H. Mauk and W. S. Kurth; 25. Dynamics of the Jovian magnetosphere N. Krupp, V. M. Vasyliunas, J. Woch, A. Lagg, K. K. Khurana, M. G. Kivelson, B. H. Mauk, E. C. Roelof, D. J. Williams, S. M. Krimigis, W. S. Kurth, L. A. Frank and W. R. Paterson; 26. Jupiter's Aurora J. T. Clarke, D. Grodent, S. W. H. Cowley, E. J. Bunce, P. Zarka, J. E. P. Connerney and T. Satoh; 27. Jupiter's inner radiation belts S. J. Bolton, R. M. Thorne, S. Bourdarie, I. de Pater and B. Mauk; Appendix 1. Maps and spectra of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites J. R. Spencer, R. W. Carlson, T. L. Becker and J. S. Blue; Appendix 2. Planetary parameters J. W. Weiss; Index.

  9. Transiting planets from WASP-South, Euler, and TRAPPIST. WASP-68 b, WASP-73 b, and WASP-88 b, three hot Jupiters transiting evolved solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrez, L.; Van Grootel, V.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Fumel, A.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Sgransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Southworth, J.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2014-03-01

    Using the WASP transit survey, we report the discovery of three new hot Jupiters, WASP-68 b, WASP-73 b and WASP-88 b. The planet WASP-68 bhas a mass of 0.95 0.03 MJup, a radius of 1.24-0.06+0.10 RJup, and orbits a V = 10.7 G0-type star (1.24 0.03 M? 1.69-0.06+0.11 R?, Teff = 5911 60 K) with a period of 5.084298 0.000015 days. Its size is typical of hot Jupiters with similar masses. The planet WASP-73 bis significantly more massive (1.88-0.06+0.07 MJup) and slightly larger (1.16-0.08+0.12 RJup) than Jupiter. It orbits a V = 10.5 F9-type star (1.34-0.04+0.05 M?, 2.07-0.08+0.19 R?, Teff = 6036 120 K) every 4.08722 0.00022 days. Despite its high irradiation (~2.3 109 erg s-1 cm-2), WASP-73 b has a high mean density (1.20-0.30+0.26 ?Jup) that suggests an enrichment of the planet in heavy elements. The planet WASP-88 bis a 0.56 0.08 MJuphot Jupiter orbiting a V = 11.4 F6-type star (1.45 0.05 M?, 2.08-0.06+0.12 R?, Teff = 6431 130 K) with a period of 4.954000 0.000019 days. With a radius of 1.70-0.07+0.13 RJup, it joins the handful of planets with super-inflated radii. The ranges of ages we determine through stellar evolution modeling are 4.5-7.0 Gyr for WASP-68, 2.8-5.7 Gyr for WASP-73 and 1.8-4.3 Gyr for WASP-88. The star WASP-73 appears to be significantly evolved, close to or already in the subgiant phase. The stars WASP-68 and WASP-88 are less evolved, although in an advanced stage of core H-burning. Tables 1-3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe photometric time-series used in this work are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/563/A143

  10. Magnitudes of selected stellar occultation candidates for Pluto and other planets, with new predictions for Mars and Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sybert, C. B.; Bosh, A. S.; Sauter, L. M.; Elliot, J. L.; Wasserman, L. H.

    1992-01-01

    Occultation predictions for the planets Mars and Jupiter are presented along with BVRI magnitudes of 45 occultation candidates for Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Pluto. Observers can use these magnitudes to plan observations of occultation events. The optical depth of the Jovian ring can be probed by a nearly central occultation on 1992 July 8. Mars occults an unusually red star in early 1993, and the occultations for Pluto involving the brightest candidates would possibly occur in the spring of 1992 and the fall of 1993.

  11. A COLD NEPTUNE-MASS PLANET OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb: COLD NEPTUNES ARE COMMON

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A. E-mail: abe@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.j

    2010-02-20

    We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb with a planet-star mass ratio of q = [9.5 +- 2.1] x 10{sup -5} via gravitational microlensing. The planetary deviation was detected in real-time thanks to the high cadence of the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics survey, real-time light-curve monitoring and intensive follow-up observations. A Bayesian analysis returns the stellar mass and distance at M{sub l} = 0.64{sup +0.21}{sub -0.26} M{sub sun} and D{sub l} = 5.9{sup +0.9}{sub -1.4} kpc, respectively, so the mass and separation of the planet are M{sub p} = 20{sup +7}{sub -8} M{sub +} and a = 3.3{sup +1.4}{sub -0.8} AU, respectively. This discovery adds another cold Neptune-mass planet to the planetary sample discovered by microlensing, which now comprises four cold Neptune/super-Earths, five gas giant planets, and another sub-Saturn mass planet whose nature is unclear. The discovery of these 10 cold exoplanets by the microlensing method implies that the mass ratio function of cold exoplanets scales as dN{sub pl}/dlog q {proportional_to} q {sup -0.7+}-{sup 0.2} with a 95% confidence level upper limit of n < -0.35 (where dN{sub pl}/dlog q {proportional_to} q{sup n} ). As microlensing is most sensitive to planets beyond the snow-line, this implies that Neptune-mass planets are at least three times more common than Jupiters in this region at the 95% confidence level.

  12. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, AND HAT-P-46b: Three transiting hot Jupiters in possible multi-planet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; De Val-Borro, M.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Fischer, D. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M {sub J}, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R {sub J}. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M {sub ☉}. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M {sub J}. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s{sup –1} is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M {sub J}, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters.

  13. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, and HAT-P-46b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters in Possible Multi-planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Buchhave, L. A.; Bhatti, W.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; de Val-Borro, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Falco, E.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M J, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R J. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M ⊙. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M J. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s-1 is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M J, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A284Hr) and NASA (N154Hr, N108Hr).

  14. Parasitic Interference in Long Baseline Optical Interferometry: Requirements for Hot Jupiter-like Planet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, A.; Lopez, B.; Lagarde, S.; Danchi, W. C.; Robbe-Dubois, S.; Petrov, R. G.; Navarro, R.

    2009-12-01

    The observable quantities in optical interferometry, which are the modulus and the phase of the complex visibility, may be corrupted by parasitic fringes superimposed on the genuine fringe pattern. These fringes are due to an interference phenomenon occurring from stray light effects inside an interferometric instrument. We developed an analytical approach to better understand this phenomenon when stray light causes cross talk between beams. We deduced that the parasitic interference significantly affects the interferometric phase and thus the associated observables including the differential phase and the closure phase. The amount of parasitic flux coupled to the piston between beams appears to be very influential in this degradation. For instance, considering a point-like source and a piston ranging from λ/500 to λ/5 in the L band (λ = 3.5 μm), a parasitic flux of about 1% of the total flux produces a parasitic phase reaching at most one-third of the intrinsic phase. The piston, which can have different origins (instrumental stability, atmospheric perturbations, etc.), thus amplifies the effect of parasitic interference. According to the specifications of piston correction in space or at ground level (respectively λ/500 ≈ 2 nm and λ/30 ≈ 100 nm), the detection of hot Jupiter-like planets, one of the most challenging aims for current ground-based interferometers, limits parasitic radiation to about 5% of the incident intensity. This was evaluated by considering different types of hot Jupiter synthetic spectra. Otherwise, if no fringe tracking is used, the detection of a typical hot Jupiter-like system with a solar-like star would admit a maximum level of parasitic intensity of 0.01% for piston errors equal to λ/15. If the fringe tracking specifications are not precisely observed, it thus appears that the allowed level of parasitic intensity dramatically decreases and may prevent the detection. In parallel, the calibration of the parasitic phase by a reference star, at this accuracy level, seems very difficult. Moreover, since parasitic phase is an object-dependent quantity, the use of a hypothetical phase abacus, directly giving the parasitic phase from a given parasitic flux level, is also impossible. Some instrumental solutions, implemented at the instrument design stage for limiting or preventing this parasitic interference, appear to be crucial and are presented in this paper.

  15. PARASITIC INTERFERENCE IN LONG BASELINE OPTICAL INTERFEROMETRY: REQUIREMENTS FOR HOT JUPITER-LIKE PLANET DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Matter, A.; Lopez, B.; Lagarde, S.; Danchi, W. C.; Navarro, R.

    2009-12-01

    The observable quantities in optical interferometry, which are the modulus and the phase of the complex visibility, may be corrupted by parasitic fringes superimposed on the genuine fringe pattern. These fringes are due to an interference phenomenon occurring from stray light effects inside an interferometric instrument. We developed an analytical approach to better understand this phenomenon when stray light causes cross talk between beams. We deduced that the parasitic interference significantly affects the interferometric phase and thus the associated observables including the differential phase and the closure phase. The amount of parasitic flux coupled to the piston between beams appears to be very influential in this degradation. For instance, considering a point-like source and a piston ranging from lambda/500 to lambda/5 in the L band (lambda = 3.5 mum), a parasitic flux of about 1% of the total flux produces a parasitic phase reaching at most one-third of the intrinsic phase. The piston, which can have different origins (instrumental stability, atmospheric perturbations, etc.), thus amplifies the effect of parasitic interference. According to the specifications of piston correction in space or at ground level (respectively lambda/500 approx 2 nm and lambda/30 approx 100 nm), the detection of hot Jupiter-like planets, one of the most challenging aims for current ground-based interferometers, limits parasitic radiation to about 5% of the incident intensity. This was evaluated by considering different types of hot Jupiter synthetic spectra. Otherwise, if no fringe tracking is used, the detection of a typical hot Jupiter-like system with a solar-like star would admit a maximum level of parasitic intensity of 0.01% for piston errors equal to lambda/15. If the fringe tracking specifications are not precisely observed, it thus appears that the allowed level of parasitic intensity dramatically decreases and may prevent the detection. In parallel, the calibration of the parasitic phase by a reference star, at this accuracy level, seems very difficult. Moreover, since parasitic phase is an object-dependent quantity, the use of a hypothetical phase abacus, directly giving the parasitic phase from a given parasitic flux level, is also impossible. Some instrumental solutions, implemented at the instrument design stage for limiting or preventing this parasitic interference, appear to be crucial and are presented in this paper.

  16. Updated Galileo probe mass spectrometer measurements of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur on Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Niemann, Hasso B.; Owen, Tobias C.

    2004-09-01

    The in situ measurements of the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer (GPMS) were expected to constrain the abundances of the cloud-forming condensible volatile gases: H 2O, H 2S, and NH 3. However, since the probe entry site (PES) was an unusually dry meteorological system—a 5-μm hotspot—the measured condensible volatile abundances did not follow the canonical condensation-limited vertical profiles of equilibrium cloud condensation models (ECCMs) such as Weidenschilling and Lewis (1973, Icarus 20, 465-476). Instead, the mixing ratios of H 2S and NH 3 increased with depth, finally reaching well-mixed equilibration levels at pressures far greater than the lifting condensation levels, whereas the mixing ratio of H 2O in the deep well-mixed atmosphere could not be measured. The deep NH 3 mixing ratio (with respect to H 2) of (6.64±2.54)×10 -4 from 8.9-11.7 bar GPMS data is consistent with the NH 3 profile from probe-to-orbiter signal attenuation (Folkner et al., 1998, J. Geophys. Res. 103, 22847-22856), which had an equilibration level of about 8 bar. The GPMS deep atmosphere H 2S mixing ratio of (8.9±2.1)×10 -5 is the only measurement of Jupiter's sulfur abundance, with a PES equilibration level somewhere between 12 and 15.5 bar. The deepest water mixing ratio measurement is (4.9±1.6)×10 -4 (corresponding to only about 30% of the solar abundance) at 17.6-20.9 bar, a value that is probably much smaller than Jupiter's bulk water abundance. The 15N/ 14N ratio in jovian NH 3 was measured at (2.3±0.3)×10 -3 and may provide the best estimate of the protosolar nitrogen isotopic ratio. The GPMS methane mixing ratio is (2.37±0.57)×10 -3; although methane does not condense on Jupiter, we include its updated analysis in this report because like the condensible volatiles, it was presumably brought to Jupiter in icy planetesimals. Our detailed discussion of calibration and error analysis supplements previously reported GPMS measurements of condensible volatile mixing ratios (Niemann et al., 1998, J. Geophys. Res. 103, 22831-22846; Atreya et al., 1999, Planet. Space Sci. 47, 1243-1262; Atreya et al., 2003, Planet. Space Sci. 51, 105-112) and the nitrogen isotopic ratio (Owen et al., 2001b, Astrophys. J. Lett. 553, L77-L79). The approximately three times solar abundance of NH 3 (along with CH 4 and H 2S) is consistent with enrichment of Jupiter's atmosphere by icy planetesimals formed at temperatures <40 K (Owen et al., 1999, Nature 402 (6759), 269-270), but would imply that H 2O should be at least 3×solar as well. An alternate model, using clathrate hydrates to deliver the nitrogen component to Jupiter, predicts O/H⩾9×solar (Gautier et al., 2001, Astrophys. J. 550 (2), L227-L230). Finally we show that the measured condensible volatile vertical profiles in the PES are consistent with column-stretching or entraining downdraft scenarios only if the basic state (the pre-stretched column or the entrainment source region) is described by condensible volatile vertical profiles that are drier than those in the equilibrium cloud condensation models. This dryness is supported by numerous remote sensing results but seems to disagree with observations of widespread clouds on Jupiter at pressure levels predicted by equilibrium cloud condensation models for ammonia and H 2S.

  17. Clouds in Low-mass, Low-density Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline; Fortney, J.; Marley, M.; Kempton, E.; Visscher, C.; Zahnle, K.

    2013-10-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has revealed huge populations of low-mass, low-density planets, but their compositions remain elusive. For example, the density of GJ 1214b is consistent with either a water-world with a water atmosphere or a rock-iron core with a H/He envelope. Other super-Earths must contain hydrogen and helium to match their observed masses and radii. To understand this population of objects, we must be able to characterize their compositions through spectroscopy. The formation of clouds in exoplanet atmospheres significantly changes their observable spectra. For exoplanets, the opacity of hazes or clouds has been invoked as a possible explanation for the observed flat transmission spectrum of transiting super-Earth GJ 1214b as well as for the strong Rayleigh scattering feature in HD 189733b, the best-studied hot Jupiter. Here, we examine the effect of clouds on low-mass, low-density exoplanet spectra. We include the condensates that are present in chemical equilibrium for objects at these temperatures (500-900 K) which include minerals like sulfides and alkali salts. The most important of these clouds are sodium sulfide, potassium chloride, and zinc sulfide. These clouds should be most prominent at low surface gravity, strongly super-solar atmospheric abundances, and at the slant viewing geometry appropriate for transits. Hence they could be quite important for affecting the transmission spectra of cool low density super-Earth and Neptune-class planets. Another class of clouds may also dramatically alter the spectra of irradiated planets: photochemical hazes. We additionally include a hydrocarbon haze layer similar to the tholin haze in Titans atmosphere. We calculate the location and density of the haze layer using photochemical models from Kempton et al. 2012. We present new results that show that for enhanced metallicity atmospheres, either the clouds that form in equilibrium or a hydrocarbon haze layer could become sufficiently optically thick to reproduce the observations of GJ 1214b. We also present predictions for other low-mass, low-density exoplanets which will be targets of future observational campaigns: HD 97658b and GJ 3470b.

  18. Enhancement of the Accretion of Jupiters Core by a Voluminous Low-Mass Envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; D'angelo, Gennaro; Weidenschilling, Stuart John; Bodenheimer, Peter; Hubickyj, Olenka

    2013-01-01

    We present calculations of the early stages of the formation of Jupiter via core nucleated accretion and gas capture. The core begins as a seed body of about 350 kilometers in radius and orbits in a swarm of planetesimals whose initial radii range from 15 meters to 100 kilometers. We follow the evolution of the swarm by accounting for growth and fragmentation, viscous and gravitational stirring, and for drag-induced migration and velocity damping. Gas capture by the core substantially enhances the cross-section of the planet for accretion of small planetesimals. The dust opacity within the atmosphere surrounding the planetary core is computed self-consistently, accounting for coagulation and sedimentation of dust particles released in the envelope as passing planetesimals are ablated. The calculation is carried out at an orbital semi-major axis of 5.2 AU and an initial solids' surface density of 10/g/cm^2 at that distance. The results give a core mass of 7 Earth masses and an envelope mass of approximately 0.1 Earth mass after 500,000 years, at which point the envelope growth rate surpasses that of the core. The same calculation without the envelope gives a core mass of only 4 Earth masses.

  19. The mass of dwarf planet Eris.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael E; Schaller, Emily L

    2007-06-15

    The discovery of dwarf planet Eris was followed shortly by the discovery of its satellite, Dysnomia, but the satellite orbit, and thus the system mass, was not known. New observations with the Keck Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescopes show that Dysnomia has a circular orbit with a radius of 37,350 +/- 140 (1-sigma) kilometers and a 15.774 +/- 0.002 day orbital period around Eris. These orbital parameters agree with expectations for a satellite formed out of the orbiting debris left from a giant impact. The mass of Eris from these orbital parameters is 1.67 x 10(22) +/- 0.02 x 10(22) kilograms, or 1.27 +/- 0.02 that of Pluto. PMID:17569855

  20. Exceptional Stars Origins, Companions, Masses and Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hansen, Bradley M. S.; Phinney, Sterl; vanKerkwijk, Martin H.; Vasisht, Gautam

    2004-01-01

    As SIM Interdisciplinary Scientist, we will study the formation, nature and planetary companions of the exotic endpoints of stellar evolution. Our science begins with stars evolving from asymptotic branch giants into white dwarfs. We will determine the parallax and orbital inclination of several iron-deficient post-AGB stars, who peculiar abundances and infrared excesses are evidence that they are accreting gas depleted of dust from a circumbinary disk. Measurement of the orbital inclination, companion mass arid parallax will provide critical constraints. One of these stars is a prime candidate for trying nulling observations, which should reveal light reflected from both the circumbinary and Roche disks. The circumbinary disks seem favorable sites for planet formation. Next, we will search for planets around white dwarfs, both survivors froni the main-sequence stage, and ones newly formed from the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or in white dwarf mergers. Moving up in mass, we will measure the orbital reflex of OB/Be companions to pulsars, determine natal kicks and presupernova orbits, and expand the sample of well-determined neutron star masses. We will obtain the parallax of a transient X-ray binary, whose quiescent emission may be thermal emission from the neutron star, aiming for precise measurement of the neutron star radius. Finally, black holes. We will measure the reflex motions of the companion of what appear to be the most massive stellar black holes. The visual orbits will determine natal kicks, and test the assumptions underlying mass estimates made from the radial velocity curves, projected rotation, and ellipsoidal variations. In addition, we will attempt to observe the visual orbit of SS 433, as well as the proper motion of the emission line clumps in its relativistic jets. Additional information is included in the original document.

  1. The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets. VI. Three new hot Jupiters in multi-planet extrasolar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutou, C.; Hbrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Arnold, L.; Santos, N. C.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Borgniet, S.; Delfosse, X.; Daz, R. F.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Gregorio, J.; Labrevoir, O.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Montagnier, G.; Montalto, M.; Pepe, F.; Sahlmann, J.; Santerne, A.; Sgransan, D.; Udry, S.; Vanhuysse, M.

    2014-03-01

    We present high-precision radial-velocity measurements of three solar-type stars: HD 13908, HD 159243, and HIP 91258. The observations were made with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France). They show that these three bright stars host exoplanetary systems composed of at least two companions. HD 13908 b is a planet with a minimum mass of 0.865 0.035MJup on a circular orbit with a period of 19.382 0.006 days. There is an outer massive companion in the system with a period of 931 17 days, e = 0.12 0.02, and a minimum mass of 5.13 0.25MJup . The star HD 159243 also has two detected companions with respective masses, periods, and eccentricities of Mp= 1.13 0.05 and 1.9 0.13MJup , P = 12.620 0.004 and 248.4 4.9 days, and e = 0.02 0.02 and 0.075 0.05. Finally, the star HIP 91258 has a planetary companion with a minimum mass of 1.068 0.038MJup , an orbital period of 5.0505 0.0015 days, and a quadratic trend indicating an outer planetary or stellar companion that is as yet uncharacterized. The planet-hosting stars HD 13908, HD 159243, and HIP 91258 are main-sequence stars of spectral types F8V, G0V, and G5V, respectively, with moderate activity levels. HIP 91258 is slightly over-metallic, while the other two stars have solar-like metallicity. The three systems are discussed in the frame of formation and dynamical evolution models of systems composed of several giant planets. Tables 5-8 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/563/A22Tables 5-7 are also available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgBased on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93 m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, by the SOPHIE RPE Consortium (program PNP.CONS).

  2. Polarization of Directly Imaged Young Giant Planets as a Probe of Mass, Rotation, and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Sengupta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    Young, hot gas giant planets at large separations from their primaries have been directly imaged around several nearby stars. More such planets will likely be detected by ongoing and new imaging surveys with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Efforts continue to model the spectra of these planets in order to constrain their masses, effective temperatures, composition, and cloud structure. One potential tool for analyzing these objects, which has received relatively less attention, is polarization. Linear polarization of gas giant exoplanets can arise from the combined influences of light scattering by atmospheric dust and a rotationally distorted shape. The oblateness of gas giant planet increases of course with rotation rate and for fixed rotation also rises with decreasing gravity. Thus young, lower mass gas giant planets with youthful inflated radii could easily have oblateness greater than that of Saturn s 10%. We find that polarizations of over 1% may easily be produced in the near-infrared in such cases. This magnitude of polarization may be measurable by GPI and other instruments. Thus if detected, polarization of a young Jupiter places constraints on the combination of its gravity, rotation rate, and degree of cloudiness. We will present results of our multiple scattering analysis coupled with a self-consistent dusty atmospheric models to demonstrate the range of polarizations that might be expected from resolved exoplanets and the range of parameter space that such observations may inform.

  3. ON THE ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF A GIANT PLANET PAIR EMBEDDED IN A GASEOUS DISK. I. JUPITER-SATURN CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2010-05-01

    We carry out a series of high-resolution (1024 x 1024) hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the orbital evolution of Jupiter and Saturn embedded in a gaseous protostellar disk. Our work extends the results in the classical papers of Masset and Snellgrove and Morbidelli and Crida by exploring various surface density profiles ({sigma}), where {sigma} {proportional_to} r {sup -{alpha}}. The stability of the mean motion resonances (MMRs) caused by the convergent migration of the two planets is studied as well. Our results show that (1) the gap formation process of Saturn is greatly delayed by the tidal perturbation of Jupiter. These perturbations cause inward or outward runaway migration of Saturn, depending on the density profiles on the disk. (2) The convergent migration rate increases as {alpha} increases and the type of MMRs depends on {alpha} as well. When 0 < {alpha} < 1, the convergent migration speed of Jupiter and Saturn is relatively slow, thus they are trapped into 2:1 MMR. When {alpha}>4/3, Saturn passes through the 2:1 MMR with Jupiter and is captured into the 3:2 MMR. (3) The 3:2 MMR turns out to be unstable when the eccentricity of Saturn (e{sub s} ) increases too high. The critical value above which instability will set in is e{sub s} {approx} 0.15. We also observe that the two planets are trapped into 2:1 MMR after the break of 3:2 MMR. This process may provide useful information for the formation of orbital configuration between Jupiter and Saturn in the solar system.

  4. Masses, Radii, and Orbits of Small Kepler Planets: The Transition from Gaseous to Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Latham, David W.; Howell, Steve B.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Batalha, Natalie M.; Rogers, Leslie; Ciardi, David; Fischer, Debra A.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jrgen; Huber, Daniel; Chaplin, William J.; Basu, Sarbani; Buchhave, Lars A.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Hunter, Roger; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Kolbl, Rea; Weiss, Lauren M.; Petigura, Erik; Seager, Sara; Morton, Timothy; Johnson, John Asher; Ballard, Sarah; Burke, Chris; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip; Everett, Mark E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Ford, Eric B.; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Brown, Timothy M.; Steffen, Jason H.; Charbonneau, David; Basri, Gibor S.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Winn, Joshua; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Christiansen, Jessie; Adams, Elisabeth; Henze, Christopher; Dupree, Andrea; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Tarter, Jill; Holman, Matthew J.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Shporer, Avi; Lucas, Philip W.; Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Bedding, T. R.; Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Kawaler, S. D.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.; Boss, Alan; Devore, Edna; Gould, Alan; Prsa, Andrej; Agol, Eric; Barclay, Thomas; Coughlin, Jeff; Brugamyer, Erik; Mullally, Fergal; Quintana, Elisa V.; Still, Martin; Thompson, Susan E.; Morrison, David; Twicken, Joseph D.; Dsert, Jean-Michel; Carter, Josh; Crepp, Justin R.; Hbrard, Guillaume; Santerne, Alexandre; Moutou, Claire; Sobeck, Charlie; Hudgins, Douglas; Haas, Michael R.; Robertson, Paul; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Barrado, David

    2014-02-01

    We report on the masses, sizes, and orbits of the planets orbiting 22 Kepler stars. There are 49 planet candidates around these stars, including 42 detected through transits and 7 revealed by precise Doppler measurements of the host stars. Based on an analysis of the Kepler brightness measurements, along with high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, Doppler spectroscopy, and (for 11 stars) asteroseismology, we establish low false-positive probabilities (FPPs) for all of the transiting planets (41 of 42 have an FPP under 1%), and we constrain their sizes and masses. Most of the transiting planets are smaller than three times the size of Earth. For 16 planets, the Doppler signal was securely detected, providing a direct measurement of the planet's mass. For the other 26 planets we provide either marginal mass measurements or upper limits to their masses and densities; in many cases we can rule out a rocky composition. We identify six planets with densities above 5 g cm-3, suggesting a mostly rocky interior for them. Indeed, the only planets that are compatible with a purely rocky composition are smaller than ~2 R ?. Larger planets evidently contain a larger fraction of low-density material (H, He, and H2O). Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology.

  5. Advanced Ion Mass Spectrometer for Giant Planet Ionospheres, Magnetospheres and Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, EC; Cooper, JF; Paschalidis, N.; Jones, SL; Rodriguez, M.; Ali, A.; Coplan, MA; Chornay, DJ; Sturner; Bateman, FB; Andre, N.; Fedorov, A.; Wurz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Ion Composition Spectrometer (AIMS) has been under development from various NASA sources (NASA LWSID, NASA ASTID, NASA Goddard IRADs) to measure elemental, isotopic, and simple molecular composition abundances of 1 eV/e to 25 keV/e hot ions with wide field-of-view (FOV) in the 1 - 60 amu mass range at mass resolution M/ΔM ≤ 60 over a wide dynamic range of intensities and penetrating radiation background from the inner magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn to the outer magnetospheric boundary regions and the upstream solar wind. This instrument will work for both spinning spacecraft and 3-axis stabilized spacecraft with wide field-of-view capability in both cases. It will measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) for the individual ion species; ion velocity moments of the IVDF will give the fluid parameters (density, flow velocity and temperature) of the individual ion species. Outer planet mission applications are Io Observer, Jupiter Europa Orbiter/Europa Clipper, Enceladus Orbiter, and Uranus Orbiter as described in the decadal survey, but would also be valuable for inclusion on other missions to outer planet destinations such as Saturn- Titan and Neptune-Triton and for future missions to terrestrial planets, Venus and Mars, the Moon, asteroids, and comets, and of course for geospace applications to the Earth.

  6. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.

    As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  7. Jupiter-like planets as dynamical barriers to inward-migrating super-Earths: a new understanding of the origin of Uranus and Neptune and predictions for extrasolar planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Izidoro Da Costa, Andre'; Raymond, Sean

    2014-11-01

    Planets of 1-4 times Earth's size on orbits shorter than 100 days exist around 30-50% of all Sun-like stars. These ``hot super-Earths'' (or ``mini-Neptunes''), or their building blocks, might have formed on wider orbits and migrated inward due to interactions with the gaseous protoplanetary disk. The Solar System is statistically unusual in its lack of hot super-Earths. Here, we use a suite of dynamical simulations to show that gas-giant planets act as barriers to the inward migration of super-Earths initially placed on more distant orbits. Jupiter's early formation may have prevented Uranus and Neptune (and perhaps Saturn's core) from becoming hot super-Earths. It may actually have been crucial to the very formation of Uranus and Neptune. In fact, the large spin obliquities of these two planets argue that they experienced a stage of giant impacts from multi-Earth mass planetary embryos. We show that the dynamical barrier offered by Jupiter favors the mutual accretion of multiple migrating planetary embryos, favoring the formation of a few massive objects like Uranus and Neptune. Our model predicts that the populations of hot super-Earth systems and Jupiter-like planets should be anti-correlated: gas giants (especially if they form early) should be rare in systems with many hot super-Earths. Testing this prediction will constitute a crucial assessment of the validity of the migration hypothesis for the origin of close-in super-Earths.

  8. A Spitzer five-band analysis of the Jupiter-sized planet TrES-1

    SciTech Connect

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lust, Nate B.; Hardy, Ryan A.; Bowman, M. Oliver; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2014-12-10

    With an equilibrium temperature of 1200 K, TrES-1 is one of the coolest hot Jupiters observed by Spitzer. It was also the first planet discovered by any transit survey and one of the first exoplanets from which thermal emission was directly observed. We analyzed all Spitzer eclipse and transit data for TrES-1 and obtained its eclipse depths and brightness temperatures in the 3.6 μm (0.083% ± 0.024%, 1270 ± 110 K), 4.5 μm (0.094% ± 0.024%, 1126 ± 90 K), 5.8 μm (0.162% ± 0.042%, 1205 ± 130 K), 8.0 μm (0.213% ± 0.042%, 1190 ± 130 K), and 16 μm (0.33% ± 0.12%, 1270 ± 310 K) bands. The eclipse depths can be explained, within 1σ errors, by a standard atmospheric model with solar abundance composition in chemical equilibrium, with or without a thermal inversion. The combined analysis of the transit, eclipse, and radial-velocity ephemerides gives an eccentricity of e=0.033{sub −0.031}{sup +0.015}, consistent with a circular orbit. Since TrES-1's eclipses have low signal-to-noise ratios, we implemented optimal photometry and differential-evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms in our Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses, and Transits pipeline. Benefits include higher photometric precision and ∼10 times faster MCMC convergence, with better exploration of the phase space and no manual parameter tuning.

  9. How the presence of a gas giant affects the formation of mean-motion resonances between two low-mass planets in a locally isothermal gaseous disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlewska-Gaca, E.; Szuszkiewicz, E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of a migration-induced resonance locking in systems containing three planets, namely an Earth analogue (1 M?), a super-Earth (4 M?) and a gas giant (one Jupiter mass). The planets have been listed in order of increasing orbital periods. All three bodies are embedded in a locally isothermal gaseous disc and orbit around a solar mass star. We are interested in answering the following questions: will the low-mass planets form the same resonant structures with each other in the vicinity of the gas giant as in the case when the gas giant is absent? More in general, how will the presence of the gas giant affect the evolution of the two low-mass planets? When there is no gas giant in the system, it has been already shown that if the two low-mass planets undergo a convergent differential migration, they will capture each other in a mean-motion resonance. For the choices of disc parameters and planet masses made in this paper, the formation of the 5:4 resonance in the absence of the Jupiter has been observed in a previous investigation and confirmed here. In this work we add a gas giant on the most external orbit of the system in such a way that its differential migration is convergent with the low-mass planets. We show that the result of this set-up is the speeding up of the migration of the super-Earth and, after that, all three planets become locked in a triple mean-motion resonance. However, this resonance is not maintained due to the low-mass planet eccentricity excitation, a fact that leads to close encounters between planets and eventually to the ejection from the internal orbits of one or both low-mass planets. We have observed that the ejected low-mass planets can leave the system, fall into a star or become the external planet relative to the gas giant. In our simulations the latter situation has been observed for the super-Earth. It follows from the results presented here that the presence of a Jupiter-like planet might have a strong influence on the architecture of planetary systems. Moreover, the planet ejections due to the gas giant action may lead to the formation of a population of low-mass freely floating planets.

  10. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudi, B; Bennett, D; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M; Tristram, P; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; DePoy, D; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R; Park, B; Abe, F; Bond, I; Botzler, C; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A; Kilmartin, P; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Sako, T; Saito, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Yock, P; Albrow, M; Beaulieu, J; Burgdorf, M; Cook, K; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2007-11-08

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the first detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of {approx} 0.71 and {approx} 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary of mass {approx} 0.50 solar masses. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only 6 confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  11. The occurrence and mass distribution of close-in super-Earths, Neptunes, and Jupiters.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Johnson, John Asher; Fischer, Debra A; Wright, Jason T; Isaacson, Howard; Valenti, Jeff A; Anderson, Jay; Lin, Doug N C; Ida, Shigeru

    2010-10-29

    The questions of how planets form and how common Earth-like planets are can be addressed by measuring the distribution of exoplanet masses and orbital periods. We report the occurrence rate of close-in planets (with orbital periods less than 50 days), based on precise Doppler measurements of 166 Sun-like stars. We measured increasing planet occurrence with decreasing planet mass (M). Extrapolation of a power-law mass distribution fitted to our measurements, df/dlogM = 0.39 M(-0.48), predicts that 23% of stars harbor a close-in Earth-mass planet (ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 Earth masses). Theoretical models of planet formation predict a deficit of planets in the domain from 5 to 30 Earth masses and with orbital periods less than 50 days. This region of parameter space is in fact well populated, implying that such models need substantial revision. PMID:21030652

  12. The planet search programme at the ESO CES and HARPS. IV. The search for Jupiter analogues around solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmeister, M.; Kürster, M.; Endl, M.; Lo Curto, G.; Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Henning, T.; Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.

    2013-04-01

    Context. In 1992 we began a precision radial velocity survey for planets around solar-like stars with the Coudé Echelle Spectrograph and the Long Camera (CES LC) at the 1.4 m telescope in La Silla (Chile) resulting in the discovery of the planet ι Hor b. We have continued the survey with the upgraded CES Very Long Camera (VLC) and the HARPS spectrographs, both at the 3.6 m telescope, until 2007. Aims: In this paper we present additional radial velocities for 31 stars of the original sample with higher precision. The observations cover a time span of up to 15 years and permit a search for Jupiter analogues. Methods: The survey was carried out with three different instruments/instrument configurations using the iodine absorption cell and the ThAr methods for wavelength calibration. We combine the data sets and perform a joint analysis for variability, trends, and periodicities. We compute Keplerian orbits for companions and detection limits in case of non-detections. Moreover, the HARPS radial velocities are analysed for correlations with activity indicators (CaII H&K and cross-correlation function shape). Results: We achieve a long-term RV precision of 15 m/s (CES+LC, 1992-1998), 9 m/s (CES+VLC, 1999-2006), and 2.8 m/s (HARPS, 2003-2009, including archive data), respectively. This enables us to confirm the known planetary signals in ι Hor and HR 506 as well as the three known planets around HR 3259. A steady RV trend for ɛ Ind A can be explained by a planetary companion and calls for direct imaging campaigns. On the other hand, we find previously reported trends to be smaller for β Hyi and not present for α Men. The candidate planet ɛ Eri b was not detected despite our better precision. Also the planet announced for HR 4523 cannot be confirmed. Long-term trends in several of our stars are compatible with known stellar companions. We provide a spectroscopic orbital solution for the binary HR 2400 and refined solutions for the planets around HR 506 and ι Hor. For some other stars the variations could be attributed to stellar activity, as e.g. the magnetic cycle in the case of HR 8323. Conclusions: The occurrence of two Jupiter-mass planets in our sample is in line with the estimate of 10% for the frequency of giant planets with periods smaller than 10 yr around solar-like stars. We have not detected a Jupiter analogue, while the detections limits for circular orbits indicate at 5 AU a sensitivity for minimum mass of at least 1MJup (2MJup) for 13% (61%) of the stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla Chile, ESO programmes 50.7-0095, 51.7-0054, 52.7-0002, 53.7-0064, 54.E-0424, 55.E-0361, 56.E-0490, 57.E-0142, 58.E-0134, 59.E-0597, 60.E-0386, 61.E-0589, 62.L-0490, 64.L-0568, 66.C-0482, 67.C-0296, 69.C-0723, 70.C-0047, 71.C-0599, 072.C-0513, 073.C-0784, 074.C-0012, 076.C-0878, 077.C-0530, 078.C-0833, 079.C-0681. Also based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables of the radial velocities, bisector spans, and log R'_HK are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/552/A78

  13. Refining Mass Measurements of Kepler Planets with Keck/HIRES.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    We present improved radial velocity mass measurements from Keck/HIRES for exoplanets detected by NASA’s Kepler Mission. Since Kepler’s launch 6 years ago, ~30 planetary systems have been monitored with radial velocities, resulting in measured masses for many planets between 1.0 and 4.0 Earth radii. The resulting planet masses have been used to determine the transition between planets with a rocky interior and those with a lower density interior which requiring significant H/He atmospheres. We provide updated masses and densities for those planets published in Marcy et al (2014) based on two additional observing seasons with HIRES of the Kepler field. These radial velocities also reveal non-transiting planets in systems with previously found transiting planets. One such system has a non-transiting planet with a period between two transiting planets, providing a constraint on the co-planarity of the system. Finally, we provide an updated mass-radius relation, showing the distinction between planets that must have a substantial iron-silicate interior, and those requiring significant contributions from volatiles such as hydrogen and helium.

  14. A STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DROP IN PLANET OCCURRENCE RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-01-10

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ∼10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  15. Planetary populations in the mass-period diagram: A statistical treatment of exoplanet formation and the role of planet traps

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2013-11-20

    The rapid growth of observed exoplanets has revealed the existence of several distinct planetary populations in the mass-period diagram. Two of the most surprising are (1) the concentration of gas giants around 1 AU and (2) the accumulation of a large number of low-mass planets with tight orbits, also known as super-Earths and hot Neptunes. We have recently shown that protoplanetary disks have multiple planet traps that are characterized by orbital radii in the disks and halt rapid type I planetary migration. By coupling planet traps with the standard core accretion scenario, we showed that one can account for the positions of planets in the mass-period diagram. In this paper, we demonstrate quantitatively that most gas giants formed at planet traps tend to end up around 1 AU, with most of these being contributed by dead zones and ice lines. We also show that a large fraction of super-Earths and hot Neptunes are formed as 'failed' cores of gas giants—this population being constituted by comparable contributions from dead zone and heat transition traps. Our results are based on the evolution of forming planets in an ensemble of disks where we vary only the lifetimes of disks and their mass accretion rates onto the host star. We show that a statistical treatment of the evolution of a large population of planetary cores caught in planet traps accounts for the existence of three distinct exoplanetary populations—the hot Jupiters, the more massive planets around r = 1 AU, and the short-period super-Earths and hot Neptunes. There are very few populations that feed into the large orbital radii characteristic of the imaged Jovian planet, which agrees with recent surveys. Finally, we find that low-mass planets in tight orbits become the dominant planetary population for low-mass stars (M {sub *} ≤ 0.7 M {sub ☉}).

  16. XUV-driven mass loss from extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Koskinen, T. T.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2015-04-01

    Upper atmospheres of Hot Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation conditions that can result in rapid atmospheric escape. The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of these planets are affected by the high-energy spectrum of the host star. This emission depends on stellar type and age, which are thus important factors in understanding the behaviour of exoplanetary atmospheres. In this study, we focus on Extrasolar Giant Planets (EPGs) orbiting K and M dwarf stars. XUV spectra for three different stars - ? Eridani, AD Leonis and AU Microscopii - are constructed using a coronal model. Neutral density and temperature profiles in the upper atmosphere of hypothetical EGPs orbiting these stars are then obtained from a fluid model, incorporating atmospheric chemistry and taking atmospheric escape into account. We find that a simple scaling based solely on the host star's X-ray emission gives large errors in mass loss rates from planetary atmospheres and so we have derived a new method to scale the EUV regions of the solar spectrum based upon stellar X-ray emission. This new method produces an outcome in terms of the planet's neutral upper atmosphere very similar to that obtained using a detailed coronal model of the host star. Our results indicate that in planets subjected to radiation from active stars, the transition from Jeans escape to a regime of hydrodynamic escape at the top of the atmosphere occurs at larger orbital distances than for planets around low activity stars (such as the Sun).

  17. Astrometric observations of the faint satellites of Jupiter and minor planets, 1974-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. R.; Shelus, P. J.; Mulholland, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    Precise positions of the faint satellites VI-XII of Jupiter during the 1974 opposition, and for Jupiter XIII during the 1976-1977 and 1977-1978 oppositions, have been obtained from plates taken with the 2.1-m Otto Struve reflector of the McDonald Observatory by the use of a new quasi-automatic plate measurement and reduction procedure on a PDS microdensitometer. Observations of selected asteroids, including two of 1977 UB (Chiron) are given also.

  18. Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A NASA News Release is presented which contains the following: (1) general release; (2) two views of Voyager 2 flight past Jupiter; (3) Voyager mission summary; (4) Voyager 1 science results; (5) Jupiter science objectives; (6) Jupiter the planet and its satellites; (7) Voyager experiments; (8) planet comparison; (9) a list of Voyager science investigators and (10) the Voyager team.

  19. AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE SHOULDER OF GIANTS: JOVIAN PLANETS AROUND LATE K DWARF STARS AND THE TREND WITH STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric; Fischer, Debra A.; Mann, Andrew W.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2013-07-01

    Analyses of exoplanet statistics suggest a trend of giant planet occurrence with host star mass, a clue to how planets like Jupiter form. One missing piece of the puzzle is the occurrence around late K dwarf stars (masses of 0.5-0.75 M{sub Sun} and effective temperatures of 3900-4800 K). We analyzed four years of Doppler radial velocity (RVs) data for 110 late K dwarfs, one of which hosts two previously reported giant planets. We estimate that 4.0% {+-} 2.3% of these stars have Saturn-mass or larger planets with orbital periods <245 days, depending on the planet mass distribution and RV variability of stars without giant planets. We also estimate that 0.7% {+-} 0.5% of similar stars observed by Kepler have giant planets. This Kepler rate is significantly (99% confidence) lower than that derived from our Doppler survey, but the difference vanishes if only the single Doppler system (HIP 57274) with completely resolved orbits is considered. The difference could also be explained by the exclusion of close binaries (without giant planets) from the Doppler but not Kepler surveys, the effect of long-period companions and stellar noise on the Doppler data, or an intrinsic difference between the two populations. Our estimates for late K dwarfs bridge those for solar-type stars and M dwarfs, and support a positive trend with stellar mass. Small sample size precludes statements about finer structure, e.g., a ''shoulder'' in the distribution of giant planets with stellar mass. Future surveys such as the Next Generation Transit Survey and the Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey will ameliorate this deficiency.

  20. An Understanding of the Shoulder of Giants: Jovian Planets around Late K Dwarf Stars and the Trend with Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, Eric; Fischer, Debra A.; Mann, Andrew W.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2013-07-01

    Analyses of exoplanet statistics suggest a trend of giant planet occurrence with host star mass, a clue to how planets like Jupiter form. One missing piece of the puzzle is the occurrence around late K dwarf stars (masses of 0.5-0.75 M ? and effective temperatures of 3900-4800 K). We analyzed four years of Doppler radial velocity (RVs) data for 110 late K dwarfs, one of which hosts two previously reported giant planets. We estimate that 4.0% 2.3% of these stars have Saturn-mass or larger planets with orbital periods <245 days, depending on the planet mass distribution and RV variability of stars without giant planets. We also estimate that 0.7% 0.5% of similar stars observed by Kepler have giant planets. This Kepler rate is significantly (99% confidence) lower than that derived from our Doppler survey, but the difference vanishes if only the single Doppler system (HIP 57274) with completely resolved orbits is considered. The difference could also be explained by the exclusion of close binaries (without giant planets) from the Doppler but not Kepler surveys, the effect of long-period companions and stellar noise on the Doppler data, or an intrinsic difference between the two populations. Our estimates for late K dwarfs bridge those for solar-type stars and M dwarfs, and support a positive trend with stellar mass. Small sample size precludes statements about finer structure, e.g., a "shoulder" in the distribution of giant planets with stellar mass. Future surveys such as the Next Generation Transit Survey and the Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey will ameliorate this deficiency.

