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Sample records for jurassic navajo sandstone

  1. Supercritical CO2 Migration under Cross-Bedded Structures: Outcrop Analog from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Allen, J.; Han, W.; Lu, C.; McPherson, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Jurassic aeolian sandstones (e.g. Navajo and White Rim Sandstones) on the Colorado Plateau of Utah have been considered potential sinks for geologic CO2 sequestration due to their regional lateral continuity, thickness, high porosity and permeability, presence of seal strata and proximity to large point sources of anthropogenic CO2. However, aeolian deposits usually exhibit inherent internal complexities induced by migrating bedforms of different sizes and their resulting bounding surfaces. Therefore, CO2 plume migration in such complex media should be well defined and successively linked in models for better characterization of the plume behavior. Based on an outcrop analog of the upper Navajo Sandstone in the western flank of the San Rafael Swell, Utah, we identified five different bedform types with dune and interdune facies to represent the spatial continuity of lithofacies units. Using generated 3D geometrical facies patterns of cross-bedded structures in the Navajo Sandstone, we performed numerical simulations to understand the detailed behavior of CO2 plume migration under the different cross-bedded bedforms. Our numerical simulation results indicate that cross-bedded structures (bedform types) play an important role on governing the rate and directionality of CO2 migration, resulting in changes of imbibition processes of CO2. CO2 migration tends to follow wind ripple laminations and reactivation surfaces updip. Our results suggest that geologically-based upscaling of CO2 migration is crucial in cross-bedded formations as part of reservoir or basin scale models. Furthermore, comparative modeling studies between 3D models and 2D cross-sections extracted from 3D models showed the significant three-dimensional interplay in a cross-bedded structure and the need to correctly capture the geologic heterogeneity to predict realistic CO2 plume behavior. Our outcrop analog approach presented in this study also demonstrates an alternative method for assessing geologic

  2. An example of liquefaction-induced interdune sedimentation from the early Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Gerald; Monegato, Giovanni; Miall, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Extensive outcrops of Navajo Sandstone in the southwestern United States expose eolian dune deposits that are subdivided in a complex array of foresets and bounding surfaces. In the Glen Canyon region, and other places, this architecture is frequently disrupted by large-scale, soft-sediment deformation features. These features have been attributed to episodic liquefaction events that affected saturated sand below the level of the interdune surface. Though erosional truncation of deformation features indicates that liquefaction often occurred in the uppermost levels of Navajo dune deposits, very few paleotopographic disruptions due to subsurface deformation have been documented. Navajo Sandstone outcrops in West Canyon, Utah, provide unusually comprehensive exposure of architectural details linking large-scale deformation features and associated interdune deposits, enabling a well constrained appraisal of their genesis. At this location, a 23 m succession of sandstone, mudstone, carbonate, and chert deposits overlies a zone of deformation that extends, laterally, for hundreds of meters. This horizontally stratified lens occupies an abrupt synform along a bounding surface between successive crossbeds that otherwise appears as a featureless, sub-horizontal plane. Large-scale foresets below this bounding surface oversteepen at the margins of the synform and grade downdip into contorted stratification and structureless expanses. The authors propose that liquefaction in the Jurassic erg caused localized subsidence of a minor portion of a dry interdune surface to a position several meters below the contemporary water table. A succession of hyperpycnal sand flows, lacustrine evaporites, and eolian sheet and dune deposits filled this depression prior to the advance of large dunes across the site. The process/response dynamics evident in this outcrop suggest that deformation may have exercised significant, non-systematic control over depositional architectures in areas of

  3. Porosity and grain size controls on compaction band formation in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Richard A.; Okubo, Chris H.; Fossen, Haakon

    2010-11-01

    Determining the rock properties that permit or impede the growth of compaction bands in sedimentary sequences is a critical problem of importance to studies of strain localization and characterization of subsurface geologic reservoirs. We determine the porosity and average grain size of a sequence of stratigraphic layers of Navajo Sandstone that are then used in a critical state model to infer plastic yield envelopes for the layers. Pure compaction bands are formed in layers having the largest average grain sizes (0.42-0.45 mm) and porosities (28%), and correspondingly the smallest values of critical pressure (˜22 MPa) in the sequence. The results suggest that compaction bands formed in these layers after burial to ˜1.5 km depth in association with thrust faulting beneath the nearby East Kaibab monocline, and that hardening of the yield caps accompanied compactional deformation of the layers.

  4. Contrasting styles of large-scale displacement of unconsolidated sand: examples from the early Jurassic Navajo Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale soft-sediment deformation features in the Navajo Sandstone have been a topic of interest for nearly 40 years, ever since they were first explored as a criterion for discriminating between marine and continental processes in the depositional environment. For much of this time, evidence for large-scale sediment displacements was commonly attributed to processes of mass wasting. That is, gravity-driven movements of surficial sand. These slope failures were attributed to the inherent susceptibility of dune sand responding to environmental triggers such as earthquakes, floods, impacts, and the differential loading associated with dune topography. During the last decade, a new wave of research is focusing on the event significance of deformation features in more detail, revealing a broad diversity of large-scale deformation morphologies. This research has led to a better appreciation of subsurface dynamics in the early Jurassic deformation events recorded in the Navajo Sandstone, including the important role of intrastratal sediment flow. This report documents two illustrative examples of large-scale sediment displacements represented in extensive outcrops of the Navajo Sandstone along the Utah/Arizona border. Architectural relationships in these outcrops provide definitive constraints that enable the recognition of a large-scale sediment outflow, at one location, and an equally large-scale subsurface flow at the other. At both sites, evidence for associated processes of liquefaction appear at depths of at least 40 m below the original depositional surface, which is nearly an order of magnitude greater than has commonly been reported from modern settings. The surficial, mass flow feature displays attributes that are consistent with much smaller-scale sediment eruptions (sand volcanoes) that are often documented from modern earthquake zones, including the development of hydraulic pressure from localized, subsurface liquefaction and the subsequent escape of

  5. Giant stromatolites and a supersurface in the Navajo Sandstone, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenberg, Len

    2003-02-01

    At Capitol Reef National Park, Utah, 5-m-high stromatolites are present locally on interdune carbonate lenses in the Early Jurassic Navajo Sandstone. The stromatolites display both finely laminated and fenestral internal fabrics, and grew along south-facing interdune margins. These stromatolites formed during a high-water-table episode engendered by a dune-dammed paleodrainage in a stabilized Navajo erg. These stromatolites, and the thick interdune section associated with them, suggest a hiatus in erg accumulation and the presence of a super bounding surface.

  6. Downslope coarsening in aeolian grainflows of the Navajo Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, David B.; Elder, James F.; Sweeney, Mark R.

    2012-07-01

    Downslope coarsening in grainflows has been observed on present-day dunes and generated in labs, but few previous studies have examined vertical sorting in ancient aeolian grainflows. We studied the grainflow strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in the southern Utah portion of its outcrop belt from Zion National Park (west) to Coyote Buttes and The Dive (east). At each study site, thick sets of grainflow-dominated cross-strata that were deposited by large transverse dunes comprise the bulk of the Navajo Sandstone. We studied three stratigraphic columns, one per site, composed almost exclusively of aeolian cross-strata. For each column, samples were obtained from one grainflow stratum in each consecutive set of the column, for a total of 139 samples from thirty-two sets of cross-strata. To investigate grading perpendicular to bedding within individual grainflows, we collected fourteen samples from four superimposed grainflow strata at The Dive. Samples were analyzed with a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser diffraction particle analyser. The median grain size of grainflow samples ranges from fine sand (164 μm) to coarse sand (617 μm). Using Folk and Ward criteria, samples are well-sorted to moderately-well-sorted. All but one of the twenty-eight sets showed at least slight downslope coarsening, but in general, downslope coarsening was not as well-developed or as consistent as that reported in laboratory subaqueous grainflows. Because coarse sand should be quickly sequestered within preserved cross-strata when bedforms climb, grain-size studies may help to test hypotheses for the stacking of sets of cross-strata.

  7. Biosignatures in Spheroidal Iron Oxide-Rich Concretions from the Navajo Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanbauer, T. L.; Kettler, R. M.; Loope, D. B.; Weber, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Spheroidal concretions composed of an iron oxide-rich cemented outer rind and a weakly-cemented core of bleached (iron depleted) sandstone are abundant in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of the Colorado Plateau. The formation of the spheroidal concretions has been previously described as a result of advective mixing between Fe(II)-rich reducing fluids with oxidizing fluids resulting in the subsequent abiotic precipitation of Fe(III) oxides forming the spheroidal concretions. The role of microbial biomineralization has been suggested as a potential mechanism of various other iron oxide formations, such as banded iron formations and iron-manganese nodules. Here we describe a series of qualitative and quantitative observations within the spheroidal concretions from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone consistent with prior microbial activity. Spheroidal concretions were collected from Spencer Flat, east of Escalante, in south-central Utah, sectioned, and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid and acetone to remove traces of inorganic and organic carbon (C) from the surface of the samples. Elemental analysis of the treated specimens revealed elevated C as well as nitrogen (N) content with respect to the interior of the concretion (Rind, C, 0.06%, N, 0.006%; Interior, C, 0.009%, N, 0.003%). Elevated C and N values in the rind suggest carbon-nitrogen rich compounds consistent with biomolecules. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) confirmed the presence of C as well as N and S via electron backscattering analysis. Additionally, structures morphologically consistent with bacterial cells have been observed via FE-SEM in association with a matrix that coated sand grains within the iron oxide-rich rind. Together these data suggest that microorganisms were associated with the iron oxide-rich spheroidal concretions. Microbial iron oxidation has been demonstrated to be ubiquitous microbial metabolism and is facilitated by a diversity of microorganisms in terrestrial

  8. Blueberries on Earth and Mars: Correlations Between Concretions in Navajo Sandstone and Terra Meridiani on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Milner, M. W.; Netoff, D.; Dohm, J.; Kalm, V.; Krinsley, D.; Sodhi, R. N.; Anderson, R. C.; Boccia, S.; Malloch, D.; Kapran, B.; Havics, A.

    2008-12-01

    Concretionary Fe-Mn-rich nodular authigenic constituents of Jurassic Navajo sandstone (moki marbles) bear a certain relationship to similar concretionary forms ('blueberries') observed on Mars. Their origin on Earth is considered to invoke variable redox conditions with underground fluids penetrating porous quartz-rich sandstone leading to precipitation of hematite and goethite-rich material from solution, generally forming around a central nucleus of fine particles of quartz and orthoclase, recently verified by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. At the outer rim/inner nucleus boundary, bulbous lobes of fine-grained quartz often invade and fracture the outer rim armored matrix. The bulbous forms are interpreted to result from fluid explusion from the inner concretionary mass, a response to pressure changes accompanying overburden loading. Moki marbles, harder than enclosing rock, often weather out of in situ sandstone outcrops that form a surface lag deposit of varnished marbles that locally resemble desert pavement. The marbles appear morphologically similar to 'blueberries' identified on the martian surface in Terra Meridiani through the MER-1 Opportunity rover. On Earth, redox fluids responsible for the genesis of marbles may have emanated from deep in the crust (often influenced by magmatic processes). These fluids, cooling to ambient temperatures, may have played a role in the genesis of the cemented outer rim of the concretions. The low frequency of fungi filaments in the marbles, contrasts with a high occurrence in Fe-encrusted sands of the Navajo formation [1], indicating that microbial content is of secondary importance in marble genesis relative to the fluctuating influx of ambient groundwater. Nevertheless, the presence of filaments in terrestrial concretions hints at the possibility of discovering fossil/extant life on Mars, and thus should be considered as prime targets for future reconnaissance missions to Mars. 1] Mahaney, W.C., et al. (2004), Icarus, 171, 39-53.

  9. CO2-Driven Convection Produced the Vertical Distribution of Sandstone Colors and Iron Concretions in Navajo Sandstone at Zion National Park, Utah (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettler, R. M.; Loope, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Along cliff faces exposed in Zion National Park (SW Utah), the porous and permeable Navajo Sandstone (Jurassic) is 700 m thick, and is capped by impermeable mudrocks and evaporites of the Carmel Formation. Previous workers have documented an areally extensive color pattern that is easily visible across much of southwestern and south-central Utah: the uppermost Navajo Sandstone is nearly white, the middle third of the formation is pink, and the lowermost fraction is reddish brown. To the northwest of the park, however, the formation is uniformly red (likely its primary color; G.B. Nielsen et al., 2009). Spheroidal concretions with dense, iron-oxide-cemented rinds and iron-poor cores are abundant in the pink and brown sandstones. Rhomb-shaped clots of iron oxide cement that are pseudomorphous after siderite are present in the cores of the largest concretions. The color variations are evidence that iron was transported from the upper portion of the Navajo SS to the lower portion. The pseudomorphs are evidence that the concretions are the oxidized remains of siderite-cemented precursors. The vertical iron transport and the precipitation of siderite require similar vertical transport of reducing, CO2-rich formation waters through the Navajo Sandstone. We argue that this circulation was driven in part by groundwater convection beneath a CO2 accumulation that was trapped below the Navajo-Carmel contact. This circulation caused aqueous iron and aqueous carbonate to be displaced downward and to accumulate (in the form of siderite) in the lower Navajo Sandstone. There are numerous CO2 reservoirs in the Colorado Plateau region; the gas was derived mainly from mantle sources. We hypothesize that, in the late Tertiary, the Carmel Formation capped a broad, structurally high accumulation of CO2 and CH4 in the Navajo Sandstone. The CH4 bleached the upper portion of the sandstone, releasing Fe2+ into the formation water. CO2 dissolved in the water, thereby increasing its density

  10. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, David R.; Blum, Alex E.; Chipera, Stephen J.

    2006-09-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 μm thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ˜10 5 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  11. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, D.R.; Blum, A.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 ??m thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ???105 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  12. Characterization of Navajo Sandstone concretions: Mars comparison and criteria for distinguishing diagenetic origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Sally L.; Chan, Marjorie A.; Petersen, Erich U.; Dyar, M. Darby; Sklute, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The eolian Jurassic Navajo Sandstone spheroidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) concretions are divided into two size classes: macro-concretions of > 5 mm diameter and micro-concretions of < 5 mm diameter. Three internal structural end-members of macro-concretions are described as rind, layered, and solid. Two end-members of micro-concretions are rind and solid. Chemical and mineralogical gradients (μm- to mm-scale) are identified with QEMSCAN (Quantitative Elemental Mineralogy using a SCANning electron microscope) and visible to near infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectroscopy. Three HFO phases are identified using VNIR reflectance spectroscopy. An amorphous HFO phase is typically located in the rinds. Goethite is present along interior edges of rinds and throughout the interiors of layered and solid concretions. Hematite is present in the centers of rind concretions. A synthesis of petrographic, mineralogical and chemical analyses suggests that concretions grow pervasively (as opposed to radially expanding). Our model proposes that concretions precipitate initially as an amorphous HFO that sets the radius and retains some original porosity. Subsequent precipitation fills remaining pore space with younger mineral phases. Inward digitate cement crystal growth corroborates concretion growth from a set radius toward the centers. Internal structure is modified during late stage precipitation that diffuses reactants through semi-permeable rinds and overprints the interiors with younger cements. Physical characterization of textures and minerals provides diagnostic criteria for understanding how similar concretions ("blueberries") form in Meridiani Planum, Mars. The analogous Navajo Sandstone concretions show similar characteristics of in situ self-organized spacing, spheroidal geometries, internal structures, conjoined forms, and precursor HFO phases that dehydrate to goethite or hematite. These characteristics indicate a common origin via groundwater diagenesis.

  13. Tracing paleofluid circulations using iron isotopes: A study of hematite and goethite concretions from the Navajo Sandstone (Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busigny, Vincent; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2007-02-01

    Iron concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured in spherical hematite and goethite concretions, together with associated red (Fe-oxide coated) and white (bleached) sandstones from the Jurassic Navajo formation, Utah (USA). Earlier studies showed that, in the Navajo Sandstone, reducing fluids (presumably rich in hydrocarbons) mobilized Fe present as Fe-oxide coatings on detrital quartz grains. Dissolved Fe then precipitated as spherical concretions by interaction with oxidizing groundwater. Despite being depleted in Fe by ˜ 50%, the bleached sandstones have Fe isotopic compositions similar to adjacent red sandstones (˜ 0‰/amu relative to IRMM-014). This shows that dissolution of Fe-oxide did not produce significant isotope fractionation, in agreement with previous experimental studies of abiotic Fe-oxide dissolution. In contrast, the concretions are depleted in the heavy isotopes of iron by - 0.07 to - 0.68‰/amu. This is opposite to the expected fractionation for partial Fe oxidation, which tends to enrich the precipitate in the heavy isotopes. Several scenarios are considered for explaining the measured Fe isotopic compositions. Although diffusion might be an important process in controlling the growth of spherical concretions, the associated isotopic fractionation is negligible compared to the observed variations. Kinetic isotope fractionation during precipitation can be ruled out as well because no isotopic zonation is seen within indurated concretions and Fe isotope evidence supports the occurrence of dissolution-reprecipitation reactions consistent with equilibrium growth conditions. The Fe isotopic compositions of the concretions are best explained by evolution of the fluid composition through precipitation and/or adsorption of isotopically heavy Fe during fluid flow through the sandstone. This scenario is supported by a regional trend in the isotopic composition of Fe, showing that this element was transported in fluids over several

  14. Aquifer tests of the Navajo sandstone near Caineville, Wayne County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, J.W.; Danielson, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Ground water in the Navajo Sandstone near Caineville, Wayne County, Utah, was studied during 1975-77 as part of an investigation of water in bedrock in the lower Dirty Devil River basin area. The purpose of the study near Caineville was to determine the water-bearing properties of the Navajo by utilizing data obtained mainly during test drilling and aquifer testing by the Intermountain Power Project.

  15. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  16. Mineralogical Characterization of Navajo Sandstone Iron Oxide Concretions Using QEMSCAN and Reflectance Spectroscopy; Analogue for Martian Diagenetic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; Petersen, E. U.

    2008-03-01

    The Navajo Sandstone concretions were evaluated to detect mineralogical changes and chemical gradients. Sequential relationships suggest an evolution of phases of cements. The Mars "blueberries" may have a similar evolution of cements.

  17. 3D visualization of liquefaction-induced dune collapse in the Navajo Sandstone, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Colby; Nick, Kevin; Bryant, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    The eolian Navajo Sandstone outcrop on the Canyon Overlook Trail in Zion National Park in Southern Utah is dissected by modern erosion in a way which reveals a great deal of the three-dimensional architecture of a major soft-sediment deformation event. The feature is bounded below by a well-developed interdune complex made up of two superimposed carbonate lenses, above by an irregular truncational surface, and incorporates 3 - 10 m of sandstone over an approximately 2 km area. The material above the deformed interval is undeformed cross-bedded sandstone, with crossbeds downlapping onto the surface of truncation. The stratigraphic confinement of deformation and the irregularity of the upper bounding surface suggests a deformation process which created topography, which was in turn covered by the next upwind dune before it could be eroded flat. The deformed material itself is laterally segmented by a stacked succession of shear surfaces, which all strike approximately perpendicular to the paleo-wind direction and dip at decreasing angles in the down paleo-wind direction. These factors point to the collapse of a major dune into the downwind interdune area, likely initiated by liquefaction in the interdune complex. The foundering of the dune's toe into the liquefied area created a powerful lateral stress field which did not extend significantly into the subsurface. The dune collapse process has been used in the past to describe other soft-sediment deformation features in the Navajo Sandstone, but this site provides a wealth of physical details which were not previously associated with dune collapse. Shear surfaces originate in the interdune deposit as slip between laminae, then the cohesive muds provided support as they were thrust upward to angles of up to 50 degrees. The margins of the site also contain important paleoenvironmental indicators. Dinosaur tracks are exposed both at the extreme upwind and downwind margins of the interdune deposit in and slightly above

  18. Frisco City sandstone: Upper Jurassic play in southern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.; Baria, L.R.; Handford, C.R.

    1997-10-01

    The Frisco City sandstone play in southern Alabama is an example of hydrocarbon entrapment on the flanks of basement erosional features, with principal reservoirs occurring in proximal alluvial-fan to marine shoreface facies. Productive fields are developed on four-way closures of complex geometry, with reservoir sandstones showing maximum thickness along the margins of basement highs that are roughly 1.3-5.18 km{sup 2} in size and have 136-151 m of relief. Detailed analysis of sandstone facies indicates a downdip progression from alluvial-fan through wadi, eolian, beach, tidal-flat, and shoreface deposits. A sequence stratigraphic model based on identification of backstepping strata representing successive transgressive events is useful in predicting maximum reservoir occurrence in the vicinity of inselbergs. Reservoir quality in productive sandstones is high, with porosities ranging from 13 to 27% and permeabilities of 50 md to 5 d. Hydrocarbon occurrence is related to the distribution of high-quality source rock in the Smackover Formation and to maturation history.

  19. Lower Jurassic Navaho-Aztec-Equivalent Sandstones in southern Arizona and their paleogeographic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bilodeau, W.L.; Keith, S.B.

    1986-06-01

    Thick sequences of Lower Jurassic rhyolitic and andesitic volcanic rocks in several mountain ranges of southern Arizona contain interbedded quartzarenites. Locally up to 250 m thick, these sandstone lenses, composed of well-sorted and well-rounded quartz grains, commonly contain large-scale cross-stratification and are considered to be eolian sand deposits. The eolian sands were blown up against the continental side of the Early Jurassic volcanic arc that trended northwest-southeast across the southwestern margin of the North American continent and/or plate at that time. Paleocurrent data suggest southerly eolian transport of the sands from the Colorado Plateau area. Correlation of these sandstones with the Lower Jurassic Navaho and Aztec Sandstones is indicated by the paleocurrent data as well as radiometric dating of the interbedded volcanics. Eolian sand transport southward across central Arizona in the Early Jurassic indicates that the Mogollon highlands either did not then exist, or were merely low, discontinuous inselbergs on a broad back-arc ramp, more appropriately called the Mogollon slope.

