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Sample records for juvenile animal toxicity

  1. Safety of Excipients in Pediatric Formulations-A Call for Toxicity Studies in Juvenile Animals?

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The development of drug products for pediatric use often requires age-appropriate formulations which can be more complex and may involve a broader range of excipients than adult dosage forms. Excipients established for adult use are not always appropriate for use in children because they can affect children differently than adults. Therefore, a comprehensive safety assessment of the excipients in a pediatric formulation is essential before use, referring to existing safety data from adult human and animals as well as safety data from pediatric use and juvenile toxicity studies, when available. The overall risk assessment needs to consider the safety risk from the excipients and the extent to which the risk from the disease as such will be ameliorated by the drug formulation. Non-clinical safety studies in juvenile animals are used to assess for specific toxicities or sensitivities of excipients and for establishing safe exposures in pediatric age groups. As for any active ingredient, non-clinical safety studies in juvenile animals should only be performed for excipients if important for clinical risk assessment and labelling. Pharmaceutical companies should be critical of excessive demands for juvenile animal testing, particularly of excipients when critically needed for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:27417358

  2. Safety of Excipients in Pediatric Formulations—A Call for Toxicity Studies in Juvenile Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The development of drug products for pediatric use often requires age-appropriate formulations which can be more complex and may involve a broader range of excipients than adult dosage forms. Excipients established for adult use are not always appropriate for use in children because they can affect children differently than adults. Therefore, a comprehensive safety assessment of the excipients in a pediatric formulation is essential before use, referring to existing safety data from adult human and animals as well as safety data from pediatric use and juvenile toxicity studies, when available. The overall risk assessment needs to consider the safety risk from the excipients and the extent to which the risk from the disease as such will be ameliorated by the drug formulation. Non-clinical safety studies in juvenile animals are used to assess for specific toxicities or sensitivities of excipients and for establishing safe exposures in pediatric age groups. As for any active ingredient, non-clinical safety studies in juvenile animals should only be performed for excipients if important for clinical risk assessment and labelling. Pharmaceutical companies should be critical of excessive demands for juvenile animal testing, particularly of excipients when critically needed for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:27417358

  3. Acid Toxicity and Aquatic Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R.; Taylor, E. W.; Brown, D. J. A.; Brown, J. A.

    1989-04-01

    This book reviews and presents recent research on acid waters and their effects on aquatic animals. Starting with the environment, in order to assess why the problems have arisen in particular areas, the volume then deals with field and survival studies on invertebrates and vertebrates; examines the extent of the biological problem and the attempts that have been made to relate water quality and the susceptibility of animals. The natural progression of environmental and field studies, toxicity, and survival tests provide the background information for the physiological studies that follow. These form the major component of the book and they seek to analyze the toxic effects of acid waters and trace metals with cardiovascular and endocrinological effects.

  4. Animal Abuse and Youth Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascione, Frank R.

    The forms of abuse that animals are subjected to are similar to the forms of abuse children experience, such as physical abuse, serious neglect, and psychological abuse. This document describes psychiatric, psychological, and criminal research linking animal abuse to violence perpetrated by juveniles and adults. Particular attention is given to…

  5. Juvenile animal testing in drug development--is it useful?

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In pharmaceutical drug development, there has been increased interest in the need to perform juvenile animal studies to support the safety of use of new medicines in the pediatric population. Although such studies are not new, the increased interest has been "formalized" in recent regulatory guidelines. As a result, companies are now performing many more studies in juvenile animals, even when there is a lack of robust knowledge of cross-species functional and kinetic differences among juveniles that means extrapolation of any toxicology study finding to an immature human may not be easy or even relevant, especially if performed in the wrong species at the wrong time. It will be shown by presentation of some basic considerations needed in order to perform such testing, that juvenile animal studies are indeed feasible. However, it will also be highlighted that (based on available knowledge) there are currently not enough clear-cut examples to answer the question of whether juvenile animal toxicology studies to support pediatric development (by affecting the performance or design of a pediatric clinical trial or identifying a potential different-from-adult safety risk in clinical use) are truly useful or necessary. PMID:20350578

  6. Juvenile animal studies for the development of paediatric medicines: a description and conclusions from a European Medicines Agency workshop on juvenile animal testing for nonclinical assessors.

    PubMed

    Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Due Theilade-Thomsen, Mette; Carleer, Jacqueline; Vidal, Jean-Marc; Tomasi, Paolo; Saint-Raymond, Agnes

    2010-12-01

    A workshop organised by the European Medicines Agency involved assessors and experts present in a Nonclinical Working Group evaluating juvenile animal studies for Paediatric Investigation Plans in collaboration with the Paediatric Committee and the Safety Working Party of the Committee for Human Medicinal Products. The objective of the workshop was to analyse which juvenile animal studies proposals were received and agreed by the Paediatric Committee, to check consistency and how to apply the existing European guideline on juvenile animal studies. A comparison of main organ system development in man vs. animal species was presented to guide the review and to support species selection and protocol design. An analysis of juvenile animal studies included in finalised PIP's was also presented. Out of 109 paediatric investigation plans finalised between November 2008 and March 2009, 43 included one or more juvenile animal studies. In most cases the preferred species was the rat; one species only was requested to be studied (20/22), but in a minority two species were required (2/22). When deciding on the characteristics of the juvenile animal studies, such as age of animals at study start, the age of the children targeted by the medicine was considered. It is expected that the increasing experience gained by Applicants and Regulators will allow further refining the criteria for these juvenile animal studies. Further research on this topic is highly encouraged in the European Regulatory framework. PMID:20632393

  7. Chronic oral DDT toxicity in juvenile coho and chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhler, Donald R.; Rasmusson, Mary E.; Shanks, W.E.

    1969-01-01

    Technical and p,p′-DDT was incorporated into test diets and fed to juvenile chinook and coho salmon for periods as long as 95 days. Pure p,p′-DDT was slightly more toxic to young salmon than was the technical DDT mixture. Chinook salmon appeared to be 2–3 times more sensitive to a given concentration of DDT in the diet than were coho salmon. The size of the fish greatly influenced toxicity, smaller younger fish being more susceptible to a given diet than larger older fish. The dose of DDT accumulated within the median survival time ranged from 27–73 mg/kg for chinook salmon and from 56–72 mg/kg for coho salmon. The extrapolated 90-dose LD50 (Hayes, 1967) for young chinook and coho salmon were 0.0275 and 0.064 mg/kg/day, respectively. Liver size decreased on prolonged feeding with DDT, and carcass lipid content was increased. A severe surface ulceration of the nose region appeared in coho salmon fed DDT over long periods. In addition, an interesting localized degeneration of the distal convoluted tubule was observed in the kidney of coho salmon receiving DDT.

  8. The effects of chronological age and size on toxicity of zinc to juvenile brown trout

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of toxicity tests were conducted to investigate the role of chronological age and organism weight on zinc tolerance in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta). Four different incubation temperatures were used to control the maturation of the juveniles prior to zinc exposure...

  9. Juvenile toxicity study of faropenem medoxomil in beagle puppies.

    PubMed

    Faqi, Ali S; Lanphear, Chery; Gill, Stan; Colagiovanni, Dorothy B

    2010-12-01

    We determined the toxicity of faropenem medoxomil (FPM) in neonatal/juvenile dogs following 28 days of administration. The puppies received vehicle or FPM beginning on Postnatal Day (PND) 22 at respective dose levels of 0, 100, 300, 600, or 1400 mg/kg-d (four daily doses (QID) of 25, 75, 150, or 350 mg/kg/dose), respectively, at a dose volume of 5 mL/kg/dose. Body weight, food consumption, clinical observation, clinical pathology, urine analysis and TK were evaluated. Body weight in males and kidney findings at 1400 mg/kg-d were considered adverse. Comparison of Day 27 TK values with Day 1 parameters showed a change in FPM pharmacokinetic behavior over time with an apparent increase in the rate of clearance characterized by a decrease in AUC(0-6) and T(max) values on Day 27 with little to no change in C(max) values. Based on these results, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level was 600 mg/kg-d. PMID:20708074

  10. Sensitivity of juvenile Macomona liliana (bivalvia) to UV-photoactivated fluoranthene toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Michael J; Nieuwenhuis, Ronald; Hickey, Christopher W