  1. Terrestrial Planet Formation in a Protoplanetary Disk with a Local Mass Depletion: A Successful Scenario for the Formation of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izidoro, A.; Haghighipour, N.; Winter, O. C.; Tsuchida, M.

    2014-02-01

    Models of terrestrial planet formation for our solar system have been successful in producing planets with masses and orbits similar to those of Venus and Earth. However, these models have generally failed to produce Mars-sized objects around 1.5 AU. The body that is usually formed around Mars' semimajor axis is, in general, much more massive than Mars. Only when Jupiter and Saturn are assumed to have initially very eccentric orbits (e ~ 0.1), which seems fairly unlikely for the solar system, or alternately, if the protoplanetary disk is truncated at 1.0 AU, simulations have been able to produce Mars-like bodies in the correct location. In this paper, we examine an alternative scenario for the formation of Mars in which a local depletion in the density of the protosolar nebula results in a non-uniform formation of planetary embryos and ultimately the formation of Mars-sized planets around 1.5 AU. We have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the formation of terrestrial planets in such a disk for different scales of the local density depletion, and for different orbital configurations of the giant planets. Our simulations point to the possibility of the formation of Mars-sized bodies around 1.5 AU, specifically when the scale of the disk local mass-depletion is moderately high (50%-75%) and Jupiter and Saturn are initially in their current orbits. In these systems, Mars-analogs are formed from the protoplanetary materials that originate in the regions of disk interior or exterior to the local mass-depletion. Results also indicate that Earth-sized planets can form around 1 AU with a substantial amount of water accreted via primitive water-rich planetesimals and planetary embryos. We present the results of our study and discuss their implications for the formation of terrestrial planets in our solar system.

  2. Terrestrial planet formation in a protoplanetary disk with a local mass depletion: A successful scenario for the formation of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C.; Haghighipour, N.; Tsuchida, M. E-mail: nader@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-02-10

    Models of terrestrial planet formation for our solar system have been successful in producing planets with masses and orbits similar to those of Venus and Earth. However, these models have generally failed to produce Mars-sized objects around 1.5 AU. The body that is usually formed around Mars' semimajor axis is, in general, much more massive than Mars. Only when Jupiter and Saturn are assumed to have initially very eccentric orbits (e ∼ 0.1), which seems fairly unlikely for the solar system, or alternately, if the protoplanetary disk is truncated at 1.0 AU, simulations have been able to produce Mars-like bodies in the correct location. In this paper, we examine an alternative scenario for the formation of Mars in which a local depletion in the density of the protosolar nebula results in a non-uniform formation of planetary embryos and ultimately the formation of Mars-sized planets around 1.5 AU. We have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the formation of terrestrial planets in such a disk for different scales of the local density depletion, and for different orbital configurations of the giant planets. Our simulations point to the possibility of the formation of Mars-sized bodies around 1.5 AU, specifically when the scale of the disk local mass-depletion is moderately high (50%-75%) and Jupiter and Saturn are initially in their current orbits. In these systems, Mars-analogs are formed from the protoplanetary materials that originate in the regions of disk interior or exterior to the local mass-depletion. Results also indicate that Earth-sized planets can form around 1 AU with a substantial amount of water accreted via primitive water-rich planetesimals and planetary embryos. We present the results of our study and discuss their implications for the formation of terrestrial planets in our solar system.

  3. Exotic Earths: forming habitable worlds with giant planet migration.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Mandell, Avi M; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2006-09-01

    Close-in giant planets (e.g., "hot Jupiters") are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth-mass planets also form interior to the migrating jovian planet, analogous to recently discovered "hot Earths." Very-water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the habitable zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets. PMID:16960000

  4. The planet Jupiter in 1975-1976 - Commission on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragesco, J.; Gomez, J. M.; Alecsescu, M.

    1980-03-01

    Earth-based drawings and photographs of Jupiter made by the Commission on Planetary Surfaces and the Sabadell Astronomical Association during the opposition of 1975-1976 are discussed. Consideration is given to observations of the appearance, motions and conjunction with the White Oval Spot (WOS) B-C of the Red Spot, the three WOSs, the bands of Jupiter and their planetary latitudes. It is pointed out that the extensive observations performed have revealed three apparitions of the South Equatorial Band, the possible appearance of the austral perturbation, two cataclysmic apparitions of the North Temperate Band, and the probable anticyclonic rotation of the Red Spot.

  5. DETECTABILITY OF TRANSITING JUPITERS AND LOW-MASS ECLIPSING BINARIES IN SPARSELY SAMPLED PAN-STARRS-1 SURVEY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C.

    2009-10-20

    We present detailed simulations of the Pan-STARRS-1 (PS1) multi-epoch, multiband 3pi Survey in order to assess its potential yield of transiting planets and eclipsing binaries. This survey differs from dedicated transit surveys in that it will cover the entire northern sky but provide only sparsely sampled light curves. Since most eclipses would be detected at only a single epoch, the 3pi Survey will be most sensitive to deep eclipses (approx>0.10 mag) caused by Jupiters transiting M dwarfs and eclipsing stellar/substellar binaries. The survey will measure parallaxes for the approx4 x 10{sup 5} stars within 100 pc, which will enable a volume-limited eclipse search, reducing the number of astrophysical false positives compared with previous magnitude-limited searches. Using the best available empirical data, we constructed a model of the extended solar neighborhood that includes stars, brown dwarfs, and a realistic binary population. We computed the yield of deeply eclipsing systems using both a semianalytic and a full Monte Carlo approach. We examined statistical tests for detecting single-epoch eclipses in sparsely sampled data and assessed their vulnerability to false positives due to stellar variability. Assuming a short-period planet frequency of 0.5% for M dwarfs, our simulations predict that about a dozen transiting Jupiters around low-mass stars (M {sub *} < 0.3 M {sub sun}) within 100 pc are potentially detectable in the PS1 3pi Survey, along with approx300 low-mass eclipsing binaries (both component masses <0.5 M {sub sun}), including approx10 eclipsing field brown dwarfs. Extensive follow-up observations would be required to characterize these candidate eclipsing systems, thereby enabling comprehensive tests of structural models and novel insights into the planetary architecture of low-mass stars.

  6. The Keck Planet Search: Detectability and the Minimum Mass and Orbital Period Distribution of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew; Butler, R. Paul; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Vogt, Steven S.; Wright, Jason T.; Fischer, Debra A.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze 8 years of precise radial velocity measurements from the Keck Planet Search, characterizing the detection threshold, selection effects, and completeness of the survey. We first carry out a systematic search for planets, by assessing the false-alarm probability associated with Keplerian orbit fits to the data. This allows us to understand the detection threshold for each star in terms of the number and time baseline of the observations, and the underlying "noise" from measurement errors, intrinsic stellar jitter, or additional low-mass planets. We show that all planets with orbital periods P < 2000 days, velocity amplitudes K > 20 m s-1, and eccentricities e ? 0.6 have been announced, and we summarize the candidates at lower amplitudes and longer orbital periods. For the remaining stars, we calculate upper limits on the velocity amplitude of a companion. For orbital periods less than the duration of the observations, these are typically 10 m s-1 and increase ? P2 for longer periods. We then use the nondetections to derive completeness corrections at low amplitudes and long orbital periods and discuss the resulting distribution of minimum mass and orbital period. We give the fraction of stars with a planet as a function of minimum mass and orbital period and extrapolate to long-period orbits and low planet masses. A power-law fit for planet masses >0.3 MJ and periods < 2000 days gives a mass-period distribution dN = CM?P?d ln Md ln P with ? = -0.31 0.2, ? = 0.26 0.1, and the normalization constant C such that 10.5% of solar type stars have a planet with mass in the range 0.3--10 MJ and orbital period 2--2000 days. The orbital period distribution shows an increase in the planet fraction by a factor of ?5 for orbital periods ? 300 days. Extrapolation gives 17%--20% of stars having gas giant planets within 20 AU. Finally, we constrain the occurrence rate of planets orbiting M dwarfs compared to FGK dwarfs, taking into account differences in detectability.

  7. Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    Beyond the inner solar system's terrestrial planets, with their compact orbits and rock -metal compositions, lies the realm of the outer solar system and the giant planets. Here the distance between planets jumps by an order of magnitude relative to the spacing of the terrestrial planets, and the masses of the giants are one to two orders of magnitude greater than Venus and Earth - the largest terrestrial bodies. Composition changes as well, since the giant planets are largely gaseous, with inferred admixtures of ice, rock, and metal, while the terrestrial planets are essentially pure rock and metal. The giant planets have many more moons than do the terrestrial planets, and the range of magnetic field strengths is larger in the outer solar system. It is the giant planets that sport rings, ranging from the magnificent ones around Saturn to the variable ring arcs of Neptune. Were it not for the fact that only Earth supports abundant life (with life possibly existing, but not proved to exist, in the martian crust and liquid water regions underneath the ice of Jupiter's moon Europa), the terrestrial planets would pale in interest next to the giant planets for any extraterrestrial visitor.

  8. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J.; Livio, Mario; Siess, Lionel

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  9. EXTRACTING PLANET MASS AND ECCENTRICITY FROM TTV DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Lithwick, Yoram; Xie Jiwei; Wu Yanqin

    2012-12-20

    Most planet pairs in the Kepler data that have measured transit time variations (TTVs) are near first-order mean-motion resonances. We derive analytical formulae for their TTV signals. We separate planet eccentricity into free and forced parts, where the forced part is purely due to the planets' proximity to resonance. This separation yields simple analytical formulae. The phase of the TTV depends sensitively on the presence of free eccentricity: if the free eccentricity vanishes, the TTV will be in phase with the longitude of conjunctions. This effect is easily detectable in current TTV data. The amplitude of the TTV depends on planet mass and free eccentricity, and it determines planet mass uniquely only when the free eccentricity is sufficiently small. We analyze the TTV signals of six short-period Kepler pairs. We find that three of these pairs (Kepler 18, 24, 25) have a TTV phase consistent with zero. The other three (Kepler 23, 28, 32) have small TTV phases, but ones that are distinctly non-zero. We deduce that the free eccentricities of the planets are small, {approx}< 0.01, but not always vanishing. Furthermore, as a consequence of this, we deduce that the true masses of the planets are fairly accurately determined by the TTV amplitudes, within a factor of {approx}< 2. The smallness of the free eccentricities suggests that the planets have experienced substantial dissipation. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the observed pile-up of Kepler pairs near mean-motion resonances is caused by resonant repulsion. But the fact that some of the planets have non-vanishing free eccentricity suggests that after resonant repulsion occurred there was a subsequent phase in the planets' evolution when their eccentricities were modestly excited, perhaps by interplanetary interactions.

  10. Extracting Planet Mass and Eccentricity from TTV Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithwick, Yoram; Xie, Jiwei; Wu, Yanqin

    2012-12-01

    Most planet pairs in the Kepler data that have measured transit time variations (TTVs) are near first-order mean-motion resonances. We derive analytical formulae for their TTV signals. We separate planet eccentricity into free and forced parts, where the forced part is purely due to the planets' proximity to resonance. This separation yields simple analytical formulae. The phase of the TTV depends sensitively on the presence of free eccentricity: if the free eccentricity vanishes, the TTV will be in phase with the longitude of conjunctions. This effect is easily detectable in current TTV data. The amplitude of the TTV depends on planet mass and free eccentricity, and it determines planet mass uniquely only when the free eccentricity is sufficiently small. We analyze the TTV signals of six short-period Kepler pairs. We find that three of these pairs (Kepler 18, 24, 25) have a TTV phase consistent with zero. The other three (Kepler 23, 28, 32) have small TTV phases, but ones that are distinctly non-zero. We deduce that the free eccentricities of the planets are small, <~ 0.01, but not always vanishing. Furthermore, as a consequence of this, we deduce that the true masses of the planets are fairly accurately determined by the TTV amplitudes, within a factor of <~ 2. The smallness of the free eccentricities suggests that the planets have experienced substantial dissipation. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the observed pile-up of Kepler pairs near mean-motion resonances is caused by resonant repulsion. But the fact that some of the planets have non-vanishing free eccentricity suggests that after resonant repulsion occurred there was a subsequent phase in the planets' evolution when their eccentricities were modestly excited, perhaps by interplanetary interactions.

  11. Inflated Planets and Their Low-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardling, R. A.

    Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the inflated size of HD 209458b after it became clear that it has no companions capable of producing a stellar reflex velocity greater than around 5 m s-1. Had there been such a companion, the hypothesis that it forces the eccentricity of the inflated planet thereby tidally heating it may have been readily accepted. Here we summarize a paper by the author which shows that companion planets with masses as low as a fraction of an Earth mass are capable of sustaining a non-zero eccentricity in the observed planet for at least the age of the system. While such companions produce stellar reflex velocities which are fractions of a meter per second and hence are below the stellar jitter limit, they are consistent with recent theoretical work which suggests that the planet migration process often produces low-mass companions to short-period giants.

  12. Dynamical corotation torques on low-mass planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, S.-J.

    2014-11-01

    We study torques on migrating low-mass planets in locally isothermal discs. Previous work on low-mass planets generally kept the planet on a fixed orbit, after which the torque on the planet was measured. In addition to these static torques, when the planet is allowed to migrate it experiences dynamical torques, which are proportional to the migration rate and whose sign depends on the background vortensity gradient. We show that in discs a few times more massive than the minimum-mass solar nebula, these dynamical torques can have a profound impact on planet migration. Inward migration can be slowed down significantly, and if static torques lead to outward migration, dynamical torques can take over, taking the planet beyond zero-torque lines set by saturation of the corotation torque in a runaway fashion. This means that the region in non-isothermal discs, where outward migration is possible, can be larger than what would be concluded from static torques alone.

  13. Fomalhaut's Debris Disk and Planet: Constraining the Mass of Fomalhaut b from disk Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, E.; Kite, E.; Kalas, P.; Graham, J. R.; Clampin, M.

    2009-03-01

    Following the optical imaging of exoplanet candidate Fomalhaut b (Fom b), we present a numerical model of how Fomalhaut's debris disk is gravitationally shaped by a single interior planet. The model is simple, adaptable to other debris disks, and can be extended to accommodate multiple planets. If Fom b is the dominant perturber of the belt, then to produce the observed disk morphology it must have a mass M pl < 3M J, an orbital semimajor axis a pl > 101.5 AU, and an orbital eccentricity e pl = 0.11-0.13. These conclusions are independent of Fom b's photometry. To not disrupt the disk, a greater mass for Fom b demands a smaller orbit farther removed from the disk; thus, future astrometric measurement of Fom b's orbit, combined with our model of planet-disk interaction, can be used to determine the mass more precisely. The inner edge of the debris disk at a ≈ 133 AU lies at the periphery of Fom b's chaotic zone, and the mean disk eccentricity of e ≈ 0.11 is secularly forced by the planet, supporting predictions made prior to the discovery of Fom b. However, previous mass constraints based on disk morphology rely on several oversimplifications. We explain why our constraint is more reliable. It is based on a global model of the disk that is not restricted to the planet's chaotic zone boundary. Moreover, we screen disk parent bodies for dynamical stability over the system age of ~ 100 Myr, and model them separately from their dust grain progeny; the latter's orbits are strongly affected by radiation pressure and their lifetimes are limited to ~ 0.1 Myr by destructive grain-grain collisions. The single planet model predicts that planet and disk orbits be apsidally aligned. Fomalhaut b's nominal space velocity does not bear this out, but the astrometric uncertainties may be large. If the apsidal misalignment proves real, our calculated upper mass limit of 3M J still holds. If the orbits are aligned, our model predicts M pl = 0.5M J, a pl = 115 AU, and e pl = 0.12. Parent bodies are evacuated from mean-motion resonances with Fom b; these empty resonances are akin to the Kirkwood gaps opened by Jupiter. The belt contains at least 3M ⊕ of solids that are grinding down to dust, their velocity dispersions stirred so strongly by Fom b that collisions are destructive. Such a large mass in solids is consistent with Fom b having formed in situ.

  14. Fomalhaut's Debris Disk and Planet: Constraining the Mass of Formalhaut B from Disk Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, E.; Kite, E.; Kalas, P.; Graham, J. R.; Clampin, M.

    2008-01-01

    Following the optical imaging of exoplanet candidate Fomalhaut b (Fom b), we present a numerical model of how Fomalhaut's debris disk is gravitationally shaped by a single interior planet. The model is simple, adaptable to other debris disks, and can be extended to accommodate multiple planets. If Fom b is the dominant perturber of the belt, then to produce the observed disk morphology it must have a mass M(sub pl) < 3M(sub J), an orbital semimajor axis a(sub pl) > 101.5AU, and an orbital eccentricity e(sub pl) = 0.11 - 0.13. These conclusions are independent of Fom b's photometry. To not disrupt the disk, a greater mass for Fom b demands a smaller orbit farther removed from the disk; thus, future astrometric measurement of Fom b's orbit, combined with our model of planet-disk interaction, can be used to determine the mass more precisely. The inner edge of the debris disk at a approximately equals 133AU lies at the periphery of Fom b's chaotic zone, and the mean disk eccentricity of e approximately equals 0.11 is secularly forced by the planet, supporting predictions made prior to the discovery of Fom b. However, previous mass constraints based on disk morphology rely on several oversimplifications. We explain why our constraint is more reliable. It is based on a global model of the disk that is not restricted to the planet's chaotic zone boundary. Moreover, we screen disk parent bodies for dynamical stability over the system age of approximately 100 Myr, and model them separately from their dust grain progeny; the latter's orbits are strongly affected by radiation pressure and their lifetimes are limited to approximately 0.1 Myr by destructive grain-grain collisions. The single planet model predicts that planet and disk orbits be apsidally aligned. Fomalhaut b's nominal space velocity does not bear this out, but the astrometric uncertainties are difficult to quantify. Even if the apsidal misalignment proves real, our calculated upper mass limit of 3 M(sub J) still holds. Parent bodies are evacuated from mean-motion resonances with Fom b; these empty resonances are akin to the Kirkwood gaps opened by Jupiter. The belt contains at least 3M(sub Earth) of solids that are grinding down to dust, their velocity dispersions stirred so strongly by Fom b that collisions are destructive. Such a large mass in solids is consistent with Fom b having formed in situ.

  15. Atmospheres of Low-mass Planets: The "Boil-off"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin

    2016-02-01

    We show that, for a low-mass planet that orbits its host star within a few tenths of an AU (like the majority of the Kepler planets), the atmosphere it was able to accumulate while embedded in the protoplanetary disk may not survive unscathed after the disk disperses. This gas envelope, if more massive than a few percent of the core (with a mass below 10{M}\\oplus ), has a cooling time that is much longer than the timescale on which the planet exits the disk. As such, it could not have contracted significantly from its original size, of the order of the Bondi radius. So a newly exposed protoplanet would be losing mass via a Parker wind that is catalyzed by the stellar continuum radiation. This represents an intermediate stage of mass-loss, occurring soon after the disk has dispersed, but before the EUV/X-ray driven photoevaporation becomes relevant. The surface mass-loss induces a mass movement within the envelope that advects internal heat outward. As a result, the planet atmosphere rapidly cools down and contracts, until it has reached a radius of the order of 0.1 Bondi radius, at which time the mass-loss effectively shuts down. Within a million years after the disk disperses, we find a planet that has only about 10% of its original envelope, and a KelvinHelmholtz time that is much longer than its actual age. We suggest that this boil-off process may be partially responsible for the lack of planets above a radius of 2.5{R}\\oplus in the Kepler data, provided planet formation results in initial envelope masses of tens of percent.

  16. Limit on the photon mass deduced from Pioneer-10 observations of Jupiter's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.; Goldhaber, A. S.; Nieto, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Analysis of the Pioneer-10 data on Jupiter's magnetic field, in which the mass of the photon was treated as a free parameter. An upper limit of 8 to the negative 49th grams was set for the photon mass. This is the smallest limit so far obtained from direct measurements.

  17. MASSES, RADII, AND CLOUD PROPERTIES OF THE HR 8799 PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard E-mail: dsaumon@lanl.gov E-mail: andrew.ackerman@nasa.gov E-mail: freedman@darkstar.arc.nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Some studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here, we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against observations of field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike some previous studies, we require mutually consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure thus yields plausible values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends, including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition-some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to whether or not we include the H- and the K-band spectrum in our analysis. Solutions for planets c and d are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that, like in L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present an exploratory evolution calculation that accounts for this effect. Finally we recompute the bolometric luminosity of all three planets.

  18. THE PHOTOECCENTRIC EFFECT AND PROTO-HOT JUPITERS. II. KOI-1474.01, A CANDIDATE ECCENTRIC PLANET PERTURBED BY AN UNSEEN COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Crepp, Justin R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2012-12-20

    The exoplanets known as hot Jupiters-Jupiter-sized planets with periods of less than 10 days-likely are relics of dynamical processes that shape all planetary system architectures. Socrates et al. argued that high eccentricity migration (HEM) mechanisms proposed for situating these close-in planets should produce an observable population of highly eccentric proto-hot Jupiters that have not yet tidally circularized. HEM should also create failed-hot Jupiters, with periapses just beyond the influence of fast circularization. Using the technique we previously presented for measuring eccentricities from photometry (the ''photoeccentric effect''), we are distilling a collection of eccentric proto- and failed-hot Jupiters from the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Here, we present the first, KOI-1474.01, which has a long orbital period (69.7340 days) and a large eccentricity e 0.81{sup +0.10}{sub -0.07}, skirting the proto-hot Jupiter boundary. Combining Kepler photometry, ground-based spectroscopy, and stellar evolution models, we characterize host KOI-1474 as a rapidly rotating F star. Statistical arguments reveal that the transiting candidate has a low false-positive probability of 3.1%. KOI-1474.01 also exhibits transit-timing variations of the order of an hour. We explore characteristics of the third-body perturber, which is possibly the ''smoking-gun'' cause of KOI-1474.01's large eccentricity. We use the host star's period, radius, and projected rotational velocity to measure the inclination of the stellar spin. Comparing KOI 1474.01's inclination, we find that its orbit is marginally consistent with being aligned with the stellar spin axis, although a reanalysis is warranted with future additional data. Finally, we discuss how the number and existence of proto-hot Jupiters will not only demonstrate that hot Jupiters migrate via HEM, but also shed light on the typical timescale for the mechanism.

  19. Masses of the Five Small Planets Around Kepler-80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Mariah G.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2015-11-01

    Kepler has discovered hundreds of multi-transiting systems which hold tremendous potential both individually and collectively for understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Many of these systems are quite compact, containing 3-7 relatively small planets with periods less than 100 days; these are known as Systems with Tightly-packed Inner planets, or STIPs. One ultra-compact STIP is KOI-500/Kepler-80, a planetary system containing five transiting planets ranging in size from 1.5 to 2.8 times the radius of the Earth that orbit in a tightly-packed configuration with periods between 1 and 10 days. In addition to its close packedness, the outer four planets are in a unique dynamical configuration with two interconnected three-body resonances. Using transit timing variations (TTVs) caused by the gravitational perturbations, we perform a fully self-consistent dynamical analysis of the system, finding best-fit masses for the outer four planets to be each around five Earth masses. We also performed extensive testing of synthetic systems, and have determined that eccentricities cannot be reliably detected, but that assuming circular orbits does not significantly affect the mass estimates. We will present the inferred properties for Kepler-80 and discuss these results in context of (ultra-compact) STIPs and the small planet mass-radius relation.

  20. High-dispersion spectroscopy of extrasolar planets: from CO in hot Jupiters to O2 in exo-Earths.

    PubMed

    Snellen, Ignas

    2014-04-28

    Ground-based high-dispersion spectroscopy could reveal molecular oxygen as a biomarker gas in the atmospheres of twin-Earths transiting red dwarf stars within the next 25 years. The required contrasts are only a factor of 3 lower than that already achieved for carbon monoxide in hot Jupiter atmospheres today but will need much larger telescopes because the target stars will be orders of magnitude fainter. If extraterrestrial life is very common and can therefore be found on planets around the most nearby red dwarf stars, it may be detectable via transmission spectroscopy with the next-generation extremely large telescopes. However, it is likely that significantly more collecting area is required for this. This can be achieved through the development of low-cost flux collector technology, which combines a large collecting area with a low but sufficient image quality for high-dispersion spectroscopy of bright stars. PMID:24664914

  1. Methane planets and the mass-radius diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, Morris; Helled, Ravit; Levi, Amit

    2014-05-01

    The multitude of newly discovered exoplanets are too far away to be studied in the same detail as the planets of our own solar system. Many planets have measured masses and radii, and their mean densities can be compared to those expected for different simple compositions (see, e.g. Seager et al. 2007). Clearly, different mixtures of materials can give similar density distributions and as a result, the mass and radius of a planet do not give a unique composition. It turns out that even if we limit the composition to one species, the mass-radius relation can show complex structure. To illustrate this, we consider planets composed of pure CH4. The complications arise because CH4 is expected to undergo dissociation at high pressure. Ab initio calculations (Gao et al. 2010) suggest that CH4 dissociates to C2H6, C4H10, and finally carbon + hydrogen at progressively higher pressures. We have modeled isothermal planets composed initially of pure CH4. We assume that if the planet is massive enough so that the central pressure exceeds the dissociation pressure of CH4, a diamond core is formed and the hydrogen released diffuses through the intermediate CH4 shell to form an H2 atmosphere. This leads to a sharp discontinuity in the mass-radius relation for such planets. A further complication arises from the fact that within a narrow range around the transition mass there can be multiple solutions ranging from a pure CH4 planet to those with diamond cores, CH4 shells, and hydrogen atmospheres of different masses. Methane planets thus provide an example of the instability first noted by Ramsey (1950) and Lighthill (1950). As a result, even for a given composition the mass-radius diagram is non-unique, making the characterization of extrasolar planets even more challenging. REFERENCES Gao, G., Oganov, A. R., Wang, H., Li, P., Ma, Y., Cui, T., and Zou, G., 2010. Dissociation of methane under high pressure. J. Chem. Phys., 133:144,508-1 - 144,508-5. Lighthill, M. J., 1950. On the instability of small planetary cores (II). Mon. Not. RAS, 110:339. Ramsey, W. H., 1950. On the instability of small planetary cores (I). Mon. Not. RAS, 110:325. Seager, S., Kuchner, M., Hier-Majumder, C. A., and Militzer, B., 2007. Mass-radius relationships for solid exoplanets. Astrophys. J., 669:1279-1297.

  2. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Dittmann, Jason; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michael; Jehin, Emmanuel; Stark, Antony; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christoph; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno; Udry, Stphane; Wunsche, Anael

    2015-12-01

    Results from Kepler indicate that M dwarfs host, on average, at least 1.4 planets between 0.5 and 1.5 Earth radii per star. Yet, the closest small planets known to transit M dwarfs have been too distant to allow Doppler measurements of their masses or spectroscopic studies of their atmospheres. Here, we announce a new planet discovered by the MEarth-South observatory, an Earth-size planet transiting an M dwarf that is only 12 pc away. The density of the planet, determined from radial velocity observations with HARPS, is consistent with an Earth-like rock/iron composition. With an equilibrium temperature of 530K (assuming a Bond albedo of 0.3), this planet is cooler than most other rocky planets with measured densities. Although too hot to be habitable, it is cool enough that it may have retained a substantial atmosphere over its lifetime. Thanks to the star's proximity and its diminutive size of only 1/5th the radius of the Sun, this new world likely provides the first opportunity for our community to spectroscopically examine the atmosphere of a terrestrial exoplanet. We estimate that JWST could secure high signal-to-noise spectra of the planet's atmosphere, both in transmission during transit and in emission at secondary eclipse.

  3. An Earth-mass planet orbiting ? Centauri B.

    PubMed

    Dumusque, Xavier; Pepe, Francesco; Lovis, Christophe; Sgransan, Damien; Sahlmann, Johannes; Benz, Willy; Bouchy, Franois; Mayor, Michel; Queloz, Didier; Santos, Nuno; Udry, Stphane

    2012-11-01

    Exoplanets down to the size of Earth have been found, but not in the habitable zone--that is, at a distance from the parent star at which water, if present, would be liquid. There are planets in the habitable zone of stars cooler than our Sun, but for reasons such as tidal locking and strong stellar activity, they are unlikely to harbour water-carbon life as we know it. The detection of a habitable Earth-mass planet orbiting a star similar to our Sun is extremely difficult, because such a signal is overwhelmed by stellar perturbations. Here we report the detection of an Earth-mass planet orbiting our neighbour star ? Centauri B, a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun. The planet has an orbital period of 3.236 days and is about 0.04 astronomical units from the star (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). PMID:23075844

  4. Search for earth mass planets and dark matter too

    SciTech Connect

    Rhie, S.H.; Bennett, D.P.

    1996-02-01

    Gravitational microlensing is known for baryonic dark matter searches. Here we show that microlensing also provides a unique tool for the detection of low mass planets (such as earths and neptunes) from the ground. A planetary system forms a binary lens (or, a multi-point lens), and we can determine the mass ratio of the planet with respect to the star and relative distance (= separation/Einstein ring radius) between the star and planet. Such a microlensing planet search project requires a {approx} 2 m survey telescope, and a network of 1.5 - 2 m follow-up telescopes capable of monitoring stars in the Bulge on a 24-hour basis. During the off-season of the Galactic bulge, this network can be used for dark matter search by monitoring the stars in the LMC and SMC.

  5. The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets. V. Follow-up of ELODIE candidates: Jupiter-analogs around Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Bonfils, X.; Bouchy, F.; Santos, N. C.; Arnold, L.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Daz, R. F.; Delfosse, X.; Eggenberger, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Hbrard, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Moutou, C.; Naef, D.; Santerne, A.; Sgransan, D.; Sivan, J.-P.; Udry, S.

    2012-09-01

    We present radial-velocity measurements obtained in one of a number of programs underway to search for extrasolar planets with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 1.93-m telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory. Targets were selected from catalogs observed with ELODIE, which had been mounted previously at the telescope, in order to detect long-period planets with an extended database close to 15 years. Two new Jupiter-analog candidates are reported to orbit the bright stars HD 150706 and HD 222155 in 16.1 yr and 10.9 yr at 6.7-1.4+4.0 AU and 5.1-0.7+0.6 AU, and to have minimum masses of 2.71-0.66+1.14 MJup and 1.90-0.53+0.67 MJup, respectively. Using the measurements from ELODIE and SOPHIE, we refine the parameters of the long-period planets HD 154345b and HD 89307b, and publish the first reliable orbit for HD 24040b. This last companion has a minimum mass of 4.01 0.49 MJup orbiting its star in 10.0 yr at 4.92 0.38 AU. Moreover, the data provide evidence of a third bound object in the HD 24040 system. With a surrounding dust debris disk, HD 150706 is an active G0 dwarf for which we partially corrected the effect of the stellar spot on the SOPHIE radial-velocities. In contrast, HD 222155 is an inactive G2V star. In the SOPHIE measurements, an instrumental effect could be characterized and partly corrected. On the basis of the previous findings of Lovis and collaborators and since no significant correlation between the radial-velocity variations and the activity index are found in the SOPHIE data, these variations are not expected to be only due to stellar magnetic cycles. Finally, we discuss the main properties of this new population of long-period Jupiter-mass planets, which for the moment consists of fewer than 20 candidates. These stars are preferential targets either for direct-imaging or astrometry follow-up surveys to constrain the system parameters and for higher-precision radial-velocity searches for lower mass planets, aiming to find a solar system twin. In the Appendix, we determine the relation that defines the radial-velocity offset between the ELODIE and SOPHIE spectrographs. Based on observations made with the ELODIE and the SOPHIE spectrographs on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, CNRS/OAMP), France (program 07A.PNP.CONS) and on spectral data retrieved from the ELODIE archive at OHP. Tables A.1-A.10 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/545/A55

  6. Jupiter's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M. F.; Bunce, E. J.; Kronberg, E. A.; Jackman, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is a highly dynamic environment. Hundreds of reconnection events have been identified in Jupiter's magnetotail through analysis of magnetic field and particle measurements collected by the Galileo spacecraft. Quasi-periodic behavior, suggestive of reconnection, has been intermittently observed on a ~2-3 day time scale in several data sets, including magnetic field dipolarizations, flow bursts, auroral polar dawn spots, and the hectometric radio emission. In this paper we review the present state of knowledge of Jovian magnetospheric dynamics. Throughout the discussion, we highlight similarities and differences to Saturn's magnetosphere. For example, recent analysis of plasmoid signatures at both Jupiter and Saturn has established the role of tail reconnection in the overall mass and flux transport in the outer planet magnetospheres. The results for both Jupiter and Saturn suggest that the observed mass loss rate due to tail reconnection and plasmoid release is insufficient to account for the mass input rate from the moons Io and Enceladus, respectively. We also present new analysis in which we use the Michigan mSWiM propagated solar wind MHD model to estimate the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter. This information allows us to determine whether reconnection events occur preferentially during certain solar wind conditions, or whether there is evidence that the solar wind modulates the quasi-periodicity seen in the field dipolarizations and flow bursts.

  7. The Influence of Giant Planet Mass on Long-Period Comet Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alexia; Quinn, T.

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of the outer solar system architecture on the flux of Earth-crossing comets. In particular, we seek to quantify the role of the giant planets as ``planetary protectors''. Because the outer planets modify the structure of the Oort Cloud throughout its formation, we must follow its evolution over the full age of the solar system. We have run simulations in each of 4 different planetary mass configurations to analyze the structure and formation of each Oort Cloud and to better constrain the flux of comets into the inner solar system. Particles are integrated over 4.5 Gyrs under the influence of the giant planets, the Galactic tide, and passing stars. We find that the structure of the Oort Cloud, including the location of boundaries and the relative number of comets in the inner and outer Oort Cloud, does not change significantly between configurations. As overall planetary mass decreases, the flux of comets increases. Trapping efficiency of the Oort Cloud also increases, as expected. We find that Saturn is as effective as Jupiter at deflecting possible Earth-crossing comets, as reflected by the fact that a comparable numbers of particles enter the inner solar system when we independently reduce their masses. In each configuration, we confirm the conclusion from Kaib & Quinn (2009) that the majority of observable comets originate in the inner Oort Cloud. Although the final effect may be small, accounting for the formation and growth of the giant planets in simulations may help us better understand the trapping efficiency of the Oort Cloud and the mass of the protoplanetary disk.

  8. Terrestrial Planet Formation around Low-Mass Stars: Effect of the Mass of Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshino, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has detected several thousand planets and candidates.Their central stars are mainly FGK-type stars.It is difficult to observe M-stars by using visible light since M-stars have their peak radiation in the infrared region.However, recently there are several survey projects for planets around M-stars such as the InfraRed Doppler (IRD) survey of the Subaru telescope.Therefore it is expected that the number of planets around M-stars will increase in the near future.The habitable zone of M-stars is closer to the stars than that of G-stars.For this reason, the possibility of finding habitable planets is expected to be higher.Here we study the formation of close-in terrestrial planets by giant impacts of protoplanets around low-mass stars by using N-body simulations.An important parameter that controls formation processes is the ratio between the physical radius of a planet and its Hill radius, which decreases with the stellar mass.We systematically change the mass of the central stars and investigate its effects on terrestrial planet formation.We find that the mass of the maximum planet decreases with the mass of central stars, while the number of planets in the system increases.We also find that the orbital separation of adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radius increases with the stellar mass.

  9. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen–helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen–helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  10. The Planets Around Low-Mass Stars (PALMS) Direct Imaging Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, M. C.; Shkolnik, E.; Mann, A.; Tamura, M.

    2013-01-01

    Direct imaging is the only method to study the outer architecture (>10 AU) of extrasolar planetary systems in a targeted fashion. Previous imaging surveys have primarily focused on intermediate- and high-mass stars because of the relative dearth of known nearby young M dwarfs. As a result, even though M dwarfs make up 70% of stars in our galaxy, there are few constraints on the population of giant planets at moderate separations (10-100 AU) in this stellar mass regime. We present results from an ongoing high-contrast adaptive optics imaging survey targeting newly identified nearby (<35 pc) young (<300 Myr) M dwarfs with Keck-2/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO. We have already discovered four young brown dwarf companions with masses between 30-70 Mjup; two of these are members of the ~120 Myr AB Dor moving group, and another one will yield a dynamical mass in the near future. Follow-up optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of these companions reveal spectral types of late-M to early-L and spectroscopic indicators of youth such as angular H-band morphologies, weak J-band alkali lines, and Li absorption and Halpha emission in one target. Altogether our survey is sensitive to planet masses a few times that of Jupiter at separations down to ~10 AU. With a sample size of roughly 80 single M dwarfs, this program represents the deepest and most extensive imaging search for planets around young low-mass stars to date.

  11. Ab Initio Equation of State for Hydrogen-Helium Mixtures with Recalibration of the Giant-planet Mass-Radius Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militzer, B.; Hubbard, W. B.

    2013-09-01

    Using density functional molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the equation of state (EOS) for hydrogen-helium mixtures spanning density-temperature conditions typical of giant-planet interiors, ~0.2-9 g cm-3 and 1000-80,000 K for a typical helium mass fraction of 0.245. In addition to computing internal energy and pressure, we determine the entropy using an ab initio thermodynamic integration technique. A comprehensive EOS table with 391 density-temperature points is constructed and the results are presented in the form of a two-dimensional free energy fit for interpolation. Deviations between our ab initio EOS and the semi-analytical EOS model by Saumon and Chabrier are analyzed in detail, and we use the results for initial revision of the inferred thermal state of giant planets with known values for mass and radius. Changes are most pronounced for planets in the Jupiter mass range and below. We present a revision to the mass-radius relationship that makes the hottest exoplanets increase in radius by ~0.2 Jupiter radii at fixed entropy and for masses greater than ~0.5 Jupiter mass. This change is large enough to have possible implications for some discrepant "inflated giant exoplanets."

  12. AB INITIO EQUATION OF STATE FOR HYDROGEN-HELIUM MIXTURES WITH RECALIBRATION OF THE GIANT-PLANET MASS-RADIUS RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Militzer, B.; Hubbard, W. B.

    2013-09-10

    Using density functional molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the equation of state (EOS) for hydrogen-helium mixtures spanning density-temperature conditions typical of giant-planet interiors, {approx}0.2-9 g cm{sup -3} and 1000-80,000 K for a typical helium mass fraction of 0.245. In addition to computing internal energy and pressure, we determine the entropy using an ab initio thermodynamic integration technique. A comprehensive EOS table with 391 density-temperature points is constructed and the results are presented in the form of a two-dimensional free energy fit for interpolation. Deviations between our ab initio EOS and the semi-analytical EOS model by Saumon and Chabrier are analyzed in detail, and we use the results for initial revision of the inferred thermal state of giant planets with known values for mass and radius. Changes are most pronounced for planets in the Jupiter mass range and below. We present a revision to the mass-radius relationship that makes the hottest exoplanets increase in radius by {approx}0.2 Jupiter radii at fixed entropy and for masses greater than {approx}0.5 Jupiter mass. This change is large enough to have possible implications for some discrepant ''inflated giant exoplanets''.

  13. Formation of giant planets around stars with various masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornet, K.; Wolf, S.; R?yczka, M.

    2006-11-01

    We examine the predictions of the core accretion - gas capture model concerning the efficiency of planet formation around stars with various masses. First, we follow the evolution of gas and solids from the moment when all solids are in the form of small grains to the stage when most of them are in the form of planetesimals. We show that the surface density of the planetesimal swarm tends to be higher around less massive stars. Then, we derive the minimum surface density of the planetesimal swarm required for the formation of a giant planet both in a numerical and in an approximate analytical approach. We combine these results by calculating a set of representative disk models characterized by different masses, sizes, and metallicities, and by estimating their capability of forming giant planets. Our results show that the set of protoplanetary disks capable of giant planet formation is larger for less massive stars. Provided that the distribution of initial disk parameters does not depend too strongly on the mass of the central star, we predict that the percentage of stars with giant planets should increase with decreasing stellar mass. Furthermore, we identify the radial redistribution of solids during the formation of planetesimal swarms as the key element in explaining these effects.

  14. Terrestrial planets in high-mass disks without gas giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ela, G. C.; Guilera, O. M.; Brunini, A.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Observational and theoretical studies suggest that planetary systems consisting only of rocky planets are probably the most common in the Universe. Aims: We study the potential habitability of planets formed in high-mass disks without gas giants around solar-type stars. These systems are interesting because they are likely to harbor super-Earths or Neptune-mass planets on wide orbits, which one should be able to detect with the microlensing technique. Methods: First, a semi-analytical model was used to define the mass of the protoplanetary disks that produce Earth-like planets, super-Earths, or mini-Neptunes, but not gas giants. Using mean values for the parameters that describe a disk and its evolution, we infer that disks with masses lower than 0.15 M? are unable to form gas giants. Then, that semi-analytical model was used to describe the evolution of embryos and planetesimals during the gaseous phase for a given disk. Thus, initial conditions were obtained to perform N-body simulations of planetary accretion. We studied disks of 0.1, 0.125, and 0.15 M?. Results: All our simulations form massive planets on wide orbits. For a 0.1 M? disk, 2-3 super-Earths of 2.8 to 5.9 M? are formed between 2 and 5 AU. For disks of 0.125 and 0.15 M?, our simulations produce a 10-17.1 M? planet between 1.6 and 2.7 AU, and other super-Earths are formed in outer regions. Moreover, six planets survive in the habitable zone (HZ). These planets have masses from 1.9 to 4.7 M? and significant water contents ranging from 560 to 7482 Earth oceans, where one Earth ocean represents the amount of water on Earth's surface, which equals 2.8 10-4M?. Of the six planets formed in the HZ, three are water worlds with 39%-44% water by mass. These planets start the simulations beyond the snow line, which explains their high water abundances. In general terms, the smaller the mass of the planets observed on wide orbits, the higher the possibility to find water worlds in the HZ. In fact, massive planets can act as a dynamical barrier that prevents the inward diffusion of water-rich embryos located beyond the snow line. Conclusions: Systems without gas giants that harbor super-Earths or Neptune-mass planets on wide orbits around solar-type stars are of astrobiological interest. These systems are likely to harbor super-Earths in the HZ with significant water contents, which missions such as Kepler and Darwin should be able to find.

  15. Fast migration of low-mass planets in radiative discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierens, A.

    2015-12-01

    Low-mass planets are known to undergo Type I migration and this process must have played a key role during the evolution of planetary systems. Analytical formulae for the disc torque have been derived assuming that the planet evolves on a fixed circular orbit. However, recent work has shown that in isothermal discs, a migrating protoplanet may also experience dynamical corotation torques that scale with the planet drift rate. The aim of this study is to examine whether dynamical corotation torques can also affect the migration of low-mass planets in non-isothermal discs. We performed 2D radiative hydrodynamical simulations to examine the orbital evolution outcome of migrating protoplanets as a function of disc mass. We find that a protoplanet can enter a fast migration regime when it migrates in the direction set by the entropy-related horseshoe drag and when the Toomre stability parameter is less than a threshold value below which the horseshoe region contracts into a tadpole-like region. In that case, an underdense trapped region appears near the planet, with an entropy excess compared to the ambient disc. If the viscosity and thermal diffusivity are small enough so that the entropy excess is conserved during migration, the planet then experiences strong corotation torques arising from the material flowing across the planet orbit. During fast migration, we observe that a protoplanet can pass through the zero-torque line predicted by static torques. We also find that fast migration may help in disrupting the mean-motion resonances that are formed by convergent migration of embryos.