  20. Net-Infiltration Map of the Navajo Sandstone Outcrop Area in Western Washington County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, Victor M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in the arid southwestern United States and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration and recharge becomes critically important for inventorying ground-water resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. A Geographic Information System (GIS)-based model utilizing readily available soils, topographic, precipitation, and outcrop data has been developed for predicting net infiltration to exposed and soil-covered areas of the Navajo Sandstone outcrop of southwestern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is an important regional bedrock aquifer. The GIS model determines the net-infiltration percentage of precipitation by using an empirical equation. This relation is derived from least squares linear regression between three surficial parameters (soil coarseness, topographic slope, and downgradient distance from outcrop) and the percentage of estimated net infiltration based on environmental tracer data from excavations and boreholes at Sand Hollow Reservoir in the southeastern part of the study area. Processed GIS raster layers are applied as parameters in the empirical equation for determining net infiltration for soil-covered areas as a percentage of precipitation. This net-infiltration percentage is multiplied by average annual Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) precipitation data to obtain an infiltration rate for each model cell. Additionally, net infiltration on exposed outcrop areas is set to 10 percent of precipitation on the basis of borehole net-infiltration estimates. Soils and outcrop net-infiltration rates are merged to form a final map. Areas of low, medium, and high potential for ground-water recharge have been identified, and estimates of net infiltration range from 0.1 to 66 millimeters per year (mm/yr). Estimated net-infiltration rates of less than 10 mm/yr are considered low, rates of 10 to 50 mm

  1. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the Updip Jurassic trend of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Subsequent to the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sand of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical for wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields; API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sand and the Megargel sand. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked fining-upward sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Petrophysical properties differ between the two areas. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporate minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

  2. Temperatures of quartz cementation in Jurassic sandstones from the Norwegian continental shelf -- evidence from fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Walderhaug, O. )

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies of fluid inclusions in quartz overgrowths have shown quartz cementation to have taken place at temperatures within the range 60--145 C in several sandstones from the North Sea and offshore mid-Norway (Malley et al. 1986; Konnerup-Madsen and Dypvik 1988; Burley et al. 1989; Walderhaug 1990; Ehrenberg 1990; Saigal et al. 1992; Nedkvitne et al. 1993). This study aims at determining whether these results are typical for quartz cementation of sandstones by presenting homogenization temperatures for 274 aqueous and 366 hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz overgrowths from Jurassic reservoir sandstones on the Norwegian continental shelf, and by reviewing previously published fluid-inclusion data. Possible explanations for different ranges of homogenization temperatures in different sandstones are also discussed, and possible sources of quartz cement and the effect of hydrocarbon emplacement on quartz cementation are considered.

  3. Groundwater-silicates Reaction Kinetics in the Navajo Sandstone Aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C.

    2009-12-01

    Despite numerous studies of soil profiles and watersheds for critical zone processes, the studies of reaction kinetics in groundwater systems are relatively a few. Yet, aquifers are major sites for water-rock interaction, and a significant segment of the hydrological cycle and global elemental cycling. In this presentation, I will show a multi-discipline study of the Navajo sandstone aquifer at Black Mesa, Arizona. The aeolian sandstone represents some simplest lithology, and the study area has unusually abundant hydrologic, geochemical, isotopic, and paleoclimate data. Solute fluxes along flow paths are supplemented by travel time bounded by 14C and excess 4-He data, from which orders of magnitude estimates of the in situ silicate dissolution rates were calculated. These rates show two to five orders of magnitude slower than those from laboratory experiments at comparable temperature and pH and at far from equilibrium conditions, and are much slower than those derived from studies of soils and watersheds. Data from some new analytical and microscopic methods show that the reaction kinetics are complex. Stable Si isotopes of dissolved Si in groundwater along a 100 km flow path show 2 per mil variation and as low as -1.42‰, representing the most negative dissolved Si isotope composition so far found for natural waters. Near atomic scale transmission electron microscopy show a thin (~ 10 nm) amorphous layer is present on naturally weathered K-feldspars in the aquifer, which requires re-consideration of the details of surface reaction controlled mechanism. However, the new hypothesis of strongly coupled dissolution and precipitation reactions that we have been advancing in recent years appear to be able to explain part of the well-known apparent field-lab discrepancy. The slow precipitation of secondary minerals raised the groundwater saturation state with respect to feldspars to close to equilibrium, and thus retard the feldspar dissolution rates. Our recent

  4. Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, U. K. North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, S.D. Ltd., Aberdeen ); Mantel, K.A. ); Morton, D.J. ); Riley, L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Oil-bearing Late Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Graben. They form the reservoirs in Scott, which in 1993 will be the largest producing North Sea oil field to come on stream for more than a decade. Together with Scott, the Piper, Saltire, Tartan, Highlander, Petronella, Rob Roy, and Ivanhoe fields contained almost 2 Bbbl of recoverable reserves in these formations. The Sgiath and Piper represent two phases of Late Jurassic transgression and regression, initially represented by paralic deposited sand culminating in a wave-dominated delta sequence. The history of the Sgiath and Piper formations is reviewed and lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic correlations presented to illustrate the distribution of the reservoir sandstones.

  5. Acoustic Emission and Ultrasonic Characterization of Jurassic Navajo Formation Deformation During Axisymmetric Compression Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, A. J.; Dewers, T. A.; Holcomb, D. J.; Broome, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    Linking continuum-scale and microscale brittle damage in rock remains a challenge impacting CO2 sequestration, secondary recovery, structural monitoring, and other geotechnical engineering applications. We examine if the mode of micromechanical failure scales directly up to continuum-scale damage-induced velocity anisotropy. Axisymmetric drained lab-dry compression experiments are performed on facies of moderately cemented finely laminated quartz arenite from the Jurassic Navajo Formation, a target reservoir rock for CO2 sequestration in Utah. The tests are 1 unconfined uniaxial compression test, 1 hydrostatic compression test, and 3 triaxial compression tests. Microscale damage is monitored using acoustic emissions (AE) and continuum scale damage is monitored with ultrasonic velocity scans. During the non-hydrostatic tests, three to five unload loops are performed pre-failure, with one unload loop performed post-failure. While stresses are increasing, AEs are monitored continuously using 1.6-mm diameter, 0.5-mm thick PZT-5A pins attached circumferentially around the cylindrical sample, and with 6-mm diameter, 2-mm thick PZT-5A discs at the ends of the sample. Before and after each unload loop, the test is paused and the AE transducers sequentially emit an ultrasonic pulse to measure wave speeds. The resulting elastic wave is detected by the other AE transducers. Post-test, the changing anisotropic velocity structure of the rock during compression and failure is compared to the locations, frequency, and relative moment tensors of the AEs measured between ultrasonic scans. Pre- and post-test visual and x-ray CT scan observations of the sample are compared to the acoustic metrics. These tiered observations of rock damage will further elucidate the scaling of microscale brittle failure to the continuum-scale This work was supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of

  6. Strength and failure characteristics of Jurassic Red-Bed sandstone under cyclic wetting-drying conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Jiang, Qinghui; Zhou, Chuangbing; Liu, Xinting

    2014-08-01

    Due to cyclic fluctuations of reservoir water levels, bank slopes in drawdown areas are subjected to wetting-drying cycles. In order to reasonably evaluate the stabilities of sandstone slopes in the drawdown area of the Three Gorges Reservoir, it is a primary premise to obtain the strength and failure characteristics of the sandstones undergoing wetting-drying cycles. In this paper, the conventional triaxial compression tests, ultrasonic velocity and porosity measurements and microstructural observations were conducted on Jurassic Red-Bed sandstone (JRS) specimens undergoing wetting-drying cycles. The results from the triaxial experiments indicate that the peak strengths of the JRS are dramatically reduced after the first wetting-drying cycle, and then remain approximately constant with increasing number of wetting-drying cycles. The failure modes of the JRS samples undergoing different wetting-drying cycles are all brittle failures under low confining pressures ( ≤ 15 MPa). The decrease in P-wave velocity and increase in porosity with increasing number of wetting-drying cycles reveals the raise of damage level of the sandstone specimens, which is the main reason for the decline of peak strength. Detailed microstructural analysis has shown obvious argillization phenomena after undergoing wetting-drying cycles, which weakens the cements between grains in the sandstone and increases the damage of the sandstone.

  7. Diagenetic history of fluvial and lacustrine sandstones of the Hartford Basin (Triassic Jurassic), Newark Supergroup, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A. M.; Gierlowski-Kordesch, E. H.

    2007-04-01

    The early introduction of clays into continental sandstones has been attributed to mechanical infiltration by percolation of clay-rich surface waters into grain framework or cutans formed from pedogenic processes. The discovery of pedogenic mud aggregates as traction-load mud in ancient fluvial deposits suggests that permeability and porosity of terrigenous sandstones can be influenced at deposition and control early diagenetic patterns. This study compares diagenesis in fluvial (subaerially exposed) sandstones with lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones in a Triassic-Jurassic continental rift basin (Hartford Basin, Newark Supergroup). Diversity of diagenetic minerals and sequence of diagenetic alteration can be directly related to depositional environment. The fluvial sandstones in the New Haven Arkose, East Berlin Formation, and Shuttle Meadow Formation of the Hartford Basin are dominated by concretionary calcite and early calcite cement, infiltrated clays (illite-smectite), pedogenic mud aggregates (smectite and illite-smectite), grain coating clays (illite/hematite, illite-chlorite/hematite), quartz overgrowths, late stage carbonate cements (calcite, ferroan calcite), pore-filling clays (illite, kaolinite with minor amounts of smectite, smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite) and hematite. However, pedogenic processes in these fluvial sandstones retarded the development of quartz and feldspar overgrowths, and carbonate authigenesis, as well as the quality of diagenetically enhanced porosity. Dark gray-black lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones and mudrocks in the East Berlin and Shuttle Meadow Formations are dominated by pyrite, concretionary dolomite and early dolomite cement, radial grain coating clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite), late stage carbonate cements (dolomite, ferroan dolomite, ankerite), albite and pore-filling clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite, illite-chlorite). Clay minerals exist as detrital, mechanically infiltrated, and neoformed clay

  8. Petrology and diagenesis of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic graben-fill sandstones of Jameson land basin, central east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Davee, K.W.; Mansfield, C.F.

    1986-05-01

    Sands of the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Kap Stewart and Lower Jurassic Neill Klinter Formations were deposited during the early development of a major Jurassic rift basin. Depositional environments have been interpreted as alluvial fan, fluvial, and deltaic for the Kap Stewart, and as tidal estuary for the Neill Klinter. Most of these sandstones are fine to medium-grained quartz and subarkosic wackestones. Clay matrix is abundant and comprises mostly diagenetic kaolinite, illite, and complex clay mixtures derived from the breakdown of labile framework grains, especially plagioclase and biotite. Early emplacement of carbonate cement in some sandstones prevented development of diagenetic clay matrix. The carbonate cement is poikilotopic and constitutes up to 30% of some samples. The current high level of maturity indicated by the quartz-feldspar-lithic composition for these sandstones results from selective diagenetic decomposition of labile grains. The original, more feldspathic compositions reflect less maturity and an earlier stage of basin fill than the Middle Jurassic, high-porosity arenites, which also contain abundant quartz and up to 25% feldspar. Because of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic sands were deposited in continental and low-energy marine environments, they likely underwent greater in-situ alteration but less winnowing of labile grains than the overlying Middle Jurassic sands deposited in higher energy marine settings.

  9. Diagenetic quartzarenite and destruction of secondary porosity: An example from the Middle Jurassic Brent sandstone of northwest Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, N.B. )

    1989-04-01

    Significant amounts of feldspar have been dissolved from Middle Jurassic sandstone oil reservoirs in the North Sea (northwest Europe) during burial diagenesis Sandstones of the Middle Jurassic Brent Group become increasingly quartzose with increasing burial depth. At Statfjord field (2500 m depth), sandstones are arkose to subarkose; at Hutton field (3050 m depth), they are subarkose to quartzarenite, and at Lyell field (3500 m depth), sandstones are typically quartzarenite. In spite of extensive feldspar dissolution, the abundance of secondary porosity due to feldspar dissolution is similar for all fields, averaging 2.9% of the total rock volume. Thus, far more feldspar has been dissolved than is recorded as secondary porosity. The limit on preservation of secondary porosity may be largely the effect of the mechanical strength of the rock. An excessive number of large secondary pores lowers the rock strength below the point at which the rock can withstand overburden stress, thus causing collapse of some of the secondary pores.

  10. Diagenetic quartzarenite and destruction of secondary porosity: An example from the Middle Jurassic Brent sandstone of northwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas B.

    1989-04-01

    Significant amounts of feldspar have been dissolved from Middle Jurassic sandstone oil reservoirs in the North Sea (northwest Europe) during burial diagenesis. Sandstones of the Middle Jurassic Brent Group become increasingly quartzose with increasing burial depth. At Stafford field (2500 m depth), sandstones are arkose to subarkose; at Hutton field (3050 m depth), they are subarkose to quartzarenite; and at Lyell field (3500 m depth), sandstones are typically quartzarenite. In spite of extensive feldspar dissolution, the abundance of secondary porosity due to feldspar dissolution is similar for all fields, averaging 2.9% of the total rock volume. Thus, far more feldspar has been dissolved than is recorded as secondary porosity. The limit on preservation of secondary porosity may be largely the effect of the mechanical strength of the rock. An excessive number of large secondary pores lowers the rock strength below the point at which the rock can withstand overburden stress, thus causing collapse of some of the secondary pores.

  11. Relationship Between Petrographic Characteristics and the Engineering Properties of Jurassic Sandstones, Hamedan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, M.; Momeni, A. A.; Rafiei, B.; Khodabakhsh, S.; Torabi-Kaveh, M.

    2013-09-01

    To study the relationship between engineering properties and petrographic characteristics, 20 rock samples were collected from Jurassic sandstones in the Hamedan region, western Iran. The specimens were tested to determine uniaxial compressive strength, point load strength index, tangent modulus, porosity, and dry and saturated unit weights. Samples were also subjected to petrographic examination, which included the observation of 11 parameters and modal analysis. Based on the results of a statistical analysis, polynomial prediction equations were developed to estimate physical and mechanical properties from petrographic characteristics. The results show that textural characteristics are more important than mineral compositions for predicting engineering characteristics. The packing density, packing proximity and grain shape are the petrographic properties that significantly affect the engineering properties of samples. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed, employing four steps comprising various combinations of petrographic characteristics for each engineering parameter. The optimal equation, along with the relevant combination of petrographic characteristics for estimating the engineering properties of the rock samples is proposed.

  12. Three-dimensional analysis of eolian systems in Jurassic Wingate sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, M.J.; Blakey, R.C.

    1989-03-01

    Regional bounding surfaces in ancient eolian sequences aid in establishing lateral profiles not previously obtainable using standard stratigraphic methods. Correlation of detailed measured sections permits three-dimensional analysis of erg dynamics in the Jurassic Wingate Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau. Four periods of erg development marked by contrasting styles of eolian architecture are documented in the Salt Anticline region (in ascending stratigraphic order): (1) discontinuous sand sheets, isolated dunes, and aqueous environments; (2) large compound dunes with decreasing amounts of dune margin material; (3) compound dunes and draas alternating with locally thick sandsheet deposits; and (4) widespread dunes and draas prior to erosion by Kayenta fluvial systems. Regional bounding surface characteristics reflect different mechanisms for erg stabilization, including deflation to the water table, climate change, and negative net sand budget. Lateral reconstruction and correlation of erg sequences indicate significant intrabasinal paleogeographic and tectonic controls on eolian systems. Localities removed from the Salt Anticline region contain much larger compound draa deposits and lack extensive accumulations of sand-sheet material. Regional comparison of these characteristics suggests that the salt uplifts modified eolian processes within the Wingate depositional basin. Existence of additional geographic variations not associated with salt tectonism is indicated by local accumulations of noneolian deposits in northeastern Arizona. The use of regional bounding surfaces to construct lateral profiles is a powerful method to establish three-dimensional models of eolian systems. Analysis of erg dynamics in other ancient eolian formations is possible utilizing the criteria documented in the Wingate Sandstone.

  13. Reconstruction of eolian sequences - a function of scale, Jurassic Page sandstone, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Kocurek, G.; Knight, J.; Havholm, K.

    1989-03-01

    Interpretation of sequences of ergs and bed forms that comprise an eolian unit is strongly dependent on the scale of mapping. A pentagon-shaped, three-dimensional outcrop of eolian Middle Jurassic Page sandstone near Page, Arizona, measuring 36 m high and nearly 1 km in perimeter, was mapped with the aid of an electronic tacheometer. The extent and orientation of bounding surfaces and sets of cross-strata were mapped in detail, foreset orientation were measured, and a general depiction was made of the lateral and vertical distribution of stratification types within sets and of features associated with the surfaces. The level of mapping is at a middle scale with respect to architectural elements and proved adequate for an interpretation of most bed forms in terms of shape (two or three dimensions, sinuosity, symmetry, and crestline-phase relationships), size (height and width), aerodynamics (overall primary and secondary airflow patterns), and migration behavior (degree of climb and recognition of cyclicity). These interpretations allow the determination of bed-form hierarchy (simple dunes or draas) and of the bed-form type according to the descriptive (crescentic, linear) and dynamic (transverse, oblique, longitudinal) classifications. In conjunction with this level of mapping, large-scale or regional mapping was used in order to identify distinct, stacked, dune-field, and erg deposits that comprise the Page sandstone. Local mapping of the out-crop at a fine scale was necessary for refined interpretation of cyclicity, bed-form size, migration rate, and airflow pattern.

  14. The stratigraphy of Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, United Kingdom North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, S.D. ); Mantel, K.A. ); Morton, D.J. ); Riley, L.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Oil-bearing Upper Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Gaben, United Kingdom North Sea. They form the reservoirs in 14 fields that originally contained 2 billion bbl of oil reserves, including Scott Field, which in 1993 will be the largest producing United Kingdom North Sea oil field to come on stream in more than a decade. The Sgiath and Piper formations represent Late Jurassic transgressive and regressive phases that began with paralic deposition and culminated in a wave-dominated delta system. These phases preceded the major grabel rifting episode (late Kimmeridgian to early Ryazanian) and deposition of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, the principal source rock of the Witch Ground Graben oil fields. A threefold subdivision of the middle to upper Oxfordian Sgiath Formation is formally proposed, with Scott field well 15/21a-15 as the designated reference well. The basal Skene Member consists of thinly interbedded paralic carbonaceous shales, coals, and sandstones. This is overlain by transgressive marine shales of the Saltire Member. The upper-most Oxfordian Scott Member consists of shallow marine sandstones that prograded to the southwest. The contact of the Sgiath and Piper formations is a basinwide transgressive marine shale (I shale), which can act as an effective barrier to fluid communication between the Sgiath and Piper reservoir sandstones.

  15. Detrital Zircon Ages from Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Myrgovaam Basin Sandstones (Rauchua Trough), Western Chukotka, NE Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. L.; Toro, J.; Gehrels, G.; Tuchkova, M.; Katkov, S.

    2004-12-01

    Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Myrgovaam Basin sediments (previously Rauchua Trough) are regionally significant because of the stratigraphic constraints they provide on the age and progression of deformation in the Chukotka fold belt, a possible along-strike continuation of the Alaskan Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. Existing descriptions of the structural and stratigraphic relations of Myrgovaam Basin sediments to underlying strata are contradictory. Some maps portray the basin fill as deposited unconformably over deformed Triassic and Jurassic strata of the Chukotka fold-belt. In other publications, the deposits are described as structurally detached and imbricated by N-verging thrust sheets (Baranov, 1996). Field studies reveal that underlying strata are tightly folded compared to overlying strata and that the contact is a structural discordance not an unconformity. More locally, we observed arkosic sandstones typical of the Myrgovaam Basin interbedded with underlying Late Jurassic strata or present as submarine channel deposits cut into older rocks, suggesting an original stratigraphic relationship. To reconcile these observations we suggest regional deformation post-dates deposition of Myrgovaam Basin deposits, and that the disharmony in deformational style between underlying thin-bedded Triassic sandstones and shales and (stratigraphically) overlying massive quartzites, is due to their different mechanical properties. Petrographic studies indicate that fine-grained Triassic-early Jurassic sandstones represent a distal recycled orogen source, while Myrgovaam Basin sandstones originated from a proximal orogenic source containing granitoid and crystalline basement rocks (microcline, biotite, muscovite and fragments of multiply deformed schist) and intermediate to felsic volcanic rocks. Laser Ablation ICPMS was used to date zircons (100 grains) from sandstones of the Myrgovaam Basin and compare them to those in Triassic sandstones (300 grains) and verify

  16. Kinematic implications of joint zones and isolated joints in the Navajo Sandstone at Zion National Park, Utah: Evidence for Cordilleran relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Christie M.; Myers, Douglas A.; Engelder, Terry

    2004-02-01

    At Zion National Park (ZNP) the landscape is a consequence of differential weathering of the Navajo Sandstone where closely spaced vertical joints constitute joint zones that erode to form regularly spaced (half kilometer) slot canyons striking 351°. Between these joint zones is a set of isolated joints striking 339°. Fracture interaction and horsetail/wing crack development indicate that the 339° striking joint set is younger than the 351° striking joint zones, despite the lateral extent of stress reduction shadows in the vicinity of the large-scale joint zones. In addition to an older, less pervasive, ˜020° joint set, this sequence of jointing records a counterclockwise rotation of the regional extension directed from WNW to WSW in the Navajo Sandstone at ZNP. ZNP is located at the western margin of the Colorado Plateau, ˜100 km east of the major normal faults of the northeastern central Basin and Range subprovince. Extension within the eastern central Basin and Range initiated during the Miocene and exhibited a WSW extension direction [, 1971; , 1988; , 2000]. The correlation between nearby Basin and Range extension and the extension direction for the 351° tending joint zones of ZNP is so close that the jointing at ZNP is interpreted as evidence for modest, yet pervasive Basin and Range extension in the western margin of the Colorado Plateau.

  17. Hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone in the Upper Jurassic Naknek Formation on the south shore of Kamishak Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Herriott, Trystan M.; Helmold, Kenneth P.; Gillis, Robert J.; Lillis, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an active petroleum system in Kamishak Bay is demonstrated by an outcrop of hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone in the Upper Jurassic Naknek Formation near the south shore of the bay (fig. 1). The outcrop is about 140 km southwest of Homer on a small, unnamed island near the mouth of the Douglas River (fig. 17). The existence of this outcrop was kindly reported to us by Les Magoon (U.S. Geological Survey, emeritus), who also provided a topographic map showing its exact position. The outcrop was mentioned very briefly in publications by Magoon and others (1975, p. 19) and by Lyle and Morehouse (1977, p. E-1), but to our knowledge there are no detailed descriptions of this outcrop or its hydrocarbons in the published scientific literature.

  18. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the updip-Jurassic trend of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Since the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sandstone of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe Counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical in wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2,000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields had produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 Mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields, API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sandstone and the Megargel sandstone. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked upward-fining sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2,000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1,800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than that in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporite minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

  19. Role of halite in the evolution of sandstone porosity, upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W. )

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of petrographic point-count data, cement paragenesis, and scanning electron microscopy examination of pores has shown that poikilitic halite cement in sandstones of the Norphlet Formation in a core from Wayne County, Mississippi, formed following cementation by quartz, feldspar, dolomite, and anhydrite. Intergranular volume ranges from 26 to 42%, averaging 35%, indicating that an average of 10% of the rock volume was lost to compaction, and a further 10-15%, was lost to cementation prior to halite cementation, assuming a depositional porosity of about 45%. Most halite occurs as intergranular cement, but some halite is present as intragranular cement within framework feldspars and lithic fragments. Halite is easily removed from a sandstone during coring, slabbing, and thin-section preparation techniques that do not use oil-based fluids and muds, so the amount of porosity in these samples that is a product of artificial removal of halite is unknown. Although the present and former distribution of halite is poorly known, natural halite dissolution could have produced about 20% secondary porosity in the Norphlet Formation at depth in this part of the Mississippi Salt basin.

  20. Investigation of exfoliation joints in Navajo sandstone at the Zion National Park and in granite at the Yosemite National Park by tectonofractographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bahat, D.; Grossenbacher, K.; Karasaki, K.

