Science.gov

Sample records for juris priekulis aivars

  1. Our Faltering Jury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Albert W.

    1996-01-01

    Jury verdicts in recent high-profile cases, including the O. J. Simpson murder trial, have been controversial. Suggestions are offered for reform of jury trials to lessen the impact of societal stereotypes and public opinion. Among these suggestions are to eliminate or restrict peremptory juror challenges and rewrite and clarify instructions to…

  2. 25 CFR 11.314 - Jury trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Criminal Procedure § 11.314 Jury trials. (a) A defendant has a right, upon demand, to a jury trial in any criminal case: (1) That is punishable by a maximum sentence of one year incarceration; or (2) In which...

  3. JurisLIT Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacramento County Probation Dept., Sacramento, CA.

    JurisLIT was a literacy training effort operated jointly by the Sacramento County Probation Department, the Sacramento County Office of Education, the Los Rios Community College District, and the Superior and Municipal Courts of Sacramento County from March 1990 to March 1994. The program required selected probationers aged 18-30 to participate in…

  4. Teaching Students about Their Civic Obligation--Jury Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Leah T.; Steinbrink, John E.

    2001-01-01

    Contends that early adolescents need to learn how the jury trial system works. Provides background information on the topic for teachers. Includes a two-day lesson plan on jury duty as a civic obligation, background information for students, and extension activities relating to jury trials in the appendix. (CMK)

  5. Moral lessons from the jury box.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ben A

    2002-01-01

    A decade ago a North Carolina jury awarded millions of dollars in damages because of a healthcare institution's failure to provide appropriate pain relief to a dying patient. In 2001, a California jury found a physician guilty of elder abuse for his failure to properly manage the pain of a cancer patient. In both instances, state licensing boards had failed to take any disciplinary action against those involved. These cases dramatically illustrate a significant and persistent gulf between the lay public and the health professions with regard to the moral significance they attach to the duty to relieve suffering. Measures to insure that all patients receive effective assessment and management of their pain must take into account this disparity, and endeavor to achieve congruence by reconnecting the health professions to their ancient and core value--the relief of suffering. PMID:14650451

  6. Evaluation of 3D-Jury on CASP7 models

    PubMed Central

    Kaján, László; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Background 3D-Jury, the structure prediction consensus method publicly available in the Meta Server , was evaluated using models gathered in the 7th round of the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP7). 3D-Jury is an automated expert process that generates protein structure meta-predictions from sets of models obtained from partner servers. Results The performance of 3D-Jury was analysed for three aspects. First, we examined the correlation between the 3D-Jury score and a model quality measure: the number of correctly predicted residues. The 3D-Jury score was shown to correlate significantly with the number of correctly predicted residues, the correlation is good enough to be used for prediction. 3D-Jury was also found to improve upon the competing servers' choice of the best structure model in most cases. The value of the 3D-Jury score as a generic reliability measure was also examined. We found that the 3D-Jury score separates bad models from good models better than the reliability score of the original server in 27 cases and falls short of it in only 5 cases out of a total of 38. We report the release of a new Meta Server feature: instant 3D-Jury scoring of uploaded user models. Conclusion The 3D-Jury score continues to be a good indicator of structural model quality. It also provides a generic reliability score, especially important for models that were not assigned such by the original server. Individual structure modellers can also benefit from the 3D-Jury scoring system by testing their models in the new instant scoring feature available in the Meta Server. PMID:17711571

  7. Twelve Angry Jurors?: Argument in the Jury Decision Making Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Ann; Badzinski, Diane M.

    Although scholars know a great deal about how argument works in the small group process in general, little is known about the role of argument in the jury decision making process. A study used R. A. Meyers' (1991) coding scheme to analyze the argument in 80 juries. Subjects were 209 males and 203 females enrolled in communication courses at a…

  8. Jury Selection in Child Sex Abuse Trials: A Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Robert J.; Adams, Desiree D.; Brodsky, Stanley L.

    2009-01-01

    Child sex abuse cases have been the target of considerable psycho-legal research. The present paper offers an analysis of psychological constructs for jury selection in child sex abuse cases from the defense perspective. The authors specifically delineate general and case-specific jury selection variables. General variables include…

  9. How Juries Assess Universal Design in Norwegian Architectural School Competitions.

    PubMed

    Houck, Leif D

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how architectural school competition juries assess Universal Design. The method used is a case study of 18 recent architectural school competitions in Norway. The results show that most competition briefs ask for Universal Designed buildings. In 8 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is mentioned as an assessment criterion. In 11 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is commented on by the juries in the jury reports, but only in 3 of the cases, do the juries assess this aspect consistently on every competition project. The overall impression is that some amount of uncertainty looms concerning how Universal Design should be assessed in the competition stage. Based on the findings, future juries should concentrate on orientation and overview prior to technicalities and details. PMID:27534308

  10. Juries and Medical Malpractice Claims: Empirical Facts versus Myths

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Juries in medical malpractice trials are viewed as incompetent, antidoctor, irresponsible in awarding damages to patients, and casting a threatening shadow over the settlement process. Several decades of systematic empirical research yields little support for these claims. This article summarizes those findings. Doctors win about three cases of four that go to trial. Juries are skeptical about inflated claims. Jury verdicts on negligence are roughly similar to assessments made by medical experts and judges. Damage awards tend to correlate positively with the severity of injury. There are defensible reasons for large damage awards. Moreover, the largest awards are typically settled for much less than the verdicts. PMID:19002541

  11. Juries and medical malpractice claims: empirical facts versus myths.

    PubMed

    Vidmar, Neil

    2009-02-01

    Juries in medical malpractice trials are viewed as incompetent, antidoctor, irresponsible in awarding damages to patients, and casting a threatening shadow over the settlement process. Several decades of systematic empirical research yields little support for these claims. This article summarizes those findings. Doctors win about three cases of four that go to trial. Juries are skeptical about inflated claims. Jury verdicts on negligence are roughly similar to assessments made by medical experts and judges. Damage awards tend to correlate positively with the severity of injury. There are defensible reasons for large damage awards. Moreover, the largest awards are typically settled for much less than the verdicts. PMID:19002541

  12. The occupational hazards of jury duty.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S M; Winget, C

    1992-01-01

    Jurors on criminal trials carry a considerable burden of responsibility. They determine the defendant's fate. Additionally, during trials they can be exposed to stressful, frightening, and sordid aspects of life. The stressfulness varies depending upon the nature of the trial, its length, the nature of the testimony and evidence, the jurors' interpersonal relationships, the difficulty establishing guilt or innocence, the public's attitude, etc. These experiences can create psychological and/or physical discomfort that can be transient and mildly or moderately intense, or more serious and constitute illness. The authors have studied juries of four criminal trials--two murder cases, one child abuse case, and one obscenity case. Forty jurors were interviewed. Twenty-seven had one or more discomforting physical and/or physiological symptoms. These involved gastrointestinal distress (10 jurors); generalized nervousness (4 jurors); heart palpitation (6 jurors); headaches (4 jurors); sexual inhibitions (4 jurors); depression (4 jurors); anorexia (4 jurors); faintness (2 jurors); and numbness, lump in throat, chest pain, hives, and flu (1 juror each). Seven of the jurors became clearly ill. Illnesses included: peptic ulcer reactivation and hives, phobic reaction, anxiety state and increased alcohol use, hypertensive episode and visual scotomata, sexual inhibition, chills, fever, and depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:1421562

  13. PlanJury: probabilistic plan evaluation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Sonke, J.-J.; van Herk, M.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Over a decade ago, the 'Van Herk margin recipe paper' introduced plan evaluation through DVH statistics based on population distributions of systematic and random errors. We extended this work for structures with correlated uncertainties (e.g. lymph nodes or parotid glands), and considered treatment plans containing multiple (overlapping) dose distributions (e.g. conventional lymph node and hypo-fractionated tumor doses) for which different image guidance protocols may lead to correlated errors. Methods: A command-line software tool 'PlanJury' was developed which reads 3D dose and structure data exported from a treatment planning system. Uncertainties are specified by standard deviations and correlation coefficients. Parameters control the DVH statistics to be computed: e.g. the probability of reaching a DVH constraint, or the dose absorbed at given confidence in a (combined) volume. Code was written in C++ and parallelized using OpenMP. Testing geometries were constructed using idealized spherical volumes and dose distributions. Results: Negligible stochastic noise could be attained within two minutes computation time for a single target. The confidence to properly cover both of two targets was 90% for two synchronously moving targets, but decreased by 7% if the targets moved independently. For two partially covered organs at risk the confidence of at least one organ below the mean dose threshold was 40% for synchronous motion, 36% for uncorrelated motion, but only 20% for either of the organs separately. Two abutting dose distributions ensuring 91% confidence of proper target dose for correlated motions led to 28% lower confidence for uncorrelated motions as relative displacements between the doses resulted in cold spots near the target. Conclusions: Probabilistic plan evaluation can efficiently be performed for complicated treatment planning situations, thus providing important plan quality information unavailable in conventional PTV based evaluations.

  14. Order of Verdict Consideration and Decision Rule Effects on Mock Jury Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaye, Imafidon M.

    A study investigated the effects of order verdict consideration and decision rule on jury verdicts. After reading the summary of an actual trial, 240 mock jurors drawn from undergraduate communications classes were randomly assigned to six-member juries. Jury assignments were made under two verdict orders (ascending and descending order of…

  15. The Dynamics of Jury Decision-Making: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, W. Gary; Redfering, David

    1983-01-01

    Surveyed jurors serving on 99 criminal cases to examine socioeconomic, demographic, and psychological factors related to a guilty verdict. Results showed items concerning authoritarianism, religious ideology, and prior experience with courts correlated with jury behavior, but socioeconomic characteristics were not significant. (JAC)

  16. Jury selection in child sex abuse trials: a case analysis.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Robert J; Adams, Desiree D; Brodsky, Stanley L

    2009-01-01

    Child sex abuse cases have been the target of considerable psycho-legal research. The present paper offers an analysis of psychological constructs for jury selection in child sex abuse cases from the defense perspective. The authors specifically delineate general and case-specific jury selection variables. General variables include authoritarianism, dogmatism, need for cognition, pretrial knowledge, and race/socioeconomic status. Case-specific variables include sexual attitudes, homonegativity, juror abuse history, and beliefs about children. The paper also provides a factual background of a representative case, incorporates relevant case law, identifies sources for voir dire and juror questionnaire items, and discusses lessons from the primary author's first experience as a trial consultant for the defense. PMID:19306206

  17. Setting priorities: is there a role for citizens' juries?

    PubMed

    Lenaghan, J; New, B; Mitchell, E

    1996-06-22

    Citizens' juries are an attempt to meaningfully involve members of the public in decisions which affect them in their own communities. The Institute for Public Policy Research and Cambridge and Huntingdon Health Authority have recently piloted the first jury in the United Kingdom. Sixteen jurors sat for four days, hearing evidence from a number of expert witnesses. The jurors were asked to consider how priorities for health care should be set, according to what criteria, and to what extent the public should be involved in this process. This pilot was also an attempt to assess the process itself, and our initial evaluation indicates that, given enough time and information, the public is willing and able to contribute to the debate about priority setting in health care. PMID:8664672

  18. Judge upholds jury award over employer's HIV disclosure.

    PubMed

    1995-06-30

    A Federal judge has refused to overturn or reduce a jury's $125,000 award to a Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) employee who said his privacy was invaded when his superiors learned he was taking an AIDS medication. The employee, known as John Doe, charged that Judith Pierce, the chief administrative officer of SEPTA, looked at the records of the agency's prescription drug plan to confirm her suspicions that he had HIV. Pierce, who claimed drug report review was part of her job in controlling costs, contended that she wanted to make sure the plan's new administrator, Rite-Aid Corp., was charging the right prices for prescriptions. The judge agreed with the jury that Pierce went far beyond her role as auditor of the drug plan when she asked Rite-Aid to link individuals' names to specific prescriptions and then informed Doe's supervisor, associate, and another employee about Doe's AIDS medication. PMID:11362636

  19. The use of citizens' juries in health policy decision-making: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Street, Jackie; Duszynski, Katherine; Krawczyk, Stephanie; Braunack-Mayer, Annette

    2014-05-01

    Deliberative inclusive approaches, such as citizen juries, have been used to engage citizens on a range of issues in health care and public health. Researchers engaging with the public to inform policy and practice have adapted the citizen jury method in a variety of ways. The nature and impact of these adaptations has not been evaluated. We systematically searched Medline (PubMED), CINAHL and Scopus databases to identify deliberative inclusive methods, particularly citizens' juries and their adaptations, deployed in health research. Identified studies were evaluated focussing on principles associated with deliberative democracy: inclusivity, deliberation and active citizenship. We examined overall process, recruitment, evidence presentation, documentation and outputs in empirical studies, and the relationship of these elements to theoretical explications of deliberative inclusive methods. The search yielded 37 papers describing 66 citizens' juries. The review demonstrated that the citizens' jury model has been extensively adapted. Inclusivity has been operationalised with sampling strategies that aim to recruit representative juries, although these efforts have produced mixed results. Deliberation has been supported through use of steering committees and facilitators to promote fair interaction between jurors. Many juries were shorter duration than originally recommended, limiting opportunity for constructive dialogue. With respect to citizenship, few juries' rulings were considered by decision-making bodies thereby limiting transfer into policy and practice. Constraints in public policy process may preclude use of the 'ideal' citizens' jury with potential loss of an effective method for informed community engagement. Adapted citizens' jury models provide an alternative: however, this review demonstrates that special attention should be paid to recruitment, independent oversight, jury duration and moderation. PMID:24657639

  20. Argumentation in Science Teacher Education: The Simulated Jury as a Resource for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieira, Rodrigo Drumond; da Rocha Bernardo, José Roberto; Evagorou, Maria; de Melo, Viviane Florentino

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we focus on the contributions that a simulated jury-based activity might have for pre-service teachers, especially for their active participation and learning in teacher education. We observed a teacher educator using a series of simulated juries as teaching resources to help pre-service teachers develop their pedagogical…

  1. The Impact of Voir Dire and the Deliberation Process on Jury Verdicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, K. Phillip; Buchanan, Raymond W.

    Recent social scientific interest in juror selection has advanced the "voir dire" (jury selection) process beyond Clarence Darrow's formula for choosing a jury likely to be sympathetic to his client. From a communication perspective, generalization to different cases in different sections of the country and under different conditions suggests…

  2. Evaluating the use of citizens’ juries in food policy: a case study of food regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deliberative engagement techniques and citizens’ juries are touted as means of incorporating the public into policy decision-making, managing community expectations and increasing commitment to public health policy. This paper reports a study to examine the feasibility of citizens’ juries as a means of collecting data to inform public health policy related to food regulation through evaluation of the conduct of a citizens’ jury. Methods A citizens’ jury was conducted with a representative sample of 17 South Australians to explore their willingness to consider the proposition that food and drink advertising and/or sponsorship should be banned at children’s sporting events. Results The results showed that, in relation to the central proposition and evaluation data from the jury, opinion on the proposition remained comparatively stable. Most jurors indicated that they thought that food and drink sponsorship and/or advertising at children’s sporting events would have little or no effect on altering children’s diet and eating habits, with the proportion increasing during the jury process. Jurors were given evaluation sheets about the content of the jury and the process of the citizens’ jury to complete at the end of the session. The evaluation of the citizens’ jury process revealed positive perceptions. The majority of jurors agreed that their knowledge of the issues of food and drink sponsorship in children’s sport had increased as a result of participation in the citizens’ jury. The majority also viewed the decision-making process as fair and felt that their views were listened to. One important response in the evaluation was that all jurors indicated that, if given the opportunity, they would participate in another citizens’ jury. Conclusions The findings suggest that the citizens’ jury increased participant knowledge of the issue and facilitated reflective discussion of the proposition. Citizens’ juries are an effective means

  3. Engaging the public in healthcare decision-making: quantifying preferences for healthcare through citizens’ juries

    PubMed Central

    Scuffham, Paul A; Ratcliffe, Julie; Kendall, Elizabeth; Burton, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Chalkidou, Kalipso; Littlejohns, Peter; Whitty, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The optimal approach to engage the public in healthcare decision-making is unclear. Approaches range from deliberative citizens’ juries to large population surveys using discrete choice experiments. This study promotes public engagement and quantifies preferences in two key areas of relevance to the industry partners to identify which approach is most informative for informing healthcare policy. Methods and analysis The key areas identified are optimising appropriate use of emergency care and prioritising patients for bariatric surgery. Three citizens’ juries will be undertaken—two in Queensland to address each key issue and one in Adelaide to repeat the bariatric surgery deliberations with a different sample. Jurors will be given a choice experiment before the jury, immediately following the jury and at approximately 1 month following the jury. Control groups for each jury will be given the choice experiment at the same time points to test for convergence. Samples of healthcare decision-makers will be given the choice experiment as will two large samples of the population. Jury and control group participants will be recruited from the Queensland electoral roll and newspaper advertisements in Adelaide. Population samples will be recruited from a large research panel. Jury processes will be analysed qualitatively and choice experiments will be analysed using multinomial logit models and its more generalised forms. Comparisons between preferences across jurors predeliberation and postdeliberation, control participants, healthcare decision-makers and the general public will be undertaken for each key issue. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by Griffith University Human Research Ethics Committee (MED/10/12/HREC). Findings of the juries and the choice experiments will be reported at a workshop of stakeholders to be held in 2015, in reports and in peer reviewed journals. PMID:24793259

  4. Respirators versus medical masks: evidence accumulates but the jury remains out

    PubMed Central

    Killingley, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Killingley (2011). Respiratory versus medical masks: evidence accumulates but the jury remains out. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2011.00237.x. PMID:21477131

  5. Teaching about Our Jury System. Unit 1. Our Right to an Impartial Jury of Our Peers, Our Responsibility to Serve as an Impartial Factfinder When Called for Jury Service. Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Camp, Julie

    Designed for use in the junior high school curriculum, two lessons involve students in the structure and procedures of the jury system as it functions within the court system. Although intended for use with a slide program and computer software program, activities in the teaching guide can be used independently. For each lesson, background…

  6. The CSI effect and the Canadian and the Australian Jury.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Janne A; Fordham, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Television shows, such as CBS's CSI and its spin-offs CSI: Miami; CSI: Las Vegas; and CSI: New York, have sparked the imagination of thousands of viewers who want to become forensic scientists. The shows' fictional portrayals of crime scene investigations have prompted fears that jurors will demand DNA and other forensic evidence before they will convict, and have unrealistic expectations of that evidence. This has been dubbed the "CSI effect." This phenomenon was explored using results from a Canadian study based on 605 surveys of Canadian college students who would be considered jury-eligible and Australian quantitative and qualitative findings from a study that surveyed and interviewed real posttrial jurors. Information about the way jurors deal with forensic evidence in the context of other evidence and feedback about the way in which understanding such evidence could be increased were gained from both these studies. The comparison provides insights into the knowledge base of jurors, permitting adaptation of methods of presenting forensic information by lawyers and experts in court, based on evidence rather than folklore. While the Canadian juror data showed statistically significant findings that jurors are clearly influenced in their treatment of some forensic evidence by their television-viewing habits, reassuringly, no support was found in either study for the operation of a detrimental CSI effect as defined above. In the Australian study, in fact, support was found for the proposition that jurors assess forensic evidence in a balanced and thoughtful manner. PMID:21155799

  7. Argumentation in Science Teacher Education: The simulated jury as a resource for teaching and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumond Vieira, Rodrigo; da Rocha Bernardo, José Roberto; Evagorou, Maria; Florentino de Melo, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we focus on the contributions that a simulated jury-based activity might have for pre-service teachers, especially for their active participation and learning in teacher education. We observed a teacher educator using a series of simulated juries as teaching resources to help pre-service teachers develop their pedagogical knowledge and their argumentation abilities in a physics teacher methods course. For the purposes of this article, we have selected one simulated jury-based activity, comprising two opposed groups of pre-service teachers that presented aspects that hinder the teachers' development of professional knowledge (against group) and aspects that allow this development (favor group). After the groups' presentations, a group of judges was formed to evaluate the discussion. We applied a multi-level method for discourse analysis and the results showed that (1) the simulated jury afforded the pre-service teachers to position themselves as active knowledge producers; (2) the teacher acted as 'animator' of the pre-service teachers' actions, showing responsiveness to the emergence of circumstantial teaching and learning opportunities and (3) the simulated jury culminated in the judges' identification of the pattern 'concrete/obstacles-ideological/possibilities' in the groups' responses, which was elaborated by the teacher for the whole class. Implications from this study include using simulated juries for teaching and learning and for the development of the pre-service teachers' argumentative abilities. The potential of simulated juries to improve teaching and learning needs to be further explored in order to inform the uses and reflections of this resource in science education.