    2002-12-01

    This study assessed the sensitivity of Macomona liliana (bivalvia, tellinacea) to UV-photoactivated fluoranthene toxicity. Juvenile clams (0.5-2.0 mm) were exposed to a range of aqueous fluoranthene concentrations (5-500 microg/L) for 96 h, after which the clams' ability to rebury in control sediment was determined. Survivors of these fluoranthene-only toxicity tests were then exposed in clean seawater to UV radiation from a solar radiation-simulating light source for 1 h. The differences between EC(50) values before and after UV exposure provided a measure of phototoxicity of the bioaccumulated fluoranthene. Fluoranthene tissue burdens corresponding to the EC(50) values were determined by exposing a second batch of clams to (14)C-radiolabeled fluoranthene. A third experiment quantified the kinetics of fluoranthene uptake and elimination in water-only exposures. Fluoranthene phototoxicity was found to depend on the dose of fluoranthene and the duration of UV exposure. Exposure of animals to 1 h of UV radiation resulted fluoranthene toxicity that was 3 times higher (EC(50) = 46 microg/L) than that of those with no UV exposure (EC(50) = 153 microg/L). The corresponding critical body burden (i.e., fluoranthene tissue concentration at which 50% of the clams failed to rebury) was 6 ng/clam (or 700 microg/g dry weight [dw]) and 21 ng/clam (or 2300 microg/g dw) for UV-exposed and UV-unexposed animals, respectively. First-order uptake and elimination coefficients, determined in the kinetics experiment, were 0.825 Lg(-1) h(-1) and 0.059 h(-1), respectively, indicating rapid uptake and a short fluoranthene tissue half-life of approximately 12 h for M. liliana. Compared with other bivalve species of similar size, M. liliana appeared to be more than 1 order of magnitude less sensitive to UV-activated fluoranthene toxicity, although these differences may be a result in part of differences in the UV exposure regime. Nonetheless, the majority of M. liliana exposed to a

  11. Implementation of toxicokinetics in toxicity studies--Toxicokinetics of 4-methylanisole and its metabolites in juvenile and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Esther F A; van Kesteren, Petra C E; van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Tienstra, Marc; Sanchez, Patricia Lopez; Tonk, Elisa C M; Piersma, Aldert H; Bos, Peter M J

    2015-10-01

    The current risk assessment of compounds is generally based on external exposure and effect relationships. External doses are often not representative for internal exposure concentrations. The aim of this study was to show how the implementation of toxicokinetics in a scheduled toxicity study contributes to improved data interpretation without additional use of animals and to the three goals of the 3R principles for animal testing. Toxicokinetic analyses were implemented in a rat developmental immunotoxicity study with 4-methylanisole without interfering with the outcome of the study and without the use of additional animals. 4-Methylanisole and its metabolites were analysed in plasma of adult rats and in pups at postnatal day 10. 4-Methylanisole has a short half-life in adult animals and the plasma concentrations increased more than proportional with increasing dose. The metabolic profile appeared to be different at low dose as compared to high dose. This information on the dose-proportionality of the internal exposure is crucial for the interpretation of the toxicity data and helps to identify the toxic agent and the appropriate dose metric. The metabolism was similar in adult and juvenile animals. Large inter-individual variability in adult animals, as observed for 4-methylanisole, may hamper dose-response analyses of the results. In addition, 4-metylanisole was excreted via milk, but concentrations in the juvenile animals appeared to be 20- to 100-fold lower than via direct gavage exposure. The toxicokinetic parameters support the data interpretation, among others by providing better insight into internal exposures. Subsequently, it will help to prevent testing of irrelevant exposure scenarios and exposure concentrations. Overall, implementation of kinetics with limited effort provides useful information to support the interpretation of toxicological data and can contribute to reduction and refinement of animal testing. PMID:26140820

  12. Intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with glochidia and juveniles of freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.; Bidwell, Joseph R.; Cope, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Geis, S.; Greer, I.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kane, C.M.; May, T.W.; Neves, R.J.; Newton, T.J.; Roberts, A.D.; Whites, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the performance and variability in acute toxicity tests with glochidia and newly transformed juvenile mussels using the standard methods outlined in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Multiple 48-h toxicity tests with glochidia and 96-h tests with juvenile mussels were conducted within a single laboratory and among five laboratories. All tests met the test acceptability requirements (e.g., ???90% control survival). Intralaboratory tests were conducted over two consecutive mussel-spawning seasons with mucket (Actinonaias ligamentina) or fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) using copper, ammonia, or chlorine as a toxicant. For the glochidia of both species, the variability of intralaboratory median effective concentrations (EC50s) for the three toxicants, expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV), ranged from 14 to 27% in 24-h exposures and from 13 to 36% in 48-h exposures. The intralaboratory CV of copper EC50s for juvenile fatmucket was 24% in 48-h exposures and 13% in 96-h exposures. Interlaboratory tests were conducted with fatmucket glochidia and juveniles by five laboratories using copper as a toxicant. The interlaboratory CV of copper EC50s for glochidia was 13% in 24-h exposures and 24% in 48-h exposures, and the interlaboratory CV for juveniles was 22% in 48-h exposures and 42% in 96-h exposures. The high completion success and the overall low variability in test results indicate that the test methods have acceptable precision and can be performed routinely. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  13. TOXICITY OF CHLORINE TO JUVENILE SPOT, LEIOSTOMUS XANTHURUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of juvenile spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, to total residual chlorine (TRC) in flowing sea-water was investigated. Incipient LC50 bioassays, histopathology, avoidance tests and the combined effect of thermal stress and TRC were used to assess sensitivity. Estimated i...

  14. Arsenic Toxicity to Juvenile Fish: Effects of Exposure Route, Arsenic Speciation, and Fish Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic toxicity to juvenile rainbow trout and fathead minnows was evaluated in 28-day tests using both dietborne and waterborne exposures, both inorganic and organic arsenic species, and both a live diet and an arsenic-spiked pellet diet. Effects of inorganic arsenic on rainbow...

  15. Effects of ammonia on juvenile unionid mussels (Lampsilis cardium) in laboratory sediment toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, Teresa J.; Allran, John W.; O'Donnell, Jonathan A.; Bartsch, Michelle; Richardson, William B.

    2003-01-01

    Ammonia is a relatively toxic compound generated in water and sediments by heterotrophic bacteria and accumulates in sediments and pore water. Recent data suggest that unionid mussels are sensitive to un-ionized ammonia (NH3) relative to other organisms. Existing sediment exposure systems are not suitable for ammonia toxicity studies with juvenile unionids; thus, we modified a system to expose juveniles to ammonia that was continuously infused into sediments. This system maintained consistent concentrations of ammonia in pore water up to 10 d. Juvenile Lampsilis cardium mussels were exposed to NH3 in pore water in replicate 96-h and 10-d sediment toxicity tests. The 96-h median lethal concentrations (LC50s) were 127 and 165 μg NH3-N/L, and the 10-d LC50s were 93 and 140 μg NH3-N/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) (based on the proportion affected, including dead and inactive mussels) were 73 and 119 μg NH3-N/L in the 96-h tests and 71 and 99 μg NH3-N/L in the 10-d tests. Growth rate was substantially reduced at concentrations between 31 and 76 μg NH3-N/L. The lethality results (when expressed as total ammonia) are about one-half the acute national water quality criteria for total ammonia, suggesting that existing criteria may not protect juvenile unionids.

  16. ANIMAL MODELS FOR ASSESSING DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental effects may result from toxic agent exposure of parental gametes prior to conception, during the prenatal period or postnatally up to the time of sexual maturation. hese effects are not predictable from the assessment of adult exposures to the same agent. umber of a...

  17. Skin temperature recording with phosphors: toxicity studies on animals.

    PubMed

    Derse, P H; Alt, L L

    1966-08-20

    In a previous communication in this journal, a method was described for converting invisible thermal patterns of the human skin into a detailed visible picture. At that time, the question of possible toxicity of the thermographic phosphor was raised. Toxicity studies conducted on laboratory animals indicate that the probability of toxic side reactions resulting from the use of zinc-cadmium sulfide phosphor spray is very low. PMID:5943198

  18. Acute toxicity and synergism of cadmium and zinc in white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus, Juveniles

    SciTech Connect

    Vanegas, C.; Espina, S.; Botello, A.V.; Villanueva, S.