    1995-04-01

    Tectonofractographic techniques have been applied to the study of joint exfoliation in the Navajo sandstone at Zion National Park and in the granite at Yosemite National Park. New types of fracture surface morphologies have been observed which enabled the discerning of incipient joints and consequent fracture growth in these rocks. Incipient jointing in the sandstone is mostly manifested by elliptical and circular fractures (meters to tens meters across) initiating from independent origins. They interfere with each other and grow to larger circular fractures producing exfoliation surfaces up to hundreds of meters across. Less frequently, series of large concentric undulations demonstrate the propagation of a large fracture front producing exfoliation from an individual origin. One such fracture front reveals refraction of undulations at a layer boundary. Certain en echelon fringes surround the joint mirror plane with well defined rims of en echelons and hackles which enable the determination of the tensile fracture stress, {sigma}f. Arches in Zion National Park are ubiquitous in shape and size, revealing stages in their evolution by a mechanical process, which was associated with exfoliation, but independent of local faulting. Exfoliation and arching mostly occurred on vertical surfaces of N-NNW and NE sets of prominent joints, but there are also deviations from this general trend. In Yosemite National Park large exfoliations (hundreds of meters in size) developed on the El Capitan cliff by the interaction and merging of many previous smaller incipient joints that vary in size from meters to tens of meter.

  1. Periodic Spacing of Channel-Spanning Potholes in Navajo Sandstone, Henry Mountains Utah: Implications for Propagation of Incision Pulses across Tributary Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. M.; Sklar, L. S.; Whipple, K. X.; Johnson, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    Incision of the Colorado River at Glen Canyon over the past ~1 Ma triggered pulses of incision that have migrated upstream through tributary drainages. The rate of incision of small tributaries often lags behind that of trunk streams, creatng over-steepened reaches at the tributary junction. In the arid Colorado Plateau, many of these low-order tributaries in massive lithologies have developed sequences of channel-spanning, periodically-spaced pothole bedforms. Although the dynamics of pothole formation and evolution are poorly understood, the occurrence of potholes correlates with super-critical flow and tools-limited conditions. We are exploring the hypothesis that pothole spacing and other profile attributes can be used to reconstruct the propagation of waves of incision through a drainage network. Here we report preliminary results of a field study of potholed reaches in steep, low-order channels draining Navajo Sandstone in the Henry Mountains, Utah. Our survey focused on channels where overlying sedimentary units and pediment deposits have largely been removed from the Navajo Sandstone. We surveyed six tributaries of the middle fork of Trail Canyon, and one tributary of Milk Creek, which are, in turn, minor tributaries of the Colorado River. We surveyed the long profile of each channel using a 5-m rod, 100-m tape, and a clinometer. In bedrock reaches, we focused on quantifying the spacing of alternating pothole steps and bedrock chutes, and the elevation change within and between potholes steps. We also characterized individual potholes by width, depth, maximum sediment size captured, and direction of flow recirculation. In alluviated reaches, we measured the bankfull width and depth to estimate relative differences in bankfull discharge. We also measured channel geometry in higher-order trunk streams at the junctions with the surveyed tributaries. Our preliminary results include the successful prediction of locations where potholed channels were found, by

  2. Field guide to sedimentary structures in the Navajo and Entrada sandstones in southern Utah and northern Arizona: Chapter in Field-trip guidebook, 100th annual meeting, The Geological Society of America, Phoenix, Arizona, October 26-29, 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; Hunter, Ralph E.

    1987-01-01

    This field-trip guide describes the common sedimentary structures that occur in eolian sands. The outcrops that are described occur in the Navajo and Entiaia Sandstones between the areas of Page, Arizona and St. George, Utah (figure I), but the sedimentary structures of these two sandstones are typical of most eolian deposits. The main part of the guide discusses the geologic setting and the origin of the various structures, and the road log discusses which structures are best displayed at selected outcrops.

  3. Reconstruction and geochemical modelling of the diagenetic history of the middle Jurassic Oseberg sandstone reservoir, Oseberg Field, Norwegian North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, J.P.; Sanjuan, B.; Fouillac, C.

    1995-08-01

    A detailed multidisciplinary integrated study of the Middle Jurassic Oseberg reservoir in 13 wells of the Oseberg field, Norwegian North Sea, was carried out in order to (1) reconstruct precisely the timing, conditions and spatial variation of diagenetic transformations (2) characterize the nature and origin of the diagenetic fluids, and (3) develop a geochemical model of the observed diagenesis. The 20-60 in thick Oseberg Formation occurs at depths of 2.5 to 3.2 km, and at present temperatures ranging from 100 to 125{degrees}C. The detrital assemblage is mainly composed of quartz, K-feldspar, albrite, muscovite and lithic clay clasts, and is very homogeneous throughout the study area. The chronological sequence of diagenetic phases established from petrographic observations includes: minor siderite and pyrite, K-feldspar overgrowths, ankerite, feldspar dissolution, vermiform, kaolinite, quartz overgrowths, poikilotopic Fe-rich calcite, dickite. Diagenetic temperatures were determined from fluid inclusions in ankerite, quarts and calcite. Combination with modelled burial/thermal history permitted to constrain approximate ages and duration of major diagenetic events. Isotopic compositions of diagenetic cements indicate that meteoric water was (and still is) a major constituant of diagenetic fluids. Present formation waters are fairly similar chemically and isotopically at reservoir scale and represent mixing of three endmembers: seawater, meteoric water and primary evaporative brine. Stability diagrams and chemical geothermometers suggest that formation fluids are close to equilibrium with the host sandstone at present reservoir temperatures. Geochemical modelling of the diagenetic evolution of water-reservoir interactions was carried out using the EQ3/6 code and the Allan{sup TM}/Neptunix integrated simulator system. Results emphasize the importance of circulations of large volumes of fluid within the reservoir throughout the diagenetic history.

  4. Degradation processes and consolidation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur tracks in museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Sofia; mateus, Octavio; Tomas, Carla; Dionisio, Amelia

    2014-05-01

    The current study aims to conciliate conservation and restoration museology diagnosis with paleontological and geological curational needs and has, as subject of study, dinosaur footprints (vertebrates fossils). The footprints have been being exposed since 2004 in the paleontology hall of the Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal, and are part of a important paleontological collection of Late Jurassic vertebrate fossils from Lourinhã Formation. Presently, it is considered a unique heritage in danger of disappearing due to high decay level of disaggregation of its geological structure. The dinosaur footprints, (ML557) found, more precisely, on a coastline cliff in Lourinhã, Porto das Barcas, Lagido do Forno (coordinate 39° 14. 178'N, 9° 20. 397'W), Jurassic period, on the 5th of June 2001, by Jesper Milàn. This cliff of high slope presents sedimentary stratigraphic characteristics of a sandstone/siltstone of gray and red colors, by the '' Munsell scale and Color Chart''. Geological the tracks are Late Jurassic in age, and colected in the Lourinhã Formation, Praia Azul Member, of the Lusitanian Basin. There are three natural infills tridactyl tracks, possibly ascribed to ornithopod, a bipedal herbivore, resultant of a left foot movement, right and left. Footprints have 300-400mm of wide and 330-360mm of height with round fingers, which are elongated due to some degradation/erosion. In 2001, the footprints were collected from the field, cleaned, consolidated and glued in the laboratory of the Museum of Lourinhã before being exhibited in a museum display. Stone matrix was removed and a consolidation product applied, probably a polyvinyl acetate, of the brand Plexigum. The footprint with broken central digit was glued with an epoxy resin, Araldite. Both applied products were confirmed by analysis of µ-FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) and both presented colour change and detachment surface problems. After collecting and storing, in 2004, footprints were

  5. Provenance of Late Carboniferous to Jurassic sandstones for southern Taimyr, Arctic Russia: A comparison of heavy mineral analysis by optical and QEMSCAN methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Pease, Victoria; Omma, Jenny; Benedictus, Aukje

    2015-11-01

    Sandstone framework-grain petrography, optical and QEMSCAN (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy) heavy mineral analysis carried out on 40 samples collected from east and west southern Taimyr are used to constrain the provenance and tectonic history of Late Carboniferous to Late Jurassic siliciclastic sequences. The tectonic settings of provenance evolved gradually from a mix of volcanic arc and recycled orogen to craton interior. Much of the detritus in the Late Paleozoic to Mesozoic siliciclastic succession came from proximal sources with contributions from multi-type source rocks including acid igneous rocks, basalts, sedimentary rocks and low to medium-grade metamorphic rocks. Carboniferous to Permian sandstones contain low-diversity suites of heavy minerals, including apatite, tourmaline, zircon, rutile, Cr-spinel, monazite and titanite. Cr-spinel indicates probable influx from exposed ophiolitic basement. Abundant euhedral zircon and apatite suggest a volcanic arc source related with Uralian collision. The appearance of garnet in the early Triassic signals the unroofing of a metamorphic source. The abrupt increase of clinopyroxene in Middle to Late Triassic sandstones indicates the influx of detritus from basic rocks related with Siberian Trap magmatism. The decrease of Cr-spinel and an abundance of staurolite in Jurassic samples indicate that unroofing of an ophiolitic source ceased and that stripping of a different thrust sheet containing plenty of staurolite-bearing metamorphic rocks commenced.

  6. Rock doughnut and pothole structures of the Clarens Fm. Sandstone in the Karoo Basin, South Africa: Possible links to Lower Jurassic fluid seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, Stefan; Svensen, Henrik

    2011-08-01

    South Africa has a wealth of sandstone landforms, yet many of these have not been examined in detail to expand knowledge on their morphology and process origins. Here we present data on primary morphological statistics, rock hardness, surface roughness and petrographic investigations of rock doughnuts and associated pothole structures in Golden Gate Highlands National Park (GGHNP) and in the Witkop III complex, with the aim of using such data and field observations to argue their likely origins. Schmidt hammer R-values indicate consistently harder doughnut rims (mean = 48.7; n = 150) than the enclosed potholes (mean = 37.8; n = 150) and surrounding sandstone platform (mean = 39.7; n = 250). The petrography of Clarens Fm. Sandstone shows that the typical whitish sandstone is affected by intense chemical weathering. Pothole rims and the irregular reddish crust typical of the Witkop III outcrops show a secondary cementation by microcrystalline silica. Although preservation of old land surfaces is difficult to prove, small and circular pipe structures filled with calcite-cemented sand are present locally surrounding the Witkop III hydrothermal complex, and represent conduits for fluidized sand. Based on the morphologies of the Witkop III summit with the associated potholes and pipes, we hypothesize that they are remnants of morphologies created by Jurassic fluid seepage, with a superimposed and secondary silica cementation. Given that fluidization structures evidently occur in Clarens Fm. Sandstone, as is the case at Witkop, such mechanisms could possibly have contributed to the observed rock doughnut structures elsewhere on Clarens Fm. Sandstones, such as at the GGHNP where the rock doughnut morphological attributes are typical to landforms originating from fluid venting.

  7. Becoming Navajo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Rolland D.

    1992-01-01

    A 15-year-old Navajo artist, R. D. Lee, tells about his heritage and his painting. To this adolescent, culture means believing in and living the traditions of family. Lee hopes to be known as Navajo to Navajos but still accepted as a person out in the world. (SLD)

  8. Erosional remnants and adjacent unconformities along an eolian-marine boundary of the Page Sandstone and Carmel Formation, Middle Jurassic, south-central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.S.; Blakey, R.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    Sandstone ridges along the marine-eolian boundary of the Middle Jurassic Page Sandstone (eolian) with the lower Carmel Formation (restricted marine) in south-central Utah have been identified as erosional remnants consisting of strata of siliciclastic sabkha and eolian origin. The ridges lie within two distinct units of the Thousand Pockets Tongue of the Page. Two equally plausible models explain the genesis of these ridges. One model involves (1) early cementation of eolian and sabkha strata, (2) wind erosion leading to development of yardangs and unconformities, (3) yardang tilting due to evaporite dissolution, and (4) renewed deposition and burial. The alternative model explains ridge development through (1) subsidence, with tilting, of eolian and sabkha strata into evaporites due to loading from linear dunes, (2) evaporite dissolution and unconformity development, and (3) renewed deposition and burial. These models provide important clues about the nature of a missing part of the rock record. Reconstruction of units that were deposited but later eroded improves paleogeographic interpretation and here indicates that the Carmel paleo-shoreline was considerably farther to the northwest than previously believed.

  9. THE NAVAJOS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Tribe Public Relations and Information Dept., Window Rock, AZ.

    A STUDY OF NAVAJO AMERICAN INDIANS IS PRESENTED. INCLUDED ARE THE TRIBE'S HISTORY, RESOURCES, ECONOMIC SITUATION, AND WAYS TO IMPROVE IT. THE NAVAJOS ARE DIFFERENT FROM OTHER AMERICAN INDIAN TRIBES IN THAT THEY ARE RAPIDLY INCREASING, THEY HAVE INCREASED THE SIZE OF THEIR RESERVATION, THEY STILL LIVE IN ISOLATION AND IN A PRIMITIVE FASHION, AND…

  10. Navajo Studies at Navajo Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessel, Ruth, Ed.

    The Navajo Studies Program at Navajo Community College consists of 2 major areas of study, the first of which includes courses dealing with the Navajos. This book deals with that portion of the program and provides a picture of selected Navajo Studies courses as taught at Navajo Community College. Contained in the book are the origin myths of the…

  11. Triassic and Jurassic rocks at Currie, Nevada Preliminary paleontologic evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.A.; Dubiel, R.F.; Brouwers, E.M. ); Litwin, R.J. ); Ash, S.R. ); Good, S.C. )

    1993-04-01

    A sequence of continental rocks overlies the Lower Triassic Thaynes Formation in a poorly exposed syncline near Currie in northeastern NV. The authors recognize four lithostratigraphic units above the Thaynes near Currie and provide new paleontologic data. In ascending order, unit 1 (120 ft) consists of reddish-brown, very fine grained sandstone. Unit 2 (50 ft) consists of light-gray, trough cross-stratified, coarse-grained, conglomeratic sandstone. Unit 3 (at least 500 ft) consists of green, red, and brown sandstone and mudstone. Unit 4 occurs as isolated outcrops of reddish-orange, fine- to medium-grained sandstone. New fossil evidence, while not definitive, constrain the age of this sequence. Plant megafossils in unit 1 include (1) a specimen with narrow ovate leaves, possibly from an early Mesozoic conifer and (2) abundant fragments of probable Neocalamites. The presence of these fossils and the absence of any angiosperm leaves or wood fragments suggest an early Mesozoic age. Ostracodes in unit 3 are exclusively Darwinula sp., and their association with conchostracans in the absence of younger ostracodes suggests a Triassic age. Finally, two small outcrops, previously mapped as Triassic/Jurassic, contain the gastropods Pilidae indet. and Lymnaea sp., which resemble Late Cretaceous to Paleocene faunas. The sequence is similar to the nearest Lower Mesozoic section on the Colorado Plateau at Cove Fort, Utah, 165 miles to the southeast. The authors' new evidence supports the longstanding correlation of units 1--4 with the Lower Triassic Moenkopi Formation (part), the Shinarump and Petrified Forest Members of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of the Plateau. These rocks at Currie demonstrate that the Early Mesozoic depositional systems of the Colorado Plateau extended at least this far west and provide constraints on Early Mesozoic tectonism in the eastern Great Basin.

  12. Siderite (FeCO3)—the Hidden (but Primary) Player in Iron Diagenesis of Non-Marine Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, D.; Kettler, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Siderite precipitates in reducing pore waters in which iron reduction exceeds sulfate reduction. Abundant siderite should be expected in non-marine strata in which a reductant was present. The Triassic Shinarump Member (Chinle Fm) and Cretaceous Dakota Fm are fluvial and contain siderite in outcrops of floodplain mudstones. Siderite is present in cores of Dakota channel sandstones. Rinded and jointed iron-oxide concretions, Wonderstone patterns, and rhombic, iron-oxide pseudomorphs are present in outcrops of these sandstones. Vascular plants growing on floodplains provided the reductant. Similar concretions, patterns, and pseudomorphs are present in outcropping eolian cross-strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone and in fluvial sandstone of the Cambrian Umm Ishrin Fm. Bleached sandstones indicate reductant was present in both units during late diagenesis. Because Jurassic deserts and Cambrian river systems lacked vascular plants, extra-formational methane was the likely reductant. We interpret the various iron-oxide-cemented phenomena of the Shinarump, Dakota, Navajo, and Umm Ishrin as products of siderite oxidation that accompanied exhumation. In the Navajo, large concretions are enclosed in thick sheaths of iron-oxide cement. Through-going horizontal and vertical joints cut sheaths. Outside concretion sheaths, joints are unassociated with iron-oxide cements, but inside the sheaths, thick cement zones are present on both sides of (still-open) joints. Joints were conduits for oxidizing water entering the concretions. Redox gradients formed on both sides of joints and iron oxide accumulated as Fe+2 diffused from dissolving siderite toward joints and O2 diffused away from joints. Horizontal joints formed <100 m from the land surface. Iron-oxide accumulations on the horizontal joints and on the vertical joints that abut them (see figure) are evidence that siderite oxidation is ongoing and linked to exhumation.

  13. Navajo Studies at Navajo Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatathli, Ned

    The document covers the Navajo Studies Program (NSP) at Navajo Community College (NCC). The Navajo Studies Program differs from other Indian Studies Programs in 7 ways, e.g.: (1) it is located on the Navajo Reservation and controlled by the tribe; (2) NCC incorporates Indian studies into every individual program and area of concentration--English…

  14. Navajo Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Navajo Nation has eliminated jail time for 79 offenses and required traditional peacemaking in criminal cases, primarily involving family violence. Peacemaking entails examination of the criminal act by all involved, family responsibility for its members, and symbolic restitution. The change promotes prevention and child protection by breaking…

  15. Annual monsoon rains recorded by Jurassic dunes.

    PubMed

    Loope, D B; Rowe, C M; Joeckel, R M

    2001-07-01

    Pangaea, the largest landmass in the Earth's history, was nearly bisected by the Equator during the late Palaeozoic and early Mesozoic eras. Modelling experiments and stratigraphic studies have suggested that the supercontinent generated a monsoonal atmospheric circulation that led to extreme seasonality, but direct evidence for annual rainfall periodicity has been lacking. In the Mesozoic era, about 190 million years ago, thick deposits of wind-blown sand accumulated in dunes of a vast, low-latitude desert at Pangaea's western margin. These deposits are now situated in the southwestern USA. Here we analyse slump masses in the annual depositional cycles within these deposits, which have been described for some outcrops of the Navajo Sandstone. Twenty-four slumps, which were generated by heavy rainfall, appear within one interval representing 36 years of dune migration. We interpret the positions of 20 of these masses to indicate slumping during summer monsoon rains, with the other four having been the result of winter storms. The slumped lee faces of these Jurassic dunes therefore represent a prehistoric record of yearly rain events. PMID:11452305

  16. Architectural studies of Jurassic-Cretaceous fluvial units, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Miall, A.D.; Bromley, M.H.; Cowan, E.J.; Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A sixfold hierarchy of architectural elements and bounding surfaces evolved from outcrop studies of three fluvial units: Westwater Canyon member (WCM), Morrison Formation, Upper Jurassic; Torrivio sandstone member (TSM), Gallup Sandstone, Upper Cretaceous, northwestern New Mexico; and Kayenta Formation (KF), Lower Jurassic, southwestern Colorado. This hierarchy is discussed.

  17. Navajo Electrification Demonstraiton Project

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Ahasteen, Project Manager

    2006-07-17

    This is a final technical report required by DOE for the Navajo Electrification Demonstration Program, This report covers the electric line extension project for Navajo families that currently without electric power.

  18. Navajo Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll., Tsaile, AZ.

    The objectives of this Special Experimental Demonstration Project in Adult Basic Education for the Navajo were: (1) to raise the educational and social level of Navajo adult students who are unable to read, write, and speak English; (2) to assist the Navajo adult students to take advantage of occupational and vocational training programs; (3) to…

  19. Strong Navajo Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenbrand, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths:…

  20. Comparison of sandstone reservoir geometry in a valley-fill depositional sequence and a deltaic progradational sequence, Middle Jurassic, Yorkshire, England

    SciTech Connect

    Eschard, R.; Ravenne, C.; Houel, P.

    1989-03-01

    The geostatistic simulations elaborated by the reservoir geology group of the IFP and the Geostatistic Center of the Ecole des Mines (HERESI GROUP) are based on the interpretation of representative outcrops of littoral to deltaic deposits. The methodology includes some detailed studies of large outcrops in terms of reservoir geology, a computation of the geological and petrophysical parameters, the conditional simulation of reservoir geometry, and their internal heterogeneities by geostatistic methods. Two sites, Cloughton and Ravenscar, have been selected along the Yorkshire coast in the Middle Jurassic siliciclastic series. The Ravenscar Group series (a stratigraphic and sedimentologic equivalent of the Brent Formation in the North Sea) is well exposed in wide, extended cliffs. The two-dimensional geometry of the reservoirs is reconstructed from photomosaics and surveying. Their three-dimensional architecture is controlled by core drills located just behind the studied cliffs. The wells are full-cored wire-line log (gamma ray and dipmeter) recorded, and porosity and permeability measurements are made every 20 cm in reservoir levels.

  1. Our Friends -- The Navajos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll. Press, Tsaile, AZ.

    Papers in this collection reflect the academic and on-reservation learning experiences of institute participants exposed to: Indian arts and crafts; the Navajo language; the Navajo people in their own homes, schools, and communities; basic knowledge of Indians; ceremonies, community meetings, and neighboring reservations; and major problems and…

  2. Navajo Biographies. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Virginia

    The life stories of eight Navajo ("Dine", their term for themselves) leaders are presented in volume one of this collection of biographies. Interspersed with portraits, drawings, and maps, the narrative chronologically covers the time period from 1766 when the Navajos lived on land under the rule of Spain into the twentieth century and dealings…

  3. The Navajo Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert W., Comp.

    The Navajo Yearbook began as an annual report to relate progress in carrying out provisions of the Navajo-Hopi Long Range Rehabilitation Act (P.L. 474 - 81st Congress), but the scope has been expanded to include all programs conducted on the reservation. This volume, the eighth in the series, is designed to reflect changing problems, changing…

  4. Navajo Wisdom and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie, Ethelou

    The oral literature of the Navajo people generally falls into two categories: the sacred stories and the folk tales, which often, but not always, point a moral. Sacred stories relate the Navajo's emergence history. These stories tell how the universe holds two kinds of people: the "Earth Surface People" (both living and dead) and the "Holy People"…

  5. Navajo-ABLE: Replication Model Navajo Assistive Technology Loan Program. Final Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Katie Jebb

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of the Navajo Assistive Bank of Loanable Equipment (Navajo-ABLE), a federally funded program designed to provide assistive technology (AT) devices, services, technical information, funding information, and training for Navajo children and youth with disabilities. The program was operated and…

  6. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  7. Contemporary Navajo Affairs: Navajo History Volume III, Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, Norman K.