  8. Facial Comparison from CCTV footage: The competence and confidence of the jury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Heather; Tough, Ann

    2015-12-01

    CCTV footage is commonly used in the court room to help visualise the crime in question and to help identify the offender. Unfortunately the majority of surveillance cameras produce such poor quality images that the task of identifying individuals can be extremely difficult. This study aimed at determining whether the task of identifying the offender in CCTV footage was one which a jury should be competent to do, or whether expert evidence would be beneficial in such cases. The ability of potential jury members, the general public, was tested by asking participants to play the role of a jury member by means of an online survey. Potential jury members viewed CCTV in which a simulated offence took place, and were subsequently asked to compare still images of a defendant to the offender to try to determine if they were competent and confident about making a judgement as to whether the defendant committed the crime. Factors such as age, gender and profession of the potential jury members were considered, as well as the type of crime committed, in order to establish if these play any role in the decision made by potential jury members. These factors did not appear to play a significant role; however confidence was also investigated and it became very evident that this was a factor that must be taken into consideration when determining the requirement for expert contribution in facial comparisons. Jury members may well be willing and competent to a basic level in carrying out a facial comparison but if they lack a certain level of confidence in their ability and decision making then this task is more suitable for an expert with experience and skills in this field. PMID:26654085

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    'I know very well that my theory rests on a shaky foundation. What attracts me to it is that it leads to consequences that seem to be accessible to experiment, and it provides a starting point for the theoretical understanding of gravitation', wrote Einstein in 1911. Einstein's Jury by Jeffrey Crelinsten—well documented, well written, and fascinating to read—describes how, from 1909 on, Einstein's two theories of relativity became known to astronomers, and how the predictions made between 1907 and 1915 were received as challenges to observers. The author gives a non-technical account of the efforts made until 1930 to test these predictions; he focuses on two of the three classical tests, namely gravitational redshift and bending of light; the 'jury' consists mainly of American observers—Adams, Campbell, Curtis, Hale, Perrin, St John, Trumpler and others—working with newly built large telescopes, and the Britons Eddington and Evershed. The major steps which, after a long struggle, convinced the majority of astronomers that Einstein was right, are narrated chronologically in rather great detail, especially the work at Lick Observatory, before and after the famous British observation of 1919, on solar eclipses, and the work at Mount Wilson and the Indian Kodaikanal Observatories to extract the gravitational redshift from the complicated spectrum of the sun. The account of the eclipse work which was carried out between 1918 and 1923 by Lick astronomers corrects the impression suggested by many historical accounts that the British expedition alone settled the light-bending question. Apart from these main topics, the anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury and the ether problem are covered. By concentrating on astronomy rather than on physics this book complements the rich but repetitive literature on Einstein and relativity which appeared in connection with the commemoration of Einstein's annus mirabilis, 2005. The well told stories include curiosities such as

  10. Social Justice and Environmental Awareness Developed through a Citizens' Jury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J.

    2014-12-01

    A Citizens' Jury (CJ) is a discussion forum in which managers, policymakers or politicians are able to present their case to the general public ('citizens') to whom they are accountable, and for these citizens to critically ask questions of the managers/policymakers/politicians in order to better understand issues surrounding local development, planning and policy, impacts and adaptive measures, and to highlight their concerns. A CJ can be useful with respect to developing social justice and environmental awareness issues because it can empower community action and present different viewpoints. A practical CJ exercise is used in a second-year undergraduate course entitled Climate Change and Society, at University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. The CJ is used to consider some of the impacts of management policies used for climate change and sustainable development adaption, based on a hypothetical scenario. This scenario is that a major energy company wants to build a dam with hydroelectric power station in a developing country. This will provide low-carbon renewable energy to the country, investment in electricity infrastructure, and the company is committed to help economic development in the country, including in jobs and education. However, building and flooding of the dam will involve displacing 10,000 people from rural communities, flooding agricultural areas and areas of high biodiversity, and archaeological sites. The exercise is based on students, in groups, assuming different 'identities' which may include a local business person, resident, politician, member of an NGO, tourist, engineer, farmer etc, from which viewpoint they must argue for/against the proposal and to question other peoples' viewpoints. This exercise is useful because it allows students to develop understandings of different viewpoints, evaluate risk and impacts on different communities, and highlights the complexity of real-world decision-making.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    'I know very well that my theory rests on a shaky foundation. What attracts me to it is that it leads to consequences that seem to be accessible to experiment, and it provides a starting point for the theoretical understanding of gravitation', wrote Einstein in 1911. Einstein's Jury by Jeffrey Crelinsten—well documented, well written, and fascinating to read—describes how, from 1909 on, Einstein's two theories of relativity became known to astronomers, and how the predictions made between 1907 and 1915 were received as challenges to observers. The author gives a non-technical account of the efforts made until 1930 to test these predictions; he focuses on two of the three classical tests, namely gravitational redshift and bending of light; the 'jury' consists mainly of American observers—Adams, Campbell, Curtis, Hale, Perrin, St John, Trumpler and others—working with newly built large telescopes, and the Britons Eddington and Evershed. The major steps which, after a long struggle, convinced the majority of astronomers that Einstein was right, are narrated chronologically in rather great detail, especially the work at Lick Observatory, before and after the famous British observation of 1919, on solar eclipses, and the work at Mount Wilson and the Indian Kodaikanal Observatories to extract the gravitational redshift from the complicated spectrum of the sun. The account of the eclipse work which was carried out between 1918 and 1923 by Lick astronomers corrects the impression suggested by many historical accounts that the British expedition alone settled the light-bending question. Apart from these main topics, the anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury and the ether problem are covered. By concentrating on astronomy rather than on physics this book complements the rich but repetitive literature on Einstein and relativity which appeared in connection with the commemoration of Einstein's annus mirabilis, 2005. The well told stories include curiosities such as

  12. (Almost) Everything I Need to Know about Multiculturalism I Learned on Jury Duty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shaunna

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author states that during her experience on jury duty--spent with a melting pot of socially-conscious citizens--she reflected upon the implications for education and her own teaching practice. Three major themes centering around her understanding of multiculturalism surfaced: (1) Defining multiculturalism; (2) The cult of…

  13. Generational and age-based differences in attitudes towards jury service.

    PubMed

    Boatright, R G

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of surveys of jurors, potential jurors, and the general public show significant differences in attitudes towards jury service by the age of the respondent. This study analyzes the degree to which these differences are the result of generational effects, in which younger citizens are likely to continue in their beliefs about jury service as they age, and the degree to which they are a result of a respondent's life circumstances-income, employment status, or family status-and are thus not likely to be carried with jurors as they age. The article shows that, while there are differences in confidence in the courts by age group, younger jurors are more confident in their own abilities to serve well as jurors but more skeptical of the court as a whole; most differences in attitudes towards jury service are linked to life-cycle phenomena. As such, courts should work to provide assistance to particular age groups within the jury pool, including child care and appropriate compensation, if they are to attract jurors who are representative by age of the general public. PMID:11385703

  14. From Blood Freud to Jury System: The Metamorphosis of Cherokee Law from 1750 to 1840.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Michelle

    1987-01-01

    Examines the Cherokees' deliberate adoption of the laws of the white man, focusing on the blood feud--a retaliation system designed to deal with homicide. Discusses cultural bases of Cherokee law and factors influencing the change to a jury system and noted key events of the adoption period (1797 to 1840). (JHZ)

  15. [How to become a pharmacist via the medical juries, during the Consulate and the Empire].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    The law of Germinal an XI organized the education of pharmacists. It offered two different pathways to become a pharmacist. The first one needed three years in a pharmacy followed by three years of courses in a School of Pharmacy (located in Paris, Montpellier or Strasbourg) and the examination had to be passed in the School. The second one needed eight years in a pharmacy followed by an examination in front of a Medical jury. Medical juries were organized in every department and were composed by three physicians and four pharmacists. An interesting document, a book gathering together all the preparations realized during years 1811, 1812, 1813, collected by Claude Duméril in many departments, will allow to study what had been asked to the candidates in Rouen, in 1813, and what were reference pharmacopoeias used. PMID:26529887

  16. Stacking the Jury: Legal Professionals' Peremptory Challenges Reflect Jurors' Levels of Implicit Race Bias.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Mike; DeVaul-Fetters, Amanda; Gawronski, Bertram

    2016-08-01

    Most legal systems are based on the premise that defendants are treated as innocent until proven guilty and that decisions will be unbiased and solely based on the facts of the case. The validity of this assumption has been questioned for cases involving racial minority members, in that racial bias among jury members may influence jury decisions. The current research shows that legal professionals are adept at identifying jurors with levels of implicit race bias that are consistent with their legal interests. Using a simulated voir dire, professionals assigned to the role of defense lawyer for a Black defendant were more likely to exclude jurors with high levels of implicit race bias, whereas prosecutors of a Black defendant did the opposite. There was no relation between professionals' peremptory challenges and jurors' levels of explicit race bias. Implications for the role of racial bias in legal decision making are discussed. PMID:27354112

  17. Justins v The Queen: assisted suicide, juries and the discretion to prosecute.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; Townsend, Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Juries are often a crucial protection for citizens against unjust or highly controversial laws. The decision whether to proceed with a prosecution rests on the discretionary powers of prosecutors. In cases where the community is deeply divided over right and wrong, it appears that there is, at times, a transference from the public of thwarted law reform aspirations which can create difficult tensions and expectations. This case commentary considers an appeal by Shirley Justins following her conviction for manslaughter by gross criminal negligence as a result of her involvement in the mercy killing of her partner, Mr Graeme Wylie. The morally unsettled nature of the charges brought against her, her own initial plea, the directions given to the jury by the trial judge and even the basis of her appeal resulted in a convoluted and complicated legal case. Spigelman CJ and Johnson J ordered a new trial, Spigelman CJ stating that it was open for a new jury to consider (a) if Mr Wylie lacked capacity; and (b) whether there was criminal involvement by one person in another's death. Simpson J found that further prosecution on the count of manslaughter would amount to an abuse of process and that an acquittal should be entered. This case highlights how fundamentally unsettled are the publicly much debated and persistently contentious issues of euthanasia, assisted suicide, the right of a person to die a dignified death and the way their capacity in that respect should be assessed. It perhaps asks us to reconsider the role of juries and the exercise of discretion by Directors of Public Prosecutions in areas of law where the community and law-makers are deeply and intractably divided. PMID:21774267

  18. Yes, The Government Should Tax Soft Drinks: Findings from a Citizens’ Jury in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Nicole; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer; Byrnes, Joshua; Hills, Andrew P.; Gordon, Louisa; Turkstra, Erika; Scuffham, Paul; Comans, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Taxation has been suggested as a possible preventive strategy to address the serious public health concern of childhood obesity. Understanding the public’s viewpoint on the potential role of taxation is vital to inform policy decisions if they are to be acceptable to the wider community. A Citizens’ Jury is a deliberative method for engaging the public in decision making and can assist in setting policy agendas. A Citizens’ Jury was conducted in Brisbane, Australia in May 2013 to answer the question: Is taxation on food and drinks an acceptable strategy to the public in order to reduce rates of childhood obesity? Citizens were randomly selected from the electoral roll and invited to participate. Thirteen members were purposively sampled from those expressing interest to broadly reflect the diversity of the Australian public. Over two days, participants were presented with evidence on the topic by experts, were able to question witnesses and deliberate on the evidence. The jurors unanimously supported taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks but generally did not support taxation on processed meats, snack foods and foods eaten/ purchased outside the home. They also supported taxation on snack foods on the condition that traffic light labelling was also introduced. Though they were not specifically asked to deliberate strategies outside of taxation, the jurors strongly recommended more nutritional information on all food packaging using the traffic light and teaspoon labelling systems for sugar, salt and fat content. The Citizens’ Jury suggests that the general public may support taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks to reduce rates of obesity in children. Regulatory reforms of taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks and improved labelling of nutritional information on product packaging were strongly supported by all members of the jury. These reforms should be considered by governments to prevent childhood obesity and the future burden on society from the consequences of

  19. Jury awards $6,000 in firing of hair stylist with AIDS.

    PubMed

    1996-12-27

    A Federal jury in New Mexico awarded $6,000 to the estate of a hairdresser after deciding that his employer retaliated against him for filing a discrimination complaint. The employer, MTS Corp., fired [name removed] after other workers refused to work with him. MTS Corp. also denied his request to work at his primary salon, denied his attendance at the company Christmas party, and claimed that he worked fewer hours than required. Outstanding legal costs are still being disputed. PMID:11364067

  20. Yes, the government should tax soft drinks: findings from a citizens' jury in Australia.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Nicole; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer; Byrnes, Joshua; Hills, Andrew P; Gordon, Louisa; Turkstra, Erika; Scuffham, Paul; Comans, Tracy

    2014-03-01

    Taxation has been suggested as a possible preventive strategy to address the serious public health concern of childhood obesity. Understanding the public's viewpoint on the potential role of taxation is vital to inform policy decisions if they are to be acceptable to the wider community. A Citizens' Jury is a deliberative method for engaging the public in decision making and can assist in setting policy agendas. A Citizens' Jury was conducted in Brisbane, Australia in May 2013 to answer the question: Is taxation on food and drinks an acceptable strategy to the public in order to reduce rates of childhood obesity? Citizens were randomly selected from the electoral roll and invited to participate. Thirteen members were purposively sampled from those expressing interest to broadly reflect the diversity of the Australian public. Over two days, participants were presented with evidence on the topic by experts, were able to question witnesses and deliberate on the evidence. The jurors unanimously supported taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks but generally did not support taxation on processed meats, snack foods and foods eaten/ purchased outside the home. They also supported taxation on snack foods on the condition that traffic light labelling was also introduced. Though they were not specifically asked to deliberate strategies outside of taxation, the jurors strongly recommended more nutritional information on all food packaging using the traffic light and teaspoon labelling systems for sugar, salt and fat content. The Citizens' Jury suggests that the general public may support taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks to reduce rates of obesity in children. Regulatory reforms of taxation on sugar-sweetened drinks and improved labelling of nutritional information on product packaging were strongly supported by all members of the jury. These reforms should be considered by governments to prevent childhood obesity and the future burden on society from the consequences of obesity

  1. A Community Jury on PSA screening: what do well-informed men want the government to do about prostate cancer screening—a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rychetnik, Lucie; Doust, Jenny; Thomas, Rae; Gardiner, Robert; MacKenzie, Geraldine; Glasziou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cancer screening policies and programmes should take account of public values and concerns. This study sought to determine the priorities, values and concerns of men who were ‘fully informed’ about the benefits and harms of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening; and empirically examine the value of a community jury in eliciting public values on PSA screening. Setting Community jury was convened on the Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia) to consider PSA screening benefits and harms, and whether government campaigns on PSA screening should be conducted. Participants 27 men (volunteers) aged 50–70 with no personal history of prostate cancer and willing to attend jury 6–7 April 2013: 12 were randomly allocated to jury (11 attended). Outcome measures A qualitative analysis was conducted of the jury deliberations (audio-recorded and transcribed) to elicit the jury's views and recommendations. A survey determined the impact of the jury process on participants’ individual testing decisions compared with control group. Results The jury concluded governments should not invest in programmes focused on PSA screening directed at the public because the PSA test did not offer sufficient reassurance or benefit and could raise unnecessary alarm. It recommended an alternative programme to support general practitioners to provide patients with better quality and more consistent information about PSA screening. After the jury, participants were less likely to be tested in the future compared with the controls, but around half said they would still consider doing so. Conclusions The jury's unanimous verdict about government programmes was notable in the light of their divergent views on whether or not they would be screened themselves in the future. Community juries provide valuable insights into the priorities and concerns of men weighing up the benefits and harms of PSA screening. It will be important to assess the degree to which the findings are generalisable

  2. Examining pretrial publicity in a shadow jury paradigm: issues of slant, quantity, persistence and generalizability.

    PubMed

    Daftary-Kapur, Tarika; Penrod, Steven D; O'Connor, Maureen; Wallace, Brian

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of pretrial publicity (PTP) on mock juror decision making. Specifically, we examined the influence of quantity and slant of the PTP (proprosecution vs. prodefense), the persistence of PTP effects over time, and whether the PTP effects demonstrated in research laboratories would also occur in more naturalistic settings (generalizability). Using a shadow jury paradigm we examined these effects using a real trial as stimulus. Mock jurors included 115 jury-eligible community members who were naturally exposed to PTP in the venue in which the actual case occurred and 156 who were experimentally exposed. We found mock jurors were significantly influenced by both the slant and quantity of the PTP to which they were exposed, such that those exposed to proprosecution or prodefense PTP tended to render decision in support of the party favored in the PTP, and those exposed to greater quantities of PTP tended to be more biased. Additionally, PTP effects persisted throughout the course of the trial and continued to influence judgments in face of trial evidence and arguments. A finding of no significant difference in the effect of exposure slant between the naturally exposed and experimentally exposed samples provides support for the external validity of laboratory studies examining PTP effects. This research helps address some of the concerns raised by courts with regard to the durability of PTP effects and the application of laboratory findings to real world settings. PMID:24933173

  3. Probability of criminal acts of violence: a test of jury predictive accuracy.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Thomas J; Sorensen, Jon R; Cunningham, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The ability of capital juries to accurately predict future prison violence at the sentencing phase of aggravated murder trials was examined through retrospective review of the disciplinary records of 115 male inmates sentenced to either life (n = 65) or death (n = 50) in Oregon from 1985 through 2008, with a mean post-conviction time at risk of 15.3 years. Violent prison behavior was completely unrelated to predictions made by capital jurors, with bidirectional accuracy simply reflecting the base rate of assaultive misconduct in the group. Rejection of the special issue predicting future violence enjoyed 90% accuracy. Conversely, predictions that future violence was probable had 90% error rates. More than 90% of the assaultive rule violations committed by these offenders resulted in no harm or only minor injuries. PMID:23613146