    1997-01-01

    Toxic effects of individual heavy metals on decapod crustaceans have been reported frequently, but little information exists concerning interactions. Among the non-essential heavy metals, cadmium is one of the most hazardous elements in the aquatic environment; on the other hand, zinc is an essential element, but toxic when present in greater than trace amounts. Biological effects of cadmium in aquatic organisms are complex due to the interactions with both environmental variables and other toxic agents. In decapod crustaceans, the toxicity of cadmium and zinc is modified by salinity, temperature, hypoxia, calcium ion concentrations and life-cycle stage. Heavy metal pollution has increased in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico, particularly in shrimp habitat. This study examined the toxicity of cadmium and zinc to white shrimp juveniles and looked at the interaction of the metals. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella modulates juvenile oyster Crassostrea gigas hemocyte variables subjected to different biotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lassudrie, Malwenn; Soudant, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-Louis; Miner, Philippe; Le Grand, Jacqueline; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly; Hégaret, Hélène; Fabioux, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important commercial species cultured throughout the world. Oyster production practices often include transfers of animals into new environments that can be stressful, especially at young ages. This study was undertaken to determine if a toxic Alexandrium bloom, occurring repeatedly in French oyster beds, could modulate juvenile oyster cellular immune responses (i.e. hemocyte variables). We simulated planting on commercial beds by conducting a cohabitation exposure of juvenile, "specific pathogen-free" (SPF) oysters (naïve from the environment) with previously field-exposed oysters to induce interactions with new microorganisms. Indeed, toxic Alexandrium spp. exposures have been reported to modulate bivalve interaction with specific pathogens, as well as physiological and immunological variables in bivalves. In summary, SPF oysters were subjected to an artificial bloom of Alexandrium catenella, simultaneously with a cohabitation challenge. Exposure to A. catenella, and thus to the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and extracellular bioactive compounds produced by this alga, induced higher concentration, size, complexity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of circulating hemocytes. Challenge by cohabitation with field-exposed oysters also activated these hemocyte responses, suggesting a defense response to new microorganism exposure. These hemocyte responses to cohabitation challenge, however, were partially inhibited by A. catenella exposure, which enhanced hemocyte mortality, suggesting either detrimental effects of the interaction of both stressors on immune capacity, or the implementation of an alternative immune strategy through apoptosis. Indeed, no infection with specific pathogens (herpesvirus OsHV-1 or Vibrio aesturianus) was detected. Additionally, lower PST accumulation in challenged oysters suggests a physiological impairment through alteration of feeding-related processes. Overall, results of this

  20. Aliskiren toxicity in juvenile rats is determined by ontogenic regulation of intestinal P-glycoprotein expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Peter; Beckman, David; McLean, Lee Anne; Yan, Jing-He

    2014-02-15

    Juvenile rat toxicity studies with the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren were initiated to support treatment in the pediatric population. In Study 1, aliskiren was administered orally to juvenile rats at doses of 0, 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day with repeated dosing from postpartum day (PPD) 8 to PPD 35/36. In-life, clinical pathology, anatomic pathology, and toxicokinetics evaluations were performed. In Study 2, single oral doses of aliskiren (0, 100 or 300 mg/kg) were given to 14-, 21-, 24-, 28-, 31- or 36-day-old rats; in-life data and toxicokinetics were evaluated. Study 3 was a single dose (3 mg/kg i.v.) pharmacokinetic study in juvenile rats on PPD 8, 14, 21 and 28. In Study 4, naïve rats were used to investigate ontogenic changes of the multidrug-resistant protein 1 (MDR1) and the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) mRNA in several organs. Oral administration of aliskiren at 100 and 300 mg/kg caused unexpected mortality and severe morbidity in 8-day-old rats. Aliskiren plasma and tissue concentrations were increased in rats aged 21 days and younger. Expression of MDR1 and OATP mRNA in the intestine, liver and brain was significantly lower in very young rats. In conclusion, severe toxicity and increased exposure in very young rats after oral administration of aliskiren are considered to be the result of immature drug transporter systems. Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes appears to be the most important mechanism responsible for the high exposure. - Highlights: • Aliskiren was orally administered to juvenile rats. • Unexpected severe toxicity and acute mortality occurred in rats aged 8 days. • Toxicity was associated with increased aliskiren plasma and tissue exposure. • Developmental changes of exposure correlated with ontogeny of transporters. • Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes causes increased exposure in very young rats.

  1. Acute toxicity of copper, ammonia, and chlorine to glochidia and juveniles of freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Hardesty, D.K.; Ivey, C.D.; Kunz, J.L.; May, T.W.; Dwyer, F.J.; Roberts, A.D.; Augspurger, T.; Kane, C.M.; Neves, R.J.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine acute toxicity of copper, ammonia, or chlorine to larval (glochidia) and juvenile mussels using the recently published American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard guide for conducting laboratory toxicity tests with freshwater mussels. Toxicity tests were conducted with glochidia (24- to 48-h exposures) and juveniles (96-h exposures) of up to 11 mussel species in reconstituted ASTM hard water using copper, ammonia, or chlorine as a toxicant. Copper and ammonia tests also were conducted with five commonly tested species, including cladocerans (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia; 48-h exposures), amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 48-h exposures), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; 96-h exposures), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas; 96-h exposures). Median effective concentrations (EC50s) for commonly tested species were >58 ??g Cu/L (except 15 ??g Cu/L for C. dubia) and >13 mg total ammonia N/L, whereas the EC50s for mussels in most cases were 40 ??g/L and above the FAV in the WQC for chlorine. The results indicate that the early life stages of mussels generally were more sensitive to copper and ammonia than other organisms and that, including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC, would lower the WQC for copper or ammonia. Furthermore, including additional mussel data in 2007 WQC for copper based on biotic ligand model would further lower the WQC. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  2. Use of the juvenile clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, as a sensitive indicator of aqueous and sediment toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Katy W; Fulton, Michael H; Scott, Geoffrey I

    2007-07-01

    The hard clam is an economically important bivalve and is abundant along the East Coast of the US. The goal of this research was to evaluate the sensitivity of this test species as compared to that of other benthic and epibenthic organisms. Toxic effects of cadmium (inorganic metal), DDT (organochlorine pesticide), and fluoranthene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) exposure in sediments (10-day) and seawater (24-h) on juvenile (212-350-microm) hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria were determined. The aqueous 24-h LC(50) values were 0.42 mg/L cadmium (95% CL=0.35-0.45 mg/L), 0.61 mg/L DDT (95% CL=0.40-0.95 mg/L), and 0.65 mg/L fluoranthene (95% CL=0.44-1.23 mg/L). Results of sediment toxicity tests indicated that the 10-day LC(50) values were 1.66 mg/kg cadmium (95% CL=1.21-2.28 mg/kg), 5.8 mg/kg DDT (95% CL=4.8-8.3mg/kg), and 1.75 mg/kg fluoranthene (95% CL=1.38-2.09 mg/kg). Based on comparisons to toxicity data for other marine species, these findings suggest that the juvenile clam is one of the more sensitive species to a variety of contaminants and may be a valuable indicator for potential sediment toxicity. PMID:17239949

  3. The effects of chronological age and size on toxicity of zinc to juvenile brown trout.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Daniel J; Sofield, Ruth M; Ranville, James F; Hoff, Dale J; Wall, V Dan; Brinkman, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    A series of toxicity tests were conducted to investigate the role of chronological age on zinc tolerance in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta). Four different incubation temperatures were used to control the maturation of the juveniles before zinc exposures. These 96-h exposures used flow-through conditions and four chronological ages of fish with weights ranging from 0.148 to 1.432 g. Time-to-death (TTD) data were collected throughout the exposure along with the final mortality. The results indicate that chronological age does not play a predictable role in zinc tolerance for juvenile brown trout. However, a relationship between zinc tolerance and fish size was observed in all chronological age populations, which prompted us to conduct additional exploratory data analysis to quantify how much of an effect size had during this stage of development. The smallest fish (0.148-0.423 g) were shown to be less sensitive than the largest fish (0.639-1.432 g) with LC50 values of 868 and 354 µg Zn/L, respectively. The Kaplan-Meier product estimation method was used to determine survival functions from the TTD data and supports the LC50 results with a greater median TTD for smaller fish than larger juvenile fish. These results indicate that fish size or a related characteristic may be a significant determinant of susceptibility and should be considered in acute zinc toxicity tests with specific attention paid to the expected exposure scenario in the field. PMID:25822313

  4. TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN ANIMAL DIETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uncertified commercial research animal feed (Purina Chow TM) was analyzed over forty-one months to determine essential and trace elements and toxic contaminants. Parametric statistics and graphic chronologic progressions of the results are presented for cat, monkey, rodent (rat/m...

  5. ACUTE TOXICITY AND BIOCONCENTRATION OF ENDOSULFAN-EXPOSED ESTUARINE ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute (96-h) flow-through toxicity tests with endosulfan (Thiodan) were conducted with several estuarine animals. The test species and their 96-h lethal concentration for 50 percent of the organisms (LC50) values were: pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum), 0.04 micrograms/litre; grass ...