    Written specifically for Navajo junior high through college students, but also serving those interested in modern reservation developments and processs, the third volume of a curricular series on Navajo history provides a synthesis of data and pictorial records on current events in the areas of Navajo government, economic development, and health.…

  8. Marine Jurassic lithostratigraphy of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesook, A.; Grant-Mackie, J. A.

    Marine Jurassic rocks of Thailand are well-exposed in the Mae Sot and Umphang areas and less extensively near Mae Hong Son, Kanchanaburi, Chumphon and Nakhon Si Thammarat, in the north, west, and south respectively. They are generally underlain unconformably by Triassic and overlain by Quaternary strata. Based mainly on five measured sections, fourteen new lithostratigraphic units are established: (in ascending order) Pa Lan, Mai Hung and Kong Mu Formations of the Huai Pong Group in the Mae Hong Son area; Khun Huai, Doi Yot and Pha De Formations of the Hua Fai Group in the Mae Sot area; Klo Tho, Ta Sue Kho, Pu Khloe Khi and Lu Kloc Tu Formations of the Umphang Group in the Umphang area; and the Khao Lak Formation in the Chumphon area. Mudstone, siltstone, sandstone, limestone and marl are the dominant lithologies. Mudstones, siltstones and sandstones are widespread; limestones are confined to the Mae Sot, Umphang, Kanchanaburi and Mae Hong Son areas; marls are found only in Mae Sot. The sequences are approximately 900 m thick in Mae Sot and 450 m thick in Umphang and are rather thinner in the other areas, particularly in the south. Based on ammonites, with additional data from bivalves and foraminifera, the marine Jurassic is largely Toarcian-Aalenian plus some Bajocian. Late Jurassic ages given previously for strata in the Mae Sot and Umphang areas have not been confirmed.

  9. Walking in Navajo Footprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Katie B.

    This module presents a guide for the study of the Navajo Indians' life and customs as they existed about thirty years ago. The length of time necessary to complete the activities, which are designed for use in kindergarten through third grades, may vary from one to two weeks. The module includes language, science, mathematics, art, music, dramatic…

  10. The Story of Three Navajo Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Beth; Barry, Tom

    1978-01-01

    The place of Navajo women on the reservation (as breadwinners, caretakers, and leaders) has suffered from a century of Anglo control. Three Navajo women tell how Navajos can effect change through the strength of their women. (Author/AM)

  11. NAVAJO NATION HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage represents the locations of hazardous waste sites on the Navajo Nation Indian Reservation. The point locations were delineated on 1:24,000 scale US Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps by staff from the Navajo Nation EPA, Resource Conservation & Reco...

  12. Navajo Nation Educational Hearings, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Tribe, Window Rock, AZ.

    Part of an effort by the Navajo Division of Education to formulate a comprehensive educational plan, this document includes testimony by people representing the five agency divisions on the Reservation (Shiprock, Crownpoint, Chinle, Tuba City, and Fort Defiance) and the public school districts serving Navajos. Also included is a synthesis of the…

  13. Towards a Navajo Indian Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, Rik; And Others

    This book examines the Navajo system of spatial knowledge and describes a culture-based curriculum for the development of an intuitive geometry based on the child's experience of the physical world. Aspects of the Navajo cosmology relevant to spatial knowledge are discussed: the structure of the world; the dynamic nature of the universe;…

  14. Piagetian Conservation in Navajo Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odell, Sandra J.; Ferraro, Douglas P.

    In order to determine the cognitive development of Navajo children in terms of Piagetian conservation of number, mass, and continuous quantity, 168 Navajo children at seven different age levels from 5 to adult were presented with a series of three conservation tasks. The tasks consisted of a standard object and an equivalent object that could be…

  15. Fault evolution in volcanic tuffs and quartz-rich eolian sandstone as mechanical analogs for faulting in Martian pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    In order to establish a foundation for studies of faulting in Martian rocks and soils in volcanic terrain, the distribution of brittle strain around faults within the North Menan Butte Tuff in the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho and the Joe Lott Tuff Member of the Mount Belknap Volcanics, Utah, has been recently described. These studies employed a combination of macroscopic and microscopic observations, including measurements of in situ permeability as a proxy for non-localized brittle deformation of the host rock. In areas where the tuff retained its primary granular nature at the time of deformation, initial plastic yielding in both tuffs occurred along deformation bands. Both compactional and dilational types of deformation bands were observed, and faulting occurred along clusters of deformation bands. Where secondary alteration processes imparted a massive texture to the tuff, brittle deformation was accommodated along fractures. Host-rock permeability exhibits little variation from non-deformed values in the North Menan Butte Tuff, whereas host rock permeability is reduced by roughly an order of magnitude through compaction alone (no alteration) in the Joe Lott Tuff. To create a bridge between these observations in tuff and the more substantial body of work centered on deformation band formation and faulting in quartz-rich sandstones, the same techniques employed in the North Menan Butte Tuff and the Joe Lott Tuff have also been applied to a kilometer-scale fault in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in the Waterpocket Fold, Utah. These observations demonstrate that the manifestation of strain and evolution of faulting in the Mars-analog tuffs are comparable to that in quartz-rich sandstones. Therefore, current understanding of brittle deformation in quartz-rich sandstones can be used to inform investigations into fault growth within porous tuffs on Mars. A discussion of these observations, practical limitations, and directions for future work are presented here.

  16. To Be A Navajo. Second Edition, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begay, Shirley M., Ed.

    Designed to provide culturally relevant and interesting reading material in Navajo for Navajo speaking children, this booklet presents 20 short stories written and illustrated by students at Rough Rock Demonstration School. Intended to encourage Navajo speaking children, and others, to read and to instill pride in being a Navajo, the stories…

  17. Navajo Coal: Demands, Attitudes, and Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, James M.

    The operation of several coal mines with vast proven reserves on the Navajo reservation is a manifestation of conflict between: a power hungry external world; the preservationist attitudes of traditional Navajo culture; the disadvantaged socio-economic status of the average Navajo wage earner; and the Navajo Nation's long term needs for internal…

  18. A History of Navajo Clans. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Regina H.; And Others

    Pen and ink drawings illustrate characterizations of 29 Navajo clans in this book, which is intended to acquaint young Navajo people and others with Navajo history and culture. The introduction discusses the significance of the Navajo clan system and the relationship among family bonds, self-esteem, and cultural values. The illustrated text tells…

  19. Provenance of Norphlet sandstone, northern Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.P.; Ward, W.C.; Kuglar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet sandstone of the northern Gulf Coast is predominantly subarkose, with some arkose in the eastern area and sublitharenite and quartzarenite in the western area. Despite great depths of burial and despite feldspar and rock-fragment constituents, diagenesis has not appreciably altered the composition of Norphlet sandstone. Therefore, reconstruction of original composition of Norphlet sandstone presented little difficulty. Variation in detrital modes of the Norphlet suggests compositionally distinct source terranes. Samples from Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi reflect the influence of metamorphic and plutonic rocks of the Appalachian Piedmont Province and of Triassic-Jurassic volcanic rocks. Sandstones in east Texas, northern Louisiana, and southern Arkansas were derived from sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks of the Ouachita system. The Arbuckle Mountains and Llano uplift may have supplied trace amounts of quartzo-feldspathic and volcanic-rock fragments to the extreme western part of the study area. Norphlet sandstones represent a mixture of collision-orogen-derived sediment from the Appalachian and/or Ouachita system and continental-block-derived sediment from paleohighs and uplifts within the Gulf basin. However, Norphlet sandstones plot in the craton-interior and transitional-continental fields on Q-F-L and QM-F-Lt tectonic-provenance diagrams, because of mineralogically mature source rocks, elimination of unstable grains by abrasion and sorting during deposition, and/or sediment mixing from different source terranes.

  20. The nucleation and evolution of Riedel shear zones as deformation bands in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlgren, S. G.

    2001-08-01

    The term Riedel shear zone refers to a geometric fracture pattern commonly associated with strike-slip fault systems. Using field mapping and three-dimensional digital modeling, the progressive temporal evolution of natural Riedel shear zones within exposures of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone is interpreted from the spatial evolution of small-scale, incipient Proto-Riedel Zones (PRZs) to more completely developed systems. PRZs nucleate as a tabular zone of localized shearing marked by en échelon deformation bands, each of which is no more than a few mm wide and tens of cm long. These initial deformation bands have an opposite (antithetic) sense of slip with respect to the zone, and are oriented at an acute angle of 55-85° to the trend of the zone. With increasing strain, deformation bands and sedimentary markers become sheared through granular flow across the zone and assume a sigmoidal form. Subsequent bands develop as conjugate shear fractures within the strain-hardened axis of the PRZ. These antithetic driven systems are not directly linked to pre-existing or external structural elements and are not compatible with traditional synthetic driven models of Riedel shear zones.

  1. Jurassic Paleolatitudes, Paleogeography, and Climate Transitions In the Mexican Subcontinen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Garza, R. S.; Geissman, J. W.; Lawton, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Jurassic northward migration of Mexico, trailing the North America plate, resulted in temporal evolution of climate-sensitive depositional environments. Lower-Middle Jurassic rocks in central Mexico contain a record of warm-humid conditions, which are indicated by coal and compositionally mature sandstone deposited in continental environments. Preliminary paleomagnetic data indicate that these rocks were deposited at near-equatorial paleolatitudes. The Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 Ma) Diquiyú volcanic sequence in central Oaxaca give an overall mean of D=82.2º/ I= +4.1º (n=10; k=17.3, α95=12º). In the Late Jurassic, the Gulf of Mexico formed as a subsidiary basin of the Atlantic Ocean, when the supercontinent Pangaea ruptured. Upper Jurassic strata, including eolianite and widespread evaporite deposits, across Mexico indicate dry-arid conditions. Available paleomagnetic data (compaction-corrected) from eolianites in northeast Mexico indicate deposition at ~15-20ºN. As North America moved northward during Jurassic opening of the Atlantic, different latitudinal regions experienced coeval Late Jurassic climatic shifts. Climate transitions have been widely recognized in the Colorado plateau region. The plateau left the horse-latitudes in the late Middle Jurassic to reach temperate humid climates at ~40ºN in the latest Jurassic. In turn, the southern end of the North America plate (central Mexico) reached arid horse-latitudes in the Late Jurassic. At that time, epeiric platforms developed in the circum-Gulf region after a long period of margin extension. We suggest that Upper Jurassic hydrocarbon source rocks in the circum-Gulf region accumulated on these platforms as warm epeiric hypersaline seas and the Gulf of Mexico itself were fertilized by an influx of wind-blown silt from continental regions. Additional nutrients were brought to shallow zones of photosynthesis by ocean upwelling driven by changes in the continental landmass configuration.

  2. Analytical Bibliography of Navajo Reading Materials. Navajo Reading Study, Progress Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard; And Others

    English and Navajo language materials are described in this bibliography of reading materials primarily for elementary school students. The English language materials were developed to teach Navajo children about their own culture and could be used to form the base for a curriculum in English for Navajo students. The Navajo language materials were…

  3. Advances in Navajo Bilingual Education 1969-72. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard, Ed.

    Advances in Navajo Bilingual Education are described in this progress report, in which bilingual education is presented as an element in aiding the community to be involved in and to control the Navajo education system. Also, the reports of 3 meetings concerning Navajo education are included. The report of a Navajo bilingual-bicultural materials…

  4. Navajo-Speaking Parents' Perceptions of Reasons for Navajo Language Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons-Yazzie, Evangeline

    1995-01-01

    Case studies of 10 Navajo families and their children revealed several factors as to why the children did not speak Navajo, including the amount of exposure the child had to Navajo speakers, the importance of Native language within the family, and lack of parental encouragement for learning Navajo. Includes recommendations of parents for…

  5. Navajo Opposition to the Indian New Deal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinde, Donald A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Examines how the livestock reduction plan enforced by the Federal government in the 1930s resulted in drastically negative ecological, economic, and health consequences for the Navajo people. Describes manifestations of Navajo criticism and resistance. (GC)

  6. Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and central and eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, and in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico. These trends are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps, reservoirs, and hydrocarbon types. The source for the Jurassic hydrocarbons is Smackover algal mudstones. The Jurassic oil trend includes the area north of the regional peripheral fault systems in the tri-state area, and extends into the area north of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs and salt anticlines, with Smackover grainstones and dolostones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones as reservoirs. This trend has potential for Jurassic oil accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic oil and gas-condensate trend includes the onshore area between the regional peripheral fault systems and Wiggins arch and extends into the area of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs, salt related anticlines, and extensional faults. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Haynesville carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Smackover grainstones, packstones, dolostones, and marine sandstones, and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones serve as reservoirs. This trend contains most of the Jurassic fields in the eastern Gulf coastal plain. The trend has high potential for significant petroleum accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic deep natural gas trend includes the onshore area south of the Wiggins arch and extends into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf. Traps are faulted salt anticlines with basement highs as potential traps. Cotton Valley deltaic-strandplain sandstones and Norphlet eolian sandstones are the reservoirs. Several gas discoveries below 20,000 ft have been made in this trend in Mississippi and offshore Alabama. The trend has excellent potential for major gas accumulations in coastal Alabama and central Gulf of Mexico.

  7. The Origins of Navajo Youth Gangs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Eric; Kunitz, Stephen J.; Levy, Jerrold E.

    1999-01-01

    Extended interviews with 50 Navajo men, aged 21 to 45, provided information on peer relationships and gang formation among male Navajo youth in the 1960s through the 1980s. Results suggest that gangs are an extreme example of traditional hell-raising among young Navajo men and that most gang members "age out" of their gangs. Suggestions for gang…

  8. Navajo Pawn: A Misunderstood Traditional Trading Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiser, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Navajo trading has been a crucial component of that tribe's localized economy for generations and has been the subject of much scholarship over the years. The role of the Navajo trader in influencing the types and styles of crafts that Navajos created as well as providing tribal members with an outlet for those items remains important to their…

  9. Navajo History: The Land and the People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acrey, Bill P.

    This textbook for high school, college, or adult readers covers the history and culture of the Navajo People from their own perspective from the coming of American control in 1846 until 1978. Topics include the last Navajo war, the Long Walk, the impact of Navajo agents on policy, early traders and flourishing of crafts, settlement of reservation…

  10. A Bibliographic Essay Pertaining to Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Scott

    Introduced by a discussion of the fact that most of the works cited describe Navajos as they "used to be" and an admonition against the common practice of placing all Navajos, or all Indians, under one stereotype, this bibliographic essay traces the history of Navajo contact with the white man and emphasizes efforts at educational development. Six…

  11. A Utah Navajo History = Dineji Nakee' Naahane'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benally, Clyde; And Others

    This book presents Navajo history in two aspects--traditional stories that describe the ancestors of the Navajo and explain how the Earth-Surface World was changed from monster-filled chaos into the well-ordered world of today, and historical events from 1525 to today after the Navajos had settled in the Southwest. Events described include…

  12. Social services: the Navajo way.

    PubMed

    Belone, Cecilia; Gonzalez-Santin, Edwin; Gustavsson, Nora; MacEachron, Ann E; Perry, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    The development of child welfare services in Indian Country followed enactment of the 1975 Indian Education and Self-Determination Act and the 1978 Indian Child Welfare Act. These acts allow tribal contracting with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to provide social services. Because the BIA model has not fit well with Navajo needs, the Navajo Nation Division of Social Services is creating a more holistic case management paradigm for child and family services, which is more congruent with its culture and its rural, sparsely populated land. PMID:12380626

  13. A Jurassic Shock-Aftershock Earthquake Sequence Recorded by Small Clastic Pipes and Dikes within Dune Cross-Strata, Zion National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, D. B.; Zlotnik, V. A.; Kettler, R. M.; Pederson, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    Eolian sandstones of south-central and southeast Utah contain large volumes of contorted cross-strata that have long been recognized as products of liquefaction caused by seismic shaking. Unlike most sites where Navajo Sandstone is exposed, in Zion National Park (southwestern Utah), the Navajo contains very, very few contorted strata. We have, however, mapped the distribution of more than 1,000 small-scale, vertical pipes and dikes in uncontorted cross-strata of the Navajo at two small study sites in Zion. Pipes are 2-5 cm in diameter and up to 3 m long; dikes are ~6 cm wide. Clusters of the water-escape structures lie directly above and below numerous, near-horizontal bounding surfaces. Dikes are restricted to the wind-ripple strata that lie above the bounding surfaces. Pipes are common both above and below the bounding surfaces. In map view, most pipes are arranged in lines. Near the bounding surfaces, pipes merge upward with shallow dikes trending parallel to the lines of pipes. Pipes formed in grainflows—homogeneous, well-sorted sand lacking cohesion. Dikes formed above the bounding surface, in more-cohesive, poorly sorted, wind-ripple strata. As liquefaction began, expansion of subsurface sand caused spreading within the unliquified (capping) beds near the land surface. Dikes intruded cracks in the wind-ripple strata, and pipes rose from the better-sorted sand to interdune surfaces, following trends of cracks. Because the wind-ripple strata had low cohesive strength, a depression formed around each rupture, and ejected sand built upward to a flat-topped surface rather than forming the cone of a classic sand volcano. In one 3 m2 portion of the map area, a cluster of about 20 pipes and dikes, many with truncated tops, record eight stratigraphically distinct seismic events. The large dunes that deposited the Navajo cross-strata likely moved ~1m/yr. When, in response to seismic shaking, a few liters of fluidized sand erupted onto the lowermost portion of the

  14. Postsecondary Transitions among Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Smith, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A study examining postsecondary transition experiences interviewed 22 Navajos who were recent high school graduates. Prominent themes included family influence and pressures, discrepancy between high school and college learning environments, student-faculty relationships, vague educational and career plans, misconceptions about postsecondary…

  15. Memo to Navajo Community Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, George P.

    This handbook contains general resource information for program planning in Navajo education. Contained are listings on: 1) Key Questions; 2) Community Education and Local Control; 3) Education Laboratories; 4) Steps in Starting A Community College; 5) Recommended Books; 6) Bibliography of Instructional Resources; 7) Program Planning and Proposal…

  16. Navajos and National Nuclear Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Tom

    1979-01-01

    Describes the history of nuclear development in New Mexico, notes the cumulative detrimental effect on the Navajo Nation, and emphasizes federal inaction regarding health and safety standards and regulation in the nuclear power industry. Journal availability: see RC 503 522. (SB)

  17. Dinetah: Navajo History. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessel, Robert A., Jr.

    Using archaeological data, written chronicles of Spanish explorers and missionaries, and oral narratives and legends, the book traces the history of the Navajo people to their original homeland, Dinetah, located primarily off the present reservation in an area south and east of Farmington, New Mexico. The book discusses various theories on Navajo…

  18. So Many Kinds of Navajos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Ruth

    Written for both American Indian and non-Indian school children, the purpose of this book is to present a picture of the varied ways of life on the Navajo Reservation in 1970. Facts relating to health, education, employment, and living conditions are presented from the viewpoint of Denny Lincoln, a 12 year old orphan who is placed in a Navajo…

  19. Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1989-03-01

    Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by the heavy rainfall, soil zones, lush vegetation, and accompanying voluminous production of organic and inorganic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution, causing a net gain in porosity near unconformities. Thus, porosity in sandstones tends to increase toward overlying unconformities. Such porosity trends have been observed in hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas. A common attribute of these reservoirs is that they were all subaerially exposed under heavy rainfall conditions. An empirical model has been developed for the Triassic and Jurassic sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian North Sea on the basis of the observed relationship that shows an increase in porosity in these reservoirs with increasing proximity to the overlying base of Cretaceous unconformity. An important practical attribute of this model is that it allows for the prediction of porosity in the neighboring undrilled areas by recognizing the base of Cretaceous unconformity in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps.

  20. Traders on the Navajo Reservation. A Report on the Economic Bondage of the Navajo People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Indian Development, Inc., Window Rock, AZ.

    Conducted in 1969 by 8 Navajo students, this study investigates the Anglo trader in terms of his socioeconomic influence on the American Indians of the Navajo Reservation. Limited to 30 randomly selected trading posts located in the central and eastern portions of the Navajo Reservation, this study reflects findings derived from personal…

  1. The Situation of Navajo Literacy Projects. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard

    The Navajo Reading Study has been prepared for a volume describing literacy projects in the indigenous languages of the Americas. In 1969-70, 2 surveys were made to determine the present language situation of 6-year-old Navajo children. For each survey, a simple questionnaire was sent to all teachers with Navajo 6-year-olds in their classes.…

  2. Transforming Biology Curriculum at Navajo Community College to Include Navajo and Western Cultural Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Edward R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a college teacher used Navajo traditional knowledge to rethink the teaching of college biology. Suggests that teachers intimidated by the intricate Dine Philosophy of Education may integrate Navajo knowledge into their courses through focused research guided by Navajo consultants. Includes five examples of redesigned curricula for…

  3. Mortality among Navajo uranium miners.

    PubMed Central

    Roscoe, R J; Deddens, J A; Salvan, A; Schnorr, T M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To update mortality risks for Navajo uranium miners, a retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted of 757 Navajos from the cohort of Colorado Plateau uranium miners. METHODS. Vital status was followed from 1960 to 1990. Standardized mortality ratios were estimated, with combined New Mexico and Arizona non-White mortality rates used for comparison. Cox regression models were used to evaluate exposure-response relationships. RESULTS. Elevated standardized mortality ratios were found for lung cancer (3.3), tuberculosis (2.6), and pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases (2.6). Lowered ratios were found for heart disease (0.6), circulatory disease (0.4), and liver cirrhosis (0.5). The estimated relative risk for a 5-year duration of exposure vs none was 3.7 for lung cancer, 2.1 for pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases, and 2.0 for tuberculosis. The relative risk for lung cancer was 6.9 for the midrange of cumulative exposure to radon progeny compared with the least exposed. CONCLUSIONS. Findings were consistent with those from previous studies. Twenty-three years after their last exposure to radon progeny, these light-smoking Navajo miners continue to face excess mortality risks from lung cancer and pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases. PMID:7702118

  4. Navajo Changes--A History of the Navajo People = Dinetahgi Lahgo Ahoodzaa--Dine Bahane. Fifth-Eighth Grade Navajo Bilingual Bicultural Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Stephen; And Others

    The Navajo bilingual-bicultural social studies curriculum for grades 5-8 contains six chapters of Navajo history. The chapters trace Navajo history beginning with legends of the first Navajos and life in Dinetah and continuing through early contact with the Spaniards, conflict and defeat at the hands of the United States government, and the…

  5. Navajo generating plant and Grand Canyon haze

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.E.

    1991-01-15

    This article examines the question of whether the Navajo generating plant pollution is contributing to pollution of the air in the Grand Canyon region. The topics include the regulatory context of the plant, the experiment known as the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment (WHITEX), the National Research Council evaluation of the WHITEX, and The Navajo Generating Station Visibility Study.