  16. Probing Clouds in Planets with a Simple Radiative Transfer Model: The Jupiter Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendikoa, Inigo; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of planets evokes using expensive on-orbit satellites and gathering complex data from space. However, the basic properties of clouds in planetary atmospheres can be successfully estimated with small telescopes even from an urban environment using currently available and affordable technology. This makes the process accessible for

  17. Probing Clouds in Planets with a Simple Radiative Transfer Model: The Jupiter Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendikoa, Inigo; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of planets evokes using expensive on-orbit satellites and gathering complex data from space. However, the basic properties of clouds in planetary atmospheres can be successfully estimated with small telescopes even from an urban environment using currently available and affordable technology. This makes the process accessible for…

  18. Masses, Radii, and Cloud Properties of the HR 8799 Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have compared the photometric and limited spectral data of the planets to the predictions of various atmosphere and evolution models and concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Most studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike almost all previous studies we specify mutually self-consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure yields plausible and self-consistent values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are in fact not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition, some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to the H and K band spectrum. Solutions for planets c and particularly d are less certain but are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that as for L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present a new evolution calculation that predicts cooling tracks on the near-infrared color-magnitude diagram. Finally we argue that the range of uncertainty conventionally quoted for the bolometric luminosity of all three planets is too small.

  19. PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Sean N.; Armitage, Philip J.; Gorelick, Noel

    2009-07-10

    We study the final architecture of planetary systems that evolve under the combined effects of planet-planet and planetesimal scattering. Using N-body simulations we investigate the dynamics of marginally unstable systems of gas and ice giants both in isolation and when the planets form interior to a planetesimal belt. The unstable isolated systems evolve under planet-planet scattering to yield an eccentricity distribution that matches that observed for extrasolar planets. When planetesimals are included the outcome depends upon the total mass of the planets. For M {sub tot} {approx}> 1 M{sub J} the final eccentricity distribution remains broad, whereas for M {sub tot} {approx}< 1 M{sub J} a combination of divergent orbital evolution and recircularization of scattered planets results in a preponderance of nearly circular final orbits. We also study the fate of marginally stable multiple planet systems in the presence of planetesimal disks, and find that for high planet masses the majority of such systems evolve into resonance. A significant fraction leads to resonant chains that are planetary analogs of Jupiter's Galilean satellites. We predict that a transition from eccentric to near-circular orbits will be observed once extrasolar planet surveys detect sub-Jovian mass planets at orbital radii of a {approx_equal} 5-10 AU.

  20. Revised Masses and Densities of the Planets around Kepler-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Agol, Eric; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Kipping, David; Fulton, Benjamin; Lissauer, Jack; Howard, Andrew; Clark Fabrycky, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Determining which small exoplanets have stony-iron compositions is necessary for quantifying the occurrence of such planets and for understanding the physics of planet formation. Kepler-10 hosts the stony-iron world Kepler-10b, and also contains what has been reported to be the largest solid silicate-ice planet, Kepler-10c. Using 220 radial velocities (RVs), including 72 new precise RVs from Keck-HIRES, and 17 quarters of Kepler photometry, we obtain the most complete picture of the Kepler-10 system to date. We find that Kepler-10b (Rp = 1.47 R?) has mass 3.70 0.43 M? and density 6.44 0.73 g cm-3. Modeling the interior of Kepler-10b as an iron core overlaid with a silicate mantle, we find that the core constitutes 0.17 0.11 of the planet mass. For Kepler-10c (Rp = 2.35 R?) we measure mass 13.32 1.65 M?and density 5.67 0.70 g cm-3, significantly lower than the mass in Dumusque et al. (2014, 17.21.9 M?). Kepler-10c is not sufficiently dense to have a pure stony-iron composition. Internal compositional modeling reveals that at least 10% of the radius of Kepler-10c is a volatile envelope composed of either hydrogen-helium (0.0027 0.0015 of the mass, 0.1720.037 of the radius) or super-ionic water (0.3090.11 of the mass, 0.3050.075 of the radius). Transit timing variations (TTVs) of Kepler-10c indicate the likely presence of a third planet in the system, KOI-72.X. The TTVs and RVs are consistent with KOI-72.X having an orbital period of 24, 71, 82, or 101 days, and a mass from 1-7 M?.

  1. Revised Masses and Densities of the Planets around Kepler-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Agol, Eric; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Kipping, David; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Determining which small exoplanets have stony-iron compositions is necessary for quantifying the occurrence of such planets and for understanding the physics of planet formation. Kepler-10 hosts the stony-iron world Kepler-10b, and also contains what has been reported to be the largest solid silicate-ice planet, Kepler-10c. Using 220 radial velocities (RVs), including 72 precise RVs from Keck-HIRES of which 20 are new from 2014 to 2015, and 17 quarters of Kepler photometry, we obtain the most complete picture of the Kepler-10 system to date. We find that Kepler-10b ({R}{{p}}=1.47 {R}\\oplus ) has mass 3.72\\quad +/- \\quad 0.42\\quad {M}\\oplus and density 6.46\\quad +/- \\quad 0.73\\quad {{g}} {{cm}}-3. Modeling the interior of Kepler-10b as an iron core overlaid with a silicate mantle, we find that the iron core constitutes 0.17 ± 0.11 of the planet mass. For Kepler-10c ({R}{{p}}=2.35 {R}\\oplus ) we measure mass 13.98\\quad +/- \\quad 1.79\\quad {M}\\oplus and density 5.94\\quad +/- \\quad 0.76\\quad {{g}} {{cm}}-3, significantly lower than the mass computed in Dumusque et al. (17.2+/- 1.9 {M}\\oplus ). Our mass measurement of Kepler-10c rules out a pure stony-iron composition. Internal compositional modeling reveals that at least 10% of the radius of Kepler-10c is a volatile envelope composed of hydrogen–helium (0.2% of the mass, 16% of the radius) or super-ionic water (28% of the mass, 29% of the radius). However, we note that analysis of only HIRES data yields a higher mass for planet b and a lower mass for planet c than does analysis of the HARPS-N data alone, with the mass estimates for Kepler-10 c being formally inconsistent at the 3σ level. Moreover, dividing the data for each instrument into two parts also leads to somewhat inconsistent measurements for the mass of planet c derived from each observatory. Together, this suggests that time-correlated noise is present and that the uncertainties in the masses of the planets (especially planet c) likely exceed our formal estimates. Transit timing variations (TTVs) of Kepler-10c indicate the likely presence of a third planet in the system, KOI-72.X. The TTVs and RVs are consistent with KOI-72.X having an orbital period of 24, 71, or 101 days, and a mass from 1 to 7 {M}\\oplus . W.M.O. Keck Observatory.

  2. Types of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Kaygorodov, Pavel V.; Ionov, Dmitry E.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    Hot Jupiters, i.e. exoplanet gas giants, having masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and semimajor axes shorter than 0.1 AU, are a unique class of objects. Since they are so close to the host stars, their atmospheres form and evolve under the action of very active gas dynamical processes caused by the gravitational field and irradiation of the host star. As a matter of fact, the atmospheres of several of these planets fill their Roche lobes , which results in a powerful outflow of material from the planet towards the host star. The energy budget of this process is so important that it almost solely governs the evolution of hot Jupiters gaseous envelopes. Based on the years of experience in the simulations of gas dynamics in mass-exchanging close binary stars, we have investigated specific features of hot Jupiters atmospheres. The analytical estimates and results of 3D numerical simulations, discussed in this Chapter, show that the gaseous envelopes around hot Jupiters may be significantly non-spherical and, at the same time, stationary and long-lived. These results are of fundamental importance for the interpretation of observational data.

  3. DISCOVERY AND MASS MEASUREMENTS OF A COLD, 10 EARTH MASS PLANET AND ITS HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Suzuki, D.; Sumi, T.; Monard, L. A. G.; Street, R.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kundurthy, P.; Becker, A. C.; Skowron, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Barry, R. K.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Wellnitz, D. D.; Bond, I. A.; Dong, S. E-mail: bennett@nd.edu

    2011-11-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, performed with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m{sub p} = 10.4 {+-} 1.7 M{sub +} and orbits a star of mass M{sub *} = 0.56 {+-} 0.09 M{sub sun} at a semimajor axis of a = 3.2{sub -0.5}{sup +1.9} AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6{sub -1.5}{sup +7+7} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure the microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a 'failed' gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets.

  4. Problems of simulation of large, long-lived vortices in the atmospheres of the giant planets (jupiter, saturn, neptune)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezlin, Michael V.; Sutyrin, Georgi G.

    1994-01-01

    Large, long-lived vortices are abundant in the atmospheres of the giant planets. Some of them survive a few orders of magnitude longer than the dispersive linear Rossby wave packets, e.g. the Great Red Spot (GRS), Little Red Spot (LRS) and White Ovals (WO) of Jupiter, Big Bertha, Brown Spot and Anne's Spot of Saturn, the Great Dark Spot (GDS) of Neptune, etc. Nonlinear effects which prevent their dispersion spreading are the main subject of our consideration. Particular emphasis is placed on determining the dynamical processes which may explain the remarkable properties of observed vortices such as anticyclonic rotation in preference to cyclonic one and the uniqueness of the GRS, the largest coherent vortex, along the perimeter of Jupiter at corresponding latitude. We review recent experimental and theoretical studies of steadily translating solitary Rossby vortices (anticyclones) in a rotating shallow fluid. Two-dimensional monopolar solitary vortices trap fluid which is transported westward. These dualistic structures appear to be vortices, on the one hand, and solitary waves, on the other hand. Owing to the presence of the trapped fluid, such solitary structures collide inelastically and have a memory of the initial disturbance which is responsible for the formation of the structure. As a consequence, they have no definite relationship between the amplitude and characteristic size. Their vortical properties are connected with geostrophic advection of local vorticity. Their solitary properties (nonspreading and stationary translation) are due to a balance between Rossby wave dispersion and nonlinear effects which allow the anticyclones, with an elevation of a free surface, to propagate faster than the linear waves, without a resonance with linear waves, i.e. without wave radiation. On the other hand, cyclones, with a depression of a free surface, are dispersive and nonstationary features. This asymmetry in dispersion-nonlinear properties of cyclones and anticyclones is thought to be one of the essential reasons for the observed predominance of anticyclones among the long-lived vortices in the atmospheres of the giant planets and also among the intrathermocline oceanic eddies. The effects of shear flows and differences between the properties of monopolar vortices in planetary flows and various laboratory experiments are discussed. General geostrophic (GG) theory of Rossby vortices is presented. It differs essentially from the traditional quasi-geostrophic (QG) and intermediate-geostrophic (IG) approximations by the account of (i) all scales between the deformation radius and the planetary scale and (ii) the arbitrary amplitudes of vortices. It is shown that, unlike QG- and IG-models, the GG-model allows for explaining the mentioned cyclonic-anticyclonic asymmetry not only in planetary flows, but also in laboratory modeling with vessels of near paraboloidal form.

  5. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Gaudi, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of mp = 10.4 +/- M(Earth) and orbits a star of Mstar = 0.56 +/- 0.09 M(Sun) at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 + 1.9/-0.5 AU, and an orbital period of 7.6 +7.7/-1.5 yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are due to the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect. This measurement was primarily due to the orbital motion of the Earth, but the analysis also demonstrates the capability measure micro lensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a failed gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets

  6. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, Sub-Neptune Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational microlensing exoplanet detection method is uniquely sensitive to cold, low-mass planets which orbit beyond the snow-line, where the most massive planets are thought to form. The early statistical results from microlensing indicate that Neptune-Saturn mass planets located beyond the snow-line are substantially more common than their counterparts in closer orbits that have found by the Doppler radial velocity method. We present the discovery of the planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, which demonstrates that the gravitational microlensing method also has the capability to measure the masses of cold, low-mass planets. The mass measurements of the host star and the planet are made possible by the detection of the microlensing parallax signal due to the orbital motion or the Earth as well as observations from the EPOXI spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The microlensing light curve indicates a planetary host star mass of M(sun) = 0.54 + / - 0.05M(sun) located at a distance of DL= 2.94 _ 0.21 kpc, orbited by a planet of mass mp= 9.8 +/-1.1M(Earth) with a semi-major axis of a = 3.1(+1.9-0.4)MAU.

  7. Newton's determination of the masses and densities of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn and the Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. B.

    1998-05-01

    This article analyzes the methods Newton applied in his Principia for calculating the masses and densities of the Sun and planets, and in particular, investigates the origins of the numerical parameter values used by Newton in these calculations.

  8. Qatar-2: A K Dwarf Orbited by a Transiting Hot Jupiter and a Longer-Period Massive Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Marta; Alsubai, K. A.; Latham, D. W.; Quinn, S. N.; Collier Cameron, A.; Carter, J. A.; Buchave, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery and initial characterization of Qatar-2b, a hot Jupiter transiting a K dwarf in a circular orbit with a short period, Pb = 1.34 days. Differential photometry and model fitting of transit data from both KeplerCam and LCOGT yielded light curve parameters Rp/Rs, a/Rs, u1, u2, and i that were optimized using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. Radial velocity measurements from the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph of Qatar-2 over a span of 153 days provided a mass estimate for Qatar-2b, with velocity residuals from the orbital solution that pointed to the presence of a third body in the system. The light curve parameter a/Rs and spectroscopic values for effective temperature and metallicity were used in conjunction with stellar models to estimate the mass and radius of Qatar-2, leading to a mass and radius for Qatar-2b of MP = 2.54 MJ and RP = 1.14 RJ, respectively. Next we used the Systemic Console to explore possible orbital solutions for the outer companion, Qatar-2c. Plausible solutions have periods slightly less than a year and a mass of several MJ. However, further observations are needed to determine a reliable orbit for Qatar-2c. Qatar-2 is only the fourth example in the short but growing list of systems with a transiting hot Jupiter and an outer companion. This system architecture is in sharp contrast to that found by Kepler for multi-transiting systems, which are dominated by objects smaller than Neptune, usually with tightly spaced orbits that must be nearly coplanar.

  9. Architectural Insights into the Origin of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Winn, Joshua

    2015-12-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. This problem has been with us for 20 years, long enough for significant progress to have been made, and also for a great deal of "lore" to have accumulated about the properties of these planets. Among this lore is the widespread belief that hot Jupiters are less likely be in multiple giant planet systems than longer-period giant planets. We will show that in this case the lore is not supported by the best data available today: hot Jupiters are no more or less likely than warm or cool Jupiters to have additional Jupiter-mass companions. In contrast to the expectation from the simplest models of high-eccentricity migration, the result holds for Jupiter-mass companions both inside and outside of the water-ice line. This support the importance of disk migration for the origin of short-period giant planets.

  10. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    PubMed

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R; Dittmann, Jason A; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-12

    M-dwarf stars--hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun--are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere. PMID:26560298

  11. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Dittmann, Jason A.; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michal; Jehin, Emmanul; Stark, Antony A.; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C.; Udry, Stphane; Wnsche, Anal

    2015-11-01

    M-dwarf starshydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sunare the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere.

  12. Statistical Characteristics of Low-Mass Companions (Extrasolar Planets)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacox, W. D.

    1998-12-01

    Statistical characteristics for recently discovered low-mass companions (``extrasolar planets") to solar-like stars, considered as a group, have been compared to those of stellar companions to solar-like stars in an unbiased survey. Nonparametric statistical models have been used to derive distributions of characteristics not individually observable in all systems, and to correct for observational selection of low-mass companions. The semi-major axis distributions of the two populations are of the same smooth, monotonically decreasing, scale-free form, strongly suggestive of dissipative orbital evolution by transfer of energy and angular momentum to dispersed material in young systems. The mass distribution of low-mass companions, corrected for observational selection due to limited radial velocity precision, is probably a power law with a relatively large negative index; this may be an extension of the stellar companion mass distribution if the latter's roll-over near 0.2 solar masses is an observational selection effect, as seems possible. There is no statistically significant evidence for the existence of two distinct populations (e.g., planets and brown dwarfs) of low-mass companions, and no statistically significant difference between the orbital characteristics of low-mass and stellar companions to solar-like primaries.

  13. MEASURING THE MASS OF SOLAR SYSTEM PLANETS USING PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, D. J.; Hobbs, G. B.; Manchester, R. N.; Edwards, R. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Backer, D. C.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Van Straten, W.; Coles, W.; Demorest, P. B.; Ferdman, R. D.; Purver, M. B.; Folkner, W. M.; Hotan, A. W.; Kramer, M.; Lommen, A. N.; Nice, D. J.; Stairs, I. H.

    2010-09-10

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2) x10{sup -4} M {sub sun}, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate measurements for individual solar system bodies, the pulsar technique is sensitive to planetary system masses and has the potential to provide the most accurate values of these masses for some planets.

  14. Measuring the Mass of Solar System Planets Using Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, D. J.; Hobbs, G. B.; Manchester, R. N.; Edwards, R. T.; Backer, D. C.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Coles, W.; Demorest, P. B.; Ferdman, R. D.; Folkner, W. M.; Hotan, A. W.; Kramer, M.; Lommen, A. N.; Nice, D. J.; Purver, M. B.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Stairs, I. H.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Yardley, D. R. B.

    2010-09-01

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2) 10-4 M sun, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate measurements for individual solar system bodies, the pulsar technique is sensitive to planetary system masses and has the potential to provide the most accurate values of these masses for some planets.

  15. Measuring the mass of solar system planets using pulsar timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, D. J.; Hobbs, G. B.; Manchester, R. N.; Edwards, R. T.; Backer, D. C.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Coles, W.; Demorest, P. B.; Ferdman, R. D.; Folkner, W. M.; Hotan, A. W.; Kramer, M.; Lommen, A. N.; Nice, D. J.; Purver, M. B.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Stairs, I. H.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Yardley, D. R. B.

    2011-08-01

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2)10-4Msolar, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate measurements for individual solar system bodies, the pulsar technique is sensitive to planetary system masses and has the potential to provide the most accurate values of these masses for some planets.

  16. The Structural and Thermal Evolution of Transiting Exoplanets: From Hot Jupiters to Kepler's Super Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, Jonathan

    2011-06-11

    Large numbers of exoplanets can now be seen to transit their parent stars, which allows for measurements of their radii, masses, and densities. We can now begin to examine the Jupiter-class gas giant planets as a class of astrophysical objects. At the same time, thanks to NASA’s Kepler telescope, the number of transiting planets below 10 Earth masses is now moving beyond just a handful. For the Jupiter-like planets, we model their interior structure and find several interesting properties regarding the amount of ice and rock within these planets, which gives us clues to their formation. For the lowest-mass planets, such as the 6-planet Kepler-11 system, signs point to a large populations of mini-Neptunes---low-mass, low-density planets with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. The Kepler-11 system may tell us much about the evaporation of the atmospheres of these kinds of planets.

  17. Lone Planet Under a Cosmic Magnifying Glass - Duration: 45 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This artist's animation illustrates the technique used for finding free-floating, Jupiter-mass planets in space. Astronomers found evidence for 10 of these worlds, thought to have been ejected earl...

  18. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY IN GIANT PLANETS, BROWN DWARFS, AND LOW-MASS DWARF STARS. III. IRON, MAGNESIUM, AND SILICON

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, Channon; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce E-mail: lodders@wustl.ed

    2010-06-20

    We use thermochemical equilibrium calculations to model iron, magnesium, and silicon chemistry in the atmospheres of giant planets, brown dwarfs, extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), and low-mass stars. The behavior of individual Fe-, Mg-, and Si-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of temperature, pressure, and metallicity. Our equilibrium results are thus independent of any particular model atmosphere. The condensation of Fe metal strongly affects iron chemistry by efficiently removing Fe-bearing species from the gas phase. Monatomic Fe is the most abundant Fe-bearing gas throughout the atmospheres of EGPs and L dwarfs, and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. Mg- and Si-bearing gases are effectively removed from the atmosphere by forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) and enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) cloud formation. Monatomic Mg is the dominant magnesium gas throughout the atmospheres of EGPs and L dwarfs and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. Silicon monoxide (SiO) is the most abundant Si-bearing gas in the deep atmospheres of brown dwarfs and EGPs, whereas SiH{sub 4} is dominant in the deep atmosphere of Jupiter and other gas giant planets. Several other Fe-, Mg-, and Si-bearing gases become increasingly important with decreasing effective temperature. In principle, a number of Fe, Mg, and Si gases are potential tracers of weather or diagnostic of temperature in substellar atmospheres.

  19. The multiplicity of planet host stars - new low-mass companions to planet host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Seifahrt, A.; Neuhuser, R.

    2007-07-01

    We present new results from our ongoing multiplicity study of exoplanet host stars, carried out with the infrared camera SofI (Son of ISAAC) at European Southern Observatory-New Technology Telescope (ESO-NTT). We have identified new low-mass companions to the planet host stars HD101930 and HD65216. HD101930AB is a wide binary system composed of the planet host star HD101930A and its companion HD101930B which is a M0 to M1 dwarf with a mass of about 0.7 Msolar separated from the primary by ~73arcsec (2200au projected separation). HD65216 forms a hierarchical triple system, with a projected separation of 253au (angular separation of about 7arcsec) between the planet host star HD65216A and its close binary companion HD65216BC, whose two components are separated by only ~0.17arcsec (6au of projected separation). Two VLT-NACO images separated by 3yr confirm that this system is comoving to the planet host star. The infrared photometry of HD65216B and C is consistent with a M7 to M8 (0.089 Msolar) and a L2 to L3 dwarf (0.078 Msolar), respectively, both close to the substellar limit. An infrared spectrum with VLT-Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera (VLT-ISAAC) of the pair HD65216BC, even though not resolved spatially, confirms this late spectral type. Furthermore, we present H- and K-band ISAAC infrared spectra of HD16141B, the recently detected comoving companion of the planet host star HD16141A. The infrared spectroscopy as well as the apparent infrared photometry of HD16141B are both fully consistent with a M2 to M3 dwarf located at the distance of the planet host star. Based on observations obtained on La Silla in ESO programs 075.C-0098(A), 077.C-0572(A) and 078.C-0376(A), as well as on Paranal in ESO programs 070.C-0557(A), 076.C-0057(A) and 078.C-0376(B). E-mail: markus@astro.uni-jena.de

  20. Periodic mass extinctions and the Planet X model reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmire, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    The 27 Myr period in the fossil extinction record has been confirmed in modern data bases dating back 500 Myr, which is twice the time interval of the original analysis from 30 years ago. The surprising regularity of this period has been used to reject the Nemesis model. A second model based on the Sun's vertical Galactic oscillations has been challenged on the basis of an inconsistency in period and phasing. The third astronomical model originally proposed to explain the periodicity is the Planet X model in which the period is associated with the perihelion precession of the inclined orbit of a trans-Neptunian planet. Recently, and unrelated to mass extinctions, a trans-Neptunian super-Earth planet has been proposed to explain the observation that the inner Oort cloud objects Sedna and 2012VP113 have perihelia that lie near the ecliptic plane. In this Letter, we reconsider the Planet X model in light of the confluence of the modern palaeontological and outer Solar system dynamical evidence.

  1. Constraining Planetary Migration Mechanisms with Highly Eccentric Hot Jupiter Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Johnson, J. A.; Murray-Clay, R.; Morton, T.; Crepp, J. R.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Howard, A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Hot Jupiters --- Jupiter-mass planets orbiting within 0.1 AU of their host stars --- are unlikely to have formed in situ and thus serve as evidence for the prevalence of planetary migration. However, it is debated whether the typical hot Jupiter migrated smoothly inward through the protoplanetary disk or was perturbed onto an eccentric orbit, which tidal dissipation subsequently shrank and circularized during close passages to the star. In the latter class of model, the perturber may be a stellar or planetary companion, which causes the Jupiter to undergo a temporary epoch with high eccentricity (e> 0.9). Socrates and et al. (2012) predicted that these super-eccentric hot Jupiter progenitors should be readily discoverable through the transit method by the Kepler Mission. However, eccentricities of individual transiting planets primarily come from Doppler measurements, which are unfortunately precluded by the faintness of most Kepler targets. To solve this problem, we developed a Bayesian method (the photoeccentric effect) for measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its Kepler light curve, allowing for a tight measurement of large eccentricities. We applied this new approach to the Kepler giant planet candidates and identified KOI-1474.01 as an eccentric planet (e = 0.81+0.10/-0.07) with an average orbital period of 69.7340 days, varying by approximately 1 hour due to perturbations by a massive outer companion, which is possibly the culprit responsible for KOI-1474.01s highly eccentric orbit. KOI-1474.01 is likely a failed hot Jupiter, too far from its host star to be tidally transformed into a hot Jupiter. We found a significant lack of super-eccentric proto-hot Jupiters compared to the number expected, allowing us to place a strong upper limit on the fraction of hot Jupiters created by stellar binaries. Our results are consistent with disks or planetary companions being the primary channel for hot Jupiter creation. Supported by NSFGRFP DGE-1144152.

  2. Molecular formation along the atmospheric mass loss of HD 209458b and similar Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, R.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry along the mass loss of Hot Jupiters is generally considered to be simple, consisting mainly of atoms, prevented from forming more complex species by the intense radiation field from their host stars. In order to probe the region where the temperature is low (T<2000 K), we developed a 1D chemical and photochemical reaction model of the atmospheric mass loss of HD 209458b, involving 56 species, including carbon chain and oxygen-bearing ones, interacting through 566 reactions. The simulation results indicate that simple molecules like OH+, H2O+ and H3O+ are formed inside the region, considering that residual H2 survives in the exosphere, a possibility indicated by recent observational work. The molecules are formed and destroyed within a radial distance of less than 107 km, but the estimated integrated column density of OH+, a potential tracer of H2, is high enough to allow detection, which, once achieved, would indicate a revision of chemical models of the upper atmosphere of Hot Jupiters. For low density Hot Jupiters receiving less intense XUV radiation from their host stars than HD 209458b, molecular species could conceivably be formed with a higher total column density.

  3. A CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST STAR ACTIVITY AND PLANET MASS FOR CLOSE-IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2011-07-01

    The activity levels of stars are influenced by several stellar properties, such as stellar rotation, spectral type, and the presence of stellar companions. Analogous to binaries, planetary companions are also thought to be able to cause higher activity levels in their host stars, although at lower levels. Especially in X-rays, such influences are hard to detect because coronae of cool stars exhibit a considerable amount of intrinsic variability. Recently, a correlation between the mass of close-in exoplanets and their host star's X-ray luminosity has been detected, based on archival X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. This finding has been interpreted as evidence for star-planet interactions. We show in our analysis that this correlation is caused by selection effects due to the flux limit of the X-ray data used and due to the intrinsic planet detectability of the radial velocity method, and thus does not trace possible planet-induced effects. We also show that the correlation is not present in a corresponding complete sample derived from combined XMM-Newton and ROSAT data.

  4. The Galileo probe mass spectrometer: composition of Jupiter's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H B; Atreya, S K; Carignan, G R; Donahue, T M; Haberman, J A; Harpold, D N; Hartle, R E; Hunten, D M; Kasprzak, W T; Mahaffy, P R; Owen, T C; Spencer, N W; Way, S H

    1996-05-10

    The composition of the jovian atmosphere from 0.5 to 21 bars along the descent trajectory was determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the Galileo probe. The mixing ratio of He (helium) to H2 (hydrogen), 0.156, is close to the solar ratio. The abundances of methane, water, argon, neon, and hydrogen sulfide were measured; krypton and xenon were detected. As measured in the jovian atmosphere, the amount of carbon is 2.9 times the solar abundance relative to H2, the amount of sulfur is greater than the solar abundance, and the amount of oxygen is much less than the solar abundance. The neon abundance compared with that of hydrogen is about an order of magnitude less than the solar abundance. Isotopic ratios of carbon and the noble gases are consistent with solar values. The measured ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) of (5 +/- 2) x 10(-5) indicates that this ratio is greater in solar-system hydrogen than in local interstellar hydrogen, and the 3He/4He ratio of (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-4) provides a new value for protosolar (solar nebula) helium isotopes. Together, the D/H and 3He/4He ratios are consistent with conversion in the sun of protosolar deuterium to present-day 3He. PMID:8629016

  5. The Galileo probe mass spectrometer: composition of Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Way, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    The composition of the jovian atmosphere from 0.5 to 21 bars along the descent trajectory was determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the Galileo probe. The mixing ratio of He (helium) to H2 (hydrogen), 0.156, is close to the solar ratio. The abundances of methane, water, argon, neon, and hydrogen sulfide were measured; krypton and xenon were detected. As measured in the jovian atmosphere, the amount of carbon is 2.9 times the solar abundance relative to H2, the amount of sulfur is greater than the solar abundance, and the amount of oxygen is much less than the solar abundance. The neon abundance compared with that of hydrogen is about an order of magnitude less than the solar abundance. Isotopic ratios of carbon and the noble gases are consistent with solar values. The measured ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) of (5 +/- 2) x 10(-5) indicates that this ratio is greater in solar-system hydrogen than in local interstellar hydrogen, and the 3He/4He ratio of (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-4) provides a new value for protosolar (solar nebula) helium isotopes. Together, the D/H and 3He/4He ratios are consistent with conversion in the sun of protosolar deuterium to present-day 3He.

  6. Conditions for water ice lines and Mars-mass exomoons around accreting super-Jovian planets at 1-20 AU from Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.; Pudritz, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The first detection of a moon around an extrasolar planet (an "exomoon") might be feasible with NASA's Kepler or ESA's upcoming PLATO space telescopes or with the future ground-based European Extremely Large Telescope. To guide observers and to use observational resources most efficiently, we need to know where the largest, most easily detected moons can form. Aims: We explore the possibility of large exomoons by following the movement of water (H2O) ice lines in the accretion disks around young super-Jovian planets. We want to know how the different heating sources in those disks affect the location of the H2O ice lines as a function of stellar and planetary distance. Methods: We simulate 2D rotationally symmetric accretion disks in hydrostatic equilibrium around super-Jovian exoplanets. The energy terms in our semi-analytical framework - (1) viscous heating; (2) planetary illumination; (3) accretional heating of the disk; and (4) stellar illumination - are fed by precomputed planet evolution models. We consider accreting planets with final masses between 1 and 12 Jupiter masses at distances between 1 and 20 AU to a solar type star. Results: Accretion disks around Jupiter-mass planets closer than about 4.5 AU to Sun-like stars do not feature H2O ice lines, whereas the most massive super-Jovians can form icy satellites as close as 3 AU to Sun-like stars. We derive an empirical formula for the total moon mass as a function of planetary mass and stellar distance and predict that super-Jovian planets forming beyond about 5 AU can host Mars-mass moons. Planetary illumination is the major heat source in the final stages of accretion around Jupiter-mass planets, whereas disks around the most massive super-Jovians are similarly heated by planetary illumination and viscous heating. This indicates a transition towards circumstellar accretion disks, where viscous heating dominates in the stellar vicinity. We also study a broad range of circumplanetary disk parameters for planets at 5.2 AU and find that the H2O ice lines are universally between about 15 and 30 Jupiter radii in the final stages of accretion when the last generation of moons is supposed to form. Conclusions: If the abundant population of super-Jovian planets around 1 AU formed in situ, then these planets should lack the previously predicted population of giant icy moons, because those planets' disks did not host H2O ice in the final stages of accretion. But in the more likely case that these planets migrated to their current locations from beyond about 3 to 4.5 AU they might be orbited by large, water-rich moons. In this case, Mars-mass ocean moons might be common in the stellar habitable zones. Future exomoon detections and non-detections can provide powerful constraints on the formation and migration history of giant exoplanets.

  7. Planet traps and first planets: The critical metallicity for gas giant formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hirashita, Hiroyuki E-mail: hirashita@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-06-10

    The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when are first planets formed in galaxies? We investigate this by adopting a theoretical model where planet traps are combined with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the metallicity ([Fe/H]) in disks. Three characteristic exoplanetary populations are examined: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters around 1 AU, and low-mass planets in tight orbits, such as super-Earths. We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs), as well as the orbital radius (〈R{sub rapid}〉) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets, as a function of metallicity (–2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤–0.6). We show that the total PFFs for these three populations increase steadily with metallicity. This is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the metallicity range considered here, the population of low-mass planets dominates Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H] ≅ –1. We find that the hot Jupiters form more efficiently than the exo-Jupiters at [Fe/H] ≲ –0.7. This arises from the slower growth of planetary cores and their more efficient radial inward transport by the host traps in lower metallicity disks. We show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H] ≅ –1.2 by comparing 〈R{sub rapid}〉 of hot Jupiters and low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between these two types of planets. Therefore, this study implies that important physical processes in planet formation may be tested by exoplanet observations around metal-poor stars.

  8. Down-tail mass loss by plasmoids in Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, S. W. H.; Nichols, J. D.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent estimates of the plasma mass-loss rates by the formation and down-tail propagation of plasmoids observed in the plasma sheet in Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetosphere fall short of inner moon source rates by at least an order of magnitude. Here we argue that on the time scale between large-scale disconnection events, ~15 h at Jupiter and ~45 h at Saturn, mass-loaded closed flux tubes will typically have stretched out a few hundred planetary radii down tail at speeds ~100-200 km s-1. Consequently, the "plasmoids" of order ~10 planetary radii in length observed at closer planetary distances represent only a small planetward portion of the overall structure that is disconnected and lost down tail. Plasmoid mass-loss estimates are then revised upward by around an order of magnitude, becoming comparable to the moon source values. Additional "hidden," e.g., small-scale, mass-loss processes of comparable strength may not then be required. The essentially continuous azimuthally flowing source plasma in the dusk sector is shown to correspond to a plasma sheet layer adjacent to the magnetopause of width typically ~10% of the distance to the magnetopause in that local time sector. This physical picture also provides a simple explanation for the asymmetry in the plasmoid bipolar field signature observed at both Jupiter and Saturn and predicts that the apparent plasmoid length will increase with distance down tail to a limit beyond a few hundred planetary radii where the full ~100-200 planetary radii structures will be observed.

  9. Gravitational energy sources in Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.

    1973-01-01

    Gravitational sources of the intrinsic luminosity of Jupiter are examined in the context of current hydrogen-helium models. When no gravitational separation of matter occurs, the amount of heat which can be released over the remaining lifetime of the planet is necessarily limited by the size of its existing reservoir of thermal energy. This conclusion rests only on the assumption that its interior is relatively cold and degenerate. If gravitational unmixing occurs, the size of the thermal reservoir does not necessarily limit the heat output. If core formation occurs, for example, then the size of the core formed will be a limiting factor. The energy released with the formation of a helium core is computed for Jupiter. A core growth rate, averaged over several billion years, of 20 trillionths of Jupiter's mass per year is required if gravitational separation is to play a significant role in the thermal evolution.

  10. Origins of Hot Jupiters, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods less than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances (a > 2AU) in protostellar disks, only to subsequently experience large-scale inward migration to the small orbital radii at which they are observed. Here, we propose that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population forms in situ, with the Galactically prevalent short-period super-Earths acting as the source population. Our calculations suggest that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protostellar disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated for solid cores of 10-20 Earth masses, in line with the conventional picture of core-nucleated accretion. This formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional planets, reminiscent of those observed in large numbers by NASAs Kepler Mission and Doppler velocity surveys. However, dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' evolutionary lifetimes tend to increase the mutual inclinations of exterior, low-mass companions to hot Jupiters, making transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  11. Moons around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this photo of Jupiter at 20:42:01 UTC on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The volcanic moon Io is to the left of the planet; the shadow of the icy moon Ganymede moves across Jupiter's northern hemisphere.

    Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles). Both Io and Ganymede are larger than Earth's moon; Ganymede is larger than the planet Mercury.

  12. Constraining the Masses of the Kepler-11 Planets through Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard T.

    2015-01-01

    The six transiting planets of Kepler-11 have all been found to have ultra-low densities through N-body dynamical analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of the six planets. Numerically reproducing TTVs has become a new method for solving the masses of planets, but this method is susceptible to certain dynamic degeneracies: the planet eccentricity is degenerate with the planet mass, and perturbations caused by non-transiting planets could be misattributed to the transiting planets. Furthermore, the masses of planets characterized by TTV analysis are systematically 2x lower than the masses (including non-detections) reported by radial velocity (RV) analysis for planets of the same radius. We address the discrepancy between the TTV- and RV-determined planet masses by measuring the RVs of Kepler-11 at opportunistic times, as determined by the ephemerides of the transiting planets. We place an upper limit on the masses of the Kepler-11 planets using RVs and preliminarily show that the RVs are consistent with the ultra-low mass scenario determined by the TTVs. The lack of disagreement between the TTVs and RVs in the Kepler-11 system bodes well for N-body simulations of TTVs for other Kepler systems that are too faint for RV follow-up.

  13. Warm Jupiters as failed hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah Ilene; Chiang, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The orbits of hot Jupiters often have surprisingly small semi-major axes, large eccentricities, or severe misalignments between their normals and their host stars' spin axes. In some formation scenarios invoking Kozai-Lidov oscillations, an external planetary companion drives a planet onto an orbit having these properties. The mutual inclinations for Kozai-Lidov oscillations can be large and have not been confirmed observationally. Here I present evidence for a population of eccentric warm Jupiters with eccentric giant companions with mutual inclinations just above 40 degrees. These planets may be undergoing a stalled version of tidal migration that produces warm Jupiters over hot Jupiters. I conclude by assessing the contribution of this mechanism to the overall population of short-period hot Jupiters, super-Earths, and mini-Neptunes.

  14. An Overview of the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammier, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Arriving in orbit around the planet Jupiter in 2016 after a five-year journey, the Juno spacecraft will begin a one-year investigation of the gas giant in order to understand its origin and evolution by determining its water abundance and constraining its core mass. In addition, Juno will map the planet's magnetic and gravitational fields, map its atmosphere, and explore the three-dimensional structure of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere and auroras. Juno will discriminate among different models for giant planet formation. These investigations will be conducted over the course of thirty-two 11-day elliptical polar orbits of the planet. The orbits are designed to avoid Jupiter's highest radiation regions. The spacecraft is a spinning, solar-powered system carrying a complement of eight science instruments for conducting the investigations. The spacecraft systems and instruments take advantage of significant design and operational heritage from previous space missions.

  15. Mass Losses Of Co, Cs And Hcn On Jupiter/sl9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Raphael; Marten, A.

    2006-09-01

    Since comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) collided with Jupiter in 1994, the IRAM 30-m Telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain) and the 15-m JCMT (Mauna Kea,Hawaii) have regularly observed Jupiter at millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths. Molecular trace species such as HCN, CO, CS and their isotopomers have been detected in the upper atmosphere since the collision. Because of the high spectral resolution attained, our data allow one to infer both temperature and abundances in Jupiter's stratosphere with a maximum spatial resolution of 10 arcsec. We have used all these data to monitor the latitudinal spreading since the impacts occurred (Marten et al. 1995), to look for changes in their abundances with time (Moreno et al. 2001, 2003) and to determine several isotopic ratios (Matthews et al. 2002). Data taken in 2004 have shown that latitudinal distributions of all these species were almost homogeneous 10 years after impacts, as predicted by Moreno et al. 2003. Moreover, compared to 1998 results, respective mass loss factors as high as 2-7 have been determined for the three molecular main compounds (Moreno et al. 2005). In order to follow-up our monitoring, new disk mapping observations took place in May 2006 using the IRAM-30m Telescope. Here we report the results of the recent measurements of CO, CS and HCN, and also the search for new species: H2CO, H2CS, CH3CN, CH3OH. Such trace compounds could have explained the mass losses observed in 2004, but no clear detections have been obtained after reasonable integration times. Estimates of the new CO, CS and HCN total masses and upper limits for the trace species searched for will be presented. The loss mechanisms will be discussed. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  16. THE ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PLANET SEARCH. XXII. TWO NEW MULTI-PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, J.; Salter, G. S.; Tinney, C. G.; Bailey, J.; Tuomi, Mikko; Zhang, Z.; Butler, R. P.; Jones, H. R. A.; O'Toole, S. J.; Carter, B. D.; Jenkins, J. S.; Vogt, S. S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-07-10

    We report the detection of two new planets from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search. These planets orbit two stars each previously known to host one planet. The new planet orbiting HD 142 has a period of 6005 {+-} 427 days, and a minimum mass of 5.3 M{sub Jup}. HD 142c is thus a new Jupiter analog: a gas-giant planet with a long period and low eccentricity (e = 0.21 {+-} 0.07). The second planet in the HD 159868 system has a period of 352.3 {+-} 1.3 days and m sin i = 0.73 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Jup}. In both of these systems, including the additional planets in the fitting process significantly reduced the eccentricity of the original planet. These systems are thus examples of how multiple-planet systems can masquerade as moderately eccentric single-planet systems.

  17. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  18. SECULAR CHAOS AND THE PRODUCTION OF HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram

    2011-07-10

    In a planetary system with two or more well-spaced, eccentric, inclined planets, secular interactions may lead to chaos. The innermost planet may gradually become very eccentric and/or inclined as a result of the secular degrees of freedom drifting toward equipartition of angular momentum deficit. Secular chaos is known to be responsible for the eventual destabilization of Mercury in our own solar system. Here we focus on systems with three giant planets. We characterize the secular chaos and demonstrate the criterion for it to occur, but leave a detailed understanding of secular chaos to a companion paper. After an extended period of eccentricity diffusion, the inner planet's pericenter can approach the star to within a few stellar radii. Strong tidal interactions and ensuing tidal dissipation extract orbital energy from the planet and pull it inward, creating a hot Jupiter. In contrast to other proposed channels for the production of hot Jupiters, such a scenario (which we term 'secular migration') explains a range of observations: the pile-up of hot Jupiters at 3 day orbital periods, the fact that hot Jupiters are in general less massive than other radial velocity planets, that they may have misaligned inclinations with respect to stellar spin, and that they have few easily detectable companions (but may have giant companions in distant orbits). Secular migration can also explain close-in planets as low in mass as Neptune; and an aborted secular migration can explain the 'warm Jupiters' at intermediate distances. In addition, the frequency of hot Jupiters formed via secular migration increases with stellar age. We further suggest that secular chaos may be responsible for the observed eccentricities of giant planets at larger distances and that these planets could exhibit significant spin-orbit misalignment.

  19. Secular Chaos and the Production of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram

    2011-07-01

    In a planetary system with two or more well-spaced, eccentric, inclined planets, secular interactions may lead to chaos. The innermost planet may gradually become very eccentric and/or inclined as a result of the secular degrees of freedom drifting toward equipartition of angular momentum deficit. Secular chaos is known to be responsible for the eventual destabilization of Mercury in our own solar system. Here we focus on systems with three giant planets. We characterize the secular chaos and demonstrate the criterion for it to occur, but leave a detailed understanding of secular chaos to a companion paper. After an extended period of eccentricity diffusion, the inner planet's pericenter can approach the star to within a few stellar radii. Strong tidal interactions and ensuing tidal dissipation extract orbital energy from the planet and pull it inward, creating a hot Jupiter. In contrast to other proposed channels for the production of hot Jupiters, such a scenario (which we term "secular migration") explains a range of observations: the pile-up of hot Jupiters at 3 day orbital periods, the fact that hot Jupiters are in general less massive than other radial velocity planets, that they may have misaligned inclinations with respect to stellar spin, and that they have few easily detectable companions (but may have giant companions in distant orbits). Secular migration can also explain close-in planets as low in mass as Neptune; and an aborted secular migration can explain the "warm Jupiters" at intermediate distances. In addition, the frequency of hot Jupiters formed via secular migration increases with stellar age. We further suggest that secular chaos may be responsible for the observed eccentricities of giant planets at larger distances and that these planets could exhibit significant spin-orbit misalignment.