  6. California's Proposition 65: extrapolating animal toxicity to humans.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, W W

    1990-01-01

    In 1986, the voters of California passed a law regarding the concept of extrapolating animal toxicity data to humans. The California Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, known as Proposition 65, does five things: 1. It creates a list of chemicals (including a number of agricultural chemicals) known to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity; 2. It limits discharges of listed chemicals to drinking water sources; 3. It requires prior warning before exposure to listed chemicals by anyone in the course of doing business; 4. It creates a list of chemicals requiring testing for carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity; and 5. It requires the Governor to consult with qualified experts (a 12-member "Scientific Advisory Panel" was appointed) as necessary to carry out his duties. This paper discusses the details and implications of this proposition. Areas of responsibility have been assigned. The definition of significant risk is being addressed. PMID:2248253

  7. Acute toxicity of copper, ammonia, and chlorine to glochidia and juveniles of freshwater mussels (Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Hardesty, Douglas K; Ivey, Christopher D; Kunz, James L; May, Thomas W; Dwyer, F James; Roberts, Andy D; Augspurger, Tom; Kane, Cynthia M; Neves, Richard J; Barnhart, M Chris

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine acute toxicity of copper, ammonia, or chlorine to larval (glochidia) and juvenile mussels using the recently published American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard guide for conducting laboratory toxicity tests with freshwater mussels. Toxicity tests were conducted with glochidia (24- to 48-h exposures) and juveniles (96-h exposures) of up to 11 mussel species in reconstituted ASTM hard water using copper, ammonia, or chlorine as a toxicant. Copper and ammonia tests also were conducted with five commonly tested species, including cladocerans (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia; 48-h exposures), amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 48-h exposures), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; 96-h exposures), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas; 96-h exposures). Median effective concentrations (EC50s) for commonly tested species were >58 microg Cu/L (except 15 microg Cu/L for C. dubia) and >13 mg total ammonia N/L, whereas the EC50s for mussels in most cases were <45 microg Cu/L or <12 mg N/L and were often at or below the final acute values (FAVs) used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1996 acute water quality criterion (WQC) for copper and 1999 acute WQC for ammonia. However, the chlorine EC50s for mussels generally were >40 microg/L and above the FAV in the WQC for chlorine. The results indicate that the early life stages of mussels generally were more sensitive to copper and ammonia than other organisms and that, including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC, would lower the WQC for copper or ammonia. Furthermore, including additional mussel data in 2007 WQC for copper based on biotic ligand model would further lower the WQC. PMID:17867873

  8. Zebrafish: A complete animal model to enumerate the nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Presently, nanotechnology is a multi-trillion dollar business sector that covers a wide range of industries, such as medicine, electronics and chemistry. In the current era, the commercial transition of nanotechnology from research level to industrial level is stimulating the world's total economic growth. However, commercialization of nanoparticles might offer possible risks once they are liberated in the environment. In recent years, the use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an established animal model system for nanoparticle toxicity assay is growing exponentially. In the current in-depth review, we discuss the recent research approaches employing adult zebrafish and their embryos for nanoparticle toxicity assessment. Different types of parameters are being discussed here which are used to evaluate nanoparticle toxicity such as hatching achievement rate, developmental malformation of organs, damage in gill and skin, abnormal behavior (movement impairment), immunotoxicity, genotoxicity or gene expression, neurotoxicity, endocrine system disruption, reproduction toxicity and finally mortality. Furthermore, we have also highlighted the toxic effect of different nanoparticles such as silver nanoparticle, gold nanoparticle, and metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, Al2O3, CuO, NiO and ZnO). At the end, future directions of zebrafish model and relevant assays to study nanoparticle toxicity have also been argued. PMID:27544212

  9. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients. PMID:26256397

  10. Acute toxicity of an acid mine drainage mixing zone to juvenile bluegill and largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, T.B.; Irwin, E.R.; Grizzle, J.M.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    1999-01-01

    The toxicity of an acid mixing zone produced at the confluence of a stream that was contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD) and a pH-neutral stream was investigated in toxicity tests with juvenile bluegill Lepomis macrochirus and largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides. Fish mortalities in instream cages located in the mixing zone, below the mixing zone, and upstream in both tributaries were compared to determine relative toxicity at each site. In all tests and for both species, significantly higher mortality was observed in the mixing zone than at any other location, including the acid stream, which had lower pH (2.9-4.3). The mixing zone was defined chemically by rapid precipitation of dissolved aluminum and iron, which arrived from the low-pH stream, and by the presence of white precipitates, which were attached to the substratum and which extended below the confluence. Possible seasonal changes in mixing zone toxicity were investigated by conducting field tests with bluegill in June, July, and August 1996 and in January 1997 and by conducting field tests with largemouth bass in April and May 1997. Toxicity was not significantly different at the extremes of temperature, pH, and metal concentration that occurred in June and July, as compared with January. Toxicity was significantly lower in August; however, elevated stream discharge during the August test may have disturbed mixing zone characteristics. High toxicity in AMD mixing zones may lower the survival of fishes in streams, reduce available habitat, and impede movements of migratory fish.

  11. BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY SYNDROMES: A PROMISING TOOL FOR ASSESSING TOXICITY MECHANISMS IN JUVENILE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to acutely toxic concentrations of organic chemicals under flow-through conditions at 25oC for 96 h. hanges in behavior and morphology were systematically recorded to develop a plan for classifying these chemicals. n this basis, ...

  12. Chronic toxicity of copper and ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Greer, I.E.; Hardesty, D.K.; Ivey, C.D.; Kunz, J.L.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Roberts, A.D.; Augspurger, T.; Kane, C.M.; Neves, R.J.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to develop methods for conducting chronic toxicity tests with juvenile mussels under flow-through conditions and to determine the chronic toxicity of copper and ammonia to juvenile mussels using these methods. In two feeding tests, two-month-old fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and rainbow mussel (Villosa iris) were fed various live algae or nonviable algal mixture for 28 d. The algal mixture was the best food resulting in high survival (???90%) and growth. Multiple copper and ammonia toxicity tests were conducted for 28 d starting with two-month-old mussels. Six toxicity tests using the algal mixture were successfully completed with a control survival of 88 to 100%. Among copper tests with rainbow mussel, fatmucket, and oyster mussel (Epioblasma capsaeformis), chronic value ([ChV], geometric mean of the no-observed-effect concentration and the lowest-observed-effect concentration) ranged from 8.5 to 9.8 ??g Cu/L for survival and from 4.6 to 8.5 ??g Cu/L for growth. Among ammonia tests with rainbow mussel, fatmucket, and wavy-rayed lampmussel (L. fasciola), the ChV ranged from 0.37 to 1.2 mg total ammonia N/L for survival and from 0.37 to 0.67 mg N/L for growth. These ChVs were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1996 chronic water quality criterion (WQC) for copper (15 ??g/L; hardness 170 mg/L) and 1999 WQC for total ammonia (1.26 mg N/L; pH 8.2 and 20??C). Results indicate that toxicity tests with two-month-old mussels can be conducted for 28 d with >80% control survival; growth was frequently a more sensitive endpoint compared to survival; and the 1996 chronic WQC for copper and the 1999 chronic WQC for total ammonia might not be adequately protective of the mussel species tested. However, a recently revised 2007 chronic WQC for copper based on the biotic ligand model may be more protective in the water tested. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  13. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART III

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  14. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  15. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  16. Phenotypic plasticity in juvenile jellyfish medusae facilitates effective animal-fluid interaction.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, J C; Feitl, K E; Colin, S P; Costello, J H; Dabiri, J O

    2010-06-23

    Locomotion and feeding in marine animals are intimately linked to the flow dynamics created by specialized body parts. This interaction is of particular importance during ontogeny, when changes in behaviour and scale challenge the organism with shifts in fluid regimes and altered functionality. Previous studies have indicated that Scyphozoan jellyfish ontogeny accommodates the changes in fluid dynamics associated with increasing body dimensions and velocities during development. However, in addition to scale and behaviour that-to a certain degree-underlie the control of the animal, flow dynamics are also dependent on external factors such as temperature. Here, we show phenotypic plasticity in juvenile Aurelia aurita medusae, where morphogenesis is adapted to altered fluid regimes imposed by changes in ambient temperature. In particular, differential proportional growth was found to compensate for temperature-dependent changes in viscous effects, enabling the animal to use adhering water boundary layers as 'paddles'-and thus economize tissue-at low temperatures, while switching to tissue-dominated propulsion at higher temperatures where the boundary layer thickness is insufficient to serve for paddling. This effect was predicted by a model of animal-fluid interaction and confirmed empirically by flow-field visualization and assays of propulsion efficiency. PMID:20335200

  17. Solanum malacoxylon: a toxic plant which affects animal calcium metabolism.

    PubMed

    Boland, R L

    1988-12-01

    The "enteque seco" is a disease of calcinosis, i.e., pathological deposition of calcium phosphate in soft tissues, which occurs in grazing cattle in Argentina and is of considerable economic importance. The ingestion of leaves of Solanum malacoxylon has been identified as the cause of the disease. Hypercalcemia and/or hyperphosphatemia and mineralization of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems are usually seen in bovines or experimental animals exposed to this plant. The symptoms of the disease resemble those of vitamin D intoxication. In agreement with these observations, a glycoside derivative of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the hormonally active form of vitamin D in animals, has been identified as the toxic principle of S. malacoxylon. Glycoside conjugates of its precursors, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and vitamin D3, may also be present. Recent studies indicate that the plant factor is modified in the rumen of bovines through cleavage of the glycosidic linkage and further conversion of the released 1,25(OH)2D3 to a more polar metabolite, possibly 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3. Excess free 1,25(OH)2D3 may alter extracellular and intracellular Ca homeostasis in intoxicated animals through a receptor-mediated mechanism and activation of membrane Ca channels. In addition, 1,24,25(OH)3D3 may potentiate the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on intestinal Ca transport. PMID:3077267

  18. Toxicity of sediments from lead-zinc mining areas to juvenile freshwater mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea) compared to standard test organisms.