  6. An Ethnography of the Navajo Reproductive Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Anne

    1982-01-01

    Describes the reproductive cycle (menarche, menstrual cycle, fertility and contraceptive use, and menopause) as experienced by two groups of contemporary Navajo women. Eighty Navajo women, 40 traditional and 40 acculturated, participated in the 1978 research project which focused on influences of menopause. (ERB)

  7. SURVEY REPORT--NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASHE, ROBERT W.

    THIS PLAN FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NAVAJO JUNIOR COLLEGE GOES INTO ALL ASPECTS OF ITS ORGANIZATION. IT DESCRIBES THE PRESENT NAVAJO SCHOOL SYSTEM, WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF MISSION, PUBLIC, AND BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS OPERATIONS. FINANCIAL HELP TO STUDENTS WANTING MORE THAN A HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION IS PRESENTLY INADEQUATE, THROUGH INCREASING. IF…

  8. Entrepreneurship and Economic Development: The Navajo Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, J. Stuart; Carlin, William B.

    The Navajo Nation, in the summer of 1987, sponsored the Special Pre-Business Introduction for Navajo Students (SPINS) program through the business colleges at three universities: (1) University of Arizona; (2) University of New Mexico; and (3) New Mexico State University. SPINS provided entrepreneurial training, through entrepreneurship workshops,…

  9. "1970" Inter-Agency Health Meeting (Navajo).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    An inter-agency health meeting regarding health services for Navajo Indians is reported on in this document. The meeting, sponsored by the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, involved agencies such as the U.S. Public Health Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Navajo Tribe. Included in the proceedings are reports and remarks by…

  10. Defining Student Success through Navajo Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Colleen Wilma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine the definition of student success as defined by the Navajo people. The data collection method used was the focus group. The data were collected from two geographical settings from two public schools located within the boundaries of the Navajo Indian Reservation. The focus group participants…

  11. Sovereignty: The Navajo Nation and Taxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Michael

    Contending that it is wrong for the Navajo Government to continue to neglect its citizens by not implementing a taxation program, this monograph is written to generate interest in and discussion of a taxation program and the Navajo Tax Commission, created in 1974. Specifically, this booklet presents basic information re: the financing of the…

  12. Navajo Art--A Way of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Faith

    This curriculum unit on Navajo art consists of three lessons, each of which can stand alone or be used in conjunction with the others. Teacher and students will explore Navajo traditions in the unit and use the insight gained to create artworks that connect people to their community and natural environment. The key artworks provide the foundation…

  13. Navajo Health Authority: Accomplishments--Future Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    Accomplishments of the Navajo Health Authority (NHA) since it began in 1972 are presented in synopsis form in a report of programs underway at Window Rock and Shiprock, along with NHA goals: to promote development of Navajo Health manpower, preventive medicine, health education, and native healing sciences. After a brief review of executive and…

  14. Navajo History to 1846: The Land and the People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acrey, Bill P.

    This textbook for high school, college, or adult readers covers major areas of Navajo history from prehistoric times to 1846 from the Navajo point of view. A brief description of pre-Navajo cultures including the Hohokam, Mogollon, and Anasazi precedes the more detailed history of the arrival of the Navajo and contact with the Pueblo peoples.…

  15. Some Remarks on Navajo Geometry and Piagetian Genetic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, Rik

    1991-01-01

    Examines aspects of Navajo cosmology relevant to understanding Navajo spatial representations. Compares Navajo children's spatial knowledge with Piaget's findings about the development of geometric concepts in Swiss children. Describes classroom activities whereby Navajo children explore the geometry inherent in their cultural and physical…

  16. When Navajos Had Too Many Sheep: the 1940's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, George A.

    The book is the story of the Navajos during the decade of forced stock reduction on the Navajo Reservation. This decade was marked by confusion, frustration, and bitterness on the part of the Navajo Nation. It is of the 1940's, during which the Navajos faced their greatest crisis since their removal to military confinement from 1864 to 1868, that…

  17. Petrophysical Properties of Sandstones Containing Deformation Bands Versus Those With Fractures: the Importance of Grain Contact Strength to Fault-Zone Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. R.; Tobin, H. J.; Goodwin, L. B.

    2010-12-01

    In upper crustal fault zones, the majority of slip accumulates within a fault core, which is surrounded by a less deformed damage zone. Both the width and structural character of the damage zone affect its mechanical and hydrologic properties. Fault-related deformation can change rock mechanical properties, causing stress orientations to rotate in fault damage zones, and affecting seismicity over time. In addition, the types, densities, and orientations of structures in fault zones exert a first-order control on fault-zone permeability structure, permeability anisotropy, and flow pathways. For example, open-fracture damage zones enhance fault-parallel flow, whereas cataclastic deformation band networks slow flow in every direction except parallel to the line of intersection between bands. To improve our understanding of controls on damage zone character, we explored relationships between fault-zone structure and lithologic characteristics such as porosity and cement mineralogy in faulted quartz-rich sandstones. The sandstones chosen from fault sites in the Jurassic Navajo and Entrada sandstones in Utah, and the Cretaceous Mesaverde sandstone in Wyoming, exhibit a wide range in porosity. Samples collected include even greater variability in cements, from clay coatings on grains to patchy carbonate cement to grain-bridging quartz overgrowths and iron oxide cements. These variables demonstrably influence damage zone character, resulting in fractures in some locations and deformation bands in others (even within a single fault zone) and affecting deformation-band damage zone width. They likely influenced grain-contact strength also. Because ultrasonic velocity and related elastic moduli also vary with grain-contact strength, we measured P and S wave velocities as a function of confining pressure to 20 MPa as a sensitive proxy for grain-contact strength. More than 40 samples, including both host rock and rock with deformation bands, have been analyzed. Samples

  18. Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.

    1983-01-01

    The N aquifer is the main source of water in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area in the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations in northeastern Arizona. The N aquifer consists of the Navajo Sandstone and parts of the underlying Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone of Jurassic and Triassic age. Maximum saturated thickness of the aquifer is about 1,050 feet in the northwestern part of the area, and the aquifer thins to extinction to the southeast. Water is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 square miles of the area. To the east, north, and west of Black Mesa, the aquifer is exposed at the surface, and water is unconfined. The aquifer was in equilibrium before about 1965. Recharge of about 13,000 acre-feet per year was balanced primarily by discharge near Moenkopi Wash and Laguna Creek and by evapotranspiration. At least 180 million acre-feet of water was in storage. The estimated average hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is 0.65 foot per day. The confined storage coefficient is estimated to be about 0.0004 where the aquifer is thickest, and the estimated unconfined storage coefficient ranges from 0.10 to 0.15. Ground-water withdrawals that averaged 5,300 acre-feet per year from 1976 to 1979 have caused water levels to decline in wells in the confined part of the aquifer. Withdrawals include an average of 3,700 acre-feet per year to supply a coal-slurry pipeline from a coal mine on Black Mesa. Six observation wells equipped with water-level recorders have been used to monitor aquifer response. The water level in one well 32 miles south of the mine declined 17 feet from 1972 through 1979 and 3.5 feet during 1979. A mathematical model of the N aquifer was developed and calibrated for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The model was used in part to improve estimates of aquifer characteristics and the water budget, and it successfully reproduced the observed response of the aquifer through 1979. The model results indicate that about 95 percent of

  19. Effects of diagenesis on pore texture and petrophysical properties of sandstone reservior and its geological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with diagenesis of Yan-10 Sandstones, Yanan Series, jurassic-the main producing horizons in an exploratory area in Shan-Gan-Ning Basin, China. The effects of diagenesis on pore texture and petrophysical porperties of sandstones, its effects on forming trapping conditions for oil pools, the genesis of low permeability zone near the oil-water boundary, as well as secondary pores together with authigenic clay minerals of sandstones are presented. Furthermore, the paper describes briefly Yan-10 Sandstones in some other areas. 11 refs.

  20. Exploring Jurassic Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Patricia E.; Wiley, Clyde

    1993-01-01

    Describes several student-tested activities built around "Jurassic Park." The activities feature students engaged in role-playing scenarios, investigative research projects, journal writing and communications skills activities, cooperative learning groups, and learning experiences that make use of reading skills and mathematical knowledge. (PR)

  1. Navajo Leadership and Government: A History. Sixth-Ninth Grade Navajo Bilingual-Bicultural Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, T. L.; Wallace, Stephen

    This history of Navajo leadership and government, part of the sixth-ninth grade Navajo bilingual-bicultural social studies curriculum from the Navajo Curriculum Centers, covers types of government from the animal leaders of Navajo legend to modern times. The text is divided into five chapters: "The First Leaders,""New Neighbors--New…

  2. Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

    2007-03-31

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

  3. Final Report Navajo Transmission Project (NTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bennie Hoisington; Steven Begay

    2006-09-14

    The Diné Power Authority is developing the Navajo Transmission Project (NTP) to relieve the constraints on the transmission of electricity west of the Four Corners area and to improve the operation flexibility and reliability of the extra-high-voltage transmission system in the region. The NTP creates the wholesale transmission capacity for more economical power transfers, sales, and purchases in the region. It will facilitate the development of Navajo energy resources, improve economic conditions on the Navajo Nation as well as allow DPA to participate in the western electrical utility industry.

  4. Kinaalda: The Pathway to Navajo Womanhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Danita Begay

    1988-01-01

    Presents a personal account of the Navajo ceremony of Kinaalda, performed when a girl reaches puberty. Describes ceremonial running, corn grinding, and grooming, and admonitions and blessings received from grandmother, elderly women of the tribe, and medicine man. (SV)

  5. The Navajo Culture Center: Purpose and Plans. A Shrine and Living Symbol for the Navajo Nation to Be Located at Navajo Community College, Tsaile, Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll., Tsaile, AZ.

    Presenting its past, present, and future expectations, the Navajo Junior College anc the forthcoming Navajo Culture Center are described in detail in this publication. College information relative to the following is presented: (1) History and Origin; (2) Philosophy; (3) Objectives; (4) Purpose of the Navajo College (to serve the Navajo…

  6. Navajo Language Bibliography. Preliminary Edition, September 1973. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kari, James

    Over the years the Navajo language has received more attention than any other American Indian language. The grammatical work represents all traditions in American Indian linguistic research, from the earliest descriptivism to the latest generative grammar. In addition, there exists a large amount of material written in Navajo and a plethora of…

  7. 40 CFR 49.5513 - Federal Implementation Plan Provisions for Navajo Generating Station, Navajo Nation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Implementation Plan Provisions for Navajo Generating Station, Navajo Nation. 49.5513 Section 49.5513 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE INDIAN COUNTRY: AIR QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT Implementation Plans...

  8. Dual Language = Saad Ahaah Sinil. A Navajo-English Dictionary. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Martha, Ed.; Lynch, Regina, Ed.

    A dual-language Navajo-English dictionary provides a chart of the Navajo kinship system, a two-page map of the Navajo Nation, and English equivalents for Navajo words in 46 linguistic and cultural categories. Included are words for: races (Indian and other ethnic groups); Navajo clans; age groups; Navajo ceremonies; body parts; sickness; clothing;…

  9. Pennsylvanian to Jurassic eolian transportation systems in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, F.

    1988-01-01

    The direction of sediment transport in eolian sandstones of Pennsylvanian to Jurassic age was interpreted from crossbedding resultants (vector means) obtained from studies of eolian rocks in the western U.S., supplemented by data from the few eolian units of eastern North America. These were compiled from the published or unpublished (theses) literature, from unpublished field data contributed by colleagues, or from measurements made for this study. In addition, new paleogeographic maps were compiled to evaluate the influence of geographic features on the atmospheric circulation patterns that are inferred from the crossbedding studies. Regionally, the crossbedding indicates northeasterly, northerly, or northwesterly winds (present coordinates) from Pennsylvanian through most of Middle Jurassic time. A rather abrupt change in wind directions occurred in late Middle Jurassic time (late part of the Callovian Age) when westerly wind patterns developed. By the Late Jurassic the winds shifted to southwesterly. Calculations of the consistency factor (vector mean strength) made from region-wide analyses of the resultants indicate fairly unidirectional winds from the Pennsylvanian through the Early Jurassic. Middle Jurassic circulation was more varied, judging from crossbedding studies in the lower part of the Entrada Sandstone. Crossbedding in Upper Jurassic eolian rocks of Wyoming and South Dakota yielded a random pattern but Upper Jurassic rocks farther south on the Colorado Plateau and adjoining areas show a return to a fairly unidirectional pattern. Comparing the resultants with their reconstructed paleogeographic setting shows surprisingly little influence of major geographic features on overall circulation patterns. However, the greatest amount of local variation occurred at or near highly indented shorelines where the temperature contrast between land and water produces local wind currents that may vary appreciably from regional circulation patterns. Although they

  10. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  11. Recognition and source correlation of migrated hydrocarbons in Upper Jurassic Hareelv Formation, Jameson Land, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Requejo, A.G.; Hollywood, J.; Halpern, H.I. )

    1989-09-01

    Organic geochemical analysis of an interbedded shales and sandstone sequence from the Upper Jurassic Hareelv Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland, has revealed oil shows in the sandstones, consistent with petroleum generation and migration. A comparison of the molecular characteristics of extractable material from the sandstones with those of kerogen and bitumen from the shales indicates that the most likely origin of these shows is generation within the shales with expulsion and short-range migration into the sandstones. This conclusion is based on comparisons of biological marker distributions, stable carbon isotopic compositions of extractable material and kerogen, and pyrolysate compositions of kerogen and asphaltenes. Oil from a seep in the Savoia Halvo region south of Jameson Land can be correlated to the Jurassic sandstone oil shows based on similar isotopic compositions and asphaltene pyrolysate distributions. Impregnation of both sandstones and shales throughout the sequence by products generated at higher maturities is considered unlikely, but cannot be ruled out by the existing data. 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Diagnosis and distress in Navajo healing.

    PubMed

    Csordas, Thomas J; Storck, Michael J; Strauss, Milton

    2008-08-01

    In contemporary Navajo society, traditional Navajo ceremonies, Native American Church prayer meetings, and Navajo Christian faith healing are all highly sought-after resources in the everyday pursuit of health and well-being. What is the nature of affliction among patients who turn to such forms of religious healing? Are these patients typically afflicted with psychiatric disorder? In this article we discuss 84 Navajo patients who participated in the Navajo Healing Project during a period in which they consulted one of these forms of healing. We present diagnostic results obtained from the Structured Clinical Interview for DSMIV (SCID) administered to these patients. We then present an ethnographically augmented analysis comparing the research diagnosis obtained via the SCID with a clinical diagnosis, with the diagnosis given by religious healers, and with the understanding of their own distress on the part of patients. These analyses demonstrate how a cultural approach contributes to the basic science and clinical understandings of affliction as well as to discussion of the advantages and limitations of DSM categories as descriptors of distress and disorder. PMID:18974670

  13. 78 FR 17743 - Navajo Nation Disaster #AZ-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Navajo Nation Disaster AZ-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the Navajo Nation (FEMA-4104- DR), dated 03/05/2013. Incident: Severe Freeze. Incident Period: 12...: Primary Areas: Navajo Nation and Associated Lands. The Interest Rates are: For Physical Damage:...

  14. 78 FR 17422 - Navajo Nation; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Navajo Nation; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Navajo Nation (FEMA-4104-DR), dated March 5, 2013, and...''), as follows: I have determined that the damage to the lands associated with the Navajo...

  15. Verb Nominalization and Categorization in Navajo Children's Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iris, Madelyn Anne

    Verb nominalization in Navajo is a strategy by which children create category labels when the adult lexical item is not known; it allows for the creation of uniquely descriptive category labels. This study was based on a series of interviews with Navajo children aged four-and-a-half to approximately ten years, all native speakers of Navajo with…

  16. The Navajo Code Talkers: A Secret World War II Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jevec, Adam; Potter, Lee Ann

    2001-01-01

    Provides background information on the development of and work performed by the Navajo code talkers during World War II. Includes teaching activities for classroom use as well as examples from the code. Includes the Navajo dictionary and words with the English and Navajo meaning. (CMK)

  17. Prospects for the Survival of the Navajo Language: A Reconsideration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard

    This paper aims to reassess conclusions drawn in 1975 about the prospects for survival of the Navajo language. A study done at that time uncovered evidence that there was increasing knowledge of English among Navajo children, although knowledge of English was highly, positively correlated to the level of isolation from Navajo speakers. As a result…

  18. Analytical Bibliography of Navajo Reading Materials. Revised and Enlarged Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard; And Others

    English and Navajo language materials are described in this annotated bibliography of reading materials which is part of the Navajo Reading Study funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The English language materials were developed to teach Navajo children about their own culture and could be used to form the base for a curriculum in English for…

  19. The Fears of Navajo Children: Adaptation or Pathology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikalsky, Frank D.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the literature concerning the fears of children generally and Navajo children specifically, and reviews a recent cross-cultural study with Navajo informants. Suggests that high fear frequencies in Navajo children may not indicate pathology, but may demonstrate a cultural pattern with important adaptive value. Contains 10 references. (SV)

  20. Family Planning Attitudes of Traditional and Acculturated Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Alan; And Others

    To determine whether various indices of "acculturation" would predict attitudes towards family planning was the major purpose of a survey conducted among a highly educated group of Navajo people at Navajo Community College (NCC). Owned and operated by the Navajo Tribe, NCC served as a target survey model due to its 90% population of Navajo…

  1. Navajo Adult Basic Education: Final Report 1971-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll., Tsaile, AZ.

    The thrust of the Navajo Adult Basic Education (NABE) program is aimed at three major objectives. First, it seeks to establish, through the study of history and current events, a feeling of pride in Navajo cultural heritage, promoting self-esteem and building self-confidence. Next, it prepares the Navajo to function better in those areas of the…

  2. Mother Tongue Literacy and Language Renewal: The Case of Navajo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Teresa L.; Dick, Galena Sells

    This paper discusses the contribution of school-based mother-tongue literacy to the maintenance and renewal of endangered languages, with Navajo as the case in point. Although Navajo claims the most speakers among U.S. indigenous languages, the absolute number and relative proportion of Navajo speakers have declined drastically in the last 30…

  3. Navajo Evaluators Look at Rough Rock Demonstration School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begaye, John Y.; And Others

    Four prominent Navajo leaders evaluated Rough Rock Demonstration School by invitation of the school board. Inquiry was directed toward ascertaining the type of education Navajos desire for their children, the extent Indian culture should be included in the curriculum, and how Navajos want their schools operated. It was concluded that the student…

  4. Navajo Reading Study. Progress Report No. 4, December 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Paul, Ed.

    A summary of the discussions of the Navajo Reading Study Conference, held on December 4-5, 1969, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was presented in this report. A group of consultants met to discuss the collection of data and its analysis for a study on Navajo reading materials and the language of 6-year-old Navajo children. The consultants included Mr.…

  5. Health Problems of the Navajo Area and Suggested Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltenbach, Charles

    Analysis of morbidity, mortality, and demographic data on Navajo people was undertaken to identify leading health problems in the Navajo area and to suggest intervention activities. Comparisons with total U.S. population were made to provide perspective. Data on Navajo mortality showed: a ratio of male to female deaths of 2:1, more than 50 percent…

  6. Middle Jurassic Topawa group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona: Volcanic and sedimentary record of deep basins within the Jurassic magmatic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haxel, G.B.; Wright, J.E.; Riggs, N.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; May, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Among supracrustal sequences of the Jurassic magmatic arc of the southwestern Cordillera, the Middle Jurassic Topawa Group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona, is remarkable for its lithologic diversity and substantial stratigraphic thickness, ???8 km. The Topawa Group comprises four units (in order of decreasing age): (1) Ali Molina Formation-largely pyroclastic rhyolite with interlayered eolian and fluvial arenite, and overlying conglomerate and sandstone; (2) Pitoikam Formation-conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone overlain by interbedded silt- stone and sandstone; (3) Mulberry Wash Formation-rhyolite lava flows, flow breccias, and mass-flow breccias, with intercalated intraformational conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone, plus sparse within-plate alkali basalt and comendite in the upper part; and (4) Tinaja Spring Porphyry-intrusive rhyolite. The Mulberry Wash alkali basalt and comendite are genetically unrelated to the dominant calcalkaline rhyolite. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon from volcanic and intrusive rocks indicate the Topawa Group, despite its considerable thickness, represents only several million years of Middle Jurassic time, between approximately 170 and 165 Ma. Sedimentary rocks of the Topawa Group record mixing of detritus from a minimum of three sources: a dominant local source of porphyritic silicic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, identical or similar to those of the Topawa Group itself; Meso- proterozoic or Cambrian conglomerates in central or southeast Arizona, which contributed well-rounded, highly durable, polycyclic quartzite pebbles; and eolian sand fields, related to Middle Jurassic ergs that lay to the north of the magmatic arc and are now preserved on the Colorado Plateau. As the Topawa Group evidently represents only a relatively short interval of time, it does not record long-term evolution of the Jurassic magmatic arc, but rather represents a Middle Jurassic "stratigraphic snapshot" of the arc

  7. Diagenetic pathways for sandstones: The role of initial composition

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, N.B.

    1995-09-01

    The initial composition of a clastic section is critical in determining the diagenetic reactions that a sandstone will undergo during burial, reactions which strongly influence its reservoir properties. The role of initial composition is illustrated for Middle Jurassic sandstones of northwest Europe (including the Brent sandstone of the North Sea) and Tertiary sandstones of the Gulf of Mexico. The composition of the former evolves from arkose to quartz arenite, with massive dissolution first of plagioclase and subsequently K-feldspar. As the bulk composition changes, the suite of clay minerals changes from kaolinite-dominated to illite-dominated, suite of clay minerals changes from kaolinite-dominated to illite-dominated, typically accompanied by a pronounced decrease in permeability. The Gulf of Mexico sandstones are also initially arkoses. Their composition, however, evolves toward a mixture of quartz and compositionally pure albite. Kaolinite remains the dominant authigenic clay within the sandstones; however detrital clays change from a Na-rich, smectitic mixed layer clay to a K-rich, illitic mixed layer clay. The contrasting diagenetic pathways result from differing mineralogy in the clastic section. The smectite-rich mudstones in the Gulf of Mexico provide a powerful sink for potassium and source of sodium. The resulting low potassium activity results in K-feldspar dissolution; it also prevents illite formation, while high sodium activity stabilizes albite. The Middle Jurassic clastic section in northwest Europe contains relatively little smectite, thus lacks the potassium sink and sodium source. Sodium activity is low, so plagioclases preferentially dissolve. K-feldspars also dissolve, but the potassium here is available for illite formation.

  8. Origins of relief along contacts between eolian sandstones and overlying marine strata

    SciTech Connect

    Eschner, T.B.; Kocurek, G.

