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Sample records for jupiter mass planets

  1. Final Masses of Giant Planets II: Jupiter Formation in a Gas-Depleted Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-12-01

    Firstly, we study the final masses of giant planets growing in protoplanetary disks through capture of disk gas, by employing an empirical formula for the gas capture rate and a shallow disk gap model, which are both based on hydrodynamical simulations. The shallow disk gaps cannot terminate growth of giant planets. For planets less massive than 10 Jupiter masses, their growth rates are mainly controlled by the gas supply through the global disk accretion, rather than their gaps. The insufficient gas supply compared with the rapid gas capture causes a depletion of the gas surface density even at the outside of the gap, which can create an inner hole in the protoplanetary disk. Our model can also predict how deep the inner hole is for a given planet mass. Secondly, our findings are applied to the formation of our solar system. For the formation of Jupiter, a very low-mass gas disk with a few or several Jupiter masses is required at the beginning of its gas capture because of the non-stopping capture. Such a low-mass gas disk with sufficient solid material can be formed through viscous evolution from an initially ˜10AU-sized compact disk with the solar composition. By the viscous evolution with a moderate viscosity of α˜10-3, most of disk gas accretes onto the sun and a widely spread low-mass gas disk remains when the solid core of Jupiter starts gas capture at t˜107 yrs. The depletion of the disk gas is suitable for explaining the high metallicity in giant planets of our solar system. A very low-mass gas disk also provides a plausible path where type I and II planetary migrations are both suppressed significantly. In particular, we also show that the type II migration of Jupiter-size planets becomes inefficient because of the additional gas depletion due to the rapid gas capture by themselves.

  2. Accretion of Jupiter-mass planets in the limit of vanishing viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Szulágyi, J.; Morbidelli, A.; Crida, A.; Masset, F.

    2014-02-20

    In the core-accretion model, the nominal runaway gas-accretion phase brings most planets to multiple Jupiter masses. However, known giant planets are predominantly Jupiter mass bodies. Obtaining longer timescales for gas accretion may require using realistic equations of states, or accounting for the dynamics of the circumplanetary disk (CPD) in the low-viscosity regime, or both. Here we explore the second way by using global, three-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamical simulations with eight levels of nested grids around the planet. In our simulations, the vertical inflow from the circumstellar disk (CSD) to the CPD determines the shape of the CPD and its accretion rate. Even without a prescribed viscosity, Jupiter's mass-doubling time is ∼10{sup 4} yr, assuming the planet at 5.2 AU and a Minimum Mass Solar Nebula. However, we show that this high accretion rate is due to resolution-dependent numerical viscosity. Furthermore, we consider the scenario of a layered CSD, viscous only in its surface layer, and an inviscid CPD. We identify two planet-accretion mechanisms that are independent of the viscosity in the CPD: (1) the polar inflow—defined as a part of the vertical inflow with a centrifugal radius smaller than two Jupiter radii and (2) the torque exerted by the star on the CPD. In the limit of zero effective viscosity, these two mechanisms would produce an accretion rate 40 times smaller than in the simulation.

  3. Final Masses of Giant Planets. II. Jupiter Formation in a Gas-depleted Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-05-01

    First, we study the final masses of giant planets growing in protoplanetary disks through capture of disk gas, by employing empirical formulae for the gas capture rate and a shallow disk gap model, which are both based on hydrodynamic simulations. We find that, for planets less massive than 10 Jupiter masses, their growth rates are mainly controlled by the gas supply through the global disk accretion, and the gap opening does not limit the accretion. The insufficient gas supply compared with the rapid gas capture causes a depletion of the gas surface density even at the outside the gap, which can create an inner hole in the disk. Second, our findings are applied to the formation of our solar system. For the formation of Jupiter, a very low-mass gas disk of several Jupiter masses is required at the beginning of its gas capture because of the continual capture. Such a low-mass gas disk with sufficient solid material can be formed through viscous evolution from a compact disk of initial size ˜10 au. By viscous evolution with a moderate viscosity of α ˜ 10‑3, most of the disk gas accretes onto the Sun and a widely spread low-mass gas disk remains when the solid core of Jupiter starts gas capture at t ˜ 107 yr. A very low-mass gas disk also provides a plausible path where type I and II planetary migrations are both suppressed significantly. In particular, the type II migration of Jupiter-size planets becomes inefficient because of the additional gas depletion due to the rapid gas capture by such planets.

  4. Final Masses of Giant Planets. II. Jupiter Formation in a Gas-depleted Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-05-01

    First, we study the final masses of giant planets growing in protoplanetary disks through capture of disk gas, by employing empirical formulae for the gas capture rate and a shallow disk gap model, which are both based on hydrodynamic simulations. We find that, for planets less massive than 10 Jupiter masses, their growth rates are mainly controlled by the gas supply through the global disk accretion, and the gap opening does not limit the accretion. The insufficient gas supply compared with the rapid gas capture causes a depletion of the gas surface density even at the outside the gap, which can create an inner hole in the disk. Second, our findings are applied to the formation of our solar system. For the formation of Jupiter, a very low-mass gas disk of several Jupiter masses is required at the beginning of its gas capture because of the continual capture. Such a low-mass gas disk with sufficient solid material can be formed through viscous evolution from a compact disk of initial size ∼10 au. By viscous evolution with a moderate viscosity of α ∼ 10‑3, most of the disk gas accretes onto the Sun and a widely spread low-mass gas disk remains when the solid core of Jupiter starts gas capture at t ∼ 107 yr. A very low-mass gas disk also provides a plausible path where type I and II planetary migrations are both suppressed significantly. In particular, the type II migration of Jupiter-size planets becomes inefficient because of the additional gas depletion due to the rapid gas capture by such planets.

  5. Jupiter: As a planet. [its physical characteristics and radio waves emitted from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The planet Jupiter, its planetary mass and atmosphere, radio waves emitted from Jupiter, thermal radiation, internal structure of Jupiter, and the possibility of life on Jupiter are discussed. Educational study projects are included.

  6. The Giant Planet Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, John H.

    2009-07-01

    Part I. Observing Jupiter: 1. Observations from Earth; 2. Observations from spacecraft; Part II. The Visible Structure of the Atmosphere: 3. Horizontal structure: belts, currents, spots and storms; 4. Vertical structure: colours and clouds; Part III. The Observational Record of the Atmosphere: 5. The Polar Region; 6. North North Temperate Regions (57°N to 35°N); 7. North Temperate Region (35°N to 23°N); 8. North Tropical Region (23°N to 9°N); 9. Equatorial Region (9°N to 9°S); 10. South Tropical Region (9°S to 27°S); 11. South Temperate Region (27°S to 37°S); 12. South South Temperate Region (37°S to 53°S); Part IV: The Physics and Chemistry of the Atmosphere: 13. Possible large-scale and long-term patterns; 14. The dynamics of individual spots; 15. Theoretical models of the atmosphere; 16. The composition of the planet; Part V. The Electrodynamic Environment of Jupiter: 17. Lights in the Jovian night; 18. The magnetosphere and radiation belts; Part VI. The Satellites: 19. The inner satellites and the ring; 20. The Galilean satellites; 21. Io; 22. Europa; 23. Ganymede; 24. Callisto; 25. The outer satellites; Appendices: 1. Measurement of longitude; 2. Measurement of latitude; 3. Lists of apparitions and published reports; 4. Bibliography (The planet); 5. Bibliography (The magnetosphere and satellites); Index.

  7. Dust Coagulation in the Vicinity of a Gap-opening Jupiter-mass Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballido, Augusto; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the coagulation of dust in and around a gap opened by a Jupiter-mass planet. To this end, we carry out a high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the gap environment, which is turbulent due to the magnetorotational instability. From the MHD simulation, we obtain values of the gas velocities, densities, and turbulent stresses (a) close to the gap edge, (b) in one of the two gas streams that accrete onto the planet, (c) inside the low-density gap, and (d) outside the gap. The MHD values are then input into a Monte Carlo dust-coagulation algorithm which models grain sticking and compaction. We also introduce a simple implementation for bouncing, for comparison purposes. We consider two dust populations for each region: one whose initial size distribution is monodisperse, with monomer radius equal to 1 μm, and another one whose initial size distribution follows the Mathis–Rumpl–Nordsieck distribution for interstellar dust grains, with an initial range of monomer radii between 0.5 and 10 μm. Without bouncing, our Monte Carlo calculations show steady growth of dust aggregates in all regions, and the mass-weighted (m-w) average porosity of the initially monodisperse population reaches extremely high final values of 98%. The final m-w porosities in all other cases without bouncing range between 30% and 82%. The efficiency of compaction is due to high turbulent relative speeds between dust particles. When bouncing is introduced, growth is slowed down in the planetary wake and inside the gap. Future studies will need to explore the effect of different planet masses and electric charge on grains.

  8. Jupiter: Lord of the Planets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, William

    1984-01-01

    Presents a chapter from an introductory college-level astronomy textbook in which full-color photographs and numerous diagrams highlight an extensive description of the planet Jupiter. Topics include Jupiter's geology, rotation, magnetic field, atmosphere (including clouds and winds), and the Great Red Spot. (DH)

  9. ACCRETION OF ROCKY PLANETS BY HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Jacob A.; Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2011-11-01

    The observed population of Hot Jupiters displays a stunning variety of physical properties, including a wide range of densities and core sizes for a given planetary mass. Motivated by the observational sample, this Letter studies the accretion of rocky planets by Hot Jupiters, after the Jovian planets have finished their principal migration epoch and become parked in {approx}4 day orbits. In this scenario, rocky planets form later and then migrate inward due to torques from the remaining circumstellar disk, which also damps the orbital eccentricity. This mechanism thus represents one possible channel for increasing the core masses and metallicities of Hot Jupiters. This Letter determines probabilities for the possible end states for the rocky planet: collisions with the Jovian planets, accretion onto the star, ejection from the system, and long-term survival of both planets. These probabilities depend on the mass of the Jovian planet and its starting orbital eccentricity, as well as the eccentricity damping rate for the rocky planet. Since these systems are highly chaotic, a large ensemble (N {approx} 10{sup 3}) of simulations with effectively equivalent starting conditions is required. Planetary collisions are common when the eccentricity damping rate is sufficiently low, but are rare otherwise. For systems that experience planetary collisions, this work determines the distributions of impact velocities-both speeds and impact parameters-for the collisions. These velocity distributions help determine the consequences of the impacts, e.g., where energy and heavy elements are deposited within the giant planets.

  10. The planet Jupiter (1970)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.

    1971-01-01

    Data obtained through 1970, some materials published during the first half of 1971, and conclusions of the Jupiter Radiation Belt Workshop held in July 1971 are presented. All the information on Jupiter was derived from data obtained at angular and spectral resolutions possible with Earth-based instrumentation or with sensors on aircraft, rockets, and balloons. The observations were made primarily in the visible, near visible, infrared, and radio portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The information was assessed for the potential effects of the Jovian environment on spacecraft performance. The assessment was done independently for the three types of missions under consideration and formulated for overall spacecraft as well as for subsystem design.

  11. Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters: chemical reactions and a new hypothesis for the origin of water in habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Rafael; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa M.

    2015-08-01

    The chemistry along the mass loss of Hot Jupiters is generally considered to be simple, consisting mainly of atoms, prevented from forming more complex species by the intense radiation field from their host stars. However, the results of our chemical reaction simulations, involving 56 species and 566 reactions, indicate that many simple molecules, including H2O+ and OH+, are formed along the mass loss of HD 209458 b and analogs, in a region farther away from the planet, where the temperature is lower (T < 2000 K). Our simulations included benzene formation reactions; the results indicate that carbon chain species are not formed in the mass loss of HD 209458 b. We also formulate a new hypothesis for the origin of water on the surface of habitable planets in general: chemical interaction of their primordial atmospheres with hydrogen and oxygen ions from the atmospheric mass loss of primordial, low density Hot Jupiters. This mechanism could have possibly operated in the Solar System and accounted for the formation of the oceans of the Earth.

  12. There might be giants: unseen Jupiter-mass planets as sculptors of tightly packed planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, T. O.; Alexander, R. D.

    2016-03-01

    The limited completeness of the Kepler sample for planets with orbital periods ≳1 yr leaves open the possibility that exoplanetary systems may host undetected giant planets. Should such planets exist, their dynamical interactions with the inner planets may prove vital in sculpting the final orbital configurations of these systems. Using an N-body code with additional forces to emulate the effects of a protoplanetary disc, we perform simulations of the assembly of compact systems of super-Earth-mass planets with unseen giant companions. The simulated systems are analogous to Kepler-11 or Kepler-32 in that they contain four or five inner super-Earths, but our systems also contain longer-period giant companions which are unlikely to have been detected by Kepler. We find that giant companions tend to break widely spaced first-order mean-motion resonances, allowing the inner planets to migrate into tighter resonances. This leads to more compact architectures and increases the occurrence rate of Laplace resonant chains.

  13. KELT-10b and KELT-11b: Two Sub-Jupiter Mass Planets well-Suited for Atmospheric Characterization in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.

    2015-12-01

    The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a photometric survey in both the northern and southern hemispheres for transiting planets around bright stars (8 < V < 11), and has discovered 15 planets to date. Of these, several possess unique characteristics that make them especially well suited for study of planet atmospheres. Here, I present the first two discoveries from the KELT-South survey. KELT-10b is an inflated transiting sub-Jupiter mass planet (0.68 MJ) around a V=10.7 early G-star. It has the 3rd deepest transit (1.4%) in the southern hemisphere for a star V < 12.5, making it a great target for transmission spectroscopy. KELT-11b is a highly inflated transiting Saturn mass planet (0.22 MJ) orbiting one of the brightest planet-hosting stars in the southern hemisphere. Interestingly, KELT-11b's host star is a clear sub-giant star (log(g) ~ 3.7). I will discuss their impact for atmospheric characterization. For example, the highly inflated nature of the KELT-11b planet provides the ability to study a sub-Jupiter atmosphere at very low planetary gravity, while the sub-giant nature of its host star allows us to study the effects of post main sequence evolution of a host star on a hot Jupiter.

  14. Hot Jupiters from secular planet-planet interactions.

    PubMed

    Naoz, Smadar; Farr, Will M; Lithwick, Yoram; Rasio, Frederic A; Teyssandier, Jean

    2011-05-12

    About 25 per cent of 'hot Jupiters' (extrasolar Jovian-mass planets with close-in orbits) are actually orbiting counter to the spin direction of the star. Perturbations from a distant binary star companion can produce high inclinations, but cannot explain orbits that are retrograde with respect to the total angular momentum of the system. Such orbits in a stellar context can be produced through secular (that is, long term) perturbations in hierarchical triple-star systems. Here we report a similar analysis of planetary bodies, including both octupole-order effects and tidal friction, and find that we can produce hot Jupiters in orbits that are retrograde with respect to the total angular momentum. With distant stellar mass perturbers, such an outcome is not possible. With planetary perturbers, the inner orbit's angular momentum component parallel to the total angular momentum need not be constant. In fact, as we show here, it can even change sign, leading to a retrograde orbit. A brief excursion to very high eccentricity during the chaotic evolution of the inner orbit allows planet-star tidal interactions to rapidly circularize that orbit, decoupling the planets and forming a retrograde hot Jupiter. PMID:21562558

  15. RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC PLANET SEARCH. II. CONSTRAINTS ON SUB-JUPITER-MASS COMPANIONS TO GJ 896A

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Bolatto, Alberto; Ford, Eric B.; Fries, Adam; Kalas, Paul; Sanchez, Karol; Viscomi, Vincent; Sanderbeck, Phoebe

    2011-10-10

    We present results from the Radio Interferometric Planet search for companions to the nearby star GJ 896A. We present 11 observations over 4.9 yr. Fitting astrometric parameters to the data reveals a residual with peak-to-peak amplitude of {approx}3 mas in right ascension. This residual is well fit by an acceleration term of 0.458 {+-} 0.032 mas yr{sup -2}. The parallax is fit to an accuracy of 0.2 mas and the proper motion terms are fit to accuracies of 0.01 mas yr{sup -1}. After fitting astrometric and acceleration terms, residuals are 0.26 mas in each coordinate, demonstrating that stellar jitter does not limit the ability to carry out radio astrometric planet detection and characterization. The acceleration term originates in part from the companion GJ 896B, but the amplitude of the acceleration in declination is not accurately predicted by the orbital model. The acceleration sets a mass upper limit of 0.15 M{sub J} at a semimajor axis of 2 AU for a planetary companion to GJ 896A. For semimajor axes between 0.3 and 2 AU upper limits are determined by the maximum angular separation; the upper limits scale from the minimum value in proportion to the inverse of the radius. Upper limits at larger radii are set by the acceleration and scale as the radius squared. An improved solution for the stellar binary system could improve the exoplanet mass sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  16. Kepler-423b: a half-Jupiter mass planet transiting a very old solar-like star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, D.; Parviainen, H.; Deeg, H. J.; Lanza, A. F.; Fridlund, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Alonso, R.; Augusteijn, T.; Cabrera, J.; Evans, T.; Geier, S.; Hatzes, A. P.; Holczer, T.; Hoyer, S.; Kangas, T.; Mazeh, T.; Pagano, I.; Tal-Or, L.; Tingley, B.

    2015-04-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of the Kepler object of interest KOI-183.01 (Kepler-423b), a half-Jupiter mass planet transiting an old solar-like star every 2.7 days. Our analysis is the first to combine the full Kepler photometry (quarters 1-17) with high-precision radial velocity measurements taken with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. We simultaneously modelled the photometric and spectroscopic data-sets using Bayesian approach coupled with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. We found that the Kepler pre-search data conditioned light curve of Kepler-423 exhibits quarter-to-quarter systematic variations of the transit depth, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of ~4.3% and seasonal trends reoccurring every four quarters. We attributed these systematics to an incorrect assessment of the quarterly variation of the crowding metric. The host star Kepler-423 is a G4 dwarf with M⋆ = 0.85 ± 0.04 M⊙, R⋆ = 0.95 ± 0.04 R⊙, Teff= 5560 ± 80 K, [M/H] = - 0.10 ± 0.05 dex, and with an age of 11 ± 2 Gyr. The planet Kepler-423b has a mass of Mp= 0.595 ± 0.081MJup and a radius of Rp= 1.192 ± 0.052RJup, yielding a planetary bulk density of ρp = 0.459 ± 0.083 g cm-3. The radius of Kepler-423b is consistent with both theoretical models for irradiated coreless giant planets and expectations based on empirical laws. The inclination of the stellar spin axis suggests that the system is aligned along the line of sight. We detected a tentative secondary eclipse of the planet at a 2σ confidence level (ΔFec = 14.2 ± 6.6 ppm) and found that the orbit might have asmall non-zero eccentricity of 0.019+0.028-0.014. With a Bond albedo of AB = 0.037 ± 0.019, Kepler-423b is one of the gas-giant planets with the lowest albedo known so far. Based on observations obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of

  17. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Boss, Alan P.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  18. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ford, Eric B.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Boss, Alan P.; Ciardi, David R.; Quinn, Samuel N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2∶1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history. PMID:22566651

  19. The planet Jupiter in 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neel, R.

    1986-03-01

    A study of Jupiter's cloud formations, based primarily on documentation of the May 27, 1983 opposition, is presented. Using some 200 high-resolution photographs, measurements were made of cloud latitudes and periods of rotation, permitting the identification of over 120 cloud formations and the classification of 14 permanent atmospheric currents. The observed movement of white clouds in the South Temperate Zone suggests that the south-south temperate current is very active. The southern tropical perturbation was seen west of the Red Spot, which was observed to continue its retreat toward decreasing longitudes. Other observations included significant activity along the northern and southern limits of the North Equatorial Belt, and a North Tropical Zone/northern North Equatorial Belt rift recognized to be a stable formation.

  20. The planet Jupiter in 1980-1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neel, R.

    1983-09-01

    Observations of the planet Jupiter made with 15 telescopes in 4 countries between October 1980 and July 1981 are reported and combined to produce a general survey of activity in the Jovian upper atmosphere during the period. Numerous photographs of the planetary disk and detailed drawings derived from them are provided, and the individual surface features are numbered and classified. Mean drift, period, and longitude at opposition are listed in tables for each formation, and the activity in each surface band is characterized.

  1. Stability of a terrestrial planet in a planetary system with a Hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Patrick

    With the discovery of over 200 Extra-solar planetary systems recently, it appears that the existence of a "Hot Jupiter" in a planetary system is a fairly common event. Jupiter size planets and larger have been found at the location of orbits of terrestrial planets in our own solar system. This raises the question, under what conditions could an Earth type planet have a stable orbit in the Habitable Zone of a planetary system if a Hot Jupiter is also a part of the system? In this study I will consider a systems with three and four bodies. The star will be one solar mass. The terrestrial planet will have one earth mass, placed at one AU from the star. The other two bodies will have masses on the order that of Jupiter. One "Jupiter" will be a Hot Jupiter, with an orbit closer to the star than that of the terrestrial planet. The other "Jupiter" will be put at an orbit further out than that of the terrestrial planet. Of particular interest are orbits where the terrestrial planet is in resonance with one or both of the Jupiter size planets, to determine whether certain resonances have an effect on the stability of the Earth type planet's orbit. The stability of the Earth size planet will be explored using a Fourier Analysis of its orbital parameters based on a previously developed method called the Frequency Map Analysis (FMA). Using the FMA, the goal is to determine what are the conditions for a "stable" Earth orbit, stability being one of the keys to the development of life on an Earth type planet.

  2. Exploring the diversity of Jupiter-class planets.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Irwin, Patrick G J; Barstow, Joanna K; de Kok, Remco J; Lee, Jae-Min; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2014-04-28

    Of the 900+ confirmed exoplanets discovered since 1995 for which we have constraints on their mass (i.e. not including Kepler candidates), 75% have masses larger than Saturn (0.3 MJ), 53% are more massive than Jupiter and 67% are within 1 AU of their host stars. When Kepler candidates are included, Neptune-sized giant planets could form the majority of the planetary population. And yet the term 'hot Jupiter' fails to account for the incredible diversity of this class of astrophysical object, which exists on a continuum of giant planets from the cool jovians of our own Solar System to the highly irradiated, tidally locked hot roasters. We review theoretical expectations for the temperatures, molecular composition and cloud properties of hydrogen-dominated Jupiter-class objects under a variety of different conditions. We discuss the classification schemes for these Jupiter-class planets proposed to date, including the implications for our own Solar System giant planets and the pitfalls associated with compositional classification at this early stage of exoplanetary spectroscopy. We discuss the range of planetary types described by previous authors, accounting for (i) thermochemical equilibrium expectations for cloud condensation and favoured chemical stability fields; (ii) the metallicity and formation mechanism for these giant planets; (iii) the importance of optical absorbers for energy partitioning and the generation of a temperature inversion; (iv) the favoured photochemical pathways and expectations for minor species (e.g. saturated hydrocarbons and nitriles); (v) the unexpected presence of molecules owing to vertical mixing of species above their quench levels; and (vi) methods for energy and material redistribution throughout the atmosphere (e.g. away from the highly irradiated daysides of close-in giants). Finally, we discuss the benefits and potential flaws of retrieval techniques for establishing a family of atmospheric solutions that reproduce the

  3. Exploring the diversity of Jupiter-class planets

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Barstow, Joanna K.; de Kok, Remco J.; Lee, Jae-Min; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Of the 900+ confirmed exoplanets discovered since 1995 for which we have constraints on their mass (i.e. not including Kepler candidates), 75% have masses larger than Saturn (0.3 MJ), 53% are more massive than Jupiter and 67% are within 1 AU of their host stars. When Kepler candidates are included, Neptune-sized giant planets could form the majority of the planetary population. And yet the term ‘hot Jupiter’ fails to account for the incredible diversity of this class of astrophysical object, which exists on a continuum of giant planets from the cool jovians of our own Solar System to the highly irradiated, tidally locked hot roasters. We review theoretical expectations for the temperatures, molecular composition and cloud properties of hydrogen-dominated Jupiter-class objects under a variety of different conditions. We discuss the classification schemes for these Jupiter-class planets proposed to date, including the implications for our own Solar System giant planets and the pitfalls associated with compositional classification at this early stage of exoplanetary spectroscopy. We discuss the range of planetary types described by previous authors, accounting for (i) thermochemical equilibrium expectations for cloud condensation and favoured chemical stability fields; (ii) the metallicity and formation mechanism for these giant planets; (iii) the importance of optical absorbers for energy partitioning and the generation of a temperature inversion; (iv) the favoured photochemical pathways and expectations for minor species (e.g. saturated hydrocarbons and nitriles); (v) the unexpected presence of molecules owing to vertical mixing of species above their quench levels; and (vi) methods for energy and material redistribution throughout the atmosphere (e.g. away from the highly irradiated daysides of close-in giants). Finally, we discuss the benefits and potential flaws of retrieval techniques for establishing a family of atmospheric solutions that reproduce the

  4. Study of Power Options for Jupiter and Outer Planet Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James

    2015-01-01

    Power for missions to Jupiter and beyond presents a challenging goal for photovoltaic power systems, but NASA missions including Juno and the upcoming Europa Clipper mission have shown that it is possible to operate solar arrays at Jupiter. This work analyzes photovoltaic technologies for use in Jupiter and outer planet missions, including both conventional arrays, as well as analyzing the advantages of advanced solar cells, concentrator arrays, and thin film technologies. Index Terms - space exploration, spacecraft solar arrays, solar electric propulsion, photovoltaic cells, concentrator, Fresnel lens, Jupiter missions, outer planets.

  5. JUPITER WILL BECOME A HOT JUPITER: CONSEQUENCES OF POST-MAIN-SEQUENCE STELLAR EVOLUTION ON GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Madhusudhan, Nikku E-mail: Nikku.Madhusudhan@yale.edu

    2012-09-10

    When the Sun ascends the red giant branch (RGB), its luminosity will increase and all the planets will receive much greater irradiation than they do now. Jupiter, in particular, might end up more highly irradiated than the hot Neptune GJ 436b and, hence, could appropriately be termed a 'hot Jupiter'. When their stars go through the RGB or asymptotic giant branch stages, many of the currently known Jupiter-mass planets in several-AU orbits will receive levels of irradiation comparable to the hot Jupiters, which will transiently increase their atmospheric temperatures to {approx}1000 K or more. Furthermore, massive planets around post-main-sequence stars could accrete a non-negligible amount of material from the enhanced stellar winds, thereby significantly altering their atmospheric chemistry as well as causing a significant accretion luminosity during the epochs of most intense stellar mass loss. Future generations of infrared observatories might be able to probe the thermal and chemical structure of such hot Jupiters' atmospheres. Finally, we argue that, unlike their main-sequence analogs (whose zonal winds are thought to be organized in only a few broad, planetary-scale jets), red-giant hot Jupiters should have multiple, narrow jets of zonal winds and efficient day-night redistribution.

  6. Could Jupiter or Saturn Have Ejected a Fifth Giant Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Tamayo, Daniel; Valencia, Diana

    2015-11-01

    Models of the dynamical evolution of the early solar system that follow the dispersal of the gaseous protoplanetary disk have been widely successful in reconstructing the current orbital configuration of the giant planets. Statistically, some of the most successful dynamical evolution simulations have initially included a hypothetical fifth giant planet, of ice giant (IG) mass, which gets ejected by a gas giant during the early solar system’s proposed instability phase. We investigate the likelihood of an IG ejection (IGE) event by either Jupiter or Saturn through constraints imposed by the current orbits of their wide-separation regular satellites Callisto and Iapetus, respectively. We show that planetary encounters that are sufficient to eject an IG often provide excessive perturbations to the orbits of Callisto and Iapetus, making it difficult to reconcile a planet ejection event with the current orbit of either satellite. Quantitatively, we compute the likelihood of reconciling a regular Jovian satellite orbit with the current orbit of Callisto following an IGE by Jupiter of ∼42%, and conclude that such a large likelihood supports the hypothesis of a fifth giant planet’s existence. A similar calculation for Iapetus reveals that it is much more difficult for Saturn to have ejected an IG and reconciled a Kronian satellite orbit with that of Iapetus (likelihood ∼1%), although uncertainties regarding the formation of Iapetus, with its unusual orbit, complicates the interpretation of this result.

  7. Pan-Planets: Searching for hot Jupiters around cool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeier, C.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Henning, Th.; Bender, R.; Kodric, M.; Deacon, N.; Riffeser, A.; Burgett, W.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-03-01

    The Pan-Planets survey observed an area of 42 sq deg. in the galactic disk for about 165 h. The main scientific goal of the project is the detection of transiting planets around M dwarfs. We establish an efficient procedure for determining the stellar parameters Teff and log g of all sources using a method based on SED fitting, utilizing a three-dimensional dust map and proper motion information. In this way we identify more than 60 000 M dwarfs, which is by far the largest sample of low-mass stars observed in a transit survey to date. We present several planet candidates around M dwarfs and hotter stars that are currently being followed up. Using Monte Carlo simulations we calculate the detection efficiency of the Pan-Planets survey for different stellar and planetary populations. We expect to find 3.0+3.3-1.6 hot Jupiters around F, G, and K dwarfs with periods lower than 10 days based on the planet occurrence rates derived in previous surveys. For M dwarfs, the percentage of stars with a hot Jupiter is under debate. Theoretical models expect a lower occurrence rate than for larger main sequence stars. However, radial velocity surveys find upper limits of about 1% due to their small sample, while the Kepler survey finds a occurrence rate that we estimate to be at least 0.17b(+0.67-0.04) %, making it even higher than the determined fraction from OGLE-III for F, G and K stellar types, 0.14 (+0.15-0.076) %. With the large sample size of Pan-Planets, we are able to determine an occurrence rate of 0.11 (+0.37-0.02) % in case one of our candidates turns out to be a real detection. If, however, none of our candidates turn out to be true planets, we are able to put an upper limit of 0.34% with a 95% confidence on the hot Jupiter occurrence rate of M dwarfs. This limit is a significant improvement over previous estimates where the lowest limit published so far is 1.1% found in the WFCAM Transit Survey. Therefore we cannot yet confirm the theoretical prediction of a lower

  8. Scientists Revise Thinking on Comets, Planet Jupiter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Discusses scientific information obtained from Pioneer 10's Jupiter flyby and the comet Kohoutek's first trip around the sun, including the high hydrogen emission of Jupiter's principal moon, Io. (CC)

  9. On the Detection of Non-transiting Hot Jupiters in Multiple-planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Wang, Songhu; Laughlin, Gregory

    2016-05-01

    We outline a photometric method for detecting the presence of a non-transiting short-period giant planet in a planetary system harboring one or more longer-period transiting planets. Within a prospective system of the type that we consider, a hot Jupiter on an interior orbit inclined to the line of sight signals its presence through approximately sinusoidal full-phase photometric variations in the stellar light curve, correlated with astrometrically induced transit timing variations for exterior transiting planets. Systems containing a hot Jupiter along with a low-mass outer planet or planets on inclined orbits are a predicted hallmark of in situ accretion for hot Jupiters, and their presence can thus be used to test planetary formation theories. We outline the prospects for detecting non-transiting hot Jupiters using photometric data from typical Kepler objects of interest (KOIs). As a demonstration of the technique, we perform a brief assessment of Kepler candidates and identify a potential non-transiting hot Jupiter in the KOI-1822 system. Candidate non-transiting hot Jupiters can be readily confirmed with a small number of Doppler velocity observations, even for stars with V ≳ 14.

  10. MULTIPLE-PLANET SCATTERING AND THE ORIGIN OF HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Beauge, C.; Nesvorny, D.

    2012-06-01

    Doppler and transit observations of exoplanets show a pile-up of Jupiter-size planets in orbits with a 3 day period. A fraction of these hot Jupiters have retrograde orbits with respect to the parent star's rotation, as evidenced by the measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. To explain these observations we performed a series of numerical integrations of planet scattering followed by the tidal circularization and migration of planets that evolved into highly eccentric orbits. We considered planetary systems having three and four planets initially placed in successive mean-motion resonances, although the angles were taken randomly to ensure orbital instability in short timescales. The simulations included the tidal and relativistic effects, and precession due to stellar oblateness. Our results show the formation of two distinct populations of hot Jupiters. The inner population (Population I) is characterized by semimajor axis a < 0.03 AU and mainly formed in the systems where no planetary ejections occurred. Our follow-up integrations showed that this population was transient, with most planets falling inside the Roche radius of the star in <1 Gyr. The outer population of hot Jupiters (Population II) formed in systems where at least one planet was ejected into interstellar space. This population survives the effects of tides over >1 Gyr and fits nicely the observed 3 day pile-up. A comparison between our three-planet and four-planet runs shows that the formation of hot Jupiters is more likely in systems with more initial planets. Due to the large-scale chaoticity that dominates the evolution, high eccentricities and/or high inclinations are generated mainly by close encounters between the planets and not by secular perturbations (Kozai or otherwise). The relative proportion of retrograde planets seems of be dependent on the stellar age. Both the distribution of almost aligned systems and the simulated 3 day pile-up also fit observations better in our four-planet

  11. Planet Masses from Disk Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Young, forming planets can generate immense spiral structures within their protoplanetary disks. A recent study has shown that observations of these spiral structures may allow astronomers to measure the mass of the planets that create them.Spirals From WavesSnapshots of the surface density of a protoplanetary disk in a 2D simulation, 3D simulation, and synthesized scattered-light image. Click for a closer look! [Fung Dong, 2015]Recent studies have shown that a single planet, if it is massive enough, can excite multiple density waves within a protoplanetary disk as it orbits. These density waves can then interfere to produce a multiple-armed spiral structure in the disk inside of the planets orbit a structure which can potentially be observed in scattered-light images of the disk.But what do these arms look like, and what factors determine their structure? In a recently published study, Jeffrey Fung and Ruobing Dong, two researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, have modeled the spiral arms in an effort to answer these questions.Arms Provide AnswersA useful parameter for describing the structure is the azimuthal separation (sep) between the primary and secondary spiral arms. If you draw a circle within the disk and measure the angle between the two points where the primary and secondary arms cross it, thats sep.Azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary spiral arms, as a function of the planet-to-star mass ratio q. The different curves represent different disk aspect ratios. [Fung Dong, 2015]The authors find thatsep stays roughly constant for different radii, but its strongly dependent on the planets mass: for larger planets, sep increases. They discover that sep scales as a power of the planet mass for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses, orbiting around a solar-mass star. For larger, brown-dwarf-size companions, sep is a constant 180.If this new theory is confirmed, it could have very interesting implications for

  12. Investigation of hydrogen and helium pumping by sputter ion pumps for Jupiter and outer planets mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomena of ion pumping is reviewed with emphasis on the pumping mechanism for hydrogen and helium. The experimental tests measure the performance of a small, flight proven ion pump which has a nominal four liter/second pumping speed for air. The speed of this pump for hydrogen and helium, and for hydrogen/helium mixes, is presented with particular detail regarding the time dependence. Pump test results are related to anticipated performance of the mass spectrometer by the pumping speeds for the gases to the partial pressure in the ion source. From this analysis, the pump specifications are quantified in terms of mission goals and in terms of observed pumping speeds for the various gases, load levels, and time periods.