  20. Toward Chemical Constraints on Hot Jupiter Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Amin, Mustafa A.; Kennedy, Grant M.

    2014-10-01

    The origin of hot Jupitersgas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host starsis a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily explained by giant planets forming at large orbital separations, either by core accretion or gravitational instability, and migrating to close-in orbits via disk-free mechanisms involving dynamical encounters. Such planets also contain solar or super-solar C/O ratios. On the contrary, hot Jupiters with super-solar O and C abundances can be explained by a variety of formation-migration pathways which, however, lead to solar or sub-solar C/O ratios. Current estimates of low oxygen abundances in hot Jupiter atmospheres may be indicative of disk-free migration mechanisms. We discuss open questions in this area which future studies will need to investigate.

  1. X-MIME: An imaging x-ray spectrometer for detailed study of Jupiter's icy moons and the planet's x-ray aurora.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-11-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is due to bombardment of their surfaces by highly energetic magnetospheric protons, oxygen and sulfur ions. These ions excite atoms in their surfaces leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we describe the physical processes leading to x-ray emission from the surfaces of Jupiter's moons and the instrumental properties required to map the elemental composition of their surfaces. We describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer undergoing a feasibility study for the JIMO mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  2. Deep Atmosphere Ammonia Mixing Ratio at Jupiter from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Niemann, H. B.; Demick, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    New laboratory studies employing the Engineering Unit (EU) of the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer (GPMS) have resulted in a substantial reduction in the previously reported upper limit on the ammonia mixing ratio derived from the GPMS experiment at Jupiter. This measurement is complicated by background ammonia contributions in the GPMS during direct atmospheric sampling produced from the preceding gas enrichment experiments. These backgrounds can be quantified with the data from the EU studies when they are carried out in a manner that duplicates the descent profile of pressure and enrichment cell loading. This background is due to the tendency of ammonia to interact strongly with the walls of the mass spectrometer and on release to contribute to the gas being directly directed into the ion source from the atmosphere through a capillary pressure reduction leak. It is evident from the GPMS and other observations that the mixing ratio of ammonia at Jupiter reaches the deep atmosphere value at substantially higher pressures than previously assumed. This is a likely explanation for the previously perceived discrepancy between ammonia values derived from ground based microwave observations and those obtained from attenuation of the Galileo Probe radio signal.

  3. Observed properties of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrew W

    2013-05-01

    Observational surveys for extrasolar planets probe the diverse outcomes of planet formation and evolution. These surveys measure the frequency of planets with different masses, sizes, orbital characteristics, and host star properties. Small planets between the sizes of Earth and Neptune substantially outnumber Jupiter-sized planets. The survey measurements support the core accretion model, in which planets form by the accumulation of solids and then gas in protoplanetary disks. The diversity of exoplanetary characteristics demonstrates that most of the gross features of the solar system are one outcome in a continuum of possibilities. The most common class of planetary system detectable today consists of one or more planets approximately one to three times Earth's size orbiting within a fraction of the Earth-Sun distance. PMID:23641110

  4. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn analog with gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G W; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M K; Tristram, P J; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Depoy, D L; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C-U; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R W; Park, B-G; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Saito, To; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W L; Yock, P C M; Albrow, M D; Allan, A; Beaulieu, J-P; Burgdorf, M J; Cook, K H; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2008-02-15

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of approximately 0.71 and approximately 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of approximately 2.3 and approximately 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass approximately 0.50 solar mass at a distance of approximately 1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common. PMID:18276883

  5. THE EFFECT OF MASS LOSS ON THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    By combining mass loss and tidal evolution of close-in planets, we present a qualitative study on their tidal migrations. We incorporate mass loss in tidal evolution for planets with different masses and find that mass loss could interfere with tidal evolution. In an upper limit case (beta = 3), a significant portion of mass may be evaporated in a long evolution timescale. Evidence of greater modification of the planets with an initial separation of about 0.1 AU than those with a = 0.15 AU can be found in this model. With the assumption of a large initial eccentricity, the planets with initial mass <=1 M{sub J} and initial distance of about 0.1 AU could not survive. With the supposition of beta = 1.1, we find that the loss process has an effect on the planets with low mass at a {approx} 0.05 AU. In both cases, the effect of evaporation on massive planets can be neglected. Also, heating efficiency and initial eccentricity have significant influence on tidal evolution. We find that even low heating efficiency and initial eccentricity have a significant effect on tidal evolution. Our analysis shows that evaporation on planets with different initial masses can accelerate (decelerate) the tidal evolution due to the increase (decrease) in tide of the planet (star). Consequently, the effect of evaporation cannot be neglected in evolutionary calculations of close-in planets. The physical parameters of HD 209458b can be fitted by our model.

  6. Extrasolar binary planets. I. Formation by tidal capture during planet-planet scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ochiai, H.; Nagasawa, M.; Ida, S.

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated (1) the formation of gravitationally bounded pairs of gas-giant planets (which we call 'binary planets') from capturing each other through planet-planet dynamical tide during their close encounters and (2) the subsequent long-term orbital evolution due to planet-planet and planet-star quasi-static tides. For the initial evolution in phase 1, we carried out N-body simulations of the systems consisting of three Jupiter-mass planets taking into account the dynamical tide. The formation rate of the binary planets is as much as 10% of the systems that undergo orbital crossing, and this fraction is almost independent of the initial stellarcentric semimajor axes of the planets, while ejection and merging rates sensitively depend on the semimajor axes. As a result of circularization by the planet-planet dynamical tide, typical binary separations are a few times the sum of the physical radii of the planets. After the orbital circularization, the evolution of the binary system is governed by long-term quasi-static tide. We analytically calculated the quasi-static tidal evolution in phase 2. The binary planets first enter the spin-orbit synchronous state by the planet-planet tide. The planet-star tide removes angular momentum of the binary motion, eventually resulting in a collision between the planets. However, we found that the binary planets survive the tidal decay for the main-sequence lifetime of solar-type stars (∼10 Gyr), if the binary planets are beyond ∼0.3 AU from the central stars. These results suggest that the binary planets can be detected by transit observations at ≳ 0.3 AU.

  7. STELLAR PARAMETERS AND METALLICITIES OF STARS HOSTING JOVIAN AND NEPTUNIAN MASS PLANETS: A POSSIBLE DEPENDENCE OF PLANETARY MASS ON METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, L.; Cunha, K.; De Araujo, F. X.; De la Reza, R.; Smith, V. V.; Schuler, S. C.

    2010-09-10

    The metal content of planet-hosting stars is an important ingredient that may affect the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Accurate stellar abundances require the determinations of reliable physical parameters, namely, the effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and metallicity. This work presents the homogeneous derivation of such parameters for a large sample of stars hosting planets (N = 117), as well as a control sample of disk stars not known to harbor giant, closely orbiting planets (N = 145). Stellar parameters and iron abundances are derived from an automated analysis technique developed for this work. As previously found in the literature, the results in this study indicate that the metallicity distribution of planet-hosting stars is more metal rich by {approx}0.15 dex when compared to the control sample stars. A segregation of the sample according to planet mass indicates that the metallicity distribution of stars hosting only Neptunian-mass planets (with no Jovian-mass planets) tends to be more metal poor in comparison with that obtained for stars hosting a closely orbiting Jovian planet. The significance of this difference in metallicity arises from a homogeneous analysis of samples of FGK dwarfs which do not include the cooler and more problematic M dwarfs. This result would indicate that there is a possible link between planet mass and metallicity such that metallicity plays a role in setting the mass of the most massive planet. Further confirmation, however, must await larger samples.

  8. Searching sequences of resonant orbits between a spacecraft and Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formiga, J. K. S.; Prado, A. F. B. A.

    2013-10-01

    This research shows a study of the dynamical behavior of a spacecraft that performs a series of close approaches with the planet Jupiter. The main idea is to find a sequence of resonant orbits that allows the spacecraft to stay in the region of the space near the orbit of Jupiter around the Sun gaining energy from each passage by the planet. The dynamical model considers the existence of only two massive bodies in the systems, which are the Sun and Jupiter. They are assumed to be in circular orbits around their center of mass. Analytical equations are used to obtain the values of the parameters required to get this sequence of close approaches. Those equations are useful, because they show which orbits are physically possible when taking into account that the periapsis distances have to be above the surface of the Sun and that the closest approach distances during the passage by Jupiter have to be above its surface.

  9. Constraints on the Mass of Planets with Water of Nebular Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikoma, M.; Genda, H.

    2005-08-01

    Detection of many extrasolar planets has stimulated us to make a systematic study of planet formation. Theoretical studies on the accretion and dynamical evolution of planets have constrained the masses and periods of planets in extrasolar systems. From an astrobiological point of view, special attention has been paid to probabilities of the existence of planets in the habitable zone where a planet can keep liquid water above its surface. Few studies have, however, discussed how likely a planet acquires a sufficient amount of water. Although there are several sources of water on terrestrial planets, we focus on an idea that water is produced on a planet by oxidation of a hydrogen-rich atmosphere, the nebular gas being attracted gravitationally by the planet. The process of water production could work if a planet captures a sufficient amount of hydrogen, has a molten surface (i.e., magma oceans), and contains some oxide. Our extensive investigation of properties of the hydrogen-rich atmosphere shows the former two conditions are fulfilled on an Earth-size planet for a wide range of parameters. Moreover, some oxide such as FeO is common material in planets, as long as the C/O ratio of extrasolar systems is less than unity. Therefore, sufficient water on an Earth-sized rocky planet is a natural consequence of planet formation. The range of masses of those potentially-habitable planets is also constrained. This research was supported by the 21st Century COE Program ``How to build habitable planets", Tokyo Institute of Technology, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Technology and Science (MEXT), Japan.

  10. Pathways towards Neptune-mass Planets around Very Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreizler, S.; Bean, J.; Seifahrt, A.; Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Wiedemann, G.; Reiners, A.; Henry, T. J.

    2010-10-01

    Radial velocities measured from near-infrared spectra are a potentially powerful tool to search for planets around low-mass stars. The radial velocity precision routinely obtained in the visible can, however, not be achieved in the NIR with existing techniques. In this paper, we describe a method for measuring high-precision radial velocities of a sample of the lowest-mass M dwarfs using CRIRES on the VLT. Our project makes use of a gas cell filled with ammonia to calibrate the instrument response similar to the iodine cell technique that has been used so successfully in the visible. Tests of the method based on the analysis of hundreds of spectra obtained for late M dwarfs over six months demonstrate that precisions of ˜5 m s-1 are obtainable over long timescales, and precisions better than 3 m s-1 can be obtained over timescales up to a week. This allows to search for low-mass planets, i.e., Neptune-mass or even Super-Earth planets around very low-mass stars or sub-stellar objects.

  11. DEUTERIUM BURNING IN MASSIVE GIANT PLANETS AND LOW-MASS BROWN DWARFS FORMED BY CORE-NUCLEATED ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenheimer, Peter; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Saumon, Didier E-mail: gennaro.dangelo@nasa.gov E-mail: jfortney@ucolick.org

    2013-06-20

    Using detailed numerical simulations, we study the formation of bodies near the deuterium-burning limit according to the core-nucleated giant planet accretion scenario. The objects, with heavy-element cores in the range 5-30 M{sub Circled-Plus }, are assumed to accrete gas up to final masses of 10-15 Jupiter masses (M{sub Jup}). After the formation process, which lasts 1-5 Myr and which ends with a ''cold-start'', low-entropy configuration, the bodies evolve at constant mass up to an age of several Gyr. Deuterium burning via proton capture is included in the calculation, and we determined the mass, M{sub 50}, above which more than 50% of the initial deuterium is burned. This often-quoted borderline between giant planets and brown dwarfs is found to depend only slightly on parameters, such as core mass, stellar mass, formation location, solid surface density in the protoplanetary disk, disk viscosity, and dust opacity. The values for M{sub 50} fall in the range 11.6-13.6 M{sub Jup}, in agreement with previous determinations that do not take the formation process into account. For a given opacity law during the formation process, objects with higher core masses form more quickly. The result is higher entropy in the envelope at the completion of accretion, yielding lower values of M{sub 50}. For masses above M{sub 50}, during the deuterium-burning phase, objects expand and increase in luminosity by one to three orders of magnitude. Evolutionary tracks in the luminosity versus time diagram are compared with the observed position of the companion to Beta Pictoris.

  12. Jupiter's first 100 miles

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, T

    1996-04-01

    In December, 1995, after a journey of six years, the Galileo probe plunged into Jupiter's atmosphere, becoming the first artificial object to make direct contact with an outer planet. New data supplied by the probe indicated: 1) A new radiation belt around Jupiter ten times stronger than the Van Allen belt around Earth; 2) Jupiter may be much drier than predicted. Its atmosphere contains about as much water as the Sun, but this is subject to instrument calibration uncertainties, and the location of the landing in one of the driest spots on the planet; 3) Jupiter's atmosphere appears to have about three to ten times less lightning than Earth's, while the events are about 10 times stronger, both in terms of size and amount of electrical discharge; and, 4) Jupiter's winds were stronger than expected, increasing with depth, at 330 mph. PMID:11538723

  13. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter Benjamin; Knutson, Heather; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, Benjamin James; Burrows, Adam Seth; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit due to the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Due to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity is in part dictated by its Love number, i.e. the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. We can therefore directly constrain the fraction of HAT-P-13b's mass contained in its core by measuring its orbital eccentricity. This method offers considerable advantages over the standard approach of inferring core size based on mass and radius measurements alone. In this study we derive new constraints on the value of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b is 0.00696 ± 0.00096. We then use octupole-order secular perturbation theory to find that the corresponding Love number is 0.31 (+0.11, -0.05). Applying structural evolution models, we then find, with 68% confidence, that the core mass lies between 0-25 Earth masses, with a most likely value of the core mass of 11 Earth masses. This is the tightest constraint, to date, on the core mass of an exoplanet. We also compare the measured secondary eclipse depths, in the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands, to the predictions of a suite of atmosphere models and find that the depths are best matched by models with a dayside temperature inversion and relatively efficient day-night circulation.

  14. The interplanetary and near-Jupiter meteoroid environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.; Alvarez, J. M.; Oneal, R. L.; Kinard, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The meteoroid penetration detectors on the Pioneer 10 spacecraft recorded 67 meteoroid penetrations through the 25-micron stainless steel test material while the spacecraft was between 1.0 and 5.1 AU. Ten of these penetrations occurred during the encounter with Jupiter. The cumulative spatial density of meteoroids with masses greater than 2 nanograms has been calculated from these data for interplanetary space and for the near-Jupiter space. The spatial density is found to be essentially constant in interplanetary space between 1 and 5 AU, approximately 1 meteoroid per cubic km, and 1-2 orders of magnitude greater near Jupiter. There was no increase in the spatial density of meteoroids in the asteroid belt and hence no evidence that there is a significant asteroidal component of 2-nanogram meteoroids. It is uncertain whether the meteoroids detected near Jupiter were in orbit about Jupiter or were gravitationally focused toward the planet from solar orbits.

  15. TOWARD CHEMICAL CONSTRAINTS ON HOT JUPITER MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Amin, Mustafa A.; Kennedy, Grant M.

    2014-10-10

    The origin of hot Jupiters—gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars—is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily explained by giant planets forming at large orbital separations, either by core accretion or gravitational instability, and migrating to close-in orbits via disk-free mechanisms involving dynamical encounters. Such planets also contain solar or super-solar C/O ratios. On the contrary, hot Jupiters with super-solar O and C abundances can be explained by a variety of formation-migration pathways which, however, lead to solar or sub-solar C/O ratios. Current estimates of low oxygen abundances in hot Jupiter atmospheres may be indicative of disk-free migration mechanisms. We discuss open questions in this area which future studies will need to investigate.

  16. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A URANUS-MASS FOURTH PLANET FOR GJ 876 IN AN EXTRASOLAR LAPLACE CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Eugenio J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S.; Meschiari, Stefano; Haghighipour, Nader

    2010-08-10

    Continued radial velocity (RV) monitoring of the nearby M4V red dwarf star GJ 876 with Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph has revealed the presence of a Uranus-mass fourth planetary companion in the system. The new planet has a mean period of P{sub e} = 126.6 days (over the 12.6-year baseline of the RV observations), and a minimum mass of m{sub e} sin i{sub e} = 12.9 {+-} 1.7 M {sub +}. The detection of the new planet has been enabled by significant improvements to our RV data set for GJ 876. The data have been augmented by 36 new high-precision measurements taken over the past five years. In addition, the precision of all of the Doppler measurements have been significantly improved by the incorporation of a high signal-to-noise template spectrum for GJ 876 into the analysis pipeline. Implementation of the new template spectrum improves the internal rms errors for the velocity measurements taken during 1998-2005 from 4.1 m s{sup -1} to 2.5 m s{sup -1}. Self-consistent, N-body fits to the RV data set show that the four-planet system has an invariable plane with an inclination relative to the plane of the sky of i = 59.{sup 0}5. The fit is not significantly improved by the introduction of a mutual inclination between the planets 'b' and 'c', but the new data do confirm a non-zero eccentricity, e{sub d} = 0.207 {+-} 0.055 for the innermost planet, 'd'. In our best-fit coplanar model, the mass of the new component is m{sub e} = 14.6 {+-} 1.7 M {sub +}. Our best-fitting model places the new planet in a three-body resonance with the previously known giant planets (which have mean periods of P{sub c} = 30.4 and P{sub b} = 61.1 days). The critical argument, {psi}{sub Laplace} = {lambda} {sub c} - 3{lambda} {sub b} + 2{lambda} {sub e}, for the Laplace resonance librates with an amplitude of {Delta}{psi}{sub Laplace} = 40{sup 0} {+-} 13{sup 0} about {psi}{sub Laplace} = 0{sup 0}. Numerical integration indicates that the four-planet system is stable for at least a billion years (at least for the coplanar cases). This resonant configuration of three giant planets orbiting an M dwarf primary differs from the well-known Laplace configuration of the three inner Galilean satellites of Jupiter, which are executing very small librations about {psi}{sub Laplace} = 180{sup 0} and which never experience triple conjunctions. The GJ 876 system, by contrast, comes close to a triple conjunction between the outer three planets once per every orbit of the outer planet, 'e'.

  17. X-MIME: An Imaging X-ray Spectrometer for Detailed Study of Jupiter's Icy Moons and the Planet's X-ray Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Such maps would provide important constraints on formation and evolution scenarios for the surfaces of these moons. Here we describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIMO mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  18. The Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey and the discovery of the young Jupiter analog 51 Eridani b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Bruce; Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey

    2016-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey has been began in November 2014 and has surveyed more than 100 young nearby stars. I will present an updated status of the survey, including instrument performance and completeness limits. We reported our first new exoplanet discovery, the 20 Myr planet 51 Eri b, in August of 2015. J and H band spectra show that it is among the coolest and lowest-luminosity exoplanets yet imaged, with strong methane absorption and a luminosity consistent with low-entropy formation. I will give an overview of the planet's properties, and results from observations in the second half of 2015.

  19. Nested-grid calculations of disk-planet interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Henning, T.; Kley, W.

    2002-04-01

    We study the evolution of embedded protoplanets in a protostellar disk using very high resolution nested-grid computations. This method allows us to perform global simulations of planets orbiting in disks and, at the same time, to resolve in detail the dynamics of the flow inside the Roche lobe of the planet. The primary interest of this work lies in the analysis of the gravitational torque balance acting on the planet. For this purpose we study planets of different masses, ranging from one Earth-mass up to one Jupiter-mass, assuming typical parameters of the protostellar disk. The high resolution supplied by the nested-grid technique permits an evaluation of the torques, resulting from short and very short range disk-planet interactions, more reliable than the one previously estimated with the aid of numerical methods. Likewise, the mass flow onto the planet is computed in a more accurate fashion. The obtained migration time scales are in the range from few times 104 years, for intermediate mass planets, to 106 years, for very low and high mass planets. These are longer than earlier assessments due to the action of circumplanetary material. Typical growth time scales depend strongly on the planetary mass. Below 64 Earth-masses, we find this time scale to increase as the 2/3-power of the planet's mass; otherwise it rises as the 4/3-power. In the case of Jupiter-size planets, the growth time scale is several times ten thousand years.

  20. Origin of Giant Planet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lega, Elena; Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorny, D.

    2012-10-01

    The observed eccentricity distribution of extrasolar giant planets has been successfully reproduced (e.g. Juric and Tremaine, 2008; Chatterjee et al., 2008) assuming that said planets formed in systems of at least three planets that became unstable. However, these works placed the planets initially on circular and non-resonant orbits that were too close to each other to be stable. In reality, giant planets form in disks of gas, and their orbits should be the result of migration and eccentricity-damping processes induced by their gravitational interaction with said disks. In this work we simulate the evolution of systems of three planets as they grow in sequence to Jupiter mass. We use the hydro-dynamical code FARGO (Masset, 2000) that we modified to implement the algorithm Symba (Duncan et al., 1998) to solve the gravitational interactions among the planets, handling also close-encounters and mutual collisions. We start our simulations with sets of three embryos of 20 Earth masses in resonant configuration. The growth of each embryo to Jupiter mass leads to a global instability, but the damping action of the gas eventually re-stabilizes the system into a new orbital configuration. However, once the three planets are all giants, their orbital eccentricities can grow to large values on short timescales through their mutual resonant interactions, while migrating towards the star. We study their subsequent evolution as a function of the disk mass and dissipation time. We conclude that the observed large eccentricities of many extrasolar planets are best reproduced if planets become giants towards the end of the disk lifetime, when the density of gas is rapidly decaying. Instead, if they form in massive disks, their orbital instabilities lead to systems with fewer planets and/or separated orbits with small eccentricities, due to the strong damping action of the disk, as in Marzari et al (2010).

  1. THE McDONALD OBSERVATORY PLANET SEARCH: NEW LONG-PERIOD GIANT PLANETS AND TWO INTERACTING JUPITERS IN THE HD 155358 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Caldwell, Caroline; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, J.; Simon, Attila E.

    2012-04-10

    We present high-precision radial velocity (RV) observations of four solar-type (F7-G5) stars-HD 79498, HD 155358, HD 197037, and HD 220773-taken as part of the McDonald Observatory Planet Search Program. For each of these stars, we see evidence of Keplerian motion caused by the presence of one or more gas giant planets in long-period orbits. We derive orbital parameters for each system and note the properties (composition, activity, etc.) of the host stars. While we have previously announced the two-gas-giant HD 155358 system, we now report a shorter period for planet c. This new period is consistent with the planets being trapped in mutual 2:1 mean-motion resonance. We therefore perform an in-depth stability analysis, placing additional constraints on the orbital parameters of the planets. These results demonstrate the excellent long-term RV stability of the spectrometers on both the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m telescope and the Hobby-Eberly telescope.

  2. Small, Numerous and Close-in: The Population of Planets around Low-mass Stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Gijs Dirk; Pascucci, Ilaria; apai, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has monitored stars from spectral type M to A for transiting exoplanets, covering a factor four in planet host star mass. We take advantage of this large coverage in stellar masses to establish what are the key processes in the formation and evolution of planetary systems.We derive planet occurrence rates for a range of orbital periods and planet sizes, taking into account the different observational biases that exist for stars of different mass, size, and luminosity. This uniform approach allows us to compare planet populations directly and identify scaling relations with stellar mass. We identify three trends:First, planets around lower mass stars are found closer to their hosts stars. The inner edges of the planet populations match the inner edges of the gas disks where planets halt their migration. Second, the size of the largest planets decreases with stellar mass, indicating formation in less massive disks. Third, the 3-4 times higher occurrence rate of small (1-3 earth radii) planets around M dwarfs with respect to sunlike stars indicates an increased planet migration efficiency and is inconsistent with in-situ formation models.Our findings demonstrate how exoplanet studies around stars of very different masses can pin down specific physical processes shaping the final architecture of planetary systems. We will conclude by exploring how the yield from the Kepler extended mission -- with a large number of M stars but a different detection bias -- can further our knowledge of planet formation and evolution.References:Mulders et al. 2015Mulders et al. in prep

  3. The ELODIE and SOPHIE Search for Northern Extrasolar Planets: Jupiter-Analogs around Sun-Like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Bouchy, F.; Santos, N. C.

    2014-04-01

    We present radial-velocity measurements (RV) obtained in one of the numbers of programs underway to search for extrasolar planets with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 1.93-m telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. Targets were selected from catalogs observed with ELODIE, which had been mounted previously at the telescope, in order to detect long-period planets with an extended database close to 15 years.

  4. The ELODIE and SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets: Jupiter-analogs around Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Bouchy, F.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    We present radial-velocity measurements (RV) obtained in one of a number of programs underway to search for extrasolar planets with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 1.93-m telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. Targets were selected from catalogs observed with ELODIE, which had been mounted previously at the telescope, in order to detect long-period planets with an extended database close to 15 years.

  5. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to {approx}5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} planetesimals with absolute magnitude H < 9 (corresponding to diameter D = 80 km for a 7% albedo). The disk mass inferred from this work, M{sub disk} {approx} 14-28 M{sub Earth}, is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.

  6. Full-lifetime simulations of multiple unequal-mass planets across all phases of stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Mustill, Alexander J.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Redfield, Seth; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Bowler, Alex B.; Lloyd, Maximillian J. S.

    2016-03-01

    We know that planetary systems are just as common around white dwarfs as around main sequence stars. However, self-consistently linking a planetary system across these two phases of stellar evolution through the violent giant branch poses computational challenges, and previous studies restricted architectures to equal-mass planets. Here, we remove this constraint and perform over 450 numerical integrations over a Hubble time (14 Gyr) of packed planetary systems with unequal-mass planets. We characterize the resulting trends as a function of planet order and mass. We find that intrusive radial incursions in the vicinity of the white dwarf become less likely as the dispersion amongst planet masses increases. The orbital meandering which may sustain a sufficiently dynamic environment around a white dwarf to explain observations is more dependent on the presence of terrestrial-mass planets than any variation in planetary mass. Triggering unpacking or instability during the white dwarf phase is comparably easy for systems of unequal-mass planets and systems of equal-mass planets; instabilities during the giant branch phase remain rare and require fine-tuning of initial conditions. We list the key dynamical features of each simulation individually as a potential guide for upcoming discoveries.

  7. PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS. II. PREDICTIONS FOR OUTER EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Sean N.; Armitage, Philip J.; Gorelick, Noel

    2010-03-10

    We develop an idealized dynamical model to predict the typical properties of outer extrasolar planetary systems, at radii comparable to the Jupiter-to-Neptune region of the solar system. The model is based upon the hypothesis that dynamical evolution in outer planetary systems is controlled by a combination of planet-planet scattering and planetary interactions with an exterior disk of small bodies ('planetesimals'). Our results are based on 5000 long duration N-body simulations that follow the evolution of three planets from a few to 10 AU, together with a planetesimal disk containing 50 M{sub +} from 10 to 20 AU. For large planet masses (M {approx}> M{sub Sat}), the model recovers the observed eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. For lower-mass planets, the range of outcomes in models with disks is far greater than that which is seen in isolated planet-planet scattering. Common outcomes include strong scattering among massive planets, sudden jumps in eccentricity due to resonance crossings driven by divergent migration, and re-circularization of scattered low-mass planets in the outer disk. We present the distributions of the eccentricity and inclination that result, and discuss how they vary with planet mass and initial system architecture. In agreement with other studies, we find that the currently observed eccentricity distribution (derived primarily from planets at a {approx}< 3 AU) is consistent with isolated planet-planet scattering. We explain the observed mass dependence-which is in the opposite sense from that predicted by the simplest scattering models-as a consequence of strong correlations between planet masses in the same system. At somewhat larger radii, initial planetary mass correlations and disk effects can yield similar modest changes to the eccentricity distribution. Nonetheless, strong damping of eccentricity for low-mass planets at large radii appears to be a secure signature of the dynamical influence of disks. Radial velocity measurements capable of detecting planets with K {approx} 5 m s{sup -1} and periods in excess of 10 years will provide constraints on this regime. Finally, we present an analysis of the predicted separation of planets in two-planet systems, and of the population of planets in mean-motion resonances (MMRs). We show that, if there are systems with {approx} Jupiter-mass planets that avoid close encounters, the planetesimal disk acts as a damping mechanism and populates MMRs at a very high rate (50%-80%). In many cases, resonant chains (in particular the 4:2:1 Laplace resonance) are set up among all three planets. We expect such resonant chains to be common among massive planets in outer planetary systems.

  8. A limit on the presence of Earth-mass planets around a Sun-like star

    SciTech Connect

    Agol, Eric; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    We present a combined analysis of all publicly available, visible HST observations of transits of the planet HD 209458b. We derive the times of transit, planet radius, inclination, period, and ephemeris. The transit times are then used to constrain the existence of secondary planets in the system. We show that planets near an Earth mass can be ruled out in low-order mean-motion resonance, while planets less than an Earth mass are ruled out in interior, 2:1 resonance. We also present a combined analysis of the transit times and 68 high precision radial velocity measurements of the system. These results are compared to theoretical predictions for the constraints that can be placed on secondary planets.

  9. Influence of Jovian Extrasolar Planets on Transits of Inner Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Borucki, W. J.

    1996-09-01

    Current thinking on the formation of planetary systems is in a state of flux following the recent discoveries of over a dozen extrasolar planets, including brown dwarves, Jovian-mass planets in close orbits, and planets of pulsars. It is important to characterize the architecture of new planetary systems. The transit method for detecting planets of other stars relies on the dimming of the star as a planet passes in front of it. A wide-field space telescope monitoring many stars simultaneously (such as the proposed Kepler spacecraft, formerly FRESIP) can readily detect small inner planets. However, it is unlikely to observe transits of outer planets. Massive outer planets could be detected indirectly, though, through their perturbations of the transits of inner planets. For example, yearly transits of the Earth across the Sun last up to ~ 13 hours as seen from afar. Perturbations by Jupiter alter the duration of these events by about a second, but they change the timing of these transits by about a minute. For comparison, the massive planets of pulsar PSR1257+12 alter each other's orbital periods by ~ 10(3) seconds (Rasio et al., Nature 355, 325--326, 1992). Their interaction is stronger because those planets are much closer together, and their orbital periods are nearly in the ratio of 3:2. The time resolution of the Kepler instrument is also on the order of 15 minutes. Thus it is about an order of magnitude short of detecting Jupiter-type planets of other stars, but is capable of indirectly detecting multiple planets in some of the novel systems seen recently.

  10. Jupiter's decisive role in the inner Solar System's early evolution.

    PubMed

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-04-01

    The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planet formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System is unusual. Here, we present simulations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward from a > 5 astronomical units (AU) to a ? 1.5 AU before reversing direction, can explain the low overall mass of the Solar System's terrestrial planets, as well as the absence of planets with a < 0.4 AU. Jupiter's inward migration entrained s ? 10-100 km planetesimals into low-order mean motion resonances, shepherding and exciting their orbits. The resulting collisional cascade generated a planetesimal disk that, evolving under gas drag, would have driven any preexisting short-period planets into the Sun. In this scenario, the Solar System's terrestrial planets formed from gas-starved mass-depleted debris that remained after the primary period of dynamical evolution. PMID:25831540

  11. Securing the Extremely Low-Densities of Low-Mass Planets Characterized by Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) provide an excellent tool to characterize the masses and orbits of dozens of small planets, including many at orbital periods beyond the reach of both Doppler surveys and photoevaporation-induced atmospheric loss. Dynamical modeling of these systems has identified low-mass planets with surprisingly large radii and low densities (e.g., Kepler-79d, Jontof-Hutter et al. 2014; Kepler-51, Masuda 2014; Kepler-87c, Ofir et al. 2014). Additional low-density, low-mass planets will likely become public before ESS III (Jontof-Hutter et al. in prep). Collectively, these results suggest that very low density planets with masses of 2-6 MEarth are not uncommon in compact multiple planet systems. Some astronomers have questioned whether there could be an alternative interpretation of the TTV observations. Indeed, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. While the physics of TTVs is rock solid, the statistical analysis of Kepler observations can be challenging, due to the complex interactions between model parameters and high-dimensional parameter spaces that must be explored. We summarize recent advances in computational statistics that enable robust characterization of planetary systems using TTVs. We present updated analyses of a few particularly interesting systems and discuss the implications for the robustness of extremely low densities for low-mass planets. Such planets pose an interesting challenge for planet formation theory and are motivating detailed theoretical studies (e.g., Lee & Chiang 2015 and associated ESS III abstracts).

  12. Mass Estimates of a Giant Planet in a Protoplanetary Disk from the Gap Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Muto, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake

    2015-06-01

    A giant planet embedded in a protoplanetary disk forms a gap. An analytic relationship among the gap depth, planet mass Mp, disk aspect ratio hp, and viscosity ? has been found recently, and the gap depth can be written in terms of a single parameter K={{({{M}p}/{{M}*})}2}hp-5{{? }-1}. We discuss how observed gap features can be used to constrain the disk and/or planet parameters based on the analytic formula for the gap depth. The constraint on the disk aspect ratio is critical in determining the planet mass so the combination of the observations of the temperature and the image can provide a constraint on the planet mass. We apply the formula for the gap depth to observations of HL Tau and HD 169142. In the case of HL Tau, we propose that a planet with ? 0.3 MJ is responsible for the observed gap at 30 AU from the central star based on the estimate that the gap depth is ? 1/3. In the case of HD 169142, the planet mass that causes the gap structure recently found by VLA is ? 0.4{{M}J}. We also argue that the spiral structure, if observed, can be used to estimate the lower limit of the disk aspect ratio and the planet mass.

  13. Combining Transit and Radial Velocity Data to Infer the Planet Mass-Radius-Flux Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Leslie Anne

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler Mission, combined with ground based radial velocity (RV) follow-up, has revolutionized the observational constraints on sub-Neptune-size planet compositions. Keplers unprecedentedly large and homogeneous samples of planets with both mass and radius constraints open the possibility of statistical studies of the underlying planet composition distribution. This presentation will describe the application of hierarchical Bayesian models to constrain the underlying planet composition distribution from a sample of noisy mass-radius measurements. This approach represents a promising avenue toward a quantitative measurement of the amount of physical scatter in small planet compositions, the identification of planet sub-populations that may be tied to distinct formation pathways, and empirical constraints on the dominant compositional trends in the planet sample. Both the transit and radial velocity techniques are subject to selection effects, and approaches to mitigate the resulting biases will be addressed. In addition to distilling composition-distribution insights from the current sample of Kepler planets with RV masses, this framework may be used to optimize the target selection for future transiting planet RV follow-up surveys.

  14. KEPLER-15b: A HOT JUPITER ENRICHED IN HEAVY ELEMENTS AND THE FIRST KEPLER MISSION PLANET CONFIRMED WITH THE HOBBY-EBERLY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Cochran, William D.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Rowe, Jason; Lucas, Phillip; Isaacson, Howard; Bryson, Steve; Howell, Steve B.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Haas, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hansen, Terese; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark; Ford, Eric B.; and others

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of Kepler-15b (KOI-128), a new transiting exoplanet detected by NASA's Kepler mission. The transit signal with a period of 4.94 days was detected in the quarter 1 (Q1) Kepler photometry. For the first time, we have used the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) to determine the mass of a Kepler planet via precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. The 24 HET/HRS RVs and 6 additional measurements from the Fibre-fed Echelle Spectrograph spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope reveal a Doppler signal with the same period and phase as the transit ephemeris. We used one HET/HRS spectrum of Kepler-15 taken without the iodine cell to determine accurate stellar parameters. The host star is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.36 {+-} 0.07) G-type main-sequence star with T{sub eff} = 5515 {+-} 124 K. The semi-amplitude K of the RV orbit is 78.7{sup +8.5}{sub -9.5} m s{sup -1}, which yields a planet mass of 0.66 {+-} 0.1 M{sub Jup}. The planet has a radius of 0.96 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Jup} and a mean bulk density of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 g cm{sup -3}. The radius of Kepler-15b is smaller than the majority of transiting planets with similar mass and irradiation level. This suggests that the planet is more enriched in heavy elements than most other transiting giant planets. For Kepler-15b we estimate a heavy element mass of 30-40 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

  15. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of Jupiter with the Galileo Probe mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H B; Atreya, S K; Carignan, G R; Donahue, T M; Haberman, J A; Harpold, D N; Hartle, R E; Hunten, D M; Kasprzak, W T; Mahaffy, P R; Owen, T C; Spencer, N W

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for 3He/4He, D/H, 13C/12C, 20Ne/22Ne, 38Ar/36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe. PMID:11541457

  16. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of Jupiter with the Galileo Probe mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for 3He/4He, D/H, 13C/12C, 20Ne/22Ne, 38Ar/36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe.

  17. Numerical theory of the motion of Jupiter's Galilean satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmodamianskii, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    A numerical theory of the motion of Jupiters Galilean satellites was constructed using 3767 absolute observations of the satellites. The theory was based on the numerical integration of the equations of motion of the satellites. The integration was carried out by Everharts method using the ERA software package developed at the Institute of Applied Astronomy (IAA). Perturbations due to the oblateness of the central planet, perturbations from Saturn and the Sun, and the mutual attraction of the satellites were taken into account in the integration. As a result, the coefficients of the Chebyshev series expansion for coordinates and velocities were found for the period from 1962 to 2010. The initial coordinates and velocities of the satellites, as well as their masses, the mass of Jupiter, and the harmonic coefficient J 2 of the potential of Jupiter, were adjusted. The resulting ephemerides were compared to those of Lieske and Lainey.

  18. HABITABILITY OF EARTH-MASS PLANETS AND MOONS IN THE KEPLER-16 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, B.; Musielak, Z. E.; Cuntz, M. E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate that habitable Earth-mass planets and moons can exist in the Kepler-16 system, known to host a Saturn-mass planet around a stellar binary, by investigating their orbital stability in the standard and extended habitable zone (HZ). We find that Earth-mass planets in satellite-like (S-type) orbits are possible within the standard HZ in direct vicinity of Kepler-16b, thus constituting habitable exomoons. However, Earth-mass planets cannot exist in planetary-like (P-type) orbits around the two stellar components within the standard HZ. Yet, P-type Earth-mass planets can exist superior to the Saturnian planet in the extended HZ pertaining to considerably enhanced back-warming in the planetary atmosphere if facilitated. We briefly discuss the potential detectability of such habitable Earth-mass moons and planets positioned in satellite and planetary orbits, respectively. The range of inferior and superior P-type orbits in the HZ is between 0.657-0.71 AU and 0.95-1.02 AU, respectively.

  19. Mass and distance of the sub-Saturn microlensing planet OGLE-2007-BLG-349Lb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    2007-07-01

    OGLE-2007-BLG-349Lb is the seventh planet discovered using gravitational microlensing, with planet/star mass ratio 2.8e-4. These microlensing planets lie in the cold, outer reaches of their solar systems and are difficult to detect by other techniques because of their long periods. However, microlensing detections by themselves generally give only the planet/star mass ratio, not the absolute planet mass. HST observations have yielded host star masses and distances for two previous microlensing planets. Here, we propose to apply a proven technique to measure the mass and distance of the newest microlensing planet, which was discovered only two weeks ago. We will use WFPC2 observations to unambiguously determine whether the blended light seen during the event is due to the host star {rather than a random interloper} and a combination of WFPC2 and NICMOS observations to obtain photometric estimates of the mass and distance. Two epochs of observations are required, one at high magnification {in the very near future} and the other at baseline {but not too late - to avoid having the lens move substantially away from the source}.

  20. ORBITAL MIGRATION OF LOW-MASS PLANETS IN EVOLUTIONARY RADIATIVE MODELS: AVOIDING CATASTROPHIC INFALL

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or

    2010-06-01

    Outward migration of low-mass planets has recently been shown to be a possibility in non-barotropic disks. We examine the consequences of this result in evolutionary models of protoplanetary disks. Planet migration occurs toward equilibrium radii with zero torque. These radii themselves migrate inwards because of viscous accretion and photoevaporation. We show that as the surface density and temperature fall the planet orbital migration and disk depletion timescales eventually become comparable, with the precise timing depending on the mass of the planet. When this occurs, the planet decouples from the equilibrium radius. At this time, however, the gas surface density is already too low to drive substantial further migration. A higher mass planet, of 10 M {sub +}, can open a gap during the late evolution of the disk, and stops migrating. Low-mass planets, with 1 or 0.1 M {sub +}, released beyond 1 AU in our models avoid migrating into the star. Our results provide support for the reduced migration rates adopted in recent planet population synthesis models.

  1. Jupiter and Saturn: Interior and Shape (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helled, R.

    2013-12-01

    Jupiter and Saturn are composed mostly of hydrogen and helium and a smaller fraction of heavy elements. The exact mass of those heavy elements and their distribution within the planets are not well constrained. In addition, due to the in-homogenous density distribution within the planetary interior and the rapid rotation, both Jupiter and Saturn have oblate shapes. The compositions and internal structures of Jupiter and Saturn are derived from structure (interior) models which use the measured physical properties of the planets such as mass, gravitational coefficients J2n, equatorial/mean radius, 1 bar temperature, rotation rate, and occasionally, the atmospheric He/H. Interior models, however, are typically static 1D models, and therefore do not account for the continuous planetary shape (i.e. radius as a function of latitude) and dynamical contributions (i.e. winds). First, I will discuss how the uncertainties in Saturn's internal rotation and shape affect its derived internal structure. It is found that for a rotation period of of 10h39mns Saturn's heavy element mass in the envelope is between 0 and 7 Earth masses, while the core mass ranges between 5 and 20 Earth masses. Interior models of Saturn with no ice/rock core are also possible. For a rotation period of 10h32mns the heavy element mass in the envelope is found to be lower than 4 Earth masses and the core mass is estimated to be 5-20 Earth masses. A derivation of Saturn's shape using the geodetic approach will also be presented. Next, I will show that the physical shape of a giant planet can be used to reveal information about its centrifugal potential, and therefore, its rotation. For Jupiter, it is found that both solid-body rotation (with System III rotation rate) and total differential rotation on cylinders up to a latitude between 20 and 30 degrees are consistent with its measured shape. Occultation measurements of the shapes of both Jupiter and Saturn can be used to constrain the depth of their zonal winds, although the case of Saturn is more complex due to the uncertainty in its rotation period, and therefore, wind velocities. Due to the importance of the planetary shape, it is suggested that it should be incorporated self-consistently in future structure models in order to make full use of Juno and Cassini data, and establish a better understanding of the planetary interior and dynamics. Finally, I will briefly discuss the water (O/H) abundance determination expected from Juno and how it can be used to reveal valuable information on Jupiter's internal structure and formation history.

  2. Planet Hunters. VII. Discovery of a New Low-mass, Low-density Planet (PH3 C) Orbiting Kepler-289 with Mass Measurements of Two Additional Planets (PH3 B and D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Gazak, J. Zachary; Fischer, Debra A.; Wang, Ji; Holman, Matthew J.; Jek, Kian J.; Margossian, Charles; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Brewer, John M.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Lintott, Chris; Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; Simpson, Robert; Smith, Arfon M.