    1988-08-01

    Origins of large-scale relief along eolian-marine unit contacts, which form significant stratigraphic traps for hydrocarbons, can be recognized as inherited, reworked, and/or erosional. The Permian Rotliegende-Weissliegende Sandstone and Yellow Sands of Europe may best exemplify inherited relief in that dunes are preserved largely intact. Reworked relief, which shows significant destruction of original dune topography but with remnants of the bedforms preserved, is shown by relict Holocene dunes of coastal Australia, the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone of the San Juan basin, and the Pennsylvanian-Permian Minnelusa Formation of Wyoming. Erosional relief results from post-eolian processes and is exemplified by the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone of northeastern Utah. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Navajo Caregivers' Perceptions of Early Intervention Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applequist, Karen L.; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated 52 Navajo family caregiver perceptions about early intervention services and supplemental information was gathered from 15 early interventionists identified by caregivers. Overall, caregivers were satisfied with services. Caregivers' perceptions of program family-centeredness had a strong positive relationship with…

  10. Navajo Nation expands family planning services.

    PubMed

    Haws, J; Crawford, G

    1996-01-01

    An AVSC training program, conducted in cooperation with the Navajo Nation Family Planning Corporation (NNFPC), has the potential to profoundly affect sterilization provision and acceptability on the Navajo Nation reservation. AVSC trained a family physician from the Northern Navajo Medical Center (New Mexico) in the no-scalpel vasectomy technique. This physician expects to provide 30 such sterilizations in the one-year period following the training and is preparing to teach reservation physicians from other health centers to perform the procedure. In addition, a joint AVSC-NNFPC course on sterilization counseling was presented to 30 nursing staff from the New Mexico Center. Central to this training was consideration of the obstacles to sterilization acceptance posed by Navajo cultural beliefs. Sensitivity to some women's desire to keep the procedure private, due to concerns their husbands will abandon them if they can no longer bear children, and to the potential need to include mothers and grandmothers in counseling sessions, is required. Also salient for female counselors and nurses are cultural taboos against a woman discussing sexual matters with a man with whom she is not intimate. In late 1996, AVSC will provide a sterilization counseling update for all NNFPC counselors working at centers throughout the four-state reservation. PMID:12347635

  11. Ramah Navajo Radio and Cultural Preservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rada, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    The Ramah leadership, aware of their isolation, the lack of economic opportunity, the Navajo's poor self image as a people, and the almost total absence of any sense of community, built a radio station. This study, conducted over three and a half years after the station was put into operation, is a preliminary assessment of its impact upon the…

  12. Determinants of Blood Pressure in Navajo Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulehan, John L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Among 580 Navajo adolescents, 11.1 percent of males and 1.6 percent of females had high blood pressure. Blood pressure was related to age in males and to body mass index in females but was not related to level of acculturation or traditionality. Contains 17 references. (SV)

  13. Jurassic Park: Adventure in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shams, Marcia; Boteler, Trina

    1993-01-01

    Describes using the movie "Jurassic Park" as a foundation for a middle school interdisciplinary unit involving science, math, language arts, history, and geography. Suggested books and activities are presented. (PR)

  14. Middle Jurassic sand reservoirs of Tazovskoe field (West Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurasov, I. A.

    2012-12-01

    Perspectives of Tazovskoe field Jurassic strata development are associated with lithological and mineralogical characteristics of reservoirs, which are the main reserve of the region, because of the high rate of depletion of the most prolific Cenomanian gas pools. Tazovskoye field is multibedded and is unique in terms of hydrocarbon reserves. Middle Jurassic strata occur everywhere and are represented by rocks of the Tyumenskaya formation, comprising layers J2 - J5. The producing horizons are composed of sandstones, sandy siltstones, cemented by shaly-carbonate cement mass. According to laboratory data, the Jurassic reservoirs are characterized by a wide range of porosity (up to 22.5%) and mainly low permeability (up to 2 mD), except for a few samples of J3 reservoir with permeability up to 100-150 mD. Test objects were the core samples taken from 7 intervals of the well T-83 and logging data from 4 intervals of wells 73, 93 in the Tazovskoye field. Depth and core recovery from T-83 well of the Tazovskoye field are shown in Table 1. Total linear core recovery from the Jurassic strata was 79.4 m. Late Bajocian-Bathonian alluvial-lacustrine strata compose the first regressive cycle of sedimentation in the Tazovskoye field. They are represented by alternating thin sandy, siltstone-sandy, siltstone, shaly-siltstone, siltstone-shaly, and shaly rocks with coal interbeds. They include three main productive formations: J2, J3 and J4. Above in the vertical section, the Upper Jurassic rocks occur, while lower, basal strata of the Callovian stage overlay them with a distinct unconformity. In the Upper Jurassic time, the main transgression phase of the Jurassic period occurred over the whole territory of the Western Siberia. These strata are built by non-uniform alternating sandstones, siltstones and shales with coal interbeds of the continental genesis (alluvial-lacustrine); The reservoirs contain cyclites that as a rule have binary structure, less often - ternary structure

  15. Deformation of Aztec Sandstone at Valley of Fire of Nevada: failure modes, sequence of deformation, structural products and their interplay with paleo fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Valley of Fire State Park, 60 km NE of Las Vegas, is a beacon of knowledge for deformation of Aztec Sandstone, a cross-bedded quartz arenite deposited in the Aztec-Navajo-Nugget erg in early Jurassic. It displays great diversity of physical properties, different localization types and micromechanics. The two deformation episodes, the Sevier folding & thrusting and the Basin & Range extension affected the area. The appearance of compaction bands marks the earliest deformation structure and their distribution, orientation, and dimension are controlled by the depositional architecture and loading. The earliest shear structures in the area are the Muddy Mountain, Summit, and Willow Tank thrusts and numerous small-scale bed-parallel faults. They altogether produced several kilometers of E-SE transport and shortening in the late Cretaceous and display numerous shear bands in its damage zone within the Aztec Sandstone. Shear bands also occur along dune boundaries and cross-bed interfaces. These observations indicate that the early deformation of the sandstone was accommodated by strain localization with various kinematics. The younger generation of faults in the area is of mid-Miocene age, and crops out pervasively. It includes a series of small offset normal faults (less than a few ten meters) which can be identified at steep cliff faces. These faults are highly segmented and are surrounded by a dense population of splay fractures. A large number of these splays were later sheared sequentially resulting in a well-defined network of left- and right-lateral strike-slip faults with slip magnitudes up to a few kilometers in the Park. The formation mechanisms of both the normal and strike-slip faults can be characterized as the sliding along planes of initial weaknesses and the accompanying cataclastic deformation. Some of the initial weak planes are associated with the depositional elements such as interdune boundaries and cross-bed interfaces while others are joint

  16. Map showing ground-water conditions in the Kaibito and Tuba City areas, Coconino and Navajo counties, Arizona, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    The Kaibito and Tuba City areas include about 2,500 square miles in north-central Arizona. Ground water is obtained from the N aquifer and from alluvium. The N aquifer consists of Navajo Sandstone, Kayenta Formation, Moenave Formation, and the Lukachukai Member of the Wingate Sandstone. The main source of ground water is the Navajo Sandstone. Ground-water development has been slight in the areas. In 1977 the estimated ground-water withdrawals were about 350 acre-feet in the Kaibito area and 650 acre-feet in the Tuba City area. Water levels ranged from flowing at the land surface to 1,360 feet below the land surface. The chemical quality of the water in the N aquifer does not vary greatly in the areas. Dissolved-solids concentrations in the water range from 101 to 669 milligrams per liter but generally are less than 300 milligrams per liter. Along some of the valleys in the Kaibito and Tuba City areas, the alluvium yields water to many shallow dug wells. The water levels generally are from 5 to 15 feet below the land surface. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from the alluvium usually are less than 600 milligrams per liter. Information shown on the map (scale 1:125,000) includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, and specific conductance and fluoride concentrations. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. JURASSIC Retrieval Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, J.; Ungermann, J.; Guggenmoser, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Riese, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging in the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an aircraft based infrared limb-sounder. This presentation will give an overview of the retrieval techniques used for the analysis of data produced by the GLORIA instrument. For data processing, the JUelich RApid Spectral SImulation Code 2 (JURASSIC2) was developed. It consists of a set of programs to retrieve atmospheric profiles from GLORIA measurements. The GLORIA Michelson interferometer can run with a wide range of parameters. In the dynamics mode, spectra are generate with a medium spectral and a very high temporal and spatial resolution. Each sample can contain thousands of spectral lines for each contributing trace gas. In the JURASSIC retrieval code this is handled by using a radiative transport model based on the Emissivity Growth Approximation. Deciding which samples should be included in the retrieval is a non-trivial task and requires specific domain knowledge. To ease this problem we developed an automatic selection program by analysing the Shannon information content. By taking into account data for all relevant trace gases and instrument effects, optimal integrated spectral windows are computed. This includes considerations for cross-influence of trace gases, which has non-obvious consequence for the contribution of spectral samples. We developed methods to assess the influence of spectral windows on the retrieval. While we can not exhaustively search the whole range of possible spectral sample combinations, it is possible to optimize information content using a genetic algorithm. The GLORIA instrument is mounted with a viewing direction perpendicular to the flight direction. A gimbal frame makes it possible to move the instrument 45° to both direction. By flying on a circular path, it is possible to generate images of an area of interest from a wide range of angles. These can be analyzed in a 3D-tomographic fashion, which yields superior spatial resolution along line of

  18. The Navajo Way of Life: A Resource Unit with Activities for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordova, Dahlia

    A resource unit on the Navajo way of life, for grades 4-6, contains sections on Navajo history, art, and crafts, homes, music, poetry and games; Navajo and Pueblo cookery (including recipes); traditional Navajo dress, ceremony and legends; and successful Navajos, past and present. Sections include text, vocabulary words, drawings, maps, and…

  19. Reclaiming Indigenous Intellectual, Political, and Geographic Space: A Path for Navajo Nationhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lloyd L.

    2008-01-01

    For millennia, Navajo society was self-sufficient. After 1863, beginning with Kit Carson's murderous rampage among the Navajo and the subsequent removal to the Bosque Redondo reservation, Navajo nationhood changed. Navajo society began a slow transformation away from the distinct Dine way of life. In the twentieth century Navajo nationalism was…

  20. Language Learning in the American Southwestern Borderlands: Navajo Speakers and Their Transition to Academic English Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyc, Gloria

    2002-01-01

    The Navajo Nation wants a 2-year Navajo language requirement for regional colleges. At the same time, literacy in academic English is required for Navajo students wishing to enter the sciences, medicine, and law. The difficulties students face as they make the transition from English to Navajo and from Navajo to English are described. Four…

  1. Navajo Participation in Labor Unions. Lake Powell Research Project Bulletin Number 15, December 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Lynn A.

    Navajo participation in labor unions and Navajo labor relations have undergone rapid and fundamental changes since the development of industry around Lake Powell and on Black Mesa. Early attempts to unionize Navajo workers met with stiff resistance from employees and the Navajo Tribal Council. Union entry into the Navajo Reservation was viewed as…

  2. Reevaluation of upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior

    SciTech Connect

    Mantzios, C.

    1989-03-01

    Comparison of the Brushy Basin member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Colorado Plateau with the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Morrison-Cloverly sequence in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, shows great similarities in their depositional environments and stratigraphy. The lower Brushy Basin member is a fluvial deposit composed of channel sandstones and overbank mudstones which display a great number of pedogenic features. Similar depositional setting has been observed in the Morrison Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, where pedogenic features suggest a distal floodplain setting with low-sinuosity channels cutting through. In both localities the dominant clay mineral is illite. The upper Brushy Basin member in the Colorado Plateau is composed mostly of gray and purpose mudstones rich in montmorillonite. Devitrified tuff beds and bentonite occur in certain levels throughout the unit. Pedogenic features are not conspicuously developed. The Lower Cretaceous Clovery Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, is strikingly similar in terms of lithological aspects. The depositional environment is interpreted in both localities as a playa deposit. A great variety of nodules is present such as silcretes, septaria, and silica-carbonate nodules. Radiometric dating of bentonites in central Utah revealed that the upper Brushy Basin member is Early Cretaceous in age. Field and geochemical data support these conclusions and aid the understanding of the exact nature of the depositional basin, environments, stratigraphy, and paleotectonics of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous interval in the Western Interior.

  3. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Fox, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

  4. Hydrologic analyses in support of the Navajo Generating Station–Kayenta Mine Complex environmental impact statement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, Stanley A.; Macy, Jamie P.; Truini, Margot

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionThe U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region (Reclamation) is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Navajo Generating Station-Kayenta Mine Complex Project (NGS-KMC Project). The proposed project involves various Federal approvals that would facilitate continued operation of the Navajo Generating Station (NGS) from December 23, 2019 through 2044, and continued operation of the Kayenta Mine and support facilities (collectively called the Kayenta Mine Complex, or KMC) to supply coal to the NGS for this operational period. The EIS will consider several project alternatives that are likely to produce different effects on the Navajo (N) aquifer; the N aquifer is the principal water resource in the Black Mesa area used by the Navajo Nation, Hopi Tribe, and Peabody Western Coal Company (PWCC).The N aquifer is composed of three hydraulically connected formations—the Navajo Sandstone, the Kayenta Formation, and the Lukachukai Member of the Wingate Sandstone—that function as a single aquifer. The N aquifer is confined under most of Black Mesa, and the overlying stratigraphy limits recharge to this part of the aquifer. The N aquifer is unconfined in areas surrounding Black Mesa, and most recharge occurs where the Navajo Sandstone is exposed in the area near Shonto, Arizona. Overlying the N aquifer is the D aquifer, which includes the Dakota Sandstone, Morrison Formation, Entrada Sandstone, and Carmel Formation. The aquifer is named for the Dakota Sandstone, which is the primary water-bearing unit.The NGS is located near Page, Arizona on the Navajo Nation. The KMC, which delivers coal to NGS by way of a dedicated electric railroad, is located approximately 83 miles southeast of NGS (about 125 miles northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona). The Kayenta Mine permit area is located on about 44,073 acres of land leased within the boundaries of the Hopi and Navajo Indian Reservations. KMC has been conducting mining and

  5. Lung cancer among Navajo uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, L.S.; Husen, L.A.

    1982-04-01

    Lung cancer has been a rare disease among the Indians of the southwestern United States. However, the advent of uranium mining in the area has been associated with an increased incidence of lung cancer among Navajo uranium miners. This study centers on Navajo men with lung cancer who were admitted to the hospital from February 1965 to May 1979. Of a total of 17 patients with lung cancer, 16 were uranium miners, and one was a nonminer. The mean value of cumulative radon exposure for this group was 1139.5 working level months (WLMs). The predominant cancer type was the small cell undifferentiated category (62.5 percent). The low frequency of cigarette smoking in this group supports the view that radiation is the primary cause of lung cancer among uranium miners and that cigarette smoking acts as a promoting agent.

  6. Stochastic reconstruction of sandstones

    PubMed

    Manwart; Torquato; Hilfer

    2000-07-01

    A simulated annealing algorithm is employed to generate a stochastic model for a Berea sandstone and a Fontainebleau sandstone, with each a prescribed two-point probability function, lineal-path function, and "pore size" distribution function, respectively. We find that the temperature decrease of the annealing has to be rather quick to yield isotropic and percolating configurations. A comparison of simple morphological quantities indicates good agreement between the reconstructions and the original sandstones. Also, the mean survival time of a random walker in the pore space is reproduced with good accuracy. However, a more detailed investigation by means of local porosity theory shows that there may be significant differences of the geometrical connectivity between the reconstructed and the experimental samples. PMID:11088546

  7. Frisco City sand: New Jurassic reservoir in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, S.D.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L. ); Schneeflock, R.D. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    The first commercial production of hydrocarbons from the Jurassic Haynesville Formation in southwestern Alabama was from the Frisco City field. The field currently produces 57.8{degree} API gravity oil on 160-ac well spacing from a depth of approximately 12,000 ft. Perforations are in the Frisco City sand interval, in the lower part of the Haynesville Formation. Average porosity is 15% and average permeability is 45 md. Currently, the field has two producing wells with cumulative production of over 138,876 bbl of oil and 213,144 mcf of gas. The hydrocarbon trap in the Frisco City field is a combination structural-stratigraphic trap. The Frisco City sand reservoir is located on a faulted anticline. The stratigraphic trap is produced by a permeability barrier near the crest of the structure and termination against a basement high. The lower part of the Haynesville Formation in this area is comprised of (in ascending order) the Buckner Anhydrite Member, the Frisco City sand, and interbedded shale and anhydrite. Sandstones of the Frisco City sand interval were deposited in a shallow marine setting and have a sheetlike morphology. The sandstones are poorly to moderately sorted, angular to rounded arkose, and contain angular to rounded pebbles. The sandstones are interbedded with thin, sandy, mudstones that contribute, along with patchy carbonate and anhydrite cement, to considerable reservoir heterogeneity. Porosity is predominantly primary intergranular with a small amount of framework grain dissolution and decementation.

  8. Incidence and prevalence of Parkinson's disease among Navajo people living in the Navajo nation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Paul H; Mehal, Jason M; Holman, Robert C; Bartholomew, Michael L; Cheek, James E; Rowland, Andrew S

    2015-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is largely unstudied among American Indians. Unique populations might harbor clues to elusive causes. We describe the incidence and prevalence of PD among Navajo people residing in the Navajo Nation, home to the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. We analyzed 2001-2011 inpatient and outpatient visit data for Navajo people obtained from the Indian Health Service, which provides health care to American Indian people living on the Navajo Reservation. Cases were defined by at least two inpatient or outpatient visits with the diagnosis of PD. Crude and age-adjusted incidence and prevalence rates were calculated overall as well as by age, sex, region of residence, and time period. Five hundred twenty-four Navajo people with median age-at-onset of 74.0 years were diagnosed with PD during the study period, yielding an average annual crude incidence rate of 22.5/100,000. Age-specific incidence was 232.0 for patients 65 years of age or older and 302.0 for 80 years of age or older. Age-adjusted incidence was 35.9 overall (238.1 for ≥65 years), was higher in men than in women (47.5 vs. 27.7; P<0.001), varied by region (P=0.03), and was similar between time periods (2002-2004 vs. 2009-2011). The age-adjusted point prevalence rate was 261.0. The rate of PD among Navajo People appears to be as high as or higher than rates reported in many other populations. Rates increased to the highest age group, consistent with population-based studies. Further investigation is warranted to examine risk factors for PD in this remote population. PMID:25649219

  9. Compactional deformation bands in Wingate Sandstone; additional evidence of an impact origin for Upheaval Dome, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Chris H.; Schultz, Richard A.

    2007-04-01

    Field and microstructural observations from Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, show that inelastic strain of the Wingate Sandstone is localized along compactional deformation bands. These bands are tabular discontinuities (< 0.5 cm thick) that accommodate inelastic shear and compaction of inter-granular volume. Measurements of porosity and grain size from non-deformed samples are used to define a set of capped strength envelopes for the Wingate Sandstone. These strength envelopes reveal that compactional deformation bands require at least ca. 0.7 GPa (and potentially more than 2.3 GPa) of effective mean stress in order to nucleate within this sandstone. We find that the most plausible geologic process capable of generating these required magnitudes of mean stress is a meteoritic impact. Therefore the compactional deformation bands observed within the Wingate Sandstone are additional evidence of an impact event at Upheaval Dome and support a post-Wingate (post-Early Jurassic) age for this impact.

  10. Controls on the variability of net infiltration to desert sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; McKinney, Tim S.; Zhdanov, Michael S.; Watt, Dennis E.

    2007-07-01

    As populations grow in arid climates and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration becomes critically important for accurately inventorying water resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. This paper presents a conceptual model of net infiltration to desert sandstone and then develops an empirical equation for its spatial quantification at the watershed scale using linear least squares inversion methods for evaluating controlling parameters (independent variables) based on estimated net infiltration rates (dependent variables). Net infiltration rates used for this regression analysis were calculated from environmental tracers in boreholes and more than 3000 linear meters of vadose zone excavations in an upland basin in southwestern Utah underlain by Navajo sandstone. Soil coarseness, distance to upgradient outcrop, and topographic slope were shown to be the primary physical parameters controlling the spatial variability of net infiltration. Although the method should be transferable to other desert sandstone settings for determining the relative spatial distribution of net infiltration, further study is needed to evaluate the effects of other potential parameters such as slope aspect, outcrop parameters, and climate on absolute net infiltration rates.

  11. Controls on the variability of net infiltration to desert sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; McKinney, T.S.; Zhdanov, M.S.; Watt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in and climates and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration becomes critically important for accurately inventorying water resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. This paper presents a conceptual model of net infiltration to desert sandstone and then develops an empirical equation for its spatial quantification at the watershed scale using linear least squares inversion methods for evaluating controlling parameters (independent variables) based on estimated net infiltration rates (dependent variables). Net infiltration rates used for this regression analysis were calculated from environmental tracers in boreholes and more than 3000 linear meters of vadose zone excavations in an upland basin in southwestern Utah underlain by Navajo sandstone. Soil coarseness, distance to upgradient outcrop, and topographic slope were shown to be the primary physical parameters controlling the spatial variability of net infiltration. Although the method should be transferable to other desert sandstone settings for determining the relative spatial distribution of net infiltration, further study is needed to evaluate the effects of other potential parameters such as slope aspect, outcrop parameters, and climate on absolute net infiltration rates. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Laughter: The Navajo Way. Humorous Stories of the People (in Navajo and English) Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Alan; Dennison, Gene

    This book has been prepared for the use of teachers, ethnologists, linguists, Indian studies scholars, language students and those who have an interest in the languages and cultures of the earlier inhabitants of this continent. The stories reflect the Navajo love for and genius with words and humor. Most of the humor represented is of three basic…

  13. Navajo Area Health and Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomah, Kent; And Others

    Based on health education needs of Navajo children as established by the Navajo Area health and physical education committees, this curriculum guideline for health and physical education is delineated into three phases reflecting emphasis of instructional techniques (introductory, exploration/extended learning, widened learning) and three levels…

  14. "Dine Bikeya": Teaching about Navajo Citizenship and Sovereignty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Elizabeth Yeager; van Hover, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    The Navajo Nation, comprising the largest land area allocated mainly to a Native American jurisdiction in the United States, offers a unique opportunity to enhance students' understandings of citizenship rights and sovereignty. For example, what does sovereignty mean on the reservation? What is the relationship between the Navajo Nation and the…

  15. The Impact on Navajo Mothers Becoming Special Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prater, Greg; And Others

    This paper discusses the impact that participating in a teacher preparation program has had on Navajo mothers. Mothers play a very central role in Navajo culture, and such impacts, both positive and negative, are important not only to program participants, but also to those working in Indian communities. Informal surveys were conducted with 20…

  16. Depo-provera associated with weight gain in Navajo women.

    PubMed

    Espey, E; Steinhart, J; Ogburn, T; Qualls, C

    2000-08-01

    Depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is an increasingly popular contraceptive choice among Navajo women. Weight gain is cited as a common side effect and major reason for discontinuation of DMPA. No controlled trials have evaluated the association between weight gain and DMPA in Navajo women. We aimed to clarify whether DMPA is associated with weight gain in Navajo women and to quantify the magnitude of weight gain. A cohort of 172 Navajo women who had used DMPA continuously for one or 2 years comprised the study group. A cohort of 134 Navajo women who used a non-progestin method or no method over 1 or 2 years comprised the comparison group. Initial weight, one-year weight and 2-year weights were recorded for all patients. Study subjects gained a mean of 6 pounds over one year and 11 pounds over 2 years relative to the comparison group (p < 0.001) after controlling for possible confounding variables including age, parity and initial weight. Use of DMPA is associated with significant weight gain in Navajo women. This weight gain is greater than that reported in previous uncontrolled studies in non-Navajo populations. This information should be utilized in counseling Navajo women about the side effects of DMPA. PMID:11102587

  17. Description and Bibliography, Revised 1975. Navajo Reading Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard, Comp.; And Others

    Begun in 1969, the Navajo Reading Study investigated the feasibility and effect of teaching Navajo children to read their own language before they start learning to read English. Conducted at the University of New Mexico and supported by grants from the Ford Foundation and contracts with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the U.S. Office of…

  18. Navajo Mothers and Daughters: Schools, Jobs, and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyhle, Donna; Margonis, Frank

    1995-01-01

    Studies Navajo women's family orientation in reservation society and its conflict with contemporary educational practice and the work world, especially in the city. The focus on individualistic lifestyle and adoption of middle-class values accounts for the inability of schools to meet Navajo women's needs. (MMU)

  19. Mask of Black God: The Pleiades in Navajo Cosmology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Teresa M.

    2005-01-01

    One Navajo legend attributes the creation of the primary stars and constellations to Black God. Today, a famous star cluster--the Pleiades--often appears on the traditional mask worn by chanters impersonating Black God during special ceremonies. In this case study, students learn about the Pleiades in Navajo cosmology while honing their…

  20. The Effects of Sociocultural Factors on the Navajo Literacy Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Diane C.