  13. Three newly discovered sub-Jupiter-mass planets: WASP-69b and WASP-84b transit active K dwarfs and WASP-70Ab transits the evolved primary of a G4+K3 binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Doyle, A. P.; Faedi, F.; Fumel, A.; Gillon, M.; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Skillen, I.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Southworth, J.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Turner, O. D.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    We report the discovery of the transiting exoplanets WASP-69b, WASP-70Ab and WASP-84b, each of which orbits a bright star (V ˜ 10). WASP-69b is a bloated Saturn-mass planet (0.26 MJup, 1.06 RJup) in a 3.868-d period around an active, ˜1-Gyr, mid-K dwarf. ROSAT detected X-rays 60±27 arcsec from WASP-69. If the star is the source then the planet could be undergoing mass-loss at a rate of ˜1012 g s-1. This is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the evaporation rate estimated for HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which have exhibited anomalously large Lyman α absorption during transit. WASP-70Ab is a sub-Jupiter-mass planet (0.59 MJup, 1.16 RJup) in a 3.713-d orbit around the primary of a spatially resolved, 9-10-Gyr, G4+K3 binary, with a separation of 3.3 arcsec (≥800 au). WASP-84b is a sub-Jupiter-mass planet (0.69 MJup, 0.94 RJup) in an 8.523-d orbit around an active, ˜1-Gyr, early-K dwarf. Of the transiting planets discovered from the ground to date, WASP-84b has the third-longest period. For the active stars WASP-69 and WASP-84, we pre-whitened the radial velocities using a low-order harmonic series. We found that this reduced the residual scatter more than did the oft-used method of pre-whitening with a fit between residual radial velocity and bisector span. The system parameters were essentially unaffected by pre-whitening.

  14. DISCOVERING HABITABLE EARTHS, HOT JUPITERS, AND OTHER CLOSE PLANETS WITH MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, R.

    2012-06-20

    Searches for planets via gravitational lensing have focused on cases in which the projected separation, a, between planet and star is comparable to the Einstein radius, R{sub E} . This paper considers smaller orbital separations and demonstrates that evidence of close-orbit planets can be found in the low-magnification portion of the light curves generated by the central star. We develop a protocol for discovering hot Jupiters as well as Neptune-mass and Earth-mass planets in the stellar habitable zone. When planets are not discovered, our method can be used to quantify the probability that the lens star does not have planets within specified ranges of the orbital separation and mass ratio. Nearby close-orbit planets discovered by lensing can be subject to follow-up observations to study the newly discovered planets or to discover other planets orbiting the same star. Careful study of the low-magnification portions of lensing light curves should produce, in addition to the discoveries of close-orbit planets, definite detections of wide-orbit planets through the discovery of 'repeating' lensing events. We show that events exhibiting extremely high magnification can effectively be probed for planets in close, intermediate, and wide distance regimes simply by adding several-time-per-night monitoring in the low-magnification wings, possibly leading to gravitational lensing discoveries of multiple planets occupying a broad range of orbits, from close to wide, in a single planetary system.

  15. A Hot Jupiter for Breakfast? Early Stellar Ingestion of Planets May Be Common

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, Titos; Königl, Arieh

    2015-08-01

    Models of planet formation and evolution predict that giant planets form efficiently in protoplanetary disks, that most of these migrate rapidly to the disk’s inner edge, and that, if the arriving planet’s mass is ≲ Jupiter’s mass, then it could remain stranded near that radius. We argue that such planets would be ingested by tidal interaction with the host star on a timescale ≲ 1 Gyr, and that, in the case of a solar-type host, this would cause the stellar spin to approach the direction of the ingested planet’s orbital axis even if the two were initially highly misaligned. Primordially misaligned stars whose effective temperatures are ≳ 6250 K cannot be realigned in this way because, in contrast with solar-type hosts, their angular momenta are typically higher than the orbital angular momentum of the ingested planet as a result of inefficient magnetic braking and of a comparatively large moment of inertia. Hot Jupiters located farther out from the star can contribute to this process, but their effect is weaker because the tidal interaction strength decreases rapidly with increasing semimajor axis. We demonstrate that, if ∼ 50% of planetary systems harbored a stranded hot Jupiter, this scenario can in principle account for (1) the good alignment exhibited by planets around cool stars irrespective of the planet’s mass or orbital period, (2) the prevalence of misaligned planets around hot stars, (3) the apparent upper bound on the mass of hot Jupiters on retrograde orbits, and (4) the inverse correlation between stellar spin periods and hot-Jupiter masses.

  16. Analyzing Mass Loss and Tidal Circularization as a Source for Sustained Eccentric Orbits in Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Rachel L.; Sepinsky, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of extrasolar planets and planet candidates increases, so does the number of systems that look strikingly different from our own. Hot Jupiters are such a system and are characterized by a Jupiter mass planet with a close-in orbit. Because of the proximity of the planet to its parent star, we would expect these systems to be tidally circularized. However, we observe many with significant eccentricities, suggesting that a mechanism must exist to account for sustained eccentric orbits. Previous analyses found that, in a population of eccentric hot Jupiters generated by planet-planet scattering, a significant fraction will overfill their Roche lobe at periastron. Other work has noted that mass loss in systems similar to hot Jupiters can act to increase the eccentricity of the orbit of a binary system. Here, we consider the effects of tidal circularization and mass loss on the orbital evolution of the hot Jupiters. By analyzing the balance between the tidal circularization and mass loss, we can determine an equilibrium eccentricity as a function of planet mass and the tidal quality factor, Q. If such an equilibrium value exists, then it is possible for this mechanism to be responsible for the sustained eccentric orbits of hot Jupiters that we observe. We present the orbital parameters for these equilibrium orbits over a broad parameter space and compare those results to the current population of observed extrasolar planets.

  17. A Moderate Migration Scenario for Jupiter to form the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2015-01-01

    The early solar system contained a gas-dominated protoplanetary disk that could cause the migration of the giant planets. This migration can be in the form of a two-stage migration, including an inward and then outward migration. One of the current favored theories, the Grand Tack theory, states that Jupiter migrates in to 1.5 AU, creating a planetesimal disk truncated at 1 AU to then form the terrestrial planets during the subsequent outward migration of Jupiter. There are reasons to believe that such a large movement by Jupiter may be impractical, namely the disk would need to be massive and long-lived. An exploration of migration parameters that involve smaller migration distances and shorter timescales can shed light on whether such extreme displacements are necessary for the formation of the solar system. We examine more moderate migration simulations, where Jupiter starts near the conjectured location of the ice line and migrates a moderate radial distance inward for a variety of distances and times. After the inward migration, Jupiter moves outwards to its final orbital configuration today. We find that the planetesimal disk need not be truncated at 1 AU to form planets with similar characteristics to those in the solar system. We vary the number and mass of planetesimals in the disk to see how this affects the characteristics of the forming terrestrial planets. We find a number of scenarios that provide systems of terrestrial planets similar to those in the solar system. We thus propose an alternative to the Grand Tack theory where Jupiter's migration is less extreme than proposed in the Grand Tack theory.

  18. Io-Jupiter system: a unique case of moon-planet interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Michael, M.

    2002-10-01

    Io and Jupiter constitute a moon-planet system that is unique in our solar system. Io is the most volcanically active planetary body, while Jupiter is the first among the planets in terms of size, mass, magnetic field strength, spin rate, and volume of the magnetosphere. That Io is electrodynamically linked to Jupiter is known for nearly four decades from the radio emissions. Io influences Jupiter by supplying heavy ions to its magnetosphere, which dominates its energetic and dynamics. Jupiter influences Io by tidally heating its interior, which in turn drives the volcanic activity on Io. The role of Io and Jupiter in their mutual interaction and the nature of their coupling were first elaborated in greater detail by the two Voyagers flybys in 1979. Subsequent exploration of this system by ground-based and Earth-satellite-borne observatories and by the Galileo orbiter mission has improved our understanding of the highly complex electrodynamical interaction between Io and Jupiter many fold. A distinct feature of this interaction has been discovered in Jupiter's atmosphere as a auroral-like bright emission spot along with a comet-like tail in infrared, ultraviolet (UV), and visible wavelengths at the foot of Io flux tube (IFT). The HST and Galileo and Cassini imagining experiments have observed emissions from Io's atmosphere at UV and visible wavelengths. which could be produced by energetic electrons in the IFT. In this paper an overview on these aspects of the Io-Jupiter system is presented, which by virtue of the nature of its electrodynamical coupling, has implications for the extra-solar planetary systmes and binary stars.

  19. Hot Jupiter breezes: time-dependent outflows from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Adams, Fred C.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the dynamics of magnetically controlled outflows from hot Jupiters, where these flows are driven by UV heating from the central star. In these systems, some of the open field lines do not allow the flow to pass smoothly through the sonic point, so that steady-state solutions do not exist in general. This paper focuses on this type of magnetic field configuration, where the resulting flow becomes manifestly time-dependent. We consider the case of both steady heating and time-variable heating, and find the time-scales for the corresponding time variations of the outflow. Because the flow cannot pass through the sonic transition, it remains subsonic and leads to so-called breeze solutions. One manifestation of the time variability is that the flow samples a collection of different breeze solutions over time, and the mass outflow rate varies in quasi-periodic fashion. Because the flow is subsonic, information can propagate inwards from the outer boundary, which determines, in part, the time-scale of the flow variability. This work finds the relationship between the outer boundary scale and the time-scale of flow variations. In practice, the location of the outer boundary is set by the extent of the sphere of influence of the planet. The measured time variability can be used, in principle, to constrain the parameters of the system (e.g. the strengths of the surface magnetic fields).

  20. Discovery of Low Mass Binary with Super Jupiter Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthes Rich, Evan; Wisniewski, John P.; Hashimoto, Jun; Brandt, Timothy; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-12-01

    Transit and radial velocity surveys have been prolific in detecting ~2000 confirmed planets to date. While few directly imaged planets have detected, such systems provide a unique scientific opportunity to probe exoplanets at larger angular separation, younger ages, and study their atmospheres. We present new L- and M-band AO observations, obtained with IRCS on Subaru, of a super Jupiter companion orbiting a cool dwarf. We show that the central object is likely a binary, thereby making this system the first likely directly imaged planetary mass companion surrounding a low mass binary system.

  1. Alternate multiple-outer-planet missions using a Saturn-Jupiter flyby sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.; Hannah, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    A study has been made of a method for providing more frequent launch opportunities for multiple-planet Grand Tour type missions to the outer solar system. A Saturn-Jupiter flyby sequence was used in the analysis to initiate the mission instead of the normal Jupiter-Saturn sequence. The Saturn-first approach is shown to yield several new launch opportunities following the 1980 cutoff date for Jupiter-first missions. Results are given for various two-planet, three-planet, and four-planet Jupiter-first and Saturn-first missions. A unique five-planet Saturn-first mission and a Saturn-Jupiter flyby which returns to earth are also discussed. Mission performance is evaluated for each flyby technique by comparing Saturn-first and Jupiter-first missions with respect to launch energy requirements, available launch windows, planetary encounter conditions, and total mission times.

  2. N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation under the influence of a hot Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: ogihara@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of multiple-planet systems in the presence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using extended N-body simulations that are performed simultaneously with semianalytic calculations. Our primary aims are to describe the planet formation process starting from planetesimals using high-resolution simulations, and to examine the dependences of the architecture of planetary systems on input parameters (e.g., disk mass, disk viscosity). We observe that protoplanets that arise from oligarchic growth and undergo type I migration stop migrating when they join a chain of resonant planets outside the orbit of an HJ. The formation of a resonant chain is almost independent of our model parameters, and is thus a robust process. At the end of our simulations, several terrestrial planets remain at around 0.1 AU. The formed planets are not equal mass; the largest planet constitutes more than 50% of the total mass in the close-in region, which is also less dependent on parameters. In the previous work of this paper, we have found a new physical mechanism of induced migration of the HJ, which is called a crowding-out. If the HJ opens up a wide gap in the disk (e.g., owing to low disk viscosity), crowding-out becomes less efficient and the HJ remains. We also discuss angular momentum transfer between the planets and disk.

  3. An orbital period of 0.94 days for the hot-Jupiter planet WASP-18b.

    PubMed

    Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D R; Cameron, A Collier; Gillon, M; Hebb, L; Maxted, P F L; Queloz, D; Smalley, B; Triaud, A H M J; West, R G; Wilson, D M; Bentley, S J; Enoch, B; Horne, K; Irwin, J; Lister, T A; Mayor, M; Parley, N; Pepe, F; Pollacco, D L; Segransan, D; Udry, S; Wheatley, P J

    2009-08-27

    The 'hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which they were born, or by an alternative mechanism such as planet-planet scattering. The hot Jupiters closest to their parent stars, at orbital distances of only approximately 0.02 astronomical units, have strong tidal interactions, and systems such as OGLE-TR-56 have been suggested as tests of tidal dissipation theory. Here we report the discovery of planet WASP-18b with an orbital period of 0.94 days and a mass of ten Jupiter masses (10 M(Jup)), resulting in a tidal interaction an order of magnitude stronger than that of planet OGLE-TR-56b. Under the assumption that the tidal-dissipation parameter Q of the host star is of the order of 10(6), as measured for Solar System bodies and binary stars and as often applied to extrasolar planets, WASP-18b will be spiralling inwards on a timescale less than a thousandth that of the lifetime of its host star. Therefore either WASP-18 is in a rare, exceptionally short-lived state, or the tidal dissipation in this system (and possibly other hot-Jupiter systems) must be much weaker than in the Solar System. PMID:19713926

  4. THE HEAVY-ELEMENT MASSES OF EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS, REVEALED

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Neil; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate a population of transiting planets that receive relatively modest stellar insolation, indicating equilibrium temperatures <1000 K, and for which the heating mechanism that inflates hot Jupiters does not appear to be significantly active. We use structural evolution models to infer the amount of heavy elements within each of these planets. There is a correlation between the stellar metallicity and the mass of heavy elements in its transiting planet(s). It appears that all giant planets possess a minimum of {approx}10-15 Earth masses of heavy elements, with planets around metal-rich stars having larger heavy-element masses. There is also an inverse relationship between the mass of the planet and the metal enrichment (Z{sub pl}/Z{sub star}), which appears to have little dependency on the metallicity of the star. Saturn- and Jupiter-like enrichments above solar composition are a hallmark of all the gas giants in the sample, even planets of several Jupiter masses. These relationships provide an important constraint on planet formation and suggest large amounts of heavy elements within planetary H/He envelopes. We suggest that the observed correlation can soon also be applied to inflated planets, such that the interior heavy-element abundance of these planets could be estimated, yielding better constraints on their interior energy sources. We point to future directions for planetary population synthesis models and suggest future correlations. This appears to be the first evidence that extrasolar giant planets, as a class, are enhanced in heavy elements.

  5. Simulated Photoevaporative Mass Loss from Hot Jupiters in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Anjali; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2015-08-01

    Ionizing stellar photons heat the upper regions of planetary atmospheres, driving atmospheric mass loss. Gas escaping from several hot, hydrogen-rich planets has been detected using UV and X-ray transmission spectroscopy. Because these planets are tidally locked, and thus asymmetrically irradiated, escaping gas is unlikely to be spherically symmetric. In this paper, we focus on the effects of asymmetric heating on local outflow structure. We use the Athena code for hydrodynamics to produce 3D simulations of hot Jupiter mass loss that jointly model wind launching and stellar heating via photoionization. Our fiducial planet is an inflated, hot Jupiter with radius {R}{{p}}=2.14{R}{Jup} and mass {M}{{p}}=0.53{M}{Jup}. We irradiate the initially neutral, atomic hydrogen atmosphere with 13.6 eV photons and compute the outflow’s ionization structure. There are clear asymmetries in the atmospheric outflow, including a neutral shadow on the planet’s nightside. Given an incident ionizing UV flux comparable to that of the Sun, we find a steady-state mass loss rate of ˜ 2× {10}10 g s-1. The total mass loss rate and the outflow substructure along the substellar ray show good agreement with earlier 1D models, for two different fluxes. Our 3D data cube can be used to generate the outflow’s extinction spectrum during transit. As a proof of concept, we find absorption of stellar Lyα at Doppler-shifted velocities of up to ±50 km s-1. Our work provides a starting point for further 3D models that can be used to predict observable signatures of hot Jupiter mass loss.

  6. Eccentricity versus Mass for Low-Mass Secondaries and Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Mayor, Michel; Latham, David W.

    1997-03-01

    Spectroscopic orbits have been reported for six unseen companions orbiting solar-type stars with minimum possible masses in the range 0.5-10 Jupiter masses. The four least massive companions, around 51 Peg, 47 UMa, 55 Cnc, and τ Boo, have nearly circular orbits, while the two most massive companions, around HD 114762 and 70 Vir, have eccentricities of 0.35 and 0.40. We compare the orbital eccentricities of these six planet candidates with the eccentricities of the planets in the solar system, of the three planets found around the pulsar PSR B1957+12, and of the low-mass secondaries in a subsample of the spectroscopic binaries from the Carney-Latham proper-motion survey. The distribution of eccentricities for the combined samples displays a striking pattern: the companions with masses smaller than about 5 Jupiter masses have circular orbits, while the more massive companions have eccentric orbits. We outline four possible scenarios that might have produced this pattern of eccentricity versus mass.

  7. ON THE ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF A GIANT PLANET PAIR EMBEDDED IN A GASEOUS DISK. II. A SATURN-JUPITER CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2010-08-10

    We carry out a series of high-resolution (1024 x 1024) hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the orbital evolution of a Saturn-Jupiter pair embedded in a gaseous disk. This work extends the results of our previous work by exploring a different orbital configuration-Jupiter lies outside Saturn (q < 1, where q {identical_to} M{sub i} /M{sub o} is the mass ratio of the inner planet and the outer one). We focus on the effects of different initial separations (d) between the two planets and the various surface density profiles of the disk, where {sigma} {proportional_to} r {sup -}{alpha}. We also compare the results of different orbital configurations of the planet pair. Our results show that (1) when the initial separation is relatively large (d>d {sub iLr}, where d {sub iLr} is the distance between Jupiter and its first inner Lindblad resonance), the two planets undergo divergent migration. However, the inward migration of Saturn could be halted when Jupiter compresses the inner disk in which Saturn is embedded. (2) Convergent migration occurs when the initial separation is smaller (d < d {sub iLr}) and the density slope of the disk is nearly flat ({alpha} < 1/2). Saturn is then forced by Jupiter to migrate inward where the two planets are trapped into mean motion resonances (MMRs), and Saturn may get very close to the central star. (3) In the case of q < 1, the eccentricity of Saturn could be excited to a very high value (e{sub S} {approx} 0.4-0.5) by the MMRs and the system could maintain stability. These results explain the formation of MMRs in the exoplanet systems where the outer planet is more massive than the inner one. It also helps us to understand the origin of the 'hot Jupiter/Saturn' with a highly eccentric orbit.

  8. The planet Jupiter: The observer's handbook /2nd revised edition/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, B. M.; Moore, P.

    The book presents an account of observations of the planet Jupiter, complete to the year 1947 and including additional material to 1957, as well as the data revealed by these observations, revised in light of the Voyager results. Following remarks on the aims, methods and limitations of visual observations of the Jovian surface, attention is given to color and position observations, and observations of the individual polar regions, belts and zones, the Great Red Spot and South Tropical Disturbance, oscillating spots, and to the limitations, methods and achievements of photographic observations. A brief survey is presented of the satellite system and the mutual occultations and eclipses within it. Computational methods are also noted as regards the reduction of latitude measurements, times of apparent central meridian passage of a satellite shadow, and central meridian movements.

  9. On the Final Mass of Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2004-01-01

    In the core accretion model of giant planet formation, when the core reaches critical mass, hydrostatic equilibrium is no longer possible and gas accretion ensues. If the envelope is radiative, the critical core mass is nearly independent of the boundary conditions and is roughly M(sub crit) 10Mass of the Earth (with weak dependence on the rate of planetesimal accretion M(sub core) and the disk opacity k). Given that such a core may form at the present location of Jupiter in a time comparable to its Type I migration time (10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6) years) provided that the nebula was significantly enhanced in solids with respect to the MMSN and stall at this location in a weakly turbulent (alpha approximately less than 10(exp -4) disk, it may be appropriate to assume that such objects inevitably form and drive the evolution of late-phase T Tauri star disks. Here we investigate the final masses of giant planets in disks with one or more than one such cores. Although the presence of several planets would lead to Type II migration (due to the effective viscosity resulting from the planetary tidal torques), we ignore this complication for now and simply assume that each core has stalled at its location in the disk. Once a core has achieved critical mass, its gaseous accretion is governed by the given Kelvin-Helmholtz timescale.

  10. AN INTERPRETATION OF THE ORBITAL PERIOD DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HOT JUPITERS AND GIANT PLANETS ON LONG-PERIOD ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Liping

    2010-09-10

    It is believed that a hot Jupiter (giant planet with a short period less than 10 days) forms in the outer region of a protoplanetary disk, then migrates inward to an orbit with a short period around 3 days, and stops there by a final stopping mechanism. The prominent problem is why hot Jupiters migrate inward to short-period orbits, while other extrasolar giant planets and Jovian planets in our solar system exist on long-period orbits. Here we show that this difference in orbital periods is caused by two populations of protoplanetary disks. One population experiences gravitational instability during some periods of their lifetime (GI disks), while the other does not (No-GI disks). In GI disks, planets can quickly migrate inward to short-period orbits to become hot Jupiters. In No-GI disks, the migration is so slow that planets can exist on long-period orbits. Protoplanetary disks are classified into the two populations because of the differences in properties of molecular cloud cores, from which disks from. We specifically compare our theory with observations. Our theory is supported by observations of extrasolar planets. We analyze the current status of our solar system and find that our solar nebula belongs to the population with a low migration rate. This is consistent with the observation that Jupiter and Saturn are indeed on long-period orbits. Our results further suggest that, in the future observations, a hot Jupiter cannot be found around a star with mass below a critical mass (0.14-0.28 M {sub sun}).

  11. Hot Jupiters with relatives: discovery of additional planets in orbit around WASP-41 and WASP-47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Queloz, D.; Anderson, D. R.; Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Díaz, R. F.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lister, T.; Pepe, F.; Rojo, P.; Ségransan, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Turner, O. D.; Udry, S.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of two additional planetary companions to WASP-41 and WASP-47. WASP-41 c is a planet of minimum mass 3.18 ± 0.20 MJup and eccentricity 0.29 ± 0.02, and it orbits in 421 ± 2 days. WASP-47 c is a planet of minimum mass 1.24 ± 0.22 MJup and eccentricity 0.13 ± 0.10, and it orbits in 572 ± 7 days. Unlike most of the planetary systems that include a hot Jupiter, these two systems with a hot Jupiter have a long-period planet located at only ~1 au from their host star. WASP-41 is a rather young star known to be chromospherically active. To differentiate its magnetic cycle from the radial velocity effect induced by the second planet, we used the emission in the Hα line and find this indicator well suited to detecting the stellar activity pattern and the magnetic cycle. The analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect induced by WASP-41 b suggests that the planet could be misaligned, though an aligned orbit cannot be excluded. WASP-47 has recently been found to host two additional transiting super Earths. With such an unprecedented architecture, the WASP-47 system will be very important for understanding planetary migration. Using data collected at ESO's La Silla Observatory, Chile: HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m (Prog ID 087.C-0649 & 089.C-0151), the Swiss Euler Telescope, TRAPPIST, the 1.54-m Danish telescope (Prog CN2013A-159), and at the LCOGT's Faulkes Telescope South.Photometric lightcurve and RV tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/586/A93

  12. The Occurrence of Additional Giant Planets Inside the Water–Ice Line in Systems with Hot Jupiters: Evidence Against High-Eccentricity Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2016-07-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. It is widely believed that these planets formed near the water–ice line of the protoplanetary disk, and subsequently migrated into much smaller orbits. Most of the proposed migration mechanisms can be classified either as disk-driven migration, or as excitation of a very high eccentricity followed by tidal circularization. In the latter scenario, the giant planet that is destined to become a hot Jupiter spends billions of years on a highly eccentric orbit, with apastron near the water–ice line. Eventually, tidal dissipation at periastron shrinks and circularizes the orbit. If this is correct, then it should be especially rare for hot Jupiters to be accompanied by another giant planet interior to the water–ice line. Using the current sample of giant planets discovered with the Doppler technique, we find that hot Jupiters with P orb < 10 days are no more or less likely to have exterior Jupiter-mass companions than longer-period giant planets with P orb ≥ 10 days. This result holds for exterior companions both inside and outside of the approximate location of the water–ice line. These results are difficult to reconcile with the high-eccentricity migration scenario for hot Jupiter formation.

  13. Mass-Radius Relationships for Low-Mass Planets: From Iron Planets to Water Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Transit observations, and radial velocity measurements, have begun to populate the mass radius diagram for extrasolar planets; fubture astrometric measurements and direct images promise more mass and radius information. Clearly, the bulk density of a planet indicates something about a planet s composition--but what? I will attempt to answer this question in general for low-mass planets (mass) using a combination of analytic and numerical calculations, and I will show that all low-mass planets obey a kind of universal mass-radius relationship: an expansion whose first term is M approx. R(sup 3).

  14. ON THE FUNDAMENTAL MASS-PERIOD FUNCTIONS OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, I.-G.; Yeh, L.-C.; Chang, Y.-C.; Hung, W.-L.

    2010-01-01

    Employing a catalog of 175 extrasolar planets (exoplanets) detected by the Doppler-shift method, we constructed the independent and coupled mass-period functions. It is the first time in this field that the selection effect is considered in the coupled mass-period functions. Our results are consistent with those of Tabachnik and Tremaine in 2002, with the major difference that we obtain a flatter mass function but a steeper period function. Moreover, our coupled mass-period functions show that about 2.5% of stars would have a planet with mass between Earth Mass and Neptune Mass, and about 3% of stars would have a planet with mass between Neptune Mass and Jupiter Mass.

  15. Helping students understand planet categories using "sensing" personification: Jupiter as want-to-be star, Earth as want-to-be Jupiter, etc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor-Morris, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Students often, in learning about the classification of planets, consider the planets to be in strict categories (such as gas giants and terrestrial planets) and assume that these categories are drastically different in nature. This is not the case. Small objects such as asteroids have a weak gravitational pull such that they cannot hold an atmosphere, while terrestrial planets are capable of holding a gaseous (often transparent) atmosphere according to their larger mass. However, asteroids and terrestrial planets are very similar in composition (though not necessarily in homogeneity due to varying presence of collisional heating during formation). Meanwhile, gas giant planets (also often referred to as Jovian planets) such as Jupiter have been theorized to contain super-sized rocky terrestrial-like planets interior to their dense cloud covering. Hence, due then to their similar natures, the categorization of the terrestrial and gas giant planets is made not due to fundamental differences in the nature of the planets, a concept often ill-understood by students. Examining this further, the gas giants are planets whose masses, and hence gravitational ability to condense their gases, especially those close to their core, is less than those of stars wherein thermonuclear fusion initiates. This implies that stars also have terrestrial cores (albeit likely extremely densely packed), but the gaseous environments of hydrogen are dense enough to start and sustain this process of thermonuclear fusion. It is proposed here that seeing planets as fundamentally related to each other in composition though differing in size allows students to better understand the variety of planet types AND describing these as want-to-be (or wanna-be) in terms of ranking and according to a “sensing” personification that eschews anthropomorphism, animism, or teleology [see A. E. Tabor-Morris, “Thinking in terms of sensors: personification of self as an object in physics problem solving

  16. Three Low-Mass Planets from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinney, C. G.; Butler, R. Paul; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Penny, Alan J.; McCarthy, Chris; Carter, Brad D.; Fischer, Debra A.

    2005-04-01

    We report the detection of three new low-mass planets from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search. The three parent stars of these planets are chromospherically quiet main-sequence G dwarfs with metallicities ranging from roughly solar (HD 117618 and HD 208487) to metal enriched (HD 102117). The orbital periods range from 20.8 to 130 days, the minimum masses from roughly 0.5MSat to 0.5MJup, and the eccentricities from 0.08 to 0.37, with the planet in the smallest orbit (HD 102117) having the smallest eccentricity. With semiamplitudes of 10.6-19 m s-1, these planets induce Doppler amplitudes similar to those of Jupiter analogs, albeit with shorter periods. Many of the most interesting future Doppler planets will be detected at these semiamplitude levels, placing a premium on measurement precision. The detection of such amplitudes in data extending back 6 yr gives confidence in the Anglo-Australian Planet Search's ability to detect Jupiter analogs as our time baseline extends to 12 yr. We discuss the criticality of such detections for the design of the next generation of extremely large telescopes and also highlight prospects for suitable observing strategies to push to below 1 m s-1 precisions for bright stars in a search for sub-Neptunian planets. Based on observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope, Siding Spring, Australia.

  17. Jupiter and Planet Earth. [planetary and biological evolution and natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of Jupiter and Earth are discussed along with their atmospheres, the radiation belts around both planets, natural satellites, the evolution of life, and the Pioneer 10. Educational study projects are also included.

  18. A common mass scaling for satellite systems of gaseous planets.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M; Ward, William R

    2006-06-15

    The Solar System's outer planets that contain hydrogen gas all host systems of multiple moons, which notably each contain a similar fraction of their respective planet's mass (approximately 10(-4)). This mass fraction is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of the largest satellites of the solid planets (such as the Earth's Moon), and its common value for gas planets has been puzzling. Here we model satellite growth and loss as a forming giant planet accumulates gas and rock-ice solids from solar orbit. We find that the mass fraction of its satellite system is regulated to approximately 10(-4) by a balance of two competing processes: the supply of inflowing material to the satellites, and satellite loss through orbital decay driven by the gas. We show that the overall properties of the satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus arise naturally, and suggest that similar processes could limit the largest moons of extrasolar Jupiter-mass planets to Moon-to-Mars size. PMID:16778883

  19. A low mass for Mars from Jupiter's early gas-driven migration.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kevin J; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Raymond, Sean N; O'Brien, David P; Mandell, Avi M

    2011-07-14

    Jupiter and Saturn formed in a few million years (ref. 1) from a gas-dominated protoplanetary disk, and were susceptible to gas-driven migration of their orbits on timescales of only ∼100,000 years (ref. 2). Hydrodynamic simulations show that these giant planets can undergo a two-stage, inward-then-outward, migration. The terrestrial planets finished accreting much later, and their characteristics, including Mars' small mass, are best reproduced by starting from a planetesimal disk with an outer edge at about one astronomical unit from the Sun (1 au is the Earth-Sun distance). Here we report simulations of the early Solar System that show how the inward migration of Jupiter to 1.5 au, and its subsequent outward migration, lead to a planetesimal disk truncated at 1 au; the terrestrial planets then form from this disk over the next 30-50 million years, with an Earth/Mars mass ratio consistent with observations. Scattering by Jupiter initially empties but then repopulates the asteroid belt, with inner-belt bodies originating between 1 and 3 au and outer-belt bodies originating between and beyond the giant planets. This explains the significant compositional differences across the asteroid belt. The key aspect missing from previous models of terrestrial planet formation is the substantial radial migration of the giant planets, which suggests that their behaviour is more similar to that inferred for extrasolar planets than previously thought. PMID:21642961

  20. A Low Mass for Mars from Jupiter's Early Gas-Driven Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin J.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Raymond, Sean N.; O'Brien, David P.; Mandell, Avi M.

    2011-01-01

    Jupiter and Saturn formed in a few million years from a gas-dominated protoplanetary disk, and were susceptible to gas-driven migration of their orbits on timescales of only approximately 100,000 years. Hydrodynamic simulations show that these giant planets can undergo a two-stage, inward-then-outward, migration. The terrestrial planets finished accreting much later and their characteristics, including Mars' small mass, are best reproduced by starting from a planetesimal disk with an outer edge at about one astronomical unit from the Sun (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance). Here we report simulations of the early Solar System that show how the inward migration of Jupiter to 1.5 AU, and its subsequent outward migration, lead to a planetesimal disk truncated at 1 AU; the terrestrial planets then form from this disk over the next 30-50 million years, with an Earth/Mars mass ratio consistent with observations. Scattering by Jupiter initially empties but then repopulates the asteroid belt, with inner-belt bodies originating between 1 and 3 AU and outer-belt bodies originating between and beyond the giant planets. This explains the significant compositional differences across the asteroid belt. The key aspect missing from previous models of terrestrial planet formation is the substantial radial migration of the giant planets, which suggests that their behaviour is more similar to that inferred for extrasolar planets than previously thought.

  1. The anglo-australian planet search. XXIII. Two new Jupiter analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C. G.; Salter, G. S.; Bailey, J.; Wright, D.; Butler, R. P.; Jones, H. R. A.; Tuomi, Mikko; Carter, B. D.; Koch, F. Elliott; O'Toole, S. J.

    2014-03-10

    We report the discovery of two long-period giant planets from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search. HD 154857c is in a multiple-planet system, while HD 114613b appears to be solitary. HD 114613b has an orbital period P = 10.5 yr, and a minimum mass msin i of 0.48 M {sub Jup}; HD 154857c has P = 9.5 yr and msin i = 2.6 M {sub Jup}. These new data confirm the planetary nature of the previously unconstrained long-period object in the HD 154857 system. We have performed detailed dynamical stability simulations which show that the HD 154857 two-planet system is stable on timescales of at least 10{sup 8} yr. These results highlight the continued importance of 'legacy' surveys with long observational baselines; these ongoing campaigns are critical for determining the population of Jupiter analogs, and hence of those planetary systems with architectures most like our own solar system.

  2. A hot Jupiter orbiting a 2-million-year-old solar-mass T Tauri star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J. F.; Moutou, C.; Malo, L.; Baruteau, C.; Yu, L.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G.; Alencar, S.; Ménard, F.; Bouvier, J.; Petit, P.; Takami, M.; Doyon, R.; Cameron, A. Collier

    2016-06-01

    Hot Jupiters are giant Jupiter-like exoplanets that orbit their host stars 100 times more closely than Jupiter orbits the Sun. These planets presumably form in the outer part of the primordial disk from which both the central star and surrounding planets are born, then migrate inwards and yet avoid falling into their host star. It is, however, unclear whether this occurs early in the lives of hot Jupiters, when they are still embedded within protoplanetary disks, or later, once multiple planets are formed and interact. Although numerous hot Jupiters have been detected around mature Sun-like stars, their existence has not yet been firmly demonstrated for young stars, whose magnetic activity is so intense that it overshadows the radial velocity signal that close-in giant planets can induce. Here we report that the radial velocities of the young star V830 Tau exhibit a sine wave of period 4.93 days and semi-amplitude 75 metres per second, detected with a false-alarm probability of less than 0.03 per cent, after filtering out the magnetic activity plaguing the spectra. We find that this signal is unrelated to the 2.741-day rotation period of V830 Tau and we attribute it to the presence of a planet of mass 0.77 times that of Jupiter, orbiting at a distance of 0.057 astronomical units from the host star. Our result demonstrates that hot Jupiters can migrate inwards in less than two million years, probably as a result of planet–disk interactions.

  3. A hot Jupiter orbiting a 2-million-year-old solar-mass T Tauri star.

    PubMed

    Donati, J F; Moutou, C; Malo, L; Baruteau, C; Yu, L; Hébrard, E; Hussain, G; Alencar, S; Ménard, F; Bouvier, J; Petit, P; Takami, M; Doyon, R; Collier Cameron, A

    2016-06-30

    Hot Jupiters are giant Jupiter-like exoplanets that orbit their host stars 100 times more closely than Jupiter orbits the Sun. These planets presumably form in the outer part of the primordial disk from which both the central star and surrounding planets are born, then migrate inwards and yet avoid falling into their host star. It is, however, unclear whether this occurs early in the lives of hot Jupiters, when they are still embedded within protoplanetary disks, or later, once multiple planets are formed and interact. Although numerous hot Jupiters have been detected around mature Sun-like stars, their existence has not yet been firmly demonstrated for young stars, whose magnetic activity is so intense that it overshadows the radial velocity signal that close-in giant planets can induce. Here we report that the radial velocities of the young star V830 Tau exhibit a sine wave of period 4.93 days and semi-amplitude 75 metres per second, detected with a false-alarm probability of less than 0.03 per cent, after filtering out the magnetic activity plaguing the spectra. We find that this signal is unrelated to the 2.741-day rotation period of V830 Tau and we attribute it to the presence of a planet of mass 0.77 times that of Jupiter, orbiting at a distance of 0.057 astronomical units from the host star. Our result demonstrates that hot Jupiters can migrate inwards in less than two million years, probably as a result of planet–disk interactions. PMID:27324847

  4. Tidal Constraints on the Masses of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, D. E.

    2000-07-01

    Tidal theory predicts that the orbits of close extrasolar giant planets will circularize on timescales that can be comparable to the ages of those systems. Additionally, planets that are close enough and massive enough can spin up their central stars. Since the eccentricities of extrasolar planet orbits are determined by the radial velocity technique and since stellar rotation rates are observed, or at least derived, limits on the masses of close extrasolar planets can be placed. We find upper limits on the masses of eight extrasolar planets, including limiting the masses of υ And b, HD 75289b, HD 187123b, and 51 Peg b to less than 1.48, 1.21, 0.59, and 0.51 Jupiter masses, respectively. There is a contradiction in the constrained mass of HD 217107b, in that its eccentricity is apparently too high. This anomalously high eccentricity could be real and caused by other planets in that system; or it could be an artifact of fitting a one-orbit solution to multiplanet data. The tidal limits placed on all these extrasolar planets are only as good as the knowledge of the stellar parameters (age, rotation period), which in some cases is not very good; better detailed knowledge of stars hosting planets will be necessary.