  4. Teaching about Our Jury System. Unit 2. Our Right to an Impartial Jury of Our Peers, Our Role to Serve as an Impartial Factfinder When Called for Jury Service, Our Responsibility as Global Citizens to Understand the Judicial Systems of Other Countries. Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Camp, Julie

    Designed for use in the high school curriculum, two lessons introduce students to contemporary issues surrounding the American jury system and to political, legal, and economic systems of other countries. Although intended for use with a filmstrip, cassette, computer software, and a computer instructional manual, activities in the teaching guide…

  5. Involving a Citizens’ Jury in Decisions on Individual Screening for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mosconi, Paola; Colombo, Cinzia; Satolli, Roberto; Carzaniga, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Aims Most public health agencies and learned societies agree that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test in asymptomatic men should not be recommended, on account of its potential for harm. Yet PSA is still widely used as a screening test and is not being abandoned. This remains a significant public health issue, and citizens’ engagement is needed. This study was designed to produce a deliberation on the PSA screening test by a citizens’ jury. Methods Fifteen citizens were selected and balanced for sex, age, and education. They received an information booklet and participated in a two-day meeting with experts to reach a deliberation on the question “Should the National Health Service discourage or recommend PSA as an individual screening test for prostate cancer in men 55–69 years old?”. A facilitator ran the jurors’ discussion. Results All except three of the jurors decided that the National Health Service should discourage the use of PSA as an individual screening test for prostate cancer in 55–69 year-old men. The jury was particularly convinced by the uncertainty of the test outcomes, the utility of the test, and its cost/benefit ratio. Before the meeting 60% of jurors would have recommended the test to a relative, and all the male jurors would have done so. After the meeting these percentages fell to 15% and 12%. Conclusions This experience confirms the feasibility and effectiveness of delegating to a group of citizens the responsibility to decide on public health issues on behalf of the community. Public health authorities should invest in information campaigns aimed at the public and in educational initiatives for physicians. This also provided an opportunity to disseminate information on screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment. PMID:26751212

  6. Bold, smart, dangerous and evil: perceived correlates of core psychopathic traits among jury panel members.

    PubMed

    Edens, John F; Clark, John; Smith, Shannon Toney; Cox, Jennifer; Kelley, Shannon E

    2013-05-01

    Relatively few studies have investigated how laypersons perceive psychopathy, what factors they believe to be commonly associated with this disorder, or what rater personality characteristics might predict perceived psychopathic traits of the target person. An ethnically diverse sample of 285 US community members attending jury duty reviewed a case vignette regarding a capital murder trial and then rated (1) their perceptions of the defendant's psychopathic characteristics loosely based on trait indicators from the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised; (2) other characteristics of the defendant that might be associated with psychopathy (e.g. intelligence, violence potential); and (3) their own personality, using a very brief measure of Five Factor traits. Multivariate regression analyses indicated that participant ratings of psychopathy pertaining to the defendant were strongly associated with ratings on measures of his perceived boldness (i.e. social dominance and fearlessness), intelligence, violence potential, and perceptions that he was 'evil'. Big Five personality characteristics of the layperson raters, however, were only modestly associated with their ratings of psychopathy for the defendant. We review these results in terms of the potential stigmatization of individuals labelled as 'psychopaths' in forensic settings. PMID:24343940

  7. Life and death in the Lone Star State: three decades of violence predictions by capital juries.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mark D; Sorensen, Jon R; Vigen, Mark P; Woods, S O

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of three decades of Texas jury predictions of future violence by capital defendants was tested through retrospective review of the disciplinary records of former death row (FDR) inmates in Texas (N = 111) who had been sentenced to death under this "special issue" and subsequently obtained relief from their death sentences between 1989 and 2008. FDR inmates typically had extended tenures on death row (M = 9.9 years) and post-relief in the general prison population (M = 8.4 years). FDR prevalence of serious assault was low, both on death row (3.6%) and upon entering the prison population (4.5%). None of the assaults resulted in life-threatening injuries to the victims. Violence among the FDR inmates was not disproportionate compared with life-sentenced capital offenders. Consistent with other research, juror expectations of serious prison violence by these offenders had high error (i.e., false positive) rates. The confidence of legislators and courts in the violence prediction capabilities of capital jurors is misplaced. PMID:21105010

  8. Use of a Classroom Jury Trial To Increase Student Perception of Science as Part of Their Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marjorie A.

    1997-05-01

    The concept of a jury trial in the classroom setting was used to present and discuss a current, controversial topic, the drug mifepristone (RU486). This drug is used as an abortion inducing agent although it has other clinical uses. The major goal was for students to see that science is a very important part of their lives. The class project involved discussions of the scientific, sociological, moral, ethical, religious, legal, as well as financial aspects of a real trial which involved a major science issue. Students were involved in role playing which included obtaining information and then participating in the mock trial. Student roles in this activity were as judges, defendant, jury, witnesses, lawyers, and court reporters. This four week project involved both verbal and written participation. Grades were based on both their oral and written on this project. The students found this a very interesting activity as evidenced by their enthusiasm. This class activity could be adapted to a variety of timely topics.

  9. A Study of Youth Attitudes Toward Authority and Their Relation to School Adjustment Patterns. A Report Prepared by the 1973-74 Humboldt County Grand Jury, June 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowlus, Donald; And Others

    The Humboldt County Grand Jury (1973-74) examined the attitudes of high school youths toward law enforcement in the California county. Since these are sensitive indicators of their attitudes toward authority in general, results should not be interpreted as being exclusively relevant to law enforcement. The study covered a 4 month period, sampling…

  10. Ira C. Ritter and The Kroger Co., v. Jerry and Ruth Stanton. "Trial by Jury." Lesson Plans for Secondary Teachers on the Constitutional Protections of Trial by Jury. Courts in the Classroom: Curriculum Concepts and Other Information on Indiana's Courts for the K-12 Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Elizabeth

    In the case of Ritter v. Stanton, the attorneys for Ira Ritter and Kroger alleged that the amount of damages awarded by the jury were excessive and asked the Indiana Supreme Court to review the matter. This set of three lesson plans for secondary educators uses the Ritter v. Stanton case to examine the concept of the U.S. constitutional right to…

  11. All care, but whose responsibility? Community juries reason about expert and patient responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris; Carter, Stacy M; Rychetnik, Lucie

    2016-09-01

    General practitioners have implicitly been given responsibility for guiding men's decisions about prostate-specific antigen-based screening for prostate cancer, but patients' expectations of the bounds of this responsibility remain unclear. We sought to explore how well-informed members of the public allocate responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening decision-making. In 2014, we convened two Community juries in Sydney, Australia, to address questions related to the content and timing of information provision and respective roles of patients and general practitioners in screening decisions. Participants in the first jury were of mixed gender and of all ages (n = 15); the participants in the second jury were all male and of screening age (n = 12). Both juries were presented with balanced factual evidence on the harms and benefits of prostate-specific antigen screening and expert perspectives on ethico-legal aspects of consent in medical practice. In their deliberations, jurors agreed that general practitioners should take responsibility for informing men of the options, risks and benefits of prostate-specific antigen testing, but arrived at different positions on whether or not general practitioners should also guide screening decisions. Jurors also disagreed on how much and when general practitioners should provide detailed information about biopsies and treatments. These responses suggest that for prostate-specific antigen testing, there is a public expectation that both the allocation of responsibility between general practitioners and their male patients, and the level of information provided will be tailored to individual men. In the presence of expert uncertainty, a well-informed public may have reason to embrace or resist shared decision-making processes. PMID:27491944

  12. Development of a Base for the Re-evaluation of the Professional Segment of the Master of Science Degree Program in Industrial Education at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. Part VIII: Importance of Industrial Education Teacher's Professional Tasks as Seen by a Jury of Selected Leaders in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lawrence S.

    This study was conducted a) to determine the importance that a jury of selected national leaders in education attaches to each of the professional tasks for secondary school industrial education teachers and b) to find out what differences, if any, exist between the importance judgments of the jury and those of each of four industrial education…

  13. Trial By Jury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    2000-01-01

    With 600 organizations in 45 states, teen courts are becoming viable alternative to processing first-time youthful offenders through the juvenile justice system. Teen courts may be run by schools, juvenile courts and probation departments, law enforcement agencies, or youth welfare organizations. Successful school-related courts are profiled. (MLH)

  14. Jury panel member perceptions of interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy predict support for execution in a capital murder trial simulation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer; Clark, John C; Edens, John F; Smith, Shannon Toney; Magyar, Melissa S

    2013-01-01

    Recent research with college undergraduate mock jurors suggests that how psychopathic they perceive a criminal defendant to be is a powerful predictor of whether they will support a death verdict in simulated capital murder trials. Perceived affective and interpersonal traits of psychopathy are especially predictive of support for capital punishment, with perceived remorselessness explaining a disproportionate amount of variance in these attitudes. The present study attempted to extend these findings with a more representative sample of community members called for jury duty (N = 304). Jurors reviewed a case vignette based on an actual capital murder trial, provided sentencing verdicts, and rated the defendant on several characteristics historically associated with the construct of psychopathy. Consistent with prior findings, remorselessness predicted death verdicts, as did the affective and interpersonal features of psychopathy - though the latter effect was more pronounced among jurors who were Caucasian and/or who described their political beliefs as moderate rather than conservative or liberal. Results are discussed in terms of the potentially stigmatizing effects of psychopathy evidence in capital cases. PMID:23754472

  15. Olestra? The Jury's Still Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-04-01

    Although it has been more than a year since the FDA approved the use of olestra in certain foods, this fat substitute, a mixture of sucrose polyesters, is still controversial. It would seem that a fat substitute that is heat stable and has an acceptable flavor and texture would be welcomed enthusiastically in a country where increasing numbers of people, young and old, exceed their ideal body weight. Obesity and diets containing high levels of fat have been linked to numerous health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancer, and adult-onset diabetes; they may also exacerbate some chronic problems such as arthritis in joints of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some scientists and consumer groups question olestra's safety and usefulness.

  16. Assessing Racial Attitudes in Jury Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Clara; Bromley, Stephanie

    This paper examines the current state of voir dire procedures (the process in which prospective jurors are questioned about possible prejudgment or bias) used to detect racial attitudes in court cases involving black defendants and compares voir dire questions allowed and disallowed by the court. Data based upon an assessment of racial attitudes…

  17. Trials by Juries: Suggested Practices for Database Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritterbush, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Librarians frequently utilize product trials to assess the content and usability of a database prior to committing funds to a new subscription or purchase. At the 2012 Electronic Resources and Libraries Conference in Austin, Texas, three librarians presented a panel discussion on their institutions' policies and practices regarding database…

  18. The Historical Importance of Jury to Press Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olasky, Marvin N.

    Staggered by some recent libel verdicts, many journalists are neglecting lessons about press freedom learned at great cost during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Journalists then learned that state power over the press, residing in the hands of either censors or judges, leads to a decrease in press freedom. In 1986, though, many media…

  19. Attorney Questions Predict Jury-eligible Adult Assessments of Attorneys, Child Witnesses, and Defendant Guilt.

    PubMed

    Mugno, Allison P; Klemfuss, J Zoe; Lyon, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Children are often the primary source of evidence in maltreatment cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse, and may be asked to testify in court. Although best-practice protocols for interviewing children suggest that interviewers ask open-ended questions to elicit detailed responses from children, during in-court testimony, attorneys tend to rely on closed-ended questions that elicit simple (often "yes" or "no") responses (e.g., Andrews, Lamb, & Lyon, ; Klemfuss, Quas, & Lyon, ). How then are jurors making decisions about children's credibility and ultimately the case outcome? The present study examined the effect of two attorney-specific factors (e.g., temporal structure and questioning phase) on mock jurors' perceptions of attorney performance, child witness credibility, storyline clarity, and defendant guilt. Participants were randomly assigned to read a trial excerpt from one of eight conditions and were then asked to evaluate the attorney, child witness, and the case. Selected excerpts were from criminal court case transcripts and contained either high attorney temporal structure (e.g., use of temporal markers) or low temporal structure (e.g., frequent topic switching), involved direct or cross-examination, and represented cases resulting in a conviction or acquittal. Child responses were kept consistent across all excerpts. Results showed that participants perceived the attorney's performance and child's credibility more favorably and thought the storyline was clearer when attorneys provided high rather than low temporal structure and when the excerpt contained direct rather than cross-examination. Participants who read a direct rather than cross-examination excerpt were also more likely to think the defendant was guilty. The study highlights the impact of attorney questioning style on mock jurors' perceptions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26932420

  20. Jury acquits seven prison guards in beating of HIV-positive inmate.

    PubMed

    1999-03-19

    Seven guards from the Charlotte Correctional Institution were acquitted of beating and harassing an HIV-positive inmate, [name removed] was transferred to that prison because he bit a guard in the face at another prison. He later attempted suicide and slowly bled to death while shackled to a bed. Prosecutor Doug Molloy said [name removed] was harassed from the moment he arrived, and slashed his own wrist after 3 days of abuse. The jurors found insufficient evidence to convict the seven with conspiring to deny [name removed] his civil rights. Three other corrections officers, who also faced charges, testified for the prosecution. PMID:11366445

  1. Change over Time in Obedience: The Jury's Still out, but It Might Be Decreasing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twenge, Jean M.

    2009-01-01

    Jerry M. Burger's (see record 2008-19206-001) partial replication of Stanley Milgram's (1974) obedience study shows both the influence of culture and generations on behavior and the power of the situation. In Burger's data, disobedience has nearly doubled among male participants since the 1960s, a shift just as large as the increase in Americans'…

  2. Visual Spatial Attention to Multiple Locations At Once: The Jury Is Still Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jans, Bert; Peters, Judith C.; De Weerd, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Although in traditional attention research the focus of visual spatial attention has been considered as indivisible, many studies in the last 15 years have claimed the contrary. These studies suggest that humans can direct their attention simultaneously to multiple noncontiguous regions of the visual field upon mere instruction. The notion that…

  3. Reactance in the Jury Room: Decision by Men and Not by Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follert, Vincent F.

    Based on research indicating that restrictive judicial language directed at jurors encourages reactance, or decisions contrary to the judge's instructions, two experiments were conducted to determine whether courtroom jurors merely admonished to ignore inadmissible evidence would be more inclined to comply with judicial instructions than would…

  4. Do health care delivery system reforms improve value? The jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Korenstein, Deborah; Duan, Kevin; Diaz, Manuel Jose; Ahn, Rosa; Keyhani, Salomeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Widespread restructuring of health delivery systems is underway in the US to reduce costs and improve the quality of healthcare. Objective To describe studies evaluating the impact of system-level interventions (incentives and delivery structures) on the value of US healthcare, defined as the balance between quality and cost. Research Design We identified articles in PubMed (2003 to July 2014) using keywords identified through an iterative process, with reference and author tracking. We searched tables of contents of relevant journals from August 2014 through 11 August 2015 to update our sample. Subjects We included prospective or retrospective studies of system-level changes, with a control, reporting both quality and either cost or utilization of resources. Measures Data about study design, study quality, and outcomes was extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second. Results Thirty reports of 28 interventions were included. Interventions included patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementations (n=12), pay-for-performance programs (n=10), and mixed interventions (n=6); no other intervention types were identified. Most reports (n=19) described both cost and utilization outcomes. Quality, cost, and utilization outcomes varied widely; many improvements were small and process outcomes predominated. Improved value (improved quality with stable or lower cost/utilization or stable quality with lower cost/utilization) was seen in 23 reports; 1 showed decreased value, and 6 showed unchanged, unclear or mixed results. Study limitations included variability among specific endpoints reported, inconsistent methodologies, and lack of full adjustment in some observational trials. Lack of standardized MeSH terms was also a challenge in the search. Conclusions On balance the literature suggests that health system reforms can improve value. However, this finding is tempered by the varying outcomes evaluated across studies with little documented improvement in outcome quality measures. Standardized measures of value would facilitate assessment of the impact of interventions across studies and better estimates of the broad impact of system change. PMID:26492216

  5. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Multiple Sclerosis: The Jury is Still Out

    PubMed Central

    Treiner, Emmanuel; Liblau, Roland S.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS), as demonstrated by the efficacy of therapies targeting various components of adaptive immunity. However, the disease still progresses despite these treatments in many patients, while others experience life-threatening adverse effects, urging for the discovery of new immune-targeting medications. Among the immune cell types participating to MS pathogenesis, decades of work have highlighted the prominent role of CD4 T cells. More recent data demonstrate the involvement of CD8 T cells as well. The existence of both pathogenic and protective CD8 T cells subsets has been suggested, adding an additional layer of complexity to the picture. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that make up to 25% of CD8 T cells in healthy subjects. They are specific for conserved microbial ligands and may constitute an important barrier against invasive bacterial and fungal infection. An increasing number of reports also suggest their possible involvement in chronic inflammatory diseases, including MS. MAIT cells could participate through their ability to produce IFNγ and/or IL-17, two major cytokines in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms by which MAIT cells could be activated in these sterile conditions are not known. Furthermore, contradictory observations have been made, reporting either a protective or a pro-inflammatory behavior of MAIT cells in MS or its murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In this review article, we will describe the current knowledge on MAIT cell biology in health and disease, and discuss the possible mechanisms behind their role in MS. The specific features of this new non-conventional T cell subset make it an interesting candidate as a biomarker or as the target of immune-mediated intervention. PMID:26483793

  6. The Effect of Cross-Examination Tactics on Simulated Jury Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Margaret; And Others

    Past research has demonstrated the negative effects of leading questions by attorneys on eyewitness testimony and has found that adversary lawyers produced less accurate testimony from eyewitnesses. This study was conducted to examine the effects of lawyer's hostile versus non-hostile behavior and lawyer's leading versus non-leading questions on…

  7. Fostering Organizational Change through Deliberations: The Deliberative Jury in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindell, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Universities in Europe face a variety of reform initiatives, and university reform can be seen as a wicked problem that should be resolved through collaborative efforts. In Finland, there has been considerable resistance to proposed reforms, with university personnel complaining that they have not been heard. Students, on the other hand, seem…

  8. Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges: The Jury Is Still Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael

    This paper examines a number of issues associated with part-time faculty in community colleges. In the area of part-time faculty integration, the author surveyed 28 Florida colleges using an online survey, and received responses from 20, for a response rate of 71.4%. The survey contained five questions: (1) Are adjunct/part-time faculty listed in…

  9. The Jury Is Still Out: Psychoemotional Support in Peer E-Mentoring for Transition to University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risquez, Angelica; Sanchez-Garcia, Marife

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how computer mediated communication (CMC) can sustain nourishing and emotionally enriching peer mentoring relations. A peer electronic mentoring program was implemented in an Irish university to facilitate freshmen's transition to college. A sample of 123 participants (42 mentors and 81 mentees) was evaluated with a…

  10. Role of anti-angiogenesis therapy in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma: The jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Zhu, Man-Sheng; Wu, Wen-Rui; Shi, Xiang-De; Xu, Lei-Bo

    2014-01-01

    As the leading cause of disease-related deaths, cancer is a major public health threat worldwide. Surgical resection is still the first-line therapy for patients with early-stage cancers. However, postoperative relapse and metastasis remain the cause of 90% of deaths of patients with solid organ malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). With the rapid development of molecular biology techniques in recent years, molecularly targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies, small molecules, and vaccines have become a milestone in cancer therapeutic by significantly improving the survival of cancer patients, and have opened a window of hope for patients with advanced cancer. Hypervascularization is a major characteristic of HCC. It has been reported that anti-angiogenic treatments, which inhibit blood vessel formation, are highly effective for treating HCC. However, the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenesis therapies remain controversial. Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor with anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects and is the first molecular target drug approved for the treatment of advanced HCC. While sorafenib has shown promising therapeutic effects, substantial evidence of primary and acquired resistance to sorafenib has been reported. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate a large number of molecularly targeted drugs for treating HCC, but most drugs exhibited less efficacy and/or higher toxicity compared to sorafenib. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s) underlying sorafenib resistance of cancer cells is highlighted for efficiently treating HCC. This concise review aims to provide an overview of anti-angiogenesis therapy in the management of HCC and to discuss the common mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapies. PMID:25544869

  11. Perinatal interventions and survival in resource-poor settings: which work, which don’t, which have the jury out?

    PubMed Central

    Osrin, David; Prost, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal conditions make the largest contribution to the burden of disease in low-income countries. Although postneonatal mortality rates have declined, stillbirth and early neonatal mortality rates remain high in many countries in Africa and Asia, and there is a concentration of mortality around the time of birth. Our article begins by considering differences in the interpretation of ‘intervention’ to improve perinatal survival. We identify three types of intervention: a single action, a collection of actions delivered in a package and a broader social or system approach. We use this classification to summarise the findings of recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses. After describing the growing evidence base for the effectiveness of community-based perinatal care, we discuss current concerns about integration: of women’s and children’s health programmes, of community-based and institutional care, and of formal and informal sector human resources. We end with some thoughts on the complexity of choices confronting women and their families in low-income countries, particularly in view of the growth in non-government and private sector healthcare. PMID:20980274

  12. Student Teaching Behaviors Identified by a National Jury of Cooperating Teachers as Indicators of Success in Sixteen Competency Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Sarah J.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what behaviors would be accepted by cooperating teachers in the public schools as indications of success in sixteen broad areas of teaching competence. In order to determine the behaviors most appropriate for judging effectiveness, a modified Delphi survey involving two contacts with the survey population…

  13. Juror Judgments and Discussion: Effect of Presentation and Memory Factors on Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Martin F.; Miller, Charles E.