    This paper describes an ethnographic study of school and community characteristics affecting the literacy development of Navajo children, and provides an overview of sociocultural factors in the literacy environment of one Navajo community. The researcher was a principal at Pinon Public School District #4 in Pinon, Arizona, in the heart of the…

  1. The Navajo Agricultural Projects Industry: Subsistence Farming to Corporate Agribusiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Tom

    1979-01-01

    Originally designed to create small farms for individual Navajos, the irrigation project has grown into a single 110,000-acre corporate agribusiness, the land's management has fallen out of the grasp of individual Navajos, and the idea of subsistence farming has been plowed under for the planting of major money-making crops. (NQ)

  2. Navajo Youth and Anglo Racism: Cultural Integrity and Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyhle, Donna

    1995-01-01

    Results of a 10-year ethnographic study of Navajo youth show that racial and cultural differences intertwine with power relations and that Navajos' success or failure in school is part of the process of racial conflict. Subject to discrimination in workplaces and curricula, they are more academically successful when more secure in their…

  3. Right after Sundown: Teaching Stories of the Navajos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabery, Marilyne Virginia

    Understanding of the traditional Navajo world view and philosophy is ultimately centered on their origin story of emergence into the present world. All stories stem from this basic one. This collection of 12 Navajo stories includes origin stories, coyote stories, and a fairly recent one that describes a recognizable place. In the Anglo sense,…

  4. Assessing Navajo Psychological and Educational Needs in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Elaine; French, Laurence; Tempest, Phyllis

    1997-01-01

    Examines issues impacting identification and evaluation of Navajo children at risk: acculturation variables creating culture conflict; mental health issues for Navajo communities; environmental, emotional, and physical health factors contributing to underachievement; testing bias issues resulting in inappropriate educational placement decisions;…

  5. The Navajo Student and the Tennessee Self Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempest, Phyllis

    1985-01-01

    Using Tennessee Self Concept, the follow-up study evaluated 33 Navajo eighth graders who were part of a seventh grade daily prescriptive intervention program and were part of a previous study of 222 Navajo fifth graders given tests assessing their strength and needs so that an appropriate curriculum could be adopted. (NEC)

  6. Socializing English-Speaking Navajo Children to Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vining, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how young children are socialized to the process and products of storytelling as part of everyday family life is important for language and literacy instruction. A language socialization framework was used to understand storytelling practices on the Navajo Nation. This study examined how three young English-speaking Navajo children,…

  7. Navajo Archaeologist Is Not an Oxymoron: A Tribal Archaeologist's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Two Bears, Davina R.

    2006-01-01

    Many Navajos, or Dines, and Native American people in general, are archaeologists or are becoming archaeologists. The distinction between "Native Americans" and "archaeologists" in academia, or elsewhere, is no longer accurate. This fact should not come as such a surprise. As the epigraph, a quote by Richard Begay, demonstrates, Navajo people, for…

  8. Petrography and geologic significance of Upper Jurassic rocks dredged near Pribilof Islands, southern Bering Sea continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Vallier, T.L.; Underwood, M.B.; Jones, D.L.; Gardner, J.V.

    1980-06-01

    Upper Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) sandstone and siltstone dredged from a probable submerged marine terrace near St. George Island (Pribilof Islands) in the southern Bering Sea are correlative with the upper part of the Naknek Formation exposed on the Alaska Peninsula and with rocks dredged from the continental slope. The rocks have higher percentages of volcanic components than those of the Naknek Formation collected from the Alaska Peninsula. This discovery increases the known regional extent of Upper Jurassic rocks and suggests that they underlie a large part of the continental margin in the St. George Basin region of the southern Bering Sea. 3 figures, 1 table.

  9. Health and health services among the Navajo Indians.

    PubMed

    Haraldson, S S

    1988-01-01

    The Navajo are the largest Indian tribe in the continental U.S. with a population in 1986 estimated at 171,097. The Navajo Nation (Reservation) is located along the borders where Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah meet. Social and economic changes have accrued among the Navajo at a rapid rate during this century. At present, revenues are derived from oil, coal and uranium and from federal grants and contracts. High unemployment rates have been a major problem among the Navajo. This article reviews health, disease and health care among the present day Navajo. Mortality rates from accidents and suicide are disproportionately high and have as their causes longstanding social and behavioral problems. Although there has been a sharp decline in morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases, there are still major environmental health problems. PMID:3068261

  10. Cultural identity, explanatory style, and depression in Navajo adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, Traci R; Wadsworth, Martha E; Deyhle, Donna

    2004-11-01

    This study investigated the interrelationships among cultural identity, explanatory style, and depression in Navajo adolescents. A total of 332 (197 female, 135 male) Navajo adolescents completed 7 self-report measures. These data were used to create, via structural equation modeling, a series of factor models and full structural models. Analyses indicated that current factor structures for explanatory style and depression are adequate for use with Navajo adolescents. Increased control and predictability and limited duration of stressful encounters were both predictive of decreased symptoms of depression. Higher levels of Navajo cultural identity had a modest effect in terms of reducing depression. Other factors, such as perceived discrimination and urban/reservation domicile, are important to study to provide an increased understanding of depression among Navajo adolescents. PMID:15554799

  11. Collapsing the Fear of Mathematics: A Study of the Effects of Navajo Culture on Navajo Student Performance in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Henry H.

    2010-01-01

    Collapsing the Fear of Mathematics: A Study of the Effects of Navajo Culture on Navajo Student Performance in Mathematics by Henry H Fowler Abstract American schools are in a state of "mediocrity" because of the low expectations in math (National Commission on Excellence in Education, 1983; No Child Left Behind Act of 2001; Duncan, 2009).…

  12. Navajo Culture and Family Influences on Academic Success: Traditionalism Is Not a Significant Predictor of Achievement among Navajo Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willeto, Angela A. A.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 451 Navajo youths attending 11 high schools in the Navajo Nation found no relationship between their academic achievement and their cultural attachments and practices. Families modestly influenced educational outcomes, but being female was a stronger predictor of academic success. An appendix describes study variables. (Contains 42…

  13. From a Place Deep inside: Culturally Appropriate Curriculum as the Embodiment of Navajo-ness in Classroom Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie-Mintz, Tarajean

    2007-01-01

    Three Navajo teachers' conceptions of culturally appropriate curriculum and pedagogy highlight the benefits of reflective practice within different educational and school contexts. Each teacher provides a way of thinking about culturally appropriate curriculum, and its implementation in classroom practice for different Navajo students. The ways in…

  14. Area Health Education Center of the Navajo Health Authority to Establish the Navajo Center for Health Professions Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    The Area Health Education Center (AHEC) is designed to provide educational opportunities in health and allied fields and to improve health care for the Navajo people and other Indians in the region that includes and immediately surrounds the Navajo Indian Reservation. As prime contractor, the University of New Meixco School of Medicine will…

  15. Looking after the Land: The Navajo Dryland Environments Laboratory Researches the Environmental Needs of the Navajo Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semken, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the formation and operations of the Navajo Dryland Environments Laboratory (NDEL). NDEL, established by the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium of New Mexico on the campus of Navajo Community College, focuses on environmental geology, hydrology, and resource management of the Colorado Plateau drylands. (DMM)

  16. Diné (Navajo) Ethno- and Archaeoastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Von Del

    The Navajo (Diné) are an Athabascan-speaking people who migrated from the far northwest of America into the desert southwest where they became the largest surviving Native American culture. Three words portray Diné philosophy - beauty, harmony, and balance. Their traditions are rich with astronomical symbolism found in literature, ceremony, iconography, artifacts, rock art, and the sacred landscape. This chapter summarizes Diné astronomical traditions, identification of stars known to be important to the Diné, and how these are depicted on artifacts and rock art.

  17. Long term effects of CO2 on 3-D pore structure and 3-D phase distribution in reservoir sandstones from the Green River well (Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhoorn, Auke; Kisoensingh, Shailesh

    2014-05-01

    Reservoir sandstones and cap rocks from the Green River area in Utah (USA) have been naturally exposed to CO2 fluids for hundreds of thousands of years, leading to compositional and microstructural alterations of the rocks. A 300m long section of this section of these Green river reservoir and cap rocks has been cored in 2012. Here, results of a high-resolution micro X-ray tomography study of a suite of samples from the well are reported detailing the 3D pore structure and phase distribution changes due to long term CO2 exposure. The reservoir sandstones from the Green River well (Utah) reveal the presence of various degrees of carbonate precipitation in the pores. Both reservoir sandstones (the shallower Entrada Formation and the deeper Navajo Formation) show variations in carbonate content and porosity structure. The Entrada sandstone exhibits widespread carbonate precipitation (up to 60% of infill of the original porosity), with the largest amount of carbonates at the boundary with the underlying Carmel cap rock. In an interval of a meter from the contact, carbonate precipitation decreases sharply till ~20%. The porosity is significantly reduced in the lowest 1 meter. The reduction in porosity lead to a reduction in pore connectivity and thereby permeability by the long-term CO2 exposure. On the other hand the Navajo sandstone shows predominantly only isolated spots of carbonate precipitation (up to 20% of the original porosity). Widespread carbonate precipitation is absent in the Navajo reservoir sandstone samples. Because carbonate precipitation is not present throughout, the large-scale permeability of the formation is likely not significantly affected by the CO2 exposure. The results show how the 3D distribution of the phases and the 3D shapes of the pores are affected by long term CO2 exposure and can be used as an example for potential changes to be expected in reservoir sandstones due to CO2 storage in future CO2 sequestration endeavours.

  18. 40 CFR 147.3400 - Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained or inspected at the Navajo Nation... General of the Navajo Nation Pursuant to 40 CFR 145.24”, August 27, 2001. (2) “Statement of the Attorney... Plant and the Navajo Generating Station; and on Navajo Nation tribal trust lands and trust...

  19. 40 CFR 147.3400 - Navajo Indian lands-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained or inspected at the Navajo Nation... General of the Navajo Nation Pursuant to 40 CFR 145.24”, August 27, 2001. (2) “Statement of the Attorney... Plant and the Navajo Generating Station; and on Navajo Nation tribal trust lands and trust...

  20. 25 CFR 161.802 - How will the Navajo Nation recommend amendments to this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How will the Navajo Nation recommend amendments to this... Navajo Nation recommend amendments to this part? The Resources Committee will have final authority on behalf of the Navajo Nation to approve amendments to the Navajo Partitioned Lands grazing...

  1. 30 CFR 756.13 - Approval of the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine....13 Approval of the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan. The Navajo Nation's Abandoned Mine Land... approved effective May 16, 1988. Copies of the approved program are available at: (a) The Navajo...

  2. 25 CFR 161.802 - How will the Navajo Nation recommend amendments to this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will the Navajo Nation recommend amendments to this... Navajo Nation recommend amendments to this part? The Resources Committee will have final authority on behalf of the Navajo Nation to approve amendments to the Navajo Partitioned Lands grazing...

  3. 30 CFR 756.13 - Approval of the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine....13 Approval of the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan. The Navajo Nation's Abandoned Mine Land... approved effective May 16, 1988. Copies of the approved program are available at: (a) The Navajo...

  4. A Framework for Engaging Navajo Women in Clean Energy Development through Applied Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osnes, Beth; Manygoats, Adrian; Weitkamp, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Through applied theatre, Navajo women can participate in authoring a new story for how energy is mined, produced, developed, disseminated and used in the Navajo Nation. This article is an analysis of a creative process that was utilised with primarily Navajo women to create a Navajo Women's Energy Project (NWEP). The framework for this creative…

  5. Teaching Dine Language and Culture in Navajo Schools: Voices from the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelder, Ann

    Since 1984 the Navajo Nation has mandated instruction in Navajo language and culture in K-12 schools within its boundaries. In 1998-99, a survey and follow-up interviews with 48 individuals in 20 Navajo communities examined community attitudes and beliefs about the value of Navajo language and culture studies and the extent to which the schools…

  6. The Physical, Environmental, and Intellectual Profile of the Fifth Grade Navajo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempest, Phyllis

    1987-01-01

    A random sample of 222 Navajo fifth graders from the Navajo Reservation were selected from eight schools and given an extensive battery of tests to determine intelligence, academic achievement, physical health, and environmental conditions. Results produced an average Navajo learning profile to which other Reservation Navajo students can be…

  7. Middle Jurassic strata link Wallowa, Olds Ferry, and Izee terranes in the accreted Blue Mountains island arc, northeastern Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.L. ); Vallier, T. ); Stanley, G.D. Jr. ); Ash, S.R. ); White, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    Middle Jurassic strata atop the Wallowa terrane in northeastern Oregon link the Wallowa, Izee, and Olds Ferry terranes as related elements of a single long-lived and complex oceanic feature, the Blue Mountains island arc. Middle Jurassic strata in the Wallowa terrane include a dacitic ash-flow deposit and contain fossil corals and bivalves of North American affinity. Plant fossils in fluvial sandstones support a Jurassic age and indicate a seasonal temperate climate. Corals in a transgressive sequence traditionally overlying the fluvial units are of Bajocian age and are closely related to endemic varieties of the Western Interior embayment. They are unlike Middle Jurassic corals in other Cordilleran terranes; their presence suggests that the Blue Mountains island arc first approached the North American craton at high paleolatitudes in Middle Jurassic time. The authors consider the Bajocian marine strata and underlying fluvial volcaniclastic units to be a basin-margin equivalent of the Izee terrane, a largely Middle Jurassic (Bajocian) succession of basinal volcaniclastic and volcanic rocks known to overlie the Olds Ferry and Baker terranes.

  8. A northwest trending, Jurassic Fold Nappe, northernmost Zacatecas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas H.; McKee, James W.; Jones, Norris W.

    1991-04-01

    The Caopas, Rodeo, and Nazas formations exposed in the San Julián uplift of northern Zacatecas are distinguished principally on the basis of style and intensity of deformation; they are parts of the same early Mesozoic(?) volcanogenic suite. This suite was the source for overlying volcaniclastic conglomerate and sandstone (La Joya Formation) that appears transitional into succeeding Late Jurassic (Oxfordian?) Zuloaga Limestone. Deformation that was contemporaneous with the deposition of the lower part of the Zuloaga produced an asymmetrical northwest trending fold nappe that was driven southwestward. The massive quartz-porphyry core of the structure (Caopas Formation) moved somewhat independently of the encasing, more ductile rocks (Rodeo and Nazas formations). Phyllonite developed in the nose of the nappe; the upright limb was attenuated and ruptured. In zones where deformation due to the nappe-forming process was weaker, a gently dipping foliation, possibly related to an older episode of recumbent folding, is preserved. Orientation, age, and location of the nappe suggest that it is a manifestation of transpressional stress developed along the Mojave-Sonora megashear as left-lateral movement carried the Jurassic arc toward the southeast.

  9. Potential tight gas resources in a frontier province - Jurassic through Tertiary strata beneath the Brooks Range foothills, Arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Houseknecht, David W.; Potter, Christopher J.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Beneath the foothills of the Brooks Range, rocks of the Lower Cretaceous-Tertiary Brookian and Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Beaufortian megasequences have been deeply buried and exhumed, and now exhibit characteristics of 'tight gas sandstones'. The data recovered from drilling, well tests, and cores exhibit the potential for substantial gas reserves over a large area. These data include recovery of gas from drillstem tests, indications of overpressure from well tests and mud weights, low porosity and permeability in sandstones, and vitrinite reflectance values ranging from 1.0 to 2.0 percent throughout substantial depth intervals.

  10. Navajo coal and air quality in Shiprock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.

    2006-01-01

    Among the Navajo people, high levels of respiratory disease, such as asthma, exist in a population with low rates of cigarette smoking. Air quality outdoors and indoors affects respiratory health. Many Navajo Nation residents burn locally mined coal in their homes for heat, as coal is the most economical energy source. The U.S. Geological Survey and Dine College, in cooperation with the Navajo Division of Health, are conducting a study in the Shiprock, New Mexico, area to determine if indoor use of this coal might be contributing to some of the respiratory health problems experienced by the residents. Researchers in this study will (1) examine respiratory health data, (2) identify stove type and use, (3) analyze samples of coal that are used locally, and (4) measure and characterize air quality inside selected homes. This Fact Sheet summarizes the interim results of the study in both English and Navajo. This Fact Sheet is available in three versions: * English [800-KB PDF file ] * Navajo [computer must have Navajo language fonts installed - 304-KB PDF file] * Image of the Navajo language version [19.8-MB PDF file

  11. HVI and HVII mitochondrial DNA data in Apaches and Navajos.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Allard, Marc W; Fisher, Constance L; Isenberg, Alice R; Monson, Keith L; Stewart, John E B; Wilson, Mark R; Miller, Kevin W P

    2002-08-01

    Most mtDNA studies on Native Americans have concentrated on hypervariable region I (HVI) sequence data. Mitochondrial DNA haplotype data from hypervariable regions I and II (HVI and HVII) have been compiled from Apaches (N=180) and Navajos (N=146). The inclusion of HVII data increases the amount of information that can be obtained from low diversity population groups. Less mtDNA variation was observed in the Apaches and Navajos than in major population groups. The majority of the mtDNA sequences were observed more than once; only 17.8% (32/180) of the Apache sequences and 25.8% of the Navajo sequences were observed once. Most of the haplotypes in Apaches and Navajos fall into the A and B haplogroups. Although a limited number of haplogroups were observed, both sample populations exhibit sufficient variation for forensic mtDNA typing. Genetic diversity was 0.930 in the Apache sample and 0.963 in the Navajo sample. The random match probability was 7.48% in the Apache sample and 4.40% in the Navajo sample. The average number of nucleotide differences between individuals in a database is 9.0 in the Navajo sample and 7.7 in the Apache sample. The data demonstrate that mtDNA sequencing can be informative in forensic cases where Native American population data are used. PMID:12185491

  12. Geology and ground water of the Red Lake area, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.; McClymonds, N.E.; Harshbarger, John William

    1962-01-01

    The Red Lake area in the Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine if 1 mgd (mil- lion gallons per day) of water could be obtained for the requirements of a proposed sawmill. Geologic mapping and stratigraphic studies indicated three favorable areas where ground water may be developed. Test holes were drilled under contract in the areas, and pumping tests indicate that 500,000 gpd (gal- lons per day) is available from alluvium along Tohdildonih Wash near Frog Rock, 100,000 gpd is available from the Shinarump member of the Chinle forma- tion and the De Chelly sandstone near Red Lake, and 800,000 gpd is available from alluvium and cinder beds in lapiUi tuff in Buell Park, an eroded diatreme. The diatreme at Buell Park is about 2% miles in diameter. It was formed by several explosions in which lapilli tuff and cinders were erupted. These materials, together with later basaltic intrusive and extrusive rock, now fill the diatreme. The tuff and cinders are water bearing, 'and they receive re- charge from rainwater and snowmelt moving through overlying alluvium and from storage in the De Chelly sandstone which encloses the east half of the diatreme. The quality of water from all areas is suitable for domestic use. However, special treatment may be necessary to make the water suitable for pulp processing.

  13. Natural and Laboratory-Induced Compaction Bands in Aztec Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimson, B. C.; Lee, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Aztec sandstone used in this research is from the Valley of Fire State Park area, Nevada. This Jurassic aeolian sandstone is extremely weak (uniaxial compressive strength of 1-2 MPa); porosity averages 26%; grains are subrounded and have a bimodal size distribution (0.1 mm and 0.5 mm); its mineral composition (K. Sternlof, personal comm.) is 93% quartz, 5% k-spar, and 2% kaolinite, Fe carbonate and others; grain bonding is primarily through suturing. Sternlof et al. (EOS, November, 2001) observed substantial exposure of mainly compactive deformation bands in the Aztec sandstone. We studied an SEM image of a compaction band found in a hand sample of the Aztec sandstone. We also conducted a drilling test in a 130x130x180 mm prismatic specimen subjected to a preset far-field true triaxial stress condition (\\sigmah = 15 MPa, \\sigmav = 25 MPa, \\sigmaH = 40 MPa). Drilling of a 20 mm dia. vertical hole created a long fracture-like thin tabular breakout along the \\sigmah springline and perpendicular to \\sigmaH direction. SEM analysis of the zones ahead of the breakout tips revealed narrow bands of presumed debonded intact grains interspersed with grain fragments. We infer that the fragments were formed from multiple splitting or crushing of compacted grains in the band of high compressive stress concentration developed along the \\sigmah springline. SEM images away from the breakout tip surroundings showed no such fragments. SEM study of the natural compaction band showed a similar arrangement of mainly intact grains surrounded by grain fragments. Using the Optimas optical software package, we found the percentage of pore area within the band ahead of the breakout tips to average 17%; outside of this zone it was 23%. In the natural compaction band pore area occupied 8.5% of the band; in the host rock adjacent to the compaction band it averaged 19%. These readings strongly suggest porosity reduction due to compaction in both cases. The close resemblance between the

  14. Triassic and Jurassic-Cretaceous deposits in the Western Chukotka: geodynamic implications, provenance studies and deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchkova, M.