  5. The Now Frontier. Pioneer to Jupiter. Man Links Earth and Planets. Issue No. 1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1973

    This packet of space science instructional materials includes five issues related to the planet Jupiter. Each issue presents factual material about the planet, diagramatic representations of its movements and positions relative to bright stars or the earth, actual photographs and/or tables of data collected relevant to Pioneer 10, the spacecraft…

  6. Formation of Jupiter-like Planets around Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    1995-12-01

    The gas giant planets of our solar system are believed to have formed through a two step process. First, collisional accumulation of a swarm of planetesimals produces a ~ 10 M_oplus core of ice and rock. Second, this core accretes an envelope of hydrogen and helium gas through the hydrodynamic collapse of disk gas onto the growing protoplanet. A necessary condition for the formation of gas giant planets is thus the presence of icy planetesimals, which cannot form inside the ice condensation radius of the disk at the time when planetary accumulation is occurring. The ice condensation radius in protoplanetary disk models thus sets a lower limit on the radius at which Jupiter-like planets could form. Radiative hydrodynamical models have been computed of the thermal structure of low mass protoplanetary disks orbiting a solar-mass protostar, with the disk being heated by mass accretion from the parent dense cloud core. These models predict that the midplane temperature falls below the ice condensation point ( ~ 160 K) only for radii of several AU or more, for a wide variety of disk masses (0.01 to 0.13 M_sun) and for a range of disk mass accretion rates ( ~ 10(-7) to ~ 10(-5) M_sun/yr). Variations in other parameters such as the radial density profile and the dust grain opacity have even less effect on temperatures. The location of the ice condensation radius is restricted to the range of ~ 3 AU to ~ 7 AU in these models. If the companion to 51 Peg (a solar-type star) is a gas giant planet, then the companion could not have formed at its present radius of ~ 0.05 AU, but must have suffered significant orbital evolution after its formation. A likely cause of such orbital decay is gravitational interaction between the companion and a protoplanetary disk that evidently survived longer than the solar nebula did.

  7. Searching for Jupiter Analogues: Detection Limits of the McDonald Observatory Harlan J. Smith 2.7m Telescope Radial Velocity Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Caroline; Endl, M.; Cochran, W.; MacQueen, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    The McDonald Observatory Planet Search has recorded twelve years of high precision radial velocity measurements. Now it is possible to test the frequency of Jupiter analogues in the database. 81 stars with a twelve-year timeline and no known companions were selected, and simulations were performed to test our sensitivity to the radial velocity signals of Jupiter analogues. Our criteria for a Jupiter analogue are a planetary companion of a sun-like star with a mass between .8 to 4 Jupiter masses, at a distance ranging from 4 to 5.5 AU. A true Jupiter signal is near the limit of our observations at a distance of 5AU with a period of 4330 days, or 11.9 years. The results of these simulations show the database's sensitivity to Jupiter analogues and the frequency of Jupiter analogues. The results demonstrate that the McDonald Observatory Planet Search is a valuable source of high precision radial velocity measurements, and that the continuation of the program is beneficial to the discovery and study of extra solar planets.

  8. The Anglo-Australian Planet Search XXIV: The Frequency of Jupiter Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Butler, R. P.; Tinney, C. G.; Horner, Jonathan; Carter, B. D.; Wright, D. J.; Jones, H. R. A.; Bailey, J.; O'Toole, Simon J.

    2016-03-01

    We present updated simulations of the detectability of Jupiter analogs by the 17-year Anglo-Australian Planet Search. The occurrence rate of Jupiter-like planets that have remained near their formation locations beyond the ice line is a critical datum necessary to constrain the details of planet formation. It is also vital in our quest to fully understand how common (or rare) planetary systems like our own are in the Galaxy. From a sample of 202 solar-type stars, and correcting for imperfect detectability on a star-by-star basis, we derive a frequency of {6.2}-1.6+2.8% for giant planets in orbits from 3 to 7 au. When a consistent definition of “Jupiter analog” is used, our results are in agreement with those from other legacy radial-velocity surveys.

  9. The mass distribution function of planets in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Renu

    2016-05-01

    I will describe some deductions about the planet mass function from the observational data of exoplanets and theoretical considerations of dynamical stability of planetary systems. The Kepler mission has carried out a systematic survey for planets in the Galaxy, and obtained data on several hundred exo-planetary systems. Analysis of these data indicates that planetary orbital separations have an approximately log-normal distribution. Taken together with plausible ansatzs for the dynamical stability of multi-planet systems, it appears that the planet mass function is peaked in logarithm of mass, with the most probable value of log m/M_Earth ∼ (0.6 ‑ 1.0). A modest extrapolation finds that Earth mass planets are about ~1000 times more common than Jupiter mass planets, and that the most common planets in the Galaxy may be of lunar-to-Mars mass.This research was supported by NSF (grant AST-1312498) and NASA (grant NNX14AG93G).

  10. Search for giant planets in M67. III. Excess of hot Jupiters in dense open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucalassi, A.; Pasquini, L.; Saglia, R.; Ruiz, M. T.; Bonifacio, P.; Leão, I.; Canto Martins, B. L.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Bedin, L. R.; Biazzo, K.; Melo, C.; Lovis, C.; Randich, S.

    2016-07-01

    Since 2008 we used high-precision radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with different telescopes to detect signatures of massive planets around main-sequence and evolved stars of the open cluster (OC) M67. We aimed to perform a long-term study on giant planet formation in open clusters and determine how this formation depends on stellar mass and chemical composition. A new hot Jupiter (HJ) around the main-sequence star YBP401 is reported in this work. An update of the RV measurements for the two HJ host-stars YBP1194 and YBP1514 is also discussed. Our sample of 66 main-sequence and turnoff stars includes 3 HJs, which indicates a high rate of HJs in this cluster (5.6% for single stars and 4.5%% for the full sample). This rate is much higher than what has been discovered in the field, either with RV surveys or by transits. High metallicity is not a cause for the excess of HJs in M67, nor can the excess be attributed to high stellar masses. When combining this rate with the non-zero eccentricity of the orbits, our results are qualitatively consistent with a HJ formation scenario dominated by strong encounters with other stars or binary companions and subsequent planet-planet scattering, as predicted by N-body simulations. Based on observations collected at the ESO 3.6 m telescope (La Silla), at the 1.93 m telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), at the Hobby Eberly Telescope (HET), at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, La Palma) and at the Euler Swiss Telescope.

  11. Study of spin-scan imaging for outer planets missions. [imaging techniques for Jupiter orbiter missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, E. E.; Chandos, R. A.; Kodak, J. C.; Pellicori, S. F.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The constraints that are imposed on the Outer Planet Missions (OPM) imager design are of critical importance. Imager system modeling analyses define important parameters and systematic means for trade-offs applied to specific Jupiter orbiter missions. Possible image sequence plans for Jupiter missions are discussed in detail. Considered is a series of orbits that allow repeated near encounters with three of the Jovian satellites. The data handling involved in the image processing is discussed, and it is shown that only minimal processing is required for the majority of images for a Jupiter orbiter mission.

  12. Dynamics of the Jupiter Trojans with Saturn's perturbation when the two planets are in migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiyun; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Liu, L.

    2016-05-01

    In a previous paper (Hou et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 119:119-142, 2014a), the problem of dynamical symmetry between two Jupiter triangular libration points (TLPs) with Saturn's perturbation in the present configuration of the two planets was studied. A small short-time scale spatial asymmetry exists but gradually disappears with the time going, so the planar stable regions around the two Jupiter TLPs should be dynamically symmetric from a longtime perspective. In this paper, the symmetry problem is studied when the two planets are in migration. Several mechanisms that can cause asymmetries are discussed. Studies show that three important ones are the large short-time scale spatial asymmetry when Jupiter and Saturn are in resonance, the changing orbits of Jupiter and Saturn in the planet migration process, and the chaotic nature of Trojan orbits during the planet migration process. Their joint effects can cause an observable difference to the two Jupiter Trojan swarms. The thermal Yarkovsky effect is also found to be able to cause dynamical differences to the two TLPs, but generally they are too small to be practically observed.

  13. Dynamics of the Jupiter Trojans with Saturn's perturbation when the two planets are in migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiyun; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Liu, L.

    2016-08-01

    In a previous paper (Hou et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 119:119-142, 2014a), the problem of dynamical symmetry between two Jupiter triangular libration points (TLPs) with Saturn's perturbation in the present configuration of the two planets was studied. A small short-time scale spatial asymmetry exists but gradually disappears with the time going, so the planar stable regions around the two Jupiter TLPs should be dynamically symmetric from a longtime perspective. In this paper, the symmetry problem is studied when the two planets are in migration. Several mechanisms that can cause asymmetries are discussed. Studies show that three important ones are the large short-time scale spatial asymmetry when Jupiter and Saturn are in resonance, the changing orbits of Jupiter and Saturn in the planet migration process, and the chaotic nature of Trojan orbits during the planet migration process. Their joint effects can cause an observable difference to the two Jupiter Trojan swarms. The thermal Yarkovsky effect is also found to be able to cause dynamical differences to the two TLPs, but generally they are too small to be practically observed.

  14. CROWDING-OUT OF GIANTS BY DWARFS: AN ORIGIN FOR THE LACK OF COMPANION PLANETS IN HOT JUPITER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-11-20

    We investigate the formation of close-in terrestrial planets from planetary embryos under the influence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using gravitational N-body simulations that include gravitational interactions between the gas disk and the terrestrial planet (e.g., type I migration). Our simulations show that several terrestrial planets efficiently form outside the orbit of the HJ, making a chain of planets, and all of them gravitationally interact directly or indirectly with the HJ through resonance, which leads to inward migration of the HJ. We call this mechanism of induced migration of the HJ ''crowding-out''. The HJ is eventually lost through collision with the central star, and only several terrestrial planets remain. We also find that the efficiency of the crowding-out effect depends on the model parameters; for example, the heavier the disk is, the more efficient the crowding-out is. When planet formation occurs in a massive disk, the HJ can be lost to the central star and is never observed. On the other hand, for a less massive disk, the HJ and terrestrial planets can coexist; however, the companion planets may be below the detection limit of current observations. In both cases, systems with a HJ and terrestrial planets have little chance of detection. Therefore, our model naturally explains the lack of companion planets in HJ systems regardless of the disk mass. In effect, our model provides a theoretical prediction for future observations; additional planets can be discovered just outside the HJ, and their masses should generally be small.

  15. A SHORT-PERIOD CENSOR OF SUB-JUPITER MASS EXOPLANETS WITH LOW DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, Gy. M.; Kiss, L. L.

    2011-02-01

    Despite the existence of many short-period hot Jupiters, there is not one hot Neptune with an orbital period less than 2.5 days. Here, we discuss a cluster analysis of the currently known 106 transiting exoplanets to investigate a possible explanation for this observation. We find two distinct clusters in the mass-density space, one with hot Jupiters with a wide range of orbital periods (0.8-114 days) and a narrow range of planet radii (1.2 {+-} 0.2 R{sub J} ) and another one with a mixture of super-Earths, hot Neptunes, and hot Jupiters, exhibiting a surprisingly narrow period distribution (3.7 {+-} 0.8 days). These two clusters follow strikingly different distributions in the period-radius parameter plane. The branch of sub-Jupiter mass exoplanets is censored by the orbital period at the large-radius end: no planets with mass between 0.02 and 0.8 M{sub J} or with radius between 0.25 and 1.0 R{sub J} are known with P{sub orb} < 2.5 days. This clustering is not predicted by current theories of planet formation and evolution, which we also review briefly.

  16. The formation of giant planets and its effects on protoplanetary disks: the case of Jupiter and the Jovian Early Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrini, D.; ISSI Team "Vesta, the key to the origins of the Solar System"; EChO "Planetary Formation" Working Group

    The formation of giant planets is accompanied by a short but intense primordial bombardment \\citep{safronov69,weidenschilling75,weidenschilling01,turrini11}: the prototype for this class of events is the Jovian Early Bombardment (JEB) caused by the formation of Jupiter in the Solar System \\citep{turrini11,turrini12}. The JEB affected the collisional evolution of the minor bodies in the inner Solar System by inflicting mass loss to planetesimals \\citep{turrini12,turrini14a,turrini14b} due to cratering erosion and, at the same time, delivering water and volatile materials to the asteroid belt \\citep{turrini14b}. The JEB also resulted in a significant number of collisions between Jupiter and planetesimals formed over a wide orbital range, delivering volatile and refractory materials to the giant planet and its circumplanetary disk \\citep{turrini14c}. In this talk I'll discuss how the study of the effects of the JEB on Vesta can be used to constrain the early evolution of the Solar System \\citep{turrini14a,turrini14b} and how these constraints can, in turn, provide insight on the composition of Jupiter and of its satellites. Finally, I'll discuss the implications of the JEB model for extrasolar planets \\citep{turrini14c}.

  17. From Dust to Dust: Protoplanetary Disk Accretion, Hot Jupiter Climates, and the Evaporation of Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel Alonso

    2013-12-01

    This dissertation is composed of three independent projects in astrophysics concerning phenomena that are concurrent with the birth, life, and death of planets. In Chapters 1 & 2, we study surface layer accretion in protoplanetary disks driven stellar X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. In Chapter 3, we identify the dynamical mechanisms that control atmospheric heat redistribution on hot Jupiters. Finally, in Chapter 4, we characterize the death of low-mass, short-period rocky planets by their evaporation into a dusty wind. Chapters 1 & 2: Whether protoplanetary disks accrete at observationally significant rates by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) depends on how well ionized they are. We find that disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays are susceptible to charge neutralization by condensates---ranging from mum-sized dust to angstrom-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ion densities in X-ray-irradiated surfaces are so low that ambipolar diffusion weakens the MRI. In contrast, ionization by stellar FUV radiation enables full-blown MRI turbulence in disk surface layers. Far-UV ionization of atomic carbon and sulfur produces a plasma so dense that it is immune to ion recombination on grains and PAHs. Even though the FUV-ionized layer is ˜10--100 times more turbulent than the X-ray-ionized layer, mass accretion rates of both layers are comparable because FUV photons penetrate to lower surface densities than do X-rays. We conclude that surface layer accretion occurs at observationally significant rates at radii ≳ 1--10 AU. At smaller radii, both X-ray- and FUV-ionized surface layers cannot sustain the accretion rates generated at larger distance and an additional means of transport is needed. In the case of transitional disks, it could be provided by planets. Chapter 3: Infrared light curves of transiting hot Jupiters present a trend in which the atmospheres of the hottest planets are less efficient at redistributing the stellar energy

  18. Mass-loss evolution of close-in exoplanets: Evaporation of hot Jupiters and the effect on population

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, H.; Nakamoto, T.

    2014-03-01

    During their evolution, short-period exoplanets may lose envelope mass through atmospheric escape owing to intense X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from their host stars. Roche-lobe overflow induced by orbital evolution or intense atmospheric escape can also contribute to mass loss. To study the effects of mass loss on inner planet populations, we calculate the evolution of hot Jupiters considering mass loss of their envelopes and thermal contraction. Mass loss is assumed to occur through XUV-driven atmospheric escape and the following Roche-lobe overflow. The runaway effect of mass loss results in a dichotomy of populations: hot Jupiters that retain their envelopes and super Earths whose envelopes are completely lost. Evolution primarily depends on the core masses of planets and only slightly on migration history. In hot Jupiters with small cores (≅ 10 Earth masses), runaway atmospheric escape followed by Roche-lobe overflow may create sub-Jupiter deserts, as observed in both mass and radius distributions of planetary populations. Comparing our results with formation scenarios and observed exoplanets populations, we propose that populations of closely orbiting exoplanets are formed by capturing planets at/inside the inner edges of protoplanetary disks and subsequent evaporation of sub-Jupiters.

  19. Planets of the solar system. [Jupiter and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondratyev, K. Y.; Moskalenko, N. I.

    1978-01-01

    Venera and Mariner spacecraft and ground based radio astronomy and spectroscopic observations of the atmosphere and surface of venus are examined. The composition and structural parameters of the atmosphere are discussed as the basis for development of models and theories of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, atmospheric circulation and cloud cover. Recommendations for further meteorological studies are given. Ground based and Pioneer satellite observation data on Jupiter are explored as well as calculations and models of the cloud structure, atmospheric circulation and thermal emission field of Jupiter.

  20. The architecture of the multi-planet system of υ And: υ And b - a super-inflated hot Jupiter in a cosmic ping-pong game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodler, Florian

    2015-12-01

    The gas giant Upsilon Andromeda b (υ And b) was one of the first discovered exoplanets. This planet orbits around a bright, similar to the Sun star only 13.5 parsecs away from us. υ And b is also the innermost planet of a confirmed three-planet system, all of them non-transiting. As with all non-transiting planets, their exact masses and sizes are unknown, with their orbital inclination being the key parameter to unveil those values. Astrometric measurements have placed constraints to the orbital inclinations of the two outer planets in this system, indicating that we look almost 'face-on' on the system (McArthur et al. 2010). However, the orbital inclination for the innermost planet remained unknown.Photometric monitoring of υ And b orbit at infrared wavelengths has revealed significant brightness changes between the day-side and the night-side of the planet (Crossfield et al. 2010). The amplitude of those brightness variations depends on the orbital inclination of the planet and on its radius, therefore we can tightly constrain the size of the planet if its inclination is known.Here we present the measurement of the orbital inclination for the innermost planet υ And b, 23 deg, obtained by monitoring the Doppler shift of carbon monoxide (CO) lines on the atmospheric day-side of the planet with Keck/NIRSPEC. From this measurement we establish a planet mass of 1.7 times the mass of Jupiter and a minimum planet radius of 1.8 times the size of Jupiter. This result reveals that υ And b is likely to be one of the most inflated giant planets discovered to date. In addition, the observed strong CO absorption suggests an atmosphere with temperature uniformly decreasing towards higher altitudes, which suggests the absence of an atmospheric thermal inversion (Rodler et al. 2015).

  1. Optical Ground-Based Spectra of Jupiter and Saturn: An Exploration of Giant Planet Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Hudson, R. L.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present and interpret ground-based optical spectra of Jupiter and Saturn recently acquired in an effort to characterize candidate coloring agents, or chromophores, in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets of our solar system. Surprisingly, despite hundreds of years of observations, we still do not know the identity of the trace chemical compounds that color the atmospheres of the giant planets. Previous analyses have attempted to identify a specific chemical that is responsible for the colors, but none has yet been conclusively proven. We acquired spatially resolved optical spectra of various regions in the atmospheres of both Jupiter and Saturn in February 2013 using the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) on the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The spectra cover the range of 300-1000 nm, with a spectral resolution of R ~ 1200. For the observations of both Jupiter and Saturn, we used DIS with the 6 arcminute long slit aligned with the planets' latitudinal bands and stepped the slit north-south to build up a spectral image cube with spectra at all locations on the planet. This enables the extraction of subapertures within the slit corresponding to specific locations, e.g. the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, during the data reduction process. We compare the optical spectra of various colored regions in the giant planet atmospheres to laboratory data of candidate chromophores. The characterization of chromophore materials will provide insight into the upper tropospheric dynamics and circulation patterns on Jupiter and Saturn that provide a stable environment for the creation and/or sustenance of chromophores. This will help further our understanding of the different evolutionary pathways of the gas giant planets of our solar system, providing a process-oriented view of their variations in cloud colors.

  2. Little Stars Don't Like Big Planets: An Astrometric Search for Super-Jupiters Around Red Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, John C.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.; Koerner, D. W.; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J.; RECONS

    2013-01-01

    The astrometric detection and characterization of extrasolar planets presents considerable technical challenges, but also promises to greatly enhance our understanding of these systems. Nearly all currently confirmed exoplanets have been discovered using transit or radial velocity techniques. The former is geometrically biased towards planets with small orbits, while the latter is biased towards massive planets with short periods that exert large gravitational accelerations on their host stars. Astrometric techniques are limited by the minimum detectable perturbation of a star's position due to a planet, but allow for the determination of orbit inclination and an accurate planetary mass. Here we present astrometric solutions for five nearby stars with known planets: four M dwarfs (GJ 317, GJ 581, GJ 849, and GJ 1214) and one K dwarf (BD -10 3166). Observations have baselines of three to thirteen years, and were made using the 0.9 m telescope at CTIO as part of the RECONS long-term astrometry program. We provide improved parallaxes for the stars and find that there are no planets of several Jupiter masses or brown dwarfs orbiting these stars with periods up to twice the length of the astrometric coverage. In the broader context, these results are consistent with the paucity of super-Jupiter and brown dwarf companions we find among the roughly 200 red dwarfs searched in our astrometric program. This effort has been supported by the National Science Foundation via grant AST 09-08402 and the long-term cooperative efforts of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories and the members of the SMARTS Consortium.

  3. Limits on the Core Mass of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The core is here defined as the central concentration of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium (it need not be solid and it need not be purely heavy elements and it will not have a sharp boundary). Its determination is a major goal of the Juno mission (2016-17) and it will be difficult to determine because it is expected to be only a few percent of the total mass. It has long been known that there is no prospect of determining the nature of this core (e.g., its density) from gravity measurements, even though the mass can be estimated. By consideration of simple models that are nonetheless faithful to the essential physics, it is further shown that should the core be contaminated with light elements (hydrogen and helium) then the gravity data can tell us the core mass as defined (with some caveats about the fuzziness of its boundary) but not the total mass within some small radius (which could include any light elements mixed in). This is both good and bad news: Good in that the core is thought to be diagnostic of the conditions under which the planet formed but bad in that the admixture also tells us more about both formation process and core erosion. Further, a linear perturbation theory has been developed that provides an easy approximate way of determining how errors in the equation of state (EOS) propagate into errors in the estimated core mass or envelope enrichment in heavies in models that nonetheless satisfy all observables. This theory does not require detailed models of the planet but provides an integral mapping from changes in the EOS into approximate changes in radius at fixed mass, and low degree gravity (or moment of inertia, MOI). This procedure also shows that there exist perturbations that leave the radius, mass and MOI unchanged but cause a change in J2, though in practice the non-uniqueness of structure by this consideration (~0.2% or less in MOI for example) is less than the non-uniqueness arising from likely EOS uncertainties (~1% in total

  4. A historical interpretation of the study of the visible cloud morphology on the planet Jupiter: 1610-1878

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, Thomas Arnold

    The majority of the literature discussing the perceived physical appearance of Jupiter published prior to 1878 was examined in order to determine to what extent observations were biased by technical limitations and preconceptions of their day and, in lieu of these, how useful this body of work is in characterizing the behavior of the Jovian upper atmosphere over the last three hundred years. The biographies of the historical observers; their instrumentation, available viewing conditions, and observational techniques; their means of communication with their fellows; and the primary interpretive references available to their libraries were investigated in order to attempt to explain discrepancies and agreement between what was reported in pre-photographic times and what is presently seen. It was found that nearly all of the prominent feature-types found on Jupiter today existed during the nineteenth century and, in some cases, earlier. The longevity and frequency of the appearance of features can not be accurately determined from the time before objective surveys of the planet were organized. This is because, during each apparition of Jupiter, nonprofessional part-time observers, working independently chose to use their finite time and resources to follow the progress of specific discoveries on its disk to the exclusion of the rest of the planet. Interpretation of Jovian features were subject to three major impediments: the belief in and search for a solid surface of Jupiter at moderate depth below the clouds; a lack of appreciation for the two or more orders of magnitude differences of scale between the dimensions of Jupiter's area, mass, and properties of its atmosphere compared to those of the Earth; and an inability to differentiate between real and phantom features watched through seeing-limited telescopes.

  5. The Photoeccentric Effect and Proto-hot Jupiters. I. Measuring Photometric Eccentricities of Individual Transiting Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Johnson, John Asher

    2012-09-01

    Exoplanet orbital eccentricities offer valuable clues about the history of planetary systems. Eccentric, Jupiter-sized planets are particularly interesting: they may link the "cold" Jupiters beyond the ice line to close-in hot Jupiters, which are unlikely to have formed in situ. To date, eccentricities of individual transiting planets primarily come from radial-velocity measurements. Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting Jupiters spanning a range of periods, but the faintness of the host stars precludes radial-velocity follow-up of most. Here, we demonstrate a Bayesian method of measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its transit light curve using prior knowledge of its host star's density. We show that eccentric Jupiters are readily identified by their short ingress/egress/total transit durations—part of the "photoeccentric" light curve signature of a planet's eccentricity—even with long-cadence Kepler photometry and loosely constrained stellar parameters. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploration of parameter posteriors naturally marginalizes over the periapse angle and automatically accounts for the transit probability. To demonstrate, we use three published transit light curves of HD 17156 b to measure an eccentricity of e = 0.71+0.16 - 0.09, in good agreement with the discovery value e = 0.67 ± 0.08 based on 33 radial-velocity measurements. We present two additional tests using Kepler data. In each case, the technique proves to be a viable method of measuring exoplanet eccentricities and their confidence intervals. Finally, we argue that this method is the most efficient, effective means of identifying the extremely eccentric, proto-hot Jupiters predicted by Socrates et al.

  6. THE PHOTOECCENTRIC EFFECT AND PROTO-HOT JUPITERS. I. MEASURING PHOTOMETRIC ECCENTRICITIES OF INDIVIDUAL TRANSITING PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Johnson, John Asher

    2012-09-10

    Exoplanet orbital eccentricities offer valuable clues about the history of planetary systems. Eccentric, Jupiter-sized planets are particularly interesting: they may link the 'cold' Jupiters beyond the ice line to close-in hot Jupiters, which are unlikely to have formed in situ. To date, eccentricities of individual transiting planets primarily come from radial-velocity measurements. Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting Jupiters spanning a range of periods, but the faintness of the host stars precludes radial-velocity follow-up of most. Here, we demonstrate a Bayesian method of measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its transit light curve using prior knowledge of its host star's density. We show that eccentric Jupiters are readily identified by their short ingress/egress/total transit durations-part of the 'photoeccentric' light curve signature of a planet's eccentricity-even with long-cadence Kepler photometry and loosely constrained stellar parameters. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploration of parameter posteriors naturally marginalizes over the periapse angle and automatically accounts for the transit probability. To demonstrate, we use three published transit light curves of HD 17156 b to measure an eccentricity of e = 0.71{sup +0.16}{sub -0.09}, in good agreement with the discovery value e = 0.67 {+-} 0.08 based on 33 radial-velocity measurements. We present two additional tests using Kepler data. In each case, the technique proves to be a viable method of measuring exoplanet eccentricities and their confidence intervals. Finally, we argue that this method is the most efficient, effective means of identifying the extremely eccentric, proto-hot Jupiters predicted by Socrates et al.

  7. Scorched Planets: Understanding the Structure and Climate of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole; Martioli, Eder; Angerhausen, Daniel; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Zhou, George; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan; Gaudi, B. Scott; James, David; Eastman, Jason; Beatty, Thomas G.; Bayliss, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity and transit surveys have revealed that hot Jupiters are intrinsically rare in the Galaxy. These extreme examples of extrasolar planets have been the subject of many studies to date, but their formation and evolution are still shrouded in mystery. I will present results from a large ground-based survey to study the atmospheres of hot Jupiters via their secondary eclipses in the near-infrared. Such observations provide us with a direct measurement of thermal emission from a planet’s day-side, allowing us to probe the connection between the atmospheric structure and climate deep in their atmospheres, as well as the irradiation from their host star. I will present results obtained for several hot Jupiters using the wide-field camera WIRCam on the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope (CFHT). The sample of hot Jupiters observed to date in the CFHT survey spans a range of planetary parameters (e.g. temperatures and densities) and also includes several new exotic discoveries from the KELT transit survey, such as a planet in a hierarchical triple stellar system as well as a planet with a very rapidly rotating host star. Results from the CFHT survey will be combined with those from an ongoing survey of hot Jupiter eclipses in the southern hemisphere using the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope as well as an upcoming survey using the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. The combined survey will be the largest homogeneous study of this kind to date, and it will provide us with the congruent observations of a significant number of unique planets in eclipse. These observations will ultimately allow a comprehensive statistical analysis of the diversity of hot Jupiter atmospheres via their near-infrared eclipses. In addition, this project will identify legacy targets for comparative exoplanetology using next-generation facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope.

  8. A Venus-mass Planet Orbiting a Brown Dwarf: A Missing Link between Planets and Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Jung, Y. K.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Mróz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hwang, K.-H.; Choi, J.-Y.; Shin, I.-G.; Park, H.; Bozza, V.

    2015-10-01

    The co-planarity of solar system planets led Kant to suggest that they formed from an accretion disk, and the discovery of hundreds of such disks around young stars as well as hundreds of co-planar planetary systems by the Kepler satellite demonstrate that this formation mechanism is extremely widespread. Many moons in the solar system, such as the Galilean moons of Jupiter, also formed out of the accretion disks that coalesced into the giant planets. Here we report the discovery of an intermediate system, OGLE-2013-BLG-0723LB/Bb, composed of a Venus-mass planet orbiting a brown dwarf, which may be viewed either as a scaled-down version of a planet plus a star or as a scaled-up version of a moon plus a planet orbiting a star. The latter analogy can be further extended since they orbit in the potential of a larger, stellar body. For ice-rock companions formed in the outer parts of accretion disks, like Uranus and Callisto, the scaled masses and separations of the three types of systems are similar, leading us to suggest that the formation processes of companions within accretion disks around stars, brown dwarfs, and planets are similar.

  9. PLANET HUNTERS. V. A CONFIRMED JUPITER-SIZE PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE AND 42 PLANET CANDIDATES FROM THE KEPLER ARCHIVE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Barclay, Thomas; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Jek, Kian J.; Hoekstra, Abe J.; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; LaCourse, Daryll; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; and others

    2013-10-10

    We report the latest Planet Hunter results, including PH2 b, a Jupiter-size (R{sub PL} = 10.12 ± 0.56 R{sub ⊕}) planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. PH2 b was elevated from candidate status when a series of false-positive tests yielded a 99.9% confidence level that transit events detected around the star KIC 12735740 had a planetary origin. Planet Hunter volunteers have also discovered 42 new planet candidates in the Kepler public archive data, of which 33 have at least 3 transits recorded. Most of these transit candidates have orbital periods longer than 100 days and 20 are potentially located in the habitable zones of their host stars. Nine candidates were detected with only two transit events and the prospective periods are longer than 400 days. The photometric models suggest that these objects have radii that range between those of Neptune and Jupiter. These detections nearly double the number of gas-giant planet candidates orbiting at habitable-zone distances. We conducted spectroscopic observations for nine of the brighter targets to improve the stellar parameters and we obtained adaptive optics imaging for four of the stars to search for blended background or foreground stars that could confuse our photometric modeling. We present an iterative analysis method to derive the stellar and planet properties and uncertainties by combining the available spectroscopic parameters, stellar evolution models, and transiting light curve parameters, weighted by the measurement errors. Planet Hunters is a citizen science project that crowd sources the assessment of NASA Kepler light curves. The discovery of these 43 planet candidates demonstrates the success of citizen scientists at identifying planet candidates, even in longer period orbits with only two or three transit events.

  10. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION OF COMET P/SHOEMAKER-LEVY 9 and PLANET JUPITER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite photo, assembled from separate images of Jupiter and comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9, as imaged by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC-2), aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Jupiter was imaged on May 18, 1994, when the giant planet was at a distance of 420 million miles (670 million km) from Earth. This 'true-color' picture was assembled from separate HST exposures in red, blue, and green light. Jupiter's rotation between exposures creates the blue and red fringe on either side of the disk. HST can resolve details in Jupiter's magnificent cloud belts and zones as small as 200 miles (320 km) across (wide field mode). This detailed view is only surpassed by images from spacecraft that have traveled to Jupiter. The dark spot on the disk of Jupiter is the shadow of the inner moon Io. This volcanic moon appears as an orange and yellow disk just to the upper right of the shadow. Though Io is approximately the size of Earth's Moon (but 2,000 times farther away), HST can resolve surface details. When the comet was observed on May 17, its train of 21 icy fragments stretched across 710 thousand miles (1.1 million km) of space, or 3 times the distance between Earth and the Moon. This required six WFPC exposures along the comet train to include all the nuclei. The image was taken in red light. The apparent angular size of Jupiter relative to the comet, and its angular separation from the comet when the images were taken, have been modified for illustration purposes. Credit: H.A. Weaver, T.E. Smith (Space Telescope Science Institute) and J.T. Trauger, R.W. Evans (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), and NASA

  11. Terrestrial planet and asteroid formation in the presence of giant planets. I. Relative velocities of planetesimals subject to Jupiter and Saturn perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortenkamp, S. J.; Wetherill, G. W.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the orbital evolution of 10(13)- to 10(25) -g planetesimals near 1 AU and in the asteroid belt (near 2.6 AU) prior to the stage of evolution when the mutual perturbations between the planetesimals become important. We include nebular gas drag and the effects of Jupiter and Saturn at their present masses and in their present orbits. Gas drag introduces a size-dependent phasing of the secular perturbations, which leads to a pronounced dip in encounter velocities (Venc) between bodies of similar mass. Plantesimals of identical mass have Venc approximately 1 and approximately 10 m s-1 (near 1 and 2.6 AU, respectively) while bodies differing by approximately 10 in mass have Venc approximately 10 and approximately 100 m s-1 (near 1 and 2.6 AU, respectively). Under these conditions, growth, rather than erosion, will occur only by collisions of bodies of nearly the same mass. There will be essentially no gravitational focusing between bodies less than 10(22) to 10(25) g, allowing growth of planetary embryos in the terrestrial planet region to proceed in a slower nonrunaway fashion. The environment in the asteroid belt will be even more forbidding and it is uncertain whether even the severely depleted present asteroid belt could form under these conditions. The perturbations of Jupiter and Saturn are quite sensitive to their semi-major axes and decrease when the planets' heliocentric distances are increased to allow for protoplanet migration. It is possible, though not clearly demonstrated, that this could produce a depleted asteroid belt but permit formation of a system of terrestrial planet embryos on a approximately 10(6)-year timescale, initially by nonrunaway growth and transitioning to runaway growth after approximately 10(5) years. The calculations reported here are valid under the condition that the relative velocities of the bodies are determined only by Jupiter and Saturn perturbations and by gas drag, with no mutual perturbations between

  12. Red worlds: Spitzer exploration of a compact system of temperate terrestrial planets transiting a nearby Jupiter-sized star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, Michael; Burdanov, Artem; Delrez, Laetitia; Jehin, Emmanuel; Magain, Pierre; Van Grootel, Valerie; Bolmont, Emeline; Leconte, Jeremy; Raymond, Sean; Selsis, Franck; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Queloz, Didier; Triaud, Amaury; de Wit, Julien; Burgasser, Adam; Carey, Sean; Ingalls, Jim; Lederer, Sue; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine

    2016-08-01

    The recently detected TRAPPIST-1 planetary system represents a unique opportunity to extend the nascent field of comparative exoplanetology into the realm of temperate terrestrial worlds. It is composed of at least three Earth-sized planets similar in sizes and irradiations to Earth and Venus transiting an ultra-cool dwarf star only 39 light-years away. Thanks to the Jupiter-size and infrared brightness of their host star, the planets are amenable for detailed atmospheric characterization with JWST, including for biosignatures detection. Our Spitzer Exploration Science Program aims to prepare and optimize the detailed study of this fascinating planetary system through the two following complementary sub-programs: (1) a 480 hrs continuous monitoring of the star to explore its full inner system up to its ice line in a search for any other transiting object(s) (planet, moon, Trojan) with a sensitivity high enough to detect any body as small as Ganymede, and (2) the observation of ~130 transits of the planets (520 hrs). This second part has two goals. First, to measure precisely the planets' masses and eccentricities through the Transit Timing Variations method, to constrain strongly their compositions and energy budgets. Secondly, to measure with an extremely high precision the planets' effective radii at 4.5 microns to assess, when combined with future HST/WFC3 observations, the presence of an atmosphere around them. The two complementary parts of this program will make it a long-lasting legacy of Spitzer to the fields of comparative exoplanetology and astrobiology, by providing the necessary measurements on the inner system of TRAPPIST-1 (complete census, masses, eccentricities, first insights on atmospheres) required to initiate and optimize the detailed atmospheric characterization of its different components with JWST and other future facilities.