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of one newly confirmed planet (P = 66.06 days, R P = 2.68 0.17 R ?) and mass determinations of two previously validated Kepler planets, Kepler-289 b (P = 34.55 days, R P = 2.15 0.10 R ?) and Kepler-289-c (P = 125.85 days, R P = 11.59 0.10 R ?), through their transit timing variations (TTVs). We also exclude the possibility that these three planets reside in a 1:2:4 Laplace resonance. The outer planet has very deep (~1.3%), high signal-to-noise transits, which puts extremely tight constraints on its host star's stellar properties via Kepler's Third Law. The star PH3 is a young (~1 Gyr as determined by isochrones and gyrochronology), Sun-like star with M * = 1.08 0.02 M ?, R * = 1.00 0.02 R ?, and T eff = 5990 38 K. The middle planet's large TTV amplitude (~5 hr) resulted either in non-detections or inaccurate detections in previous searches. A strong chopping signal, a shorter period sinusoid in the TTVs, allows us to break the mass-eccentricity degeneracy and uniquely determine the masses of the inner, middle, and outer planets to be M = 7.3 6.8 M ?, 4.0 0.9M ?, and M = 132 17 M ?, which we designate PH3 b, c, and d, respectively. Furthermore, the middle planet, PH3 c, has a relatively low density, ? = 1.2 0.3 g cm-3 for a planet of its mass, requiring a substantial H/He atmosphere of 2.1+0.8-0.3% by mass, and joins a growing population of low-mass, low-density planets. .

  3. A Closely Packed System of Low-Mass Low-Density Planets Transiting Kepler-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Fabrycky, Daniel G.; Ford, Eric B.; Borucki, William J.; Fressin, Francois; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Rowe, Jason F.; Torres, Guillermo; Welsh, William F.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Carter, Joshua A.; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Cochran, William D.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Dunham, Edward W.; Haas, Michael R.; Koch, David G.

    2011-01-01

    When an extrasolar planet passes in front of (transits) its star, its radius can be measured from the decrease in starlight and its orbital period from the time between transits. Multiple planets transiting the same star reveal much more: period ratios determine stability and dynamics, mutual gravitational interactions reflect planet masses and orbital shapes, and the fraction of transiting planets observed as multiples has implications for the planarity of planetary systems. But few stars have more than one known transiting planet, and none has more than three. Here we report Kepler spacecraft observations of a single Sun-like star, which we call Kepler-11, that reveal six transiting planets, five with orbital periods between 10 and 47 days and a sixth planet with a longer period. The five inner planets are among the smallest for which mass and size have both been measured, and these measurements imply substantial envelopes of light gases. The degree of coplanarity and proximity of the planetary orbits imply energy dissipation near the end of planet formation.

  4. A closely packed system of low-mass, low-density planets transiting Kepler-11.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Jack J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Borucki, William J; Fressin, Francois; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Orosz, Jerome A; Rowe, Jason F; Torres, Guillermo; Welsh, William F; Batalha, Natalie M; Bryson, Stephen T; Buchhave, Lars A; Caldwell, Douglas A; Carter, Joshua A; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie L; Cochran, William D; Desert, Jean-Michel; Dunham, Edward W; Fanelli, Michael N; Fortney, Jonathan J; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Hall, Jennifer R; Holman, Matthew J; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Lopez, Eric; McCauliff, Sean; Miller, Neil; Morehead, Robert C; Quintana, Elisa V; Ragozzine, Darin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Short, Donald R; Steffen, Jason H

    2011-02-01

    When an extrasolar planet passes in front of (transits) its star, its radius can be measured from the decrease in starlight and its orbital period from the time between transits. Multiple planets transiting the same star reveal much more: period ratios determine stability and dynamics, mutual gravitational interactions reflect planet masses and orbital shapes, and the fraction of transiting planets observed as multiples has implications for the planarity of planetary systems. But few stars have more than one known transiting planet, and none has more than three. Here we report Kepler spacecraft observations of a single Sun-like star, which we call Kepler-11, that reveal six transiting planets, five with orbital periods between 10 and 47 days and a sixth planet with a longer period. The five inner planets are among the smallest for which mass and size have both been measured, and these measurements imply substantial envelopes of light gases. The degree of coplanarity and proximity of the planetary orbits imply energy dissipation near the end of planet formation. PMID:21293371

  5. Reevaluating the feasibility of ground-based Earth-mass microlensing planet detections

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Youn Kil; Park, Hyuk; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Shin, In-Gu; Choi, Joon-Young

    2014-05-10

    An important strength of the microlensing method to detect extrasolar planets is its high sensitivity to low-mass planets. However, many believe that microlensing detections of Earth-mass planets from ground-based observation would be difficult because of limits set by finite-source effects. This view comes from the previous estimation of planet detection probability based on the fractional deviation of planetary signals; however, a proper probability estimation is required when considering the source brightness, which is directly related to the photometric precision. In this paper, we reevaluate the feasibility of low-mass planet detections by considering photometric precision for different populations of source stars. From this, we find that the contribution of improved photometric precision to the planetary signal of a giant-source event is large enough to compensate for the decrease in magnification excess caused by finite-source effects. As a result, we conclude that giant-source events are suitable targets for Earth-mass planet detections with significantly higher detection probability than events involved with source stars of smaller radii, and we predict that Earth-mass planets could be detected by prospective high-cadence surveys.

  6. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions planets with small cores/total heavy element abundances can accrete gaseous envelopes within the lifetimes of gaseous protoplanetary disks.

  7. Influence of solar flares and CME on the gaseous envelopes of hot Jupiter exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisikalo, Dmitry; Cherenkov, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Hot Jupiters, i.e. exoplanets having masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and semimajor axes shorter than 0.1~AU, have a number of outstanding features, caused mostly by their proximity to the host star. As a matter of fact, the atmospheres of several dozens of these planets fill their Roche lobes, which results in a powerful outflow of material from the planet toward the host star. In addition, since the planet orbits at a short distance, its orbital velocity is supersonic, which causes the formation of a bow shock ahead of the planet. These effects substantially change the mechanism of interaction between the planet's gaseous envelope (atmosphere) and the stellar wind. In this paper, we investigate the flow pattern in the vicinity of a typical hot Jupiter by using 3D gas dynamic simulations. By considering the star-planet interaction we study variations in the structure of the hot Jupiter's envelope and estimate the variations of atmospheres mass-loss rate caused by the influence of typical solar flares and coronal mass ejections.

  8. The Nitrogen Constraint on the Habitability of Planets around Low Mass M-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Feng

    2011-09-01

    The traditional habitable zones around stars are defined based on the stability of liquid water over geological timescales. Being too far away from the stars, the planet would be incapable of maintaining a warm surface and thus no liquid water. Being too close to the star, the planet would experience a 'runaway' greenhouse phase, during which its oceans could be lost quickly, and end up similar to our sister planet, Venus. The definition of tranditional habitable zones does not consider the availability of other elements important for life. All life as we know it needs nitrogen. Our calculations of upper planetary atmospheres show that nitrogen could be lost rapidly from planetary atmospheres with CO2 concentrations lower than certain threshold. This suggests that life on planets around low mass M-stars may be self-limiting, and planets of low mass M-stars are less favorable places to search for life than G- or K-type stars.

  9. The Nitrogen Constraint on Habitability of Planets of Low Mass M-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, F.

    2011-12-01

    The traditional habitable zones around stars are defined based on the stability of liquid water over geological timescales. Being too far away from the stars, the planet would be incapable of maintaining a warm surface and thus no liquid water. Being too close to the star, the planet would experience a 'runaway' greenhouse phase, during which its oceans could be lost quickly, and end up similar to our sister planet, Venus. The definition of tranditional habitable zones does not consider the availability of other elements important for life. All life as we know it needs nitrogen. Our calculations of upper planetary atmospheres show that nitrogen could be lost rapidly from planetary atmospheres with CO2 concentrations lower than certain threshold. This suggests that life on planets around low mass M-stars may be selflimiting, and planets of low mass M-stars are less favorable places to search for life than G- or K-type stars.

  10. The Nitrogen Constraint on Habitability of Planets around Low Mass M-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, F.

    2011-10-01

    The traditional habitable zones around stars are defined based on the stability of liquid water over geological timescales. Being too far away from the stars, the planet would be incapable of maintaining a warm surface and thus no liquid water. Being too close to the star, the planet would experience a 'runaway' greenhouse phase, during which its oceans could be lost quickly, and end up similar to our sister planet, Venus. The definition of tranditional habitable zones does not consider the availability of other elements important for life. All life as we know it needs nitrogen. Our calculations of upper planetary atmospheres show that nitrogen could be lost rapidly from planetary atmospheres with CO2 concentrations lower than certain threshold. This suggests that life on planets around low mass M-stars may be selflimiting, and planets of low mass M-stars are less favorable places to search for life than G- or K-type stars.

  11. The Pan-Pacific Planet Search. IV. Two Super-Jupiters in a 3:5 Resonance Orbiting the Giant Star HD 33844

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Johnson, John Asher; Butler, R. P.; Horner, Jonathan; Wang, Liang; Robertson, Paul; Jones, M. I.; Jenkins, J. S.; Brahm, R.; Tinney, C. G.; Mengel, M. W.; Clark, J.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of two giant planets orbiting the K giant HD 33844 based on radial velocity data from three independent campaigns. The planets move on nearly circular orbits with semimajor axes {a}b\\=1.60+/- 0.02 AU and {a}c=2.24+/- 0.05 AU, and have minimum masses (m sin i) of {M}b=1.96+/- 0.12 {M}{{Jup}} and {M}c=1.76+/- 0.18 {M}{{Jup}}. Detailed N-body dynamical simulations show that the two planets have remained on stable orbits for more than 106 years for low eccentricities and are most likely trapped in a mutual 3:5 mean motion resonance.

  12. Friends of hot Jupiters. I. A radial velocity search for massive, long-period companions to close-in gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Johnson, John Asher; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Kao, Melodie; Hinkley, Sasha; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Crepp, Justin R.; Bakos, Gaspar Á.; Batygin, Konstantin

    2014-04-20

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M {sub Jup}, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51% ± 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M {sub Jup} and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.

  13. DIRECTLY IMAGING TIDALLY POWERED MIGRATING JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-01-10

    Upcoming direct-imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by {approx} Gyr-'old' main-sequence stars, they can be as 'hot' as young Jupiters at {approx}100 Myr, the prime targets of direct-imaging surveys. They are on years-long orbits and presently migrating to 'feed' the 'hot Jupiters'. They are expected from 'high-e' migration mechanisms, in which Jupiters are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink semimajor axis by a factor of {approx}10-100 due to tidal dissipation at close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity L {approx} 100-1000 L{sub Jup}(2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} L{sub Sun }) during a typical {approx} Gyr migration timescale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make them potentially accessible to high-contrast imaging instruments on 10 m class telescopes. {approx}10 such planets are expected to exist around FGK dwarfs within {approx}50 pc. Long-period radial velocity planets are viable candidates, and the highly eccentric planet HD 20782b at maximum angular separation {approx}0.''08 is a promising candidate. Directly imaging these tidally powered Jupiters would enable a direct test of high-e migration mechanisms. Once detected, the luminosity would provide a direct measurement of the migration rate, and together with mass (and possibly radius) estimate, they would serve as a laboratory to study planetary spectral formation and tidal physics.

  14. Mapping the stability field of Jupiter Trojans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, H. F.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Wolfe, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are a remnant of outer solar system planetesimals captured into stable or quasistable libration about the 1:1 resonance with the mean motion of Jupiter. The observed swarms of Trojans may provide insight into the original mass of condensed solids in the zone from which the Jovian planets accumulated, provided that the mechanisms of capture can be understood. As the first step toward this understanding, the stability field of Trojans were mapped in the coordinate proper eccentricity, e(sub p), and libration amplitude, D. To accomplish this mapping, the orbits of 100 particles with e(sub p) in the range of 0 to 0.8 and D in the range 0 to 140 deg were numerically integrated. Orbits of the Sun, the four Jovian planets, and the massless particles were integrated as a full N-body system, in a barycentric frame using fourth order symplectic scheme.

  15. New Horizons at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    2007-12-01

    New Horizons is NASA's reconnaissance mission to explore the Pluto system and small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). I will describe the mission's history, current status, and instrument suite. I will then describe the Jupiter gravity assist flyby New Horizons conducted in early-mid 2007. This flyby involved over 700 observations in the Jupiter system, and represents the only spacecraft encounter with Jupiter planned to occur between the demise of Galileo in 2003 and the arrival of Juno in 2016. I will focus on results obtained, including the first-ever exploration of a giant planet magnetotail, new compositional observations of icy Galilean satellites, exploration of Jupiter's tenuous ring system, the first high-resolution spacecraft imagery of Jupiter's newly-generated little red spot, and the first-ever time-lapse imagery of an Ionian volcano eruption.

  16. Taxonomy of the extrasolar planet.

    PubMed

    Plávalová, Eva

    2012-04-01

    When a star is described as a spectral class G2V, we know that the star is similar to our Sun. We know its approximate mass, temperature, age, and size. When working with an extrasolar planet database, it is very useful to have a taxonomy scale (classification) such as, for example, the Harvard classification for stars. The taxonomy has to be easily interpreted and present the most relevant information about extrasolar planets. I propose an extrasolar planet taxonomy scale with four parameters. The first parameter concerns the mass of an extrasolar planet in the form of units of the mass of other known planets, where M represents the mass of Mercury, E that of Earth, N Neptune, and J Jupiter. The second parameter is the planet's distance from its parent star (semimajor axis) described in a logarithm with base 10. The third parameter is the mean Dyson temperature of the extrasolar planet, for which I established four main temperature classes: F represents the Freezing class, W the Water class, G the Gaseous class, and R the Roasters class. I devised one additional class, however: P, the Pulsar class, which concerns extrasolar planets orbiting pulsar stars. The fourth parameter is eccentricity. If the attributes of the surface of the extrasolar planet are known, we are able to establish this additional parameter where t represents a terrestrial planet, g a gaseous planet, and i an ice planet. According to this taxonomy scale, for example, Earth is 1E0W0t, Neptune is 1N1.5F0i, and extrasolar planet 55 Cnc e is 9E-1.8R1. PMID:22506608

  17. TIDAL AND MAGNETIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN A HOT JUPITER AND ITS HOST STAR IN THE MAGNETOSPHERIC CAVITY OF A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-H.; Gu, P.-G.; Bodenheimer, P. H.

    2010-01-10

    We present a simplified model to study the orbital evolution of a young hot Jupiter inside the magnetospheric cavity of a proto-planetary disk. The model takes into account the disk locking of stellar spin as well as the tidal and magnetic interactions between the star and the planet. We focus on the orbital evolution starting from the orbit in 2:1 resonance with the inner edge of the disk, followed by the inward and then outward orbital migration driven by the tidal and magnetic torques as well as the Roche-lobe overflow of the tidally inflated planet. The goal in this paper is to study how the orbital evolution inside the magnetospheric cavity depends on the cavity size, planet mass, and orbital eccentricity. In the present work, we only target the mass range from 0.7 to 2 Jupiter masses. In the case of the large cavity corresponding to the rotational period approx7 days, the planet of mass >1 Jupiter mass with moderate initial eccentricities (approx>0.3) can move to the region <0.03 AU from its central star in 10{sup 7} yr, while the planet of mass <1 Jupiter mass cannot. We estimate the critical eccentricity beyond which the planet of a given mass will overflow its Roche radius and finally lose all of its gas onto the star due to runaway mass loss. In the case of the small cavity corresponding to the rotational period approx3 days, all of the simulated planets lose all of their gas even in circular orbits. Our results for the orbital evolution of young hot Jupiters may have the potential to explain the absence of low-mass giant planets inside approx0.03 AU from their dwarf stars revealed by transit surveys.

  18. SHORT-DURATION LENSING EVENTS. I. WIDE-ORBIT PLANETS? FREE-FLOATING LOW-MASS OBJECTS? OR HIGH-VELOCITY STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-08-01

    Short-duration lensing events tend to be generated by low-mass lenses or by lenses with high transverse velocities. Furthermore, for any given lens mass and speed, events of short duration are preferentially caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses) that can be studied in detail, or else by lenses so close to the source star that finite-source-size effects may be detected, yielding information about both the Einstein ring radius and the surface of the lensed star. Planets causing short-duration events may be in orbits with any orientation, and may have semimajor axes smaller than 1 AU, or they may reach the outer limits of their planetary systems, in the region corresponding to the solar system's Oort Cloud. They can have masses larger than Jupiter's or smaller than Pluto's. Lensing therefore has a unique potential to expand our understanding of planetary systems. A particular advantage of lensing is that it can provide precision measurements of system parameters, including the masses of and projected separation between star and planet. We demonstrate how the parameters can be extracted and show that a great deal can be learned. For example, it is remarkable that the gravitational mass of nearby free-floating planet-mass lenses can be measured by complementing observations of a photometric event with deep images that detect the planet itself. A fraction of short events may be caused by high-velocity stars located within a kiloparsec. Many high-velocity lenses are likely to be neutron stars that received large natal kicks. Other high-speed stars may be members of the halo population. Still others may be hypervelocity stars that have been ejected from the Galactic center, or runaway stars escaped from close binaries, possibly including the progenitor binaries of Type Ia supernovae.

  19. Short-duration Lensing Events. I. Wide-orbit Planets? Free-floating Low-mass Objects? Or High-velocity Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-08-01

    Short-duration lensing events tend to be generated by low-mass lenses or by lenses with high transverse velocities. Furthermore, for any given lens mass and speed, events of short duration are preferentially caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses) that can be studied in detail, or else by lenses so close to the source star that finite-source-size effects may be detected, yielding information about both the Einstein ring radius and the surface of the lensed star. Planets causing short-duration events may be in orbits with any orientation, and may have semimajor axes smaller than 1 AU, or they may reach the outer limits of their planetary systems, in the region corresponding to the solar system's Oort Cloud. They can have masses larger than Jupiter's or smaller than Pluto's. Lensing therefore has a unique potential to expand our understanding of planetary systems. A particular advantage of lensing is that it can provide precision measurements of system parameters, including the masses of and projected separation between star and planet. We demonstrate how the parameters can be extracted and show that a great deal can be learned. For example, it is remarkable that the gravitational mass of nearby free-floating planet-mass lenses can be measured by complementing observations of a photometric event with deep images that detect the planet itself. A fraction of short events may be caused by high-velocity stars located within a kiloparsec. Many high-velocity lenses are likely to be neutron stars that received large natal kicks. Other high-speed stars may be members of the halo population. Still others may be hypervelocity stars that have been ejected from the Galactic center, or runaway stars escaped from close binaries, possibly including the progenitor binaries of Type Ia supernovae.

  20. Keplers Low-Mass, Low Density Planets Characterized via Transit Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.; Lissauer, Jack; Rowe, Jason; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed an abundance of planets in a regime of mass and size that is absent from the Solar System. This includes systems of high multiplicity within 1 AU, where low-mass volatile-rich planets have been observed in compact orbital configurations, as have smaller, rocky planets. The existing sample of characterized planets on the mass-radius diagram shows no abrupt transition from rocky planets to those that must be volatile-rich, but characteristic trends are beginning to emerge. More precise characterizations of planets by mass, radius, and incident flux are revealing fundamental properties of a common class of exoplanets.There is a small sample of low mass exoplanets with known masses and radii, whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the super-Earth mass range, detectability limits this sample to planets that have short orbital periods, and high incident fluxes.In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can be used to measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modeling with Kepler data probes planetary masses over orbital periods ranging from ~5-200 days, complementing the sample of RV detections, but also with some overlap.In addition, dynamical fits to observed TTVs can tightly constrain the orbital eccentricity vectors in select cases, which can, alongside the transit light curve, tightly constrain the density and radius of the host star, and hence reduce the uncertainty on planetary radius.TTV studies have revealed a class of low-mass, low-density objects with a substantial mass fraction in the form of a voluminous H-rich atmosphere. We will present new precise planetary mass characterizations from TTVs. We find that super-Earth mass planets characterized by TTV are remarkably diverse in bulk density, and can range from super-Earth to sub-Saturn size.

  1. ON THE TIDAL ORIGIN OF HOT JUPITER STELLAR OBLIQUITY TRENDS

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.

    2014-08-01

    It is debated whether the two hot Jupiter populations—those on orbits misaligned from their host star's spin axis and those well-aligned—result from two migration channels or from two tidal realignment regimes. Here I demonstrate that equilibrium tides raised by a planet on its star can account for three observed spin-orbit alignment trends: the aligned orbits of hot Jupiters orbiting cool stars, the planetary mass cut-off for retrograde planets, and the stratification by planet mass of cool host stars' rotation frequencies. The first trend can be caused by strong versus weak magnetic braking (the Kraft break), rather than realignment of the star's convective envelope versus the entire star. The second trend can result from a small effective stellar moment of inertia participating in the tidal realignment in hot stars, enabling massive retrograde planets to partially realign to become prograde. The third trend is attributable to higher-mass planets more effectively counteracting braking to spin up their stars. Both hot and cool stars require a small effective stellar moment of inertia participating in the tidal realignment, e.g., an outer layer weakly coupled to the interior. I demonstrate via Monte Carlo that this model can match the observed trends and distributions of sky-projected misalignments and stellar rotation frequencies. I discuss implications for inferring hot Jupiter migration mechanisms from obliquities, emphasizing that even hot stars do not constitute a pristine sample.

  2. The Europa Jupiter system mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K.; Stankov, A.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Greeley, R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.; van Houten, T.

    2009-04-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM)— would be an international mission that would achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System be-fore settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupi-ter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and charac-terize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM would fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Coun-cil's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vi-sion for exploration of the outer solar system. The De-cadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission tar-get. EJSM would uniquely addresse several of the cen-tral themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM would investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Gany-mede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geo-logical, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupi-ter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant plan-ets and their satellites would be better known. Most important, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM mission architecture provides opportu-nities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupi-ter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft could and would conduct "stand-alone" measurements, including the detailed investigation of Europa and Ganymede, providing significant pro-grammatic flexibility. Although engineering advances are needed for JEO (radiation designs) and JGO, no new technologies would be required to execute either EJSM mission element. The development schedule for the mission is such that a technology developed by 2012 - 2013 could easily be incorporated if it enhances the mission capability. Risk mitigation activities are under way to ensure that the radiation designs are implemented in the lowest-risk approach. The baseline mission con-cepts include robust mass and power margins. The EJSM mission architecture provides the opti-mal balance between science, risk, and cost using three guiding principles: achieve Decadal science; builds on lessons learned; and leverages international collabora-tions.

  3. Observational Constraints on Theories of Planet Migration and Dynamical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason; Johnson, John; Marcy, Geoff

    2010-05-01

    We review the latest statistics of the orbital elements of the over 350 giant planets detected by radial velocity surveys around nearby stars. The distributions of orbital elements of these planets show several curious features including: the familiar "3-day pileup" among lower-mass singleton giant exoplanets; a "1 AU jump" among singleton super-Jupiters; indistinguishable eccentricity distributions between singleton planets and those in multiplanet systems; a preference for circular orbits among sub-Jupiter planets; a flat log-orbital-distance distribution among planets in multiple systems; and a lack of close-in planets orbiting subgiant and giant stars. Since nearly all of the detected giant exoplanets have experienced significant migration, these features form important clues to the nature of migration, and ultimately provide tests for successful theories of planetary migration and dynamical evolution.

  4. Stability of Earth-mass Planets in the Kepler-68 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.

    2015-11-01

    A key component of characterizing multi-planet exosystems is testing the orbital stability based on the observed properties. Such characterization not only tests the validity of how observations are interpreted but can also place additional constraints upon the properties of the detected planets. The Kepler mission has identified hundreds of multi-planet systems but there are a few that have additional non-transiting planets and also have well characterized host stars. Kepler-68 is one such system for which we are able to provide a detailed study of the orbital dynamics. We use the stellar parameters to calculate the extent of the habitable zone (HZ) for this system, showing that the outer planet lies within that region. We use N-body integrations to study the orbital stability of the system, in particular placing an orbital inclination constraint on the outer planet of i > 5°. Finally, we present the results of an exhaustive stability simulation that investigates possible locations of stable orbits for an Earth-mass planet. We show that there are several islands of stability within the HZ that could harbor such a planet, most particularly at the 2:3 mean motion resonance with the outer planet.

  5. CONSEQUENCES OF THE EJECTION AND DISRUPTION OF GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Lin, Douglas

    2011-05-10

    The discovery of Jupiter-mass planets in close orbits about their parent stars has challenged models of planet formation. Recent observations have shown that a number of these planets have highly inclined, sometimes retrograde orbits about their parent stars, prompting much speculation as to their origin. It is known that migration alone cannot account for the observed population of these misaligned hot Jupiters, which suggests that dynamical processes after the gas disk dissipates play a substantial role in yielding the observed inclination and eccentricity distributions. One particularly promising candidate is planet-planet scattering, which is not very well understood in the nonlinear regime of tides. Through three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of multi-orbit encounters, we show that planets that are scattered into an orbit about their parent stars with closest approach distance being less than approximately three times the tidal radius are either destroyed or completely ejected from the system. We find that as few as 9 and as many as 12 of the currently known hot Jupiters have a maximum initial apastron for scattering that lies well within the ice line, implying that these planets must have migrated either before or after the scattering event that brought them to their current positions. If stellar tides are unimportant (Q{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 7}), disk migration is required to explain the existence of the hot Jupiters present in these systems. Additionally, we find that the disruption and/or ejection of Jupiter-mass planets deposits a Sun's worth of angular momentum onto the host star. For systems in which planet-planet scattering is common, we predict that planetary hosts have up to a 35% chance of possessing an obliquity relative to the invariable plane of greater than 90{sup 0}.

  6. Atmospheric escape by magnetically driven wind from gaseous planets

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yuki A.; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the mass loss driven by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves from hot Jupiters by using MHD simulations in one-dimensional flux tubes. If a gaseous planet has a magnetic field, MHD waves are excited by turbulence at the surface, dissipate in the upper atmosphere, and drive gas outflows. Our calculation shows that mass-loss rates are comparable to the observed mass-loss rates of hot Jupiters; therefore, it is suggested that gas flow driven by MHD waves can play an important role in the mass loss from gaseous planets. The mass-loss rate varies dramatically with the radius and mass of a planet: a gaseous planet with a small mass but an inflated radius produces a very large mass-loss rate. We also derive an analytical expression for the dependence of mass-loss rate on planet radius and mass that is in good agreement with the numerical calculation. The mass-loss rate also depends on the amplitude of the velocity dispersion at the surface of a planet. Thus, we expect to infer the condition of the surface and the internal structure of a gaseous planet from future observations of mass-loss rate from various exoplanets.

  7. A Day on Jupiter (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This 'movie' strings 11 images of Jupiter captured by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was about 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The sequence covers a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter, during which the moons Ganymede and Io -- as well as the shadows they cast on Jupiter -- move across the camera's field of view.

  8. ORBITAL MIGRATION OF INTERACTING LOW-MASS PLANETS IN EVOLUTIONARY RADIATIVE TURBULENT MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Brandon; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Lyra, Wladimir; Sandor, Zsolt E-mail: wlyra@amnh.org E-mail: zsolt.sandor@uibk.ac.at

    2012-05-01

    The torques exerted by a locally isothermal disk on an embedded planet lead to rapid inward migration. Recent work has shown that modeling the thermodynamics without the assumption of local isothermality reveals regions where the net torque on an embedded planet is positive, leading to outward migration of the planet. When a region with negative torque lies directly exterior to this, planets in the inner region migrate outward and planets in the outer region migrate inward, converging where the torque is zero. We incorporate the torques from an evolving non-isothermal disk into an N-body simulation to examine the behavior of planets or planetary embryos interacting in the convergence zone. We find that mutual interactions do not eject objects from the convergence zone. Small numbers of objects in a laminar disk settle into near resonant orbits that remain stable over the 10 Myr periods that we examine. However, either or both increasing the number of planets or including a correlated, stochastic force to represent turbulence drives orbit crossings and mergers in the convergence zone. These processes can build gas giant cores with masses of order 10 Earth masses from sub-Earth mass embryos in 2-3 Myr.

  9. RESOLVING THE sin(I) DEGENERACY IN LOW-MASS MULTI-PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Gregory

    2011-04-01

    Long-term orbital evolution of multi-planet systems under tidal dissipation often converges to a stationary state, known as the tidal fixed point. The fixed point is characterized by a lack of oscillations in the eccentricities and apsidal alignment among the orbits. Quantitatively, the nature of the fixed point is dictated by mutual interactions among the planets as well as non-Keplerian effects. We show that if a roughly coplanar system hosts a hot, sub-Saturn mass planet, and is tidally relaxed, separation of planet-planet interactions and non-Keplerian effects in the equations of motion leads to a direct determination of the true masses of the planets. Consequently, a 'snap-shot' observational determination of the orbital state resolves the sin(I) degeneracy and opens up a direct avenue toward identification of the true lowest-mass exoplanets detected. We present an approximate, as well as a general, mathematical framework for computation of the line-of-sight inclination of secular systems, and apply our models illustratively to the 61 Vir system. We conclude by discussing the observability of planetary systems to which our method is applicable and we set our analysis into a broader context by presenting a current summary of the various possibilities for determining the physical properties of planets from observations of their orbital states.

  10. A Definition of Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand-Manterola, H. J.

    2005-12-01

    It had proposed some definitions about what a planet is. It seems clear that the planet's mass superior limit should be lower than the threshold for deuterium thermonuclear fusion. However the inferior limit is more elusive. It had proposed either Pluto's mass or the minimum mass to produce a spherical form. The Working Group on Extrasolar Planets (WGESP) of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) gives the next definition of a planet: 'Object with the true mass below the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium (currently calculate to be 13 Jupiter masses for objects of solar metalicity) that orbit stars or stellar remanents (no matter how they formed). The minimum mass/size required for an extrasolar object to be considered a planet should be the same as that used in our Solar System' . The definition gave by Marcy and Butler (2000) is: 'A planet is an object that has a mass between that of Pluto and the Deuterium-burning threshold and that forms in orbit around an object that can generate energy by nuclear reactions' These definitions are not satisfactory because they have some statements that are not clear. By example, the minimum mass the IAU group defines in term of the minimum mass to the Solar System but this is not defined in the first instance, unless we take the mass of Pluto as defined by Marcy and Butler. But why the mass of Pluto should be the minimum mass? Which is the physical reason to choose this one as the minimum of mass? On the other hand the two definitions state that the planets should be orbiting around either a star or a stellar remanent. What with the satellites? Are they planets or not? The geological and geophysical similarity of the larger satellites with the terrestrial planets shows that both, planets and satellites, are specimens of the same class of objects. In this work it is proposed that the definition of a planet will be made taking into account its geophysical characteristics and no by its position or neighborhood. The threshold mass of nuclear reaction is a physical feature and then it is suitable for the definition. The spherical form is another physical feature that is determinate by the strength of the gravity field and it is not produced in smaller bodies where material cohesion is stronger than gravity and could maintain irregular forms, then the nearly spherical form it is proposed as a criterion to define the minimum mass of the planets. The bodies that until now had been recognized as planets are all differentiated in their interior and this feature is function of the mass since with very small bodies the process of differentiation could not be produced. By all these the definition that here it is proposed is as follows: Planet is a body, no matter how they formed, no matter which is the place or neighborhood it take up, that have a mass below the threshold mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium and a mass sufficiently larger to have a spherical form and a differentiated interior both induced gravitationally. This definition includes all the bodies of the Solar System that until now it had been considered as planets. Accepting this definition it could grown the number of planets in our system including some of the new uncovered trans-Neptunian objects like Xena, Sedna and Quaoar (if it is demonstrated that there are spherical and differentiated), and some asteroids like Vesta that have spherical form and seem to be differentiated.

  11. A HOT GAP AROUND JUPITER'S ORBIT IN THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Choukroun, M.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Bryden, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Sun was an order of magnitude more luminous during the first few hundred thousand years of its existence, due in part to the gravitational energy released by material accreting from the solar nebula. If Jupiter was already near its present mass, the planet's tides opened an optically thin gap in the nebula. Using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that sunlight absorbed by the nebula and re-radiated into the gap raised temperatures well above the sublimation threshold for water ice, with potentially drastic consequences for the icy bodies in Jupiter's feeding zone. Bodies up to a meter in size were vaporized within a single orbit if the planet was near its present location during this early epoch. Dust particles lost their ice mantles, and planetesimals were partially to fully devolatilized, depending on their size. Scenarios in which Jupiter formed promptly, such as those involving a gravitational instability of the massive early nebula, must cope with the high temperatures. Enriching Jupiter in the noble gases through delivery trapped in clathrate hydrates will be more difficult, but might be achieved by either forming the planet much farther from the star or capturing planetesimals at later epochs. The hot gap resulting from an early origin for Jupiter also would affect the surface compositions of any primordial Trojan asteroids.

  12. Companion-driven dynamics in hot Jupiter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry; Batygin, Konstantin; Knutson, Heather A.; Lewis, Nikole K.; de Wit, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Hot Jupiters are giant planets found on orbits that lie in close proximity to their host stars. In this region, the process of tidal dissipation is believed to be generally efficient, and should act to circularize planetary orbits on timescales much shorter than the inferred ages of the observed stars. However, at time of writing, one in six known hot Jupiters have eccentricities inconsistent with zero at the three sigma level and about one in twelve have eccentricities greater than 0.2. This discrepancy hints at the existence of a dynamical mechanism that acts to maintain hot Jupiter eccentricities in face of tidal dissipation for extended periods of time. Our recent radial velocity (RV) and direct imaging surveys find that 70% of hot Jupiter systems are expected to host a distant planetary or stellar mass companion. In this work, we examine whether dynamical interactions with these long period companions could be responsible for the excited hot Jupiter eccentricities. Specifically, we consider the one of the most eccentric known hot Jupiter systems, HAT-P-2, as a case study. The inner planet in this system has a mass approximately ten times that of Jupiter, a semi-major axis of 0.07 AU, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.5. Long-term radial velocity monitoring has revealed the presence of an even more massive outer companion located beyond 4 AU with a partially constrained orbit. We examine different dynamical scenarios for this system in order to determine whether or not this outer companion might be responsible for the inner planet's unusually large orbital eccentricity, and make predictions for the short-term orbital evolution of the system.

  13. Planet Traps and Planetary Cores: Origins of the Planet-Metallicity Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2014-10-01

    Massive exoplanets are observed preferentially around high metallicity ([Fe/H]) stars while low-mass exoplanets do not show such an effect. This so-called planet-metallicity correlation generally favors the idea that most observed gas giants at r < 10 AU are formed via a core accretion process. We investigate the origin of this phenomenon using a semi-analytical model, wherein the standard core accretion takes place at planet traps in protostellar disks where rapid type I migrators are halted. We focus on the three major exoplanetary populationshot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters located at r ~= 1 AU, and the low-mass planets. We show using a statistical approach that the planet-metallicity correlations are well reproduced in these models. We find that there are specific transition metallicities with values [Fe/H] = -0.2 to -0.4, below which the low-mass population dominates, and above which the Jovian populations take over. The exo-Jupiters significantly exceed the hot Jupiter population at all observed metallicities. The low-mass planets formed via the core accretion are insensitive to metallicity, which may account for a large fraction of the observed super-Earths and hot-Neptunes. Finally, a controlling factor in building massive planets is the critical mass of planetary cores (M c, crit) that regulates the onset of rapid gas accretion. Assuming the current data is roughly complete at [Fe/H] > -0.6, our models predict that the most likely value of the "mean" critical core mass of Jovian planets is langM c, critrang ~= 5 M ? rather than 10 M ?. This implies that grain opacities in accreting envelopes should be reduced in order to lower M c, crit.

  14. Planet traps and planetary cores: origins of the planet-metallicity correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2014-10-10

    Massive exoplanets are observed preferentially around high metallicity ([Fe/H]) stars while low-mass exoplanets do not show such an effect. This so-called planet-metallicity correlation generally favors the idea that most observed gas giants at r < 10 AU are formed via a core accretion process. We investigate the origin of this phenomenon using a semi-analytical model, wherein the standard core accretion takes place at planet traps in protostellar disks where rapid type I migrators are halted. We focus on the three major exoplanetary populations—hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters located at r ≅ 1 AU, and the low-mass planets. We show using a statistical approach that the planet-metallicity correlations are well reproduced in these models. We find that there are specific transition metallicities with values [Fe/H] = –0.2 to –0.4, below which the low-mass population dominates, and above which the Jovian populations take over. The exo-Jupiters significantly exceed the hot Jupiter population at all observed metallicities. The low-mass planets formed via the core accretion are insensitive to metallicity, which may account for a large fraction of the observed super-Earths and hot-Neptunes. Finally, a controlling factor in building massive planets is the critical mass of planetary cores (M {sub c,} {sub crit}) that regulates the onset of rapid gas accretion. Assuming the current data is roughly complete at [Fe/H] > –0.6, our models predict that the most likely value of the 'mean' critical core mass of Jovian planets is (M {sub c,} {sub crit}) ≅ 5 M {sub ⊕} rather than 10 M {sub ⊕}. This implies that grain opacities in accreting envelopes should be reduced in order to lower M {sub c,} {sub crit}.

  15. GAP OPENING BY EXTREMELY LOW-MASS PLANETS IN A VISCOUS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I. E-mail: macfadyen@nyu.edu

    2013-05-20

    By numerically integrating the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions, we calculate the criterion for gap formation by a very low mass (q {approx} 10{sup -4}) protoplanet on a fixed orbit in a thin viscous disk. In contrast with some previously proposed gap-opening criteria, we find that a planet can open a gap even if the Hill radius is smaller than the disk scale height. Moreover, in the low-viscosity limit, we find no minimum mass necessary to open a gap for a planet held on a fixed orbit. In particular, a Neptune-mass planet will open a gap in a minimum mass solar nebula with suitably low viscosity ({alpha} {approx}< 10{sup -4}). We find that the mass threshold scales as the square root of viscosity in the low mass regime. This is because the gap width for critical planet masses in this regime is a fixed multiple of the scale height, not of the Hill radius of the planet.

  16. Exoplanet dynamics. Asynchronous rotation of Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone of lower-mass stars.

    PubMed

    Leconte, Jrmy; Wu, Hanbo; Menou, Kristen; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-01

    Planets in the habitable zone of lower-mass stars are often assumed to be in a state of tidally synchronized rotation, which would considerably affect their putative habitability. Although thermal tides cause Venus to rotate retrogradely, simple scaling arguments tend to attribute this peculiarity to the massive Venusian atmosphere. Using a global climate model, we show that even a relatively thin atmosphere can drive terrestrial planets' rotation away from synchronicity. We derive a more realistic atmospheric tide model that predicts four asynchronous equilibrium spin states, two being stable, when the amplitude of the thermal tide exceeds a threshold that is met for habitable Earth-like planets with a 1-bar atmosphere around stars more massive than ~0.5 to 0.7 solar mass. Thus, many recently discovered terrestrial planets could exhibit asynchronous spin-orbit rotation, even with a thin atmosphere. PMID:25592420

  17. Jupiter's Role in Sculpting the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoz, Smadar

    2015-03-01

    Recent observations made by the Kepler space mission, combined with statistical analysis of existing ground and space-based data, have shown that planets somewhat bigger than the Earth - but substantially smaller than Jupiter - ;are extremely common in our Galaxy (1-4). These systems are typically found to be tightly packed, nearly coplanar, and have nearly circular orbits. Furthermore, these planets tend to have very short-period orbits, ranging from days to months. In contrast, our innermost planet, Mercury, orbits the Sun once every 88 d. Thus, taken at face value, these observations imply that the architecture of our Solar System is unique compared with the galactic population. In other words, why are there no short-period planets in our Solar System? In PNAS, Batygin and Laughlin (5) demonstrate that Jupiter is to blame. In particular, Jupiter's inward-followed-by-outward migration during the Solar System's early evolution could have driven a collisional cascade that would grind planetesimals to smaller size. Gas drag, which dominates these small planetesimals, may then have driven preexisting short-period planets into the Sun. Thus, Batygin and Laughlin (5) suggest that the terrestrial planets in our Solar System are in fact "second-generation planets," which formed after the first short-period planets were destroyed, in mass-dispersed, gas-depleted conditions (see Fig. 1 for the description of the scenario). The developed model suggests that systems with short-period Earth and super-Earth planets are anticorrelated with the existence of giant planets within the same system.

  18. The Metallicity of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorngren, Daniel P.; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Unique clues about the formation processes of giant planets can be found in their bulk compositions. Transiting planets provide us with bulk density determinations that can then be compared to models of planetary structure and evolution, to deduce planet bulk metallicities. At a given mass, denser planets have a higher mass fraction of metals. However, the unknown hot Jupiter "radius inflation" mechanism leads to under-dense planets that severely biases this work. Here we look at cooler transiting gas giants (Teff < 1000 K), which do not exhibit the radius inflation effect seen in their warmer cousins. We identified 40 such planets between 20 M_Earth and 20 M_Jup from the literature and used evolution models to determine their bulk heavy-element ("metal") mass. Several important trends are apparent. We see that all planets have at least ~10 M_Earth of metals, and that the mass of metal correlates strongly with the total mass of the planet. The heavy-element mass goes as the square root of the total mass. Both findings are consistent with the core accretion model. We also examined the effect of the parent star metallicity [Fe/H], finding that planets around high-metallicity stars are more likely to have large amounts of metal, but the relation appears weaker than previous studies with smaller sample sizes had suggested. We also looked for connections between bulk composition and planetary orbital parameters and stellar parameters, but saw no pattern, which is also an important result. This work can be directly compared to current and future outputs from planet formation models, including population synthesis.

  19. EVIDENCE FROM THE ASTEROID BELT FOR A VIOLENT PAST EVOLUTION OF JUPITER'S ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Brasser, Ramon; Gomes, Rodney; Levison, Harold F.; Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2010-11-15

    We use the current orbital structure of large (>50 km) asteroids in the main asteroid belt to constrain the evolution of the giant planets when they migrated from their primordial orbits to their current ones. Minton and Malhotra showed that the orbital distribution of large asteroids in the main belt can be reproduced by an exponentially decaying migration of the giant planets on a timescale of {tau} {approx} 0.5 Myr. However, self-consistent numerical simulations show that the planetesimal-driven migration of the giant planets is inconsistent with an exponential change in their semi-major axes on such a short timescale. In fact, the typical timescale is {tau} {>=} 5 Myr. When giant planet migration on this timescale is applied to the asteroid belt, the resulting orbital distribution is incompatible with the observed one. However, the planet migration can be significantly sped up by planet-planet encounters. Consider an evolution where both Jupiter and Saturn have close encounters with a Neptune-mass planet (presumably Uranus or Neptune itself) and where this third planet, after being scattered inward by Saturn, is scattered outward by Jupiter. This scenario leads to a very rapid increase in the orbital separation between Jupiter and Saturn which we show here to have only mild effects on the structure of the asteroid belt. This type of evolution is called a 'jumping-Jupiter' case. Our results suggest that the total mass and dynamical excitation of the asteroid belt before migration were comparable to those currently observed. Moreover, they imply that, before migration, the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn were much less eccentric than their current ones.

  20. The effect of stellar evolution on migrating warm jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frewen, S. F. N.; Hansen, B. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Warm jupiters are an unexpected population of extrasolar planets that are too near to their host to have formed in situ, but distant enough to retain a significant eccentricity in the face of tidal damping. These planets are curiously absent around stars larger than two solar radii. We hypothesize that the warm jupiters are migrating due to Kozai-Lidov oscillations, which lead to transient episodes of high eccentricity and a consequent tidal decay. As their host evolves, such planets would be rapidly dragged in or engulfed at minimum periapse, leading to a dramatic depletion of this population with increasing stellar radius, as is observed. Using numerical simulations, we determine the relationship between periapse distance and orbital migration rate for planets 0.1-10 Jupiter masses and with orbital periods between 10 and 100 d. We find that Kozai-Lidov oscillations effectively result in planetary removal early in the evolution of the host star, possibly accounting for the observed deficit. While the observed eccentricity distribution is inconsistent with the simulated distribution for an oscillating and migrating warm jupiter population, observational biases may explain the discrepancy.

  1. Jupiter Polar Winds Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Bands of eastward and westward winds on Jupiter appear as concentric rotating circles in this movie composed of Cassini spacecraft images that have been re-projected as if the viewer were looking down at Jupiter's north pole and the planet were flattened.