    Mock juries of six females each listened to a tape-recording of facts in a courtroom trial. Twelve juries heard guilt-appearing facts, and twelve heard innocent-appearing facts. In half the juries hearing each type of trial, jurors heard the facts in the same (Homogeneous) order; in the remaining juries, each of the six jurors heard the facts in a…

  14. Total Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2007

    2007-01-01

    For 25 years, "American School & University" has been publishing a special issue dedicated to the best in education design. Although design has changed dramatically over the years, one will find that the jury criteria for award-winning projects has remained consistent. The first jury was looking for technical innovation, and 1986's jury mentioned…

  15. Campus Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Susan

    2009-01-01

    In this annual Architectural Portfolio issue, the author presents the main winners that impressed the jury as facilities that will excite and challenge students in dramatic ways. The Children's School, Stamford, Connecticut, the Caudill winner, is "reminiscent of the Crow Island School," according to this year's jury. The Kahn winner, Peninsula…

  16. Defendants' Rights in Criminal Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ralph C., II; Keeley, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the protections afforded by the Constitution for defendants in criminal trials. These include the right to a jury trial (in cases of possible incarceration), an impartial jury, and the requirement of a unanimous verdict. Defends the use of plea bargaining as essential to an efficient criminal justice system. (MJP)

  17. Perception of Rape Victims: The Impact of Evidentiary Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgida, Eugene; And Others

    A simulated jury deliberation with experienced and inexperienced jurors sampled from the jury population of Hennepin County, Minnesota, was investigated. The purpose was to assess the impact of recent reforms in evidentiary rules pertaining to the admissibility of prior sexual history evidence in rape trials. Specific questions included: (1)…

  18. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau" (Barcelona,…

  19. Justice by the People. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Diane; Alderson, Jan, Ed.

    This interactive curriculum has been developed to teach students about one of their most important rights as citizens, trial by jury. Knowledge about this right is critical since most of today's students will be called to serve on juries at some point in their lives. The curriculum's goal is to help students understand the history and value of…

  20. Eckmann v. Board of Education of Hawthorn School District: Bad Management Makes Bad Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacken, Donal M.

    1988-01-01

    A school board's dismissal of a teacher who was an unwed mother resulted in the jury granting a large award. The judge grounded the legal justification for the jury's decision in the teacher's constitutionally protected decision to bear a child, irrespective of marriage. Criticizes court's constitutional intrepretation. (MLF)

  1. Teen Courts and Law-Related Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nessel, Paula A.

    Teen courts have gained in popularity in the 1990s. These courts include youth courts, peer juries, peer courts, student courts, and other courts using juveniles to determine the sentences of juvenile offenders. The courts issue sentences that are carried out in a school or community setting and generally involve community service, jury duty,…

  2. Teen Court: A National Movement. Technical Assistance Bulletin No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nessel, Paula A.

    Teen courts have gained in popularity in the 1990s. These courts include youth courts, peer juries, peer courts, student courts, and other courts using juveniles to determine the sentences of juvenile offenders. The courts issue sentences that are carried out in a school or community setting and generally involve community service, jury duty,…

  3. To require the United States attorney to bring the matter of an individual's contempt of Congress before a grand jury not later than 30 days after receiving a certification from the Speaker of the House of Representatives or the President of the Senate that the individual is in contempt.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jordan, Jim [R-OH-4

    2014-07-29

    09/26/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Oily omen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A jury found that the Exxon Corp. was indeed reckless in allowing a captain with a track record of alcohol abuse to pilot the Valdez supertanker, which ran aground in March 1989, causing North America's worst oil spill ever. The Alaskan jury also found the captain negligent and reckless for drinking on the job the afternoon of the incident. The jury is yet to decide just how much Exxon should pay in liability in the civil suit, but the figure could easily come out in the billions.

  5. A Short History of the International Physics Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunfalvi, R.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the International Physics Competition (IPC). IPC rules, aims, organization, participants, leaders, finance, language, duration, international jury, problems, evaluation, prizes, and organizers' responsibilities are discussed. Typical problems used and problem solving methods are also discussed. (JN)

  6. Environmental Response: Strawberry Hill Campus, Bar Harbor, Maine. The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury gave citations to three projects grouped as "the response by architects to environmental problems." One citation was awarded to a college campus design utilizing solar energy, recycled materials, and wind power. (MF)

  7. Learning from the past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Andrew D.

    2015-06-01

    When it comes to safety, the jury's still out on which nanoparticle characteristics we should be measuring. But, as Andrew D. Maynard explains, there's a rich history dating back over a hundred years on how we measure them.

  8. 28 CFR 77.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... quash grand jury subpoenas and motions to compel testimony), applications for search warrants, and... licensure or membership in a particular state bar. (i) The phrase state of licensure means the District...

  9. 28 CFR 77.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... quash grand jury subpoenas and motions to compel testimony), applications for search warrants, and... licensure or membership in a particular state bar. (i) The phrase state of licensure means the District...

  10. When domestic goes capital: Juror decision making in capital murder trials involving domestic homicide.

    PubMed

    Richards, Tara N; Smith, M Dwayne; Fogel, Sondra J; Bjerregaard, Beth

    2015-08-01

    Prior research suggests that homicide cases involving familial offenders and victims are subject to a "domestic discount" that reduces sentencing severity. However, the operation of a domestic discount in regard to death penalty sentencing has been rarely examined. The current research uses a near-population of jury decisions in capital murder trials conducted in North Carolina from 1991 to 2009 (n = 800), and a series of logistic regression analyses to determine whether there is (a) a direct effect between offender-victim relationship (e.g., domestic, friend/acquaintance, and stranger) and jury decision making, and/or (b) whether domestic offender-victim relationship (as well as other offender-victim relationships) moderates the effect of legal and extralegal case characteristics on jury assessment of the death penalty. Our findings revealed no empirical support for a "domestic discount" whereby juries are less likely to impose death sentences in cases involving domestic homicides. However, substantial differences in predictors of death sentencing were found across offender-victim dyads; most notably, domestic homicide cases demonstrated the most legalistic model of jury decisions to impose death sentences. PMID:25844513

  11. Model-based synthesis of aircraft noise to quantify human perception of sound quality and annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berckmans, D.; Janssens, K.; Van der Auweraer, H.; Sas, P.; Desmet, W.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a method to synthesize aircraft noise as perceived on the ground. The developed method gives designers the opportunity to make a quick and economic evaluation concerning sound quality of different design alternatives or improvements on existing aircraft. By presenting several synthesized sounds to a jury, it is possible to evaluate the quality of different aircraft sounds and to construct a sound that can serve as a target for future aircraft designs. The combination of using a sound synthesis method that can perform changes to a recorded aircraft sound together with executing jury tests allows to quantify the human perception of aircraft noise.

  12. Effects of sentencing options and strict / lenient instructions on convicting suicide attempters.

    PubMed

    Range, Lillian M; Berman, Mitchell; Embry, Tippins

    2003-11-01

    Sentence and strictness of instructions influence juries' willingness to convict. To see whether this result holds for suicide attempters, 240 undergraduates read jury instructions for a suicide attempt that varied sentence (jail term, fine, community service, or mandatory counseling) and instructions, voted guilty / not guilty, and rated their certainty and effectiveness. With sentences of 25 hours mandatory counseling, or strict instructions, more respondents voted guilty. Sentence did not impact certainty or effectiveness, but strictness enhanced certainty. Overall, respondents were neutral that convicting a suicide attempter would reduce future attempts. Consistent with terror management theory, present students were willing to punish regardless of whether they thought that the punishment was preventive. PMID:14577449

  13. Considerations for implementing pre-dispute arbitration agreements in provider contracts.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Joseph M

    2008-01-01

    Due in part to the historical increase in large compensatory awards and punitive damages in jury verdicts in medical malpractice/long-term care cases and the concomitant increase in the costs of defending these claims, healthcare providers have sought to reduce litigation costs and avoid exposure to runaway jury verdicts in medical malpractice trials by implementing arbitration agreements in healthcare admission contracts. Risk managers should be aware of the evolving law in this area and recognize that a successful arbitration program requires a commitment to ensuring that the program is administered in accordance with evolving laws. PMID:20200899

  14. Some Second Thoughts about "Hustler v. Falwell."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drechsel, Robert E.

    In 1984, a jury awarded $200,000 to the Rev. Jerry Falwell for emotional distress intentionally inflicted by a parody depicting Falwell as a drunkard who had incestuous relations with his mother in an outhouse. In 1988, in "Hustler v. Falwell," the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the verdict on First Amendment grounds. Although the "Hustler"…

  15. A Study to Determine Competencies Needed by ABE/APL Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocker, Donald W.; Spear, George E.

    The research was conducted to identify competencies appropriate for adult basic education (ABE) teachers who use the adult performance level (APL) approach, and to determine which are critical for ABE/APL teachers. A jury of APL authorities was impaneled to: (1) validate that all ABE competencies established by Mocker in 1974 were appropriate for…

  16. Youth Court: A Community Solution for Embracing At-Risk Youth. A National Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Sarah S.; Jurich, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Youth court, also called teen court, peer jury, or student court, is an alternative to the traditional juvenile justice system and school disciplinary proceedings that empower youth and communities to take an active role in addressing the early stages of youth delinquency. The program provides communities with an opportunity to ensure immediate…

  17. Journal of College Reading and Learning, Volume XVIII, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hear, Michael F., Ed.; Knowles, Ramona, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Drawn from the proceedings of the 1985 Western College Reading and Learning Association, as well as articles submitted for juried selection, the papers in this journal issue focus on reading, learning assistance, developmental education, and tutorial services at the college level. Titles and authors of the papers include (1) "Reaching New Heights:…

  18. The Importance of Nonverbal Communication in the Courtroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remland, Martin S.

    Although a relatively new area of scientific study, theory and research on nonverbal communication in the courtroom has produced important findings for students and practitioners in five key areas: voire dire and jury analysis; opening and closing statements; client demeanor and direct examination; cross-examination; and judge demeanor and…

  19. "Francine, Kerplunk, and the Golden Nugget" -- Conducting Mock Trials and Debates in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Charles R.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process for creating a mock trial based on the fable "Francine, Kerplunk, and the Golden Nugget." Explains that during the jury deliberations the jurors utilize chart structures to assess the credibility of the witness' testimony and the attorney's arguments. Maintains that chart structures can also be adapted to classroom debates.…

  20. The Theory of Distributed Practice as Related to Acquisition of Psychomotor Skills by Adolescents in a Selected Curricular Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, James Bob

    1981-01-01

    From results on the tensile strength and nick-break average jury evaluations test, it was concluded that with the same total practice time, different distributions of welding practice time intervals (15, 30, and 45 minutes) influence the quality of butt welds made by ninth-grade vocational agriculture students. (Author/SJL)

  1. Examination of Capital Murder Jurors' Deliberations: Methods and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Keith; Coleman, Susan; Byrd, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    The study of capital juries remains a subject of critical interest for the public and for legislative and judicial policy makers as well as legal scholars and social scientists. Cowan, Thompson, and Ellsworth established one of the standard methodologies for examination of this topic in their 1984 seminal study by observing the subjects' debate…

  2. The Feldenkrais Method® in rehabilitation: a review.

    PubMed

    Ives, J C; Shelley, G A

    1998-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are often suggested to be caused, in part, by poor postural behaviors that are associated with occupational demands. The inefficacy of conventional strategies to elicit postural correction has prompted many to seek alternative techniques such as the Feldenkrais Method®. The rapidly growing use of the Feldenkrais Method® by laypersons and professionals has been fueled by extravagant claims and data published in non-peer-reviewed sources, for the effectiveness of this technique has been poorly documented in peer-reviewed publications. Therefore the purpose of this review was to critically assess the literature on the Feldenkrais Method® in both juried and non-juried sources. The results have generally indicated some improvement with Feldenkrais® interventions, however, these improvements are not nearly as large as suggested by the anecdotal claims. Unfortunately, most of the juried and non-juried findings and conclusions are questionable due to inadequately controlled studies and other serious methodological problems. As such, determination of the effectiveness of the Feldenkrais Method® based on the literature is difficult at best, and the only justifiable conclusion is that more study is warranted. PMID:24441485

  3. Out of Sight, Out of Mind/Out of Mind, Out of Site: Schooling and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a diagnostic term now indelibly scored on the public psyche. In some quarters, a diagnosis of ADHD is regarded with derision. In others it is welcomed with relief. Despite intense multidisciplinary research, the jury is still out with regard to the "truth" of ADHD. Not surprisingly, the rapid…

  4. iMAGiNE! YELLOWSTONE: Art Education and the Reinhabitation of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug; Cowan, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes an art education program that connects children and youth to the historical and contemporary issues associated with Yellowstone National Park. Originally conceived as a one-year celebration, the project has grown into a juried exhibit showcasing student art and writing which responds to Yellowstone resource themes and issues. (MJP)

  5. Litigating Grades: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lionel S.

    2005-01-01

    This account of an academic lawsuit qualifies as a horror story. A mediocre minority student abuses civil rights and ADA protections to win a massive monetary award against his school on the flimsiest of evidence. Jaded lawyers for the state university represent powerless faculty defendants in court, torpidly allowing the jury to throw 50 years of…

  6. Classic and Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, John M.

    Through an analysis of several stories, this paper defines the similarities and differences between classic and hard-boiled detective fiction. The characters and plots of three stories are discussed: "The Red House" by A. A. Milne; "I, The Jury" by Mickey Spillane; and "League of Frightened Men" by Rex Stout. The classic detective story is defined…

  7. Global Research in an Age of Export Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    When a jury convicted a Tennessee professor this month of illegally exporting information to foreign countries via his graduate students and a trip to China, it sent a message to colleges that they need to scrupulously monitor their faculty members' research and their compliance with the often confusing universe of export-control regulations. In…

  8. Exercises for Keeping Pianists' Hands in Top Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Some pianists have idiosyncratic ways of keeping their hands and fingers relaxed. Glenn Gould, for example, religiously soaked his digits in hot water before performing or recording. While the jury is still out on the effectiveness of Gould's routine, there are plenty of other exercises and practices that will keep a pianist's fingers limber.…

  9. A Correlation Study of Exemplary Exurban African American Achievement in Standardized Testing and the Relationship of Parental Household Size in a Southeastern Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, David H.

    2012-01-01

    This study included a literature review of juried research studies of student achievement factors that affect African American achievements tracked in the No Child Left Behind Legislative Act. Statistical correlation analyses were performed to determine if the absence or presence of one or two-parents in the household affected student achievement…

  10. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  11. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  12. Cutting Edge Books: The Impact of Digital Books on Public Library Acquisitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The book has made the transition to the digital age; that much is certain. However, the jury is still out on what form or forms the book of the future will take and how libraries will adapt. This article is a look at the impact of digital books on public library acquisitions, including available formats, purchasing considerations, functional…

  13. The Effect of Using a Program Based on Cooperative Learning Strategy on Developing some Oral Communication Skills of Students, at English Department, Faculty of Education, Sana'a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuheer, Khaled Mohsen Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of study is to investigate the effective of using a cooperative learning strategy STAD-based program on developing some oral communication skills of second level students, English Department, Faculty of Education, Sana'a University. Based on literature review, related studies and a panel of jury members' point of view, a list of 5 oral…

  14. The Effect of Using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on Developing English Majors' Oral Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdallah, Mahmoud Mohammad Sayed

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on developing first-year English majors' oral communication skills. Based on literature review and related studies, a list of 20 oral communication skills was prepared and displayed over a panel of jury members to select…

  15. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  16. Student Speech--The First Amendment and Qualified Immunity Under 42 U.S.C. Section 983: Conduct Implications for School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araux, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the conduct implications of qualified immunity in allegations of deprivation of civil rights by public school administrators regarding the First Amendment-student speech. Methodology: Data were collected using the LexisNexis and JuriSearch online legal research systems, which…

  17. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  18. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  19. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  20. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? (a) Yes, Section 509(a)(2) of the Act only... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines....

  1. Curriculum Materials for Teaching Students the Competencies Needed for Employment in Nonfarm Agricultural Business. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L.; And Others

    Developed by means of a research project, this teaching guide includes five instructional modules in which competencies for agribusiness occupations are stressed. These competencies were identified from a review of the literature and evaluated by a jury of teachers and agribusinessmen in terms of qualifications needed for entry-level employment.…

  2. 5 CFR 300.503 - Conditions for using private sector temporaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... appointment recruiting requirements, including veterans' preference found in 5 CFR part 316 to determine... displaced Federal employee as required by 5 CFR part 330, subpart F (Agency Career Transition Assistance... emergency, accident, illness, parental or family responsibilities, or mandatory jury service, but...