  13. COUPLED EVOLUTIONS OF THE STELLAR OBLIQUITY, ORBITAL DISTANCE, AND PLANET'S RADIUS DUE TO THE OHMIC DISSIPATION INDUCED IN A DIAMAGNETIC HOT JUPITER AROUND A MAGNETIC T TAURI STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Ling; Gu, Pin-Gao; Bodenheimer, Peter H.

    2012-10-01

    We revisit the calculation of the ohmic dissipation in a hot Jupiter presented by Laine et al. by considering more realistic interior structures, stellar obliquity, and the resulting orbital evolution. In this simplified approach, the young hot Jupiter of one Jupiter mass is modeled as a diamagnetic sphere with a finite resistivity, orbiting across tilted stellar magnetic dipole fields in vacuum. Since the induced ohmic dissipation occurs mostly near the planet's surface, we find that the dissipation is unable to significantly expand the young hot Jupiter. Nevertheless, the planet inside a small corotation orbital radius can undergo orbital decay by the dissipation torque and finally overfill its Roche lobe during the T Tauri star phase. The stellar obliquity can evolve significantly if the magnetic dipole is parallel/antiparallel to the stellar spin. Our results are validated by the general torque-dissipation relation in the presence of the stellar obliquity. We also run the fiducial model of Laine et al. and find that the planet's radius is sustained at a nearly constant value by the ohmic heating, rather than being thermally expanded to the Roche radius as suggested by the authors.

  14. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, James P.

    2013-09-01

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  15. Delay of planet formation at large radius and the outward decrease in mass and gas content of Jovian planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Li-Ping; Liu, Chun-Jian; Zhang, Yu

    2015-09-01

    A prominent observation of the solar system is that the mass and gas content of Jovian planets decrease outward with orbital radius, except that, in terms of these properties, Neptune is almost the same as Uranus. In previous studies, the solar nebula was assumed to preexist and the formation process of the solar nebula was not considered. It was therefore assumed that planet formation at different radii started at the same time in the solar nebula. We show that planet formation at different radii does not start at the same time and is delayed at large radii. We suggest that this delay might be one of the factors that causes the outward decrease in the masses of Jovian planets. The nebula starts to form from its inner part because of the inside-out collapse of its progenitorial molecular cloud core. The nebula then expands outward due to viscosity. Material first reaches a small radius and then reaches a larger radius, so planet formation is delayed at the large radius. The later the material reaches a planet's location, the less time it has to gain mass and gas content. Hence, the delay tends to cause the outward decrease in mass and gas content of Jovian planets. Our nebula model shows that the material reaches Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune at t = 0.40, 0.57, 1.50 and 6.29 × 106 yr, respectively. We discuss the effects of time delay on the masses of Jovian planets in the framework of the core accretion model of planet formation. Saturn's formation is not delayed by much time relative to Jupiter so that they both reach the rapid gas accretion phase and become gas giants. However, the delay in formation of Uranus and Neptune is long and might be one of the factors that cause them not to reach the rapid gas accretion phase before the gas nebula is dispersed. Saturn has less time to go through the rapid gas accretion, so Saturn's mass and gas content are significantly less than those of Jupiter.

  16. EMBRYO IMPACTS AND GAS GIANT MERGERS. I. DICHOTOMY OF JUPITER AND SATURN's CORE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shulin; Agnor, C.B.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2010-09-10

    Interior to the gaseous envelopes of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, there are high-density cores with masses larger than 10 Earth masses. According to the conventional sequential accretion hypothesis, such massive cores are needed for the onset of efficient accretion of their gaseous envelopes. However, Jupiter's gaseous envelope is more massive and its core may be less massive than those of Saturn. In order to account for this structural diversity and the super-solar metallicity in the envelope of Jupiter and Saturn, we investigate the possibility that they may have either merged with other gas giants or consumed several Earth-mass protoplanetary embryos during or after the rapid accretion of their envelope. In general, impinging sub-Earth-mass planetesimals disintegrate in gas giants' envelopes, deposit heavy elements well outside the cores, and locally suppress the convection. Consequently, their fragments sediment to promote the growth of cores. Through a series of numerical simulations, we show that it is possible for colliding super-Earth-mass embryos to reach the cores of gas giants. Direct parabolic collisions also lead to the coalescence of gas giants and merging of their cores. In these cases, the energy released from the impact leads to vigorous convective motion throughout the envelope and the erosion of the cores. This dichotomy contributes to the observed dispersion in the internal structure and atmospheric composition between Jupiter and Saturn and other gas giant planets and elsewhere.

  17. Friends of Hot Jupiters. IV. Stellar Companions Beyond 50 au Might Facilitate Giant Planet Formation, but Most are Unlikely to Cause Kozai–Lidov Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Bryan, Marta; Crepp, Justin R.; Batygin, Konstantin; Crossfield, Ian; Hansen, Brad; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Wang, Ji

    2016-08-01

    Stellar companions can influence the formation and evolution of planetary systems, but there are currently few observational constraints on the properties of planet-hosting binary star systems. We search for stellar companions around 77 transiting hot Jupiter systems to explore the statistical properties of this population of companions as compared to field stars of similar spectral type. After correcting for survey incompleteness, we find that 47 % +/- 7 % of hot Jupiter systems have stellar companions with semimajor axes between 50 and 2000 au. This is 2.9 times larger than the field star companion fraction in this separation range, with a significance of 4.4σ . In the 1–50 au range, only {3.9}-2.0+4.5 % of hot Jupiters host stellar companions, compared to the field star value of 16.4 % +/- 0.7 % , which is a 2.7σ difference. We find that the distribution of mass ratios for stellar companions to hot Jupiter systems peaks at small values and therefore differs from that of field star binaries which tend to be uniformly distributed across all mass ratios. We conclude that either wide separation stellar binaries are more favorable sites for gas giant planet formation at all separations, or that the presence of stellar companions preferentially causes the inward migration of gas giant planets that formed farther out in the disk via dynamical processes such as Kozai–Lidov oscillations. We determine that less than 20% of hot Jupiters have stellar companions capable of inducing Kozai–Lidov oscillations assuming initial semimajor axes between 1 and 5 au, implying that the enhanced companion occurrence is likely correlated with environments where gas giants can form efficiently.

  18. Earth, Jupiter and Saturn as guides for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs: a lightning climatology study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodosán, Gabriella; Asensio Torres, Rubén; Helling, Christiane; Vorgul, Irena

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale electrostatic discharges (i.e. lightning) have been observed in the Solar System. Apart from Earth there are direct detections from Jupiter and Saturn and indirect (only radio) detection from Uranus and Neptune. Recent observations made by the Venus Explorer revealed radio signals that may be related to lightning. Observations indicate that clouds form on extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. The conditions in these clouds may be good for lightning to occur, which can be a main ionization process in these atmospheres (lightning in mineral clouds e.g.: Bailey et al. 2014, ApJ, 784, 43; Helling at al. 2013, ApJ, 767, 136; Helling et al. 2013, P&SS, 77, 152). In this study our aim is to compare lightning climatology from Earth, Jupiter and Saturn and use these statistics as a guide to study potential lightning on extrasolar planetary objects. Earth is a fair analogy for rocky or ocean planets while Jupiter and Saturn resemble giant planets and brown dwarfs. To give an estimate on the total lightning energy (or power) that can reach us from a particular extrasolar body, we need to know how much lightning can occur on the object globally. We will show the possibilities in the number and quality of the giant planet data sets, which may give a fine comparison of future observations of extrasolar giant gas planets and even brown dwarfs. Data were obtained from Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS)/Optical Transient Detector (OTD) (e.g.: Cecil et al. 2014, Atmospheric Research, 135, 404), Sferics Timing and Ranging Network (STARNET) (e.g.: Morales Rodrigues et al. 2011, 2014, XIV and XV International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity) and World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) (e.g.: Hutchins et al. 2012, Radio Science, 47, RS6005), four major lightning detecting networks, which monitor lightning occurrence in the optical or radio range on Earth. We compare flash/stroke rates in space and time and use the data to refer to Earth as a transiting exoplanet. We

  19. Orbital Stability of Multi-planet Systems: Behavior at High Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sarah J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-06-01

    In the coming years, high-contrast imaging surveys are expected to reveal the characteristics of the population of wide-orbit, massive, exoplanets. To date, a handful of wide planetary mass companions are known, but only one such multi-planet system has been discovered: HR 8799. For low mass planetary systems, multi-planet interactions play an important role in setting system architecture. In this paper, we explore the stability of these high mass, multi-planet systems. While empirical relationships exist that predict how system stability scales with planet spacing at low masses, we show that extrapolating to super-Jupiter masses can lead to up to an order of magnitude overestimate of stability for massive, tightly packed systems. We show that at both low and high planet masses, overlapping mean-motion resonances trigger chaotic orbital evolution, which leads to system instability. We attribute some of the difference in behavior as a function of mass to the increasing importance of second order resonances at high planet–star mass ratios. We use our tailored high mass planet results to estimate the maximum number of planets that might reside in double component debris disk systems, whose gaps may indicate the presence of massive bodies.

  20. The mass disruption of Jupiter Family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2015-01-01

    I show that the size-distribution of small scattered-disk trans-neptunian objects when derived from the observed size-distribution of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) and other observational constraints implies that a large percentage (94-97%) of newly arrived active comets within a range of 0.2-15.4 km effective radius must physically disrupt, i.e., macroscopically disintegrate, within their median dynamical lifetime. Additional observational constraints include the numbers of dormant and active nuclei in the near-Earth object (NEO) population and the slope of their size distributions. I show that the cumulative power-law slope (-2.86 to -3.15) of the scattered-disk TNO hot population between 0.2 and 15.4 km effective radius is only weakly dependent on the size-dependence of the otherwise unknown disruption mechanism. Evidently, as JFC nuclei from the scattered disk evolve into the inner Solar System only a fraction achieve dormancy while the vast majority of small nuclei (e.g., primarily those with effective radius <2 km) break-up. The percentage disruption rate appears to be comparable with that of the dynamically distinct Oort cloud and Halley type comets (Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Jedicke, R., Wiegert, P.A., Bottke Jr., W.F. [2002]. Science 296, 2212-2215) suggesting that all types of comet nuclei may have similar structural characteristics even though they may have different source regions and thermal histories. The typical disruption rate for a 1 km radius active nucleus is ∼5 × 10-5 disruptions/year and the dormancy rate is typically 3 times less. We also estimate that average fragmentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.04 events/year/comet, somewhat above the lower limit of 0.01 events/year/comet observed by Chen and Jewitt (Chen, J., Jewitt, D.C. [1994]. Icarus 108, 265-271).

  1. THE MASS OF KOI-94d AND A RELATION FOR PLANET RADIUS, MASS, AND INCIDENT FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Kolbl, Rea; Rowe, Jason F.; Howell, Steve B.; Howard, Andrew W.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Miller, Neil; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara; Fischer, Debra A.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Johnson, John Asher; Horch, Elliott P.; Everett, Mark E.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2013-05-01

    We measure the mass of a modestly irradiated giant planet, KOI-94d. We wish to determine whether this planet, which is in a 22 day orbit and receives 2700 times as much incident flux as Jupiter, is as dense as Jupiter or rarefied like inflated hot Jupiters. KOI-94 also hosts at least three smaller transiting planets, all of which were detected by the Kepler mission. With 26 radial velocities of KOI-94 from the W. M. Keck Observatory and a simultaneous fit to the Kepler light curve, we measure the mass of the giant planet and determine that it is not inflated. Support for the planetary interpretation of the other three candidates comes from gravitational interactions through transit timing variations, the statistical robustness of multi-planet systems against false positives, and several lines of evidence that no other star resides within the photometric aperture. We report the properties of KOI-94b (M{sub P} = 10.5 {+-} 4.6 M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P} = 1.71 {+-} 0.16 R{sub Circled-Plus }, P = 3.74 days), KOI-94c (M{sub P} = 15.6{sup +5.7}{sub -15.6} M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P} = 4.32 {+-} 0.41 R{sub Circled-Plus }, P = 10.4 days), KOI-94d (M{sub P} = 106 {+-} 11 M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P} = 11.27 {+-} 1.06 R{sub Circled-Plus }, P = 22.3 days), and KOI-94e (M{sub P} = 35{sup +18}{sub -28} M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P} = 6.56 {+-} 0.62 R{sub Circled-Plus }, P = 54.3 days). The radial velocity analyses of KOI-94b and KOI-94e offer marginal (>2{sigma}) mass detections, whereas the observations of KOI-94c offer only an upper limit to its mass. Using the KOI-94 system and other planets with published values for both mass and radius (138 exoplanets total, including 35 with M{sub P} < 150 M{sub Circled-Plus }), we establish two fundamental planes for exoplanets that relate their mass, incident flux, and radius from a few Earth masses up to 13 Jupiter masses: (R{sub P}/R{sub Circled-Plus }) = 1.78(M{sub P}/M{sub Circled-Plus }){sup 0.53}(F/erg s{sup -1} cm

  2. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR VERY LOW MASS GASEOUS PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Stevenson, David J.

    2013-05-20

    Recently, the Kepler spacecraft has detected a sizable aggregate of objects, characterized by giant-planet-like radii and modest levels of stellar irradiation. With the exception of a handful of objects, the physical nature, and specifically the average densities, of these bodies remain unknown. Here, we propose that the detected giant planet radii may partially belong to planets somewhat less massive than Uranus and Neptune. Accordingly, in this work, we seek to identify a physically sound upper limit to planetary radii at low masses and moderate equilibrium temperatures. As a guiding example, we analyze the interior structure of the Neptune-mass planet Kepler-30d and show that it is acutely deficient in heavy elements, especially compared with its solar system counterparts. Subsequently, we perform numerical simulations of planetary thermal evolution and in agreement with previous studies, show that generally, 10-20 M{sub Circled-Plus }, multi-billion year old planets, composed of high density cores and extended H/He envelopes can have radii that firmly reside in the giant planet range. We subject our results to stability criteria based on extreme ultraviolet radiation, as well as Roche-lobe overflow driven mass-loss and construct mass-radius relationships for the considered objects. We conclude by discussing observational avenues that may be used to confirm or repudiate the existence of putative low mass, gas-dominated planets.

  3. Astrometric positions of Jupiter VI, Jupiter VII, and minor planet (2153) Akiyama from Table Mountain Observatory, with remarks on decimalization in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, J. Derral

    1990-11-01

    Astrometric positions of satellites VI and VII of Jupiter were obtained on plates taken at the 60-cm reflector at Table Mountain Observatory on one night in February 1968. Prediscovery images of minor planet (2153) Akiyama were found on two of the plates. The presentation of numerical results is bolstered with remarks on the four-century history of use of decimal fractions in astronomy.

  4. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: FOUR TRANSITING PLANETS MORE MASSIVE THAN JUPITER ORBITING MODERATELY BRIGHT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Torres, G.; Beky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenar, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Kovacs, G.; Shporer, A.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; and others

    2012-07-15

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M{sub J} and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M{sub J}), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 {+-} 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 {+-} 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters.

  5. ON THE MIGRATION OF JUPITER AND SATURN: CONSTRAINTS FROM LINEAR MODELS OF SECULAR RESONANT COUPLING WITH THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Agnor, Craig B.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2012-02-01

    We examine how the late divergent migration of Jupiter and Saturn may have perturbed the terrestrial planets. Using a modified secular model we have identified six secular resonances between the {nu}{sub 5} frequency of Jupiter and Saturn and the four apsidal eigenfrequencies of the terrestrial planets (g{sub 1-4}). We derive analytic upper limits on the eccentricity and orbital migration timescale of Jupiter and Saturn when these resonances were encountered to avoid perturbing the eccentricities of the terrestrial planets to values larger than the observed ones. Because of the small amplitudes of the j = 2, 3 terrestrial eigenmodes the g{sub 2} - {nu}{sub 5} and g{sub 3} - {nu}{sub 5} resonances provide the strongest constraints on giant planet migration. If Jupiter and Saturn migrated with eccentricities comparable to their present-day values, smooth migration with exponential timescales characteristic of planetesimal-driven migration ({tau} {approx} 5-10 Myr) would have perturbed the eccentricities of the terrestrial planets to values greatly exceeding the observed ones. This excitation may be mitigated if the eccentricity of Jupiter was small during the migration epoch, migration was very rapid (e.g., {tau} {approx}< 0.5 Myr perhaps via planet-planet scattering or instability-driven migration) or the observed small eccentricity amplitudes of the j = 2, 3 terrestrial modes result from low probability cancellation of several large amplitude contributions. Results of orbital integrations show that very short migration timescales ({tau} < 0.5 Myr), characteristic of instability-driven migration, may also perturb the terrestrial planets' eccentricities by amounts comparable to their observed values. We discuss the implications of these constraints for the relative timing of terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and the origin of the so-called Late Heavy Bombardment of the Moon 3.9 {+-} 0.1 Ga ago. We suggest that the simplest way to satisfy these

  6. Galilean Moons, Kepler's Third Law, and the Mass of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Alan

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of physical systems are widely available online, with no cost, and are ready to be used in our classrooms. ,2 Such simulations offer an accessible tool that can be used for a range of interactive learning activities. The Jovian Moons Applet2 allows the user to track the position of Jupiter's four Galilean moons with a variety of viewing options. For this activity, data are obtained from the orbital period and orbital radii charts. Earlier experiments have used telescopes to capture the orbital motion of the Galilean moons,3 although observation of astronomical events and the measurement of quantities may be difficult to achieve due to a combination of cost, training, and observing conditions. The applet allows a suitable set of data to be generated and data analysis that verifies Kepler's third law of planetary motion, which leads to a calculated value for the mass of Jupiter.

  7. Extrasolar Planets and Prospects for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, Steven S.; Fischer, Debra A.

    2004-06-01

    Examination of ˜2000 sun--like stars has revealed 97 planets (as of 2002 Nov), all residing within our Milky Way Galaxy and within ˜200 light years of our Solar System. They have masses between 0.1 and 10 times that of Jupiter, and orbital sizes of 0.05--5 AU. Thus planets occupy the entire detectable domain of mass and orbits. News &summaries about extrasolar planets are provided at: http://exoplanets.org. These planets were all discovered by the wobble of the host stars, induced gravitationally by the planets, causing a periodicity in the measured Doppler effect of the starlight. Earth--mass planets remain undetectable, but space--based missions such as Kepler, COROT and SIM may provide detections of terrestrial planets within the next decade. The number of planets increases with decreasing planet mass, indicating that nature makes more small planets than jupiter--mass planets. Extrapolation, though speculative, bodes well for an even larger number of earth--mass planets. These observations and the theory of planet formation suggests that single sun--like stars commonly harbor earth--sized rocky planets, as yet undetectable. The number of planets increases with increasing orbital distance from the host star, and most known planets reside in non--circular orbits. Many known planets reside in the habitable zone (albeit being gas giants) and most newly discovered planets orbit beyond 1 AU from their star. A population of Jupiter--like planets may reside at 5--10 AU from stars, not easily detectable at present. The sun--like star 55 Cancri harbors a planet of 4--10 Jupiter masses orbiting at 5.5 AU in a low eccentricity orbit, the first analog of our Jupiter, albeit with two large planets orbiting inward. To date, 10 multiple--planet systems have been discovered, with four revealing gravitational interactions between the planets in the form of resonances. GJ 876 has two planets with periods of 1 and 2 months. Other planetary systems are ``hierarchical'', consisting

  8. DETERMINATION OF THE MINIMUM MASSES OF HEAVY ELEMENTS IN THE ENVELOPES OF JUPITER AND SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Marboeuf, Ulysse; Alibert, Yann; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, Glenn S.; Pauzat, Francoise; Ellinger, Yves

    2009-05-10

    conditions, the minimum mass of ices needed in the envelope of Saturn decreases from {approx} 16.7 to 15.6 M {sub +}, including a mass of water diminishing from 8.6 to 7.7 M {sub +}. The accretion of planetesimals with ices to rocks ratios {approx} 1 in the envelope of Jupiter, namely a value derived from the bulk densities of Ganymede and Callisto, remains compatible with the mass of heavy elements predicted by interior models. On the other hand, the accretion of planetesimals with similar ice-to-rock in the envelope of Saturn implies a mass of heavy elements greater than the one predicted by interior models, unless a substantial fraction of the accreted rock and water sedimented onto the core of the planet during its evolution.

  9. Orbital Circularization of a Planet Accreting Disk Gas: The Formation of Distant Jupiters in Circular Orbits Based on a Core Accretion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Arika; Ida, Shigeru

    2014-12-01

    Recently, gas giant planets in nearly circular orbits with large semimajor axes (a ~ 30-1000 AU) have been detected by direct imaging. We have investigated orbital evolution in a formation scenario for such planets, based on a core accretion model. (1) Icy cores accrete from planetesimals at <~ 30 AU, (2) they are scattered outward by an emerging nearby gas giant to acquire highly eccentric orbits, and (3) their orbits are circularized through the accretion of disk gas in outer regions, where they spend most of their time. We analytically derived equations to describe the orbital circularization through gas accretion. Numerical integrations of these equations show that the eccentricity decreases by a factor of more than 5 while the planetary mass increases by a factor of 10. Because runaway gas accretion increases planetary mass by ~10-300, the orbits are sufficiently circularized. On the other hand, a is reduced at most only by a factor of two, leaving the planets in the outer regions. If the relative velocity damping by shock is considered, the circularization slows down, but is still efficient enough. Therefore, this scenario potentially accounts for the formation of observed distant jupiters in nearly circular orbits. If the apocenter distances of the scattered cores are larger than the disk sizes, their a shrink to a quarter of the disk sizes; the a-distribution of distant giants could reflect the outer edges of the disks in a similar way that those of hot jupiters may reflect inner edges.

  10. Orbital circularization of a planet accreting disk gas: the formation of distant jupiters in circular orbits based on a core accretion model

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Arika; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: higuchia@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2014-12-10

    Recently, gas giant planets in nearly circular orbits with large semimajor axes (a ∼ 30-1000 AU) have been detected by direct imaging. We have investigated orbital evolution in a formation scenario for such planets, based on a core accretion model. (1) Icy cores accrete from planetesimals at ≲ 30 AU, (2) they are scattered outward by an emerging nearby gas giant to acquire highly eccentric orbits, and (3) their orbits are circularized through the accretion of disk gas in outer regions, where they spend most of their time. We analytically derived equations to describe the orbital circularization through gas accretion. Numerical integrations of these equations show that the eccentricity decreases by a factor of more than 5 while the planetary mass increases by a factor of 10. Because runaway gas accretion increases planetary mass by ∼10-300, the orbits are sufficiently circularized. On the other hand, a is reduced at most only by a factor of two, leaving the planets in the outer regions. If the relative velocity damping by shock is considered, the circularization slows down, but is still efficient enough. Therefore, this scenario potentially accounts for the formation of observed distant jupiters in nearly circular orbits. If the apocenter distances of the scattered cores are larger than the disk sizes, their a shrink to a quarter of the disk sizes; the a-distribution of distant giants could reflect the outer edges of the disks in a similar way that those of hot jupiters may reflect inner edges.

  11. WFIRST PLANET MASSES FROM MICROLENS PARALLAX

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, J. C.

    2013-06-20

    I present a method using only a few ground-based observations of magnified microlensing events to routinely measure the parallaxes of WFIRST events if WFIRST is in an L2 orbit. This could be achieved for all events with A{sub max} > 30 using target-of-opportunity observations of select WFIRST events, or with a complementary, ground-based survey of the WFIRST field, which can push beyond this magnification limit. When combined with a measurement of the angular size of the Einstein ring, which is almost always measured in planetary events, these parallax measurements will routinely give measurements of the lens masses and hence the absolute masses of the planets. They can also lead to mass measurements for dark, isolated objects such as brown dwarfs, free-floating planets, and stellar remnants if the size of the Einstein ring is measured.

  12. Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, Fran; Dowling, Timothy E.; McKinnon, William B.

    2007-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction F. Bagenal, T. E. Dowling and W. B. McKinnon; 2. The origin of Jupiter J. I. Lunine, A. Corandini, D. Gautier, T. C. Owen and G. Wuchterl; 3. The interior of Jupiter T. Guillot, D. J. Stevenson, W. B. Hubbard and D. Saumon; 4. The composition of the atmosphere of Jupiter F. W. Taylor, S. K. Atreya, Th. Encrenaz, D. M. Hunten, P. G. J. Irwin and T. C. Owen; 5. Jovian clouds and haze R. A. West, K. H. Baines, A. J. Friedson, D. Banfield, B. Ragent and F. W. Taylor; 6. Dynamics of Jupiter's atmosphere A. P. Ingersoll, T. E. Dowling, P. J. Gierasch, G. S. Orton, P. L. Read, A. Sánchez-Lavega, A. P. Showman, A. A. Simon-Miller and A. R. Vasavada; 7. The stratosphere of Jupiter J. I. Moses, T. Fouchet, R. V. Yelle, A. J. Friedson, G. S. Orton, B. Bézard, P. Drossart, G. R. Gladstone, T. Kostiuk and T. A. Livengood; 8. Lessons from Shoemaker-Levy 9 about Jupiter and planetary impacts J. Harrington, I. de Pater, S. H. Brecht, D. Deming, V. Meadows, K. Zahnle and P. D. Nicholson; 9. Jupiter's thermosphere and ionosphere R. V. Yelle and S. Miller; 10. Jovian dust: streams, clouds and rings H. Krüger, M. Horányi, A. V. Krivov and A. L. Graps; 11. Jupiter's ring-moon system J. A. Burns, D. P. Simonelli, M. R. Showalter, D. P. Hamilton, C. C. Porco, H. Throop and L. W. Esposito; 12. Jupiter's outer satellites and trojans D. C. Jewitt, S. Sheppard and C. Porco; 13. Interior composition, structure and dynamics of the Galilean satellites G. Schubert, J. D. Anderson, T. Spohn and W. B. McKinnon; 14. The lithosphere and surface of Io A. S. McEwen, L. P. Keszthelyi, R. Lopes, P. M. Schenk and J. R. Spencer; 15. Geology of Europa R. Greeley, C. F. Chyba, J. W. Head III, T. B. McCord, W. B. McKinnon, R. T. Pappalardo and P. Figueredo; 16. Geology of Ganymede R. T. Pappalardo, G. C. Collins, J. W. Head III, P. Helfenstein, T. B. McCord, J. M. Moore, L. M. Procktor, P. M. Shenk and J. R. Spencer; 17. Callisto J. M. Moore, C. R. Chapman. E. B. Bierhaus, R

  13. Magnitudes of selected stellar occultation candidates for Pluto and other planets, with new predictions for Mars and Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sybert, C. B.; Bosh, A. S.; Sauter, L. M.; Elliot, J. L.; Wasserman, L. H.

    1992-01-01

    Occultation predictions for the planets Mars and Jupiter are presented along with BVRI magnitudes of 45 occultation candidates for Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Pluto. Observers can use these magnitudes to plan observations of occultation events. The optical depth of the Jovian ring can be probed by a nearly central occultation on 1992 July 8. Mars occults an unusually red star in early 1993, and the occultations for Pluto involving the brightest candidates would possibly occur in the spring of 1992 and the fall of 1993.

  14. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, AND HAT-P-46b: Three transiting hot Jupiters in possible multi-planet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; De Val-Borro, M.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Fischer, D. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M {sub J}, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R {sub J}. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M {sub ☉}. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M {sub J}. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s{sup –1} is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M {sub J}, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters.

  15. Growth of Jupiter: Enhancement of core accretion by a voluminous low-mass envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Gennaro; Weidenschilling, Stuart J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2014-10-01

    We present calculations of the early stages of the formation of Jupiter via core nucleated accretion and gas capture. The core begins as a seed body of about 350 km in radius and orbits in a swarm of planetesimals whose initial radii range from 15 m to 50 km. The evolution of the swarm accounts for growth and fragmentation, viscous and gravitational stirring, and for drag-assisted migration and velocity damping. During this evolution, less than 9% of the mass is in planetesimals smaller than 1 km in radius; ≲25% is in planetesimals with radii between 1 and 10 km; and ≲7% is in bodies with radii larger than 100 km. Gas capture by the core substantially enhances the size-dependent cross-section of the planet for accretion of planetesimals. The calculation of dust opacity in the planet's envelope accounts for coagulation and sedimentation of dust particles released as planetesimals are ablated. The calculation is carried out at an orbital semi-major axis of 5.2 AU and the initial solids' surface density is 10 g cm-2 at that distance. The results give a core mass of nearly 7.3 Earth masses (M⊕) and an envelope mass of ≈0.15 M⊕ after about 4×105 years, at which point the envelope growth rate surpasses that of the core. The same calculation without the envelope yields a core of only about 4.4 M⊕.

  16. A COLD NEPTUNE-MASS PLANET OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb: COLD NEPTUNES ARE COMMON

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A. E-mail: abe@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.j

    2010-02-20

    We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb with a planet-star mass ratio of q = [9.5 +- 2.1] x 10{sup -5} via gravitational microlensing. The planetary deviation was detected in real-time thanks to the high cadence of the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics survey, real-time light-curve monitoring and intensive follow-up observations. A Bayesian analysis returns the stellar mass and distance at M{sub l} = 0.64{sup +0.21}{sub -0.26} M{sub sun} and D{sub l} = 5.9{sup +0.9}{sub -1.4} kpc, respectively, so the mass and separation of the planet are M{sub p} = 20{sup +7}{sub -8} M{sub +} and a = 3.3{sup +1.4}{sub -0.8} AU, respectively. This discovery adds another cold Neptune-mass planet to the planetary sample discovered by microlensing, which now comprises four cold Neptune/super-Earths, five gas giant planets, and another sub-Saturn mass planet whose nature is unclear. The discovery of these 10 cold exoplanets by the microlensing method implies that the mass ratio function of cold exoplanets scales as dN{sub pl}/dlog q {proportional_to} q {sup -0.7+}-{sup 0.2} with a 95% confidence level upper limit of n < -0.35 (where dN{sub pl}/dlog q {proportional_to} q{sup n} ). As microlensing is most sensitive to planets beyond the snow-line, this implies that Neptune-mass planets are at least three times more common than Jupiters in this region at the 95% confidence level.

  17. Parasitic Interference in Long Baseline Optical Interferometry: Requirements for Hot Jupiter-like Planet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, A.; Lopez, B.; Lagarde, S.; Danchi, W. C.; Robbe-Dubois, S.; Petrov, R. G.; Navarro, R.

    2009-12-01

    The observable quantities in optical interferometry, which are the modulus and the phase of the complex visibility, may be corrupted by parasitic fringes superimposed on the genuine fringe pattern. These fringes are due to an interference phenomenon occurring from stray light effects inside an interferometric instrument. We developed an analytical approach to better understand this phenomenon when stray light causes cross talk between beams. We deduced that the parasitic interference significantly affects the interferometric phase and thus the associated observables including the differential phase and the closure phase. The amount of parasitic flux coupled to the piston between beams appears to be very influential in this degradation. For instance, considering a point-like source and a piston ranging from λ/500 to λ/5 in the L band (λ = 3.5 μm), a parasitic flux of about 1% of the total flux produces a parasitic phase reaching at most one-third of the intrinsic phase. The piston, which can have different origins (instrumental stability, atmospheric perturbations, etc.), thus amplifies the effect of parasitic interference. According to the specifications of piston correction in space or at ground level (respectively λ/500 ≈ 2 nm and λ/30 ≈ 100 nm), the detection of hot Jupiter-like planets, one of the most challenging aims for current ground-based interferometers, limits parasitic radiation to about 5% of the incident intensity. This was evaluated by considering different types of hot Jupiter synthetic spectra. Otherwise, if no fringe tracking is used, the detection of a typical hot Jupiter-like system with a solar-like star would admit a maximum level of parasitic intensity of 0.01% for piston errors equal to λ/15. If the fringe tracking specifications are not precisely observed, it thus appears that the allowed level of parasitic intensity dramatically decreases and may prevent the detection. In parallel, the calibration of the parasitic phase by a

  18. PARASITIC INTERFERENCE IN LONG BASELINE OPTICAL INTERFEROMETRY: REQUIREMENTS FOR HOT JUPITER-LIKE PLANET DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Matter, A.; Lopez, B.; Lagarde, S.; Danchi, W. C.; Navarro, R.

    2009-12-01

    The observable quantities in optical interferometry, which are the modulus and the phase of the complex visibility, may be corrupted by parasitic fringes superimposed on the genuine fringe pattern. These fringes are due to an interference phenomenon occurring from stray light effects inside an interferometric instrument. We developed an analytical approach to better understand this phenomenon when stray light causes cross talk between beams. We deduced that the parasitic interference significantly affects the interferometric phase and thus the associated observables including the differential phase and the closure phase. The amount of parasitic flux coupled to the piston between beams appears to be very influential in this degradation. For instance, considering a point-like source and a piston ranging from lambda/500 to lambda/5 in the L band (lambda = 3.5 mum), a parasitic flux of about 1% of the total flux produces a parasitic phase reaching at most one-third of the intrinsic phase. The piston, which can have different origins (instrumental stability, atmospheric perturbations, etc.), thus amplifies the effect of parasitic interference. According to the specifications of piston correction in space or at ground level (respectively lambda/500 approx 2 nm and lambda/30 approx 100 nm), the detection of hot Jupiter-like planets, one of the most challenging aims for current ground-based interferometers, limits parasitic radiation to about 5% of the incident intensity. This was evaluated by considering different types of hot Jupiter synthetic spectra. Otherwise, if no fringe tracking is used, the detection of a typical hot Jupiter-like system with a solar-like star would admit a maximum level of parasitic intensity of 0.01% for piston errors equal to lambda/15. If the fringe tracking specifications are not precisely observed, it thus appears that the allowed level of parasitic intensity dramatically decreases and may prevent the detection. In parallel, the calibration

  19. A New Planet around an M Dwarf: Revealing a Correlation between Exoplanets and Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, John Asher; Butler, R. Paul; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Vogt, Steven S.; Wright, Jason T.; Peek, Kathryn M. G.