    2012-04-01

    Studied region is situated in western Chukotka, in Northeast Russia. We examine the part of Chukotka microplate, the key element in the evolution of the Amerasian basin. The Triassic of Chukotka is represented by up to 5 km of deposits. Triassic terrigeneous deposits consist of three different complexes: Lower-Middle Triassic, Upper Triassic Carnian, and Norian. All the complexes are represented by rhythmic intercalation of sandstones, siltstones and mudstones. Clastic material was carried by large rivers, possessing large reservoir on neighbouring continent. Progradation of delta system in deeper regions is observed. During the Triassic, sedimentation was represented by continental slope progradation. Petrographic study of mineral composition has established the sandstones as graywackes and lithic arenites, according to Pettijohn classification (1981). Sandstones with clasts of rock fragments of lower metamorphic grade rocks dominate at the base of Triassic deposits, sandstones with fragments of higher grade metamorphic rocks dominate in the Later Triassic deposits. This different shows that the Triassic represents an unroofing sequence sours of erosional processes that produced the clastic material eroded more deeply buried rocks through time. Detrital zircons from Triassic sedimentary rocks were collected for constain its paleogeographic links to source terranes. Zircons populations from these three samples are very similar, and youngest zircon ages show peaks at 236-255 Ma. Besides, we are dating the 9 samples for K-Ar and Rb-Sr methods. Data are similar and show 200-204 Ma, and we suppose that this isotopic data indicate the age of first stage of deformation in Chukotka's basin. The Jurassic-Cretaceous of Chukotka is represented by up to 3 km of deposits. The sedimentary complexes are enriched by organic matter, and fresh clastic materials. Fragments of shales, sometimes laminated or cleaved are their indicator constituents. Sandstones are arkosic. The

  15. Taphonomy and paleoecology inferences of vertebrate ichnofossils from Guará Formation (Upper Jurassic), southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentzien-Dias, Paula C.; Schultz, Cesar L.; Bertoni-Machado, Cristina

    2008-03-01

    In southern Brazil, the eolian facies of the Guará Formation (Late Jurassic) reveal footprints and trackways of vertebrates (dinosaurs), as well as burrows made by small vertebrates. All the footprints and trackways are preserved in dunes and sand sheets. The footprints made in the sand sheets are not well preserved due to intense trampling and can be distinguished only by the deformation of the sandstone laminations. In some cases it is possible to see this deformation in plan and in section. Tracks of theropods, ornithopods and middle-sized sauropods are present. Two footprints preserved in the foreset of a paleodune permitted recognition of slide structures and identification of the trackmaker, a theropod. Burrows horizontally across the foresets were found at this same paleodune. Ribbons of massive sandstone - interpreted as the partial filling of the base of the burrows - covered by little blocks of stratified sandstone - suggest the collapse of the burrow roof inward. There are no body fossils in the Guará Formation, consequently the preservation of these tracks provides unique evidence of widespread dinosaurs activity in southern Brazil near the end of the Jurassic.

  16. Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous(?) synorogenic sedimentary rocks in the southern Spring Mountains, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Michael D.

    1980-08-01

    A newly recognized sequence of Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous(?) terrigenous rocks in the Good-springs district, Nevada, was deposited during the emplacement of the Contact thrust plate. Two facies are recognized: (1) interbedded conglomerate and sandstone derived from Mesozoic igneous and terrigenous platform rocks and (2) interbedded carbonate and sandstone-clast conglomerate, quartz sandstone, and red shale. No igneous detritus occurs in the facies with carbonate-clast conglomerate. Carbonate clasts could only have been derived from the Paleozoic carbonate sequence, which was exposed in the area by latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous thrusting. The age of rocks from a volcanic unit within the synorogenic sequence was determined radiometrically to be 150 ± 10 m.y. (K-Ar on biotite). The sequence was deposited disconformably on deeply eroded rocks of the early Mesozoic platform and ultimately overridden from the west by the Contact thrust plate. Information from the sequence corroborates previously reported regional data regarding the timing and nature of the Contact-Red Springs thrust event. *Present address: U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025

  17. Depth and thickness of selected units in Upper Permian, Upper Jurassic, and Lower Cretaceous rocks in southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kume, Jack; Spinazola, Joseph M.

    1984-01-01

    As ground-water reserves decline in the Ogallala aquifer in an area of about 17,400 square miles in 26 counties of southwestern Kansas, sandstone aquifers in underlying Upper Jurassic and Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks may be developed to supplement or replace the Ogallala as a source of water for some uses. Maps show that depths from land surface to Upper Permian rocks range from 0 at the outcrop to over 2,100 feet, depths to Upper Jurassic rocks ran from 0 at the outcrop to about 2,000 feet, depths to the Cheyenne Sandstone range from about 150 to about 1 ,950 feet, and depths to the Dakota Formation range from 0 at the outcrop to about 1,650 feet. Additional maps show that the thickness of Upper Jurassic rocks, where present, ranges from less than 50 feet to about 250 feet, the thickness of the Cheyenne Sandstone, where present, ranges from about 20 feet to about 250 feet, and the thickness of the Dakota Formation, where present, ranges from about 60 feet to about 460 feet. (USGS)

  18. Assistive Technology Provision Within the Navajo Nation

    PubMed Central

    Ripat, Jacquie D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explored the factors that affect assistive technology (AT) provision within the Navajo Nation using a qualitative approach to inquiry. Focus groups were held in which AT users discussed their awareness of AT and their need for, use of, and satisfaction with AT devices and services. Twenty-eight individuals who used wheelchairs, orthotics or prosthetics, hearing aids, communication aids, vision aids, and other AT participated in one of seven focus groups. Seven AT providers discussed the facilitators and barriers that affect AT provision. The findings revealed six themes common to both stakeholder groups and two additional themes for AT users. The central theme for AT users centered on (not) feeling understood; the central theme for AT providers revolved around the processes, activities, and roles the providers engaged in at times for different clients. Activities to increase awareness and to promote successful AT provision and satisfaction with AT devices were proposed. PMID:25147224

  19. Late Jurassic weather forecast, Four Corners area: Dry, hot, and partly sunny

    SciTech Connect

    Turner-Peterson, C.E.; Fishman, N.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Interfingering between members of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation and inferences based on their various environments of deposition permit interpretation of a persistent paleoclimate during the Late Jurassic in the Colorado Plateau region. Paleoclimate interpretation is based on evaporites in the Tidwell member, at the base of the Morrison; eolian deposits in the Recapture and Bluff Sandstone members; and saline, alkaline-lake deposits (which indicate high evaporation rates) in the Brushy Basin member at the top of the Morrison. Interfingering of these members with all other members of the Morrison Formation implies that a semiarid to arid climate was likely throughout Morrison time. The semiarid to arid interpretation is consistent with the global climatic zone inferred from the paleogeographic/paleotectonic setting. The Four Corners area during the Late Jurassic was in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and thus was affected by prevailing westerly winds. A magmatic arc located several hundred kilometers to the west of the Morrison depositional basin may have caused a broad rain-shadow effect, which contributed to a dry continental climate downwind. A typical Late Jurassic day in the Four Corners area is predicted to have been hot and dry, although seasonally heavy rains probably fed intermittent streams that transported sediments into the region. Explosive eruptions of silicic volcanic ash may have darkened the skies episodically, and thus partly sunny would have been a conservative forecast.

  20. Teaching Initial Reading in Navajo: Report of a Conference of Educators Held at Kayenta, January 30-31, 1970. Navajo Reading Study, Progress Report No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Penny, Ed.

    This report includes descriptions of ongoing reading programs for Navajo students in Rough Rock, Rock Point, and Navajo Community College, presented by teacher-participants in the conference on reading held in Kayenta, Arizona, January 30-31, 1970. Also included are reports from the Navajo Reading Study staff and a discussion of the problems of…

  1. Navajo coal and air quality in Shiprock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.

    2006-01-01

    Among the Navajo people, high levels of respiratory disease, such as asthma, exist in a population with low rates of cigarette smoking. Air quality outdoors and indoors affects respiratory health. Many Navajo Nation residents burn locally mined coal in their homes for heat, as coal is the most economical energy source. The U.S. Geological Survey and Dine College, in cooperation with the Navajo Division of Health, are conducting a study in the Shiprock, New Mexico, area to determine if indoor use of this coal might be contributing to some of the respiratory health problems experienced by the residents. Researchers in this study will (1) examine respiratory health data, (2) identify stove type and use, (3) analyze samples of coal that are used locally, and (4) measure and characterize air quality inside selected homes. This Fact Sheet summarizes the interim results of the study in both English and Navajo.

  2. Uranium mining and lung cancer in Navajo men

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Kutvirt, D.M.; Waxweiler, R.J.; Key, C.R.

    1984-06-07

    We performed a population-based case-control study to examine the association between uranium mining and lung cancer in Navajo men, a predominantly nonsmoking population. The 32 cases included all those occurring among Navajo men between 1969 and 1982, as ascertained by the New Mexico Tumor Registry. For each case in a Navajo man, two controls with nonrespiratory cancer were selected. Of the 32 Navajo patients, 72 per cent had been employed as uranium miners, whereas no controls had documented experience in this industry. The lower 95 per cent confidence limit for the relative risk of lung cancer associated with uranium mining was 14.4. Information on cigarette smoking was available for 21 of the 23 affected uranium miners; eight were nonsmokers and median consumption by the remainder was one to three cigarettes daily. These results demonstrate that in a rural nonsmoking population most of the lung cancer may be attributable to one hazardous occupation.

  3. TECHNICAL SUPPORT TO NAVAJO NATION ON URANIUM MINING TENORM WASTES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assistance is being provided to the Navajo Nation to establish its own radiation protection standards, radiation action levels, identification of safe drinking water sources, safe disposal of radioactive TENORM wastes from abandoned uranium mines, and to locate and decontaminate ...

  4. Composition, provenance and source weathering of Mesozoic sandstones from Western-Central Mediterranean Alpine Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, F.

    2014-03-01

    Forty-two Mesozoic sandstone samples from three different sedimentary successions of the Internal Domains along the Western-Central Mediterranean Alpine Chains (Betic Cordillera, Rif Chain and Calabria-Peloritani Arc) were chemically analyzed to characterize their composition and the degree of weathering in the source area(s). The Rif Chain sandstones have SiO2 contents higher than those of the Calabria-Peloritani Arc and Betic Cordillera sandstones, whereas Al2O3 contents are higher in the Calabria-Peloritani Arc sandstones rather than in the Rif Chain and Betic Cordillera sandstones. The indices of compositional variability (ICV) of the studied samples are generally less than 1, suggesting that the samples are compositionally mature and were likely dominated by recycling. Recycling processes are also shown by the Al-Zr-Ti diagram indicating zircon addition and, thus, recycling processes. The Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) values are quite homogeneous for the Calabria-Peloritani Arc (mean = 76) and Betic Cordillera sandstones (mean = 55), whereas the Rif Chain sandstones are characterized by CIA values ranging from 54 to 76. The CIW and PIA values are high for all the studied sandstones indicating intense weathering at the source areas. The different values of weathering rates among the studied sandstones may be related to variations of paleoclimatic conditions during the Mesozoic, that further favored recycling processes. Thus, these differences among the studied samples, may be related to an increase in continental palaeoweathering conditions and sediment recycling effects from the Middle Triassic to the earliest Jurassic due to rising humidity. In addition, regional tectonic movements promoted structural changes that allowed sedimentary recycling and subsidence, which in turn caused diagenetic K-metasomatism. These processes could significantly affect the CIW and PIA weathering indices, which likely monitor a cumulative effect, including several cycles of

  5. Navajo: A Century of Progress, 1868-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Martin A., Ed.

    The year 1968 marks the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Peace between the Navajo tribe and the U.S. Government. The treaty, signed by 29 Navajo headmen and 10 officers of the U.S. Army on June 1, 1968, brought to an end a tragic period of suffering, hardship, deprivation, and exile at the Bosque Redondo, New Mexico. During the…

  6. Distribution, chemistry, isotopic composition and origin of diagenetic carbonates: Magnus Sandstone, North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Macaulay, C.I.; Haszeldine, R.S. ); Fallick, A.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Diagenetic ferroan carbonates grew in the Upper Jurassic reservoir sandstones of the Magnus oilfield in porewaters which differed in composition across the field. These porewaters remained compositionally different and stratified for at least 35 M.y. Variations in carbonate chemistry across the field are attributable to these porewater variations, which resulted from displacement of marine depositional water from the crest of the field by meteoric water during late Cimmerian subaerial exposure. Original depositional facies and detrital mineralogy strongly influenced diagenetic carbonate distribution. The objective of this paper is twofold: (1) to describe the occurrence of burial diagenetic magnesian siderite and ankerite from the Magnus Sandstone, and (2) to show that variations in the elemental and isotopic geochemistry of siderite and ankerite relate to long-lived variations in the composition of the porewaters in the sandstone during diagenesis.

  7. Protecting the Navajo People through tribal regulation of research.

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug; Missaghian, Mariam

    2006-07-01

    This essay explores the process and issues related to community collaborative research that involves Native Americans generally, and specifically examines the Navajo Nation's efforts to regulate research within its jurisdiction. Researchers need to account for both the experience of Native Americans and their own preconceptions about Native Americans when conducting research about Native Americans. The Navajo Nation institutionalized an approach to protecting members of the nation when it took over Institutional Review Board (IRB) responsibilities from the US Indian Health Service (IHS) in 1996. While written regulations for the Navajo Nation IRB are not dissimilar, and in some ways are less detailed than those of the IHS IRB, in practice the Navajo Nation allows less flexibility. Primary examples of this include not allowing expedited review and requiring prepublication review of all manuscripts. Because of its broad mandate, the Navajo Nation IRB may also require review of some projects that would not normally be subject to IRB approval, including investigative journalism and secondary research about Navajo People that does not involve direct data collection from human subjects. PMID:16909151

  8. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  9. STEM Summer Academy on the Navajo Reservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The US Rosetta Project is the NASA contribution to the International Rosetta Mission, an ESA cornerstone mission to comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. While the project's outreach efforts span multi-media, and a variety of age and ethnic groups, a special emphasis has been made to find a way to provide meaningful outreach to the reservation communities. Because language preservation is an issue of urgent concern to the reservation communities, and because Rosetta, uniquely among NASA missions, has been named after the notion that keys to missing understanding of elements of the ancient past were found in the language on the original Rosetta stone, the US Rosetta Project has embarked upon outreach with a focus on STEM vocabulary in ancient US languages of the Navajo, Hopi, Ojibwe, and other tribal communities as the project expands. NASA image and science are used and described in the native language, alongside lay English and scientific English curriculum elements. Additionally, science (geology/chemistry/botany/physics) elements drawn from the reservation environment, including geomorphology, geochemistry, soil physics, are included and discussed in the native language as much as possible — with their analogs in other planetary environments (such as Mars). In this paper we will report on the most recent Summer Science Academy [2012], a four week summer course for middle school children, created in collaboration with teachers and administrators in the Chinle Unified School District. The concept of the Academy was initiated in 2011, and the first Academy was conducted shortly thereafter, in June 2011 with 14 children, 3 instructors, and a NASA teacher workshop. The community requested three topics: geology, astronomy, and botany. The 2012 Academy built on the curriculum already developed with more robust field trips, addressed to specific science topics, additional quantitative measurements and activities, with more written material for the cultural components from

  10. A Jurassic mammal from South America.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Oliver W M; Martin, Thomas; Ortiz-Jaureguizar, Edgardo; Puerta, Pablo

    2002-03-14

    The Jurassic period is an important stage in early mammalian evolution, as it saw the first diversification of this group, leading to the stem lineages of monotremes and modern therian mammals. However, the fossil record of Jurassic mammals is extremely poor, particularly in the southern continents. Jurassic mammals from Gondwanaland are so far only known from Tanzania and Madagascar, and from trackway evidence from Argentina. Here we report a Jurassic mammal represented by a dentary, which is the first, to our knowledge, from South America. The tiny fossil from the Middle to Late Jurassic of Patagonia is a representative of the recently termed Australosphenida, a group of mammals from Gondwanaland that evolved tribosphenic molars convergently to the Northern Hemisphere Tribosphenida, and probably gave rise to the monotremes. Together with other mammalian evidence from the Southern Hemisphere, the discovery of this new mammal indicates that the Australosphenida had diversified and were widespread in Gondwanaland well before the end of the Jurassic, and that mammalian faunas from the Southern Hemisphere already showed a marked distinction from their northern counterparts by the Middle to Late Jurassic. PMID:11894091

  11. 78 FR 32273 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... for Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0162. This.... Data OMB Control Number: 1076-0162. Title: Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits, 25 CFR 161....

  12. Log interpretation of shaly sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The determination of water saturation from electrical resistivity measurements to evaluate the potential of reservoirs is a fundamental tool of the oil industry. Shaly sandstones are difficult to evaluate because clays are conductive and they lower the resistivity of the rock. A review of shaly-sandstone research concerning ''volume-of-shale'' equations reveals three theoretical categories: (1) laminated clay equations, (2) dispersed clay equations, and (3) equations that assume that the effect of the clays on the conductivity measurement is directly related to water saturation. A new model for predicting the relative amounts of laminated and dispersed shales and accounting for their effects according to their abundance can be used for any sandstone, clean or shaly. Equations representing each of the three theoretical categories and the new equation were tested on cored Wilcox sandstones from two wells. Cores were analyzed to determine the volume and distribution of clays and to correlate porosity with the well logs.

  13. Presence of the dinosaur Scelidosaurus indicates Jurassic age for the Kayenta Formation (Glen Canyon Group, northern Arizona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padian, Kevin

    1989-05-01

    The Glen Canyon Group (Moenave, Wingate, Kayenta and Navajo Formations) of northern Arizona represents an extensive outcrop of early Mesozoic age terrestrial sediments. The age of these formations has long been disputed because independent stratigraphic data from marine tie-ins, paleobotanical and palynological evidence, and radiometric calibrations have been scanty or absent. The fauna of the Kayenta Formation in particular has been problematic because it has appeared to contain both typical Late Triassic and Early Jurassic taxa Here I report that the principal evidence for Late Triassic taxa, dermal scutes previously assigned to an aetosaur, in fact belongs to the thyreophoran ornithischian dinosaur Scelidosaurus, previously known only as a washed-in form found in marine sediments in the Early Jurassic of England. The presence of this dinosaur represents the first vertebrate biostratigraphic tie-in of the Glen Canyon Group horizons with reliably dated marine deposits in Europe. Together with revised systematic assessments of other vertebrates and independent evidence from fossil pollen, it supports an Early Jurassic age for the Kayenta Formation and most or all of the Glen Canyon Group.

  14. 30 CFR 756.15 - Required amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS § 756.15 Required amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan. Pursuant to 30 CFR 884.15, the Navajo Nation is required to submit to OSM by the date specified either a proposed... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required amendments to the Navajo...

  15. 78 FR 23277 - Navajo Nation; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Navajo Nation; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the Navajo Nation (FEMA-4104-DR), dated March 5, 2013, and... for the Navajo Nation is hereby amended to include the following area among those areas determined...

  16. 30 CFR 756.15 - Required amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS § 756.15 Required amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan. Pursuant to 30 CFR 884.15, the Navajo Nation is required to submit to OSM by the date specified either a proposed... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Required amendments to the Navajo...

  17. 25 CFR 700.843 - Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands. 700.843... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.843 Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands. (a) Pursuant to the Act and this subpart, the written consent of the Navajo Nation is required. Written...

  18. 30 CFR 756.14 - Approval of amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of amendments to the Navajo Nation's... PROGRAMS § 756.14 Approval of amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan. (a) Revisions to the following provisions of the Navajo Nation AMLR plan, as submitted to OSM on April 7 and 22,...

  19. 25 CFR 700.843 - Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands. 700.843... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.843 Permitting procedures for Navajo Nation Lands. (a) Pursuant to the Act and this subpart, the written consent of the Navajo Nation is required. Written...

  20. 30 CFR 756.14 - Approval of amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of amendments to the Navajo Nation's... PROGRAMS § 756.14 Approval of amendments to the Navajo Nation's abandoned mine land plan. (a) Revisions to the following provisions of the Navajo Nation AMLR plan, as submitted to OSM on April 7 and 22,...

  1. The Trading Post System on the Navajo Reservation. Staff Report to the Federal Trade Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Trade Commission, Los Angeles, CA.

    Since the late 19th century, trading posts have been a prominant feature in Navajo economic life. Today, due to geographic isolation and an absence of economic alternatives, many Navajos are still dependent upon trading posts. This report of a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) investigation details the system on the Navajo Reservation, including the…

  2. Crosscultural Contacts: Changes in the Diet and Nutrition of the Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Judy

    1986-01-01

    Describes changes in Navajo food sources in pre-colonial times, through nineteenth-century war with American soldiers and to contemporary times. Discusses nutritional value of Navajo diets, suggesting food changes following Indian contact with economically developed White culture was harmful to Navajo health. Suggests areas for further study. (TES)

  3. The Image of the Scientist through the Eyes of Navajo Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monhardt, Rebecca M.

    2003-01-01

    A study of Navajo children's attitude towards scientists asked 94 southern Utah Navajo students in grades 4-6 to draw a scientist. Although many students appeared to have no conception of what a scientist is, the drawings provided unique insights into Navajo students' perceptions, racial and gender sterotypes, and world views. Implications for…

  4. We Could Make a Book: The Textual Tradition of Navajo Language Literacy in 1940-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Louise

    1998-01-01

    The textual tradition of Navajo language literacy is illustrated with the story of the production of the first Navajo language readers by Ann Nolan Clark, an effort based in Navajo classrooms and communities in the 1930s. Origins of the project, influence of linguists on its evolution, classroom implications of having the readers, and publications…

  5. Social Studies Concept Attainment of Anglo and Navajo Indian Sixth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritt, Sharon Isaacson

    1978-01-01

    Compares understanding of social studies concepts among 6th grade Navajo and Anglo students in four Arizona communities. Findings indicated that Anglo students' scores exceeded those of Navajo students for all concepts and tasks. Offers recommendations for increasing Navajo students' comprehension of social studies. (DB)

  6. Tuning In to Navajo: The Role of Radio in Native Language Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Leighton C.

    Since 1986, KTNN Radio (tribally owned) has broadcast Navajo-language programming to the entire Navajo Nation. Its large broadcast range and position as the "Voice of the Navajo Nation" gives KTNN the "symbolic" power to affect linguistic change, as well as the unenviable position of being held to a high language standard although no such…

  7. Peer Group Evaluation of Narrative Competence: A Navajo Example. Working Papers in Sociolinguistics, No. 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret

    The narrative performances of Navajo children were examined to determine the ways in which the skills of competently structuring a narrative are informally learned within the peer group. Ten- and eleven-year-old Navajo children, living near Window Rock, Arizona, were evaluated in telling stories about the most traditional figures of Navajo belief,…

  8. The Feasibility of Test Translation between Unrelated Languages: English to Navajo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbluth, Annabelle R.

    1976-01-01

    The Boehm Test of Basic Concepts was translated into Navajo to investigate whether an English test can be translated into Navajo in a form suitable for assessing the language development of K-2 level Navajos. Differences were in: syntactic difficulty, organization of experience into concepts, accidental similarity of words, ranges of meaning. (SCC)

  9. Navajo Materials For Classroom Use: K-12 Curriculum Directory (Preliminary Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Gene, Comp.; And Others

    Compiled as part of Title IV-B Materials Development Project at Rough Rock Demonstration School, the bibliography attempts to address: (1) what Navajo-based materials already exist and are available; (2) where Navajo curriculum development is currently taking place; and (3) what needs exist at the present stage of Navajo curriculum development.…

  10. A Little History of North American Indians: The Navajos. New Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipps, Oscar H.

    This reprint of a 1909 volume portrays the life and history of the Navajo people, based on the personal experiences of an unusually enlightened white observer. The first three chapters cover the Navajo's early history, discovery by Spanish explorers, evidence of a prehistoric and possibly ancestral race, and the beauties of the Navajo's rugged…