  3. By Unanimous Decision? A Second Look at Consensus in the Film Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Erwin; Popik, Zuzanna

    2014-01-01

    This article reports analyses of the verdicts of various film organizations that annually present awards to motion pictures and investigates whether they award/nominate the same movies in a given year. This research disputes previous findings that reported a high level of agreement between those juries, by the means of reliability analysis and the…

  4. Balancing Act: First and Sixth Amendment Rights in High-Profile Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, James H.

    2005-01-01

    We often hear that democracy is not a spectator sport. This is certainly true of trial by jury, a cornerstone of our democracy, which depends on the willingness of Americans from all walks of life to devote themselves to the difficult work of determining another person's guilt or innocence of a crime. But the work of those citizens selected to…

  5. 28 CFR 0.13 - Legal proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Legal proceedings. 0.13 Section 0.13... Attorney General § 0.13 Legal proceedings. (a) Each Assistant Attorney General and Deputy Assistant... to conduct any legal proceeding, civil or criminal, including grand jury proceedings and...

  6. Free Press and Fair Trial: Some Dimensions of the Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Ed.

    This volume presents the findings of several research studies related to jury verdicts in felony cases and pretrial publicity. The studies include: "Trial Judges' Opinions on Prejudicial Publicity" by Fred Siebert, an attempt to learn whether or not judges thought that pretrial publicity had ever resulted in miscarriage of justice in their courts;…

  7. Will Female Kicker's Legal Victory Reshape Gender Roles in Athletics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes implications of a $2-million judgment awarded to a female football player by a federal jury who found that Duke University (North Carolina) engaged in illegal discrimination by keeping her off its football team. Considers the tradition of football as a decidedly male activity, Title IX requirements, and the large degree of variance in…

  8. Teaching Law to Online Law Students at RMIT University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babacan, Alperhan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the online Juris Doctor Program (JD Program) at RMIT University. The first part of the paper provides a brief overview of the JD Program, the graduate capabilities of the Program and key principles associated with the teaching of law to online postgraduate students. In line with the literature in the area of online teaching…

  9. Anti-Bullying Practices in American Schools: Perspectives of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Yiping C.; Nickerson, Amanda B.

    2010-01-01

    A random sample of 213 school psychologists working in a school setting completed a survey on their schools' current anti-bullying practices. Talking with bullies following bullying incidents, disciplinary consequences for bullies, and increasing adult supervision were the three most frequently used strategies. Peer juries/court, an anti-bullying…

  10. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  11. The Nebraska Interstate-80 Sculpture Project and the Hidden Arts Curriculum of Small Towns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallance, Elizabeth

    Ten American artists were commissioned in 1975 to produce sculptures as rest stops along the Nebraska stretch of Interstate-80 in celebration of the American Bicentennial. The ten commissioned sculptures were selected through a national juried competition that drew 121 initial entries at a cost of $500,000. Despite initial controversy centering…

  12. The Florida High School Mock Trial Competition Case Materials, 1997. State of Florida v. Lee Appleman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Law Related Education Association, Tallahassee.

    This material provides students with information to prepare for a mock trial. The defendant in this case has been accused of the crime of driving under the influence of alcoholic beverages causing severe bodily injury. Case materials include stipulated facts, jury instructions, depositions, and other related materials. (EH)

  13. From Theory to Data: The Process of Refining Learning Progressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Nicole A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan

    2013-01-01

    Learning progressions (LPs) are theoretical models of how learners develop expertise in a domain over extended periods of time. Recent policy reports have touted LPs as a promising approach to aligning standards, curriculum, and assessment. However, the scholarship on LPs is relatively sparse, and the jury is still out on the theoretical and…

  14. The Double Helix Takes the Witness Stand: Behavioral and Neuropsychiatric Genetics in Court

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Data on neuropsychiatric and behavioral genetics have attracted legal interest, as attorneys explore their use in criminal and civil cases. These developments may assist judges and juries in making difficult judgments—but they bring substantial risk of misinterpretation and misuse. PMID:24908480

  15. The Wasps in Court: Argument and Audience in the Athenian Dikasteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Raymond S.

    In an attempt to explain why Aristotle devotes a substantial part of Book Two of "The Rhetoric" to methods for arousing jurors' emotions, despite stating previously that such emotional appeal is nonessential and unethical, this paper examines the nature of the Athenian jury courts, or dikasteries. It first discusses the historical development and…

  16. The Effectiveness of Guided Induction versus Deductive Instruction on the Development of Complex Spanish "Gustar" Structures: An Analysis of Learning Outcomes and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerezo, Luis; Caras, Allison; Leow, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytic research suggests an edge of explicit over implicit instruction for the development of complex L2 grammatical structures, but the jury is still out as to which type of explicit instruction--"deductive" or "inductive," where rules are respectively provided or elicited--proves more effective. Avoiding this…

  17. A Physical Education Evaluation for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Albert

    A physical education evaluation was constructed which was flexible enough to measure the varying degrees of retardation. Validity was determined by submitting the test to a jury of experts. Reliability was ascertained by administering the same test to the same students three times with two week intervals between testing. Objectivity was determined…

  18. Score Calculation in Informatics Contests Using Multiple Criteria Decision Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupiene, Jurate

    2011-01-01

    The Lithuanian Informatics Olympiad is a problem solving contest for high school students. The work of each contestant is evaluated in terms of several criteria, where each criterion is measured according to its own scale (but the same scale for each contestant). Several jury members are involved in the evaluation. This paper analyses the problem…

  19. Washington State Juvenile Justice Code: An Experiment in Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    In the Washington State juvenile justice system, serious or repeat offenders receive the full panoply of due process rights and procedures, with the exception of jury trials; minor offenders are diverted to community boards that require community service or victim restitution; and status offenders are removed from the courts' jurisdiction and…

  20. Sociologist Jailed Because He "Wouldn't Snitch" Ponders the Way Research Ought to Be Done.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A Washington doctoral candidate in sociology is jailed for contempt of court for not revealing conversations with animal-rights activists in a grand jury investigation of a research laboratory raid at his institution. The graduate student refused to breach an American Sociological Association pledge of scholarly confidentiality. (MSE)

  1. 48 CFR 31.001 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Compensated personal absence means any absence from work for reasons such as illness, vacation, holidays, jury duty, military training, or personal activities for which an employer pays compensation directly to an employee in accordance with a plan or custom of the employer. Compensation for personal services means...

  2. The Authority of Truth: Religion and the John Peter Zenger Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, David Paul

    An appreciation of the religious milieu of the John Peter Zenger libel case of 1735 can help explain the nature of the Zenger defense as prepared by Alexander Hamilton, the meaning of the jury's verdict, and the ambiguous legacy of the trial for freedom of expression in the United States. In essence, the case was a disputation on "truth" and on…

  3. Community Development as an Approach to Community Engagement in Rural-Based Higher Education Institutions in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netshandama, V. O.

    2010-01-01

    The premise of this article is that the "jury is still out" to describe what effective Community Engagement entails in South African higher education institutions. The current discussions about community engagement and service learning do not cover the primary objective of adding value to the community, particularly of the rural-based universities…

  4. Beyond the Schoolhouse Door: Educating the Political Animal in Jefferson's Little Republics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotts, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Jefferson believed that citizenship must exhibit republican virtue. While education was necessary in a republican polity, it alone was insufficient in sustaining a revolutionary civic spirit. This paper examines Jefferson's expectations for citizen virtue, specifically related to militia and jury service in his "little republics."…

  5. A Content Analysis of the Methods Course for the Teaching of English in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boze, Nancy Smith

    Through the completion of a questionnaire-rating scale, three juries composed of authorities in education and English, of communication arts coordinators, and of outstanding English teachers helped to identify and rank common competencies and concepts that all prospective English teachers should acquire in their English methods courses, and…

  6. Employing a Mock Trial in a Criminology Course: An Applied Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepelak, Norma J.

    1996-01-01

    Recounts a criminology class exercise that consisted of staging a mock trial using the murders from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" as source material. Students research the case and role play various lawyers, jury members, and witnesses. Identifies and discusses four educational objectives attainable through the staging of mock trials. (MJP)

  7. American military dentists as prisoners-of-war in the Pacific theatre during World War II.

    PubMed

    Bober-Moken, I G

    1994-03-01

    Fifty-three American Military dentists were held by the Japanese as Prisoners-of-War during World War II. Throughout 40 months of captivity these men served their fellow prisoners providing dental treatment in an austere environment with "jury-rigged" equipment and supplies. A brief overview of their experiences is presented in this paper. PMID:8061507

  8. Supreme Court's New Term. Supreme Court Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the issues addressed in the 2002 U.S. Supreme Court term, such as the First, Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments, cruel and unusual punishment, sex offender registries, fair housing, cross burning, jury selection, affirmative action, abortion protests, and copyrights and the public domain. (CMK)

  9. A Report on a Survey of Artists/Craftspersons' Attitudes Toward Competitive Exhibitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinale, Robert L.; Arch, Adria B.

    Results of a survey to determine the attitudes of artists and craftspersons toward entering competitive juried exhibitions are reported. Questionnaires were sent to people entering the national Copper, Brass, and Bronze Exhibition for 1977 along with notices of acceptance or rejection. One hundred-ninety artists (38%) responded. The questionnaire…

  10. An Empirical Study of Post-Branzburg Cases Involving Newsmen's Privilege.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehra, Achal

    Nine years after the 1972 Supreme Court ruling in *Branzburg v. Hayes" that journalists enjoy no constitutional privilege to withhold the names of sources and to conceal information from grand jury proceedings, a study was conducted to determine the courts' attitudes toward journalists' privilege and to test commonly held beliefs about its status…

  11. 25 CFR 39.114 - What characteristics may qualify a student as gifted and talented for purposes of supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization... school, community, clubs and organization, awards documenting leadership capabilities. No school can... juried competitions. No school can identify more than 15 percent of its student population as gifted...

  12. 25 CFR 39.114 - What characteristics may qualify a student as gifted and talented for purposes of supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization... school, community, clubs and organization, awards documenting leadership capabilities. No school can... juried competitions. No school can identify more than 15 percent of its student population as gifted...

  13. 25 CFR 39.114 - What characteristics may qualify a student as gifted and talented for purposes of supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization... school, community, clubs and organization, awards documenting leadership capabilities. No school can... juried competitions. No school can identify more than 15 percent of its student population as gifted...

  14. 25 CFR 39.114 - What characteristics may qualify a student as gifted and talented for purposes of supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization... school, community, clubs and organization, awards documenting leadership capabilities. No school can... juried competitions. No school can identify more than 15 percent of its student population as gifted...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  16. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  17. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  18. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  19. 26 CFR 301.6103(i)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement Administration) or other Federal... investigation, involving enforcement of Federal criminal statute not involving tax administration. 301.6103(i)-1... grand jury proceeding, or preparation for proceeding or investigation, involving enforcement of......

  20. Clothing Construction Performance Assessment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Betty A.

    The goal of the project was to validate, refine, and develop plans for implementation of a performance-based challenge test in the cognitive and psychomotor aspects of basic clothing construction skills that could be utilized for grades 7-14. An advisory board and a jury panel representing the three instructional levels provided assistance in…

  1. Fait A La Main: A Source Book of Louisiana Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Maida, Ed.

    The Louisiana Crafts Program is an economic development program that strives to stimulate several markets for Louisiana craftsmen. This publication is a directory of juried Louisiana craftsmen of various types; it is intended as a source book for anyone interested in handmade crafts. It is divided into two sections: "Folk Craftsmen" and…

  2. 42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... may only be filed in Federal court under the provisions of the APA, 5 U.S.C. 701-706. Under the APA, a... the court's views for those of the agency. Jury trials and civil discovery are not permitted in APA... injunctive relief to the interested party. No money damages or fines are permitted in APA proceedings....

  3. 42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... may only be filed in Federal court under the provisions of the APA, 5 U.S.C. 701-706. Under the APA, a... the court's views for those of the agency. Jury trials and civil discovery are not permitted in APA... injunctive relief to the interested party. No money damages or fines are permitted in APA proceedings....

  4. The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education: Ten Years of Learning for Peace. Peace Education Miniprints, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Unku Abdul; Reardon, Betty A.

    The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education was established in 1981. The purpose of the award is to honor outstanding contributions to the field of peace education in its most broadly defined sense. In this paper, two members of the international jury for the prize review the recipients of the awards from 1981 to 1991, and thus demonstrate the variety of…

  5. Blackboard Wins Payment from Competitor in Patent Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    A federal jury in Texas awarded Blackboard Inc. $3.1-million last month, saying that a smaller Canadian competitor, Desire2Learn Inc., had infringed Blackboard's patent for a system of delivering course materials online. The case has been closely watched by campus-technology officials, many of whom feared that a Blackboard win could stifle…

  6. Recommendations for laparoscopic liver resection: a report from the second international consensus conference held in Morioka.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Go; Cherqui, Daniel; Geller, David A; Buell, Joseph F; Kaneko, Hironori; Han, Ho Seong; Asbun, Horacio; OʼRourke, Nicholas; Tanabe, Minoru; Koffron, Alan J; Tsung, Allan; Soubrane, Olivier; Machado, Marcel Autran; Gayet, Brice; Troisi, Roberto I; Pessaux, Patrick; Van Dam, Ronald M; Scatton, Olivier; Abu Hilal, Mohammad; Belli, Giulio; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Edwin, Bjørn; Choi, Gi Hong; Aldrighetti, Luca Antonio; Cai, Xiujun; Cleary, Sean; Chen, Kuo-Hsin; Schön, Michael R; Sugioka, Atsushi; Tang, Chung-Ngai; Herman, Paulo; Pekolj, Juan; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Dagher, Ibrahim; Jarnagin, William; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Strong, Russell; Jagannath, Palepu; Lo, Chung-Mau; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Kokudo, Norihiro; Barkun, Jeffrey; Strasberg, Steven M

    2015-04-01

    The use of laparoscopy for liver surgery is increasing rapidly. The Second International Consensus Conference on Laparoscopic Liver Resections (LLR) was held in Morioka, Japan, from October 4 to 6, 2014 to evaluate the current status of laparoscopic liver surgery and to provide recommendations to aid its future development. Seventeen questions were addressed. The first 7 questions focused on outcomes that reflect the benefits and risks of LLR. These questions were addressed using the Zurich-Danish consensus conference model in which the literature and expert opinion were weighed by a 9-member jury, who evaluated LLR outcomes using GRADE and a list of comparators. The jury also graded LLRs by the Balliol Classification of IDEAL. The jury concluded that MINOR LLRs had become standard practice (IDEAL 3) and that MAJOR liver resections were still innovative procedures in the exploration phase (IDEAL 2b). Continued cautious introduction of MAJOR LLRs was recommended. All of the evidence available for scrutiny was of LOW quality by GRADE, which prompted the recommendation for higher quality evaluative studies. The last 10 questions focused on technical questions and the recommendations were based on literature review and expert panel opinion. Recommendations were made regarding preoperative evaluation, bleeding controls, transection methods, anatomic approaches, and equipment. Both experts and jury recognized the need for a formal structure of education for those interested in performing major laparoscopic LLR because of the steep learning curve. PMID:25742461

  7. BOSTI (Boston Organization for Social and Technological Innovations, Inc.). The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury included applied research for the first time this year. In the category of "research process and techniques" an award was given for a mental health planning aid kit -- a process for organizing and aiding planning of mental health programs and facilities. (Author/MF)

  8. Adapted Verbal Feedback, Instructor Interaction and Student Emotions in the Landscape Architecture Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl A.; Boyer, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    In light of concerns with architectural students' emotional jeopardy during traditional desk and final-jury critiques, the authors pursue alternative approaches intended to provide more supportive and mentoring verbal assessment in landscape architecture studios. In addition to traditional studio-based critiques throughout a semester, we provide…

  9. MOOCs for High School: Unlocking Opportunities or Substandard Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    If 2012 was the year of the MOOC--massive open online course--then 2013 was the year the MOOC hype returned to Earth. Largely lost in the coverage in both years, however, was the impact MOOCs might have in high schools. Although the jury is still out on that question, high schools around the country are experimenting with adding MOOCs to their…

  10. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  11. 32 CFR 144.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Responsibilities. 144.5 Section 144.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SERVICE BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON STATE AND LOCAL JURIES § 144.5 Responsibilities. The Secretaries...

  12. Selected Papers from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (12th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection contains the 20 best papers from a conference at which nearly 300 faculty members presented papers. Those that were selected by juried review include: (1) "Where Have You Been? A Case Study of Successful Implementation of Undergraduate Online Learning Communities" (John Barnett); (2) "A Strange Sense of Disquietude: Understanding…

  13. A Guide for Developing Comprehensive Community College Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Frank P.

    Heretofore community colleges have adopted the facility standards of high schools or other colleges, or have devised their own. To establish flexible specifications especially for the junior college, based on the educational program, architectural feasibility, safety, student and faculty use, and possible future needs, a 6-man jury prepared a…

  14. Reading the Riot Act: Rhetoric, Psychology, and Counter-Revolutionary Discourse in Shays's Rebellion, 1786-1787

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engels, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In 1786, backcountry Massachusetts farmers, fed up with government policies favoring aristocratic elites, marched on courts to bar the entry of judges and juries. Enacting a long-standing tradition known to colonists as a "Regulation," the farmers' movement became known as Shays's Rebellion. Erupting in the turbulent days following the War for…

  15. Racial Bias in the Juvenile Justice System in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Menah A. E.

    1993-01-01

    Examines research on racial bias, focusing on the discretionary decision-making junctures of the juvenile court system. Research and statistics continue to suggest that the public, the police, the prosecution, and the jury all treat blacks more unfairly based to a large extent on race. (SLD)

  16. Natural Supports in the Workplace: No Need for a Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogan, Pat

    1996-01-01

    This commentary on "Natural Supports in the Workplace: The Jury Is Still Out" (Test and Wood), discusses existing research on the effectiveness of natural supports. Describes job development and training approaches that facilitate natural supports and how supports can be responsive to the changing needs of supported employees and employers. (CR)

  17. 48 CFR 31.001 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Compensated personal absence means any absence from work for reasons such as illness, vacation, holidays, jury... subdivision, contract, or other work unit for which cost data are desired and for which provision is made to... for the benefits it yields. Job means a homogeneous cluster of work tasks, the completion of...