    The sequence covers 70 days, from October 1 to December 9, 2000. Cassini's narrow-angle camera captured the images of Jupiter's atmosphere in the near-infrared region of the spectrum.

    What is surprising in this view is the coherent nature of the high-latitude flows, despite the very chaotic, mottled and non-banded appearance of the planet's polar regions. This is the first extended movie sequence to show the coherence and longevity of winds near the pole and the features blown around the planet by them.

    There are thousands of spots, each an active storm similar to the size to the largest of storms on Earth. Large terrestrial storms usually last only a week before they dissolve and are replaced by other storms. But many of the Jovian storms seen here, while occasionally changing latitude or merging with each other, persist for the entire 70 days. Until now, the lifetime of the high-latitude features was unknown. Their longevity is a mystery of Jovian weather.

    Cassini collected images of Jupiter for months before and after it passed the planet on December 30, 2000. Six or more images of the planet in each of several spectral filters were taken at evenly spaced intervals over the course of Jupiter's 10-hour rotation period. The entire sequence was repeated generally every other Jupiter rotation, yielding views of every sector of the planet at least once every 20 hours.

    The images used for the movie shown here were taken every 20 hours through a filter centered at a wavelength of 756 nanometers, where there are almost no absorptions in the planet's atmosphere. The images covering each rotation were mosaiced together to form a cylindrical map extending from 75 degrees north to 75 degrees south in latitude and covering 360 degrees in longitude. The movie consists of 84 such maps, spanning 70 Earth days in time or 168 Jupiter rotations.

    Transforming the cylindrical maps into polar stereographic projections produces a movie of what Jupiter would look like if viewed from the pole. Jupiter's alternating eastward and westward jet streams flow in concentric rings around the pole, with equatorial motions visible in the corners. The dark features flowing counterclockwise near the equator are'hot spots' where cloud cover is relatively thin.

    The high-latitude movements call into question one notion concerning wind circulation on Jupiter. The model in question suggests that Jupiter'a alternating bands of east-west winds are the exposed edges of deeper rotating cylinders that extend north-south through the planet. However, the east-west winds that the movie shows in polar regions don't fit that model. The cylinders whose edges would form those bands would have to go through the innermost portion of the planet, where the cylinders' different rotations could not be maintained. Jupiter's wind pattern may involve a mix of rotation-on-cylinders near the equator and some other circulation mechanism near the poles.

    For more information, see the Cassini Project home page, http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/cassini/ and the Cassini Imaging Team home page, http://ciclops.lpl.arizona.edu/ciclops/ .

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  2. Jupiter Formed with More Tar than Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodders, Katharina

    2004-08-01

    Elemental abundances in Jupiter determined from Galileo probe measurements are compared to recently revised solar system abundances. When normalized to the abundance of sulfur, the most abundant refractory rock-forming element reliably determined in Jupiter's atmosphere by the Galileo probe, abundances of argon, krypton, and xenon are 1 times solar, the observed oxygen is depleted by a factor of 4, and carbon is enriched 1.7 times. The fairly uncertain nitrogen abundance ranges from 1 to 3 times solar. The oxygen abundance in Jupiter derived from the observed atmospheric water abundance is only a lower limit to the total planetary oxygen because oxygen is also bound to rock-forming elements such as magnesium or silicon sequestered deep in the planet. The sulfur abundance constrains the amount of rock-forming elements on Jupiter. Considering the amount of oxygen bound to silicate rock, the total oxygen abundance on Jupiter of 0.47 times solar system indicates an overall oxygen depletion by about a factor of 2. The hydrogen and helium abundances in the Jovian atmosphere are depleted (0.48 and 0.39 times solar system, respectively). These relative depletions may indicate the extent of hydrogen and helium partitioning from the molecular envelope into Jupiter's metallic layer. A formation scenario for Jupiter is proposed to explain the relative oxygen depletion and, at the same time, the relative carbon enrichment. In essence, the model assumes that at the time of Jupiter's formation, abundant carbonaceous matter was present near 5.2 AU rather than abundant water ice, increasing the surface mass density of solids in the solar nebula accretion disk. Carbonaceous matter, which has high sticking probabilities, was the agent that sped up accumulation of solid matter of proto-Jupiter. This led to runaway accretion of the planet. Major consequences of this scenario are that the water ice condensation front (the snow line) typically placed near 5.2 AU in solar nebula models must be replaced by a carbonaceous condensation/evaporation front (the ``tar line'') and that the snow line is located farther out in the solar nebula.

  3. THE EFFECT OF PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING ON THE SURVIVAL OF EXOMOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yanxiang; Zhou Jilin; Xie Jiwei; Wu Xiaomei E-mail: yxgong@nju.edu.cn

    2013-05-20

    Compared to the giant planets in the solar system, exoplanets have many remarkable properties, such as the prevalence of giant planets on eccentric orbits and the presence of hot Jupiters. Planet-planet scattering (PPS) between giant planets is a possible mechanism to interpret the above and other observed properties. If the observed giant planet architectures are indeed outcomes of PPS, such a drastic dynamical process must affect their primordial moon systems. In this Letter, we discuss the effect of PPS on the survival of exoplanets' regular moons. From an observational viewpoint, some preliminary conclusions are drawn from the simulations. (1) PPS is a destructive process to the moon systems; single planets on eccentric orbits are not ideal moon-search targets. (2) If hot Jupiters formed through PPS, their original moons have little chance of survival. (3) Planets in multiple systems with small eccentricities are more likely to hold their primordial moons. (4) Compared with lower-mass planets, massive planets in multiple systems may not be the preferred moon-search targets if the system underwent a PPS history.

  4. Water Ice Lines and the Formation of Giant Moons around Super-Jovian Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, René; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Most of the exoplanets with known masses at Earth-like distances to Sun-like stars are heavier than Jupiter, which raises the question of whether such planets are accompanied by detectable, possibly habitable moons. Here we simulate the accretion disks around super-Jovian planets and find that giant moons with masses similar to Mars can form. Our results suggest that the Galilean moons formed during the final stages of accretion onto Jupiter, when the circumjovian disk was sufficiently cool. In contrast to other studies, with our assumptions, we show that Jupiter was still feeding from the circumsolar disk and that its principal moons cannot have formed after the complete photoevaporation of the circumsolar nebula. To counteract the steady loss of moons into the planet due to type I migration, we propose that the water ice line around Jupiter and super-Jovian exoplanets acted as a migration trap for moons. Heat transitions, however, cross the disk during the gap opening within ≈104 years, which makes them inefficient as moon traps and indicates a fundamental difference between planet and moon formation. We find that icy moons larger than the smallest known exoplanet can form at about 15-30 Jupiter radii around super-Jovian planets. Their size implies detectability by the Kepler and PLATO space telescopes as well as by the European Extremely Large Telescope. Observations of such giant exomoons would be a novel gateway to understanding planet formation, as moons carry information about the accretion history of their planets.

  5. Constraint of a planet mass from the depth and width of an observed gap on a protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro; Muto, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku

    2015-12-01

    In a protoplanetary disk, a large planet is able to create the so-called disk gap, which is a low gas density region along the planet's orbit, due to the gravitational interaction between the disc and the planet. The gap formation induced by the giant planet is a possible mechanism to explain the formation of the so-called pre-transition disks with a ring gap structure. If the gap is created by the planet, the gap shape, i.e., the depth and width, would represent the mass and location of the planet. At the present stage, many pre-transition disks have been observed by e.g., ALMA and Subaru telescopes. It is important for us to examine what properties of the planet are constrained from the observed gap if the planet is in the gap.We derived the relation between the depth of the observed gap and the planet mass in the gap based on the analytical model (Kanagawa et al. 2015a). This relation is a powerful tool to estimate the planet mass from the direct imaging of gaps in protoplanetary disks. We also applied this relation to the image of HL Tau' disk given by a part of the 2014 ALMA long baseline camphene and estimate the planet masses (Kanagawa et al 2015b).We also performed the numerical hydrodynamic simulation with the FARGO which is well-known code for the rotation disk, and found that the gap width becomes wider with a square root of the planet mass. Using this empirical relation for the gap width, we can also constrain the planet mass from the gap width.I'll talk about the relation between the gap depth, width and the planet, and the method for estimating the planet mass from the observed image of the disks.

  6. Diffusivity of heavy elements in Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Hugh F.

    2015-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that gas giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn may not consist of a small number of fully convective and chemically homogenous layers as has been conventionally assumed, but instead may be chemically inhomogeneous with convective redistribution of elements limited by semiconvection. Constructing accurate planetary models which include semiconvective processes requires accurate estimates of the diffusion constants of minority chemical species in planetary fluids, which have not previously been available. In this work we use ab initio density functional molecular dynamics simulations to simulate the diffusion of heavy elements (specifically carbon, silicon, iron) in hydrogen-helium mixtures at conditions corresponding to giant planet deep interiors. We find diffusivities at the high end of the previously proposed range, and estimate that semiconvective processes may be able to redistribute a substantial fraction of Jupiter's core mass within the planet's age.

  7. Planet hunters. VII. Discovery of a new low-mass, low-density planet (PH3 C) orbiting Kepler-289 with mass measurements of two additional planets (PH3 B and D)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Fischer, Debra A.; Wang, Ji; Margossian, Charles; Brewer, John M.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Gazak, J. Zachary; Holman, Matthew J.; Jek, Kian J.; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; and others

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of one newly confirmed planet (P = 66.06 days, R {sub P} = 2.68 ± 0.17 R {sub ⊕}) and mass determinations of two previously validated Kepler planets, Kepler-289 b (P = 34.55 days, R {sub P} = 2.15 ± 0.10 R {sub ⊕}) and Kepler-289-c (P = 125.85 days, R {sub P} = 11.59 ± 0.10 R {sub ⊕}), through their transit timing variations (TTVs). We also exclude the possibility that these three planets reside in a 1:2:4 Laplace resonance. The outer planet has very deep (∼1.3%), high signal-to-noise transits, which puts extremely tight constraints on its host star's stellar properties via Kepler's Third Law. The star PH3 is a young (∼1 Gyr as determined by isochrones and gyrochronology), Sun-like star with M {sub *} = 1.08 ± 0.02 M {sub ☉}, R {sub *} = 1.00 ± 0.02 R {sub ☉}, and T {sub eff} = 5990 ± 38 K. The middle planet's large TTV amplitude (∼5 hr) resulted either in non-detections or inaccurate detections in previous searches. A strong chopping signal, a shorter period sinusoid in the TTVs, allows us to break the mass-eccentricity degeneracy and uniquely determine the masses of the inner, middle, and outer planets to be M = 7.3 ± 6.8 M {sub ⊕}, 4.0 ± 0.9M {sub ⊕}, and M = 132 ± 17 M {sub ⊕}, which we designate PH3 b, c, and d, respectively. Furthermore, the middle planet, PH3 c, has a relatively low density, ρ = 1.2 ± 0.3 g cm{sup –3} for a planet of its mass, requiring a substantial H/He atmosphere of 2.1{sub −0.3}{sup +0.8}% by mass, and joins a growing population of low-mass, low-density planets.

  8. Galilean Moons, Kepler's Third Law, and the Mass of Jupiter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of physical systems are widely available online, with no cost, and are ready to be used in our classrooms. Such simulations offer an accessible tool that can be used for a range of interactive learning activities. The Jovian Moons Apple allows the user to track the position of Jupiter's four Galilean moons with a variety of

  9. Galilean Moons, Kepler's Third Law, and the Mass of Jupiter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of physical systems are widely available online, with no cost, and are ready to be used in our classrooms. Such simulations offer an accessible tool that can be used for a range of interactive learning activities. The Jovian Moons Apple allows the user to track the position of Jupiter's four Galilean moons with a variety of…

  10. FORMATION OF GIANT PLANETS BY DISK INSTABILITY ON WIDE ORBITS AROUND PROTOSTARS WITH VARIED MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2011-04-10

    Doppler surveys have shown that more massive stars have significantly higher frequencies of giant planets inside {approx}3 AU than lower mass stars, consistent with giant planet formation by core accretion. Direct imaging searches have begun to discover significant numbers of giant planet candidates around stars with masses of {approx}1 M{sub sun} to {approx}2 M{sub sun} at orbital distances of {approx}20 AU to {approx}120 AU. Given the inability of core accretion to form giant planets at such large distances, gravitational instabilities of the gas disk leading to clump formation have been suggested as the more likely formation mechanism. Here, we present five new models of the evolution of disks with inner radii of 20 AU and outer radii of 60 AU, for central protostars with masses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 M{sub sun}, in order to assess the likelihood of planet formation on wide orbits around stars with varied masses. The disk masses range from 0.028 M{sub sun} to 0.21 M{sub sun}, with initial Toomre Q stability values ranging from 1.1 in the inner disks to {approx}1.6 in the outer disks. These five models show that disk instability is capable of forming clumps on timescales of {approx}10{sup 3} yr that, if they survive for longer times, could form giant planets initially on orbits with semimajor axes of {approx}30 AU to {approx}70 AU and eccentricities of {approx}0 to {approx}0.35, with initial masses of {approx}1 M{sub Jup} to {approx}5 M{sub Jup}, around solar-type stars, with more protoplanets forming as the mass of the protostar (and protoplanetary disk) is increased. In particular, disk instability appears to be a likely formation mechanism for the HR 8799 gas giant planetary system.

  11. Discovery and spectroscopy of the young jovian planet 51 Eri b with the Gemini Planet Imager.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, B; Graham, J R; Barman, T; De Rosa, R J; Konopacky, Q; Marley, M S; Marois, C; Nielsen, E L; Pueyo, L; Rajan, A; Rameau, J; Saumon, D; Wang, J J; Patience, J; Ammons, M; Arriaga, P; Artigau, E; Beckwith, S; Brewster, J; Bruzzone, S; Bulger, J; Burningham, B; Burrows, A S; Chen, C; Chiang, E; Chilcote, J K; Dawson, R I; Dong, R; Doyon, R; Draper, Z H; Duchêne, G; Esposito, T M; Fabrycky, D; Fitzgerald, M P; Follette, K B; Fortney, J J; Gerard, B; Goodsell, S; Greenbaum, A Z; Hibon, P; Hinkley, S; Cotten, T H; Hung, L-W; Ingraham, P; Johnson-Groh, M; Kalas, P; Lafreniere, D; Larkin, J E; Lee, J; Line, M; Long, D; Maire, J; Marchis, F; Matthews, B C; Max, C E; Metchev, S; Millar-Blanchaer, M A; Mittal, T; Morley, C V; Morzinski, K M; Murray-Clay, R; Oppenheimer, R; Palmer, D W; Patel, R; Perrin, M D; Poyneer, L A; Rafikov, R R; Rantakyrö, F T; Rice, E L; Rojo, P; Rudy, A R; Ruffio, J-B; Ruiz, M T; Sadakuni, N; Saddlemyer, L; Salama, M; Savransky, D; Schneider, A C; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Song, I; Soummer, R; Thomas, S; Vasisht, G; Wallace, J K; Ward-Duong, K; Wiktorowicz, S J; Wolff, S G; Zuckerman, B

    2015-10-01

    Directly detecting thermal emission from young extrasolar planets allows measurement of their atmospheric compositions and luminosities, which are influenced by their formation mechanisms. Using the Gemini Planet Imager, we discovered a planet orbiting the ~20-million-year-old star 51 Eridani at a projected separation of 13 astronomical units. Near-infrared observations show a spectrum with strong methane and water-vapor absorption. Modeling of the spectra and photometry yields a luminosity (normalized by the luminosity of the Sun) of 1.6 to 4.0 × 10(-6) and an effective temperature of 600 to 750 kelvin. For this age and luminosity, "hot-start" formation models indicate a mass twice that of Jupiter. This planet also has a sufficiently low luminosity to be consistent with the "cold-start" core-accretion process that may have formed Jupiter. PMID:26272904

  12. Discovery and spectroscopy of the young jovian planet 51 Eri b with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.; Graham, J. R.; Barman, T.; De Rosa, R. J.; Konopacky, Q.; Marley, M. S.; Marois, C.; Nielsen, E. L.; Pueyo, L.; Rajan, A.; Rameau, J.; Saumon, D.; Wang, J. J.; Patience, J.; Ammons, M.; Arriaga, P.; Artigau, E.; Beckwith, S.; Brewster, J.; Bruzzone, S.; Bulger, J.; Burningham, B.; Burrows, A. S.; Chen, C.; Chiang, E.; Chilcote, J. K.; Dawson, R. I.; Dong, R.; Doyon, R.; Draper, Z. H.; Duchêne, G.; Esposito, T. M.; Fabrycky, D.; Fitzgerald, M. P.; Follette, K. B.; Fortney, J. J.; Gerard, B.; Goodsell, S.; Greenbaum, A. Z.; Hibon, P.; Hinkley, S.; Cotten, T. H.; Hung, L.-W.; Ingraham, P.; Johnson-Groh, M.; Kalas, P.; Lafreniere, D.; Larkin, J. E.; Lee, J.; Line, M.; Long, D.; Maire, J.; Marchis, F.; Matthews, B. C.; Max, C. E.; Metchev, S.; Millar-Blanchaer, M. A.; Mittal, T.; Morley, C. V.; Morzinski, K. M.; Murray-Clay, R.; Oppenheimer, R.; Palmer, D. W.; Patel, R.; Perrin, M. D.; Poyneer, L. A.; Rafikov, R. R.; Rantakyrö, F. T.; Rice, E. L.; Rojo, P.; Rudy, A. R.; Ruffio, J.-B.; Ruiz, M. T.; Sadakuni, N.; Saddlemyer, L.; Salama, M.; Savransky, D.; Schneider, A. C.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Song, I.; Soummer, R.; Thomas, S.; Vasisht, G.; Wallace, J. K.; Ward-Duong, K.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.; Wolff, S. G.; Zuckerman, B.

    2015-10-01

    Directly detecting thermal emission from young extrasolar planets allows measurement of their atmospheric compositions and luminosities, which are influenced by their formation mechanisms. Using the Gemini Planet Imager, we discovered a planet orbiting the ~20-million-year-old star 51 Eridani at a projected separation of 13 astronomical units. Near-infrared observations show a spectrum with strong methane and water-vapor absorption. Modeling of the spectra and photometry yields a luminosity (normalized by the luminosity of the Sun) of 1.6 to 4.0 × 10-6 and an effective temperature of 600 to 750 kelvin. For this age and luminosity, “hot-start” formation models indicate a mass twice that of Jupiter. This planet also has a sufficiently low luminosity to be consistent with the “cold-start” core-accretion process that may have formed Jupiter.

  13. Sharpening Up Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    New image-correction technique delivers sharpest whole-planet ground-based picture ever A record two-hour observation of Jupiter using a superior technique to remove atmospheric blur has produced the sharpest whole-planet picture ever taken from the ground. The series of 265 snapshots obtained with the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) prototype instrument mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal changes in Jupiter's smog-like haze, probably in response to a planet-wide upheaval more than a year ago. Sharpening Up Jupiter ESO PR Photo 33/08 Sharpening Up Jupiter Being able to correct wide field images for atmospheric distortions has been the dream of scientists and engineers for decades. The new images of Jupiter prove the value of the advanced technology used by MAD, which uses two or more guide stars instead of one as references to remove the blur caused by atmospheric turbulence over a field of view thirty times larger than existing techniques [1]. "This type of adaptive optics has a big advantage for looking at large objects, such as planets, star clusters or nebulae," says lead researcher Franck Marchis, from UC Berkeley and the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, USA. "While regular adaptive optics provides excellent correction in a small field of view, MAD provides good correction over a larger area of sky. And in fact, were it not for MAD, we would not have been able to perform these amazing observations." MAD allowed the researchers to observe Jupiter for almost two hours on 16 and 17 August 2008, a record duration, according to the observing team. Conventional adaptive optics systems using a single Jupiter moon as reference cannot monitor Jupiter for so long because the moon moves too far from the planet. The Hubble Space Telescope cannot observe Jupiter continuously for more than about 50 minutes, because its view is regularly blocked by the Earth during Hubble's 96-minute orbit. Using MAD, ESO astronomer Paola Amico, MAD project manager Enrico Marchetti and Sbastien Tordo from the MAD team tracked two of Jupiter's largest moons, Europa and Io - one on each side of the planet - to provide a good correction across the full disc of the planet. "It was the most challenging observation we performed with MAD, because we had to track with high accuracy two moons moving at different speeds, while simultaneously chasing Jupiter," says Marchetti. With this unique series of images, the team found a major alteration in the brightness of the equatorial haze, which lies in a 16 000-kilometre wide belt over Jupiter's equator [2]. More sunlight reflecting off upper atmospheric haze means that the amount of haze has increased, or that it has moved up to higher altitudes. "The brightest portion had shifted south by more than 6000 kilometres," explains team member Mike Wong. This conclusion came after comparison with images taken in 2005 by Wong and colleague Imke de Pater using the Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble images, taken at infrared wavelengths very close to those used for the VLT study, show more haze in the northern half of the bright Equatorial Zone, while the 2008 VLT images show a clear shift to the south. "The change we see in the haze could be related to big changes in cloud patterns associated with last year's planet-wide upheaval, but we need to look at more data to narrow down precisely when the changes occurred," declares Wong.

  14. MOA-2011-BLG-028Lb: A Neptune-mass Microlensing Planet in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; The OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration; Dominik, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Bozza, V.; Harpsøe, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Skottfelt, J.; The MiNDSTEp Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet orbiting a 0.8+/- 0.3{M}ȯ star in the Galactic bulge. The planet manifested itself during the microlensing event MOA-2011-BLG-028/OGLE-2011-BLG-0203 as a low-mass companion to the lens star. The analysis of the light curve provides the measurement of the mass ratio (1.2+/- 0.2)× {10}-4, which indicates that the mass of the planet is 12–60 Earth masses. The lensing system is located at 7.3 ± 0.7 kpc away from the Earth near the direction of Baade’s Window. The projected separation of the planet at the time of the microlensing event was 3.1–5.2 au. Although the microlens parallax effect is not detected in the light curve of this event, preventing the actual mass measurement, the uncertainties of mass and distance estimation are narrowed by the measurement of the source star proper motion on the OGLE-III images spanning eight years, and by the low amount of blended light seen, proving that the host star cannot be too bright and massive. We also discuss the inclusion of undetected parallax and orbital motion effects into the models and their influence onto the final physical parameters estimates. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3 m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory operated by the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  15. Measurement of Planet Masses with Transit Timing Variations Due to Synodic Chopping Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Katherine M.; Agol, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational interactions between planets in transiting exoplanetary systems lead to variations in the times of transit that are diagnostic of the planetary masses and the dynamical state of the system. Here we show that synodic chopping contributions to these transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used to uniquely measure the masses of planets without full dynamical analyses involving direct integration of the equations of motion. We present simple analytic formulae for the chopping signal, which are valid (generally \\lt 10% error) for modest eccentricities e? 0.1. Importantly, these formulae primarily depend on the mass of the perturbing planet, and therefore the chopping signal can be used to break the mass/free-eccentricity degeneracy, which can appear for systems near first-order mean motion resonances. Using a harmonic analysis, we apply these TTV formulae to a number of Kepler systems, which had been previously modeled with full dynamical analyses. We show that when chopping is measured, the masses of both planets can be determined uniquely, in agreement with previous results, but without the need for numerical orbit integrations. This demonstrates how mass measurements from TTVs may primarily arise from an observable chopping signal. The formula for chopping can also be used to predict the number of transits and timing precision required for future observations, such as those made by TESS or PLATO, in order to infer planetary masses through analysis of TTVs.

  16. Cold Hole Over Jupiter's Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations with two NASA telescopes show that Jupiter has an arctic polar vortex similar to a vortex over Earth's Antarctica that enables depletion of Earth's stratospheric ozone.

    These composite images of Jupiter's north polar region from the Hubble Space Telescope (right) and the Infrared Telescope Facility (left) show a quasi-hexagonal shape that extends vertically from the stratosphere down into the top of the troposphere. A sharp temperature drop, compared to surrounding air masses, creates an eastward wind that tends to keep the polar atmosphere, including the stratospheric haze, isolated from the rest of the atmosphere.

    The linear striations in the composite projections are artifacts of the image processing. The area closest to the pole has been omitted because it was too close to the edge of the planet in the original images to represent the planet reliably.

    The composite on the right combines images from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope taken at a wavelength of 890 nanometers, which shows stratospheric haze particles.

    The sharp boundary and wave-like structure of the haze layer suggest a polar vortex and a similarity to Earth's stratospheric polar clouds. Images of Jupiter's thermal radiation clinch that identification. The composite on the left, for example, is made from images taken with Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mid-Infrared Large-Well Imager at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility at a wavelength of 17 microns. It shows polar air mass that is 5 to 6 degrees Celsius (9 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit) colder than its surroundings, with the same border as the stratospheric haze. Similar observations at other infrared wavelengths show the cold air mass extends at least as high as the middle stratosphere down to the top of the troposphere.

    These images were taken Aug. 11 through Aug. 13, 1999, near a time when Jupiter's north pole was most visible from Earth. Other Infrared Telescope Facility images at frequencies sensitive to the polar haze were taken at frequent intervals from June to October 1999. They show that the quasi-hexagonal structure rotates slowly eastward at 1.2 degrees of longitude per day, a rate consistent with the average wind speeds measured from movement of visible clouds.

    Scientists studying the Earth's atmosphere are interested in these results because Jupiter's atmosphere provides a natural laboratory in which models of the polar vortex phenomenon can be studied under different conditions - for example, without the interference of topography. Of particular interest but yet unknown is how deep into Jupiter's troposphere the phenomenon extends. The answer to this question might be supplied by instrumentation on a polar orbiter mission at Jupiter.

    These images were taken as part of a program to support NASA's Galileo spacecraft reconnaissance of Jupiter. The Infrared Telescope Facility is on the summit of Hawaii's Mauna Kea and is operated by the University of Hawaii under a cooperative agreement with NASA. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. The telescope is managed by the Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The California Institute of Technology, Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

  17. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XV. KOI-614b, KOI-206b, and KOI-680b: a massive warm Jupiter orbiting a G0 metallic dwarf and two highly inflated planets with a distant companion around evolved F-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Damiani, C.; Bouchy, F.; Havel, M.; Bruno, G.; Hbrard, G.; Diaz, R. F.; Deleuil, M.; Barros, S. C. C.; Boisse, I.; Bonomo, A. S.; Montagnier, G.; Santerne, A.

    2015-03-01

    We report the validation and characterization of three new transiting exoplanets using SOPHIE radial velocities: KOI-614b, KOI-206b, and KOI-680b. KOI-614b has a mass of 2.86 0.35 MJup and a radius of 1.13 +0.26-0.18 RJup, and it orbits a G0, metallic ([ Fe/H ] = 0.35 0.15) dwarf in 12.9 days. Its mass and radius are familiar and compatible with standard planetary evolution models, so it is one of the few known transiting planets in this mass range to have an orbital period over ten days. With an equilibrium temperature of Teq = 1000 45 K, this places KOI-614b at the transition between what is usually referred to as "hot" and "warm" Jupiters. KOI-206b has a mass of 2.82 0.52 MJup and a radius of 1.45 0.16 RJup, and it orbits a slightly evolved F7-type star in a 5.3-day orbit. It is a massive inflated hot Jupiter that is particularly challenging for planetary models because it requires unusually large amounts of additional dissipated energy in the planet. On the other hand, KOI-680b has a much lower mass of 0.84 0.15 MJup and requires less extra-dissipation to explain its uncommonly large radius of 1.99 0.18 RJup. It is one of the biggest transiting planets characterized so far, and it orbits a subgiant F9-star well on its way to the red giant stage, with an orbital period of 8.6 days. With host stars of masses of 1.46 0.17 M? and 1.54 0.09 M?, respectively, KOI-206b, and KOI-680b are interesting objects for theories of formation and survival of short-period planets around stars more massive than the Sun. For those two targets, we also find signs of a possible distant additional companion in the system. Based on observations made with SOPHIE on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.Figures 11-14 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Chandra Probes High-Voltage Auroras on Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Scientists have obtained new insight into the unique power source for many of Jupiter's auroras, the most spectacular and active auroras in the Solar System. Extended monitoring of the giant planet with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory detected the presence of highly charged particles crashing into the atmosphere above its poles. X-ray spectra measured by Chandra showed that the auroral activity was produced by ions of oxygen and other elements that were stripped of most of their electrons. This implies that these particles were accelerated to high energies in a multimillion-volt environment above the planet's poles. The presence of these energetic ions indicates that the cause of many of Jupiter's auroras is different from auroras produced on Earth or Saturn. Chandra X-ray Image of Jupiter Chandra X-ray Image of Jupiter "Spacecraft have not explored the region above the poles of Jupiter, so X-ray observations provide one of the few ways to probe that environment," said Ron Elsner of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and lead author on a recently published paper describing these results in the Journal for Geophysical Research. "These results will help scientists to understand the mechanism for the power output from Jupiter's auroras, which are a thousand times more powerful than those on Earth." Electric voltages of about 10 million volts, and currents of 10 million amps - a hundred times greater than the most powerful lightning bolts - are required to explain the X-ray observations. These voltages would also explain the radio emission from energetic electrons observed near Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. Schematic of Jupiter's Auroral Activity Production Schematic of Jupiter's Auroral Activity Production On Earth, auroras are triggered by solar storms of energetic particles, which disturb Earth's magnetic field. Gusts of particles from the Sun can also produce auroras on Jupiter, but unlike Earth, Jupiter has another way of producing auroras. Jupiter's rapid rotation, intense magnetic field, and an abundant source of particles from its volcanically active moon, Io, create a huge reservoir of electrons and ions. These charged particles, trapped in Jupiter's magnetic field, are continually accelerated down into the atmosphere above the polar regions where they collide with gases to produce the aurora, which are almost always active on Jupiter. If the particles responsible for the aurora came from the Sun, they should have been accompanied by large number of protons, which would have produced an intense ultraviolet aurora. Hubble ultraviolet observations made during the Chandra monitoring period showed relatively weak ultraviolet flaring. The combined Chandra and Hubble data indicate that this auroral activity was caused by the acceleration of charged ions of oxygen and other elements trapped in the polar magnetic field high above Jupiter's atmosphere. Hubble Ultraviolet Image of Jupiter Hubble Ultraviolet Image of Jupiter Chandra observed Jupiter in February 2003 for four rotations of the planet (approximately 40 hours) during intense auroral activity. These Chandra observations, taken with its Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, were accompanied by one-and-a-half hours of Hubble Space Telescope observations at ultraviolet wavelengths. The research team also included Noe Lugaz, Hunter Waite, and Tariq Majeed (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), Thomas Cravens (University of Kansas, Lawrence), Randy Gladstone (Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas), Peter Ford (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge), Denis Grodent (University of Liege, Belgium), Anil Bhardwaj (Marshall Space Flight Center) and Robert MacDowell and Michael Desch (Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.) NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington. Northrop Grumman of Redondo Beach, Calif., formerly TRW, Inc., was the prime development contractor for the observatory. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  19. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  20. Formation of Misaligned Hot Jupiters: Star-Disk-Binary Interaction, Spin-Orbit Coupling and Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    2015-08-01

    Many hot Jupiter systems are found to have highly misaligned orbital axes relative to the stellar spin axes. The formation mecahnisms of these misaligned hot Jupiters remain uncertain. I will discuss (1) the possibility of primordial misalignment in proptoplanetary disks due to star-disk-binary resonant interactions, and (2) chaotic evolution of stellar spin as a giant planet undergoes high-eccetricty, Lidov-Kozai migration. The implications for the observation of misaligned planets will also be discussed, particularly the dependence of hot Jupiter formation on the stellar rotation history and the planet mass.(1) Lai,D. 2014 MNRAS, 440, 3532(2) Storch, N., Anderson, K.R., Lai, D. 2014, Science, 345, 1317(3) Srorch, N., Lai, D. 2015, MNRAS, 448, 1821(4) Anderson, K.R., Storch, N., Lai, D. 2015, MNRAS, submitted

  1. Dark compact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Schaffner-Bielich, Jrgen

    2015-12-01

    We investigate compact objects formed by dark matter admixed with ordinary matter made of neutron-star matter and white-dwarf material. We consider non-self annihilating dark matter with an equation of state given by an interacting Fermi gas. We find new stable solutions, dark compact planets, with Earth-like masses and radii from a few Km to few hundred Km for weakly interacting dark matter which are stabilized by the mutual presence of dark matter and compact star matter. For the strongly interacting dark matter case, we obtain dark compact planets with Jupiter-like masses and radii of few hundred Km. These objects could be detected by observing exoplanets with unusually small radii. Moreover, we find that the recently observed 2 M? pulsars set limits on the amount of dark matter inside neutron stars which is, at most, 1 0-6 M? .

  2. Detection of Extrasolar Planets by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Webster, Larry; Dunham, Edward; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Showen, Robert; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A knowledge of other planetary systems that includes information on the number, size, mass, and spacing of the planets around a variety of star types is needed to deepen our understanding of planetary system formation and processes that give rise to their final configurations. Recent discoveries show that many planetary systems are quite different from the solar system in that they often possess giant planets in short period orbits. The inferred evolution of these planets and their orbital characteristics imply the absence of Earth-like planets near the habitable zone. Information on the properties of the giant-inner planets is now being obtained by both the Doppler velocity and the transit photometry techniques. The combination of the two techniques provides the mass, size, and density of the planets. For the planet orbiting star HD209458, transit photometry provided the first independent confirmation and measurement of the diameter of an extrasolar planet. The observations indicate a planet 1.27 the diameter of Jupiter with 0.63 of its mass (Charbonneau et al. 1999). The results are in excellent agreement with the theory of planetary atmospheres for a planet of the indicated mass and distance from a solar-like star. The observation of the November 23, 1999 transit of that planet made by the Ames Vulcan photometer at Lick Observatory is presented. In the future, the combination of the two techniques will greatly increase the number of discoveries and the richness of the science yield. Small rocky planets at orbital distances from 0.9 to 1.2 AU are more likely to harbor life than the gas giant planets that are now being discovered. However, new technology is needed to find smaller, Earth-like planets, which are about three hundred times less massive than Jupiter-like planets. The Kepler project is a space craft mission designed to discover hundreds of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone around a wide variety of stars. To demonstrate that the technology exists to find such small planets, our group has conducted an end-to-end system test. The results of the laboratory tests are presented and show that we are ready to start the search for Earth-size planets.

  3. Fomalhaut's Disk And Planet: Constraining The Mass And Orbit Of Fomalhaut-b Using Disk Morphology"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Eugene; Kite, E.; Kalas, P.; Graham, J. R.; Clampin, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a numerical model of how Fomalhaut b, the recently imaged exoplanet candidate, shapes Fomalhaut's debris disk. Our model indicates that Fomalhaut b must have a mass less than 3 Jupiter masses. Previous mass constraints based on disk morphology rely on several oversimplifications. We explain why our new constraints on the mass and the orbit of Fomalhaut b are more reliable. They are based on a global model of the disk that is not restricted to the chaotic zone boundary. We screen disk parent bodies, which define Fomalhaut's birth ring, for dynamical stability over the system age. Parent bodies are modelled separately from their dust grain progeny, whose orbits are strongly affected by radiation pressure and whose lifetimes are limited to about 0.1 Myr by destructive grain-grain collisions. Parent bodies are evacuated from mean-motion resonances with Fomalhaut b; these empty resonances are akin to the Kirkwood gaps opened by Jupiter. The belt contains at least 3 Earth masses of solids that are grinding down to dust, their velocity dispersions stirred so strongly by Fomalhaut b that collisions are destructive.

  4. The Jupiter Twin HD 154345b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. T.; Marcy, G. W.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S. S.; Henry, G. W.; Isaacson, H.; Howard, A. W.

    2008-08-01

    We announce the discovery of a twin of Jupiter orbiting the slightly metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-0.1) nearby (d=18 pc) G8 dwarf HD 154345. This planet has a minimum mass of 0.95 MJup and a 9.2 year, circular orbit with radius 4.2 AU. There is currently little or no evidence for other planets in the system, but smaller or exterior planets cannot yet be ruled out. We also detect a ~ 9 year activity cycle in this star photometrically and in chromospheric emission. We rule out activity cycles as the source of the radial velocity variations by comparison with other cycling late G dwarfs. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. The Keck Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Shaping of the Inner Solar System by the Gas-Driven Migration of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Kevin J.; Morbidelli, Alessando; Raymond, Sean N.; O'Brien, David P.; Mandell, Avi M.

    2014-04-01

    A persistent difficulty in terrestrial planet formation models is creating Mars analogs with the appropriate mass: Mars is typically an order of magnitude too large in simulations. Some recent work found that a small Mars can be created if the planetesimal disk from which the planets form has an outermost edge at 1.0 AU. However, that work and no previous work could produce a truncation of the planetesimal disk while also explaining the mass and structure of the asteroid belt. We show that gas-driven migration of Jupiter inward to 1.5 AU, before its subsequent outward migration, can truncate the disk and repopulate the asteroid belt. This dramatic migration history of Jupiter suggests that the dynamical behavior of our giant planets was more similar to that inferred for extra-solar planets than previously thought, as both have been characterised by substantial radial migration.

  6. Extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, J J; Marcy, G W; Ida, S

    2000-11-01

    The first known extrasolar planet in orbit around a Sun-like star was discovered in 1995. This object, as well as over two dozen subsequently detected extrasolar planets, were all identified by observing periodic variations of the Doppler shift of light emitted by the stars to which they are bound. All of these extrasolar planets are more massive than Saturn is, and most are more massive than Jupiter. All orbit closer to their stars than do the giant planets in our Solar System, and most of those that do not orbit closer to their star than Mercury is to the Sun travel on highly elliptical paths. Prevailing theories of star and planet formation, which are based on observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments, predict that planets should form in orbit about most single stars. However, these models require some modifications to explain the properties of the observed extrasolar planetary systems. PMID:11035782

  7. Extrasolar planets

    PubMed Central

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Ida, Shigeru

    2000-01-01

    The first known extrasolar planet in orbit around a Sun-like star was discovered in 1995. This object, as well as over two dozen subsequently detected extrasolar planets, were all identified by observing periodic variations of the Doppler shift of light emitted by the stars to which they are bound. All of these extrasolar planets are more massive than Saturn is, and most are more massive than Jupiter. All orbit closer to their stars than do the giant planets in our Solar System, and most of those that do not orbit closer to their star than Mercury is to the Sun travel on highly elliptical paths. Prevailing theories of star and planet formation, which are based on observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments, predict that planets should form in orbit about most single stars. However, these models require some modifications to explain the properties of the observed extrasolar planetary systems. PMID:11035782

  8. Formation of planets around stars of various masses. I - Formulation and a star of one solar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.

    1987-01-01

    The processes of planet formation are investigated both in a gaseous nebula and after the gaseous nebula has been blown away. It is shown that a protoplanet of mass more than about 100 times the representative mass of the planetesimal rapidly captures the planetesimals whose orbital semimajor axes are near its own. Therefore the growth of the protoplanet is determined by the migration rate of planetesimals to the region where they can be captured. The growth and capture of planetesimals is investigated and the time of planet formation is determined as a function of distance from the central star. As an example, planet formation around a star of 1 solar mass is investigated. The earth is found to form at t of about 2 x 10 to the 6th yr in the gaseous nebula. The protoplanets at Jovian and Saturnian orbits grow to 10 times the earth mass at 2 x 10 to the 7th yr and 5 x 10 to the 7th yr, respectively, in the gaseous nebula. Therefore they can capture large amounts of gas and grow to giant planets as long as the gaseous nebula survives for 5 x 10 to the 7th yr in these regions. The formation time of Neptune in a gas-free state is found to be 3 x 10 to the 9th yr, which is shorter than the age of the solar system.

  9. The HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets. XVIII. An Earth-mass planet in the GJ 581 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, M.; Bonfils, X.; Forveille, T.; Delfosse, X.; Udry, S.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Beust, H.; Bouchy, F.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.

    2009-11-01

    The GJ 581 planetary system is already known to harbour three planets, including two super-Earth planets that straddle its habitable zone. We report the detection of an additional planet - GJ 581e - with a minimum mass of 1.9 M_?. With a period of 3.15 days, it is the innermost planet of the system and has a ~5% transit probability. We also correct our previous confusion about the orbital period of GJ 581d (the outermost planet) with a one-year alias, benefitting from an extended time span and many more measurements. The revised period is 66.8 days, and positions the semi-major axis inside the habitable zone of the low mass star. The dynamical stability of the 4-planet system imposes an upper bound on the orbital plane inclination. The planets cannot be more massive than approximately 1.6 times their minimum mass. Based on observations made with the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope under the GTO and LP programs 072.C-0488 and 183.C-0437 at Cerro La Silla (Chile). Our radial-velocity, photometric and Ca II H+K index time series (Table 1) are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/507/487

  10. The Kepler Mission: Search for Habitable Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Likins, B.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Detecting extrasolar terrestrial planets orbiting main-sequence stars is of great interest and importance. Current ground-based methods are only capable of detecting objects about the size or mass of Jupiter or larger. The difficulties encountered with direct imaging of Earth-size planets from space are expected to be resolved in the next twenty years. Spacebased photometry of planetary transits is currently the only viable method for detection of terrestrial planets (30-600 times less massive than Jupiter). This method searches the extended solar neighborhood, providing a statistically large sample and the detailed characteristics of each individual case. A robust concept has been developed and proposed as a Discovery-class mission. Its capabilities and strengths are presented.

  11. The effect of planets beyond the ice line on the accretion of volatiles by habitable-zone rocky planets

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2014-05-01

    Models of planet formation have shown that giant planets have a large impact on the number, masses, and orbits of terrestrial planets that form. In addition, they play an important role in delivering volatiles from material that formed exterior to the snow line (the region in the disk beyond which water ice can condense) to the inner region of the disk where terrestrial planets can maintain liquid water on their surfaces. We present simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet formation from a disk of protoplanets around a solar-type star and we include a massive planet (from 1 M {sub ⊕} to 1 M {sub J}) in Jupiter's orbit at ∼5.2 AU in all but one set of simulations. Two initial disk models are examined with the same mass distribution and total initial water content, but with different distributions of water content. We compare the accretion rates and final water mass fraction of the planets that form. Remarkably, all of the planets that formed in our simulations without giant planets were water-rich, showing that giant planet companions are not required to deliver volatiles to terrestrial planets in the habitable zone. In contrast, an outer planet at least several times the mass of Earth may be needed to clear distant regions of debris truncating the epoch of frequent large impacts. Observations of exoplanets from radial velocity surveys suggest that outer Jupiter-like planets may be scarce, therefore, the results presented here suggest that there may be more habitable planets residing in our galaxy than previously thought.

  12. Full Jupiter Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This image of Jupiter is produced from a 2x2 mosaic of photos taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), and assembled by the LORRI team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The telescopic camera snapped the images during a 3-minute, 35-second span on February 10, when the spacecraft was 29 million kilometers (18 million miles) from Jupiter. At this distance, Jupiter's diameter was 1,015 LORRI pixels -- nearly filling the imager's entire (1,024-by-1,024 pixel) field of view. Features as small as 290 kilometers (180 miles) are visible.

    Both the Great Red Spot and Little Red Spot are visible in the image, on the left and lower right, respectively. The apparent 'storm' on the planet's right limb is a section of the south tropical zone that has been detached from the region to its west (or left) by a 'disturbance' that scientists and amateur astronomers are watching closely.

    At the time LORRI took these images, New Horizons was 820 million kilometers (510 million miles) from home -- nearly 51/2 times the distance between the Sun and Earth. This is the last full-disk image of Jupiter LORRI will produce, since Jupiter is appearing larger as New Horizons draws closer, and the imager will start to focus on specific areas of the planet for higher-resolution studies.