    2007-11-01

    We report precise Doppler measurements of GJ 317 (M3.5 V) that reveal the presence of a planet with a minimum mass MPsini=1.2 MJup in an eccentric, 692.9 day orbit. GJ 317 is only the third M dwarf with a Doppler-detected Jovian planet. The residuals to a single-Keplerian fit show evidence of a possible second orbital companion. The inclusion of a second Jupiter-mass planet (P~2700 days, MPsini=0.83 MJup) decreases sqrt(χ2ν) from 2.02 to 1.23, and reduces the rms from 12.5 to 6.32 m s-1. A false-alarm test yields a 1.1% probability that the curvature in the residuals of the single-planet fit is due to random fluctuations, lending additional credibility to the two-planet model. However, our data only marginally constrain a two-planet fit, and further monitoring is necessary to fully characterize the properties of the second companion. To study the effect of stellar mass on giant planet occurrence, we measure the fraction of stars with planets in three mass bins comprised of our samples of M Dwarfs, solar-mass stars, and intermediate-mass subgiants. We find a positive correlation between stellar mass and the occurrence rate of Jovian planets within 2.5 AU. Low-mass K and M stars have a 1.8%+/-1.0% planet occurrence rate compared to 4.2%+/-0.7% for solar-mass stars and 8.9%+/-2.9% for the higher mass subgiants. This result indicates that the former F- and A-type stars with M*>=1.3 Msolar in our sample are nearly 5 times more likely than the M dwarfs to harbor a giant planet. Our analysis shows that the correlation between Jovian planet occurrence and stellar mass exists even after correcting for the effects of stellar metallicity. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by both NASA and the University of California.

  20. Close-in planets around giant stars. Lack of hot-Jupiters and prevalence of multiplanetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Correia, A. C. M.

    2016-04-01

    Extrasolar planets abound in almost any possible configuration. However, until five years ago, there was a lack of planets orbiting closer than 0.5 au to giant or subgiant stars. Since then, recent detections have started to populated this regime by confirming 13 planetary systems. We discuss the properties of these systems in terms of their formation and evolution off the main sequence. Interestingly, we find that 70.0 ± 6.6% of the planets in this regime are inner components of multiplanetary systems. This value is 4.2σ higher than for main-sequence hosts, which we find to be 42.4 ± 0.1%. The properties of the known planets seem to indicate that the closest-in planets (a< 0.06 au) to main-sequence stars are massive (i.e., hot Jupiters) and isolated and that they are subsequently engulfed by their host as it evolves to the red giant branch, leaving only the predominant population of multiplanetary systems in orbits 0.06 Jupiters.

  1. Falling of Shoemaker-Levy Comet on Jupiter Planet. Physical and Epistmological Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofonea, Liviu

    The author is discussing Physical and Epistemological consequences of the Shoemeker-Levy Comet impact on Jupiter. The impact excited a major interest from many of phylosophers of science. The main topic of their investigations is the Human condition. It is to mention, that the Shoemaker-Levy comet was not an obvious event. Since some of scientists predicted the impact, it is necessary to mention the validity of scientific research. Most of astronomers consider that the Impact Shoemaker-Levy Comet and Jupiter was one of maximal scientific magnitude (interest). In view of this it is to add, that the impact was the most violent astrophysical phenomenon observed during the last years. The reasearh of the impact and the knowledge of the physical characteristics of the Comet will generate informations of very great value: gnoseologic, methodologic and historical. The scietific methodology used was adequate and complex in the preparation of observations, observations itselves, collection of observational data, the data procession, the information of scientific community, mass media and amateur astronomers. The modelling of the phenomenon was necessary and adequate. The author is pledging for an energic continuation of space researches in view of their very great impact on Humans civilisation development.

  2. Clouds in Low-mass, Low-density Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline; Fortney, J.; Marley, M.; Kempton, E.; Visscher, C.; Zahnle, K.

    2013-10-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has revealed huge populations of low-mass, low-density planets, but their compositions remain elusive. For example, the density of GJ 1214b is consistent with either a water-world with a water atmosphere or a rock-iron core with a H/He envelope. Other super-Earths must contain hydrogen and helium to match their observed masses and radii. To understand this population of objects, we must be able to characterize their compositions through spectroscopy. The formation of clouds in exoplanet atmospheres significantly changes their observable spectra. For exoplanets, the opacity of hazes or clouds has been invoked as a possible explanation for the observed flat transmission spectrum of transiting super-Earth GJ 1214b as well as for the strong Rayleigh scattering feature in HD 189733b, the best-studied hot Jupiter. Here, we examine the effect of clouds on low-mass, low-density exoplanet spectra. We include the condensates that are present in chemical equilibrium for objects at these temperatures (500-900 K) which include minerals like sulfides and alkali salts. The most important of these clouds are sodium sulfide, potassium chloride, and zinc sulfide. These clouds should be most prominent at low surface gravity, strongly super-solar atmospheric abundances, and at the slant viewing geometry appropriate for transits. Hence they could be quite important for affecting the transmission spectra of cool low density super-Earth and Neptune-class planets. Another class of clouds may also dramatically alter the spectra of irradiated planets: photochemical hazes. We additionally include a hydrocarbon haze layer similar to the tholin haze in Titan’s atmosphere. We calculate the location and density of the haze layer using photochemical models from Kempton et al. 2012. We present new results that show that for enhanced metallicity atmospheres, either the clouds that form in equilibrium or a hydrocarbon haze layer could become sufficiently optically thick

  3. Ogle-2012-blg-0724lb: A Saturn Mass Planet Around an M-dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirao, Y.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Suzuki, D.; Koshimoto, N.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a planet by the microlensing method, OGLE-2012-BLG-0724Lb. Although the duration of the planetary signal for this event was one of the shortest seen for a planetary event, the anomaly was well covered thanks to high-cadence observations taken by the survey groups OGLE and MOA. By analyzing the light curve, this planetary system is found to have a mass ratio q = (1.58 +/- 0.15) x 10(exp -3). By conducting a Bayesian analysis, we estimate that the host star is an M dwarf with a mass of M(sub L) = 0.29(+0.33/-0.16) solar mass located at D(sub L) = 6.7(+1.1/-1.2) kpc away from the Earth and the companion's mass is m(sub P) = 0.47(+0.54/-0.26) M(Jup). The projected planet- host separation is a falsum = 1.6(+0.4/-0.3) AU. Because the lens-source relative proper motion is relatively high, future highresolution images would detect the lens host star and determine the lens properties uniquely. This system is likely a Saturn-mass exoplanet around an M dwarf, and such systems are commonly detected by gravitational microlensing. This adds another example of a possible pileup of sub-Jupiters (0.2 less than m(sub P)/M(sub Jup) less than 1) in contrast to a lack of Jupiters (approximately 1-2 M(sub Jup)) around M dwarfs, supporting the prediction by core accretion models that Jupiter-mass or more massive planets are unlikely to form around M dwarfs.

  4. Enhancement of the Accretion of Jupiters Core by a Voluminous Low-Mass Envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; D'angelo, Gennaro; Weidenschilling, Stuart John; Bodenheimer, Peter; Hubickyj, Olenka

    2013-01-01

    We present calculations of the early stages of the formation of Jupiter via core nucleated accretion and gas capture. The core begins as a seed body of about 350 kilometers in radius and orbits in a swarm of planetesimals whose initial radii range from 15 meters to 100 kilometers. We follow the evolution of the swarm by accounting for growth and fragmentation, viscous and gravitational stirring, and for drag-induced migration and velocity damping. Gas capture by the core substantially enhances the cross-section of the planet for accretion of small planetesimals. The dust opacity within the atmosphere surrounding the planetary core is computed self-consistently, accounting for coagulation and sedimentation of dust particles released in the envelope as passing planetesimals are ablated. The calculation is carried out at an orbital semi-major axis of 5.2 AU and an initial solids' surface density of 10/g/cm^2 at that distance. The results give a core mass of 7 Earth masses and an envelope mass of approximately 0.1 Earth mass after 500,000 years, at which point the envelope growth rate surpasses that of the core. The same calculation without the envelope gives a core mass of only 4 Earth masses.

  5. On the mass and orbit of the ninth planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugwoke, Azubike Christian

    2016-07-01

    ON THE MASS AND ORBIT OF THE NINTH PLANET A new planet is currently being proposed in the literature.This yet to be observed planet has its mass and orbit yet to be determined. However, if this planet is to escape being labelled a plutinoid, it must posses all the characteristics of a planet as currently set by the IAU. In addition it must be massive enough to enable it couple into the gravitational potential of the sun. Our earlier paper on this issue has suggested that no new planets are expected beyond Neptune , due to the vanishing gravitational potential of the sun within that orbit.Any new planet must be indeed very massive to be gravitationally linked sufficiently to the sun. In the current paper we have obtained estimates for planet 9 orbit and mass using this method.

  6. The mass of dwarf planet Eris.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael E; Schaller, Emily L

    2007-06-15

    The discovery of dwarf planet Eris was followed shortly by the discovery of its satellite, Dysnomia, but the satellite orbit, and thus the system mass, was not known. New observations with the Keck Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescopes show that Dysnomia has a circular orbit with a radius of 37,350 +/- 140 (1-sigma) kilometers and a 15.774 +/- 0.002 day orbital period around Eris. These orbital parameters agree with expectations for a satellite formed out of the orbiting debris left from a giant impact. The mass of Eris from these orbital parameters is 1.67 x 10(22) +/- 0.02 x 10(22) kilograms, or 1.27 +/- 0.02 that of Pluto. PMID:17569855

  7. ON THE ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF A GIANT PLANET PAIR EMBEDDED IN A GASEOUS DISK. I. JUPITER-SATURN CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2010-05-01

    We carry out a series of high-resolution (1024 x 1024) hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the orbital evolution of Jupiter and Saturn embedded in a gaseous protostellar disk. Our work extends the results in the classical papers of Masset and Snellgrove and Morbidelli and Crida by exploring various surface density profiles ({sigma}), where {sigma} {proportional_to} r {sup -{alpha}}. The stability of the mean motion resonances (MMRs) caused by the convergent migration of the two planets is studied as well. Our results show that (1) the gap formation process of Saturn is greatly delayed by the tidal perturbation of Jupiter. These perturbations cause inward or outward runaway migration of Saturn, depending on the density profiles on the disk. (2) The convergent migration rate increases as {alpha} increases and the type of MMRs depends on {alpha} as well. When 0 < {alpha} < 1, the convergent migration speed of Jupiter and Saturn is relatively slow, thus they are trapped into 2:1 MMR. When {alpha}>4/3, Saturn passes through the 2:1 MMR with Jupiter and is captured into the 3:2 MMR. (3) The 3:2 MMR turns out to be unstable when the eccentricity of Saturn (e{sub s} ) increases too high. The critical value above which instability will set in is e{sub s} {approx} 0.15. We also observe that the two planets are trapped into 2:1 MMR after the break of 3:2 MMR. This process may provide useful information for the formation of orbital configuration between Jupiter and Saturn in the solar system.

  8. Exceptional Stars Origins, Companions, Masses and Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hansen, Bradley M. S.; Phinney, Sterl; vanKerkwijk, Martin H.; Vasisht, Gautam

    2004-01-01

    As SIM Interdisciplinary Scientist, we will study the formation, nature and planetary companions of the exotic endpoints of stellar evolution. Our science begins with stars evolving from asymptotic branch giants into white dwarfs. We will determine the parallax and orbital inclination of several iron-deficient post-AGB stars, who peculiar abundances and infrared excesses are evidence that they are accreting gas depleted of dust from a circumbinary disk. Measurement of the orbital inclination, companion mass arid parallax will provide critical constraints. One of these stars is a prime candidate for trying nulling observations, which should reveal light reflected from both the circumbinary and Roche disks. The circumbinary disks seem favorable sites for planet formation. Next, we will search for planets around white dwarfs, both survivors froni the main-sequence stage, and ones newly formed from the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or in white dwarf mergers. Moving up in mass, we will measure the orbital reflex of OB/Be companions to pulsars, determine natal kicks and presupernova orbits, and expand the sample of well-determined neutron star masses. We will obtain the parallax of a transient X-ray binary, whose quiescent emission may be thermal emission from the neutron star, aiming for precise measurement of the neutron star radius. Finally, black holes. We will measure the reflex motions of the companion of what appear to be the most massive stellar black holes. The visual orbits will determine natal kicks, and test the assumptions underlying mass estimates made from the radial velocity curves, projected rotation, and ellipsoidal variations. In addition, we will attempt to observe the visual orbit of SS 433, as well as the proper motion of the emission line clumps in its relativistic jets. Additional information is included in the original document.

  9. The Effect of Tidal Inflation Instability on the Mass and Dynamical Evolution of Extrasolar Planets with Ultrashort Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Pin-Gao; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Bodenheimer, Peter H.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the possibility of substantial inflation of short-period Jupiter-mass planets, as a result of their internal tidal dissipation associated with the synchronization and circularization of their orbits. We employ the simplest prescription based on an equilibrium model with a constant lag angle for all components of the tide. We show the following: (1) In the low-eccentricity limit, the synchronization of the planets' spin with their mean motion is established before tidal dissipation can significantly modify their internal structure. (2) However, above a critical eccentricity, which is a function of the planets' semimajor axis, tidal dissipation of energy during the circularization process can induce planets to inflate in size before their eccentricity is damped. (3) For moderate eccentricities, the planets adjust to stable thermal equilibria in which the rate of their internal tidal dissipation is balanced by the enhanced radiative flux associated with their enlarged radii. (4) For sufficiently large eccentricities, the planets swell beyond two Jupiter radii and their internal degeneracy is partially lifted. Thereafter, their thermal equilibria become unstable and they undergo runaway inflation until their radii exceed the Roche radius. (5) We determine the necessary and sufficient condition for this tidal inflation instability. (6) These results are applied to study short-period planets. We show that for young Jupiter-mass planets, with a period of less than 3 days, an initial radius of about 2RJ, and an orbital eccentricity greater than 0.2, the energy dissipated during the circularization of their orbits is sufficiently intense and protracted to inflate their sizes up to their Roche radii. (7) We estimate the mass-loss rate, the asymptotic planetary masses, and the semimajor axes for various planetary initial orbital parameters. The possibility of gas overflow through both inner (L1) and outer (L2) Lagrangian points for the planets with short

  10. Polarization of Directly Imaged Young Giant Planets as a Probe of Mass, Rotation, and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Sengupta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    Young, hot gas giant planets at large separations from their primaries have been directly imaged around several nearby stars. More such planets will likely be detected by ongoing and new imaging surveys with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Efforts continue to model the spectra of these planets in order to constrain their masses, effective temperatures, composition, and cloud structure. One potential tool for analyzing these objects, which has received relatively less attention, is polarization. Linear polarization of gas giant exoplanets can arise from the combined influences of light scattering by atmospheric dust and a rotationally distorted shape. The oblateness of gas giant planet increases of course with rotation rate and for fixed rotation also rises with decreasing gravity. Thus young, lower mass gas giant planets with youthful inflated radii could easily have oblateness greater than that of Saturn s 10%. We find that polarizations of over 1% may easily be produced in the near-infrared in such cases. This magnitude of polarization may be measurable by GPI and other instruments. Thus if detected, polarization of a young Jupiter places constraints on the combination of its gravity, rotation rate, and degree of cloudiness. We will present results of our multiple scattering analysis coupled with a self-consistent dusty atmospheric models to demonstrate the range of polarizations that might be expected from resolved exoplanets and the range of parameter space that such observations may inform.

  11. Masses, Radii, and Orbits of Small Kepler Planets: The Transition from Gaseous to Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Latham, David W.; Howell, Steve B.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Batalha, Natalie M.; Rogers, Leslie; Ciardi, David; Fischer, Debra A.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Huber, Daniel; Chaplin, William J.; Basu, Sarbani; Buchhave, Lars A.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Hunter, Roger; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Kolbl, Rea; Weiss, Lauren M.; Petigura, Erik; Seager, Sara; Morton, Timothy; Johnson, John Asher; Ballard, Sarah; Burke, Chris; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip; Everett, Mark E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Ford, Eric B.; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Brown, Timothy M.; Steffen, Jason H.; Charbonneau, David; Basri, Gibor S.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Winn, Joshua; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Christiansen, Jessie; Adams, Elisabeth; Henze, Christopher; Dupree, Andrea; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Tarter, Jill; Holman, Matthew J.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Shporer, Avi; Lucas, Philip W.; Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Bedding, T. R.; Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Kawaler, S. D.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.; Boss, Alan; Devore, Edna; Gould, Alan; Prsa, Andrej; Agol, Eric; Barclay, Thomas; Coughlin, Jeff; Brugamyer, Erik; Mullally, Fergal; Quintana, Elisa V.; Still, Martin; Thompson, Susan E.; Morrison, David; Twicken, Joseph D.; Désert, Jean-Michel; Carter, Josh; Crepp, Justin R.; Hébrard, Guillaume; Santerne, Alexandre; Moutou, Claire; Sobeck, Charlie; Hudgins, Douglas; Haas, Michael R.; Robertson, Paul; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Barrado, David

    2014-02-01

    We report on the masses, sizes, and orbits of the planets orbiting 22 Kepler stars. There are 49 planet candidates around these stars, including 42 detected through transits and 7 revealed by precise Doppler measurements of the host stars. Based on an analysis of the Kepler brightness measurements, along with high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, Doppler spectroscopy, and (for 11 stars) asteroseismology, we establish low false-positive probabilities (FPPs) for all of the transiting planets (41 of 42 have an FPP under 1%), and we constrain their sizes and masses. Most of the transiting planets are smaller than three times the size of Earth. For 16 planets, the Doppler signal was securely detected, providing a direct measurement of the planet's mass. For the other 26 planets we provide either marginal mass measurements or upper limits to their masses and densities; in many cases we can rule out a rocky composition. We identify six planets with densities above 5 g cm-3, suggesting a mostly rocky interior for them. Indeed, the only planets that are compatible with a purely rocky composition are smaller than ~2 R ⊕. Larger planets evidently contain a larger fraction of low-density material (H, He, and H2O). Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology.

  12. A Spitzer Five-band Analysis of the Jupiter-sized Planet TrES-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lust, Nate B.; Hardy, Ryan A.; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2014-12-01

    With an equilibrium temperature of 1200 K, TrES-1 is one of the coolest hot Jupiters observed by Spitzer. It was also the first planet discovered by any transit survey and one of the first exoplanets from which thermal emission was directly observed. We analyzed all Spitzer eclipse and transit data for TrES-1 and obtained its eclipse depths and brightness temperatures in the 3.6 μm (0.083% ± 0.024%, 1270 ± 110 K), 4.5 μm (0.094% ± 0.024%, 1126 ± 90 K), 5.8 μm (0.162% ± 0.042%, 1205 ± 130 K), 8.0 μm (0.213% ± 0.042%, 1190 ± 130 K), and 16 μm (0.33% ± 0.12%, 1270 ± 310 K) bands. The eclipse depths can be explained, within 1σ errors, by a standard atmospheric model with solar abundance composition in chemical equilibrium, with or without a thermal inversion. The combined analysis of the transit, eclipse, and radial-velocity ephemerides gives an eccentricity of e = 0.033+0.015 -0.031, consistent with a circular orbit. Since TrES-1's eclipses have low signal-to-noise ratios, we implemented optimal photometry and differential-evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms in our Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses, and Transits pipeline. Benefits include higher photometric precision and ~10 times faster MCMC convergence, with better exploration of the phase space and no manual parameter tuning.

  13. A Spitzer five-band analysis of the Jupiter-sized planet TrES-1

    SciTech Connect

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lust, Nate B.; Hardy, Ryan A.; Bowman, M. Oliver; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2014-12-10

    With an equilibrium temperature of 1200 K, TrES-1 is one of the coolest hot Jupiters observed by Spitzer. It was also the first planet discovered by any transit survey and one of the first exoplanets from which thermal emission was directly observed. We analyzed all Spitzer eclipse and transit data for TrES-1 and obtained its eclipse depths and brightness temperatures in the 3.6 μm (0.083% ± 0.024%, 1270 ± 110 K), 4.5 μm (0.094% ± 0.024%, 1126 ± 90 K), 5.8 μm (0.162% ± 0.042%, 1205 ± 130 K), 8.0 μm (0.213% ± 0.042%, 1190 ± 130 K), and 16 μm (0.33% ± 0.12%, 1270 ± 310 K) bands. The eclipse depths can be explained, within 1σ errors, by a standard atmospheric model with solar abundance composition in chemical equilibrium, with or without a thermal inversion. The combined analysis of the transit, eclipse, and radial-velocity ephemerides gives an eccentricity of e=0.033{sub −0.031}{sup +0.015}, consistent with a circular orbit. Since TrES-1's eclipses have low signal-to-noise ratios, we implemented optimal photometry and differential-evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms in our Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses, and Transits pipeline. Benefits include higher photometric precision and ∼10 times faster MCMC convergence, with better exploration of the phase space and no manual parameter tuning.

  14. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.

    As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  15. Advanced Ion Mass Spectrometer for Giant Planet Ionospheres, Magnetospheres and Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, EC; Cooper, JF; Paschalidis, N.; Jones, SL; Rodriguez, M.; Ali, A.; Coplan, MA; Chornay, DJ; Sturner; Bateman, FB; Andre, N.; Fedorov, A.; Wurz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Ion Composition Spectrometer (AIMS) has been under development from various NASA sources (NASA LWSID, NASA ASTID, NASA Goddard IRADs) to measure elemental, isotopic, and simple molecular composition abundances of 1 eV/e to 25 keV/e hot ions with wide field-of-view (FOV) in the 1 - 60 amu mass range at mass resolution M/ΔM ≤ 60 over a wide dynamic range of intensities and penetrating radiation background from the inner magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn to the outer magnetospheric boundary regions and the upstream solar wind. This instrument will work for both spinning spacecraft and 3-axis stabilized spacecraft with wide field-of-view capability in both cases. It will measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) for the individual ion species; ion velocity moments of the IVDF will give the fluid parameters (density, flow velocity and temperature) of the individual ion species. Outer planet mission applications are Io Observer, Jupiter Europa Orbiter/Europa Clipper, Enceladus Orbiter, and Uranus Orbiter as described in the decadal survey, but would also be valuable for inclusion on other missions to outer planet destinations such as Saturn- Titan and Neptune-Triton and for future missions to terrestrial planets, Venus and Mars, the Moon, asteroids, and comets, and of course for geospace applications to the Earth.

  16. Mass Determination Of Directly Imaged Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Neuhauser, R.; Seifahrt, A.

    2011-09-01

    About 20 sub-stellar companions with large separations (> 50 AU) to their young primary stars and brown dwarfs are confirmed by both common proper motion and late-M / early-L type spectra. The origin and early evolution of these objects is still under debate. While often these sub-stellar companions are regarded as brown dwarfs, they could possibly also be massive planets, the mass estimates are very uncertain so far. They are companions to primary stars or brown dwarfs in young associations and star forming regions like Taurus, Upper Scorpius, the TW Hya association, Beta Pic moving group, TucHor association, Lupus, Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon, hence their ages and distances are well known, in contrast to free-floating brown dwarfs. Here we present how mass estimates of such young directly imaged companions can be derived, using e.g. evolutionary models, which are however currently almost uncalibrated by direct mass measurements of young objects. An empirical classification by medium-resolution spectroscopy is currently not possible, because a spectral sequence that is taking the lower gravity into account, is not existing. This problem leads to an apparent mismatch between spectra of old field type objects and young low-mass companions at the same effective temperature, hampering a determination of temperature and surface gravity independent from models. We show that from spectra of the objects, using the advantages of light concentration by an AO-assisted integral field spectrograph, temperature, extinction, metallicity and surface gravity can be derived using non-equilibrium radiative transfer atmosphere models as comparison and that this procedure as well allows a mass determination in combination with the luminosities found by the direct observations, as has recently been done by us for several young sub-stellar companions, as e.g. GQ Lup, CT Cha or UScoCTIO 108.

  17. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudi, B; Bennett, D; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M; Tristram, P; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; DePoy, D; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R; Park, B; Abe, F; Bond, I; Botzler, C; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A; Kilmartin, P; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Sako, T; Saito, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Yock, P; Albrow, M; Beaulieu, J; Burgdorf, M; Cook, K; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2007-11-08

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the first detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of {approx} 0.71 and {approx} 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary of mass {approx} 0.50 solar masses. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only 6 confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  18. Observational Constraints on Low-Mass Stellar Evolution and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, Jayne Louise

    2011-07-01

    Low-mass stars (? < 1.0M⊙) account for more than 70% of the galactic stellar population yet models describing the evolution of their fundamental properties lack stringent observational constraints, especially at early ages. Furthermore, recent observations indicate a significant discrepancy between model predictions and the precise (2 - 3%) observed, dynamical masses and radii measured using low-mass eclipsing binary systems (EBs). Additionally, the theory of planet formation via core accretion predicts notably less hot-Jupiter formation around M-dwarfs (Mdot ? ≤ 0.6M⊙), but as yet, no large enough study exists to robustly test it. Further still, it is predicted that the dynamic environment of stellar clusters, in which most stars are believed to form, hampers planet formation, but again, current null detections of planets in stellar clusters are not statistically significant to test the theory. More observations are required to cement both the theory of low-mass stellar evolution and planet formation. This thesis aims to provide the necessary constraints by uncovering new low-mass EBs and transiting exoplanets in time-series photometry and follow-up spectroscopy from the Monitor project, a photometric monitoring campaign of low-mass stars in nine young open clusters, and in the WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS), a photometric monitoring campaign of ∼10,000 field M-dwarfs. Chapters 3 and 4 present my study of the young (130 Myr) cluster, M 50. I confirm three EB candidates as cluster members, including evidence that one of these is in a triple system with a wide-separation, low-mass tertiary component. The derived masses and radii for this system and one further double-lined, non-cluster member are presented, but these objects required dedicated, single-slit spectroscopic follow-up to yield the accuracy required to test pre-main sequence models. My non-detection of planets in this cluster is consistent with the results of all other cluster transit surveys. The

  19. Mass-loss rates of "hot-Jupiter" exoplanets with various types of gaseous envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherenkov, A. A.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Kaigorodov, P. V.

    2014-10-01

    According to the compuations results obtained by Bisikalo et al. (2013) for the gas-dynamical effect of stellar winds on exoplanet atmospheres, three types of gaseous envelopes can form around hot Jupiters: closed, quasi-closed, and open. The type of envelope that forms depends on the position of the frontal collision point (where the dynamical pressure of the wind is equal to the pressure of the surrounding atmosphere) relative to the Roche-lobe boundaries. Closed envelopes are formed around planets whose atmospheres lie completely within their Roche lobes. If the frontal collision point is located outside the Roche lobe, the atmospheric material begins to flow out through the Lagrangian points L1 and L2, which can result in the formation of quasi-closed (if the dynamical pressure of the stellar wind stops the outflow through L1) or open gaseous envelopes. The example of the typical hot Jupiter HD 209458b is considered for four sets of atmospheric parameters, to determine the mass-loss rates for the different types of envelopes arising with these parameters. The mass-loss rates based on the modeling results were estimated to be Ṁ ≤ 109 g/s for a closed atmosphere, Ṁ ≃ 3 × 109 g/s for a quasi-closed atmosphere, and Ṁ ≃ 3 × 1010 g/s for an open atmosphere. The matter in the closed and quasi-closed atmospheres flows out mainly through L2, and the matter in open envelopes primarily through L1.

  20. How the presence of a gas giant affects the formation of mean-motion resonances between two low-mass planets in a locally isothermal gaseous disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlewska-Gaca, E.; Szuszkiewicz, E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of a migration-induced resonance locking in systems containing three planets, namely an Earth analogue (1 M⊕), a super-Earth (4 M⊕) and a gas giant (one Jupiter mass). The planets have been listed in order of increasing orbital periods. All three bodies are embedded in a locally isothermal gaseous disc and orbit around a solar mass star. We are interested in answering the following questions: will the low-mass planets form the same resonant structures with each other in the vicinity of the gas giant as in the case when the gas giant is absent? More in general, how will the presence of the gas giant affect the evolution of the two low-mass planets? When there is no gas giant in the system, it has been already shown that if the two low-mass planets undergo a convergent differential migration, they will capture each other in a mean-motion resonance. For the choices of disc parameters and planet masses made in this paper, the formation of the 5:4 resonance in the absence of the Jupiter has been observed in a previous investigation and confirmed here. In this work we add a gas giant on the most external orbit of the system in such a way that its differential migration is convergent with the low-mass planets. We show that the result of this set-up is the speeding up of the migration of the super-Earth and, after that, all three planets become locked in a triple mean-motion resonance. However, this resonance is not maintained due to the low-mass planet eccentricity excitation, a fact that leads to close encounters between planets and eventually to the ejection from the internal orbits of one or both low-mass planets. We have observed that the ejected low-mass planets can leave the system, fall into a star or become the external planet relative to the gas giant. In our simulations the latter situation has been observed for the super-Earth. It follows from the results presented here that the presence of a Jupiter-like planet

  1. OGLE-2012-BLG-0724Lb: A Saturn-mass Planet around an M Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirao, Y.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Suzuki, D.; Koshimoto, N.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Itow, Y.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Matsuo, T.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Shibai, H.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; The OGLE Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report the discovery of a planet by the microlensing method, OGLE-2012-BLG-0724Lb. Although the duration of the planetary signal for this event was one of the shortest seen for a planetary event, the anomaly was well covered thanks to high-cadence observations taken by the survey groups OGLE and MOA. By analyzing the light curve, this planetary system is found to have a mass ratio q=(1.58+/- 0.15)× {10}-3. By conducting a Bayesian analysis, we estimate that the host star is an M dwarf with a mass of {M}{{L}}={0.29}-0.16+0.33 {M}ȯ located at {D}{{L}}={6.7}-1.2+1.1 {{kpc}} away from the Earth and the companion’s mass is {m}{{P}}={0.47}-0.26+0.54 {M}{{Jup}}. The projected planet–host separation is {a}\\perp ={1.6}-0.3+0.4 {{AU}}. Because the lens–source relative proper motion is relatively high, future high-resolution images would detect the lens host star and determine the lens properties uniquely. This system is likely a Saturn-mass exoplanet around an M dwarf, and such systems are commonly detected by gravitational microlensing. This adds another example of a possible pileup of sub-Jupiters (0.2\\lt {m}{{P}}/{M}{{Jup}}\\lt 1) in contrast to a lack of Jupiters (˜ 1{--}2 {M}{{Jup}}) around M dwarfs, supporting the prediction by core accretion models that Jupiter-mass or more massive planets are unlikely to form around M dwarfs.

  2. OGLE-2012-BLG-0724Lb: A Saturn-mass Planet around an M Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirao, Y.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Suzuki, D.; Koshimoto, N.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Itow, Y.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Matsuo, T.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Shibai, H.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; The OGLE Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report the discovery of a planet by the microlensing method, OGLE-2012-BLG-0724Lb. Although the duration of the planetary signal for this event was one of the shortest seen for a planetary event, the anomaly was well covered thanks to high-cadence observations taken by the survey groups OGLE and MOA. By analyzing the light curve, this planetary system is found to have a mass ratio q=(1.58+/- 0.15)× {10}-3. By conducting a Bayesian analysis, we estimate that the host star is an M dwarf with a mass of {M}{{L}}={0.29}-0.16+0.33 {M}ȯ located at {D}{{L}}={6.7}-1.2+1.1 {{kpc}} away from the Earth and the companion’s mass is {m}{{P}}={0.47}-0.26+0.54 {M}{{Jup}}. The projected planet–host separation is {a}\\perp ={1.6}-0.3+0.4 {{AU}}. Because the lens–source relative proper motion is relatively high, future high-resolution images would detect the lens host star and determine the lens properties uniquely. This system is likely a Saturn-mass exoplanet around an M dwarf, and such systems are commonly detected by gravitational microlensing. This adds another example of a possible pileup of sub-Jupiters (0.2\\lt {m}{{P}}/{M}{{Jup}}\\lt 1) in contrast to a lack of Jupiters (∼ 1{--}2 {M}{{Jup}}) around M dwarfs, supporting the prediction by core accretion models that Jupiter-mass or more massive planets are unlikely to form around M dwarfs.

  3. Refining Mass Measurements of Kepler Planets with Keck/HIRES.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    We present improved radial velocity mass measurements from Keck/HIRES for exoplanets detected by NASA’s Kepler Mission. Since Kepler’s launch 6 years ago, ~30 planetary systems have been monitored with radial velocities, resulting in measured masses for many planets between 1.0 and 4.0 Earth radii. The resulting planet masses have been used to determine the transition between planets with a rocky interior and those with a lower density interior which requiring significant H/He atmospheres. We provide updated masses and densities for those planets published in Marcy et al (2014) based on two additional observing seasons with HIRES of the Kepler field. These radial velocities also reveal non-transiting planets in systems with previously found transiting planets. One such system has a non-transiting planet with a period between two transiting planets, providing a constraint on the co-planarity of the system. Finally, we provide an updated mass-radius relation, showing the distinction between planets that must have a substantial iron-silicate interior, and those requiring significant contributions from volatiles such as hydrogen and helium.

  4. Origin of the Regular Satellites of Jupiter and Saturn: Mass and Composition Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P.

    2008-12-01

    It has often been noted that the compositional gradient of the Galilean satellites may provide a link to the environment in which they formed (e.g., Estrada et al. 2008). The similarities in the bulk properties of the regular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn favor a unified framework for their origin; yet, the inner, icy satellites of Saturn exhibit no such trend. We set-aside for now the inner satellites, and focus instead on the large, outer regular satellites of each satellite system. We seek to account for the masses and compositions of Ganymede and Callisto in the case of Jupiter, and Titan and Iapetus, for Saturn. For objects the size of Iapetus or larger, the porosity is likely to be small not only because the internal pressure is large enough to close pore spaces, but also because the presence of short-lived radioactive nuclides heats the interior causing ice to flow. For such satellites, densities can be interpreted in terms of rock/ice fractions. Iapetus' low density, and correspondingly low rock/ice fraction, presents a puzzle when compared to the other three satellites, each of which is roughly 50% ice and rock. In turn, the rock/ice fractions for Ganymede, Titan and Callisto are comparable to that of (captured) Saturnian irregular satellite Phoebe. Progress in understanding these observations requires tying the properties of solar nebula planetesimals to subnebula satellitesimals. We argue that planetesimal break-up following giant planet formation, in tandem with delivery via ablation of planetesimal fragments crossing the subdisk can provide a framework for understanding the mass budget and compositions of regular satellites. In particular, ablation can result in fractionation, and account for the observed density of Iapetus provided this satellite formed in situ (Mosqueira and Estrada, 2005). For this to work (solar nebula) planetesimals of size 10 km or larger may need to be at least partially differentiated, which argues that the first generation

  5. The effect of type I migration on the formation of terrestrial planets in hot-Jupiter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, M. J.; Nelson, R. P.

    2007-09-01

    Context: Our previous models of a giant planet migrating through an inner protoplanet/planetesimal disk find that the giant shepherds a portion of the material it encounters into interior orbits, whilst scattering the rest into external orbits. Scattering tends to dominate, leaving behind abundant material that can accrete into terrestrial planets. Aims: We add to the possible realism of our model by simulating type I migration forces which cause an inward drift, and strong eccentricity and inclination damping of protoplanetary bodies. This extra dissipation might be expected to enhance shepherding at the expense of scattering, possibly modifying our previous conclusions. Methods: We employ an N-body code that is linked to a viscous gas disk algorithm capable of simulating: gas accretion onto the central star; gap formation in the vicinity of the giant planet; type II migration of the giant planet; type I migration of protoplanets; and the effect of gas drag on planetesimals. We use the code to re-run three scenarios from a previous work where type I migration was not included. Results: The additional dissipation introduced by type I migration enhances the inward shepherding of material but does not severely reduce scattering. We find that >50% of the solids disk material still survives the migration in scattered exterior orbits: most of it well placed to complete terrestrial planet formation at <3 AU. The shepherded portion of the disk accretes into hot-Earths, which survive in interior orbits for the duration of our simulations. Conclusions: Water-rich terrestrial planets can form in the habitable zones of hot-Jupiter systems and hot-Earths and hot-Neptunes may also be present. These systems should be targets of future planet search missions.