  18. Selected Papers from the 13th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    The papers in this collection are the 15 best papers from the thirteenth International Conference on College Teaching and Learning. They represent a cross-section of nearly 300 presentations, selected by juried review from 40 submitted for consideration. The papers are: (1) The Use of Hybrid Type Educational Digital Entities in University…

  19. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION TO THE RURAL DEVELOPMENT OF ETHIOPIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KERBRET, MAKONNEN

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE PRESENT SITUATION IN ETHIOPIA AND A REVIEW OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT IN THE WORLD WAS MADE THROUGH INTENSIVE LIBRARY RESEARCH. GUIDELINES AND OBJECTIVES WERE BASED ON THE REVIEW SUBMITTED TO A JURY OF EXPERTS FOR VERIFICATION. REVISED GUIDELINES AND OBJECTIVES WERE THEN DEVELOPED FOR GUIDING AND IMPLEMENTING THE…

  20. A GUIDE FOR SELF-EVALUATION OF STATE SUPERVISORY PROGRAMS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LINSON, MARVIN G.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DEVELOP A GUIDE FOR THE SELF-EVALUATION OF STATE SUPERVISORY PROGRAMS OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE AND TO DESIGN AN INSTRUMENT TO ASSIST IN THIS EVALUATION. TWO NATIONAL JURIES OF EXPERTS IN EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION ASSISTED IN REFINING A SET OF STATEMENTS, DEVELOPED TO SERVE AS INDICATORS OF SUCCESSFUL…

  1. THE ROLE OF PREVOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS OF NEW YORK STATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AL-SALMAN, MUHSIN HUSSAIN

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DESCRIBE EXISTING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PREVOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE COURSES AND DETERMINE WHAT SELECTED EDUCATORS IN AGRICULTURE BELIEVE THE OBJECTIVES AND COURSE CONTENT SHOULD BE. LISTS OF 17 OBJECTIVES AND 103 COURSE CONTENT ITEMS IN NINE SUBJECT AREAS WERE ASSEMBLED. A JURY OF 17 MEMBERS RANKED THE OBJECTIVES AND…

  2. CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF THE CURRICULUM IN ADULT EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MARTINEZ, FRANK ROBERT

    A STUDY WAS MADE TO DEVELOP CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING FIVE ASPECTS OF THE ADULT EDUCATION CURRICULUM--PHILOSOPHY, CHARACTER, PLANNING, IMPROVEMENT, AND EVALUATION TECHNIQUES. ONE HUNDRED TWELVE STATEMENTS OF POLICY WERE DRAWN FROM THE LITERATURE, VALIDATED BY A QUALIFIED JURY, AND RATED BY 91 FULL TIME ADULT EDUCATION ADMINISTRATORS AND BY 42 ADULT…

  3. [INFULGAN-OPTIMAL ANALGETIC DRUG FOR USE IN LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Nichitaylo, M E; Bulik, L M

    2015-06-01

    The experience of the application of 78 patients after various laparoscopic procedures was generalized. As perioperative anesthesia drug Infulgan (production of corporation "Jury-Farm") was applyed. Appointment of Infulgan in standard dose ensured the achievement expressed analgesic effect, reducing the volume of injected opioids and frequency of adverse reactions. PMID:26521456

  4. Effects of an Evidence-Based Text on Scepticism, Methodological Reasoning, Values and Juror Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leshowitz, Barry; Okun, Morris

    2011-01-01

    Research in social cognition laboratories and in simulated legal settings demonstrates that people often do not understand the statistical properties of evidence and are unable to detect scientifically flawed studies. In a mock jury study, we examined the effects of an evidence-based transcript on scepticism towards evidence obtained in flawed…

  5. The Status of Graphical Presentation in Interior/Architectural Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Meltem O.; Basa, Inci

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that interior/architectural design education favours a dominance of final presentation over the design process in the studio environment, particularly in the evaluation of a project. It suggests that the appeal of design juries for pleasant drawings, which may shift the emphasis from the project itself to its representation,…

  6. Representation of Legal Knowledge for Conceptual Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, George R.; deBessonet, Cary G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes traditional legal information retrieval systems--Juris, Lexis, Westlaw--and several new rule-based, knowledge-based, legal knowledge reasoning, and analytical legal information systems--Waterman and Peterson's Legal Decisionmaking System, Hafner's Legal Information Retrieval System, McCarty's TAXMAN, and the deBessonet representation of…

  7. An Application of the Poisson Race Model to Confidence Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkle, Edgar C.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    In tasks as diverse as stock market predictions and jury deliberations, a person's feelings of confidence in the appropriateness of different choices often impact that person's final choice. The current study examines the mathematical modeling of confidence calibration in a simple dual-choice task. Experiments are motivated by an accumulator…

  8. Hindsight Bias and the Simpson Trial: Use in Introductory Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demakis, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Identifies hindsight bias as the tendency to exaggerate one's ability to have foreseen the outcome of an event after learning the outcome. Describes a class project where students predicted the verdict of the O. J. Simpson trial one week before the verdict and hypothesized a jury response a month later. (MJP)

  9. Breaking away. Is the divorce rate for hospital mergers and systems climbing?

    PubMed

    Bilchik, G S

    2000-09-01

    The jury is still out on whether a recent spate of hospital de-mergers and system break-ups represents a trend or a natural readjustment. But one thing is for sure--advice from trustees who have been through a hospital divorce can save you from repeating their emotionally wrenching experiences. PMID:11785233

  10. Equality v. Liberty v. Pluralism: Latinos in American Constitutional Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltero, Carlos R.

    This paper examines how U.S. courts, particularly the Supreme Court, have applied constitutional law principles to Latino communities and individuals in three areas: public education, the status of Puerto Rico, and jury selection. Consistent with traditional views of American society as biracial (black and white), constitutional law discussions…

  11. College Students' Conceptualizations of Deficits Involved in Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musso, Mandi W.; Barker, Alyse A.; Proto, Daniel A.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2012-01-01

    Precedential rulings in recent capital murder trials may, in some cases, leave it up to a jury to determine whether or not an individual meets criteria for an intellectual disability (ID) and should be spared from the death penalty. Despite the potential for misconceptions about ID to bias decisions, few empirical studies have examined the…

  12. Secondary School Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Joseph; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents five complete lesson plans for activities that teach high school students about search and seizure, due process, freedom of assembly, right to counsel, and other individual liberties, through the use of case study techniques, a jury simulation, the analysis of historical material, and discussions. (JDH)

  13. The double helix takes the witness stand: behavioral and neuropsychiatric genetics in court.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2014-06-01

    Data on neuropsychiatric and behavioral genetics have attracted legal interest, as attorneys explore their use in criminal and civil cases. These developments may assist judges and juries in making difficult judgments-but they bring substantial risk of misinterpretation and misuse. PMID:24908480

  14. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Patry, Marc W.; Penrod, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court’s ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a paper and pencil study of 245 undergraduate mock jurors. The experimental design was an incomplete 4×2×2×2×2 factorial model resulting in 56 possible conditions. Manipulations included four different types of instructions, presence of a list of case-specific mitigators to accompany the instructions, and three variations in the case facts: age of the defendant, bad prior record, and defendant history of emotional abuse. Study 2 was a fully-crossed 2×2×2×2×2 experiment with four deliberating mock juries per cell. Manipulations included jury instructions (original or revised), presence of a list of case-specific mitigators, defendant history of emotional abuse, bad prior record, and heinousness of the crime. The sample of 735 jury-eligible participants included 130 individuals who identified themselves as students. Participants watched one of 32 stimulus videotapes based on a replication of a capital sentencing hearing. The present findings support previous research showing low comprehension of capital penalty instructions. Further, we found that higher instruction comprehension was associated with higher likelihood of issuing life sentence decisions. The importance of instruction comprehension is emphasized in a social cognitive model of jury decision making at the sentencing phase of capital cases. PMID:24072981

  15. Fast Geometric Consensus Approach for Protein Model Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adamczak, Rafal; Pillardy, Jaroslaw; Vallat, Brinda K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Model quality assessment (MQA) is an integral part of protein structure prediction methods that typically generate multiple candidate models. The challenge lies in ranking and selecting the best models using a variety of physical, knowledge-based, and geometric consensus (GC)-based scoring functions. In particular, 3D-Jury and related GC methods assume that well-predicted (sub-)structures are more likely to occur frequently in a population of candidate models, compared to incorrectly folded fragments. While this approach is very successful in the context of diversified sets of models, identifying similar substructures is computationally expensive since all pairs of models need to be superimposed using MaxSub or related heuristics for structure-to-structure alignment. Here, we consider a fast alternative, in which structural similarity is assessed using 1D profiles, e.g., consisting of relative solvent accessibilities and secondary structures of equivalent amino acid residues in the respective models. We show that the new approach, dubbed 1D-Jury, allows to implicitly compare and rank N models in O(N) time, as opposed to quadratic complexity of 3D-Jury and related clustering-based methods. In addition, 1D-Jury avoids computationally expensive 3D superposition of pairs of models. At the same time, structural similarity scores based on 1D profiles are shown to correlate strongly with those obtained using MaxSub. In terms of the ability to select the best models as top candidates 1D-Jury performs on par with other GC methods. Other potential applications of the new approach, including fast clustering of large numbers of intermediate structures generated by folding simulations, are discussed as well. PMID:21244273

  16. Policing sexuality in a modern state hospital.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, T

    1989-01-01

    In 1985 a grand jury was convened by the district attorney to investigate conditions at the Rochester (N.Y.) Psychiatric Center following the center's decision not to notify police of the sodomy of a patient by another patient. The grand jury brought no civil or criminal indictments, but the incident touched off a wave of negative publicity about the hospital and prompted local police and the district attorney to demand that the hospital report any incident of sexual activity involving a mentally incompetent patient. As a result, the hospital instituted a stringent policy requiring extensive investigation and physical examination of patients found having sex. This article discusses legal and clinical issues that were raised by the incident, the impact of public scrutiny on the policing of patient sexuality. The negative aspects of overreporting sexual activity at a state hospital are described. PMID:2912842

  17. Intent, the ethos of a caring society and justice.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Grant; Gillett, Matthew

    2008-10-01

    A paradoxical New Zealand case of a father who killed his five-month-old severely impaired daughter is discussed. The jury found the father not guilty of murder despite his confession that he acted so as to bring about her death. Standard constructions do not capture any reason for the jury to acquit him on the ground of lack of intent. The case also raises the issue of social mores in relation to difficult ethical decisions and the problems in trying to capture those in legislation or guidelines. The analysis discusses an alternative conception of intent according to a broader understanding of the patient's life story and the events surrounding the act in question and also the reasons why policy and legislative needs may distort bioethical analysis and argument in relation to difficult human situations. PMID:19009999

  18. "Typical Clinton: brazen it out".

    PubMed

    Upchurch, C M; O'Connell, D C

    2000-07-01

    Ten excerpts of both President Clinton's Grand Jury Testimony of August 17, 1998 and of each of two interviews with Hillary Rodham Clinton (Today Show, January 27, 1998; Good Morning America, January 28, 1998) were analyzed. In all of them, the topic under discussion was the President's insistence on his innocence in the Lewinsky case. Comparisons between the President and First Lady revealed long and short within-speaker pauses, respectively. His replies to questions average more than twice the length of hers. Comparisons were also made with other speech genres, including modern presidential inaugural rhetoric. In particular, President Clinton's statement of his innocence at the conclusion of an educational press conference on January 26, 1998 and his prepared statement at the beginning of his Grand Jury Testimony were found to vary notably from all the other corpora. Both are characterized by several of Ekman's (1985, p. 286) behavioral cues for the detection of deception. PMID:10953827

  19. A mock juror investigation of blame attribution in the punishment of hate crime perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Robert J; Clark, John W; Kehn, Andre; Burks, Alixandra C; Wechsler, Hayley J

    2014-01-01

    We examined blame attribution as a moderator of perceptions of hate crimes against gay, African American, and transgender victims. Participants were 510 Texas jury panel members. Results of vignette-based crime scenarios showed that victim blame displayed significant negative, and perpetrator blame significant positive, effects on sentencing recommendations. Also as hypothesized, victim and perpetrator blame moderated the effect of support for hate crime legislation. Interaction patterns suggested that both types of blame attribution influence sentencing recommendations, but only for participants disagreeing with hate crime legislation. Three-way interactions with victim type also emerged, indicating that the effects of both types of blame attribution show particular influences when the victim is gay, as opposed to transgender or African American. Implications for attribution theory, hate crime policy, and jury selection are discussed. PMID:24666730

  20. Absence of physician recourse in malpractice litigation--malicious prosecution.

    PubMed

    Spector, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    The courts are protective of the plaintiff's rights under law to seek redress in the court by placing the facts of their allegations before a judge or jury. Because the avenue to the court is through representation and advocacy, the courts equally are protective of the agent of that representation, the attorney. To date, no physician who has been sued for medical malpractice in Louisiana has brought a successful malicious prosecution claim against the plaintiff or his attorney. PMID:12014457

  1. [Beauty judgment: review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Faure, Jacques; Bolender, Yves

    2014-03-01

    Esthetic judgments are surely subjective, but as surely, that does not preclude them being studied objectively through rigorous scientific methods. The factual basis of a science of esthetics is not to settle whether some person or image is "objectively beautiful" but rather to determine whether some representative set or sets of individuals judge or experience him/her/it as beautiful or unattractive. The aim of this paper is to review the definitional, theoretical and methodological aspects pertaining to the perception of facial/dental attractiveness by a group of representative individuals. The first part lays down the basic principles of the perception of facial/dental attractiveness: the perception involves a jury, a field of investigation and a test providing quantitative data; the following general determinants of beauty perception are reviewed: the average morphology, the judge's cultural background, the numerology, the judge's ethnical origin. Indirect determinants are the dentition, the osseous architecture and the muscular envelope. Some disruptive factors might alter the judges' facial perception. They might be qualified as either peripheral to the face or psycho-social factors. Peripheral factors include hair style and color, skin hue, wrinkles, lips color... Psycho-social factors cover the personality of the subject being evaluated, his/her intelligence or behavior. The second part deals specifically with the methodology used to determine facial attractiveness and to correlate this latter with a specific morphology. Typically such a study aims to determine average esthetic preferences for some set of visual displays among a particular jury, given a specific task to judge esthetic quality or qualities. The sample being studied, the displays, the jury or jurys, the rating procedure must all be specified prior to collecting data. A specific emphasis will be given to the rating process and the associated morphometrics, the ultimate goal being to

  2. A federalist strategy for nuclear waste management.

    PubMed

    Lee, K N

    1980-05-16

    The federal government plans to rely on a policy of "consultation and concurrence" with state governments in developing nuclear waste repositories. The weaknesses of the concurrence approach are analyzed, and an alternative institutional framework for locating a waste repository is proposed: a siting jury that provides representation for state and local interests, while maintaining a high level of technical review. The proposal could be tested in the siting of away-from-reactor storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel. PMID:17771087

  3. A quick screening test of competency to stand trial for defendants with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Smith, S A; Hudson, R L

    1995-02-01

    19 terms and concepts from evaluations of competency to stand trial of 55 defendants with mental retardation were rated to examine whether a quick screening test could be devised that would differentiate those who were judged competent or not competent. A multiple regression and discriminant analysis gave four items that yielded maximum predictability (R = .84): court strategy, plead, testify, and jury. Guilty, trial, and prosecutor were also significantly more difficult for those who were not competent than those who were. PMID:7770598

  4. Court upholds conviction in rape of mentally retarded boy.

    PubMed

    1999-06-25

    An Ohio appeals court upheld the conviction of an HIV-positive man convicted of kidnapping and raping a 17-year-old mentally retarded boy. The defendant had appealed his conviction, claiming that disclosure of his HIV status prejudiced the jury against him. The appeals court found that the statements about his HIV infection were relevant testimony, although some prejudice may conceivably arise. Details from the original trial and appellate hearing are provided. PMID:11367289

  5. Scrushy plots a comeback. As HealthSouth works hard to put a fraud scandal in the past, its acquitted founder studies how he can regain the company.

    PubMed

    Barr, Paul

    2005-07-11

    The jury ruled that Richard Scrushy is not guilty. So now HealthSouth's deposed leader wants to reclaim the company he founded, even if current management and investors don't want him. "I have a hard time believing he's going to get back in there," says Larry Scanlan, left, of Navigant Consulting. Others are more blunt: "We have less than zero support for his return," says a principal at the largest single owner of HealthSouth shares. PMID:16048224

  6. Present State Iof Holography In Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masane; Hayashi, Yuzo; Yamamoto, Y.

    1983-07-01

    In 1948,Dr. Dennis Gabor introduced the theory of holography as "the optical recording of the object wave formed by the resulting interference pattern of two mutually coherent, component light beams." Through the studies of enumerous practical applications, the theory of holography was further advanced to be used in conjunction with the laser beam to better serve a more practical minded industry. Such developments were introduced and engineered by Dr. Emmett Leith and Dr. Juris Upatnieks in 1962.