    PubMed

    Besser, John M; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Brumbaugh, William G; Kemble, Nile E; May, Thomas W; Wang, Ning; MacDonald, Donald D; Roberts, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    Sediment toxicity tests compared chronic effects on survival, growth, and biomass of juvenile freshwater mussels (28-d exposures with Lampsilis siliquoidea) to the responses of standard test organisms-amphipods (28-d exposures with Hyalella azteca) and midges (10-d exposures with Chironomus dilutus)-in sediments from 2 lead-zinc mining areas: the Tri-State Mining District and Southeast Missouri Mining District. Mussel tests were conducted in sediments sieved to <0.25 mm to facilitate recovery of juvenile mussels (2-4 mo old). Sediments were contaminated primarily with lead, zinc, and cadmium, with greater zinc and cadmium concentrations in Tri-State sediments and greater lead concentrations in southeast Missouri sediments. The frequency of highly toxic responses (reduced 10% or more relative to reference sites) in Tri-State sediments was greatest for amphipod survival (25% of samples), midge biomass (20%), and mussel survival (14%). In southeast Missouri sediments, the frequency of highly toxic samples was greatest for mussel biomass (25%) and amphipod biomass (13%). Thresholds for metal toxicity to mussels, expressed as hazard quotients based on probable effect concentrations, were lower for southeast Missouri sediments than for Tri-State sediments. Southeast Missouri sites with toxic sediments had 2 or fewer live mussel taxa in a concurrent mussel population survey, compared with 7 to 26 taxa at reference sites. These results demonstrate that sediment toxicity tests with juvenile mussels can be conducted reliably by modifying existing standard methods; that the sensitivity of mussels to metals can be similar to or greater than standard test organisms; and that responses of mussels in laboratory toxicity tests are consistent with effects on wild mussel populations. PMID:25545632

  19. Toxicity of sediments from lead-zinc mining areas to juvenile freshwater mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea) compared to standard test organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kemble, Nile E.; May, Thomas W.; Wang, Ning; MacDonald, Donald D.; Roberts, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment toxicity tests compared chronic effects on survival, growth, and biomass of juvenile freshwater mussels (28-d exposures with Lampsilis siliquoidea) to the responses of standard test organisms—amphipods (28-d exposures with Hyalella azteca) and midges (10-d exposures with Chironomus dilutus)—in sediments from 2 lead–zinc mining areas: the Tri-State Mining District and Southeast Missouri Mining District. Mussel tests were conducted in sediments sieved to <0.25 mm to facilitate recovery of juvenile mussels (2–4 mo old). Sediments were contaminated primarily with lead, zinc, and cadmium, with greater zinc and cadmium concentrations in Tri-State sediments and greater lead concentrations in southeast Missouri sediments. The frequency of highly toxic responses (reduced 10% or more relative to reference sites) in Tri-State sediments was greatest for amphipod survival (25% of samples), midge biomass (20%), and mussel survival (14%). In southeast Missouri sediments, the frequency of highly toxic samples was greatest for mussel biomass (25%) and amphipod biomass (13%). Thresholds for metal toxicity to mussels, expressed as hazard quotients based on probable effect concentrations, were lower for southeast Missouri sediments than for Tri-State sediments. Southeast Missouri sites with toxic sediments had 2 or fewer live mussel taxa in a concurrent mussel population survey, compared with 7 to 26 taxa at reference sites. These results demonstrate that sediment toxicity tests with juvenile mussels can be conducted reliably by modifying existing standard methods; that the sensitivity of mussels to metals can be similar to or greater than standard test organisms; and that responses of mussels in laboratory toxicity tests are consistent with effects on wild mussel populations.

  20. Critical appraisal of the duration of chronic animal toxicity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, C.E.; Walker, S.R.

    1986-03-01

    One method of assessing the contribution of studies of longer than 6 months to a safety evaluation program is to compare retrospectively the findings in toxicity tests carried out for 6 months or less with those observed after 6 months. The Center for Medicines Research has therefore established a databank comprising animal toxicological data obtained from pharmaceutical companies in Europe. Twenty-one companies have provided data for 124 compounds (214 studies), including 88 studies of 65 compounds where comparable short-term (less than or equal to 6 months) and long-term (greater than 6 months) data are available. The results from the 88 studies show that, excluding the possibility of identifying carcinogens, tests of longer than 6 months have not added to the overall safety evaluation of these compounds.

  1. Animal Models of Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Environmental Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Deepa B.; Jortner, Bernard S.; Sills, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress in our understanding of pathogeneses and the identification of etiologies of peripheral neuropathy, idiopathic neuropathy remains common. Typically, attention to peripheral neuropathies resulting from exposure to environmental agents is limited relative to more commonly diagnosed causes of peripheral neuropathy (diabetes and chemotherapeutic agents). Given that there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and that at least 1000 chemicals are known to have neurotoxic potential, very few chemicals have been established to affect the peripheral nervous system (mainly after occupational exposures). A wide spectrum of exposures, including pesticides, metals, solvents, nutritional sources, and pharmaceutical agents, has been related, both historically and recently, to environmental toxicant-induced peripheral neuropathy. A review of the literature shows that the toxicity and pathogeneses of chemicals adversely affecting the peripheral nervous system have been studied using animal models. This article includes an overview of five prototypical environmental agents known to cause peripheral neuropathy—namely, organophosphates, carbon disulfide, pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), acrylamide, and hexacarbons (mainly n-hexane, 2,5-hexanedione, methyl n-butyl ketone). Also included is a brief introduction to the structural components of the peripheral nervous system and pointers on common methodologies for histopathologic evaluation of the peripheral nerves. PMID:24615445

  2. Animal models of peripheral neuropathy due to environmental toxicants.

    PubMed

    Rao, Deepa B; Jortner, Bernard S; Sills, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress in our understanding of pathogeneses and the identification of etiologies of peripheral neuropathy, idiopathic neuropathy remains common. Typically, attention to peripheral neuropathies resulting from exposure to environmental agents is limited relative to more commonly diagnosed causes of peripheral neuropathy (diabetes and chemotherapeutic agents). Given that there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and that at least 1000 chemicals are known to have neurotoxic potential, very few chemicals have been established to affect the peripheral nervous system (mainly after occupational exposures). A wide spectrum of exposures, including pesticides, metals, solvents, nutritional sources, and pharmaceutical agents, has been related, both historically and recently, to environmental toxicant-induced peripheral neuropathy. A review of the literature shows that the toxicity and pathogeneses of chemicals adversely affecting the peripheral nervous system have been studied using animal models. This article includes an overview of five prototypical environmental agents known to cause peripheral neuropathy--namely, organophosphates, carbon disulfide, pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), acrylamide, and hexacarbons (mainly n-hexane, 2,5-hexanedione, methyl n-butyl ketone). Also included is a brief introduction to the structural components of the peripheral nervous system and pointers on common methodologies for histopathologic evaluation of the peripheral nerves. PMID:24615445

  3. Toxicity of ozonated estuarine water to juvenile blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and Juvenile Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus)

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, L.B.; Burton, D.T.