  6. A Stellar-mass-dependent Drop in Planet Occurrence Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R ⊕) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ~10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  7. A STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DROP IN PLANET OCCURRENCE RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-01-10

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ∼10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  8. A Dynamical Method for Measuring the Masses of Stars with Transiting Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, Abraham

    2005-04-01

    As a planet transits the face of a star, it accelerates along the line of sight. The changing delay in the propagation of photons produces an apparent deceleration of the planet across the sky throughout the transit. This persistent transverse deceleration breaks the time-reversal symmetry in the transit light curve of a spherical planet in a circular orbit around a perfectly symmetric star. For ``hot Jupiter'' systems, ingress advances at a higher rate than egress by a fraction of ~10-4-10-3. Forthcoming space telescopes such as Kepler or COROT will reach the sensitivity required to detect this asymmetry. The scaling of the fractional asymmetry with stellar mass M* and planetary orbital radius a, as M*/a2, is different from that of the orbital period, which scales as (M*/a3)-1/2. Therefore, this effect constitutes a new method for a purely dynamical determination of the mass of the star. Radial velocity data for the reflex motion of the star can then be used to determine the planet's mass. Although orbital eccentricity could introduce a larger asymmetry than the light-propagation delay, the eccentricity is expected to decay by tidal dissipation to negligible values for a close-in planet with no perturbing third body. Future detection of the eclipse of a planet's emission by its star could be used to measure the light-propagation delay across the orbital diameter, 46.7(a/7×1011 cm) s, and also determine the stellar mass from the orbital period.

  9. Planetary populations in the mass-period diagram: A statistical treatment of exoplanet formation and the role of planet traps

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2013-11-20

    The rapid growth of observed exoplanets has revealed the existence of several distinct planetary populations in the mass-period diagram. Two of the most surprising are (1) the concentration of gas giants around 1 AU and (2) the accumulation of a large number of low-mass planets with tight orbits, also known as super-Earths and hot Neptunes. We have recently shown that protoplanetary disks have multiple planet traps that are characterized by orbital radii in the disks and halt rapid type I planetary migration. By coupling planet traps with the standard core accretion scenario, we showed that one can account for the positions of planets in the mass-period diagram. In this paper, we demonstrate quantitatively that most gas giants formed at planet traps tend to end up around 1 AU, with most of these being contributed by dead zones and ice lines. We also show that a large fraction of super-Earths and hot Neptunes are formed as 'failed' cores of gas giants—this population being constituted by comparable contributions from dead zone and heat transition traps. Our results are based on the evolution of forming planets in an ensemble of disks where we vary only the lifetimes of disks and their mass accretion rates onto the host star. We show that a statistical treatment of the evolution of a large population of planetary cores caught in planet traps accounts for the existence of three distinct exoplanetary populations—the hot Jupiters, the more massive planets around r = 1 AU, and the short-period super-Earths and hot Neptunes. There are very few populations that feed into the large orbital radii characteristic of the imaged Jovian planet, which agrees with recent surveys. Finally, we find that low-mass planets in tight orbits become the dominant planetary population for low-mass stars (M {sub *} ≤ 0.7 M {sub ☉}).

  10. Jupiter: Cosmic Jekyll and Hyde.

    PubMed

    Grazier, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely reported that Jupiter has a profound role in shielding the terrestrial planets from comet impacts in the Solar System, and that a jovian planet is a requirement for the evolution of life on Earth. To evaluate whether jovians, in fact, shield habitable planets from impacts (a phenomenon often referred to as the "Jupiter as shield" concept), this study simulated the evolution of 10,000 particles in each of the jovian inter-planet gaps for the cases of full-mass and embryo planets for up to 100 My. The results of these simulations predict a number of phenomena that not only discount the "Jupiter as shield" concept, they also predict that in a Solar System like ours, large gas giants like Saturn and Jupiter had a different, and potentially even more important, role in the evolution of life on our planet by delivering the volatile-laden material required for the formation of life. The simulations illustrate that, although all particles occupied "non-life threatening" orbits at their onset of the simulations, a significant fraction of the 30,000 particles evolved into Earth-crossing orbits. A comparison of multiple runs with different planetary configurations revealed that Jupiter was responsible for the vast majority of the encounters that "kicked" outer planet material into the terrestrial planet region, and that Saturn assisted in the process far more than has previously been acknowledged. Jupiter also tends to "fix" the aphelion of planetesimals at its orbit irrespective of their initial starting zones, which has the effect of slowing their passages through the inner Solar System, and thus potentially improving the odds of accretion of cometary material by terrestrial planets. As expected, the simulations indicate that the full-mass planets perturb many objects into the deep outer Solar System, or eject them entirely; however, planetary embryos also did this with surprising efficiency. Finally, the simulations predict that Jupiter's capacity to

  11. Tidal dissipation in planet-hosting stars: damping of spin-orbit misalignment and survival of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    2012-06-01

    Observations of hot Jupiters around solar-type stars with very short orbital periods (˜1 d) suggest that tidal dissipation in such stars is not too efficient so that these planets can survive against rapid orbital decay. This is consistent with recent theoretical works, which indicate that the tidal quality factor, Q★, of planet-hosting stars can indeed be much larger than the values inferred from the circularization of stellar binaries. On the other hand, recent measurements of Rossiter-McLaughlin effects in transiting hot Jupiter systems not only reveal that many such systems have misaligned stellar spin with respect to the orbital angular momentum axis, but also show that systems with cooler host stars tend to have aligned spin and orbital axes. Winn et al. suggested that this obliquity-temperature correlation may be explained by efficient damping of stellar obliquity due to tidal dissipation in the convection zone of the star. This explanation, however, is in apparent contradiction with the survival of these short-period hot Jupiters. We show that in the solar-type parent stars of close-in exoplanetary systems, the effective tidal Q★ governing the damping of stellar obliquity can be much smaller than that governing orbital decay. This is because, for misaligned systems, the tidal potential contains a Fourier component with frequency equal to the stellar spin frequency (in the rotating frame of the star) and rotating opposite to the stellar spin. This component can excite inertial waves in the convective envelope of the star, and the dissipation of inertial waves then leads to a spin-orbit alignment torque and a spin-down torque, but not orbital decay. By contrast, for aligned systems, such inertial wave excitation is forbidden since the tidal forcing frequency is much larger than the stellar spin frequency. We derive a general effective tidal evolution theory for misaligned binaries, taking account of different tidal responses and dissipation rates for

  12. Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A NASA News Release is presented which contains the following: (1) general release; (2) two views of Voyager 2 flight past Jupiter; (3) Voyager mission summary; (4) Voyager 1 science results; (5) Jupiter science objectives; (6) Jupiter the planet and its satellites; (7) Voyager experiments; (8) planet comparison; (9) a list of Voyager science investigators and (10) the Voyager team.

  13. The detection of Jupiter normal modes with gravity measurements of the mission Juno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, D.; Iess, L.

    2015-10-01

    Arriving at Jupiter on July 4, 2016, NASA's Juno mission will complete 37 orbits (14-days period) around the planet, revealing details of the interior structure and composition, a crucial aspect to understand the origin and evolution of Jupiter. A radio science experiment will help to select and validate the existing models of Jupiter internal composition, in particular the mass of the silicate core.

  14. Trapping planets in an evolving protoplanetary disk: preferred time, locations, and planet mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Pantin, E.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Planet traps are necessary to prevent forming planets from falling onto their host star by type I inward migration. Surface mass density and temperature gradient irregularities favor the apparition of traps (planet accumulation region) and deserts (planet depletion zone). These features are found at the dust sublimation lines and heat transition barriers. Aims: We study how planets may remain trapped or escape these traps as they grow and as the disk evolves viscously with time. Methods: We numerically model the temporal viscous evolution of a protoplanetary disk by coupling its dynamics, thermodynamics, geometry, and composition. The resulting midplane density and temperature profiles allow the modeling of the interactions of this type of evolving disk with potential planets, even before the steady state is reached. Results: We follow the viscous evolution of a minimum mass solar nebula and compute the Lindblad and corotation torques that this type of disk would exert on potential planets of various masses that are located within the planetary formation region. We determine the position of planet traps and deserts in relationship with the sublimation lines, shadowed regions, and heat transition barriers. We notice that the planet mass affects the trapping potential of the mentioned structures through the saturation of the corotation torque. Planets that are a few tens of Earth masses can be trapped at the sublimation lines until they reach a certain mass while planets that are more massive than 100 M⊕ can only be trapped permanently at the heat transition barriers. They may also open gaps beyond 5 au and enter type II migration. Conclusions: Coupling a bimodal planetary migration model with a self-consistent evolved disk, we were able to distinguish several potential planet populations after five million years of evolution: two populations of giant planets that could stay trapped around 5.5 and 9 au and possibly open gaps, some super-Earths trapped

  15. AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE SHOULDER OF GIANTS: JOVIAN PLANETS AROUND LATE K DWARF STARS AND THE TREND WITH STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric; Fischer, Debra A.; Mann, Andrew W.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2013-07-01

    Analyses of exoplanet statistics suggest a trend of giant planet occurrence with host star mass, a clue to how planets like Jupiter form. One missing piece of the puzzle is the occurrence around late K dwarf stars (masses of 0.5-0.75 M{sub Sun} and effective temperatures of 3900-4800 K). We analyzed four years of Doppler radial velocity (RVs) data for 110 late K dwarfs, one of which hosts two previously reported giant planets. We estimate that 4.0% {+-} 2.3% of these stars have Saturn-mass or larger planets with orbital periods <245 days, depending on the planet mass distribution and RV variability of stars without giant planets. We also estimate that 0.7% {+-} 0.5% of similar stars observed by Kepler have giant planets. This Kepler rate is significantly (99% confidence) lower than that derived from our Doppler survey, but the difference vanishes if only the single Doppler system (HIP 57274) with completely resolved orbits is considered. The difference could also be explained by the exclusion of close binaries (without giant planets) from the Doppler but not Kepler surveys, the effect of long-period companions and stellar noise on the Doppler data, or an intrinsic difference between the two populations. Our estimates for late K dwarfs bridge those for solar-type stars and M dwarfs, and support a positive trend with stellar mass. Small sample size precludes statements about finer structure, e.g., a ''shoulder'' in the distribution of giant planets with stellar mass. Future surveys such as the Next Generation Transit Survey and the Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey will ameliorate this deficiency.

  16. Testing the correlation between low mass planets and debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalas, Paul

    2014-10-01

    The number of dusty debris disks has increased across all spectral types through recent infrared surveys. This has provided greater overlap with stars known to host extrasolar planets via RV surveys. New studies have therefore investigated how the different properties of host stars, exoplanets, and debris disks may be correlated, with the objective of giving empirical support to competing theories of planet formation and evolution. One such emerging correlation is that stars with only low mass planets are more likely to host prominent debris disks than stars that have at least one giant planet. If true, then M dwarfs should have abundant debris disks given that they more frequently have low mass planetary systems. However, the information needed to critically test these ideas is lacking. For most systems, the presence of an outer planet with >30 Earth masses has not been observationally tested, nor are there many M dwarf debris disks available for detailed scrutiny. Here we propose to use STIS coronagraphy to image for the first time the debris disks around three nearby stars in optical scattered light. Searching for sharp dust belt structures indirectly tests for the existence of outer planets that are otherwise undetectable by RV or adaptive optics planet searches. Moreover, two of our target stars are the most recently discovered M dwarf debris disks, both closer to the Sun than AU Mic. The scattered light observations of these two targets would present a major advance in characterizing how M dwarf debris disks co-evolve with planets under different stellar environments.

  17. Exotic Earths: forming habitable worlds with giant planet migration.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Mandell, Avi M; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2006-09-01

    Close-in giant planets (e.g., "hot Jupiters") are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth-mass planets also form interior to the migrating jovian planet, analogous to recently discovered "hot Earths." Very-water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the habitable zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets. PMID:16960000

  18. Terrestrial planet formation in a protoplanetary disk with a local mass depletion: A successful scenario for the formation of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C.; Haghighipour, N.; Tsuchida, M. E-mail: nader@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-02-10

    Models of terrestrial planet formation for our solar system have been successful in producing planets with masses and orbits similar to those of Venus and Earth. However, these models have generally failed to produce Mars-sized objects around 1.5 AU. The body that is usually formed around Mars' semimajor axis is, in general, much more massive than Mars. Only when Jupiter and Saturn are assumed to have initially very eccentric orbits (e ∼ 0.1), which seems fairly unlikely for the solar system, or alternately, if the protoplanetary disk is truncated at 1.0 AU, simulations have been able to produce Mars-like bodies in the correct location. In this paper, we examine an alternative scenario for the formation of Mars in which a local depletion in the density of the protosolar nebula results in a non-uniform formation of planetary embryos and ultimately the formation of Mars-sized planets around 1.5 AU. We have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the formation of terrestrial planets in such a disk for different scales of the local density depletion, and for different orbital configurations of the giant planets. Our simulations point to the possibility of the formation of Mars-sized bodies around 1.5 AU, specifically when the scale of the disk local mass-depletion is moderately high (50%-75%) and Jupiter and Saturn are initially in their current orbits. In these systems, Mars-analogs are formed from the protoplanetary materials that originate in the regions of disk interior or exterior to the local mass-depletion. Results also indicate that Earth-sized planets can form around 1 AU with a substantial amount of water accreted via primitive water-rich planetesimals and planetary embryos. We present the results of our study and discuss their implications for the formation of terrestrial planets in our solar system.

  19. Terrestrial Planet Formation in a Protoplanetary Disk with a Local Mass Depletion: A Successful Scenario for the Formation of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izidoro, A.; Haghighipour, N.; Winter, O. C.; Tsuchida, M.

    2014-02-01

    Models of terrestrial planet formation for our solar system have been successful in producing planets with masses and orbits similar to those of Venus and Earth. However, these models have generally failed to produce Mars-sized objects around 1.5 AU. The body that is usually formed around Mars' semimajor axis is, in general, much more massive than Mars. Only when Jupiter and Saturn are assumed to have initially very eccentric orbits (e ~ 0.1), which seems fairly unlikely for the solar system, or alternately, if the protoplanetary disk is truncated at 1.0 AU, simulations have been able to produce Mars-like bodies in the correct location. In this paper, we examine an alternative scenario for the formation of Mars in which a local depletion in the density of the protosolar nebula results in a non-uniform formation of planetary embryos and ultimately the formation of Mars-sized planets around 1.5 AU. We have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the formation of terrestrial planets in such a disk for different scales of the local density depletion, and for different orbital configurations of the giant planets. Our simulations point to the possibility of the formation of Mars-sized bodies around 1.5 AU, specifically when the scale of the disk local mass-depletion is moderately high (50%-75%) and Jupiter and Saturn are initially in their current orbits. In these systems, Mars-analogs are formed from the protoplanetary materials that originate in the regions of disk interior or exterior to the local mass-depletion. Results also indicate that Earth-sized planets can form around 1 AU with a substantial amount of water accreted via primitive water-rich planetesimals and planetary embryos. We present the results of our study and discuss their implications for the formation of terrestrial planets in our solar system.

  20. DETECTABILITY OF TRANSITING JUPITERS AND LOW-MASS ECLIPSING BINARIES IN SPARSELY SAMPLED PAN-STARRS-1 SURVEY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C.

    2009-10-20

    We present detailed simulations of the Pan-STARRS-1 (PS1) multi-epoch, multiband 3pi Survey in order to assess its potential yield of transiting planets and eclipsing binaries. This survey differs from dedicated transit surveys in that it will cover the entire northern sky but provide only sparsely sampled light curves. Since most eclipses would be detected at only a single epoch, the 3pi Survey will be most sensitive to deep eclipses (approx>0.10 mag) caused by Jupiters transiting M dwarfs and eclipsing stellar/substellar binaries. The survey will measure parallaxes for the approx4 x 10{sup 5} stars within 100 pc, which will enable a volume-limited eclipse search, reducing the number of astrophysical false positives compared with previous magnitude-limited searches. Using the best available empirical data, we constructed a model of the extended solar neighborhood that includes stars, brown dwarfs, and a realistic binary population. We computed the yield of deeply eclipsing systems using both a semianalytic and a full Monte Carlo approach. We examined statistical tests for detecting single-epoch eclipses in sparsely sampled data and assessed their vulnerability to false positives due to stellar variability. Assuming a short-period planet frequency of 0.5% for M dwarfs, our simulations predict that about a dozen transiting Jupiters around low-mass stars (M {sub *} < 0.3 M {sub sun}) within 100 pc are potentially detectable in the PS1 3pi Survey, along with approx300 low-mass eclipsing binaries (both component masses <0.5 M {sub sun}), including approx10 eclipsing field brown dwarfs. Extensive follow-up observations would be required to characterize these candidate eclipsing systems, thereby enabling comprehensive tests of structural models and novel insights into the planetary architecture of low-mass stars.

  1. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J.; Livio, Mario; Siess, Lionel

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  2. The Keck Planet Search: Detectability and the Minimum Mass and Orbital Period Distribution of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew; Butler, R. Paul; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Vogt, Steven S.; Wright, Jason T.; Fischer, Debra A.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze 8 years of precise radial velocity measurements from the Keck Planet Search, characterizing the detection threshold, selection effects, and completeness of the survey. We first carry out a systematic search for planets, by assessing the false-alarm probability associated with Keplerian orbit fits to the data. This allows us to understand the detection threshold for each star in terms of the number and time baseline of the observations, and the underlying "noise" from measurement errors, intrinsic stellar jitter, or additional low-mass planets. We show that all planets with orbital periods P < 2000 days, velocity amplitudes K > 20 m s-1, and eccentricities e lsim 0.6 have been announced, and we summarize the candidates at lower amplitudes and longer orbital periods. For the remaining stars, we calculate upper limits on the velocity amplitude of a companion. For orbital periods less than the duration of the observations, these are typically 10 m s-1 and increase vprop P2 for longer periods. We then use the nondetections to derive completeness corrections at low amplitudes and long orbital periods and discuss the resulting distribution of minimum mass and orbital period. We give the fraction of stars with a planet as a function of minimum mass and orbital period and extrapolate to long-period orbits and low planet masses. A power-law fit for planet masses >0.3 MJ and periods < 2000 days gives a mass-period distribution dN = CMαPβd ln Md ln P with α = -0.31 ± 0.2, β = 0.26 ± 0.1, and the normalization constant C such that 10.5% of solar type stars have a planet with mass in the range 0.3-10 MJ and orbital period 2-2000 days. The orbital period distribution shows an increase in the planet fraction by a factor of ≈5 for orbital periods gsim300 days. Extrapolation gives 17%-20% of stars having gas giant planets within 20 AU. Finally, we constrain the occurrence rate of planets orbiting M dwarfs compared to FGK dwarfs, taking into account differences in

  3. EXTRACTING PLANET MASS AND ECCENTRICITY FROM TTV DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Lithwick, Yoram; Xie Jiwei; Wu Yanqin

    2012-12-20

    Most planet pairs in the Kepler data that have measured transit time variations (TTVs) are near first-order mean-motion resonances. We derive analytical formulae for their TTV signals. We separate planet eccentricity into free and forced parts, where the forced part is purely due to the planets' proximity to resonance. This separation yields simple analytical formulae. The phase of the TTV depends sensitively on the presence of free eccentricity: if the free eccentricity vanishes, the TTV will be in phase with the longitude of conjunctions. This effect is easily detectable in current TTV data. The amplitude of the TTV depends on planet mass and free eccentricity, and it determines planet mass uniquely only when the free eccentricity is sufficiently small. We analyze the TTV signals of six short-period Kepler pairs. We find that three of these pairs (Kepler 18, 24, 25) have a TTV phase consistent with zero. The other three (Kepler 23, 28, 32) have small TTV phases, but ones that are distinctly non-zero. We deduce that the free eccentricities of the planets are small, {approx}< 0.01, but not always vanishing. Furthermore, as a consequence of this, we deduce that the true masses of the planets are fairly accurately determined by the TTV amplitudes, within a factor of {approx}< 2. The smallness of the free eccentricities suggests that the planets have experienced substantial dissipation. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the observed pile-up of Kepler pairs near mean-motion resonances is caused by resonant repulsion. But the fact that some of the planets have non-vanishing free eccentricity suggests that after resonant repulsion occurred there was a subsequent phase in the planets' evolution when their eccentricities were modestly excited, perhaps by interplanetary interactions.

  4. THE PHOTOECCENTRIC EFFECT AND PROTO-HOT JUPITERS. II. KOI-1474.01, A CANDIDATE ECCENTRIC PLANET PERTURBED BY AN UNSEEN COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Crepp, Justin R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2012-12-20

    The exoplanets known as hot Jupiters-Jupiter-sized planets with periods of less than 10 days-likely are relics of dynamical processes that shape all planetary system architectures. Socrates et al. argued that high eccentricity migration (HEM) mechanisms proposed for situating these close-in planets should produce an observable population of highly eccentric proto-hot Jupiters that have not yet tidally circularized. HEM should also create failed-hot Jupiters, with periapses just beyond the influence of fast circularization. Using the technique we previously presented for measuring eccentricities from photometry (the ''photoeccentric effect''), we are distilling a collection of eccentric proto- and failed-hot Jupiters from the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Here, we present the first, KOI-1474.01, which has a long orbital period (69.7340 days) and a large eccentricity e 0.81{sup +0.10}{sub -0.07}, skirting the proto-hot Jupiter boundary. Combining Kepler photometry, ground-based spectroscopy, and stellar evolution models, we characterize host KOI-1474 as a rapidly rotating F star. Statistical arguments reveal that the transiting candidate has a low false-positive probability of 3.1%. KOI-1474.01 also exhibits transit-timing variations of the order of an hour. We explore characteristics of the third-body perturber, which is possibly the ''smoking-gun'' cause of KOI-1474.01's large eccentricity. We use the host star's period, radius, and projected rotational velocity to measure the inclination of the stellar spin. Comparing KOI 1474.01's inclination, we find that its orbit is marginally consistent with being aligned with the stellar spin axis, although a reanalysis is warranted with future additional data. Finally, we discuss how the number and existence of proto-hot Jupiters will not only demonstrate that hot Jupiters migrate via HEM, but also shed light on the typical timescale for the mechanism.

  5. The Obliquity of a Hot Jupiter in a Multi-Planet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Benjamin; Howard, A.; Albrecht, S.; Johnson, J. A.; Knutson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Winn, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    We present the measured projected obliquity of a known transiting Jovian planet from the analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect in Keck-HIRES radial velocity data. We employ the new analytical approach of Hirano et al. (2011) that includes the effects of macroturbulence and instrumental broadening to accurately model the radial velocity shadow of a transiting planet, and foregoes the need to produce synthetic spectra on a case-by-case basis. RM measurements are an important tool for testing theories of planet formation and migration. To date, the measured obliquities of ~50 Jovian planets span the full range, from prograde to retrograde, with planets orbiting cool stars preferentially showing alignment of stellar spins and planetary orbits. Albrecht et al. (2012) interpret this pattern as the signature of tidal interactions with the convective envelopes of cool stars and close-in planets. This system is of particular interest because the tidal timescale for the transiting planet is relatively long and is thus a good test of the tidal-induced spin-orbit alignment theories.

  6. High-dispersion spectroscopy of extrasolar planets: from CO in hot Jupiters to O2 in exo-Earths.

    PubMed

    Snellen, Ignas

    2014-04-28

    Ground-based high-dispersion spectroscopy could reveal molecular oxygen as a biomarker gas in the atmospheres of twin-Earths transiting red dwarf stars within the next 25 years. The required contrasts are only a factor of 3 lower than that already achieved for carbon monoxide in hot Jupiter atmospheres today but will need much larger telescopes because the target stars will be orders of magnitude fainter. If extraterrestrial life is very common and can therefore be found on planets around the most nearby red dwarf stars, it may be detectable via transmission spectroscopy with the next-generation extremely large telescopes. However, it is likely that significantly more collecting area is required for this. This can be achieved through the development of low-cost flux collector technology, which combines a large collecting area with a low but sufficient image quality for high-dispersion spectroscopy of bright stars. PMID:24664914

  7. Lone Planet Under a Cosmic Magnifying Glass

    NASA Video Gallery

    This artist's animation illustrates the technique used for finding free-floating, Jupiter-mass planets in space. Astronomers found evidence for 10 of these worlds, thought to have been ejected earl...

  8. Fomalhaut's Debris Disk and Planet: Constraining the Mass of Formalhaut B from Disk Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, E.; Kite, E.; Kalas, P.; Graham, J. R.; Clampin, M.

    2008-01-01

    Following the optical imaging of exoplanet candidate Fomalhaut b (Fom b), we present a numerical model of how Fomalhaut's debris disk is gravitationally shaped by a single interior planet. The model is simple, adaptable to other debris disks, and can be extended to accommodate multiple planets. If Fom b is the dominant perturber of the belt, then to produce the observed disk morphology it must have a mass M(sub pl) < 3M(sub J), an orbital semimajor axis a(sub pl) > 101.5AU, and an orbital eccentricity e(sub pl) = 0.11 - 0.13. These conclusions are independent of Fom b's photometry. To not disrupt the disk, a greater mass for Fom b demands a smaller orbit farther removed from the disk; thus, future astrometric measurement of Fom b's orbit, combined with our model of planet-disk interaction, can be used to determine the mass more precisely. The inner edge of the debris disk at a approximately equals 133AU lies at the periphery of Fom b's chaotic zone, and the mean disk eccentricity of e approximately equals 0.11 is secularly forced by the planet, supporting predictions made prior to the discovery of Fom b. However, previous mass constraints based on disk morphology rely on several oversimplifications. We explain why our constraint is more reliable. It is based on a global model of the disk that is not restricted to the planet's chaotic zone boundary. Moreover, we screen disk parent bodies for dynamical stability over the system age of approximately 100 Myr, and model them separately from their dust grain progeny; the latter's orbits are strongly affected by radiation pressure and their lifetimes are limited to approximately 0.1 Myr by destructive grain-grain collisions. The single planet model predicts that planet and disk orbits be apsidally aligned. Fomalhaut b's nominal space velocity does not bear this out, but the astrometric uncertainties are difficult to quantify. Even if the apsidal misalignment proves real, our calculated upper mass limit of 3 M(sub J) still

  9. Atmospheres of Low-mass Planets: The "Boil-off"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin

    2016-02-01

    We show that, for a low-mass planet that orbits its host star within a few tenths of an AU (like the majority of the Kepler planets), the atmosphere it was able to accumulate while embedded in the protoplanetary disk may not survive unscathed after the disk disperses. This gas envelope, if more massive than a few percent of the core (with a mass below 10{M}\\oplus ), has a cooling time that is much longer than the timescale on which the planet exits the disk. As such, it could not have contracted significantly from its original size, of the order of the Bondi radius. So a newly exposed protoplanet would be losing mass via a Parker wind that is catalyzed by the stellar continuum radiation. This represents an intermediate stage of mass-loss, occurring soon after the disk has dispersed, but before the EUV/X-ray driven photoevaporation becomes relevant. The surface mass-loss induces a mass movement within the envelope that advects internal heat outward. As a result, the planet atmosphere rapidly cools down and contracts, until it has reached a radius of the order of 0.1 Bondi radius, at which time the mass-loss effectively shuts down. Within a million years after the disk disperses, we find a planet that has only about 10% of its original envelope, and a Kelvin-Helmholtz time that is much longer than its actual age. We suggest that this “boil-off” process may be partially responsible for the lack of planets above a radius of 2.5{R}\\oplus in the Kepler data, provided planet formation results in initial envelope masses of tens of percent.

  10. MASSES, RADII, AND CLOUD PROPERTIES OF THE HR 8799 PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard E-mail: dsaumon@lanl.gov E-mail: andrew.ackerman@nasa.gov E-mail: freedman@darkstar.arc.nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Some studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here, we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against observations of field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike some previous studies, we require mutually consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure thus yields plausible values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends, including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition-some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to whether or not we include the H- and the K-band spectrum in our analysis. Solutions for planets c and d are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that, like in L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present an exploratory evolution calculation that accounts for this effect. Finally we recompute the bolometric luminosity of all three planets.

  11. Habitability of Planets Orbiting Binaries Consisting of Solar Mass Twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Zhilkin, Andrey G.; Bisikalo, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    An important problem in astrobiology is the study of the potential habitability of planets orbiting binary stars. Theoretical and observational studies of circumbinary planets indicate that it is not uncommon for circumbinary planets to be located in the habitable zones surrounding main sequence binaries. However, it is also clear that the time evolution of stellar activity of the individual stars in close binaries is of primary concern for the habitability of planets. For example, planets orbiting active stars may lose the entirety of their water budget due to atmospheric mass loss; despite being in the standard radiative habitable zone. Alternatively, stars in some binaries may undergo a reduction in stellar activity due to tidal effects that cause the rotation of the stars to slow faster than single stars. Thereby, magneto-coronal activity is reduced to less aggressive levels, allowing circumbinary planets to maintain surface water. We summarize these effects, which we call the Binary Habitability Mechanism (BHM). We performed orbital integrations of circumbinary, Earth-like, planets and find that resonances play a particularly important role in the stability of habitable zone planets orbiting solar twin binaries in the 20-60 day period range, allowing for the possibility of several habitable planets orbiting some binaries. We present numerical simulations of the effects of colliding winds in binaries containing solar mass twins. We used stellar wind parameters based on solar like conditions for our 3D hydrodynamic simulations. We find devastating effects for close in planets, yet relatively mild stellar wind conditions exist within the circumbinary habitable zone.

  12. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Dittmann, Jason; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michael; Jehin, Emmanuel; Stark, Antony; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christoph; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno; Udry, Stéphane; Wunsche, Anael

    2015-12-01

    Results from Kepler indicate that M dwarfs host, on average, at least 1.4 planets between 0.5 and 1.5 Earth radii per star. Yet, the closest small planets known to transit M dwarfs have been too distant to allow Doppler measurements of their masses or spectroscopic studies of their atmospheres. Here, we announce a new planet discovered by the MEarth-South observatory, an Earth-size planet transiting an M dwarf that is only 12 pc away. The density of the planet, determined from radial velocity observations with HARPS, is consistent with an Earth-like rock/iron composition. With an equilibrium temperature of 530K (assuming a Bond albedo of 0.3), this planet is cooler than most other rocky planets with measured densities. Although too hot to be habitable, it is cool enough that it may have retained a substantial atmosphere over its lifetime. Thanks to the star's proximity and its diminutive size of only 1/5th the radius of the Sun, this new world likely provides the first opportunity for our community to spectroscopically examine the atmosphere of a terrestrial exoplanet. We estimate that JWST could secure high signal-to-noise spectra of the planet's atmosphere, both in transmission during transit and in emission at secondary eclipse.

  13. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  14. Terrestrial Planet Formation around Low-Mass Stars: Effect of the Mass of Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshino, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has detected several thousand planets and candidates.Their central stars are mainly FGK-type stars.It is difficult to observe M-stars by using visible light since M-stars have their peak radiation in the infrared region.However, recently there are several survey projects for planets around M-stars such as the InfraRed Doppler (IRD) survey of the Subaru telescope.Therefore it is expected that the number of planets around M-stars will increase in the near future.The habitable zone of M-stars is closer to the stars than that of G-stars.For this reason, the possibility of finding habitable planets is expected to be higher.Here we study the formation of close-in terrestrial planets by giant impacts of protoplanets around low-mass stars by using N-body simulations.An important parameter that controls formation processes is the ratio between the physical radius of a planet and its Hill radius, which decreases with the stellar mass.We systematically change the mass of the central stars and investigate its effects on terrestrial planet formation.We find that the mass of the maximum planet decreases with the mass of central stars, while the number of planets in the system increases.We also find that the orbital separation of adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radius increases with the stellar mass.

  15. An extrasolar planetary system with three Neptune-mass planets.

    PubMed

    Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Pepe, Francesco; Alibert, Yann; Benz, Willy; Bouchy, François; Correia, Alexandre C M; Laskar, Jacques; Mordasini, Christoph; Queloz, Didier; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Sivan, Jean-Pierre

    2006-05-18

    Over the past two years, the search for low-mass extrasolar planets has led to the detection of seven so-called 'hot Neptunes' or 'super-Earths' around Sun-like stars. These planets have masses 5-20 times larger than the Earth and are mainly found on close-in orbits with periods of 2-15 days. Here we report a system of three Neptune-mass planets with periods of 8.67, 31.6 and 197 days, orbiting the nearby star HD 69830. This star was already known to show an infrared excess possibly caused by an asteroid belt within 1 au (the Sun-Earth distance). Simulations show that the system is in a dynamically stable configuration. Theoretical calculations favour a mainly rocky composition for both inner planets, while the outer planet probably has a significant gaseous envelope surrounding its rocky/icy core; the outer planet orbits within the habitable zone of this star. PMID:16710412

  16. The Photoeccentric Effect and Proto-hot Jupiters. II. KOI-1474.01, a Candidate Eccentric Planet Perturbed by an Unseen Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Crepp, Justin R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2012-12-01

    The exoplanets known as hot Jupiters—Jupiter-sized planets with periods of less than 10 days—likely are relics of dynamical processes that shape all planetary system architectures. Socrates et al. argued that high eccentricity migration (HEM) mechanisms proposed for situating these close-in planets should produce an observable population of highly eccentric proto-hot Jupiters that have not yet tidally circularized. HEM should also create failed-hot Jupiters, with periapses just beyond the influence of fast circularization. Using the technique we previously presented for measuring eccentricities from photometry (the "photoeccentric effect"), we are distilling a collection of eccentric proto- and failed-hot Jupiters from the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Here, we present the first, KOI-1474.01, which has a long orbital period (69.7340 days) and a large eccentricity e = 0.81+0.10 -0.07, skirting the proto-hot Jupiter boundary. Combining Kepler photometry, ground-based spectroscopy, and stellar evolution models, we characterize host KOI-1474 as a rapidly rotating F star. Statistical arguments reveal that the transiting candidate has a low false-positive probability of 3.1%. KOI-1474.01 also exhibits transit-timing variations of the order of an hour. We explore characteristics of the third-body perturber, which is possibly the "smoking-gun" cause of KOI-1474.01's large eccentricity. We use the host star's period, radius, and projected rotational velocity to measure the inclination of the stellar spin. Comparing KOI 1474.01's inclination, we find that its orbit is marginally consistent with being aligned with the stellar spin axis, although a reanalysis is warranted with future additional data. Finally, we discuss how the number and existence of proto-hot Jupiters will not only demonstrate that hot Jupiters migrate via HEM, but also shed light on the typical timescale for the mechanism.

  17. AB INITIO EQUATION OF STATE FOR HYDROGEN-HELIUM MIXTURES WITH RECALIBRATION OF THE GIANT-PLANET MASS-RADIUS RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Militzer, B.; Hubbard, W. B.

    2013-09-10

    Using density functional molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the equation of state (EOS) for hydrogen-helium mixtures spanning density-temperature conditions typical of giant-planet interiors, {approx}0.2-9 g cm{sup -3} and 1000-80,000 K for a typical helium mass fraction of 0.245. In addition to computing internal energy and pressure, we determine the entropy using an ab initio thermodynamic integration technique. A comprehensive EOS table with 391 density-temperature points is constructed and the results are presented in the form of a two-dimensional free energy fit for interpolation. Deviations between our ab initio EOS and the semi-analytical EOS model by Saumon and Chabrier are analyzed in detail, and we use the results for initial revision of the inferred thermal state of giant planets with known values for mass and radius. Changes are most pronounced for planets in the Jupiter mass range and below. We present a revision to the mass-radius relationship that makes the hottest exoplanets increase in radius by {approx}0.2 Jupiter radii at fixed entropy and for masses greater than {approx}0.5 Jupiter mass. This change is large enough to have possible implications for some discrepant ''inflated giant exoplanets''.