  7. Using a Mock Trial Method to Enhance Effectiveness of Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing.

    PubMed

    White, Cindy T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional teaching methodologies may deter adult learning because of passive the exchange of knowledge. Teaching to the "evidence" substantiating best practice requires a systematic approach to transfer knowledge into clinical inquiry. A mock trial simulated role-play activity was selected to show the value of learning through active engagement. The nurse "defendant" was challenged to substantiate practice based on the evidence. Seminar participants (the jury) scrutinized testimony through deliberation before delivering the final verdict. PMID:26580469

  8. Law Schools Customize Degrees to Students' Taste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Going to law school to get a law degree has become a little like going to an ice-cream parlor for a scoop of vanilla. Plenty of people still do it, but many schools' brochures--like the elaborate flavor-and-topping menus on ice-cream parlor walls--now tempt them with something different, something more. Law students can have their "juris doctor"…

  9. "So, what is a psychopath?" Venireperson perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes about psychopathic personality.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon Toney; Edens, John F; Clark, John; Rulseh, Allison

    2014-10-01

    This study surveyed over 400 individuals attending jury duty regarding various perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs they had concerning psychopathic personality (psychopathy). The protocol included (a) prototype ratings of what participants considered to be core features, using the Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathic Personality (CAPP) prototype rating scale; (b) questions concerning knowledge and beliefs about psychopathy (e.g., prevalence in society); and (c) attitudinal scales concerning potential associated features (e.g., criminality, rehabilitation potential), etiological underpinnings, and moral judgments and legal sanctions. Consistent with results of earlier studies using expert raters, jury panel members rated most of the 33 individual CAPP items and all 6 CAPP scales as at least moderately prototypical, with Self and Dominance domains obtaining the highest mean ratings. Many participants also strongly endorsed symptoms of psychosis (e.g., delusions) as prototypical of psychopathy. Despite this, they viewed psychopaths as responsible for their own actions, as capable of determining right from wrong, and as generally not "insane." Our findings indicate that jury panel members view the prototypical psychopath as highly dominant, self-focused, and lacking in remorse and empathy and reinforce the need for expert witnesses to clearly differentiate between psychopathy and psychotic-spectrum disorders. PMID:24933174

  10. Metrical expectations from preceding prosody influence perception of lexical stress.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith; Salverda, Anne Pier; Dilley, Laura C; Tanenhaus, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Two visual-world experiments tested the hypothesis that expectations based on preceding prosody influence the perception of suprasegmental cues to lexical stress. The results demonstrate that listeners' consideration of competing alternatives with different stress patterns (e.g., 'jury/gi'raffe) can be influenced by the fundamental frequency and syllable timing patterns across material preceding a target word. When preceding stressed syllables distal to the target word shared pitch and timing characteristics with the first syllable of the target word, pictures of alternatives with primary lexical stress on the first syllable (e.g., jury) initially attracted more looks than alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe). This effect was modulated when preceding unstressed syllables had pitch and timing characteristics similar to the initial syllable of the target word, with more looks to alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe) than to those with stressed initial syllables (e.g., jury). These findings suggest that expectations about the acoustic realization of upcoming speech include information about metrical organization and lexical stress and that these expectations constrain the initial interpretation of suprasegmental stress cues. These distal prosody effects implicate online probabilistic inferences about the sources of acoustic-phonetic variation during spoken-word recognition. PMID:25621583

  11. Innocent until Primed: Mock Jurors' Racially Biased Response to the Presumption of Innocence

    PubMed Central

    Young, Danielle M.; Levinson, Justin D.; Sinnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that crime concepts can activate attentional bias to Black faces. This study investigates the possibility that some legal concepts hold similar implicit racial cues. Presumption of innocence instructions, a core legal principle specifically designed to eliminate bias, may instead serve as an implicit racial cue resulting in attentional bias. Methodology/Principal findings The experiment was conducted in a courtroom with participants seated in the jury box. Participants first watched a video of a federal judge reading jury instructions that contained presumption of innocence instructions, or matched length alternative instructions. Immediately following this video a dot-probe task was administered to assess the priming effect of the jury instructions. Presumption of innocence instructions, but not the alternative instructions, led to significantly faster response times to Black faces when compared with White faces. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that the core principle designed to ensure fairness in the legal system actually primes attention for Black faces, indicating that this supposedly fundamental protection could trigger racial stereotypes. PMID:24643050

  12. Metrical expectations from preceding prosody influence perception of lexical stress

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith; Salverda, Anne Pier; Dilley, Laura C.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Two visual-world experiments tested the hypothesis that expectations based on preceding prosody influence the perception of suprasegmental cues to lexical stress. The results demonstrate that listeners’ consideration of competing alternatives with different stress patterns (e.g., ‘jury/gi’raffe) can be influenced by the fundamental frequency and syllable timing patterns across material preceding a target word. When preceding stressed syllables distal to the target word shared pitch and timing characteristics with the first syllable of the target word, pictures of alternatives with primary lexical stress on the first syllable (e.g., jury) initially attracted more looks than alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe). This effect was modulated when preceding unstressed syllables had pitch and timing characteristics similar to the initial syllable of the target word, with more looks to alternatives with unstressed initial syllables (e.g., giraffe) than to those with stressed initial syllables (e.g., jury). These findings suggest that expectations about the acoustic realization of upcoming speech include information about metrical organization and lexical stress, and that these expectations constrain the initial interpretation of suprasegmental stress cues. These distal prosody effects implicate on-line probabilistic inferences about the sources of acoustic-phonetic variation during spoken-word recognition. PMID:25621583

  13. Intelligent Systems Approaches to Product Sound Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietila, Glenn M.

    As a product market becomes more competitive, consumers become more discriminating in the way in which they differentiate between engineered products. The consumer often makes a purchasing decision based on the sound emitted from the product during operation by using the sound to judge quality or annoyance. Therefore, in recent years, many sound quality analysis tools have been developed to evaluate the consumer preference as it relates to a product sound and to quantify this preference based on objective measurements. This understanding can be used to direct a product design process in order to help differentiate the product from competitive products or to establish an impression on consumers regarding a product's quality or robustness. The sound quality process is typically a statistical tool that is used to model subjective preference, or merit score, based on objective measurements, or metrics. In this way, new product developments can be evaluated in an objective manner without the laborious process of gathering a sample population of consumers for subjective studies each time. The most common model used today is the Multiple Linear Regression (MLR), although recently non-linear Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approaches are gaining popularity. This dissertation will review publicly available published literature and present additional intelligent systems approaches that can be used to improve on the current sound quality process. The focus of this work is to address shortcomings in the current paired comparison approach to sound quality analysis. This research will propose a framework for an adaptive jury analysis approach as an alternative to the current Bradley-Terry model. The adaptive jury framework uses statistical hypothesis testing to focus on sound pairings that are most interesting and is expected to address some of the restrictions required by the Bradley-Terry model. It will also provide a more amicable framework for an intelligent systems approach

  14. Sound quality of low-frequency and car engine noises after active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, A.; Ferrer, M.; de Diego, M.; Piñero, G.; Garcia-Bonito, J. J.

    2003-08-01

    The ability of active noise control (ANC) systems to achieve a more pleasant sound has been evaluated by means of sound quality analysis of a real multi-channel active noise controller. Recordings of real car engine noises had been carried out using a Head acoustics TM binaural head simulator seated in a typical car seat, and these signals together with synthesized noise have been actively controlled in an enclosed room. The sound quality study has focused on the estimation of noise quality changes through the evaluation of the sense of comfort. Two methods have been developed: firstly, a predictive method based on psychoacoustic parameters (loudness, roughness, tonality and sharpness); and secondly, a subjective method using a jury test. Both results have been related to the spectral characteristics of the sounds before and after active control. It can be concluded from both analyses that ANC positively affects acoustic comfort. The engine noise mathematical comfort predictor is based on loudness and roughness (two psychoacoustic parameters directly influenced by ANC), and has satisfactorily predicted the improvements in the pleasantness of the sounds. As far as the subjective evaluation method is concerned, the jury test has showed that acoustic comfort is, in most cases, directly related to the sense of quietness. However, ANC has also been assessed negatively by the jury in the cases that it was unable to reduce the loudness, perhaps because of the low amplitudes of the original sounds. Finally, from what has been shown, it can be said that the subjective improvements strongly depends on the attenuation level achieved by the ANC system operation, as well as the spectral characteristics of the sounds before and after control.

  15. Thin slice expert testimony and mock trial deliberations.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Caroline Titcomb; Brodsky, Stanley L; Wilson, Jennifer Kelly

    2015-01-01

    This study examined impressions of expert witness testimony in a not guilty by reason of insanity defense on two outcomes: witness's credibility and verdict. Borrowing in part from the "thin slice" methodology, we assessed outcomes in a 2 (deliberating vs. non-deliberating jurors) × 3 (length of videotaped testimony) between-subjects design. In 30 mock juries, 188 participants viewed the testimony by a forensic psychologist; then half of the juries deliberated. Thinner slices of the testimony were defined by the lower (30s long) and upper (5 min long) temporal bounds in the literature. The third, fuller testimony condition was 10 min long and served as the accuracy marker for the shorter sliced exposures. We aimed to explore potential consequences to jurors relying on impressions of the expert, and his or her opinion, and to test that effect post deliberation. Accounting for deliberation, brief impressions of expert credibility generally exerted a similar influence on credibility to fuller considerations. The essential finding was that a two-way interaction emerged from time slice and deliberation on verdict for jurors in the 30s condition. Overall, predictive accuracy was found in the 5 min slice, yet accuracy was not supported in the predictions based on the shortest slice. Individually-formed impressions are not likely to translate to the verdict ballot post-deliberation. Instead, brief impressions are likely to be heavily influenced by deliberation. Implications for understanding how impression-based testimony evaluations translate from the jury box to the deliberation room are discussed. PMID:26346686

  16. Development of an algorithm for automatic detection and rating of squeak and rattle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrika, Unnikrishnan Kuttan; Kim, Jay H.

    2010-10-01

    A new algorithm for automatic detection and rating of squeak and rattle (S&R) events was developed. The algorithm utilizes the perceived transient loudness (PTL) that approximates the human perception of a transient noise. At first, instantaneous specific loudness time histories are calculated over 1-24 bark range by applying the analytic wavelet transform and Zwicker loudness transform to the recorded noise. Transient specific loudness time histories are then obtained by removing estimated contributions of the background noise from instantaneous specific loudness time histories. These transient specific loudness time histories are summed to obtain the transient loudness time history. Finally, the PTL time history is obtained by applying Glasberg and Moore temporal integration to the transient loudness time history. Detection of S&R events utilizes the PTL time history obtained by summing only 18-24 barks components to take advantage of high signal-to-noise ratio in the high frequency range. A S&R event is identified when the value of the PTL time history exceeds the detection threshold pre-determined by a jury test. The maximum value of the PTL time history is used for rating of S&R events. Another jury test showed that the method performs much better if the PTL time history obtained by summing all frequency components is used. Therefore, r ating of S&R events utilizes this modified PTL time history. Two additional jury tests were conducted to validate the developed detection and rating methods. The algorithm developed in this work will enable automatic detection and rating of S&R events with good accuracy and minimum possibility of false alarm.

  17. Improvement of the predicted aural detection code ICHIN (I Can Hear It Now)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Smith, Charles D.; Lemasurier, Phillip

    Acoustic tests were conducted to study the far-field sound pressure levels and aural detection ranges associated with a Sikorsky S-76A helicopter in straight and level flight at various advancing blade tip Mach numbers. The flight altitude was nominally 150 meters above ground level. This paper compares the normalized predicted aural detection distances, based on the measured far-field sound pressure levels, to the normalized measured aural detection distances obtained from sound jury response measurements obtained during the same test. Both unmodified and modified versions of the prediction code ICHIN-6 (I Can Hear It Now) were used to produce the results for this study.

  18. Suit proceeds over airline's ejection of passenger with AIDS.

    PubMed

    1998-06-12

    A Federal judge refused to dismiss a disability-discrimination lawsuit where an airline refused service to an AIDS patient because his Kaposi's sarcoma lesions emitted an odor. This ruling supports the law that a carrier is only allowed to remove a passenger if the passenger poses a threat to safety. The judge ruled that a jury would need to decide if Delta Airlines violated this law. The judge also is allowing claims for punitive damages, but ruled against any claims about intentional infliction of emotional distress. PMID:11365499

  19. The Technologist As An Expert Witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, R. E. K.; Hall, Morse

    1985-03-01

    Decisions in our legal system are made by laymen. Even the most technical and complex cases are heard and decided by a judge or jury who may very well have no expertise on the questions which confront them. As a result, our legal system permits experts to explain complex phenomena to the fact finder and even to express his opinion on the issue which the fact finder ultimately has to decide. For example, an expert may explain not only how an airplane accident occurred, but also may testify that someone was at fault.

  20. Perceptions of Interpersonal Versus Intergroup Violence: The Case of Sexual Assault

    PubMed Central

    Droogendyk, Lisa; Wright, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    The social identity approach makes a distinction between behavior motivated by intergroup versus interpersonal identities, which may be relevant to victim blaming in the case of rape. Using a mock jury paradigm, we examined the impact of defining rape as an act of interpersonal violence (personal assault) versus intergroup violence (a “hate crime”), crossed with a manipulation describing the attacker as either an acquaintance or stranger. Defining rape in intergroup terms led to less victim blame than when it was defined in interpersonal terms, and participants blamed the victim more when she was assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger. PMID:25419567

  1. [Drug flow. Good manufacturing practices, good clinical practices].

    PubMed

    Dupin-Spriet, T; Spriet, A

    1991-01-01

    On a worldwide basis, the drug development circuit in clinical trials undergoes a general movement towards improvement which is sensitive to the degree of quality. The methods used to achieve this are found at the interface of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and Good Clinical Practices (GCP). They consist primarily of two types, for which examples are given here: strengthening of controls (verification of the resemblance of test drugs in double-blind comparison by a "jury" and computerized systems of drug accountability), improvement in "compliance with therapy at the site of investigation" (use of more "intelligent" drug packages and labels). PMID:2020929

  2. Perceptions of interpersonal versus intergroup violence: the case of sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Droogendyk, Lisa; Wright, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The social identity approach makes a distinction between behavior motivated by intergroup versus interpersonal identities, which may be relevant to victim blaming in the case of rape. Using a mock jury paradigm, we examined the impact of defining rape as an act of interpersonal violence (personal assault) versus intergroup violence (a "hate crime"), crossed with a manipulation describing the attacker as either an acquaintance or stranger. Defining rape in intergroup terms led to less victim blame than when it was defined in interpersonal terms, and participants blamed the victim more when she was assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger. PMID:25419567

  3. Neurolitigation of the MTBI case without loss of consciousness: using somatic complaints to make your case.

    PubMed

    Hyman, H A

    2001-01-01

    In court lay juries, not medical specialists in the rehabilitation of patients with MTBI, decide whether the plaintiff's alleged suffering and disability are real or fake, and if they resulted from cranio-cerebral trauma or from another cause for which the defendant is not responsible. This article looks at the ingrained bias of jurors against accepting that a person was brain injured if he did not suffer LOC and has a negative CT/MRI. It suggests ways of using somatic complaints causally associated with concussion in the absence of LOC or positive neuroimaging, to help MTBI patients obtain the compensation they deserve and need for neurorehabilitation. PMID:11568468

  4. HyperModules: identifying clinically and phenotypically significant network modules with disease mutations for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alvin; Bader, Gary D.; Reimand, Jüri

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Correlating disease mutations with clinical and phenotypic information such as drug response or patient survival is an important goal of personalized cancer genomics and a first step in biomarker discovery. HyperModules is a network search algorithm that finds frequently mutated gene modules with significant clinical or phenotypic signatures from biomolecular interaction networks. Availability and implementation: HyperModules is available in Cytoscape App Store and as a command line tool at www.baderlab.org/Sofware/HyperModules. Contact: Juri.Reimand@utoronto.ca or Gary.Bader@utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online PMID:24713437

  5. An Examination of the Causes and Solutions to Eyewitness Error

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Richard A.; Sartori, Giuseppe; Magnussen, Svein; Safer, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Eyewitness error is one of the leading causes of wrongful convictions. In fact, the American Psychological Association estimates that one in three eyewitnesses make an erroneous identification. In this review, we look briefly at some of the causes of eyewitness error. We examine what jurors, judges, attorneys, law officers, and experts from various countries know about eyewitness testimony and memory, and if they have the requisite knowledge and skills to accurately assess eyewitness testimony. We evaluate whether legal safeguards such as voir dire, motion-to-suppress an identification, cross-examination, jury instructions, and eyewitness expert testimony are effective in identifying eyewitness errors. Lastly, we discuss solutions to eyewitness error. PMID:25165459

  6. An examination of the causes and solutions to eyewitness error.

    PubMed

    Wise, Richard A; Sartori, Giuseppe; Magnussen, Svein; Safer, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Eyewitness error is one of the leading causes of wrongful convictions. In fact, the American Psychological Association estimates that one in three eyewitnesses make an erroneous identification. In this review, we look briefly at some of the causes of eyewitness error. We examine what jurors, judges, attorneys, law officers, and experts from various countries know about eyewitness testimony and memory, and if they have the requisite knowledge and skills to accurately assess eyewitness testimony. We evaluate whether legal safeguards such as voir dire, motion-to-suppress an identification, cross-examination, jury instructions, and eyewitness expert testimony are effective in identifying eyewitness errors. Lastly, we discuss solutions to eyewitness error. PMID:25165459

  7. Robust root clustering for linear uncertain systems using generalized Lyapunov theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of matrix root clustering in subregions of a complex plane for linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty. The nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman & Jury (1981) using the generalized Liapunov equation is extended to the perturbed matrix case, and bounds are derived on the perturbation to maintain root clustering inside a given region. The theory makes it possible to obtain an explicit relationship between the parameters of the root clustering region and the uncertainty range of the parameter space.

  8. A critique of the motivational analysis in wrongful conception cases.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, I J

    2000-05-01

    Most states now recognize a tort cause of action for wrongful conception, typically resulting from a failed sterilization. States differ, however, in determining whether damages should be awarded for child-rearing expenses and what factors juries can consider in setting such damage awards. This Note argues that one commonly used factor, the parents' motivation for selecting sterilization, is irrelevant and leads to inequitable results. Since the right to use contraception is constitutionally protected, the choice to sterilize in order to avoid financial burdens associated with child-rearing should not be given preferential treatment to sterilizations motivated by concerns of genetic defects or for the mother's health. PMID:16379092

  9. Evidence of perception of AIDS insufficient for verdict.

    PubMed

    1997-11-28

    The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the jury verdict in favor of [name removed], a welder who claimed he was fired because his employer, [name removed] National Vendor, thought he had AIDS. According to [name removed], when his health and physical appearance began deteriorating due to Graves disease, a thyroid condition, he was terminated. [Name removed] filed a grievance through his labor union and filed a lawsuit under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Circuit Court panel determined there was insufficient evidence to conclude that the company's officials and key decision makers regarded [name removed] as having AIDS. PMID:11364888

  10. Thinking the unthinkable:the clinician as perpetrator of elder abuse in patients in pain.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ben A

    2004-01-01

    Some advocates for improved pain management have devised and had initial success utilizing a controversial new weapon-the elder abuse claim. In California, two recent cases have been brought under the state's elder abuse statutes against physicians and health care institutions. The first lead to a much publicized jury verdict against a physician, and the second was recently settled as to all defendants, with related disciplinary actions against a treating physician and a skilled nursing facility by their respective regulatory agencies. This commentary reviews the phenomenon of litigating cases of undertreated pain, analyzes the most recent cases, and considers the implications of invoking elder abuse statutes in such cases. PMID:15364633

  11. Improving healthcare using Lean processes.

    PubMed

    Baker, G Ross

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, healthcare organizations across Canada have been using Lean management tools to improve care processes, reduce preventable adverse events, increase patient satisfaction and create better work environments. The largest system-wide effort in Canada, and perhaps anywhere, is currently under way in Saskatchewan. The jury is still out on whether Lean efforts in that province, or elsewhere in Canada, are robust enough to transform current delivery systems and sustain new levels of performance. This issue of Healthcare Quarterly features several articles that provide a perspective on Lean methods in healthcare. PMID:25191802

  12. Sexual harassment: issues for forensic psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Binder, R L

    1992-01-01

    The number of civil lawsuits related to sexual harassment is increasing. The author bases this paper on her experience as an expert witness in 28 sexual harassment cases over the last 10 years. She delineates the psychological and legal issues about which forensic psychiatrists may be consulted. These include issues related to helping a jury determine the veracity of the complaints of harassment, the psychological effects of the harassment, the prognosis, and the treatment for women who have been harassed. The author gives examples of cases where psychiatric testimony was given to help in the decision making about damages related to the psychological effects of sexual harassment. PMID:1482795

  13. The Welfare Effects of Medical Malpractice Liability

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Seabury, Seth A.

    2013-01-01

    We use variation in the generosity of local juries to identify the causal impact of medical malpractice liability on social welfare. Growth in malpractice payments contributed at most 5 percentage points to the 33% total real growth in medical expenditures from 1990-2003. On the other hand, malpractice leads to modest mortality reductions; the value of these more than likely exceeds the costs of malpractice liability. Therefore, reducing malpractice liability is unlikely to have a major impact on health care spending, and unlikely to be cost-effective over conventionally accepted values of a statistical life. PMID:23526860

  14. Being an expert witness in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Edward A.

    2015-02-01

    Gathering your own data and coming to your own conclusion through scientific research and discovery is the most important principle to remember when being an expert witness in geomorphology. You can only be questioned in deposition and trial in your area of expertise. You are qualified as an expert by education, knowledge, and experience. You will have absolutely nothing to fear from cross-examination if you are prepared and confident about your work. Being an expert witness requires good communication skills. When you make a presentation, speak clearly and avoid jargon, especially when addressing a jury. Keep in mind that when you take on a case that may eventually go to court as a lawsuit, the entire process, with appeals and so forth, can take several years. Therefore, being an expert may become a long-term commitment of your time and energy. You may be hired by either side in a dispute, but your job is the same - determine the scientific basis of the case and explain your scientific reasoning to the lawyers, the judge, and the jury. Your work, including pre-trial investigations, often determines what the case will be based on. The use of science in the discovery part of an investigation is demonstrated from a California case involving the Ventura River, where building of a flood control levee restricted flow to a narrower channel, increasing unit stream power as well as potential for bank erosion and landsliding.