    1981-02-01

    Large quantitites of estuarine and marine water are treated with chlorine to prevent condenser system fouling at power plants. Chlorine and its residual by-products, however, are toxic to many forms of aquatic life. Ozone is one alternative oxidant which has proven to be an effective biocide and disinfectant in many fresh water applications. Ozonation of estuarine and marine waters, however, may produce residual compounds similar to those produced by chlorination. This study was initiated to provide baseline information on the toxicity of ozonated estuarine water to two representative estuarine species. The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, and the Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus Latrobe, were selected because of their wide distribution and commercial importance. The toxicity of ozone has been compared with chlorine toxicity data from the literature in an effort to examine possible similarities in toxicity.

  4. Impact of dietary selenium on methylmercury toxicity in juvenile Atlantic cod: a transcriptional survey.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Amlund, Heidi; Sæle, Øystein; Ellingsen, Ståle; Skjaerven, Kaja H

    2015-02-01

    Selenium (Se) and its derivatives are known to have protective effects against mercury (Hg) toxicity in mammals. In this study we wanted to evaluate whether Se co-exposure affect the transcription of methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity-relevant genes in early life stages of fish. Juvenile Atlantic cod were exposed to regular feed (control), Se-spiked feed (3mg Se kg(-1)), MeHg-spiked feed (10mg Hg kg(-1)) or to Se- and MeHg-spiked feed (3mg Se kg(-1) and 10mg Hg kg(-1), respectively) for ten weeks. Liver tissue was harvested for transcriptional analysis when the fish were weighing 11.4 ± 3.2g. Accumulated levels of Hg in liver of the two groups of fish exposed to MeHg were 1.5mg Hg kg(-1) wet weight, or 44-fold higher than in the control group, while the Se concentrations differed with less than 2-fold between the fish groups. Selenium co-exposure had no effect on the accumulated levels of Hg in liver tissue; however, MeHg co-exposure reduced the accumulated level of Se. Dietary exposure to MeHg had no effect on fish growth. Interaction effects between Se and MeHg exposure were observed for the transcriptional levels of CAT, GPX1, GPX3, NFE2L2, UBA52, SEPP1 and DNMT1. Significant effects of MeHg exposure were seen for DNMT1 and PPARG, while effects of Se exposure were seen for GPX4B and SEPP1A, as well as for DNA methyltransferase activity. The transcriptional results suggest, by considering up-regulation as a proxy for negative impact and at the tested concentrations, a pro-oxidative effect of Se co-exposure with MeHg, rather than an antioxidative effect. PMID:25062025

  5. Effects of salinity on olfactory toxicity and behavioral responses of juvenile salmonids from copper.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Frank; Mudrock, Emma; Labenia, Jana; Baldwin, David

    2016-06-01

    Dissolved copper is one of the more pervasive and toxic constituents of stormwater runoff and is commonly found in stream, estuary, and coastal marine habitats of juvenile salmon. While stormwater runoff does not usually carry copper concentrations high enough to result in acute lethality, they are of concern because sublethal concentrations of copper exposure have been shown to both impair olfactory function and alter behavior in various species in freshwater. To compare these results to other environments that salmon are likely to encounter, experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of salinity on the impairment of olfactory function and avoidance of copper. Copper concentrations well within the range of those found in urban watersheds, have been shown to diminish or eliminate the olfactory response to the amino acid, l-serine in freshwater using electro-olfactogram (EOG) techniques. The olfactory responses of both freshwater-phase and seawater-phase coho and seawater-phase Chinook salmon, were tested in freshwater or seawater, depending on phase, and freshwater-phase coho at an intermediate salinity of 10‰. Both 10‰ salinity and full strength seawater protected against the effects of 50μg copper/L. In addition to impairing olfactory response, copper has also been shown to alter salmon behavior by causing an avoidance response. To determine whether copper will cause avoidance behavior at different salinities, experiments were conducted using a multi-chambered experimental tank. The circular tank was divided into six segments by water currents so that copper could be contained within one segment yet fish could move freely between them. The presence of individual fish in each of the segments was counted before and after introduction of dissolved copper (<20μg/L) to one of the segments in both freshwater and seawater. To address whether use of preferred habitat is altered by the presence of copper, experiments were also conducted with a submerged

  6. Influence of pH on the acute toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsills siliquoidea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Erickson, R.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Brunson, E.L.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of pH on the toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels. Acute 96-h ammonia toxicity tests were conducted with 10-d-old juvenile mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) at five pH levels ranging from 6.5 to 9.0 in flow-through diluter systems at 20??C. Acute 48-h tests with amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and 96-h tests with oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were conducted concurrently under the same test conditions to determine the sensitivity of mussels relative to these two commonly tested benthic invertebrate species. During the exposure, pH levels were maintained within 0.1 of a pH unit and ammonia concentrations were relatively constant through time (coefficient of variation for ammonia concentrations ranged from 2 to 30% with a median value of 7.9%). The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of total ammonia nitrogen (N) for mussels were at least two to six times lower than the EC50s for amphipods and oligochaetes, and the EC50s for mussels decreased with increasing pH and ranged from 88 mg N/L at pH 6.6 to 0.96 mg N/L at pH 9.0. The EC50s for mussels were at or below the final acute values used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acute water quality criterion (WQC). However, the quantitative relationship between pH and ammonia toxicity to juvenile mussels was similar to the average relationship for other taxa reported in the WQC. These results indicate that including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC would lower the acute criterion but not change the WQC mathematical representation of the relative effect of pH on ammonia toxicity. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  7. In-stream validation of the effects of intermittent sediment toxicity on recruitment of juvenile unionid mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, M.M.; Cherry, D.S.; Scott, J.C.; Van Hassel, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    A triad approach was used to assess sediment toxicity in the Clinch River, Virginia to determine if sediment bound toxicants are contributing to decreased recruitment of unionid mussel populations. Eleven sites in the Clinch River and one site in a tributary, which exhibited suitable mussel habitat, were included in the analysis. Physical characteristics of the sediment revealed similar particle size distribution and percent water content at the twelve sites; however, three of the sites exhibited high volatile organic compounds. Total recoverable metals analysis of lead, zinc and copper in the interstitial water showed fluctuating metal concentrations throughout the river on different sampling dates. Sediment bioassays using C. riparius, D. magna, and H. azteca identified intermittent toxicity which may be related to non-point runoff from rain events. At ten of the twelve sites, mussel density surveys indicated decreased recruitment despite apparent suitable habitat. Invertebrate community structure analysis identified eight of the twelve sites as having significantly lower total abundance than the reference side and six of the twelve sites as s supporting significantly fewer taxa. In-situ juvenile mussel testing was used to determine the degree to which toxicity may impair juvenile recruitment in unionid populations.

  8. Profiling Animal Toxicants by Automatically Mining Public Bioassay Data: A Big Data Approach for Computational Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    In vitro bioassays have been developed and are currently being evaluated as potential alternatives to traditional animal toxicity models. Already, the progress of high throughput screening techniques has resulted in an enormous amount of publicly available bioassay data having been generated for a large collection of compounds. When a compound is tested using a collection of various bioassays, all the testing results can be considered as providing a unique bio-profile for this compound, which records the responses induced when the compound interacts with different cellular systems or biological targets. Profiling compounds of environmental or pharmaceutical interest using useful toxicity bioassay data is a promising method to study complex animal toxicity. In this study, we developed an automatic virtual profiling tool to evaluate potential animal toxicants. First, we automatically acquired all PubChem bioassay data for a set of 4,841 compounds with publicly available rat acute toxicity results. Next, we developed a scoring system to evaluate the relevance between these extracted bioassays and animal acute toxicity. Finally, the top ranked bioassays were selected to profile the compounds of interest. The resulting response profiles proved to be useful to prioritize untested compounds for their animal toxicity potentials and form a potential in vitro toxicity testing panel. The protocol developed in this study could be combined with structure-activity approaches and used to explore additional publicly available bioassay datasets for modeling a broader range of animal toxicities. PMID:24950175

  9. The Effect of Toxic Cyanobacteria on Human and Animal Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants unlike people in most ambient ex...

  10. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L−1) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na+/K+–ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  11. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L(-1)) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  12. Study of Subchronic Toxicity of Relatox on Sexually Immature Animals.