  13. A giant cloud of hydrogen escaping the warm Neptune-mass planet GJ 436b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenreich, David

    2015-12-01

    Exoplanets in extreme irradiation environments, close to their parent stars, could lose some fraction of their atmospheres because of the extreme irradiation. Atmospheric mass loss has been observed during the past 12 years for hot gas giants, as large (~10%) ultraviolet absorption signals during transits. Meanwhile, no confident detection have been obtained for lower-mass planets, which are most likely to be significantly affected by atmospheric escape. In fact, hot rocky planets observed by Corot and Kepler might have lost all of their atmosphere, having begun as Neptune-like. The signature of this loss could be observed in the ultraviolet, when the planet and its escaping atmosphere transit the star, giving rise to deeper and longer transit signatures than in the optical. I will report on new Hubble observations of the Neptune-mass exoplanet GJ 436b, around which an extended atmosphere has been tentatively detected in 2014. The new data reveal that GJ 436b has huge transit depths of 56.3±3.5% in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line, far beyond the 0.69% optical transit depth, and even far beyond mass loss signatures observed at the same wavelength from more irradiated gas giants. We infer from this repeated observations that the planet is surrounded and trailed by a large exospheric cloud of hydrogen, shaped as a giant comet, much bigger than the star. We estimate a mass-loss rate, which today is far too small to deplete the atmosphere of a Neptune-like planet in the lifetime of the parent star, but would have been much greater in the past. This 16-sigma detection opens exciting perspectives for the atmospheric characterization of low-mass and moderately-irradiated exoplanets, a large number of which will be detected by forthcoming transit surveys.

  14. Interior phase transformations and mass-radius relationships of silicon-carbon planets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2014-09-20

    Planets such as 55 Cancri e orbiting stars with a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio may consist primarily of silicon and carbon, with successive layers of carbon, silicon carbide, and iron. The behavior of silicon-carbon materials at the extreme pressures prevalent in planetary interiors, however, has not yet been sufficiently understood. In this work, we use simulations based on density functional theory to determine high-pressure phase transitions in the silicon-carbon system, including the prediction of new stable compounds with Si{sub 2}C and SiC{sub 2} stoichiometry at high pressures. We compute equations of state for these silicon-carbon compounds as a function of pressure, and hence derive interior structural models and mass-radius relationships for planets composed of silicon and carbon. Notably, we predict a substantially smaller radius for SiC planets than in previous models, and find that mass radius relationships for SiC planets are indistinguishable from those of silicate planets. We also compute a new equation of state for iron. We rederive interior models for 55 Cancri e and are able to place more stringent restrictions on its composition.

  15. Post-GAIA astrometry with JWST AMI for planet masses around nearby M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Alexandra; Thatte, Deepashri G.; Artigau, Etienne; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Martel, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining the mass for young planets is an important test of giant planet evolution theories. The combination of direct imaging and radial velocity or astrometric monitoring can provide a direct measurement of both planet mass and photometry. The Near-IR Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) on the the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will contain a 7-hole non-redundant mask in its pupil that will provide interferometric resolution with good dynamic range. NIRISS aperture masking interferometry (AMI) will provide an order of magnitude better contrast than ground-based aperture masking and be able to observe stars a few orders of magnitude fainter than from the ground. This will enable the detection of young jovian planets at the highest resolution available to JWST at the near-IR wavelengths to follow up GAIA planet detections around nearby M dwarfs within 30pc. Using an analytic model of the AMI PSF we measure the astrometric precision with NIRISS. I will present recent NIRISS cryo-vacuum tests and provide an estimate for astrometric precision with AMI.

  16. Interiors of giant planets inside and outside the solar system.

    PubMed

    Guillot, T

    1999-10-01

    An understanding of the structure and composition of the giant planets is rapidly evolving because of (i) high-pressure experiments with the ability to study metallic hydrogen and define the properties of its equation of state and (ii) spectroscopic and in situ measurements made by telescopes and satellites that allow an accurate determination of the chemical composition of the deep atmospheres of the giant planets. However, the total amount of heavy elements that Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune contain remains poorly constrained. The discovery of extrasolar giant planets with masses ranging from that of Saturn to a few times the mass of Jupiter opens up new possibilities for understanding planet composition and formation. Evolutionary models predict that gaseous extrasolar giant planets should have a variety of atmospheric temperatures and chemical compositions, but the radii are estimated to be close to that of Jupiter (between 0.9 and 1.7 Jupiter radii), provided that they contain mostly hydrogen and helium. PMID:10506563

  17. The fate of scattered planets

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-12-01

    As gas giant planets evolve, they may scatter other planets far from their original orbits to produce hot Jupiters or rogue planets that are not gravitationally bound to any star. Here, we consider planets cast out to large orbital distances on eccentric, bound orbits through a gaseous disk. With simple numerical models, we show that super-Earths can interact with the gas through dynamical friction to settle in the remote outer regions of a planetary system. Outcomes depend on planet mass, the initial scattered orbit, and the evolution of the time-dependent disk. Efficient orbital damping by dynamical friction requires planets at least as massive as the Earth. More massive, longer-lived disks damp eccentricities more efficiently than less massive, short-lived ones. Transition disks with an expanding inner cavity can circularize orbits at larger distances than disks that experience a global (homologous) decay in surface density. Thus, orbits of remote planets may reveal the evolutionary history of their primordial gas disks. A remote planet with an orbital distance ∼100 AU from the Sun is plausible and might explain correlations in the orbital parameters of several distant trans-Neptunian objects.

  18. Giant Transiting Planets Observations GITPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, C.; Henning, Th.; Weldrake, D.; Mazeh, T.; Dreizler, S.

    The search for extrasolar planets is nowadays one of the most promising science drivers in Astronomy. The radial velocity technique proved to be successful in planet hunting, harvesting more than a hundred planets to date. In these last recent years, the transit method has come to fruition, with the detection of seven Jupiter-mass extrasolar transiting planets in close-in orbits ({ AU). Currently, the radius of planets can only be determined from transiting planets, representing the principal motivation and strength of this technique. The MPIA is presently building the Large Area Imager (LAIWO) for the 1m telescope in the Wise Observatory, Israel. LAIWO will have a field of view of one square degree. An intensive search for extra-solar planets will be performed with the 1m Wise telescope, together with the 1.2m MONET telescope in Texas. We will monitor three fields at a given time during three years and more than 200 nights per year. We expect several dozens of extra-solar planets.

  19. Giant Transiting Planets Observations - GITPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, C.

    2006-08-01

    The search for extrasolar planets is nowadays one of the most promising science drivers in Astronomy. The radial velocity technique proved to be successful in planet hunting, harvesting more than a hundred planets to date. In these last years, the transit method has come to fruition, with the detection of seven Jupiter-mass extrasolar transiting planets in close-in orbits (< 0.05 AU). Currently, the radius of planets can only be determined from transiting planets, representing the principal motivation and strength of this technique. The MPIA is presently building the Large Area Imager (LAIWO) for the 1m telescope in the Wise Observatory, Israel. LAIWO will have a field of view of one square degree. An intensive search for extra-solar planets will be performed with the 1m Wise telecope, together with the 1.2m MONET telescope in Texas. We will monitor three fields at a given time during three years and more than 200 nights per year. We expect several dozens of extra-solar planets.

  20. ARTIST'S CONCEPT -- 'HOT JUPITER' AROUND THE STAR HD 209458

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is an artist's impression of the gas-giant planet orbiting the yellow, Sun-like star HD 209458, 150 light-years from Earth. Astronomers used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to look at this world and make the first direct detection of an atmosphere around an extrasolar planet. The planet was not directly seen by Hubble. Instead, the presence of sodium was detected in light filtered through the planet's atmosphere when it passed in front of its star as seen from Earth (an event called a transit). The planet was discovered in 1999 by its subtle gravitational pull on the star. The planet is 70 percent the mass of Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. Its orbit is tilted nearly edge-on to Earth, which allows repeated transit observations. The planet is merely 4 million miles from the star. The distance between the pair is so close that the yellow star looms in the sky, with an angular diameter 23 times larger than the full Moon's diameter as seen from Earth, and glows 500 times brighter than our Sun. At this precarious distance the planet's atmosphere is heated to 2000 degrees Fahrenheit (1100 degrees Celsius). But the planet is big enough to hold onto its seething atmosphere. Illustration Credit: NASA and Greg Bacon (STScI/AVL)

  1. Properties of Sub-Neptune-Size Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Watershed discoveries from the Kepler mission have shaped our understanding of the properties of small planets. Mass and radius measurements of individual planets show that their densities vary by an order of magnitude, owing to great diversity in composition and atmospheric content. The ensemble of small planets discovered by Kepler have a radius distribution that rises steeply with decreasing size. Close-in sub-Neptune-size planets are an order of magnitude more common than hot Jupiters. However, the detailed structure of the planet radius distribution remains partially veiled by poorly known stellar host properties from the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). Correlations of planet properties with stellar properties are similarly out of focus or unknown. My talk will concentrate on initial results from the California Kepler Survey (CKS) that provide precise stellar parameters from LTE modeling of high-resolution Keck-HIRES spectra of Kepler planet hosts. With this catalog of stellar properties, we expect the detailed structure of the planet radius distribution to emerge, including deviations from a power-law model that suggest common planet sizes and preferred formation scenarios. This improved catalog will also shed light on the variations of planets occurrence with orbital distance and stellar mass/metallicity, offering important clues for the formation of small worlds.

  2. Planets around Giant Stars: Results from the Lick Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Bergmann, Christoph; Schwab, Christian

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a radial-velocity survey of 373 giant stars at Lick Observatory, which started in 1999. We have detected planets around 15 of these stars; an additional 20 stars host planet candidates. Companions with up to 25 Jupiter masses are rather commonly found around stars with about 2 Solar masses. The frequency of detected planetary companions appears to increase with metallicity. No planets or planet candidates are found around stars with more than 2.7 Solar masses, although our sample contains 113 such stars. We conclude that the occurrence rate of giant planets as a function of Stellar mass peaks around 2 Solar masses. This has important consequences for our understanding of giant planet formation.The stars 91 Aqr and tau Gem have companions with orbits that are among those with the lowest eccentricities of all known exoplanets, perhaps due to tidal circularization during the RGB phase. If confirmed, this would be the first evidence of planetary orbits modified through stellar evolution.We have discovered several multiple systems in our sample. An extensive dynamical analysis of the eta Cet system indicates that it contains two massive planets in a 2:1 orbital resonance. The star nu Oph is orbited by two brown dwarf companions in a 6:1 resonance. It is likely that they arrived in this resonance through migration in a circumstellar disk, arguing strongly that objects with more than 20 Jupiter masses can be formed in disks around Herbig Ae stars.

  3. Migration Then Assembly: Formation of Neptune-mass Planets inside 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Brad M. S.; Murray, Norm

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that the observed distribution of "hot Neptune"/"super-Earth" systems is well reproduced by a model in which planet assembly occurs in situ, with no significant migration post-assembly. This is achieved only if the amount of mass in rocky material is ~50-100 M ? interior to 1 AU. Such a reservoir of material implies that significant radial migration of solid material takes place, and that it occurs before the stage of final planet assembly. The model not only reproduces the general distribution of mass versus period but also the detailed statistics of multiple planet systems in the sample. We furthermore demonstrate that cores of this size are also likely to meet the criterion to gravitationally capture gas from the nebula, although accretion is rapidly limited by the opening of gaps in the gas disk. If the mass growth is limited by this tidal truncation, then the scenario sketched here naturally produces Neptune-mass objects with substantial components of both rock and gas, as is observed. The quantitative expectations of this scenario are that most planets in the "hot Neptune/super-Earth" class inhabit multiple-planet systems, with characteristic orbital spacings. The model also provides a natural division into gas-rich (hot Neptune) and gas-poor (super-Earth) classes at fixed period. The dividing mass ranges from ~3 M ? at 10 day orbital periods to ~10 M ? at 100 day orbital periods. For orbital periods <10 days, the division is less clear because a gas atmosphere may be significantly eroded by stellar radiation.

  4. MIGRATION THEN ASSEMBLY: FORMATION OF NEPTUNE-MASS PLANETS INSIDE 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Brad M. S.; Murray, Norm

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that the observed distribution of 'hot Neptune'/'super-Earth' systems is well reproduced by a model in which planet assembly occurs in situ, with no significant migration post-assembly. This is achieved only if the amount of mass in rocky material is {approx}50-100 M{sub Circled-Plus} interior to 1 AU. Such a reservoir of material implies that significant radial migration of solid material takes place, and that it occurs before the stage of final planet assembly. The model not only reproduces the general distribution of mass versus period but also the detailed statistics of multiple planet systems in the sample. We furthermore demonstrate that cores of this size are also likely to meet the criterion to gravitationally capture gas from the nebula, although accretion is rapidly limited by the opening of gaps in the gas disk. If the mass growth is limited by this tidal truncation, then the scenario sketched here naturally produces Neptune-mass objects with substantial components of both rock and gas, as is observed. The quantitative expectations of this scenario are that most planets in the 'hot Neptune/super-Earth' class inhabit multiple-planet systems, with characteristic orbital spacings. The model also provides a natural division into gas-rich (hot Neptune) and gas-poor (super-Earth) classes at fixed period. The dividing mass ranges from {approx}3 M{sub Circled-Plus} at 10 day orbital periods to {approx}10 M{sub Circled-Plus} at 100 day orbital periods. For orbital periods <10 days, the division is less clear because a gas atmosphere may be significantly eroded by stellar radiation.

  5. Jupiter Probe Heatshield design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratsch, K. M.; Loomis, W. C.; Randles, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    A heatshield performance assessment is made for extraterrestrial entry into the atmosphere of the planet Jupiter. A rigorous determination of the potential ablation and thermostructural failure mechanisms for a candidate carbon-phenolic heatshield is made. The thermostructural integrity of the char layer is addressed in detail with the total response phenomenology involving char layer formation, stress under aerodynamic and thermodynamic loads, and points of stress concentration under the high radiative heat rates and severe temperature gradients encountered in the Jovian atmosphere. An alternate material concept in the carbon-carbon generic material class is examined to assess the viability of this material class for application to the Jupiter Probe Heatshield.

  6. Jupiter's outer atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    The current state of the theory of Jupiter's outer atmosphere is briefly reviewed. The similarities and dissimilarities between the terrestrial and Jovian upper atmospheres are discussed, including the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary magnetic fields. Estimates of Jovian parameters are given, including magnetosphere and auroral zone sizes, ionospheric conductivity, energy inputs, and solar wind parameters at Jupiter. The influence of the large centrifugal force on the cold plasma distribution is considered. The Jovian Van Allen belt is attributed to solar wind particles diffused in toward the planet by dynamo electric fields from ionospheric neutral winds, and the consequences of this theory are indicated.

  7. A Moderate Migration Scenario to form the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe Robin; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2015-12-01

    The early solar system contained a gas-dominated protoplanetary disk that could cause the migration of the giant planets. This migration can be in the form of a two-stage migration, including an inward and then outward migration. One of the current favored theories, the Grand Tack theory, states that Jupiter migrates in to 1.5 AU, creating a planetesimal disk truncated at 1 AU to then form the terrestrial planets during the subsequent outward migration of Jupiter. There are reasons to believe that such a large movement by Jupiter may be impractical, namely the disk would need to be massive and long-lived. An exploration of migration parameters that involve smaller migration distances and shorter timescales can shed light on whether such extreme displacements are necessary for the formation of the solar system. We examine more moderate migration simulations, where Jupiter starts near the conjectured location of the ice line and migrates a moderate radial distance inward for a variety of distances and times. After the inward migration, Jupiter moves outwards to its final orbital configuration today. We find that the planetesimal disk need not be truncated at 1 AU to form planets with similar characteristics to those in the solar system. We vary the number and mass of planetesimals in the disk to see how this affects the characteristics of the forming terrestrial planets. We find a number of scenarios that provide systems of terrestrial planets similar to those in the solar system. We thus propose an alternative to the Grand Tack theory where Jupiters migration is less extreme than proposed in the Grand Tack theory.

  8. Probabilistic Mass-Radius Relationship for Sub-Neptune-Sized Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Rogers, Leslie Anne; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler Mission has discovered thousands of super-Earths, paving the way for the first statistical studies of the dynamics, formation, and evolution of these planets. Planetary masses are an important physical property that these studies consider, and yet the vast majority of Kepler planet candidates do not have theirs measured. A key concern for these studies is therefore how to map the measured radii to mass estimates, in this regime of planetary sizes where there are no Solar System analogs. Previous works have derived deterministic, one-to-one relationships between radius and mass. However, if these planets span a range of compositions as expected, then an intrinsic scatter about this relationship must exist in the population. Here we present the first probabilistic mass-radius relationship (M-R relation) evaluated within a Bayesian framework, which both quantifies this intrinsic dispersion and the uncertainties on the M-R relation parameters given the data. We analyze how the details depend on the radius range of the sample, and on the method used to provide the mass measurements. Assuming that the M-R relation can be described as a power law with a dispersion that is constant and normally distributed, we find that M/M_Earth = 2.7 (R/R_Earth)^1.2 and a scatter in mass of 1.7 M_Earth is the "best-fit" probabilistic M-R relation for the sample of RV-measured transiting sub-Neptunes.

  9. Measuring the Mass of Free-Floating Planets with K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Campaign 9 of the K2 mission (K2C9) will begin April next year, and presents us with our first and likely only opportunity to measure the masses of the large population of free-floating planets found by gravitational microlensing surveys. I will describe the plans for the campaign, including the unprecedented need for wide-field ground-based observations, and the innovative techniques that are being developed to work in crowded fields with Kepler's large pixels. Finally I will discuss what we can expect to learn from K2C9 and future microlensing surveys for free-floating planets.

  10. Extreme Planet-Like Systems: Brown Dwarfs at the Exoplanet Mass Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline Kelly

    2015-12-01

    Brown dwarfs have long been the observational anchors for our theoretical understanding of giant gas planets. Recent studies have uncovered a population of nearby young sources that rival the age and mass of many planetary mass companions. From detailed observations, we postulate that objects in this young population have dynamic atmospheres ripe with exotic, thick condensate cloud species that drive extreme photometric and spectroscopic characteristics. In this talk I will review how we are using these so-called exoplanet analogs to establish luminosity, temperature, age, and mass relations for brown dwarf into planetary mass objects.

  11. WARM JUPITERS NEED CLOSE ''FRIENDS'' FOR HIGH-ECCENTRICITY MIGRATION—A STRINGENT UPPER LIMIT ON THE PERTURBER'S SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle

    2014-01-20

    We propose a stringent observational test on the formation of warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with 10 days ≲ P ≲ 100 days) by high-eccentricity (high-e) migration mechanisms. Unlike hot Jupiters, the majority of observed warm Jupiters have pericenter distances too large to allow efficient tidal dissipation to induce migration. To access the close pericenter required for migration during a Kozai-Lidov cycle, they must be accompanied by a strong enough perturber to overcome the precession caused by general relativity, placing a strong upper limit on the perturber's separation. For a warm Jupiter at a ∼ 0.2 AU, a Jupiter-mass (solar-mass) perturber is required to be ≲ 3 AU (≲ 30 AU) and can be identified observationally. Among warm Jupiters detected by radial velocities (RVs), ≳ 50% (5 out of 9) with large eccentricities (e ≳ 0.4) have known Jovian companions satisfying this necessary condition for high-e migration. In contrast, ≲ 20% (3 out of 17) of the low-e (e ≲ 0.2) warm Jupiters have detected additional Jovian companions, suggesting that high-e migration with planetary perturbers may not be the dominant formation channel. Complete, long-term RV follow-ups of the warm-Jupiter population will allow a firm upper limit to be put on the fraction of these planets formed by high-e migration. Transiting warm Jupiters showing spin-orbit misalignments will be interesting to apply our test. If the misalignments are solely due to high-e migration as commonly suggested, we expect that the majority of warm Jupiters with low-e (e ≲ 0.2) are not misaligned, in contrast with low-e hot Jupiters.

  12. Long-Term Observations of Stream Interaction Regions and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections: Venus, Earth, and Jupiter Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Skoug, R. M.; Steinberg, J. T.

    2009-04-01

    Two types of large-scale solar wind structures, stream interaction regions (SIRs) and interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), can drive interplanetary shocks, generate or accelerate energetic particles, and affect the planetary ionosphere and/or magnetosphere. To quantify the properties of SIRs and ICMEs at different heliocentric distances, we have identified and characterized these structures based on consistent criteria using the in situ plasma and magnetic field observations. The data sets used are Pioneer Venus Orbiter at 0.72 AU (1979 - 1988), Wind/ACE at 1 AU (1995 - 2006), and three Ulysses aphelion passes at 5.3 AU (partial 1992, 1997 - 1998, 2003 - 2005, representing slices at different phases of the solar cycle). The long-term observations enable us to study the solar cycle variations of these two structures. The parameters relevant to space weather modeling, such as the structure duration, width, maximum dynamic pressure, maximum magnetic field intensity, average speed, speed variation, and other properties of SIRs and ICMEs are all examined at each distance. ICMEs can generally affect the planetary environment more than SIRs at Venus and Earth, especially around solar maximum. However, when they propagate to 5.3 AU, some ICMEs and SIRs merge and form hybrid events at Jupiter. In general, SIRs have greater dynamic pressure, interaction strength and field intensity than ICMEs at Jupiter, and therefore they affect the space environment more than ICMEs there.

  13. Horseshoe periodic orbits in the restricted problem of three bodies for a sun-Jupiter mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. B.

    1981-11-01

    Segments of seven families of symmetric horseshoe periodic orbits of the restricted three body problem for a sun-Jupiter mass ratio have been numerically determined. Each family is found to have a region consisting of smooth horseshoe shaped orbits with the family evolving to orbits acquiring loops on both sides of the smooth horseshoes. The general evolution of these families is discussed and one in particular (Rabe's horseshoe is a member of this family) is described in more detail with the aid of computer plots of orbits in this family. The smooth horseshoes do not continuously evolve along one family but are members of many distinct families. The change in shape of the smooth horseshoe orbits is examined as they have closer approaches to Jupiter. Each family has a bifurcation with an asymmetric family of periodic orbits. The initial conditions and other quantities describing these bifurcation orbits are given. Starting from these orbits the initial segments of the asymmetric families has been determined.

  14. Runaway greenhouse effect on exomoons due to irradiation from hot, young giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.; Barnes, R.

    2015-04-01

    The Kepler space telescope has proven capable of detecting transits of objects almost as small as the Earth's Moon. Some studies suggest that moons as small as 0.2 Earth masses can be detected in the Kepler data by transit timing variations and transit duration variations of their host planets. If such massive moons exist around giant planets in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), then they could serve as habitats for extraterrestrial life. While earlier studies on exomoon habitability assumed the host planet to be in thermal equilibrium with the absorbed stellar flux, we here extend this concept by including the planetary luminosity from evolutionary shrinking. Our aim is to assess the danger of exomoons to be in a runaway greenhouse state due to extensive heating from the planet. We apply pre-computed evolution tracks for giant planets to calculate the incident planetary radiation on the moon as a function of time. Added to the stellar flux, the total illumination yields constraints on a moon's habitability. Ultimately, we include tidal heating to evaluate a moon's energy budget. We use a semi-analytical formula to parameterize the critical flux for the moon to experience a runaway greenhouse effect. Planetary illumination from a 13-Jupiter-mass planet onto an Earth-sized moon at a distance of ten Jupiter radii can drive a runaway greenhouse state on the moon for about 200 million years (Myr). When stellar illumination equivalent to that received by Earth from the Sun is added, then the runaway greenhouse holds for about 500 Myr. After 1000 Myr, the planet's habitable edge has moved inward to about six Jupiter radii. Exomoons in orbits with eccentricities of 0.1 experience strong tidal heating; they must orbit a 13-Jupiter-mass host beyond 29 or 18 Jupiter radii after 100 Myr (at the inner and outer boundaries of the stellar HZ, respectively), and beyond 13 Jupiter radii (in both cases) after 1000 Myr to be habitable. If a roughly Earth-sized, Earth-mass moon would be detected in orbit around a giant planet, and if the planet-moon duet would orbit in the stellar HZ, then it will be crucial to recover the orbital history of the moon. If, for example, such a moon around a 13-Jupiter-mass planet has been closer than 20 Jupiter radii to its host during the first few hundred million years at least, then it might have lost substantial amounts of its initial water reservoir and be uninhabitable today.

  15. On the minimum core mass for giant planet formation at wide separations

    SciTech Connect

    Piso, Ana-Maria A.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2014-05-01

    In the core accretion hypothesis, giant planets form by gas accretion onto solid protoplanetary cores. The minimum (or critical) core mass to form a gas giant is typically quoted as 10 M {sub ?}. The actual value depends on several factors: the location in the protoplanetary disk, atmospheric opacity, and the accretion rate of solids. Motivated by ongoing direct imaging searches for giant planets, this study investigates core mass requirements in the outer disk. To determine the fastest allowed rates of gas accretion, we consider solid cores that no longer accrete planetesimals, as this would heat the gaseous envelope. Our spherical, two-layer atmospheric cooling model includes an inner convective region and an outer radiative zone that matches onto the disk. We determine the minimum core mass for a giant planet to form within a typical disk lifetime of 3 Myr. The minimum core mass declines with disk radius, from ?8.5 M {sub ?} at 5 AU to ?3.5 M {sub ?} at 100 AU, with standard interstellar grain opacities. Lower temperatures in the outer disk explain this trend, while variations in disk density are less influential. At all distances, a lower dust opacity or higher mean molecular weight reduces the critical core mass. Our non-self-gravitating, analytic cooling model reveals that self-gravity significantly affects early atmospheric evolution, starting when the atmosphere is only ?10% as massive as the core.

  16. Planets around Low-mass Stars (PALMS). IV. The Outer Architecture of M Dwarf Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets and brown dwarfs (gsim1 M Jup) around 122 newly identified nearby (lsim40 pc) young M dwarfs. Half of our targets are younger than 135 Myr and 90% are younger than the Hyades (620 Myr). After removing 44 close stellar binaries (implying a stellar companion fraction of >35.4% ± 4.3% within 100 AU), 27 of which are new or spatially resolved for the first time, our remaining sample of 78 single M dwarfs makes this the largest imaging search for planets around young low-mass stars (0.1-0.6 M ⊙) to date. Our H- and K-band coronagraphic observations with Keck/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO achieve typical contrasts of 12-14 mag and 9-13 mag at 1'', respectively, which correspond to limiting planet masses of 0.5-10 M Jup at 5-33 AU for 85% of our sample. We discovered four young brown dwarf companions: 1RXS J235133.3+312720 B (32 ± 6 M Jup; L0+2-1; 120 ± 20 AU), GJ 3629 B (64+30-23 M Jup; M7.5 ± 0.5; 6.5 ± 0.5 AU), 1RXS J034231.8+121622 B (35 ± 8 M Jup; L0 ± 1; 19.8 ± 0.9 AU), and 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B (43 ± 9 M Jup; M8.0 ± 0.5; 190 ± 20 AU). Over 150 candidate planets were identified; we obtained follow-up imaging for 56% of these but all are consistent with background stars. Our null detection of planets enables strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of long-period giant planets around single M dwarfs. We infer an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 10.3% and 16.0% for 1-13 M Jup planets between 10-100 AU for hot-start and cold-start (Fortney) evolutionary models, respectively. Fewer than 6.0% (9.9%) of M dwarfs harbor massive gas giants in the 5-13 M Jup range like those orbiting HR 8799 and β Pictoris between 10-100 AU for a hot-start (cold-start) formation scenario. The frequency of brown dwarf (13-75 M Jup) companions to single M dwarfs between 10-100 AU is 2.8+2.4-1.5%. Altogether we find that giant planets, especially massive ones, are rare in the outskirts of M dwarf planetary systems. Although the first directly imaged planets were found around massive stars, there is currently no statistical evidence for a trend of giant planet frequency with stellar host mass at large separations as predicted by the disk instability model of giant planet formation. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation. This work was also based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  17. PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). IV. THE OUTER ARCHITECTURE OF M DWARF PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets and brown dwarfs (≳1 M {sub Jup}) around 122 newly identified nearby (≲40 pc) young M dwarfs. Half of our targets are younger than 135 Myr and 90% are younger than the Hyades (620 Myr). After removing 44 close stellar binaries (implying a stellar companion fraction of >35.4% ± 4.3% within 100 AU), 27 of which are new or spatially resolved for the first time, our remaining sample of 78 single M dwarfs makes this the largest imaging search for planets around young low-mass stars (0.1-0.6 M {sub ☉}) to date. Our H- and K-band coronagraphic observations with Keck/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO achieve typical contrasts of 12-14 mag and 9-13 mag at 1'', respectively, which correspond to limiting planet masses of 0.5-10 M {sub Jup} at 5-33 AU for 85% of our sample. We discovered four young brown dwarf companions: 1RXS J235133.3+312720 B (32 ± 6 M {sub Jup}; L0{sub −1}{sup +2}; 120 ± 20 AU), GJ 3629 B (64{sub −23}{sup +30} M {sub Jup}; M7.5 ± 0.5; 6.5 ± 0.5 AU), 1RXS J034231.8+121622 B (35 ± 8 M {sub Jup}; L0 ± 1; 19.8 ± 0.9 AU), and 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B (43 ± 9 M {sub Jup}; M8.0 ± 0.5; 190 ± 20 AU). Over 150 candidate planets were identified; we obtained follow-up imaging for 56% of these but all are consistent with background stars. Our null detection of planets enables strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of long-period giant planets around single M dwarfs. We infer an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 10.3% and 16.0% for 1-13 M {sub Jup} planets between 10-100 AU for hot-start and cold-start (Fortney) evolutionary models, respectively. Fewer than 6.0% (9.9%) of M dwarfs harbor massive gas giants in the 5-13 M {sub Jup} range like those orbiting HR 8799 and β Pictoris between 10-100 AU for a hot-start (cold-start) formation scenario. The frequency of brown dwarf (13-75 M {sub Jup}) companions to single M dwarfs between 10-100 AU is 2.8{sub −1.5}{sup +2.4}%. Altogether we find that giant planets, especially massive ones, are rare in the outskirts of M dwarf planetary systems. Although the first directly imaged planets were found around massive stars, there is currently no statistical evidence for a trend of giant planet frequency with stellar host mass at large separations as predicted by the disk instability model of giant planet formation.

  18. A FRAMEWORK FOR CHARACTERIZING THE ATMOSPHERES OF LOW-MASS LOW-DENSITY TRANSITING PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Nettelmann, Nadine; Mordasini, Christoph; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Greene, Thomas P.; Zahnle, Kevin

    2013-09-20

    We perform modeling investigations to aid in understanding the atmospheres and composition of small planets of ∼2-4 Earth radii, which are now known to be common in our Galaxy. GJ 1214b is a well-studied example whose atmospheric transmission spectrum has been observed by many investigators. Here we take a step back from GJ 1214b to investigate the role that planetary mass, composition, and temperature play in impacting the transmission spectra of these low-mass low-density (LMLD) planets. Under the assumption that these planets accrete modest hydrogen-dominated atmospheres and planetesimals, we use population synthesis models to show that predicted metal enrichments of the H/He envelope are high, with metal mass fraction Z{sub env} values commonly 0.6-0.9, or ∼100-400+ times solar. The high mean molecular weight of such atmospheres (μ ≈ 5-12) would naturally help to flatten the transmission spectrum of most LMLD planets. The high metal abundance would also provide significant condensible material for cloud formation. It is known that the H/He abundance in Uranus and Neptune decreases with depth, and we show that atmospheric evaporation of LMLD planets could expose atmospheric layers with gradually higher Z{sub env}. However, values of Z{sub env} close to solar composition can also arise, so diversity should be expected. Photochemically produced hazes, potentially due to methane photolysis, are another possibility for obscuring transmission spectra. Such hazes may not form above T{sub eq} of ∼800-1100 K, which is testable if such warm, otherwise low mean molecular weight atmospheres are stable against atmospheric evaporation. We find that available transmission data are consistent with relatively high mean molecular weight atmospheres for GJ 1214b and 'warm Neptune' GJ 436b. We examine future prospects for characterizing GJ 1214b with Hubble and the James Webb Space Telescope.

  19. The Planet Observer's Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Fred W.

    2000-10-01

    Foreword; Preface; Introduction: why observe the planets?; 1. The solar system; 2. The celestial sphere; 3. Telescopes and accessories; 4. The atmosphere and seeing; 5. Mercury; 6. Venus; 7. Mars; 8. The minor planets (asteroids); 9. Jupiter; 10. Saturn; 11. Uranus; 12. Neptune; 13. Pluto; 14. Constructing maps and planispheres; 15. Planetary photography and videography; 16. Photoelectric photometry of the minor planets, planets and their satellites; Name index; Subject index.

  20. Structure and Evolution of Internally Heated Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2015-11-01

    The transit radii of many close-in extrasolar giant planets, or "hot Jupiters," are systematically larger than those expected from models considering only cooling from an initial high-entropy state. Though these planets receive strong irradiation, with equilibrium temperatures of 1000-2500 Kelvin, the absorption of stellar incident flux in the upper atmosphere alone cannot explain these anomalous radii. More promising mechanisms involve irradiation-driven meteorological activity, which penetrates much deeper into the planet than direct stellar heating. This circulation can lead to large-scale mixing and downward transport of kinetic energy, both processes whereby a fraction of the stellar incident power is transported downwards to the interior of the planet. Here we consider how deposition of heat at different pressure levels or structural locations within a planet affects the resulting evolution. To do so, we run global gas giant evolutionary models with with the stellar structure code MESA including additional energy dissipation. We find that relatively shallow atmospheric heating alone can explain the transit radii of the hot Jupiter sample, but heating in the convective zone is an order of magnitude more efficient regardless of exact location. Additionally, a small difference in atmospheric heating location can have a significant effect on radius evolution, especially near the radiative-convective boundary. The most efficient location to heat the planet is at the radiative-convective boundary or deeper. We expect that shear instabilities at this interface may naturally explain energy dissipation at the radiative-convective boundary, which typically lies at a pressure of ~1 kilobar after 5 Gyr for a planet with the mass and incident stellar flux of HD 209458b. Hence, atmospheric processes are most efficient at explaining the bloated radii of hot Jupiters if they can transport incident stellar power downwards to the top of the inner convective zone.

  1. TOO LITTLE, TOO LATE: HOW THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF HOT JUPITERS AFFECTS TRANSIT SURVEYS OF CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Jackson, Brian

    2010-11-10

    The tidal evolution of hot Jupiters may change the efficiency of transit surveys of stellar clusters. The orbital decay that hot Jupiters suffer may result in their destruction, leaving fewer transiting planets in older clusters. We calculate the impact tidal evolution has for different assumed stellar populations, including that of 47 Tuc, a globular cluster that was the focus of an intense Hubble Space Telescope search for transits. We find that in older clusters, one expects to detect fewer transiting planets by a factor of 2 for surveys sensitive to Jupiter-like planets in orbits out to 0.5 AU, and up to a factor of 25 for surveys sensitive to Jupiter-like planets in orbits out to 0.08 AU. Additionally, tidal evolution affects the distribution of transiting planets as a function of the semimajor axis, producing larger orbital period gaps for transiting planets as the age of the cluster increases. Tidal evolution can explain the lack of detected exoplanets in 47 Tuc without invoking other mechanisms. Four open clusters residing within the Kepler fields of view have ages that span 0.4-8 Gyr-if Kepler can observe a significant number of planets in these clusters, it will provide key tests for our tidal evolution hypothesis. Finally, our results suggest that observers wishing to discover transiting planets in clusters must have sufficient accuracy to detect lower mass planets, search larger numbers of cluster members, or have longer observation windows to be confident that a significant number of transits will occur for a population of stars.

  2. Too Little, Too Late: How the Tidal Evolution of Hot Jupiters Affects Transit Surveys of Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debes, John H.; Jackson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The tidal evolution of hot Jupiters may change the efficiency of transit surveys of stellar clusters. The orbital decay that hot Jupiters suffer may result in their destruction, leaving fewer transiting planets in older clusters. We calculate the impact tidal evolution has for different assumed stellar populations, including that of 47 Tuc, a globular cluster that was the focus of an intense HST search for transits. We find that in older clusters one expects to detect fewer transiting planets by a factor of two for surveys sensitive to Jupiter-like planets in orbits out to 0.5 AU, and up to a factor of 25 for surveys sensitive to Jupiter-like planets in orbits out to 0.08 AU. Additionally, tidal evolution affects the distribution of transiting planets as a function of semi-major axis, producing larger orbital period gaps for transiting planets as the age of the cluster increases. Tidal evolution can explain the lack of detected exoplanets in 47 Tuc without invoking other mechanisms. Four open clusters residing within the Kepler fields of view have ages that span 0.4-8 Gyr-if Kepler can observe a significant number of planets in these clusters, it will provide key tests for our tidal evolution hypothesis. Finally, our results suggest that observers wishing to discover transiting planets in clusters must have sufficient accuracy to detect lower mass planets, search larger numbers of cluster members, or have longer observation windows to be confident that a significant number of transits will occur for a population of stars.

  3. A 4 Earth-mass Planet Transiting a Naked-Eye Star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, Michael; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Charbonneau, David; Cameron, Andrew; Latham, David; Lovis, Chrisophe; Molinari, Emilio; Motalebi, Fatemeh; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stephane

    2015-02-01

    Doppler surveys and the Kepler space mission have revealed "super-Earths", i.e. planets of a few Earth masses, to be very frequent around solar-like stars, while being notably absent from our solar system. Improving our understanding of these ubiquitous planets requires the detection of a significant sample of them in transit in front of very nearby stars, to make possible the detailed exploration of their atmospheric composition. The most efficient method to achieve this goal remains to search for the transits of the low-mass planets detected by Doppler surveys, as exemplified by the cases of 55 Cnc e and HD 97658b which are the only two super-Earths orbiting solar-type stars that are amenable for detailed atmospheric characterization with existing and near-future facilities. In this context, we propose here to use the exquisite photometric precision of Spitzer to search for the transit of a new short-period (~3d) low-mass (~4 Earth masses) super-Earth that we have just detected with the recently commissioned HARPS-N spectrograph. This planet orbits at <0.04 au of an extremely nearby (6.5pc) naked-eye (V=5.6) early K-dwarf, resulting in a transit probability better than 9%. If transiting, the extreme infrared brightness (K=3.25) and the small size (0.78 solar radius) of the host star will make possible the first detailed atmospheric characterization of an exoplanet of a few Earth-masses.

  4. The mass-radius relationship from solar-type stars to terrestrial planets: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, G.; Baraffe, I.; Leconte, J.; Gallardo, J.; Barman, T.

    2009-02-01

    In this review, we summarize our present knowledge of the behaviour of the mass-radius relationship from solar-type stars down to terrestrial planets, across the regime of substellar objects, brown dwarfs and giant planets. Particular attention is paid to the identification of the main physical properties or mechanisms responsible for this behaviour. Indeed, understanding the mechanical structure of an object provides valuable information about its internal structure, composition and heat content as well as its formation history. Although the general description of these properties is reasonably well mastered, disagreement between theory and observation in certain cases points to some missing physics in our present modelling of at least some of these objects. The mass-radius relationship in the overlaping domain between giant planets and low-mass brown dwarfs is shown to represent a powerful diagnostic to distinguish between these two different populations and shows once again that the present IAU distinction between these two populations at a given mass has no valid foundation.

  5. Jupiter's Water Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    When the twin Voyager spacecraft cruised past Jupiter in 1979, they did more than rewrite the textbooks on the giant planet. Their cameras also unveiled the astounding diversity of the four planet-size moons of ice and stone known as the Galilean satellites. The Voyagers revealed the cratered countenance of Callisto, the valleys and ridges of Ganymede, the cracked face of Europa, and the spewing volcanoes of Io. But it would take a spacecraft named for Italian scientist Galileo, who discovered the moons in 1610, to reveal the true complexity of these worlds and to begin to divulge their interior secrets. Incredibly, the Galileo data strongly suggest that Jupiter's three large icy moons (all but rocky Io) hide interior oceans.

  6. Discovering Jupiter. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data derived from Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 and other sources on the Jovian magnetosphere, the circum-Jovian radiation belts, and Jupiter's radio emission are presented at some length, descriptions are given of the principal Jovian satellites (Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto), and inferences are drawn on the origin of the planet and its place in the solar system. The inner, middle, and outer regions of the magnetosphere, the bow shock wave, and the particularly heavy intensity of the inner radiation belt region (within 1.44 million km of the planet) are discussed. All of the major satellites except Callisto lie immersed in the intense radiation belts. Jupiter's failure to become a stellar companion to the sun, Io's action in 'switching on' Jovian radio emission, and other Pioneer discoveries relating to asteroids, the solar system in general, and trans-Jovian space, are discussed

  7. Did Fomalhaut, HR 8799, and HL Tauri Form Planets Via the Gravitational Instability? Placing Limits on the Required Disk Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nero, D.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2009-09-01

    Disk fragmentation resulting from the gravitational instability has been proposed as an efficient mechanism for forming giant planets. We use the planet Fomalhaut b, the triple-planetary system HR 8799, and the potential protoplanet associated with HL Tau to test the viability of this mechanism. We choose the above systems since they harbor planets with masses and orbital characteristics favored by the fragmentation mechanism. We do not claim that these planets must have formed as the result of fragmentation, rather the reverse: if planets can form from disk fragmentation, then these systems are consistent with what we should expect to see. We use the orbital characteristics of these recently discovered planets, along with a new technique to more accurately determine the disk cooling times, to place both lower and upper limits on the disk surface densityand thus massrequired to form these objects by disk fragmentation. Our cooling times are over an order of magnitude shorter than those of Rafikov, which makes disk fragmentation more feasible for these objects. We find that the required mass interior to the planet's orbital radius is ~0.1 M sun for Fomalhaut b, the protoplanet orbiting HL Tau, and the outermost planet of HR 8799. The two inner planets of HR 8799 probably could not have formed in situ by disk fragmentation.

  8. Cassini's Farewell to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On January 15, 2001, 17 days after it passed its closest approach to Jupiter, NASA's Cassini spacecraft looked back to see the giant planet as a thinning crescent.

    This image is a color mosaic from that day, shot from a distance of 18.3 million kilometers (11.4 million miles). The smallest visible features are roughly 110 kilometers (70 miles) across. The solar phase angle, the angle from the spacecraft to the planet to the Sun, is 120 degrees.

    A crescent Io, innermost of Jupiter's four large moons, appears to the left of Jupiter.

    Cassini collected its last Jupiter images on March 22, 2001, as the spacecraft continued the final leg of its journey to a July 1, 2004, appointment with Saturn.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  9. Microlens Masses from Astrometry and Parallax in Space-based Surveys: From Planets to Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C.

    2014-03-01

    We show that space-based microlensing experiments can recover lens masses and distances for a large fraction of all events (those with individual photometric errors <~ 0.01 mag) using a combination of one-dimensional microlens parallaxes and astrometric microlensing. This will provide a powerful probe of the mass distributions of planets, black holes, and neutron stars, the distribution of planets as a function of Galactic environment, and the velocity distributions of black holes and neutron stars. While systematics are in principle a significant concern, we show that it is possible to vet against all systematics (known and unknown) using single-epoch precursor observations with the Hubble Space Telescope roughly 10 years before the space mission.

  10. Microlens masses from astrometry and parallax in space-based surveys: From planets to black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C.