  15. Perceptions of credibility of sexual abuse victims across generations.

    PubMed

    Klettke, Bianca; Hallford, David; Mellor, David

    2016-01-01

    The success of prosecutions of perpetrators of sexual abuse often depends substantially upon the perceived credibility of the victim witness. However, perceptions of credibility may vary by generation of the observer, and the constitution of juries may therefore lead to bias. In this study we examined whether perceptions of credibility of female victims of sexual abuse varied across generation Y, generation X, "baby boomers", and "builders". One hundred and twenty-eight jury-eligible members of the community from each generation (N=512) responded to ten questions assessing the perceived believability, competence, trustworthiness, demeanour and sexual naiveté of females providing testimony related to alleged sexual abuse. Although consistent between-generation differences were not found for all questions, or all four groups of generational cohorts, in instances where significant differences were found, it was consistently the older generation groups (builders and baby boomers) that attributed less credibility to the victim than the younger generation groups (generation Y and generation X). The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26439120

  16. The emotional child witness: effects on juror decision-making.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Alexia; Quas, Jodi A; Cleveland, Kyndra C

    2014-01-01

    Despite wide variations in child witness behavior while on the stand, little research has focused on how that behavior influences jurors' perceptions of the child's credibility or the case itself. In the current study, the impact of a child's emotional displays on credibility judgments and verdict preferences was examined in jury-eligible college students and jurors released from jury duty. No significant differences emerged in perceptions or verdicts based on whether a child was shown as crying or not while participants read a transcript of the child's testimony. However, participants who rated the child as more emotional (regardless of whether the image showed a crying child) were more likely to render guilty verdicts, were more certain of guilt, and found the child more credible and the defendant less credible than participants who rated the child as less emotional. Also, when the child was perceived as low in emotion, older children were rated as less credible than younger children. The results have implications for understanding how children's emotional displays and jurors' perceptions of children's emotionality influence decisions in sexual abuse cases. PMID:25537438

  17. Court holds woman responsible for her own infection.

    PubMed

    1998-03-20

    A Washington State appeals court upheld a jury decision not to award damages to a woman who sued the Washington Department of Corrections and her boyfriend's probation officer for failing to warn her of her boyfriend's HIV-positive status. [Name removed], a hospital worker, engaged in repeated unsafe sex with [name removed], never asking him about his HIV status. Even after learning that he was a felon, [name removed] continued having unprotected sex with [name removed]. [Name removed]'s parole officer, urged [name removed] on separate occasions to inform [name removed] of his HIV status. [Name removed] felt he was prevented from directly telling [name removed] because of department policies involving confidentiality. The jury found that although [name removed] should have been told about [name removed]'s infection, she was responsible for contracting the infection through her own behavior. [Name removed] was charged with attempted first-degree murder and assault in transmitting the infection to [name removed]; however, [name removed] is incompetent to stand trial due to AIDS-related dementia. PMID:11365193

  18. A propensity score matching analysis of the relationship between victim sex and capital juror decision-making in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Wesley G; Richards, Tara N; Smith, M Dwayne; Bjerregaard, Beth; Fogel, Sondra J

    2015-07-01

    A small body of prior research has examined the impact of victim sex on jury death penalty decision-making and the majority of this research has demonstrated some evidence of a "female victim effect" such that cases involving a female victim are more likely to receive the death penalty than similarly situated cases with a male victim. However, within this line of research studies have suggested that victim sex may work in conjunction with other case characteristics. In order to further explore this phenomenon, the current study examines a near-population of death penalty cases from North Carolina (n=1069) from 1977-2009 using propensity score matching. Results demonstrate that once cases are matched on more than 50 legal and extralegal case characteristics, there is no statistically significant or substantive link between victim sex and death penalty decision-making. Findings suggest that it is concrete differences in the legal and extralegal factors observed in cases with female victims compared to male victims that shape jury death sentence decisions rather than a direct effect of victim sex (before matching: OR=1.53; 95% CI=1.20-1.95; p<.001/after matching: OR=0.90; 95% CI=0.66-1.24; p=.52). Study limitations and implications are also discussed. PMID:26004447

  19. A quantum probability account of order effects in inference.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Jennifer S; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2011-01-01

    Order of information plays a crucial role in the process of updating beliefs across time. In fact, the presence of order effects makes a classical or Bayesian approach to inference difficult. As a result, the existing models of inference, such as the belief-adjustment model, merely provide an ad hoc explanation for these effects. We postulate a quantum inference model for order effects based on the axiomatic principles of quantum probability theory. The quantum inference model explains order effects by transforming a state vector with different sequences of operators for different orderings of information. We demonstrate this process by fitting the quantum model to data collected in a medical diagnostic task and a jury decision-making task. To further test the quantum inference model, a new jury decision-making experiment is developed. Using the results of this experiment, we compare the quantum inference model with two versions of the belief-adjustment model, the adding model and the averaging model. We show that both the quantum model and the adding model provide good fits to the data. To distinguish the quantum model from the adding model, we develop a new experiment involving extreme evidence. The results from this new experiment suggest that the adding model faces limitations when accounting for tasks involving extreme evidence, whereas the quantum inference model does not. Ultimately, we argue that the quantum model provides a more coherent account for order effects that was not possible before. PMID:21951058

  20. Juror knowledge and attitudes regarding mental illness verdicts.

    PubMed

    Sloat, Lisa M; Frierson, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    We begin with a brief overview of the Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity (NGRI) and Guilty but Mentally Ill (GBMI) verdicts in the United States and then report on a study of qualified jurors (n=96) in which we examined jurors' understanding and attitudes about mental illness verdicts and the disposition of mentally ill defendants. Results indicate that although the jury pool was highly educated, only 4.2 percent of jurors could correctly identify both the definitions and dispositions of defendants found NGRI and GBMI. Jurors with lower educational levels were less likely to identify the dispositional outcome of a GBMI verdict (p<.05). Eighty-four percent of respondents believed that juries should be informed of dispositional outcome before deciding a verdict. Also, 68.4 percent of jurors erroneously believed that a defendant found GBMI could not receive the death penalty. Among jurors who correctly identified the definition of GBMI, those with lower educational levels were more punitive in their attitudes toward disposition of the GBMI defendants, believing they should eventually be sent to prison (p<.05). PMID:15985664

  1. Effects of using relaxation breathing training to reduce music performance anxiety in 3rd to 6th graders.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Huei; Luh, Jer-Junn; Chen, Hsin-I; Lin, Chao-Chen; Liao, Miin-Jiun; Chen, Heng-Shuen

    2010-06-01

    The current study examined the effects of applying relaxation breathing training (RBT) as a means to reduce music performance anxiety (MPA) in young, talented musicians. A group of 59 young musicians from 3rd to 6th grade participated in this study, and all of them started RBT twice a week for 2 months prior to the examination. Four tests--2 mos, 1 mos, half an hour and 5 min before the examination--were conducted to examine the level of MPA after the application of RBT. Results show that the degree of MPA 5 min before the trial was lower than the degree of performance anxiety half an hour before the jury (t = -3.683, p < 0.01), which indicated that the RBT was associated with a decrease in MPA. Although a series of RBT exercises was applied, results indicated that when approaching the date of examination, the degree of performance anxiety still increased and reached its maximum half an hour before the jury. The recommendation for future studies is to combine the application of RBT with other methods to expand its effect in reducing MPA. PMID:20795337

  2. The Novel New Jersey Eyewitness Instruction Induces Skepticism but Not Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Papailiou, Athan P; Yokum, David V; Robertson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, social scientists have shown that the reliability of eyewitness identifications is much worse than laypersons tend to believe. Although courts have only recently begun to react to this evidence, the New Jersey judiciary has reformed its jury instructions to notify jurors about the frailties of human memory, the potential for lineup administrators to nudge witnesses towards suspects that they police have already identified, and the advantages of alternative lineup procedures, including blinding of the administrator. This experiment tested the efficacy of New Jersey's jury instruction. In a 2×2 between-subjects design, mock jurors (N = 335) watched a 35-minute murder trial, wherein identification quality was either "weak" or "strong" and either the New Jersey or a "standard" instruction was delivered. Jurors were more than twice as likely to convict when the standard instruction was used (OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.37-4.89, p < 0.001). The New Jersey instruction, however, did not improve juror's ability to discern quality; rather, jurors receiving those instructions indiscriminatingly discounted "weak" and "strong" testimony in equal measure. PMID:26650237

  3. Expert testimony on eyewitness evidence: in search of common sense.

    PubMed

    Houston, Kate A; Hope, Lorraine; Memon, Amina; Don Read, J

    2013-01-01

    Surveys on knowledge of eyewitness issues typically indicate that legal professionals and jurors alike can be insensitive to factors that are detrimental to eyewitness accuracy. One aim of the current research was to assess the extent to which judges, an under-represented sample in the extant literature, are aware of factors that may undermine the accuracy and reliability of eyewitness evidence (Study 1). We also sought to assess the knowledge of a jury-eligible sample of the general public (drawn from the same population as the judges) and compared responses from a multiple choice survey with a scenario-based, response-generation survey in order to investigate whether questionnaire format alters the accuracy of responses provided (Study 2). Overall, judges demonstrated a reasonable level of knowledge regarding general eyewitness memory issues. Further, the jury-eligible general public respondents completing a multiple choice format survey produced more responses consistent with experts than did participants who were required to generate their own responses. The results are discussed in terms of the future training requirements for legal professionals and the ability of jurors to apply the knowledge they have to the legal context. PMID:24000168

  4. The Novel New Jersey Eyewitness Instruction Induces Skepticism but Not Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, social scientists have shown that the reliability of eyewitness identifications is much worse than laypersons tend to believe. Although courts have only recently begun to react to this evidence, the New Jersey judiciary has reformed its jury instructions to notify jurors about the frailties of human memory, the potential for lineup administrators to nudge witnesses towards suspects that they police have already identified, and the advantages of alternative lineup procedures, including blinding of the administrator. This experiment tested the efficacy of New Jersey’s jury instruction. In a 2×2 between-subjects design, mock jurors (N = 335) watched a 35-minute murder trial, wherein identification quality was either “weak” or “strong” and either the New Jersey or a “standard” instruction was delivered. Jurors were more than twice as likely to convict when the standard instruction was used (OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.37–4.89, p < 0.001). The New Jersey instruction, however, did not improve juror's ability to discern quality; rather, jurors receiving those instructions indiscriminatingly discounted “weak” and “strong” testimony in equal measure. PMID:26650237

  5. Hotel found liable in firing of HIV-positive bartender.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    A Federal jury in the court of U.S. Magistrate Judge Leslie G. Foschio of the Western District of New York found the Buffalo [name removed] liable for more than $630,000 in damages to bartender [name removed], who was fired because of his HIV infection. The [name removed] unsuccessfully argued that [name removed] was terminated because of unfavorable performance reviews. The plaintiffs claimed that the [name removed] issued false citations for infractions of hotel rules and that these citations were only issued after hotel management determined that [name removed] was HIV-positive. Testimony showed that all relevant decision-making personnel at the hotel were aware that [name removed] was HIV-positive. The hotel failed to show that all but the personnel manager had a legitimate need to know about [name removed]'s HIV status. The jury awarded [name removed] $1,439,000 in damages. Foschio lowered the amount to $637,388 in damages and $133,705 in attorneys' fees. PMID:11364135

  6. Roughness modelling based on human auditory perception for sound quality evaluation of vehicle interior noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Shen, G. Q.; Guo, H.; Tang, X. L.; Hamade, T.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a roughness model, which is based on human auditory perception (HAP) and known as HAP-RM, is developed for the sound quality evaluation (SQE) of vehicle noise. First, the interior noise signals are measured for a sample vehicle and prepared for roughness modelling. The HAP-RM model is based on the process of sound transfer and perception in the human auditory system by combining the structural filtering function and nonlinear perception characteristics of the ear. The HAP-RM model is applied to the measured vehicle interior noise signals by considering the factors that affect hearing, such as the modulation and carrier frequencies, the time and frequency maskings and the correlations of the critical bands. The HAP-RM model is validated by jury tests. An anchor-scaled scoring method (ASM) is used for subjective evaluations in the jury tests. The verification results show that the novel developed model can accurately calculate vehicle noise roughness below 0.6 asper. Further investigation shows that the total roughness of the vehicle interior noise can mainly be attributed to frequency components below 12 Bark. The time masking effects of the modelling procedure enable the application of the HAP-RM model to stationary and nonstationary vehicle noise signals and the SQE of other sound-related signals in engineering problems.

  7. Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereš, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; Chastel, Serge; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Flewelling, Heather; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugen A.; Morgan, Jeff S.; Price, Paul A.; Tonry, John L.; Waters, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a Monte Carlo technique to calculate the absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) of ∼240,000 asteroids observed by the Pan-STARRS1 telescope during the first 15 months of its 3-year all-sky survey mission. The system's exquisite photometry with photometric errors ≲ 0.04mag , and well-defined filter and photometric system, allowed us to derive accurate H and G even with a limited number of observations and restricted range in phase angles. Our Monte Carlo method simulates each asteroid's rotation period, amplitude and color to derive the most-likely H and G, but its major advantage is in estimating realistic statistical + systematic uncertainties and errors on each parameter. The method was tested by comparison with the well-established and accurate results for about 500 asteroids provided by Pravec et al. (Pravec, P. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 365-387) and then applied to determining H and G for the Pan-STARRS1 asteroids using both the Muinonen et al. (Muinonen, K. et al. [2010]. Icarus 209, 542-555) and Bowell et al. (Bowell, E. et al. [1989]. Asteroids III, Chapter Application of Photometric Models to Asteroids. University of Arizona Press, pp. 524-555) phase functions. Our results confirm the bias in MPC photometry discovered by Jurić et al. (Jurić, M. et al. [2002]. Astrophys. J. 124, 1776-1787).

  8. Surgical malpractice in California: res judicata.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Erik R; Stabile, Bruce E; Plurad, David; Kim, Dennis; Neville, Angela; Bricker, Scott; Putnam, Brant; Bongard, Fred

    2014-10-01

    Medical negligence claims are of increasing concern to surgeons. Although noneconomic damage awards in California are limited by the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act (MICRA) law to $250,000, the total amount of such settlements can increase significantly based on claims for economic damages. We reviewed negligence litigation involving California surgeons to determine outcomes and monetary awards through retrospective review of surgical malpractice cases published in a legal journal. This review was limited to actions involving general surgeons. Such litigation was voluntarily reported by either defense's or plaintiff's counsel at the conclusion of the litigation. Data reviewed included alleged damages incurred by the plaintiff; plaintiff's pretrial settlement demand, plaintiff or defense verdict, use of alternate means of resolution such as arbitration or mediation, and total monetary award to the plaintiff. A total of 69 cases were reported over a 20-month period: 32 (46%) were plaintiffs' verdicts, whereas 37 (54%) were in favor of the surgeon. Only 10 (31%) of the plaintiff verdicts were by jury trial, whereas the rest were settled by pretrial agreement, mediation, or arbitration. Of cases settled by alternate dispute resolution, the median settlement was $820,000 (n = 22) compared with a median jury trial award of $300,000 (n = 10). PMID:25264649

  9. Reasons for holding a Consensus Conference on neuropsychological rehabilitation in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Làdavass, E; Paolucci, S; Umiltà, C

    2011-03-01

    Neuropsychological deficits are common in various cerebrovascular, neurodegenerative and traumatic pathologies. Neuropsychological rehabilitation refers to a set of interventions that aim to improve a person's ability to perform cognitive tasks by retraining previously learned skills and teaching compensatory strategies. However, today there are some relevant points that need of further investigations. In 2007, a Task Force was set up under the auspices of several scientific societies that operate in the field of psychology, neuropsychology, rehabilitation and neurology (AIP, GIRN, SIMFER, SIN, SINP, and SPAN) with the aim to clarify the theoretical background of neuropsychological rehabilitation and to assess the diagnostic instruments and the treatments available to date. This consensus conference (CC), using methods derived from those of Evidence-Based-Medicine (EMB), evaluated several points, including: a) legal aspects; b) epidemiological aspects; c) neuropsychological rehabilitation of attentional and executive disorders; d) neuropsychological rehabilitation of speech/language disorders; e) neuropsychological rehabilitation of visual field defects; f) neuropsychological rehabilitation of neglect; g) neuropsychological rehabilitation of memory disorders; h) cognitive rehabilitation of arm apraxia; i) neuropsychological rehabilitation of Alzheimer disease; j) rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis; k) rehabilitation of severe brain injuries; l) rehabilitation of mild to moderate brain injuries; m) rehabilitation of behavioral disorders in severe brain injuries. Then, CC submitted to a specific Jury a final report with summary tables and questions. The final meeting of the Jury was held in Siena in February 2010. PMID:21448122

  10. Enhancement of gas-phase diffusion in the presence of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.; Angert, A.

    2003-04-01

    Gas diffusion in porous media occurs in both the gas and liquid phases. In many instances, gas diffusion in the liquid phase is ignored. However, under many conditions, gas diffusion in the liquid phase may be more important than gas diffusion in the gas phase. Two different cases will be examined in this work. The first case is a continuous liquid path between the gas concentrations of interest modeled after Jury et al. (1984). The second case is the situation at low liquid saturation where liquid islands exist. For the first case, Jury's model can be rewritten as a ratio of the total gas diffusion in the gas and liquid phases to that just in the gas phase. The liquid diffusion coefficient is approximately 10-4 times the gas diffusion coefficient consistent with Jury et al. (1984). The ratio of total diffusion to gas-phase diffusion is then only a function of Henry's constant and the liquid saturation. For higher values of Henry's constant, such as for CO2 and O2, the effect of diffusion in the liquid phase is small except at high liquid saturations. For small values of Henry's constant, such as for some VOCs and explosive compounds, diffusion in the liquid phase dominates for low and moderate liquid saturation values. The second case is the enhancement of diffusion caused by liquid islands at low liquid saturation. Enhanced vapor diffusion across liquid islands has been observed and modeled by Webb and Ho (1999), where condensation and evaporation occur on opposite ends of the liquid island. Vapor diffusion enhancement of up to a factor of 10 has been observed. Similarly, gas can diffuse through the liquid island. For high values of Henry's constant, gas diffusion through liquid islands is negligible and can be ignored. For small values of Henry's constant, diffusion through liquid islands may be much greater than diffusion through gas, so the rate is enhanced. The work was sponsored by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) under the