    PubMed

    Churin, A A; Fomina, T I; Ermolaeva, L A; Vetoshkina, T V; Dubskaya, T Yu; Lamzina, T Yu; Fedorova, E P; Neupokoeva, O V; Nikiforova, A N

    2015-11-01

    Intramuscular injections of Relatox in therapeutic and toxic doses to young outbred laboratory rats for 14 days caused no changes in the peripheral blood and bone marrow parameters, serum biochemical parameters, and morphology of the major viscera. In the toxic dose, the drug caused local irritation (inflammation, atrophy, and sclerosis in muscle tissue). Regeneration processes started in muscle tissue 7 days after Relatox withdrawal. PMID:26593416

  13. Toxicity of cadmium and lead to juvenile red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, and effects on fecundity of adults

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.M.; Howell, R.D. )

    1993-08-01

    Heavy metals such as Cd and Pb may affect aquatic organisms adversely if they are sublethally exposed for a long time. Acute toxicities of a number of heavy metals to different species of crayfish have been reported by several investigators. However, the chronic toxicities of different heavy metals have not been reported as frequently. P. clarkii is of considerable commercial importance to the economy of Louisiana, which produces 98% of the total harvest of the US, worth approximately 143 million dollars annually. This prompted us to use this crayfish for: (1) determining the 96-hr LC[sub 50] values for Cd and Pb using juvenile P. clarkii and (2) assessing the chronic effects of Cd and Pb on the fecundity of adults and hatching success of metal-exposed eggs. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Definitive evaluation of Wheeler Reservoir sedments toxicity using juvenile freshwater mussels (Andodonta imbecillis Say)

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, D.C.

    1992-10-01

    Reservoir sediments near the Decatur, Alabama, industrial waterfront were screened for acute (9-day) toxicity to 8-day old freshwater mussels In 1990. only two locations, designated as stations Alpha (TRM 303.4L, Dry Branch Embayment) and Delta (TRM 301.lL), were found to be toxic to mussels. Toxicity correlated strongly with unionized ammonia measured daily In porewater samples during the study. A definitive study was conducted in 1991 to determine persistence of the toxicity observed In 1990 at the two locations and to determine levels (magnitude) of toxicity and the role of sediment ammonia and/or other sediment contaminants. The 1991 TVA study, reported herein, found reoccurring (persistent) toxicity at both locations. Porewater was toxic at concentrations of 100, 50, and 25 percent. Toxicity was not observed in samples diluted to 12.5 percent.

  15. Approaches to extrapolating animal toxicity data on organic solvents to public health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing predictive relationships between exposure and toxicity in humans is difficult because 1) available data are usually derived from experimental animals whose sensitivity to the chemical relative to humans is unknown; 2) the specific neurotoxic endpoints measured in labor...

  16. FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS OF DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF POLYHALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS AND HUMAN INFANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A scientific evaluation was made of functional aspects of developmental toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in experimental animals and in human infants. ersistent neurobehavioral, reproductive, and endocrine alteration...

  17. A Roadmap for the Development of Alternative (Non-Animal) Methods for Systemic Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new prod...

  18. ACUTE TOXICITY OF PARA-NONYLPHENOL TO SALTWATER ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ?para-Nonylphenol (PNP), a mixture of alkylphenols used in producing nonionic surfactants, is distributed widely in surface waters and aquatic sediments, where it can affect saltwater species. This article describes a database for acute toxicity of PNP derived for calculating a n...

  19. MODEL FOR COMPARISON OF ANIMAL AND HUMAN ALVEOLAR DOSE AND TOXIC EFFECT OF INHALED OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Present models for predicting human pulmonary toxicity of ozone from the toxic effects observed in animals rely on dosimetric measurements of ozone mass balance, and species comparisons of tissue protective mechanisms against ozone. The goal of the present study was to identify a...

  20. Acute toxicity of chemically and mechanically dispersed crude oil to juvenile sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Absence of synergistic effects between oil and dispersants.

    PubMed

    Dussauze, Matthieu; Pichavant-Rafini, Karine; Le Floch, Stéphane; Lemaire, Philippe; Theron, Michaël

    2015-07-01

    The goal of the present experiment was to assess the relative acute toxicities of mechanically and chemically dispersed oil (crude Arabian Light) in controlled conditions. Juvenile sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were exposed to 4 commercial formulations of dispersants (Corexit EC9500A, Dasic Slickgone NS, Finasol OSR 52, Inipol IP 90), to mechanically dispersed oil, and to the corresponding chemical dispersions. Acute toxicity was evaluated at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h through the determination of 10%, 50%, and 90% lethal concentrations calculated from measured total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations; Kaplan-Meyer mortality analyses were based on nominal concentrations. Animals were exposed to the dissolved fraction of the oil and to the oil droplets (ranging from 14.0 μm to 42.3 μm for the chemical dispersions). Kaplan-Meyer analyses demonstrated an increased mortality in the case of chemical dispersions. This difference can be attributed mainly to differences in TPH, because the chemical lethal concentrations were not reduced compared with mechanical lethal concentrations (except after 24 h of exposure). The ratios of lethal concentrations of mechanical dispersions to the different chemical dispersions were calculated to allow direct comparisons of the relative toxicities of the dispersions. The results ranged from 0.27 to 3.59, with a mean ratio close to 1 (0.92). These results demonstrate an absence of synergistic effect between oil and chemical dispersants in an operational context. PMID:25677812

  1. TOXICITY AND BIOCONCENTRATION OF BHC AND LINDANE IN SELECTED ESTUARINE ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow-through, 96-hr bioassays were conducted to determine the acute toxicity of technical BHC and lindane to several estuarine animals. Test animals and their respective 96-hr lindane LC50 values were: mysid (Mysidopsis bahia), 6.3 micrograms/L; pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum), 0....

  2. Sublethal and acute toxicity of the ethylene glycol butyl ether ester formulation of triclopyr to juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Johansen, J A; Geen, G H

    1990-01-01

    The toxicity of Garlon4, the ethylene glycol butyl ether ester formulation of the herbicide tryclopyr, to juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) was investigated at several lethal and sublethal concentrations. Fish behavior, random activity and oxygen uptake were monitored. Coho salmon exhibited three distinct responses related to concentration and duration of exposure: (1) at concentrations greater than 0.56 mg/L fish were initially lethargic, then regressed to a highly distressed condition characterized by elevated oxygen uptake and finally death, (2) at 0.32-0.43 mg/L fish were lethargic throughout the exposure period with reduced oxygen uptake, and (3) at concentrations less than or equal to 0.10 mg/L fish were hypersensitive to stimuli, exhibiting elevated activity and oxygen uptake levels during photoperiod transitions. Whole body residue analysis showed that uptake of the ester and subsequent hydrolysis to the acid form in the fish was rapid, with significant accumulation of the acid in the tissues. This suggests that some threshold tissue concentrations were associated with the observed results. For juvenile coho salmon the 96-hr LC50 of Garlon4 was 0.84 mg/L. PMID:2386416

  3. Alterations in juvenile flatfish gill epithelia induced by sediment-bound toxicants: A comparative in situ and ex situ study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carla; Alves de Matos, António P; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Pedro M

    2015-12-01

    Juvenile Solea senegalensis were exposed in the laboratory (ex situ) and field (in situ) to different sediments of a moderately impacted estuary (the Sado, Portugal) for 28 days. A qualitative histopathological screening yielded scant lesions to gills, albeit alterations such as epithelial hyperplasia being evident and more frequent in fish exposed ex situ. Fully quantitative traits, namely chloride and goblet cell count and size revealed differences between the two bioassay approaches, with ex situ experiments likely enhancing bioavailability of toxicants. Chloride cells endured autolytic processes that could, at least in part, relate to contamination by mixed metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Goblet cells did not reveal changes in the chemistry of mucous. Still, their number and size was reduced in fish exposed ex situ to the sediments most contaminated by PAHs, with evidence for adaptation. Also, copper histochemistry revealed the potential role of mucocytes in the regulation of metals. PMID:26518455

  4. Assessing potential toxicity of chloride-affected groundwater discharging to an urban stream using juvenile freshwater mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea).