    2014-03-20

    We show that space-based microlensing experiments can recover lens masses and distances for a large fraction of all events (those with individual photometric errors ≲ 0.01 mag) using a combination of one-dimensional microlens parallaxes and astrometric microlensing. This will provide a powerful probe of the mass distributions of planets, black holes, and neutron stars, the distribution of planets as a function of Galactic environment, and the velocity distributions of black holes and neutron stars. While systematics are in principle a significant concern, we show that it is possible to vet against all systematics (known and unknown) using single-epoch precursor observations with the Hubble Space Telescope roughly 10 years before the space mission.

  11. An independent planet search in the Kepler dataset. II. An extremely low-density super-Earth mass planet around Kepler-87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofir, Aviv; Dreizler, Stefan; Zechmeister, Mathias; Husser, Tim-Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Context. The primary goal of the Kepler mission is the measurement of the frequency of Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars. However, the confirmation of the smallest of Kepler's candidates in long periods around FGK dwarfs is extremely difficult or even beyond the limit of current radial velocity technology. Transit timing variations (TTVs) may offer the possibility for these confirmations of near-resonant multiple systems by the mutual gravitational interaction of the planets. Aims: We previously detected the second planet candidate in the KOI 1574 system. The two candidates have relatively long periods (about 114 d and 191 d) and are in 5:3 resonance. We therefore searched for TTVs in this particularly promising system. Methods: The full Kepler data was detrended with the proven SARS pipeline. The entire data allowed one to search for TTVs of the above signals, and to search for additional transit-like signals. Results: We detected strong anti-correlated TTVs of the 114 d and 191 d signals, dynamically confirming them as members of the same system. Dynamical simulations reproducing the observed TTVs allowed us to also determine the masses of the planets. We found KOI 1574.01 (hereafter Kepler-87 b) to have a radius of 13.49 0.55 R? and a mass of 324.2 8.8 M?, and KOI 1574.02 (Kepler-87 c) to have a radius of 6.14 0.29 R? and a mass of 6.4 0.8 M?. Both planets have low densities of 0.729 and 0.152 g cm-3, respectively, which is non-trivial for such cold and old (7-8 Gyr) planets. Specifically, Kepler-87 c is the lowest-density planet in the super-Earth mass range. Both planets are thus particularly amenable to modeling and planetary structure studies, and also present an interesting case where ground-based photometric follow-up of Kepler planets is very desirable. Finally, we also detected two more short-period super-Earth sized (<2 R?) planetary candidates in the system, making the relatively high multiplicity of this system notable against the general paucity of multiple systems in the presence of giant planets like Kepler-87 b.

  12. The depths of clouds on Jupiter: Observational constraints on the O/H ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; de Pater, Imke; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2015-11-01

    The oxygen abundance in Jupiter is an important constraint on planet formation and conditions in protoplanetary disks. Oxygen, in the form of water, is also dynamically significant in Jupiter's atmosphere: as a tracer of circulation and as a carrier of latent heat.We have developed a technique to spectroscopically measure the depth of opaque cloud tops in Jupiter's atmosphere (Bjoraker et al. 2015, ApJ in press, arXiv:1508.04795). We measure resolved CH3D line shapes in the 5-micron window of Jupiter's spectrum to distinguish between cloud-top pressure levels of about 3 to 10 bars.We will use the retrieved cloud top pressure levels to place lower limits on the deep O/H ratio in Jupiter, based on Keck/NIRSPEC spectra acquired in January 2013. Since our spectra do not directly give the temperature/pressure profile in the cloud layer, constraining the O/H ratio requires independent atmospheric structure data. We will review observational and theoretical constraints on Jupiter's thermal structure, which lead to uncertainty bounds on the O/H ratio we derive. Preliminary work to date suggests that our technique may be able to determine whether or not the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer O/H measurement can be representative of the planet's bulk abundance, and whether O is supersolar in Jupiter like the other volatile elements C, N, and S. If we can distinguish between O/H lower limits of 10x and 3x solar, we will be able to test the hypothesis that Jupiter's volatiles must have been delivered via water ice clathrates.[This conference abstract is supported by NASA grant NNX11AM55G issued through the Outer Planets Research Program, and by grants NNX14AJ43G and NNX15AJ41G through the Planetary Astronomy and Solar System Observations Programs.

  13. Jupiter and the Voyager mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1980-01-01

    In 1977, the United States launched two unmanned Voyager spacecraft that were to take part in an extensive reconnaissance of the outer planets over a 12-year period visiting the environs of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Their first encounter was with the complex Jupiter planetary system 400 million miles away. Sweeping by Jupiter and its five moons in 1979, the two spacecraft have sent back to Earth an enormous amount of data that will prove to be vital in understanding our solar system. Voyager 1 is scheduled to fly past Saturn on November 13 of this year; Voyager 2, in August of the following year. 

  14. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. VII. Occurrence rate of giant extrasolar planets as a function of mass and metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reffert, Sabine; Bergmann, Christoph; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Trifonov, Trifon; Knstler, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Context. We have obtained precise radial velocities for a sample of 373 G and K type giants at Lick Observatory regularly over more than 12 years. Planets have been identified around 15 of these giant stars, and an additional 20 giant stars host planet candidates. Aims: We are interested in the occurrence rate of substellar companions around giant stars as a function of stellar mass and metallicity. We probe the stellar mass range from approximately 1 to beyond 3 M?, which is not being explored by main-sequence samples. Methods: We fit the giant planet occurrence rate as a function of stellar mass and metallicity with a Gaussian and an exponential distribution, respectively. Results: We find strong evidence for a planet-metallicity correlation among the secure planet hosts of our giant star sample, in agreement with the one for main-sequence stars. However, the planet-metallicity correlation is absent for our sample of planet candidates, raising the suspicion that a good fraction of them might indeed not be planets despite clear periodicities in the radial velocities. Consistent with the literature results for subgiants, the giant planet occurrence rate increases in the stellar mass interval from 1 to 1.9 M?. However, there is a maximum at a stellar mass of 1.9+ 0.1-0.5 M?, and the occurrence rate drops rapidly for masses larger than 2.5-3.0 M?. We do not find any planets around stars more massive than 2.7 M?, although there are 113 stars with masses between 2.7 and 5 M? in our sample (corresponding to a giant planet occurrence rate smaller than 1.6% at 68.3% confidence in that stellar mass bin). We also show that this result is not a selection effect related to the planet detectability being a function of the stellar mass. Conclusions: We conclude that giant planet formation or inward migration is suppressed around higher mass stars, possibly because of faster disk depletion coupled with a longer migration timescale. Based on observations collected at Lick Observatory, University of California.Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/574/A116

  15. DENSITY WAVES EXCITED BY LOW-MASS PLANETS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. LINEAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Ruobing; Stone, James M.; Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R. E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu E-mail: cpetrovi@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-11-01

    Density waves excited by planets embedded in protoplanetary disks play a central role in planetary migration and gap opening processes. We carry out two-dimensional shearing sheet simulations to study the linear regime of wave evolution with the grid-based code Athena and provide detailed comparisons with theoretical predictions. Low-mass planets (down to {approx}0.03 M{sub Circled-Plus} at 1 AU) and high spatial resolution (256 grid points per scale height) are chosen to mitigate the effects of wave nonlinearity. To complement the existing numerical studies, we focus on the primary physical variables such as the spatial profile of the wave, torque density, and the angular momentum flux carried by the wave, instead of secondary quantities such as the planetary migration rate. Our results show percent level agreement with theory in both physical and Fourier spaces. New phenomena such as the change of the toque density sign far from the planet are discovered and discussed. Also, we explore the effect of the numerical algorithms and find that a high order of accuracy, high resolution, and an accurate planetary potential are crucial to achieve good agreement with the theory. We find that the use of a too large time step without properly resolving the dynamical timescale around the planet produces incorrect results and may lead to spurious gap opening. Global simulations of planet migration and gap opening violating this requirement may be affected by spurious effects resulting in, e.g., the incorrect planetary migration rate and gap opening mass.

  16. The High-Energy Radiation Environment of Planets around Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya; Miles, Brittany; Barman, Travis; Peacock, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Low-mass stars are the dominant planet hosts averaging about one planet per star. Many of these planets orbit in the canonical habitable zone (HZ) of the star where, if other conditions allowed, liquid water may exist on the surface.A planet’s habitability, including atmospheric retention, is strongly dependent on the star’s ultraviolet (UV) emission, which chemically modifies, ionizes, and even erodes the atmosphere over time including the photodissociation of important diagnostic molecules, e.g. H2O, CH4, and CO2. The UV spectral slope of a low-mass star can enhance atmospheric lifetimes, and increase the detectability of biologically generated gases. But, a different slope may lead to the formation of abiotic oxygen and ozone producing a false-positive biosignature for oxygenic photosynthesis. Realistic constraints on the incident UV flux over a planet’s lifetime are necessary to explore the cumulative effects on the evolution, composition, and fate of a HZ planetary atmosphere.NASA’s Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) provides a unique data set with which to study the broadband UV emission from many hundreds of M dwarfs. The GALEX satellite has imaged nearly 3/4 of the sky simultaneously in two UV bands: near-UV (NUV; 175-275 nm) and far-UV (FUV; 135-175 nm). With these data these, we are able to calculate the mean UV emission and its level of variability at these wavelengths over critical planet formation and evolution time scales to better understand the probable conditions in HZ planetary atmospheres.In the near future, dedicated CubeSats (miniaturized satellites for space research) to monitor M dwarf hosts of transiting exoplanets will provide the best opportunity to measure their UV variability, constrain the probabilities of detecting habitable (and inhabited) planets, and provide the correct context within which to interpret IR transmission and emission spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets.

  17. A CORRELATION BETWEEN STELLAR ACTIVITY AND THE SURFACE GRAVITY OF HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.

    2010-07-10

    Recently, Knutson et al. have demonstrated a correlation between the presence of temperature inversions in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters and the chromospheric activity levels of the host stars. Here, we show that there is also a correlation, with greater than 99.5% confidence, between the surface gravity of hot Jupiters and the activity levels of the host stars, such that high surface gravity planets tend be found around high-activity stars. We also find a less significant positive correlation between planet mass and chromospheric activity, but no significant correlation is seen between planet radius and chromospheric activity. We consider the possibility that this may be due to an observational bias against detecting lower mass planets around higher activity stars, but conclude that this bias is only likely to affect the detection of planets much smaller than those considered here. Finally, we speculate on physical origins for the correlation-including the possibility that the effect of stellar insolation on planetary radii has been significantly underestimated, that strong UV flux evaporates planetary atmospheres, or that high-mass hot Jupiters induce activity in their host stars-but do not find any of these hypotheses to be particularly compelling.

  18. The Effects of Gravitational Instabilities on Gas Giant Planet Migration in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Scott A.; Durisen, R. H.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we conduct several three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic simulations to explore the effect of the inclusion of gas giant planets in gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disks. We compare several simulations carried out with the CHYMERA code including: a baseline simulation without a planet, and three simulations including planets of various masses 0.3, 1 and 3 Jupiter masses. The planets are inserted into the baseline simulation after the gravitational instabilities (GIs) have grown to non-linear amplitude. The planets are inserted at the same radius, which coincides with the co-rotation radius of the dominant global mode in the baseline simulation. We examine the effect that the GIs have on migration rates as well as the potential of halting inward migration. We also examine the effect the insertion of the planet has on the global torques caused by the GIs. Furthermore, we explore the relationship between planet mass and migration rates and effect on GIs.

  19. The HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets. III. Three Saturn-mass planets around HD 93083, HD 101930 and HD 102117

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Bouchy, F.; Pepe, F.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.; Udry, S.; Benz, W.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Mordasini, C.; Sivan, J.-P.

    2005-07-01

    We report on the detection of three Saturn-mass planets discovered with the HARPS instrument. HD 93083 shows radial-velocity (RV) variations best explained by the presence of a companion of 0.37 MJup orbiting in 143.6 days. HD 101930 b has an orbital period of 70.5 days and a minimum mass of 0.30 MJup. For HD 102117, we present the independent detection of a companion with m2 sin{i} = 0.14 MJup and orbital period P = 20.7 days. This planet was recently detected by Tinney et al. (ApJ, submitted). Activity and bisector indicators exclude any significant RV perturbations of stellar origin, reinforcing the planetary interpretation of the RV variations. The radial-velocity residuals around the Keplerian fits are 2.0, 1.8 and 0.9 m s-1 respectively, showing the unprecedented RV accuracy achieved with HARPS. A sample of stable stars observed with HARPS is also presented to illustrate the long-term precision of the instrument. All three stars are metal-rich, confirming the now well-established relation between planet occurrence and metallicity. The new planets are all in the Saturn-mass range, orbiting at moderate distance from their parent star, thereby occupying an area of the parameter space which seems difficult to populate according to planet formation theories. A systematic exploration of these regions will provide new constraints on formation scenarios in the near future.

  20. Barnards Star: Planets or Pretense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer L.; Ianna, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Barnards Star remains popular with planet hunters because it is not only an extremely near, high proper motion star, but also the object of early planet-detection claims. In 1963, van de Kamp explained perturbations in its proper motion by the presence of a planet. In 1969, he produced another single-planet solution and a two-planet solution to the astrometric wobbles detected. At least 19 studies have failed to confirm his results using a range of techniques, including radial velocity, direct imaging, and speckle interferometry. However, most of them lacked the sensitivity to detect the planets he described, including astrometric studies at the McCormick and Naval Observatories. However, radial-velocity monitoring of Barnards Star at Lick and Keck Observatories from 1987 through 2012 appears to have ruled out such planets. Based upon observations made at the Sproul Observatory between 1916 and 1962, van de Kamp claimed that Barnards Star had a planet with about 1.6 times the mass of Jupiter and an orbital period of 24 years. After accounting for instrumentation effects that might have been partially responsible for his initial results, he continued to assert that this red dwarf had two planets. In his 1982 analysis of ~20,000 exposures collected between 1938 and 1981, he calculated that two planets with 0.7- and 0.5-Jupiter masses in 12- and 20-year orbits, respectively, orbited the second-closest stellar system to our own. Starting in 1995, the dramatic successes of radial velocity searches for extrasolar planets drove van de Kamps unsubstantiated claims from popular consciousness. Although many low-mass stellar companions were discovered through astrometry, the technique has been less successful for planets: The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia identifies one such discovery out of the 997 planets listed on 2013 September 23. Although Barnards Star has lost its pretensions to hosting the first extrasolar planets known, its intrinsic properties will keep it under observation. NSF grant AST 98-20711, Litton Marine Systems, Levinson Fund, University of Virginia, Hampden-Sydney College, and US Naval Observatory supported this research.

  1. Super-massive planets around late-type stars—the case of OGLE-2012-BLG-0406Lb

    SciTech Connect

    Poleski, Radosław; Gould, Andrew; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymański, Michał K.; Soszyński, Igor; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Kozłowski, Szymon; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Skowron, Jan; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Dong, Subo

    2014-02-10

    Super-Jupiter-mass planets should form only beyond the snow line of host stars. However, the core accretion theory of planetary formation does not predict super-Jupiters forming around low-mass hosts. We present a discovery of a 3.9 ± 1.2 M {sub Jup} mass planet orbiting the 0.59 ± 0.17 M {sub ☉} star using the gravitational microlensing method. During the event, the projected separation of the planet and the star is 3.9 ± 1.0 AU, i.e., the planet is significantly further from the host star than the snow line. This is the fourth such planet discovered using the microlensing technique and challenges the core accretion theory.

  2. The survival of gas giant planets on wide orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2015-12-01

    It is not known whether gas giant planets on wide orbits form the same way as Jupiter or by fragmentation of gravitationally unstable discs. It has been suggested that giant planets that form on wide orbits in gravitationally unstable discs quickly migrate towards the central star. We simulate the migration of such planets including the effects of gas accretion onto the planet and radiative feedback from the planet, both of which have been ignored in previous studies. We show that a giant planet, which has formed in the outer regions of a protostellar disc, initially migrates towards the central star while accreting gas from the disc. However, the planet eventually opens up a gap in the disc and the migration is essentially halted. At the same time, accretion-powered radiative feedback from the planet, significantly limits its mass growth, keeping it within the planetary mass regime (i.e. below the deuterium burning limit). Giant planets are therefore able to survive as planets (not higher-mass objects, i.e. brown dwarfs) on wide orbits, shaping the environment in which terrestrial planets that may harbour life form.

  3. Spitzer Secondary Eclipse Observations of Five Cool Gas Giant Planets and Empirical Trends in Cool Planet Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Joshua A.; Knutson, Heather A.; Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Deming, Drake; Burrows, Adam; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Laughlin, Gregory P.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Morley, Caroline V.; Moses, Julianne I.; Showman, Adam P.; Todorov, Kamen O.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm secondary eclipse observations of five new cool (\\lt 1200 K) transiting gas giant planets: HAT-P-19b, WASP-6b, WASP-10b, WASP-39b, and WASP-67b. We compare our measured eclipse depths to the predictions of a suite of atmosphere models and to eclipse depths for planets with previously published observations in order to constrain the temperature- and mass-dependent properties of gas giant planet atmospheres. We find that the dayside emission spectra of planets less massive than Jupiter require models with efficient circulation of energy to the night side and/or increased albedos, while those with masses greater than that of Jupiter are consistently best-matched by models with inefficient circulation and low albedos. At these relatively low temperatures we expect the atmospheric CH4/CO ratio to vary as a function of metallicity, and we therefore use our observations of these planets to constrain their atmospheric metallicities. We find that the most massive planets have dayside emission spectra that are best-matched by solar metallicity atmosphere models, but we are not able to place strong constraints on metallicities of the smaller planets in our sample. Interestingly, we find that the ratio of the 3.6 and 4.5 μm brightness temperatures for these cool transiting planets is independent of planet temperature, and instead exhibits a tentative correlation with planet mass. If this trend can be confirmed, it would suggest that the shape of these planets’ emission spectra depends primarily on their masses, consistent with the hypothesis that lower-mass planets are more likely to have metal-rich atmospheres.

  4. Kepler Planets: A Tale of Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ~0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R ⊕. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ~0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M ⊕ and the majority of them should have core masses of a few Earth masses.

  5. KEPLER PLANETS: A TALE OF EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ∼0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R{sub ⊕}. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ∼0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M{sub ⊕} and the majority of them should have core masses of a few Earth masses.

  6. KEPLER-6b: A TRANSITING HOT JUPITER ORBITING A METAL-RICH STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Edward W.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B.; Kjeldsen, Hans

    2010-04-20

    We announce the discovery of Kepler-6b, a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting a star with unusually high metallicity, [Fe/H]= +0.34{+-}0.04. The planet's mass is about 2/3 that of Jupiter, M {sub P} = 0.67 M {sub J}, and the radius is 30% larger than that of Jupiter, R {sub P} = 1.32 R {sub J}, resulting in a density of {rho}{sub P} = 0.35 g cm{sup -3}, a fairly typical value for such a planet. The orbital period is P = 3.235 days. The host star is both more massive than the Sun, M {sub *} = 1.21 M {sub sun}, and larger than the Sun, R {sub *} = 1.39 R {sub sun}.

  7. The influence of coronal mass ejections on the gas dynamics of the atmosphere of a "hot Jupiter" exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisikalo, D. V.; Cherenkov, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of the gas dynamics of the atmosphere of a "hot Jupiter" exoplanet during the passage of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the central star are presented. These computations assumed the parameters for the stellar wind and the CME to be typical of the solar values. The characteristic variations of the flow pattern are considered for quasi-closed and closed (but appreciably distorted by the gravitational influence of the star) gaseous envelopes of the exoplanet. It is shown that a typical CME is sufficient to tear off the outer part of an asymmetric envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe and carry it away from the exoplanet. This leads to a substantial increase in the mass-loss rate from the exoplanet envelope during the passage of CMEs. The mass-loss rate grows by about a factor of 11 for a closed envelope, and by about a factor of 14 for a quasi-closed envelope. Possible evolutionary consequences of the loss of part of the atmosphere during the passage of CMEs are discussed.

  8. Protoplanetary Disks Including Radiative Feedback from Accreting Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, Matías; Cuadra, Jorge; Perez, Sebastian; Baruteau, Clément; Casassus, Simon

    2015-06-01

    While recent observational progress is converging on the detection of compact regions of thermal emission due to embedded protoplanets, further theoretical predictions are needed to understand the response of a protoplanetary disk to the radiative feedback from planet formation. This is particularly important to make predictions for the observability of circumplanetary regions. In this work we use 2D hydrodynamical simulations to examine the evolution of a viscous protoplanetary disk in which a luminous Jupiter-mass planet is embedded. We use an energy equation that includes the radiative heating of the planet as an additional mechanism for planet formation feedback. Several models are computed for planet luminosities ranging from 10-5 to 10-3 solar luminosities. We find that the planet radiative feedback enhances the disk’s accretion rate at the planet’s orbital radius, producing a hotter and more luminous environement around the planet, independently of the prescription used to model the disk’s turbulent viscosity. We also estimate the thermal signature of the planet feedback for our range of planet luminosities, finding that the emitted spectrum of a purely active disk, without passive heating, is appreciably modified in the infrared. We simulate the protoplanetary disk around HD 100546 where a planet companion is located at about 68 AU from the star. Assuming the planet mass is five Jupiter masses and its luminosity is ˜ 2.5× {10}-4 {L}⊙ , we find that the radiative feedback of the planet increases the luminosity of its ˜5 AU circumplanetary disk from {10}-5 {L}⊙ (without feedback) to {10}-3 {L}⊙ , corresponding to an emission of ˜ 1 {mJy} in the {L}\\prime band after radiative transfer calculations, a value that is in good agreement with HD 100546b observations.

  9. Young Solar System's Fifth Giant Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David

    2011-12-01

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside ~15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  10. YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David

    2011-12-15

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside {approx}15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  11. Bayesian search for low-mass planets around nearby M dwarfs - estimates for occurrence rate based on global detectability statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomi, Mikko; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Barnes, John R.; Anglada-Escud, Guillem; Jenkins, James S.

    2014-06-01

    Due to their higher planet-star mass ratios, M dwarfs are the easiest targets for detection of low-mass planets orbiting nearby stars using Doppler spectroscopy. Furthermore, because of their low masses and luminosities, Doppler measurements enable the detection of low-mass planets in their habitable zones that correspond to closer orbits than for solar-type stars. We re-analyse literature Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) radial velocities of 41 nearby M dwarfs in a combination with new velocities obtained from publicly available spectra from the HARPS-ESO spectrograph of these stars in an attempt to constrain any low-amplitude Keplerian signals. We apply Bayesian signal detection criteria, together with posterior sampling techniques, in combination with noise models that take into account correlations in the data and obtain estimates for the number of planet candidates in the sample. More generally, we use the estimated detection probability function to calculate the occurrence rate of low-mass planets around nearby M dwarfs. We report eight new planet candidates in the sample (orbiting GJ 27.1, GJ 160.2, GJ 180, GJ 229, GJ 422, and GJ 682), including two new multiplanet systems, and confirm two previously known candidates in the GJ 433 system based on detections of Keplerian signals in the combined UVES and High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) radial velocity data that cannot be explained by periodic and/or quasi-periodic phenomena related to stellar activities. Finally, we use the estimated detection probability function to calculate the occurrence rate of low-mass planets around nearby M dwarfs. According to our results, M dwarfs are hosts to an abundance of low-mass planets and the occurrence rate of planets less massive than 10 M? is of the order of one planet per star, possibly even greater. Our results also indicate that planets with masses between 3 and 10 M? are common in the stellar habitable zones of M dwarfs with an estimated occurrence rate of 0.21^{+0.03}_{-0.05} planets per star.

  12. HST hot Jupiter transmission spectral survey: The atmospheric circulation of a large hot Jupiter sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, Tiffany; Sing, David Kent; Lewis, Nikole K.; Fortney, Jonathan; Marley, Mark; Showman, Adam P.

    2015-12-01

    Even as we move towards characterizing smaller and cooler exoplanets, hot Jupiters continue to be the best transiting planets for probing the atmospheric properties of exoplanets and refining current theory. Here we present results from a comprehensive atmospheric circulation study of nine transiting hot Jupiters that probe a wide range of planetary properties, including orbital distance, rotation rate, mass, radius, gravity and stellar insolation. We utilize these circulation models to aid in the interpretation of transmission spectra obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) as a part of a large Hubble Space Telescope (HST) transmission spectral survey. These observations have shown a range of spectral behavior over optical and infrared wavelengths, suggesting diverse cloud and haze properties in their atmospheres. Our grid of models recovers trends shown in other parametric studies of hot Jupiters, particularly increased day-night temperature contrast with increasing equilibrium temperature and equatorial superrotation. Furthermore, we show that three-dimensional variations in temperature, particularly across the western and eastern terminators and from the equator to the pole, can vary by hundreds of Kelvin. This can result in vastly different cloud properties across the limb, which can lead to variations in transmission spectra. Finally, we comment on prospects with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to further characterize hot Jupiters out to longer wavelengths.

  13. HST hot Jupiter transmission spectral survey: The atmospheric circulation of a large hot Jupiter sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, Tiffany; Sing, David K.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Showman, Adam P.

    2015-11-01

    Even as we move towards characterizing smaller and cooler exoplanets, hot Jupiters continue to be the best transiting planets for probing the atmospheric properties of exoplanets and refining current theory. Here we present results from a comprehensive atmospheric circulation study of nine transiting hot Jupiters that probe a wide range of planetary properties, including orbital distance, rotation rate, mass, radius, gravity and stellar insolation. We utilize these circulation models to aid in the interpretation of transmission spectra obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) as a part of a large Hubble Space Telescope (HST) transmission spectral survey. These observations have shown a range of spectral behavior over optical and infrared wavelengths, suggesting diverse cloud and haze properties in their atmospheres. Our grid of models recovers trends shown in other parametric studies of hot Jupiters, particularly increased day-night temperature contrast with increasing equilibrium temperature and equatorial superrotation. Furthermore, we show that three-dimensional variations in temperature, particularly across the western and eastern terminators and from the equator to the pole, can vary by hundreds of Kelvin. This can result in vastly different cloud properties across the limb, which can lead to variations in transmission spectra. Finally, we comment on prospects with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to further characterize hot Jupiters out to longer wavelengths.

  14. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2015-09-01

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zones, which determine the compositions of Earth and Venus follow a particular pattern determined by Jupiter, while the feeding zones of Mars and Theia, the last giant impactor on Earth, appear to randomly sample the terrestrial disk. The late accreted mass samples the disk nearly evenly.

  15. A nebula of gases from Io surrounding Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Krimigis, Stamatios M; Mitchell, Donald G; Hamilton, Douglas C; Dandouras, Jannis; Armstrong, Thomas P; Bolton, Scott J; Cheng, Andrew F; Gloeckler, George; Hsieh, K C; Keath, Edwin P; Krupp, Norbert; Lagg, Andreas; Lanzerotti, Louis J; Livi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H; McEntire, Richard W; Roelof, Edmond C; Wilken, Berend; Williams, Donald J

    2002-02-28

    Several planetary missions have reported the presence of substantial numbers of energetic ions and electrons surrounding Jupiter; relativistic electrons are observable up to several astronomical units (au) from the planet. A population of energetic (>30[?]keV) neutral particles also has been reported, but the instrumentation was not able to determine the mass or charge state of the particles, which were subsequently labelled energetic neutral atoms. Although images showing the presence of the trace element sodium were obtained, the source and identity of the neutral atoms---and their overall significance relative to the loss of charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere---were unknown. Here we report the discovery by the Cassini spacecraft of a fast (>103[?]km[?]s-1) and hot magnetospheric neutral wind extending more than 0.5[?]au from Jupiter, and the presence of energetic neutral atoms (both hot and cold) that have been accelerated by the electric field in the solar wind. We suggest that these atoms originate in volcanic gases from Io, undergo significant evolution through various electromagnetic interactions, escape Jupiter's magnetosphere and then populate the environment around the planet. Thus a 'nebula' is created that extends outwards over hundreds of jovian radii. PMID:11875559

  16. CoRoT's first seven planets: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, R.; Schneider, J.; Lammer, H.; Barge, P.; Wuchterl, G.

    2011-07-01

    The up to 150 day uninterrupted high-precision photometry of about 100000 stars - provided so far by the exoplanet channel of the CoRoT space telescope - gave a new perspective on the planet population of our galactic neighbourhood. The seven planets with very accurate parameters widen the range of known planet properties in almost any respect. Giant planets have been detected at low metallicity, rapidly rotating and active, spotted stars. CoRoT-3 populated the brown dwarf desert and closed the gap of measured physical properties between standard giant planets and very low mass stars. CoRoT extended the known range of planet masses down-to 5 Earth masses and up to 21 Jupiter masses, the radii to less than 2 Earth radii and up to the most inflated hot Jupiter found so far, and the periods of planets discovered by transits to 9 days. Two CoRoT planets have host stars with the lowest content of heavy elements known to show a transit hinting towards a different planet-host-star-metallicity relation then the one found by radial-velocity search programs. Finally the properties of the CoRoT-7b prove that terrestrial planets with a density close to Earth exist outside the Solar System. The detection of the secondary transit of CoRoT-1 at the 10-5-level and the very clear detection of the 1.7 Earth radii of CoRoT-7b at 3.5 10-4 relative flux are promising evidence of CoRoT being able to detect even smaller, Earth sized planets. The CoRoT space mission has been developed and is operated by CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany and Spain.

  17. Journey to a Star Rich with Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Journey to a Star Rich with Planets

    This artist's animation takes us on a journey to 55 Cancri, a star with a family of five known planets - the most planets discovered so far around a star besides our own.

    The animation begins on Earth, with a view of the night sky and 55 Cancri (flashing dot), located 41 light-years away in the constellation Cancer. It then zooms through our solar system, passing our asteroids and planets, until finally arriving at the outskirts of 55 Cancri.

    The first planet to appear is the farthest out from the star -- a giant planet, probably made of gas, with a mass four times that of Jupiter. This planet orbits its star every 14 years, similar to Jupiter's 11.9-year orbit.

    As the movie continues, the three inner planets are shown, the closest of which is about 10 to 13 times the mass of Earth with an orbital period of less than three days.

    Zooming out, the animation highlights the newest member of the 55 Cancri family - a massive planet, likely made of gas, water and rock, about 45 times the mass of Earth and orbiting the star every 260 days. This planet is the fourth out from the star, and lies in the system's habitable zone (green). A habitable zone is the place around a star where liquid water would persist. Though the newest planet probably has a thick gaseous envelope, astronomers speculate that it could have one or more moons. In our own solar system, moons are common, so it seems likely that they also orbit planets in other solar systems. If such moons do exist, and if they are as large as Mars or Earth, astronomers speculate that they would retain atmospheres and surface liquid water that might make interesting environments for the development of life.

    The animation ends with a comparison between 55 Cancri and our solar system.

    The colors of the illustrated planets were chosen to resemble those of our own solar system. Astronomers do not know what the planets look like.

  18. A young massive planet in a star-disk system.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, J; Henning, Th; Launhardt, R; Müller, A; Weise, P; Kürster, M

    2008-01-01

    There is a general consensus that planets form within disks of dust and gas around newly born stars. Details of their formation process, however, are still a matter of ongoing debate. The timescale of planet formation remains unclear, so the detection of planets around young stars with protoplanetary disks is potentially of great interest. Hitherto, no such planet has been found. Here we report the detection of a planet of mass (9.8+/-3.3)M(Jupiter) around TW Hydrae (TW Hya), a nearby young star with an age of only 8-10 Myr that is surrounded by a well-studied circumstellar disk. It orbits the star with a period of 3.56 days at 0.04 au, inside the inner rim of the disk. This demonstrates that planets can form within 10 Myr, before the disk has been dissipated by stellar winds and radiation. PMID:18172492

  19. PLANETS AROUND THE K-GIANTS BD+20 274 AND HD 219415

    SciTech Connect

    Gettel, S.; Wolszczan, A.; Niedzielski, A.; Nowak, G.; Adamow, M.; Zielinski, P.; Maciejewski, G. E-mail: alex@astro.psu.edu

    2012-09-01

    We present the discovery of planet-mass companions to two giant stars by the ongoing Penn State-Torun Planet Search conducted with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The less massive of these stars, K5-giant BD+20 274, has a 4.2 M{sub J} minimum mass planet orbiting the star at a 578 day period and a more distant, likely stellar-mass companion. The best currently available model of the planet orbiting the K0-giant HD 219415 points to a {approx}> Jupiter-mass companion in a 5.7 year, eccentric orbit around the star, making it the longest period planet yet detected by our survey. This planet has an amplitude of {approx}18 m s{sup -1}, comparable to the median radial velocity 'jitter', typical of giant stars.

  20. Planets around the K-giants BD+20 274 and HD 219415

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettel, S.; Wolszczan, A.; Niedzielski, A.; Nowak, G.; Adamów, M.; Zieliński, P.; Maciejewski, G.

    2012-09-01

    We present the discovery of planet-mass companions to two giant stars by the ongoing Penn State-Toruń Planet Search conducted with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The less massive of these stars, K5-giant BD+20 274, has a 4.2 MJ minimum mass planet orbiting the star at a 578 day period and a more distant, likely stellar-mass companion. The best currently available model of the planet orbiting the K0-giant HD 219415 points to a >~ Jupiter-mass companion in a 5.7 year, eccentric orbit around the star, making it the longest period planet yet detected by our survey. This planet has an amplitude of ~18 m s-1, comparable to the median radial velocity "jitter," typical of giant stars.

  1. Effects of Magnetism on the Atmospheres and Evolution of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Rogers, Tamara M.; Barman, Travis S.; Showman, Adam P.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic effects imprint potentially observable features of close-in extrasolar giant planets, or "hot Jupiters," through two mechanisms: the Lorentz force, which modifies atmospheric dynamics, and Ohmic dissipation, which may have a large impact on the structure and evolution of a planet. We present results from a 3D anelastic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, taking into account purely resistive MHD. We demonstrate that magnetic effects may cause a transition from the expected superrotation in purely hydrodynamic models to subrotation (i.e. wind reversal) at high equilibrium temperatures and magnetic field strengths. This reduction of wind speeds correspondingly reduces hot spot displacement, forcing MHD atmospheric hot spots to be found westward of their hydrodynamic counterparts. For the case of HD 209458b, we do not expect that atmospheric Ohmic dissipation has a large enough magnitude to explain its observed radius, even when scaling the dissipated power into the planetary convective zone. However, the efficacy of Ohmic dissipation is expected to be greater for hot Jupiters with a lower mass than HD 209458b, as these planets have less partial degeneracy and larger pressure scale heights. Hence, Ohmic dissipation can likely explain why a subset of transiting hot Jupiters appear inflated, but other mechanisms may be required to explain those with a mass comparable to or greater than 0.7 Jupiter masses.

  2. Close approach maneuvers around an oblate planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, G. M. C.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Sanchez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    There are many applications of the close approach maneuvers in astronautics, and several missions used this technique in the last decades. In the present work, those close approach maneuvers are revisited, but now considering that the spacecraft passes around an oblate planet. This fact changes the distribution of mass of the planet, increasing the mass in the region of the equator, so increasing the gravitational forces in the equatorial plane. Since the present study is limited to planar trajectories, there is an increase in the variation of energy given by the maneuver. The planet Jupiter is used as the body for the close approach, but the value of J2 is varied in a large range to simulate situations of other celestial bodies that have larger oblateness, but the same mass ratio. This is particularly true in recent discovered exoplanets, and this first study can help the study of the dynamics around those bodies.

  3. Kepler-424 b: A "Lonely" Hot Jupiter that Found a Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, Michael; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Isaacson, Howard; Buchhave, Lars A.; Brugamyer, Erik; Robertson, Paul; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Havel, Mathieu; Lucas, Phillip; Howell, Steve B.; Fischer, Debra; Quintana, Elisa; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-11-01

    Hot Jupiter systems provide unique observational constraints for migration models in multiple systems and binaries. We report on the discovery of the Kepler-424 (KOI-214) two-planet system, which consists of a transiting hot Jupiter (Kepler-424b) in a 3.31 day orbit accompanied by a more massive outer companion in an eccentric (e = 0.3) 223 day orbit. The outer giant planet, Kepler-424c, is not detected transiting the host star. The masses of both planets and the orbital parameters for the second planet were determined using precise radial velocity (RV) measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) and its High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS). In stark contrast to smaller planets, hot Jupiters are predominantly found to be lacking any nearby additional planets; they appear to be "lonely". This might be a consequence of these systems having a highly dynamical past. The Kepler-424 planetary system has a hot Jupiter in a multiple system, similar to \\upsilon Andromedae. We also present our results for Kepler-422 (KOI-22), Kepler-77 (KOI-127), Kepler-43 (KOI-135), and Kepler-423 (KOI-183). These results are based on spectroscopic data collected with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), the Keck 1 telescope, and HET. For all systems, we rule out false positives based on various follow-up observations, confirming the planetary nature of these companions. We performed a comparison with planetary evolutionary models which indicate that these five hot Jupiters have heavy element contents between 20 and 120 M ?. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitt Mnchen, and Georg-August-Universitt Gttingen.

  4. Kepler-424 b: A 'lonely' hot Jupiter that found A companion

    SciTech Connect

    Endl, Michael; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Havel, Mathieu; Howell, Steve B.; Quintana, Elisa; Isaacson, Howard; Buchhave, Lars A.; Brugamyer, Erik; Robertson, Paul; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Lucas, Phillip; Fischer, Debra; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-11-10

    Hot Jupiter systems provide unique observational constraints for migration models in multiple systems and binaries. We report on the discovery of the Kepler-424 (KOI-214) two-planet system, which consists of a transiting hot Jupiter (Kepler-424b) in a 3.31 day orbit accompanied by a more massive outer companion in an eccentric (e = 0.3) 223 day orbit. The outer giant planet, Kepler-424c, is not detected transiting the host star. The masses of both planets and the orbital parameters for the second planet were determined using precise radial velocity (RV) measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) and its High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS). In stark contrast to smaller planets, hot Jupiters are predominantly found to be lacking any nearby additional planets; they appear to be {sup l}onely{sup .} This might be a consequence of these systems having a highly dynamical past. The Kepler-424 planetary system has a hot Jupiter in a multiple system, similar to υ Andromedae. We also present our results for Kepler-422 (KOI-22), Kepler-77 (KOI-127), Kepler-43 (KOI-135), and Kepler-423 (KOI-183). These results are based on spectroscopic data collected with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), the Keck 1 telescope, and HET. For all systems, we rule out false positives based on various follow-up observations, confirming the planetary nature of these companions. We performed a comparison with planetary evolutionary models which indicate that these five hot Jupiters have heavy element contents between 20 and 120 M {sub ⊕}.

  5. Jupiter: Giant of the solar system. [its solar orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Jupiter, its relationship to the other planets in the solar system, its twelve natural satellites, solar orbit and the appearance of Jupiter in the sky, and the sightings and motions of Jupiter in 1973 are discussed. Educational study projects for students are also included.

  6. PLANET HUNTERS: A TRANSITING CIRCUMBINARY PLANET IN A QUADRUPLE STAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We report the discovery and confirmation of a transiting circumbinary planet (PH1b) around KIC 4862625, an eclipsing binary in the Kepler field. The planet was discovered by volunteers searching the first six Quarters of publicly available Kepler data as part of the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Transits of the planet across the larger and brighter of the eclipsing stars are detectable by visual inspection every {approx}137 days, with seven transits identified in Quarters 1-11. The physical and orbital parameters of both the host stars and planet were obtained via a photometric-dynamical model, simultaneously fitting both the measured radial velocities and the Kepler light curve of KIC 4862625. The 6.18 {+-} 0.17 R{sub Circled-Plus} planet orbits outside the 20 day orbit of an eclipsing binary consisting of an F dwarf (1.734 {+-} 0.044 R{sub Sun }, 1.528 {+-} 0.087 M{sub Sun }) and M dwarf (0.378 {+-} 0.023 R{sub Sun }, 0.408 {+-} 0.024 M{sub Sun }). For the planet, we find an upper mass limit of 169 M{sub Circled-Plus} (0.531 Jupiter masses) at the 99.7% confidence level. With a radius and mass less than that of Jupiter, PH1b is well within the planetary regime. Outside the planet's orbit, at {approx}1000 AU, a previously unknown visual binary has been identified that is likely bound to the planetary system, making this the first known case of a quadruple star system with a transiting planet.

  7. Planets in Transit V Passages of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, T. P.

    2003-05-01

    Eclipses of the Sun have long influenced culture, history, and science. The analogous but much more subtle phenomena of a transit of the Sun by Mercury was first predicted by Johannes Kepler. Soon, predictions of transits of Venus inspired bold expeditions to better understand the scale of our solar system. These passages of discovery sometimes succeeded scientifically but always captured the public imagination and played an unexpected role in history. The possibility of detecting planets outside the solar system by the transit method was first outlined by Otto Struve in 1952. Early inquiries usually assumed that extrasolar planetary systems would have a distribution of planetary radii and orbital sizes like the solar system. The detection of transits from the ground in such systems would be daunting. The recent, unexpected discovery of a class of extrasolar planets (by the radial velocity technique) with orbital periods less than a week and masses near to the planet Jupiter has resulted in a resurgence of interest in the transit method. These so called "hot Jupiters", can produce transits that are likely enough, frequent enough, the transit method. These so called "hot Jupiters", can produce transits that are likely enough, frequent enough, and deep enough that ground-based transit searches can be successful. In November 1999, a planet orbiting the star HD 209458 was found to transit, and many measurements of the transit have since been made that challenge formation and evolution theories. Numerous ground based searches for transits are now underway. Several planned high precision space-based missions designed to detect transits of earth-sized planets, also have the potential to detect transits of hundreds of "hot Jupiters". These efforts and the upcoming transit of the Sun by Venus on June 8, 2004 present an opportunity for transits to once again capture the public imagination and perhaps play a role in history.

  8. Searching for Planets Around other Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    In this colloquim presentation, Professor of Astronomy, Geoffrey Marcy discusses the discovery of planets orbiting other stars. Using the Doppler shift caused by stellar wobble that is caused by nearby planetary mass, astronomers have been able to infer the existence of Jupiter-sized planets around other stars. Using a special spectrometer at Lick Observatory, the wobble of several stars have been traced over the years required to generate an accurate pattern required to infer the stellar wobble. Professor Marcy, discusses the findings of planets around 47 Ursae Majoris, 16 Cygni B, 51 Pegasus, and 56 Rho 1 Cne. In the case of 56 Rho 1 Cne the planet appears to be close to the star, within 1.5 astronomical units. The observations from the smaller Lick Observatory will be augmented by new observations from the larger telescope at the Kek observatory. This move will allow observations of smaller planets, as opposed to the massive planets thus far discovered. The astronomers also hope to observe smaller stars with the Kek data. Future spaceborne observations will allow the discovery of even smaller planets. A spaceborne interferometer is in the planning stages, and an even larger observatory, called the Terrestrial Planet Finder, is hoped for. Professor Marcy shows artists' renderings of two of the planets thus far discovered. He also briefly discusses planetary formation and shows slides of both observations from the Orion Nebula and models of stellar system formation.

  9. Range of outward migration and influence of the disc's mass on the migration of giant planet cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, B.; Kley, W.

    2011-12-01

    Context. The migration of planets plays an important role in the early planet-formation process. An important problem has been that standard migration theories predict very rapid inward migration, which poses problems for population synthesis models. However, it has been shown recently that low-mass planets (20-30 MEarth) that are still embedded in the protoplanetary disc can migrate outwards under certain conditions. Simulations have been performed mostly for planets at given radii for a particular disc model. Aims: Here, we plan to extend previous work and consider different masses of the disc to quantify the influence of the physical disc conditions on planetary migration. The migration behaviour of the planets will be analysed for a variety of positions in the disc. Methods: We perform three-dimensional (3D) radiation hydrodynamical simulations of embedded planets in protoplanetary discs. We use the exp