  18. Probing Clouds in Planets with a Simple Radiative Transfer Model: The Jupiter Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendikoa, Inigo; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of planets evokes using expensive on-orbit satellites and gathering complex data from space. However, the basic properties of clouds in planetary atmospheres can be successfully estimated with small telescopes even from an urban environment using currently available and affordable technology. This makes the process accessible for…

  19. Terrestrial planets in high-mass disks without gas giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Elía, G. C.; Guilera, O. M.; Brunini, A.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Observational and theoretical studies suggest that planetary systems consisting only of rocky planets are probably the most common in the Universe. Aims: We study the potential habitability of planets formed in high-mass disks without gas giants around solar-type stars. These systems are interesting because they are likely to harbor super-Earths or Neptune-mass planets on wide orbits, which one should be able to detect with the microlensing technique. Methods: First, a semi-analytical model was used to define the mass of the protoplanetary disks that produce Earth-like planets, super-Earths, or mini-Neptunes, but not gas giants. Using mean values for the parameters that describe a disk and its evolution, we infer that disks with masses lower than 0.15 M⊙ are unable to form gas giants. Then, that semi-analytical model was used to describe the evolution of embryos and planetesimals during the gaseous phase for a given disk. Thus, initial conditions were obtained to perform N-body simulations of planetary accretion. We studied disks of 0.1, 0.125, and 0.15 M⊙. Results: All our simulations form massive planets on wide orbits. For a 0.1 M⊙ disk, 2-3 super-Earths of 2.8 to 5.9 M⊕ are formed between 2 and 5 AU. For disks of 0.125 and 0.15 M⊙, our simulations produce a 10-17.1 M⊕ planet between 1.6 and 2.7 AU, and other super-Earths are formed in outer regions. Moreover, six planets survive in the habitable zone (HZ). These planets have masses from 1.9 to 4.7 M⊕ and significant water contents ranging from 560 to 7482 Earth oceans, where one Earth ocean represents the amount of water on Earth's surface, which equals 2.8 × 10-4M⊕. Of the six planets formed in the HZ, three are water worlds with 39%-44% water by mass. These planets start the simulations beyond the snow line, which explains their high water abundances. In general terms, the smaller the mass of the planets observed on wide orbits, the higher the possibility to find water worlds in the

  20. PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Sean N.; Armitage, Philip J.; Gorelick, Noel

    2009-07-10

    We study the final architecture of planetary systems that evolve under the combined effects of planet-planet and planetesimal scattering. Using N-body simulations we investigate the dynamics of marginally unstable systems of gas and ice giants both in isolation and when the planets form interior to a planetesimal belt. The unstable isolated systems evolve under planet-planet scattering to yield an eccentricity distribution that matches that observed for extrasolar planets. When planetesimals are included the outcome depends upon the total mass of the planets. For M {sub tot} {approx}> 1 M{sub J} the final eccentricity distribution remains broad, whereas for M {sub tot} {approx}< 1 M{sub J} a combination of divergent orbital evolution and recircularization of scattered planets results in a preponderance of nearly circular final orbits. We also study the fate of marginally stable multiple planet systems in the presence of planetesimal disks, and find that for high planet masses the majority of such systems evolve into resonance. A significant fraction leads to resonant chains that are planetary analogs of Jupiter's Galilean satellites. We predict that a transition from eccentric to near-circular orbits will be observed once extrasolar planet surveys detect sub-Jovian mass planets at orbital radii of a {approx_equal} 5-10 AU.

  1. Fast migration of low-mass planets in radiative discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierens, A.

    2015-12-01

    Low-mass planets are known to undergo Type I migration and this process must have played a key role during the evolution of planetary systems. Analytical formulae for the disc torque have been derived assuming that the planet evolves on a fixed circular orbit. However, recent work has shown that in isothermal discs, a migrating protoplanet may also experience dynamical corotation torques that scale with the planet drift rate. The aim of this study is to examine whether dynamical corotation torques can also affect the migration of low-mass planets in non-isothermal discs. We performed 2D radiative hydrodynamical simulations to examine the orbital evolution outcome of migrating protoplanets as a function of disc mass. We find that a protoplanet can enter a fast migration regime when it migrates in the direction set by the entropy-related horseshoe drag and when the Toomre stability parameter is less than a threshold value below which the horseshoe region contracts into a tadpole-like region. In that case, an underdense trapped region appears near the planet, with an entropy excess compared to the ambient disc. If the viscosity and thermal diffusivity are small enough so that the entropy excess is conserved during migration, the planet then experiences strong corotation torques arising from the material flowing across the planet orbit. During fast migration, we observe that a protoplanet can pass through the zero-torque line predicted by static torques. We also find that fast migration may help in disrupting the mean-motion resonances that are formed by convergent migration of embryos.

  2. Masses, Radii, and Cloud Properties of the HR 8799 Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have compared the photometric and limited spectral data of the planets to the predictions of various atmosphere and evolution models and concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Most studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike almost all previous studies we specify mutually self-consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure yields plausible and self-consistent values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are in fact not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition, some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to the H and K band spectrum. Solutions for planets c and particularly d are less certain but are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that as for L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present a new evolution calculation that predicts cooling tracks on the near-infrared color

  3. Revised Masses and Densities of the Planets around Kepler-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Agol, Eric; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Kipping, David; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Determining which small exoplanets have stony-iron compositions is necessary for quantifying the occurrence of such planets and for understanding the physics of planet formation. Kepler-10 hosts the stony-iron world Kepler-10b, and also contains what has been reported to be the largest solid silicate-ice planet, Kepler-10c. Using 220 radial velocities (RVs), including 72 precise RVs from Keck-HIRES of which 20 are new from 2014 to 2015, and 17 quarters of Kepler photometry, we obtain the most complete picture of the Kepler-10 system to date. We find that Kepler-10b ({R}{{p}}=1.47 {R}\\oplus ) has mass 3.72\\quad +/- \\quad 0.42\\quad {M}\\oplus and density 6.46\\quad +/- \\quad 0.73\\quad {{g}} {{cm}}-3. Modeling the interior of Kepler-10b as an iron core overlaid with a silicate mantle, we find that the iron core constitutes 0.17 ± 0.11 of the planet mass. For Kepler-10c ({R}{{p}}=2.35 {R}\\oplus ) we measure mass 13.98\\quad +/- \\quad 1.79\\quad {M}\\oplus and density 5.94\\quad +/- \\quad 0.76\\quad {{g}} {{cm}}-3, significantly lower than the mass computed in Dumusque et al. (17.2+/- 1.9 {M}\\oplus ). Our mass measurement of Kepler-10c rules out a pure stony-iron composition. Internal compositional modeling reveals that at least 10% of the radius of Kepler-10c is a volatile envelope composed of hydrogen-helium (0.2% of the mass, 16% of the radius) or super-ionic water (28% of the mass, 29% of the radius). However, we note that analysis of only HIRES data yields a higher mass for planet b and a lower mass for planet c than does analysis of the HARPS-N data alone, with the mass estimates for Kepler-10 c being formally inconsistent at the 3σ level. Moreover, dividing the data for each instrument into two parts also leads to somewhat inconsistent measurements for the mass of planet c derived from each observatory. Together, this suggests that time-correlated noise is present and that the uncertainties in the masses of the planets (especially planet c) likely

  4. Orbital Evolution and Migration of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, D. E.; Benz, W.; Guillot, T.; Lunine, J. I.; Hubbard, W. B.; Burrows, A.

    1997-07-01

    Giant planets in circumstellar disks can migrate inward from their initial (formation) positions. Migration is caused by inward torques between the planet and the disk; by outward torques between the planet and the spinning star; and by outward torques due to Roche lobe overflow and mass loss from the planet. Summing torques on planets in disks with various physical parameters, we find that Jupiter-mass planets can stably arrive and survive at small heliocentric distances. Inward migration timescales can be approximately equal to or less than disk lifetimes and star spindown timescales. Therefore, the range of fates of Jupiter-mass planets is broad, and generally comprises three classes: (I) planets which migrate inward too rapidly and lose all their mass due to Roche lobe overflow; (II) planets which migrate inward and survive in very small orbits; and (III) planets which do not migrate very far. Some, but not all, of the planets in Class II lose mass during their evolution and migration times, resulting in planets with final masses smaller than their initial masses. For example, in our model, we produce planets similar to 51 Peg b which have lost ~ 75% of their initial mass. The observed extrasolar planets, both those with extremely small semi-major axes (51 Peg b at 0.05 AU, tau Boo b (0.046 AU), upsilon And b (0.057 AU), and 55 Cnc b (0.11 AU)) and those with more moderate semi-major axes (rho Cor Bor b (0.23 AU), 47 UMa b (2.1 AU)) form a subset of the potential outcomes of the system, in that Jupiter-mass objects can stably survive in orbits with a wide range of semi-major axes. Our numerical model produces planets which have similar characteristics to the observed planets, as well as planets similar to Jupiter, and many intermediate cases. Since Jupiters can stably migrate to various orbital separations, we predict that, as planetary detection techniques improve, Jupiter-mass planets will be found in a wide range of orbits, from much less than 1 AU to

  5. DISCOVERY AND MASS MEASUREMENTS OF A COLD, 10 EARTH MASS PLANET AND ITS HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Suzuki, D.; Sumi, T.; Monard, L. A. G.; Street, R.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kundurthy, P.; Becker, A. C.; Skowron, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Barry, R. K.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Wellnitz, D. D.; Bond, I. A.; Dong, S. E-mail: bennett@nd.edu

    2011-11-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, performed with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m{sub p} = 10.4 {+-} 1.7 M{sub +} and orbits a star of mass M{sub *} = 0.56 {+-} 0.09 M{sub sun} at a semimajor axis of a = 3.2{sub -0.5}{sup +1.9} AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6{sub -1.5}{sup +7+7} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure the microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a 'failed' gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets.

  6. THE DEUTERIUM-BURNING MASS LIMIT FOR BROWN DWARFS AND GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam; Milsom, John A. E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-01-20

    There is no universally acknowledged criterion to distinguish brown dwarfs from planets. Numerous studies have used or suggested a definition based on an object's mass, taking the {approx}13 Jupiter mass (M{sub J} ) limit for the ignition of deuterium. Here, we investigate various deuterium-burning masses for a range of models. We find that, while 13 M{sub J} is generally a reasonable rule of thumb, the deuterium fusion mass depends on the helium abundance, the initial deuterium abundance, the metallicity of the model, and on what fraction of an object's initial deuterium abundance must combust in order for the object to qualify as having burned deuterium. Even though, for most proto-brown dwarf conditions, 50% of the initial deuterium will burn if the object's mass is {approx}(13.0 {+-} 0.8) M{sub J} , the full range of possibilities is significantly broader. For models ranging from zero-metallicity to more than three times solar metallicity, the deuterium-burning mass ranges from {approx}11.0 M{sub J} (for three times solar metallicity, 10% of initial deuterium burned) to {approx}16.3 M{sub J} ( for zero metallicity, 90% of initial deuterium burned).

  7. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Gaudi, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of mp = 10.4 +/- M(Earth) and orbits a star of Mstar = 0.56 +/- 0.09 M(Sun) at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 + 1.9/-0.5 AU, and an orbital period of 7.6 +7.7/-1.5 yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are due to the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect. This measurement was primarily due to the orbital motion of the Earth, but the analysis also demonstrates the capability measure micro lensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a failed gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets

  8. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, Sub-Neptune Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational microlensing exoplanet detection method is uniquely sensitive to cold, low-mass planets which orbit beyond the snow-line, where the most massive planets are thought to form. The early statistical results from microlensing indicate that Neptune-Saturn mass planets located beyond the snow-line are substantially more common than their counterparts in closer orbits that have found by the Doppler radial velocity method. We present the discovery of the planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, which demonstrates that the gravitational microlensing method also has the capability to measure the masses of cold, low-mass planets. The mass measurements of the host star and the planet are made possible by the detection of the microlensing parallax signal due to the orbital motion or the Earth as well as observations from the EPOXI spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The microlensing light curve indicates a planetary host star mass of M(sun) = 0.54 + / - 0.05M(sun) located at a distance of DL= 2.94 _ 0.21 kpc, orbited by a planet of mass mp= 9.8 +/-1.1M(Earth) with a semi-major axis of a = 3.1(+1.9-0.4)MAU.

  9. GIANT PLANET FORMATION BY DISK INSTABILITY IN LOW MASS DISKS?

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-20

    Forming giant planets by disk instability requires a gaseous disk that is massive enough to become gravitationally unstable and able to cool fast enough for self-gravitating clumps to form and survive. Models with simplified disk cooling have shown the critical importance of the ratio of the cooling to the orbital timescales. Uncertainties about the proper value of this ratio can be sidestepped by including radiative transfer. Three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics models of a disk with a mass of 0.043 M{sub sun} from 4 to 20 AU in orbit around a 1 M{sub sun} protostar show that disk instabilities are considerably less successful in producing self-gravitating clumps than in a disk with twice this mass. The results are sensitive to the assumed initial outer disk (T{sub o}) temperatures. Models with T{sub o} = 20 K are able to form a single self-gravitating clump, whereas models with T{sub o} = 25 K form clumps that are not quite self-gravitating. These models imply that disk instability requires a disk with a mass of at least {approx}0.043 M{sub sun} inside 20 AU in order to form giant planets around solar-mass protostars with realistic disk cooling rates and outer-disk temperatures. Lower mass disks around solar-mass protostars must rely upon core accretion to form inner giant planets.

  10. [Extrasolar terrestrial planets and possibility of extraterrestrial life].

    PubMed

    Ida, Shigeru

    2003-12-01

    Recent development of research on extrasolar planets are reviewed. About 120 extrasolar Jupiter-mass planets have been discovered through the observation of Doppler shift in the light of their host stars that is caused by acceleration due to planet orbital motions. Although the extrasolar planets so far observed may be limited to gas giant planets and their orbits differ from those of giant planets in our Solar system (Jupiter and Saturn), the theoretically predicted probability of existence of extrasolar terrestrial planets that can have liquid water ocean on their surface is comparable to that of detectable gas giant planets. Based on the number of extrasolar gas giants detected so far, about 100 life-sustainable planets may exist within a range of 200 light years. Indirect observation of extrasolar terrestrial planets would be done with space telescopes within several years and direct one may be done within 20 years. The latter can detect biomarkers on these planets as well. PMID:15136756

  11. Architectural Insights into the Origin of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Winn, Joshua

    2015-12-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. This problem has been with us for 20 years, long enough for significant progress to have been made, and also for a great deal of "lore" to have accumulated about the properties of these planets. Among this lore is the widespread belief that hot Jupiters are less likely be in multiple giant planet systems than longer-period giant planets. We will show that in this case the lore is not supported by the best data available today: hot Jupiters are no more or less likely than warm or cool Jupiters to have additional Jupiter-mass companions. In contrast to the expectation from the simplest models of high-eccentricity migration, the result holds for Jupiter-mass companions both inside and outside of the water-ice line. This support the importance of disk migration for the origin of short-period giant planets.

  12. The Mass - Radius Relation of Giant Gas Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik Orhan, Zeynep; Kayhan, Cenk; Yildiz, Mutlu

    2016-07-01

    Thanks to CoRoT and Kepler space telescope, the thousand of exoplanets have been discovered. The only observational construct on planetary interior is planetary radius. Mass-radius relation is widely studied in the literature. Many mechanisms have been suggested in the literature to explain the inflated radii of these planets. In this study, our aim is to consider planet and host star interaction and assess the basic mechanisms responsible for excess in radius of transiting giant gas planets. We show that there is much more definite relation between radius and energy per gram per second (log (l- )). There is a good linear relation between planetary radius and log (l- ) for log (l- /l0 ) < 3.75. The relation changes if log (l- /l0 ) > 3.5. There is a relatively clump for the range log (l- /l0 ) > 3.75. The reason for the change in the relation may be related with the structure of the heated part of the planets. We focus on these inflated planet.

  13. The Structural and Thermal Evolution of Transiting Exoplanets: From Hot Jupiters to Kepler's Super Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, Jonathan

    2011-06-11

    Large numbers of exoplanets can now be seen to transit their parent stars, which allows for measurements of their radii, masses, and densities. We can now begin to examine the Jupiter-class gas giant planets as a class of astrophysical objects. At the same time, thanks to NASA’s Kepler telescope, the number of transiting planets below 10 Earth masses is now moving beyond just a handful. For the Jupiter-like planets, we model their interior structure and find several interesting properties regarding the amount of ice and rock within these planets, which gives us clues to their formation. For the lowest-mass planets, such as the 6-planet Kepler-11 system, signs point to a large populations of mini-Neptunes---low-mass, low-density planets with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. The Kepler-11 system may tell us much about the evaporation of the atmospheres of these kinds of planets.

  14. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Dittmann, Jason A.; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A.; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C.; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-01

    M-dwarf stars—hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun—are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere.

  15. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    PubMed

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R; Dittmann, Jason A; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-12

    M-dwarf stars--hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun--are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere. PMID:26560298

  16. MEASURING THE MASS OF SOLAR SYSTEM PLANETS USING PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, D. J.; Hobbs, G. B.; Manchester, R. N.; Edwards, R. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Backer, D. C.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Van Straten, W.; Coles, W.; Demorest, P. B.; Ferdman, R. D.; Purver, M. B.; Folkner, W. M.; Hotan, A. W.; Kramer, M.; Lommen, A. N.; Nice, D. J.; Stairs, I. H.

    2010-09-10

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2) x10{sup -4} M {sub sun}, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate measurements for individual solar system bodies, the pulsar technique is sensitive to planetary system masses and has the potential to provide the most accurate values of these masses for some planets.

  17. The use of transit timing to detect terrestrial-mass extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Murray, Norman W

    2005-02-25

    Future surveys for transiting extrasolar planets are expected to detect hundreds of jovian-mass planets and tens of terrestrial-mass planets. For many of these newly discovered planets, the intervals between successive transits will be measured with an accuracy of 0.1 to 100 minutes. We show that these timing measurements will allow for the detection of additional planets in the system (not necessarily transiting) by their gravitational interaction with the transiting planet. The transit-time variations depend on the mass of the additional planet, and in some cases terrestrial-mass planets will produce a measurable effect. In systems where two planets are seen to transit, the density of both planets can be determined without radial-velocity observations. PMID:15731449

  18. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY IN GIANT PLANETS, BROWN DWARFS, AND LOW-MASS DWARF STARS. III. IRON, MAGNESIUM, AND SILICON

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, Channon; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce E-mail: lodders@wustl.ed

    2010-06-20

    We use thermochemical equilibrium calculations to model iron, magnesium, and silicon chemistry in the atmospheres of giant planets, brown dwarfs, extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), and low-mass stars. The behavior of individual Fe-, Mg-, and Si-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of temperature, pressure, and metallicity. Our equilibrium results are thus independent of any particular model atmosphere. The condensation of Fe metal strongly affects iron chemistry by efficiently removing Fe-bearing species from the gas phase. Monatomic Fe is the most abundant Fe-bearing gas throughout the atmospheres of EGPs and L dwarfs, and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. Mg- and Si-bearing gases are effectively removed from the atmosphere by forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) and enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) cloud formation. Monatomic Mg is the dominant magnesium gas throughout the atmospheres of EGPs and L dwarfs and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. Silicon monoxide (SiO) is the most abundant Si-bearing gas in the deep atmospheres of brown dwarfs and EGPs, whereas SiH{sub 4} is dominant in the deep atmosphere of Jupiter and other gas giant planets. Several other Fe-, Mg-, and Si-bearing gases become increasingly important with decreasing effective temperature. In principle, a number of Fe, Mg, and Si gases are potential tracers of weather or diagnostic of temperature in substellar atmospheres.

  19. Periodic mass extinctions and the Planet X model reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmire, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    The 27 Myr period in the fossil extinction record has been confirmed in modern data bases dating back 500 Myr, which is twice the time interval of the original analysis from 30 years ago. The surprising regularity of this period has been used to reject the Nemesis model. A second model based on the Sun's vertical Galactic oscillations has been challenged on the basis of an inconsistency in period and phasing. The third astronomical model originally proposed to explain the periodicity is the Planet X model in which the period is associated with the perihelion precession of the inclined orbit of a trans-Neptunian planet. Recently, and unrelated to mass extinctions, a trans-Neptunian super-Earth planet has been proposed to explain the observation that the inner Oort cloud objects Sedna and 2012VP113 have perihelia that lie near the ecliptic plane. In this Letter, we reconsider the Planet X model in light of the confluence of the modern palaeontological and outer Solar system dynamical evidence.

  20. Molecular formation along the atmospheric mass loss of HD 209458b and similar Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, R.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry along the mass loss of Hot Jupiters is generally considered to be simple, consisting mainly of atoms, prevented from forming more complex species by the intense radiation field from their host stars. In order to probe the region where the temperature is low (T<2000 K), we developed a 1D chemical and photochemical reaction model of the atmospheric mass loss of HD 209458b, involving 56 species, including carbon chain and oxygen-bearing ones, interacting through 566 reactions. The simulation results indicate that simple molecules like OH+, H2O+ and H3O+ are formed inside the region, considering that residual H2 survives in the exosphere, a possibility indicated by recent observational work. The molecules are formed and destroyed within a radial distance of less than 107 km, but the estimated integrated column density of OH+, a potential tracer of H2, is high enough to allow detection, which, once achieved, would indicate a revision of chemical models of the upper atmosphere of Hot Jupiters. For low density Hot Jupiters receiving less intense XUV radiation from their host stars than HD 209458b, molecular species could conceivably be formed with a higher total column density.

  1. The Galileo probe mass spectrometer: composition of Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Way, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    The composition of the jovian atmosphere from 0.5 to 21 bars along the descent trajectory was determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the Galileo probe. The mixing ratio of He (helium) to H2 (hydrogen), 0.156, is close to the solar ratio. The abundances of methane, water, argon, neon, and hydrogen sulfide were measured; krypton and xenon were detected. As measured in the jovian atmosphere, the amount of carbon is 2.9 times the solar abundance relative to H2, the amount of sulfur is greater than the solar abundance, and the amount of oxygen is much less than the solar abundance. The neon abundance compared with that of hydrogen is about an order of magnitude less than the solar abundance. Isotopic ratios of carbon and the noble gases are consistent with solar values. The measured ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) of (5 +/- 2) x 10(-5) indicates that this ratio is greater in solar-system hydrogen than in local interstellar hydrogen, and the 3He/4He ratio of (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-4) provides a new value for protosolar (solar nebula) helium isotopes. Together, the D/H and 3He/4He ratios are consistent with conversion in the sun of protosolar deuterium to present-day 3He.

  2. A CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST STAR ACTIVITY AND PLANET MASS FOR CLOSE-IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2011-07-01

    The activity levels of stars are influenced by several stellar properties, such as stellar rotation, spectral type, and the presence of stellar companions. Analogous to binaries, planetary companions are also thought to be able to cause higher activity levels in their host stars, although at lower levels. Especially in X-rays, such influences are hard to detect because coronae of cool stars exhibit a considerable amount of intrinsic variability. Recently, a correlation between the mass of close-in exoplanets and their host star's X-ray luminosity has been detected, based on archival X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. This finding has been interpreted as evidence for star-planet interactions. We show in our analysis that this correlation is caused by selection effects due to the flux limit of the X-ray data used and due to the intrinsic planet detectability of the radial velocity method, and thus does not trace possible planet-induced effects. We also show that the correlation is not present in a corresponding complete sample derived from combined XMM-Newton and ROSAT data.

  3. Planet traps and first planets: The critical metallicity for gas giant formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hirashita, Hiroyuki E-mail: hirashita@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-06-10

    The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when are first planets formed in galaxies? We investigate this by adopting a theoretical model where planet traps are combined with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the metallicity ([Fe/H]) in disks. Three characteristic exoplanetary populations are examined: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters around 1 AU, and low-mass planets in tight orbits, such as super-Earths. We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs), as well as the orbital radius (〈R{sub rapid}〉) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets, as a function of metallicity (–2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤–0.6). We show that the total PFFs for these three populations increase steadily with metallicity. This is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the metallicity range considered here, the population of low-mass planets dominates Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H] ≅ –1. We find that the hot Jupiters form more efficiently than the exo-Jupiters at [Fe/H] ≲ –0.7. This arises from the slower growth of planetary cores and their more efficient radial inward transport by the host traps in lower metallicity disks. We show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H] ≅ –1.2 by comparing 〈R{sub rapid}〉 of hot Jupiters and low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between these two types of planets. Therefore, this study implies that important physical processes in planet formation may be tested by exoplanet observations around metal-poor stars.

  4. Conditions for water ice lines and Mars-mass exomoons around accreting super-Jovian planets at 1-20 AU from Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.; Pudritz, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The first detection of a moon around an extrasolar planet (an "exomoon") might be feasible with NASA's Kepler or ESA's upcoming PLATO space telescopes or with the future ground-based European Extremely Large Telescope. To guide observers and to use observational resources most efficiently, we need to know where the largest, most easily detected moons can form. Aims: We explore the possibility of large exomoons by following the movement of water (H2O) ice lines in the accretion disks around young super-Jovian planets. We want to know how the different heating sources in those disks affect the location of the H2O ice lines as a function of stellar and planetary distance. Methods: We simulate 2D rotationally symmetric accretion disks in hydrostatic equilibrium around super-Jovian exoplanets. The energy terms in our semi-analytical framework - (1) viscous heating; (2) planetary illumination; (3) accretional heating of the disk; and (4) stellar illumination - are fed by precomputed planet evolution models. We consider accreting planets with final masses between 1 and 12 Jupiter masses at distances between 1 and 20 AU to a solar type star. Results: Accretion disks around Jupiter-mass planets closer than about 4.5 AU to Sun-like stars do not feature H2O ice lines, whereas the most massive super-Jovians can form icy satellites as close as 3 AU to Sun-like stars. We derive an empirical formula for the total moon mass as a function of planetary mass and stellar distance and predict that super-Jovian planets forming beyond about 5 AU can host Mars-mass moons. Planetary illumination is the major heat source in the final stages of accretion around Jupiter-mass planets, whereas disks around the most massive super-Jovians are similarly heated by planetary illumination and viscous heating. This indicates a transition towards circumstellar accretion disks, where viscous heating dominates in the stellar vicinity. We also study a broad range of circumplanetary disk

  5. Mass-Radius Relation for Rocky Planets Based on PREM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-03-01

    Several small dense exoplanets are now known, inviting comparisons to Earth and Venus. Such comparisons require translating their masses and sizes to composition models of evolved multi-layer interior planets. Such theoretical models rely on our understanding of the Earth’s interior, as well as independently derived equations of state, but so far have not involved direct extrapolations from Earth’s seismic model: the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). To facilitate more detailed compositional comparisons between small exoplanets and the Earth, we derive here a semi-empirical mass-radius relation for two-layer rocky planets based on PREM, \\frac{R}{{R}\\oplus }=(1.07-0.21\\cdot {CMF})\\cdot {≤ft(\\frac{M}{{M}\\oplus }\\right)}1/3.7, where CMF stands for core mass fraction. It is applicable to 1 ˜ 8 M⊕ and a CMF of 0.0 ˜ 0.4. Applying this formula to Earth and Venus and several known small exoplanets with radii and masses measured to better than ˜30% precision gives a CMF fit of 0.26 ± 0.07.

  6. Origins of Hot Jupiters, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods less than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances (a > 2AU) in protostellar disks, only to subsequently experience large-scale inward migration to the small orbital radii at which they are observed. Here, we propose that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population forms in situ, with the Galactically prevalent short-period super-Earths acting as the source population. Our calculations suggest that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protostellar disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated for solid cores of 10-20 Earth masses, in line with the conventional picture of core-nucleated accretion. This formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional planets, reminiscent of those observed in large numbers by NASA’s Kepler Mission and Doppler velocity surveys. However, dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' evolutionary lifetimes tend to increase the mutual inclinations of exterior, low-mass companions to hot Jupiters, making transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  7. Origins of Hot Jupiters, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods less than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances (a > 2AU) in protoplanetary disks, only to subsequently experience large-scale inward migration to the small orbital radii at which they are observed. Here, we propose that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population forms in situ, with the Galactically prevalent short-period super-Earths acting as the source population. Our calculations suggest that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated for solid cores of 10-20 Earth masses, in line with the conventional picture of core-nucleated accretion. The planetary conglomeration process, coupled with subsequent gravitational contraction and spin down of the host star, drives sweeping secular resonances through the system, increasing the mutual inclinations of exterior, low-mass companions to hot Jupiters. Accordingly, this formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional non-transiting planets, reminiscent of those observed in large numbers by NASA’s Kepler Mission and Doppler velocity surveys. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  8. Down-tail mass loss by plasmoids in Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, S. W. H.; Nichols, J. D.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent estimates of the plasma mass-loss rates by the formation and down-tail propagation of plasmoids observed in the plasma sheet in Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetosphere fall short of inner moon source rates by at least an order of magnitude. Here we argue that on the time scale between large-scale disconnection events, ~15 h at Jupiter and ~45 h at Saturn, mass-loaded closed flux tubes will typically have stretched out a few hundred planetary radii down tail at speeds ~100-200 km s-1. Consequently, the "plasmoids" of order ~10 planetary radii in length observed at closer planetary distances represent only a small planetward portion of the overall structure that is disconnected and lost down tail. Plasmoid mass-loss estimates are then revised upward by around an order of magnitude, becoming comparable to the moon source values. Additional "hidden," e.g., small-scale, mass-loss processes of comparable strength may not then be required. The essentially continuous azimuthally flowing source plasma in the dusk sector is shown to correspond to a plasma sheet layer adjacent to the magnetopause of width typically ~10% of the distance to the magnetopause in that local time sector. This physical picture also provides a simple explanation for the asymmetry in the plasmoid bipolar field signature observed at both Jupiter and Saturn and predicts that the apparent plasmoid length will increase with distance down tail to a limit beyond a few hundred planetary radii where the full ~100-200 planetary radii structures will be observed.

  9. An Overview of the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammier, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Arriving in orbit around the planet Jupiter in 2016 after a five-year journey, the Juno spacecraft will begin a one-year investigation of the gas giant in order to understand its origin and evolution by determining its water abundance and constraining its core mass. In addition, Juno will map the planet's magnetic and gravitational fields, map its atmosphere, and explore the three-dimensional structure of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere and auroras. Juno will discriminate among different models for giant planet formation. These investigations will be conducted over the course of thirty-two 11-day elliptical polar orbits of the planet. The orbits are designed to avoid Jupiter's highest radiation regions. The spacecraft is a spinning, solar-powered system carrying a complement of eight science instruments for conducting the investigations. The spacecraft systems and instruments take advantage of significant design and operational heritage from previous space missions.

  10. Mass Losses Of Co, Cs And Hcn On Jupiter/sl9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Raphael; Marten, A.

    2006-09-01

    Since comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) collided with Jupiter in 1994, the IRAM 30-m Telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain) and the 15-m JCMT (Mauna Kea,Hawaii) have regularly observed Jupiter at millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths. Molecular trace species such as HCN, CO, CS and their isotopomers have been detected in the upper atmosphere since the collision. Because of the high spectral resolution attained, our data allow one to infer both temperature and abundances in Jupiter's stratosphere with a maximum spatial resolution of 10 arcsec. We have used all these data to monitor the latitudinal spreading since the impacts occurred (Marten et al. 1995), to look for changes in their abundances with time (Moreno et al. 2001, 2003) and to determine several isotopic ratios (Matthews et al. 2002). Data taken in 2004 have shown that latitudinal distributions of all these species were almost homogeneous 10 years after impacts, as predicted by Moreno et al. 2003. Moreover, compared to 1998 results, respective mass loss factors as high as 2-7 have been determined for the three molecular main compounds (Moreno et al. 2005). In order to follow-up our monitoring, new disk mapping observations took place in May 2006 using the IRAM-30m Telescope. Here we report the results of the recent measurements of CO, CS and HCN, and also the search for new species: H2CO, H2CS, CH3CN, CH3OH. Such trace compounds could have explained the mass losses observed in 2004, but no clear detections have been obtained after reasonable integration times. Estimates of the new CO, CS and HCN total masses and upper limits for the trace species searched for will be presented. The loss mechanisms will be discussed. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  11. Orbital Stability of Multi-Planet Systems: Behavior at High Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sarah J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the relationships between planet separation, mass, and stability timescale in high mass multi-planet systems containing planet masses and multiplicities relevant for planetary systems detectable via direct imaging. Extrapolating empirically derived relationships between planet mass, separation, and stability timescale derived from lower mass planetary systems misestimate the stability timescales for higher mass planetary systems by more than an order of magnitude at close separations near the two body Hill stability limit. We also find that characterizing critical separations in terms of period ratio produces a linear relationship between log-timescale and separation with the same slope for planet-star mass ratios comparable to or exceeding Jupiter’s, but this slope steepens for lower mass planetary systems. We discuss possible mechanisms for instability that result in this behavior including perturbing adjacent planet pairs into an overlap regime between 1st and sometimes 2nd order mean motion resonances.

  12. THE ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PLANET SEARCH. XXII. TWO NEW MULTI-PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, J.; Salter, G. S.; Tinney, C. G.; Bailey, J.; Tuomi, Mikko; Zhang, Z.; Butler, R. P.; Jones, H. R. A.; O'Toole, S. J.; Carter, B. D.; Jenkins, J. S.; Vogt, S. S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-07-10

    We report the detection of two new planets from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search. These planets orbit two stars each previously known to host one planet. The new planet orbiting HD 142 has a period of 6005 {+-} 427 days, and a minimum mass of 5.3 M{sub Jup}. HD 142c is thus a new Jupiter analog: a gas-giant planet with a long period and low eccentricity (e = 0.21 {+-} 0.07). The second planet in the HD 159868 system has a period of 352.3 {+-} 1.3 days and m sin i = 0.73 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Jup}. In both of these systems, including the additional planets in the fitting process significantly reduced the eccentricity of the original planet. These systems are thus examples of how multiple-planet systems can masquerade as moderately eccentric single-planet systems.

  13. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  14. SECULAR CHAOS AND THE PRODUCTION OF HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram

    2011-07-10

    In a planetary system with two or more well-spaced, eccentric, inclined planets, secular interactions may lead to chaos. The innermost planet may gradually become very eccentric and/or inclined as a result of the secular degrees of freedom drifting toward equipartition of angular momentum deficit. Secular chaos is known to be responsible for the eventual destabilization of Mercury in our own solar system. Here we focus on systems with three giant planets. We characterize the secular chaos and demonstrate the criterion for it to occur, but leave a detailed understanding of secular chaos to a companion paper. After an extended period of eccentricity diffusion, the inner planet's pericenter can approach the star to within a few stellar radii. Strong tidal interactions and ensuing tidal dissipation extract orbital energy from the planet and pull it inward, creating a hot Jupiter. In contrast to other proposed channels for the production of hot Jupiters, such a scenario (which we term 'secular migration') explains a range of observations: the pile-up of hot Jupiters at 3 day orbital periods, the fact that hot Jupiters are in general less massive than other radial velocity planets, that they may have misaligned inclinations with respect to stellar spin, and that they have few easily detectable companions (but may have giant companions in distant orbits). Secular migration can also explain close-in planets as low in mass as Neptune; and an aborted secular migration can explain the 'warm Jupiters' at intermediate distances. In addition, the frequency of hot Jupiters formed via secular migration increases with stellar age. We further suggest that secular chaos may be responsible for the observed eccentricities of giant planets at larger distances and that these planets could exhibit significant spin-orbit misalignment.

  15. Formation and detection of Earth mass planets around low mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Ryan; Laughlin, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    We investigate an in situ formation scenario for Earth-mass terrestrial planets in short-period, potentially habitable orbits around low-mass stars (M∗ < 0.3M⊙). We then investigate the feasibility of detecting these Earth-sized planets. We find that such objects can feasibly be detected by a ground-based transit survey if their formation frequency is high and if correlated noise can be controlled to sub-milli-magnitude levels. Our simulations of terrestrial planet formation follow the growth of planetary embryos in an annular region spanning 0.036 AU ⩽ a ⩽ 0.4 AU around a fiducial M7 (0.12M⊙) primary. Initial distributions of planetary embryos are calculated using the semi-analytic evolutionary model outlined by Chambers [Chambers, J., 2006. Icarus 180, 496-513]. This model specifies how planetary embryos grow to the stage where the largest embryo masses lie in the 1024 g ⩽Membryo ⩽ 5 ×1026 g range (corresponding to the close of the so-called oligarchic growth phase). We then model the final phases of terrestrial planet assembly by allowing the embryos to interact with one another via a full N-body integration using the Mercury code. The final planetary system configurations produced in the simulations generally consist of 3-5 planets with masses of order 0.1- 1.0M⊕ in or near the habitable zone of the star. We explore a range of disk masses (0.2M⊕ to 3.3M⊕) to illuminate the role disk mass plays in our results. With a high occurrence fraction or fortunate alignments, transits by the planet formed in our simulations could be marginally detected with modest telescopes of aperture 1 m or smaller around the nearest M-dwarf stars. To obtain a concrete estimate of the detectability of the planets arising in our simulations, we present a detailed Monte-Carlo transit detection simulation incorporating sky observability, local weather, a target list of around 200 nearby M-dwarfs, and a comprehensive photometric noise model. We adopt a baseline 1

  16. Juno: Launching to Jupiter

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Juno spacecraft will look deep beneath Jupiter's swirling curtains of clouds to decipher the planet's structure and history during a mission that will begin with a 5-year flight through deep sp...

  17. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter B.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Wong, Ian

    2016-04-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit as a consequence of the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Owing to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity (eb) is in part dictated by its Love number ({k}{2b}), which is in turn a proxy for the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. Thus, the measurement of eb constrains {k}{2b} and allows us to place otherwise elusive constraints on the mass of HAT-P-13b's core (Mcore,b). In this study we derive new constraints on the value of eb by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that eb = 0.00700 ± 0.00100. We then use octupole-order secular perturbation theory to find the corresponding {k}{2b}={0.31}-0.05+0.08. Applying structural evolution models, we then find, with 68% confidence, that Mcore,b is less than 25 Earth masses (M⊕). The most likely value is Mcore,b = 11 M⊕, which is similar to the core mass theoretically required for runaway gas accretion. This is the tightest constraint to date on the core mass of a hot Jupiter. Additionally, we find that the measured secondary eclipse depths, which are in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, best match atmospheric model predictions with a dayside temperature inversion and relatively efficient day–night circulation.

  18. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter B.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Wong, Ian

    2016-04-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit as a consequence of the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Owing to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity (eb) is in part dictated by its Love number ({k}{2b}), which is in turn a proxy for the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. Thus, the measurement of eb constrains {k}{2b} and allows us to place otherwise elusive constraints on the mass of HAT-P-13b's core (Mcore,b). In this study we derive new constraints on the value of eb by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that eb = 0.00700 ± 0.00100. We then use octupole-order secular perturbation theory to find the corresponding {k}{2b}={0.31}-0.05+0.08. Applying structural evolution models, we then find, with 68% confidence, that Mcore,b is less than 25 Earth masses (M⊕). The most likely value is Mcore,b = 11 M⊕, which is similar to the core mass theoretically required for runaway gas accretion. This is the tightest constraint to date on the core mass of a hot Jupiter. Additionally, we find that the measured secondary eclipse depths, which are in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, best match atmospheric model predictions with a dayside temperature inversion and relatively efficient day-night circulation.

  19. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XVII. The hot Jupiter CoRoT-17b: a very old planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csizmadia, Sz.; Moutou, C.; Deleuil, M.; Cabrera, J.; Fridlund, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Almenara, J.-M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Bruntt, H.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; Cavarroc, C.; Cochran, W.; Deeg, H. J.; Díaz, R. F.; Dvorak, R.; Endl, M.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Fruth, Th.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Gillon, M.; Guenther, E. W.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Havel, M.; Hébrard, G.; Jehin, E.; Jorda, L.; Léger, A.; Llebaria, A.; Lammer, H.; Lovis, C.; MacQueen, P. J.; Mazeh, T.; Ollivier, M.; Pätzold, M.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Tingley, B.; Titz-Weider, R.; Wuchterl, G.

    2011-07-01

    We report on the discovery of a hot Jupiter-type exoplanet, CoRoT-17b, detected by the CoRoT satellite. It has a mass of 2.43 ± 0.30 MJup and a radius of 1.02 ± 0.07 RJup, while its mean density is 2.82 ± 0.38 g/cm3. CoRoT-17b is in a circular orbit with a period of 3.7681 ± 0.0003 days. The host star is an old (10.7 ± 1.0 Gyr) main-sequence star, which makes it an intriguing object for planetary evolution studies. The planet's internal composition is not well constrained and can range from pure H/He to one that can contain ~380 earth masses of heavier elements. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Part of the observations were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 184.C-0639). Based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Part of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Deep Atmosphere Ammonia Mixing Ratio at Jupiter from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Niemann, H. B.; Demick, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    New laboratory studies employing the Engineering Unit (EU) of the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer (GPMS) have resulted in a substantial reduction in the previously reported upper limit on the ammonia mixing ratio derived from the GPMS experiment at Jupiter. This measurement is complicated by background ammonia contributions in the GPMS during direct atmospheric sampling produced from the preceding gas enrichment experiments. These backgrounds can be quantified with the data from the EU studies when they are carried out in a manner that duplicates the descent profile of pressure and enrichment cell loading. This background is due to the tendency of ammonia to interact strongly with the walls of the mass spectrometer and on release to contribute to the gas being directly directed into the ion source from the atmosphere through a capillary pressure reduction leak. It is evident from the GPMS and other observations that the mixing ratio of ammonia at Jupiter reaches the deep atmosphere value at substantially higher pressures than previously assumed. This is a likely explanation for the previously perceived discrepancy between ammonia values derived from ground based microwave observations and those obtained from attenuation of the Galileo Probe radio signal.

  1. Inversion of Jupiter and Satrun gravity field into the atmospheric circulation on these planets - using the gravity measurements by Juno and Cassini and an adjoint based dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2014-11-01

    In approximately two years Juno and Cassini will both perform close flybys of Jupiter and Saturn respectively, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum for these planets. This data can be used to estimate the depth of the observed flows on these planets. Here we use a hierarchy of dynamical models in order to relate the three dimensional flow to perturbations of the density field, and therefore to the gravity field. The models are set up to allow either zonal flow only, or a full horizontal flow in both zonal and meridional directions based on the observed cloud-level winds. In addition, dynamical perturbations resulting from the non-spherical shape of the planets are accounted for. In order to invert the gravity field to be measured by Juno and Cassini into the 3D circulation, an adjoint inverse model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration of the dynamical model. This tool can be used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the depth of the winds depends on latitudinal position.We show that given the expected sensitivities of Juno and Cassini, it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn. This holds for a large range of zonal wind possible penetration depths, from ~100km to ~10000km, and for winds depth that vary with latitude. This method proves to be useful also when incorporating the full horizontal flow, and thus taking into account gravity perturbations that vary with longitude. We show that our adjoint based inversion method allows not only to estimate the depth of the circulation, but allows via iterations with the spacecraft trajectory estimation model to improve the inferred gravity field.

  2. Observed properties of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrew W

    2013-05-01

    Observational surveys for extrasolar planets probe the diverse outcomes of planet formation and evolution. These surveys measure the frequency of planets with different masses, sizes, orbital characteristics, and host star properties. Small planets between the sizes of Earth and Neptune substantially outnumber Jupiter-sized planets. The survey measurements support the core accretion model, in which planets form by the accumulation of solids and then gas in protoplanetary disks. The diversity of exoplanetary characteristics demonstrates that most of the gross features of the solar system are one outcome in a continuum of possibilities. The most common class of planetary system detectable today consists of one or more planets approximately one to three times Earth's size orbiting within a fraction of the Earth-Sun distance. PMID:23641110

  3. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn analog with gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G W; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M K; Tristram, P J; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Depoy, D L; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C-U; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R W; Park, B-G; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Saito, To; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W L; Yock, P C M; Albrow, M D; Allan, A; Beaulieu, J-P; Burgdorf, M J; Cook, K H; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2008-02-15

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of approximately 0.71 and approximately 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of approximately 2.3 and approximately 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass approximately 0.50 solar mass at a distance of approximately 1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common. PMID:18276883

  4. Extrasolar binary planets. I. Formation by tidal capture during planet-planet scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ochiai, H.; Nagasawa, M.; Ida, S.

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated (1) the formation of gravitationally bounded pairs of gas-giant planets (which we call 'binary planets') from capturing each other through planet-planet dynamical tide during their close encounters and (2) the subsequent long-term orbital evolution due to planet-planet and planet-star quasi-static tides. For the initial evolution in phase 1, we carried out N-body simulations of the systems consisting of three Jupiter-mass planets taking into account the dynamical tide. The formation rate of the binary planets is as much as 10% of the systems that undergo orbital crossing, and this fraction is almost independent of the initial stellarcentric semimajor axes of the planets, while ejection and merging rates sensitively depend on the semimajor axes. As a result of circularization by the planet-planet dynamical tide, typical binary separations are a few times the sum of the physical radii of the planets. After the orbital circularization, the evolution of the binary system is governed by long-term quasi-static tide. We analytically calculated the quasi-static tidal evolution in phase 2. The binary planets first enter the spin-orbit synchronous state by the planet-planet tide. The planet-star tide removes angular momentum of the binary motion, eventually resulting in a collision between the planets. However, we found that the binary planets survive the tidal decay for the main-sequence lifetime of solar-type stars (∼10 Gyr), if the binary planets are beyond ∼0.3 AU from the central stars. These results suggest that the binary planets can be detected by transit observations at ≳ 0.3 AU.

  5. Architectural and Chemical Insights into the Origin of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2015-08-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. This problem has been with us for 20 years, long enough for significant progress to have been made, and also for a great deal of "lore" to have accumulated about the properties of these planets. Among this lore are the widespread beliefs that hot Jupiters are less likely be in multiple giant planet systems than longer-period giant planets, and that there is an excess of close-in giant planets with orbital periods near three days. I will show that in these cases the lore is not supported by the best data available today: hot Jupiters are not lonely and there is no evidence of a three-day pile-up. I will also show that stellar sodium abundance is inversely proportional to the probability that a star hosts a short-period giant planet. This observation is best explained by the effect of decreasing sodium abundance on protoplanetary disk structure and reveals that planet-disk interactions are critical for the existence of short-period giant planets. Collectively, these results support the importance of disk migration for the origin of short-period giant planets.

  6. THE EFFECT OF MASS LOSS ON THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    By combining mass loss and tidal evolution of close-in planets, we present a qualitative study on their tidal migrations. We incorporate mass loss in tidal evolution for planets with different masses and find that mass loss could interfere with tidal evolution. In an upper limit case (beta = 3), a significant portion of mass may be evaporated in a long evolution timescale. Evidence of greater modification of the planets with an initial separation of about 0.1 AU than those with a = 0.15 AU can be found in this model. With the assumption of a large initial eccentricity, the planets with initial mass <=1 M{sub J} and initial distance of about 0.1 AU could not survive. With the supposition of beta = 1.1, we find that the loss process has an effect on the planets with low mass at a {approx} 0.05 AU. In both cases, the effect of evaporation on massive planets can be neglected. Also, heating efficiency and initial eccentricity have significant influence on tidal evolution. We find that even low heating efficiency and initial eccentricity have a significant effect on tidal evolution. Our analysis shows that evaporation on planets with different initial masses can accelerate (decelerate) the tidal evolution due to the increase (decrease) in tide of the planet (star). Consequently, the effect of evaporation cannot be neglected in evolutionary calculations of close-in planets. The physical parameters of HD 209458b can be fitted by our model.

  7. STELLAR PARAMETERS AND METALLICITIES OF STARS HOSTING JOVIAN AND NEPTUNIAN MASS PLANETS: A POSSIBLE DEPENDENCE OF PLANETARY MASS ON METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, L.; Cunha, K.; De Araujo, F. X.; De la Reza, R.; Smith, V. V.; Schuler, S. C.

    2010-09-10

    The metal content of planet-hosting stars is an important ingredient that may affect the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Accurate stellar abundances require the determinations of reliable physical parameters, namely, the effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and metallicity. This work presents the homogeneous derivation of such parameters for a large sample of stars hosting planets (N = 117), as well as a control sample of disk stars not known to harbor giant, closely orbiting planets (N = 145). Stellar parameters and iron abundances are derived from an automated analysis technique developed for this work. As previously found in the literature, the results in this study indicate that the metallicity distribution of planet-hosting stars is more metal rich by {approx}0.15 dex when compared to the control sample stars. A segregation of the sample according to planet mass indicates that the metallicity distribution of stars hosting only Neptunian-mass planets (with no Jovian-mass planets) tends to be more metal poor in comparison with that obtained for stars hosting a closely orbiting Jovian planet. The significance of this difference in metallicity arises from a homogeneous analysis of samples of FGK dwarfs which do not include the cooler and more problematic M dwarfs. This result would indicate that there is a possible link between planet mass and metallicity such that metallicity plays a role in setting the mass of the most massive planet. Further confirmation, however, must await larger samples.

  8. Deuterium Burning in Massive Giant Planets and Low-mass Brown Dwarfs Formed by Core-nucleated Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenheimer, Peter; D'Angelo, Gennaro; Lissauer, Jack J.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Saumon, Didier

    2013-06-01

    Using detailed numerical simulations, we study the formation of bodies near the deuterium-burning limit according to the core-nucleated giant planet accretion scenario. The objects, with heavy-element cores in the range 5-30 M ⊕, are assumed to accrete gas up to final masses of 10-15 Jupiter masses (M Jup). After the formation process, which lasts 1-5 Myr and which ends with a "cold-start," low-entropy configuration, the bodies evolve at constant mass up to an age of several Gyr. Deuterium burning via proton capture is included in the calculation, and we determined the mass, M 50, above which more than 50% of the initial deuterium is burned. This often-quoted borderline between giant planets and brown dwarfs is found to depend only slightly on parameters, such as core mass, stellar mass, formation location, solid surface density in the protoplanetary disk, disk viscosity, and dust opacity. The values for M 50 fall in the range 11.6-13.6 M Jup, in agreement with previous determinations that do not take the formation process into account. For a given opacity law during the formation process, objects with higher core masses form more quickly. The result is higher entropy in the envelope at the completion of accretion, yielding lower values of M 50. For masses above M 50, during the deuterium-burning phase, objects expand and increase in luminosity by one to three orders of magnitude. Evolutionary tracks in the luminosity versus time diagram are compared with the observed position of the companion to Beta Pictoris.

  9. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter Benjamin; Knutson, Heather; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, Benjamin James; Burrows, Adam Seth; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit due to the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Due to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity is in part dictated by its Love number, i.e. the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. We can therefore directly constrain the fraction of HAT-P-13b's mass contained in its core by measuring its orbital eccentricity. This method offers considerable advantages over the standard approach of inferring core size based on mass and radius measurements alone. In this study we derive new constraints on the value of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b is 0.00696 ± 0.00096. We then use octupole-order secular perturbation theory to find that the corresponding Love number is 0.31 (+0.11, -0.05). Applying structural evolution models, we then find, with 68% confidence, that the core mass lies between 0-25 Earth masses, with a most likely value of the core mass of 11 Earth masses. This is the tightest constraint, to date, on the core mass of an exoplanet. We also compare the measured secondary eclipse depths, in the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands, to the predictions of a suite of atmosphere models and find that the depths are best matched by models with a dayside temperature inversion and relatively efficient day-night circulation.

  10. TOWARD CHEMICAL CONSTRAINTS ON HOT JUPITER MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Amin, Mustafa A.; Kennedy, Grant M.

    2014-10-10

    The origin of hot Jupiters—gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars—is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily explained by giant planets forming at large orbital separations, either by core accretion or gravitational instability, and migrating to close-in orbits via disk-free mechanisms involving dynamical encounters. Such planets also contain solar or super-solar C/O ratios. On the contrary, hot Jupiters with super-solar O and C abundances can be explained by a variety of formation-migration pathways which, however, lead to solar or sub-solar C/O ratios. Current estimates of low oxygen abundances in hot Jupiter atmospheres may be indicative of disk-free migration mechanisms. We discuss open questions in this area which future studies will need to investigate.

  11. The minimum mass of detectable planets in protoplanetary discs and the derivation of planetary masses from high-resolution observations

    PubMed Central

    Rosotti, Giovanni P.; Juhasz, Attila; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the minimum planet mass that produces observable signatures in infrared scattered light and submillimetre (submm) continuum images and demonstrate how these images can be used to measure planet masses to within a factor of about 2. To this end, we perform multi-fluid gas and dust simulations of discs containing low-mass planets, generating simulated observations at 1.65, 10 and 850 μm. We show that the minimum planet mass that produces a detectable signature is ∼15 M⊕: this value is strongly dependent on disc temperature and changes slightly with wavelength (favouring the submm). We also confirm previous results that there is a minimum planet mass of ∼20 M⊕ that produces a pressure maximum in the disc: only planets above this threshold mass generate a dust trap that can eventually create a hole in the submm dust. Below this mass, planets produce annular enhancements in dust outwards of the planet and a reduction in the vicinity of the planet. These features are in steady state and can be understood in terms of variations in the dust radial velocity, imposed by the perturbed gas pressure radial profile, analogous to a traffic jam. We also show how planet masses can be derived from structure in scattered light and submm images. We emphasize that simulations with dust need to be run over thousands of planetary orbits so as to allow the gas profile to achieve a steady state and caution against the estimation of planet masses using gas-only simulations. PMID:27279783

  12. The minimum mass of detectable planets in protoplanetary discs and the derivation of planetary masses from high-resolution observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, Giovanni P.; Juhasz, Attila; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the minimum planet mass that produces observable signatures in infrared scattered light and submillimetre (submm) continuum images and demonstrate how these images can be used to measure planet masses to within a factor of about 2. To this end, we perform multi-fluid gas and dust simulations of discs containing low-mass planets, generating simulated observations at 1.65, 10 and 850 μm. We show that the minimum planet mass that produces a detectable signature is ˜15 M⊕: this value is strongly dependent on disc temperature and changes slightly with wavelength (favouring the submm). We also confirm previous results that there is a minimum planet mass of ˜20 M⊕ that produces a pressure maximum in the disc: only planets above this threshold mass generate a dust trap that can eventually create a hole in the submm dust. Below this mass, planets produce annular enhancements in dust outwards of the planet and a reduction in the vicinity of the planet. These features are in steady state and can be understood in terms of variations in the dust radial velocity, imposed by the perturbed gas pressure radial profile, analogous to a traffic jam. We also show how planet masses can be derived from structure in scattered light and submm images. We emphasize that simulations with dust need to be run over thousands of planetary orbits so as to allow the gas profile to achieve a steady state and caution against the estimation of planet masses using gas-only simulations.

  13. Investigating the free-floating planet mass by Euclid observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamolli, Lindita; Hafizi, Mimoza; De Paolis, Francesco; Nucita, Achille A.

    2016-08-01

    The detection of anomalies in gravitational microlensing events is nowadays one of the main goals among the microlensing community. In the case of single-lens events, these anomalies can be caused by the finite source effects, that is when the source disk size is not negligible, and by the Earth rotation around the Sun (the so-called parallax effect). The finite source and parallax effects may help to define the mass of the lens, uniquely. Free-floating planets (FFPs) are extremely dim objects, and gravitational microlensing provides at present the exclusive method to investigate these bodies. In this work, making use of a synthetic population algorithm, we study the possibility of detecting the finite source and parallax effects in simulated microlensing events caused by FFPs towards the Galactic bulge, taking into consideration the capabilities of the space-based Euclid telescope. We find a significant efficiency for detecting the parallax effect in microlensing events with detectable finite source effect, that turns out to be about 51 % for mass function index α_{PL} = 1.3.

  14. THE McDONALD OBSERVATORY PLANET SEARCH: NEW LONG-PERIOD GIANT PLANETS AND TWO INTERACTING JUPITERS IN THE HD 155358 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Caldwell, Caroline; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, J.; Simon, Attila E.

    2012-04-10

    We present high-precision radial velocity (RV) observations of four solar-type (F7-G5) stars-HD 79498, HD 155358, HD 197037, and HD 220773-taken as part of the McDonald Observatory Planet Search Program. For each of these stars, we see evidence of Keplerian motion caused by the presence of one or more gas giant planets in long-period orbits. We derive orbital parameters for each system and note the properties (composition, activity, etc.) of the host stars. While we have previously announced the two-gas-giant HD 155358 system, we now report a shorter period for planet c. This new period is consistent with the planets being trapped in mutual 2:1 mean-motion resonance. We therefore perform an in-depth stability analysis, placing additional constraints on the orbital parameters of the planets. These results demonstrate the excellent long-term RV stability of the spectrometers on both the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m telescope and the Hobby-Eberly telescope.

  15. The internal structure of the planets Mercury, Venus, Mars and Jupiter according to the Savic-Kasanin theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savic, P.

    The internal structure of Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Jupiter is considered in the framework of the Savic-Kasanin theory of the behavior of materials under high pressure. The main hypothesis underlying the theory is based on the deformation of the electron shells by the dislocation and ejection of electrons from atoms in a given material. This theory is discussed in relation to the spontaneous effect of gravitation and cooling on atoms in the material of a celestial body.

  16. Formation of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, G.; Coradini, A.

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we address the problem of the formation of giant planets and their regular satellites. We study in particular the problem of formation of the Jupiter System comparing the results of the model with the present characteristics of the system, in order to identify what are those better represented by our approach. In fact here, using a 3-D hydro-dynamical code, we study the modalities of gas accretion onto a solid core, believed to be the seed from which Jupiter started. To do that we have modelled three main regions: the central planet, a turbulent accretion disk surrounding it and an extended region from which the gas is collected. In the extended region we treat the gas as a frictionless fluid. Our main goal is to identify what are the characteristics of the planet during its growth and the physical parameters affecting its growth at the expenses of the nebular gas present in the feeding zone. Moreover we want to understand what are the thermodynamical parameters characterizing the gas captured by the planet and swirling around it. Finally, we check if a disk can be formed in prograde rotation around the planet and if this disk can survive the final phases of the planet formation. Due to the interaction between the accreting planet and the disk it has been necessary to develop a complete model of the Jupiter’s structure. In fact the radiation emitted by the growing planet heats up the surrounding gas. In turn the planet’s thermodynamic structure depend on the mass accretion rate onto it. When the accretion is rapid, shock waves in the gas are formed close to the planet. This region cannot be safely treated by a numerical code; for this reason we have developed a semi-analytically model of a a turbulent accretion disk to be considered as transition between the planet and the surrounding disk.

  17. THE LICK-CARNEGIE EXOPLANET SURVEY: A URANUS-MASS FOURTH PLANET FOR GJ 876 IN AN EXTRASOLAR LAPLACE CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Eugenio J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S.; Meschiari, Stefano; Haghighipour, Nader

    2010-08-10

    Continued radial velocity (RV) monitoring of the nearby M4V red dwarf star GJ 876 with Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph has revealed the presence of a Uranus-mass fourth planetary companion in the system. The new planet has a mean period of P{sub e} = 126.6 days (over the 12.6-year baseline of the RV observations), and a minimum mass of m{sub e} sin i{sub e} = 12.9 {+-} 1.7 M {sub +}. The detection of the new planet has been enabled by significant improvements to our RV data set for GJ 876. The data have been augmented by 36 new high-precision measurements taken over the past five years. In addition, the precision of all of the Doppler measurements have been significantly improved by the incorporation of a high signal-to-noise template spectrum for GJ 876 into the analysis pipeline. Implementation of the new template spectrum improves the internal rms errors for the velocity measurements taken during 1998-2005 from 4.1 m s{sup -1} to 2.5 m s{sup -1}. Self-consistent, N-body fits to the RV data set show that the four-planet system has an invariable plane with an inclination relative to the plane of the sky of i = 59.{sup 0}5. The fit is not significantly improved by the introduction of a mutual inclination between the planets 'b' and 'c', but the new data do confirm a non-zero eccentricity, e{sub d} = 0.207 {+-} 0.055 for the innermost planet, 'd'. In our best-fit coplanar model, the mass of the new component is m{sub e} = 14.6 {+-} 1.7 M {sub +}. Our best-fitting model places the new planet in a three-body resonance with the previously known giant planets (which have mean periods of P{sub c} = 30.4 and P{sub b} = 61.1 days). The critical argument, {psi}{sub Laplace} = {lambda} {sub c} - 3{lambda} {sub b} + 2{lambda} {sub e}, for the Laplace resonance librates with an amplitude of {Delta}{psi}{sub Laplace} = 40{sup 0} {+-} 13{sup 0} about {psi}{sub Laplace} = 0{sup 0}. Numerical integration indicates that the four-planet system is stable for at least a

  18. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to {approx}5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} planetesimals with absolute magnitude H < 9 (corresponding to diameter D = 80 km for a 7% albedo). The disk mass inferred from this work, M{sub disk} {approx} 14-28 M{sub Earth}, is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.

  19. PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS. II. PREDICTIONS FOR OUTER EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Sean N.; Armitage, Philip J.; Gorelick, Noel

    2010-03-10

    We develop an idealized dynamical model to predict the typical properties of outer extrasolar planetary systems, at radii comparable to the Jupiter-to-Neptune region of the solar system. The model is based upon the hypothesis that dynamical evolution in outer planetary systems is controlled by a combination of planet-planet scattering and planetary interactions with an exterior disk of small bodies ('planetesimals'). Our results are based on 5000 long duration N-body simulations that follow the evolution of three planets from a few to 10 AU, together with a planetesimal disk containing 50 M{sub +} from 10 to 20 AU. For large planet masses (M {approx}> M{sub Sat}), the model recovers the observed eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. For lower-mass planets, the range of outcomes in models with disks is far greater than that which is seen in isolated planet-planet scattering. Common outcomes include strong scattering among massive planets, sudden jumps in eccentricity due to resonance crossings driven by divergent migration, and re-circularization of scattered low-mass planets in the outer disk. We present the distributions of the eccentricity and inclination that result, and discuss how they vary with planet mass and initial system architecture. In agreement with other studies, we find that the currently observed eccentricity distribution (derived primarily from planets at a {approx}< 3 AU) is consistent with isolated planet-planet scattering. We explain the observed mass dependence-which is in the opposite sense from that predicted by the simplest scattering models-as a consequence of strong correlations between planet masses in the same system. At somewhat larger radii, initial planetary mass correlations and disk effects can yield similar modest changes to the eccentricity distribution. Nonetheless, strong damping of eccentricity for low-mass planets at large radii appears to be a secure signature of the dynamical influence of disks. Radial velocity

  20. Mass constraint for a planet in a protoplanetary disk from the gap width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Muto, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake

    2016-06-01

    A giant planet creates a gap in a protoplanetary disk, which might explain the observed gaps in protoplanetary disks. The width and depth of the gaps depend on the planet mass and disk properties. We have performed two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for various planet masses, disk aspect ratios, and viscosities, to obtain an empirical formula for the gap width. The gap width is proportional to the square root of the planet mass, -3/4 the power of the disk aspect ratio and -1/4 the power of the viscosity. This empirical formula enables us to estimate the mass of a planet embedded in the disk from the width of an observed gap. We have applied the empirical formula for the gap width to the disk around HL Tau, assuming that each gap observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations is produced by planets, and discussed the planet masses within the gaps. The estimate of planet masses from the gap widths is less affected by the observational resolution and dust filtration than that by the gap depth.

  1. Mass constraint for a planet in a protoplanetary disk from the gap width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Muto, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake

    2016-04-01

    A giant planet creates a gap in a protoplanetary disk, which might explain the observed gaps in protoplanetary disks. The width and depth of the gaps depend on the planet mass and disk properties. We have performed two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for various planet masses, disk aspect ratios, and viscosities, to obtain an empirical formula for the gap width. The gap width is proportional to the square root of the planet mass, -3/4 the power of the disk aspect ratio and -1/4 the power of the viscosity. This empirical formula enables us to estimate the mass of a planet embedded in the disk from the width of an observed gap. We have applied the empirical formula for the gap width to the disk around HL Tau, assuming that each gap observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations is produced by planets, and discussed the planet masses within the gaps. The estimate of planet masses from the gap widths is less affected by the observational resolution and dust filtration than that by the gap depth.

  2. Jupiter's decisive role in the inner Solar System's early evolution.

    PubMed

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-04-01

    The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planet formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System is unusual. Here, we present simulations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward from a > 5 astronomical units (AU) to a ≈ 1.5 AU before reversing direction, can explain the low overall mass of the Solar System's terrestrial planets, as well as the absence of planets with a < 0.4 AU. Jupiter's inward migration entrained s ≳ 10-100 km planetesimals into low-order mean motion resonances, shepherding and exciting their orbits. The resulting collisional cascade generated a planetesimal disk that, evolving under gas drag, would have driven any preexisting short-period planets into the Sun. In this scenario, the Solar System's terrestrial planets formed from gas-starved mass-depleted debris that remained after the primary period of dynamical evolution. PMID:25831540

  3. Full-lifetime simulations of multiple unequal-mass planets across all phases of stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Mustill, Alexander J.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Redfield, Seth; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Bowler, Alex B.; Lloyd, Maximillian J. S.

    2016-06-01

    We know that planetary systems are just as common around white dwarfs as around main-sequence stars. However, self-consistently linking a planetary system across these two phases of stellar evolution through the violent giant branch poses computational challenges, and previous studies restricted architectures to equal-mass planets. Here, we remove this constraint and perform over 450 numerical integrations over a Hubble time (14 Gyr) of packed planetary systems with unequal-mass planets. We characterize the resulting trends as a function of planet order and mass. We find that intrusive radial incursions in the vicinity of the white dwarf become less likely as the dispersion amongst planet masses increases. The orbital meandering which may sustain a sufficiently dynamic environment around a white dwarf to explain observations is more dependent on the presence of terrestrial-mass planets than any variation in planetary mass. Triggering unpacking or instability during the white dwarf phase is comparably easy for systems of unequal-mass planets and systems of equal-mass planets; instabilities during the giant branch phase remain rare and require fine-tuning of initial conditions. We list the key dynamical features of each simulation individually as a potential guide for upcoming discoveries.

  4. KEPLER-15b: A HOT JUPITER ENRICHED IN HEAVY ELEMENTS AND THE FIRST KEPLER MISSION PLANET CONFIRMED WITH THE HOBBY-EBERLY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Cochran, William D.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Rowe, Jason; Lucas, Phillip; Isaacson, Howard; Bryson, Steve; Howell, Steve B.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Haas, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hansen, Terese; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark; Ford, Eric B.; and others

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of Kepler-15b (KOI-128), a new transiting exoplanet detected by NASA's Kepler mission. The transit signal with a period of 4.94 days was detected in the quarter 1 (Q1) Kepler photometry. For the first time, we have used the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) to determine the mass of a Kepler planet via precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. The 24 HET/HRS RVs and 6 additional measurements from the Fibre-fed Echelle Spectrograph spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope reveal a Doppler signal with the same period and phase as the transit ephemeris. We used one HET/HRS spectrum of Kepler-15 taken without the iodine cell to determine accurate stellar parameters. The host star is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.36 {+-} 0.07) G-type main-sequence star with T{sub eff} = 5515 {+-} 124 K. The semi-amplitude K of the RV orbit is 78.7{sup +8.5}{sub -9.5} m s{sup -1}, which yields a planet mass of 0.66 {+-} 0.1 M{sub Jup}. The planet has a radius of 0.96 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Jup} and a mean bulk density of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 g cm{sup -3}. The radius of Kepler-15b is smaller than the majority of transiting planets with similar mass and irradiation level. This suggests that the planet is more enriched in heavy elements than most other transiting giant planets. For Kepler-15b we estimate a heavy element mass of 30-40 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

  5. A limit on the presence of Earth-mass planets around a Sun-like star

    SciTech Connect

    Agol, Eric; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    We present a combined analysis of all publicly available, visible HST observations of transits of the planet HD 209458b. We derive the times of transit, planet radius, inclination, period, and ephemeris. The transit times are then used to constrain the existence of secondary planets in the system. We show that planets near an Earth mass can be ruled out in low-order mean-motion resonance, while planets less than an Earth mass are ruled out in interior, 2:1 resonance. We also present a combined analysis of the transit times and 68 high precision radial velocity measurements of the system. These results are compared to theoretical predictions for the constraints that can be placed on secondary planets.

  6. Securing the Extremely Low-Densities of Low-Mass Planets Characterized by Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) provide an excellent tool to characterize the masses and orbits of dozens of small planets, including many at orbital periods beyond the reach of both Doppler surveys and photoevaporation-induced atmospheric loss. Dynamical modeling of these systems has identified low-mass planets with surprisingly large radii and low densities (e.g., Kepler-79d, Jontof-Hutter et al. 2014; Kepler-51, Masuda 2014; Kepler-87c, Ofir et al. 2014). Additional low-density, low-mass planets will likely become public before ESS III (Jontof-Hutter et al. in prep). Collectively, these results suggest that very low density planets with masses of 2-6 MEarth are not uncommon in compact multiple planet systems. Some astronomers have questioned whether there could be an alternative interpretation of the TTV observations. Indeed, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. While the physics of TTVs is rock solid, the statistical analysis of Kepler observations can be challenging, due to the complex interactions between model parameters and high-dimensional parameter spaces that must be explored. We summarize recent advances in computational statistics that enable robust characterization of planetary systems using TTVs. We present updated analyses of a few particularly interesting systems and discuss the implications for the robustness of extremely low densities for low-mass planets. Such planets pose an interesting challenge for planet formation theory and are motivating detailed theoretical studies (e.g., Lee & Chiang 2015 and associated ESS III abstracts).

  7. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of Jupiter with the Galileo Probe mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for 3He/4He, D/H, 13C/12C, 20Ne/22Ne, 38Ar/36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe.

  8. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of Jupiter with the Galileo Probe mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H B; Atreya, S K; Carignan, G R; Donahue, T M; Haberman, J A; Harpold, D N; Hartle, R E; Hunten, D M; Kasprzak, W T; Mahaffy, P R; Owen, T C; Spencer, N W

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for 3He/4He, D/H, 13C/12C, 20Ne/22Ne, 38Ar/36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe. PMID:11541457

  9. Architectural and chemical insights into the origin of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2015-10-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. This problem has been with us for 20 years, long enough for significant progress to have been made, and also for a great deal of ``lore" to have accumulated about the properties of these planets. Among this lore is the widespread belief that hot Jupiters are less likely to be in multiple giant planet systems than longer-period giant planets. I will show that in this case the lore is not supported by the best data available today: hot Jupiters are not lonely. I will also show that stellar sodium abundance is inversely proportional to the probability that a star hosts a short-period giant planet. This observation is best explained by the effect of decreasing sodium abundance on protoplanetary disk structure and reveals that planetesimal-disk or planet-disk interactions are critical for the existence of short-period giant planets.

  10. HABITABILITY OF EARTH-MASS PLANETS AND MOONS IN THE KEPLER-16 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, B.; Musielak, Z. E.; Cuntz, M. E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate that habitable Earth-mass planets and moons can exist in the Kepler-16 system, known to host a Saturn-mass planet around a stellar binary, by investigating their orbital stability in the standard and extended habitable zone (HZ). We find that Earth-mass planets in satellite-like (S-type) orbits are possible within the standard HZ in direct vicinity of Kepler-16b, thus constituting habitable exomoons. However, Earth-mass planets cannot exist in planetary-like (P-type) orbits around the two stellar components within the standard HZ. Yet, P-type Earth-mass planets can exist superior to the Saturnian planet in the extended HZ pertaining to considerably enhanced back-warming in the planetary atmosphere if facilitated. We briefly discuss the potential detectability of such habitable Earth-mass moons and planets positioned in satellite and planetary orbits, respectively. The range of inferior and superior P-type orbits in the HZ is between 0.657-0.71 AU and 0.95-1.02 AU, respectively.