    PubMed

    Roy, James W; McInnis, Rodney; Bickerton, Greg; Gillis, Patricia L

    2015-11-01

    Groundwater contaminants, such as chloride from road salt, pose a threat to aquatic ecosystems when and where they discharge to surface waters. Here we study the application of a laboratory toxicity bioassay to field-collected samples from contaminated groundwater discharging to an urban stream. The objectives were to assess the potential toxicity of the discharging groundwater, while also exploring the suitability of such standard tests to site groundwater. Juvenile freshwater mussels were chosen as a groundwater-appropriate (endobenthic) test organism. Groundwater was sampled from 6 sites at approximate depths of 0, 10, and 50 cm below the sediment. Concentrations of chloride and several metals were above aquatic life guidelines in some samples. Exposure (96-h) to site groundwater resulted in survival of 90-100% and 80-100% for the 0-cm and deeper samples, respectively, indicating that groundwater may pose a toxicological threat to freshwater mussels. Several samples with high chloride had a survival rate of 80%, but generally there was poor correlation between survival and individual contaminants. Parallel juvenile mussel exposures using reconstituted water and NaCl predicted survival in the natural groundwater below 50% based on chloride concentrations. This indicates some protective ability of groundwater, possibly associated with water hardness. Finally, some technical issues with performing bioassays with groundwater were noted. First, aeration of previously anoxic groundwater samples caused marked changes in water quality (especially metal concentrations). Second, calcite crystals formed on the mussel shells in samples with elevated chloride and water hardness, though with no apparent negative effects. PMID:26081733

  5. Periphyton photosynthesis as an indicator of effluent toxicity: Relationship to effects on animal test species

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of freshwater and marine plants in effluent toxicity evaluations is uncommon despite the presence of test methods and recommendations for their use. It has been assumed that aquatic plants are less sensitive than animal test species and consequently, results from toxicity tests with invertebrates and fish have been used often as a surrogate data base. The study evaluated the ability of these animal toxicity tests to provide safe concentrations for in-stream periphyton. The toxicity of several samples of a treated municipal effluent were determined during a five-month period by monitoring short-term changes in periphyton photosynthesis (carbon-14 uptake) and by observing the effects on young production and survival of cultured daphnids and the fathead minnow. The effect levels from the various tests were compared. The effluent was seldom acutely toxic to Daphnia magna and the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) but it was consistently acutely and chronically toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Chronic effect levels ranged between 17 and 71% effluent. Significant inhibition and stimulation of periphyton photosynthesis occurred at concentrations of 6 to 39% effluent. Periphyton photosynthesis was a more sensitive effect parameter than animal survival and in some cases than Ceriodaphnia reproductive performance. The results indicate that effluent toxicity tests conducted routinely with daphnids and fish may not be sufficient to predict effects on indigenous flora in receiving waters.

  6. Racial tropism of a highly toxic clone of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans associated with juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, D; Dirienzo, J M; Tinoco, E M; Westergaard, J; López, N J; Chung, C P; Poulsen, K; Kilian, M

    1997-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains with enhanced levels of production of leukotoxin are characterized by a 530-bp deletion from the promoter region of the leukotoxin gene operon. Previous isolates with this deletion constituted a single clone belonging to serotype b, although they displayed minor differences among each other. We have analyzed the geographic dissemination of this clone by examining 326 A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from healthy and periodontally diseased individuals as well as from patients with different types of extraoral infections originating from countries worldwide. A total of 38 isolates, all belonging to the same clone, showed the 530-bp deletion. Comparison of a 440-bp sequence from the promoter region of the leukotoxin gene operon from 10 of these strains revealed complete identity, which indicates that the deletion originates from a single mutational event. This particular clone was exclusively associated with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). In at least 12 of 28 families from which the clone was isolated, more than one family member had LJP. Notably, all the subjects carrying this clone had a genetic affiliation with the African population. These observations suggest that juvenile periodontitis in some adolescents with an African origin is associated with a disseminating clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:9399490

  7. Evaluation of acute copper toxicity to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, lampsilis siliquoidea) in natural and reconstituted waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Mebane, C.A.; Kunz, J.L.; Ingersoll, C.G.; May, T.W.; Arnold, W.R.; Santore, R.C.; Augspurger, T.; Dwyer, F.J.; Barniiart, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and water composition on the toxicity of copper to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) were evaluated in natural and reconstituted waters. Acute 96-h copper toxicity tests were conducted at four nominal DOC concentrations (0, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/L as carbon [C]) in dilutions of natural waters and in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) reconstituted hard water. Toxicity tests also were conducted in ASTM soft, moderately hard, hard, and very hard reconstituted waters (nominal hardness 45-300 mg/L as CaCO3). Three natural surface waters (9.5-11 mg/L DOC) were diluted to obtain a series of DOC concentrations with diluted well water, and an extract of natural organic matter and commercial humic acid was mixed with ASTM hard water to prepare a series of DOC concentrations for toxicity testing. Median effective concentrations (EC50s) for dissolved copper varied >40-fold (9.9 to >396 ??g Cu/L) over all 21 treatments in various DOC waters. Within a particular type of DOC water, EC50s increased 5- to 12-fold across DOC concentrations of 0.3 to up to 11 mg C/L. However, EC50s increased by only a factor of 1.4 (21 30 ??g Cu/L) in the four ASTM waters with wide range of water hardness (52-300 mg CaCO 3/L). Predictions from the biotic ligand model (BLM) for copper explained nearly 90% of the variability in EC50s. Nearly 70% of BLM-normalized EC50s for fatmucket tested in natural waters were below the final acute value used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency acute water quality criterion for copper, indicating that the criterion might not be protective of fatmucket and perhaps other mussel species. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  8. Prevention and treatment of Nitrite toxicity in juvenile steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1978-01-01

    The efficacy of mineral salts, pH, and tetramethylthianine (methylene blue) treatment in reducing the acute toxicity of nitrite to fingerling steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) was determined using a static bioassay system at 10 °C. The acute toxicity (96-h LC50) was reduced by a factor of about 24 for 5-g steelhead and 13 for 10-g fish when the total water hardness was increased from 25 to 300 mg/L (as CaCO3). NaCl or CaCl2 additions (0–200 mg/L) reduced toxicity by a factor of up to 3 for NaCl and 50 for CaCl2. Increasing the pH from 6.0 to 8.0 decreased toxicity by a factor of about 8 for the smaller and 3 for the larger fish. Methylene blue at 0.1 or 1.0 mg/L was effective in decreasing acute toxicity. For alleviating methemoglobinemia, removing the fish to freshwater for 48 h was about as effective as 1.0 mg/L methylene blue. Chronic exposure in soft water to 0.03 mg/L NO2-N for 6 mo caused no significant growth reduction, gill histological changes, hematological dyscrasias, or impaired ability of the smolts to adapt to 30‰ seawater and grow for an additional 2 mo. Key words: nitrite, toxicity, fish, methylene blue, pH, salts, acute toxicity, chronic toxicity

  9. [Toxicity by relay. I. General principles of a new method for the assessment of Toxicity of addivitives to animal feeds].

    PubMed

    Truhaut, R; Ferrando, R

    1975-01-01

    Chemical substances added for various purposes to the feeds of farm-reared animals may enter the body of these animals. This may lead to the persistence, in food offered for human consumption, of residues which may be potentially toxic under conditions of repeated absorption over the greater part of the life span. The evaluation of the safety of these residues for man poses complex problems. Their ideal solution demands very often a number of careful experiments. The methodology called "toxicity by relay" consists essentially of the submission of the animal feed itself, which is likely to contain a mosaic of residues, to long-term testing in laboratory animals. Provided a satisfactory safety factor can be applied, this methodology can contribute information permittinga conclusion regarding the acceptablity, even provisionally, of the feed additive for the use which is envisaged. In addition this methodology enables the provision of results constituting a criterion for the rejection of the additive under test. For these reasons it appears to us an appropriate procedure, taking its place among the tests to be undertaken for the toxicological evaluation of additves to the feeds of farm-reared animals. PMID:47659

  10. Toxicity of a glufosinate- and several glyphosate-based herbicides to juvenile amphibians from the Southern High Plains, USA.

    PubMed

    Dinehart, Simon K; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Philip N; Haukos, David A

    2009-01-15

    Pesticide toxicity is often proposed as a contributing factor to the world-wide decline of amphibian populations. We assessed acute toxicity (48 h) of a glufosinate-based herbicide (Ignite 280 SL) and several glyphosate-based herbicide formulations (Roundup WeatherMAX, Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Super Concentrate, Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Ready-To-Use Plus on two species of amphibians housed on soil or moist paper towels. Survival of juvenile Great Plains toads (Bufo cognatus) and New Mexico spadefoots (Spea multiplicata) was reduced by exposure to Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Ready-To-Use Plus on both substrates. Great Plains toad survival was also reduced by exposure to Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Super Concentrate on paper towels. New Mexico spadefoot and Great Plains toad survival was not affected by exposure to the two agricultural herbicides (Roundup WeatherMAX and Ignite 280 SL) on either substrate, suggesting that these herbicides likely do not pose an immediate risk to these species under field conditions. PMID:19000631

  11. Acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, zinc, ammonia, 3,3 prime -dichlorobenzidine, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitroaniline, methylene chloride, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol to juvenile grass shrimp and killifish

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.T.; Fisher, D.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The acute toxicity of several compounds was investigated while performing a toxicity evaluation of a complex chemical effluent. The tests were conducted for one or more of the following reasons: (1) data were not available for the chemical; (2) data were not available for the species; or (3) data were not available for the juvenile life stage of the species. Forty-eight hour acute toxicity tests were run on juvenile grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) and juvenile killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to the following compounds: cadmium, copper, zinc, ammonia, 3,3{prime}-dichlorobenzidine, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitroaniline, methylene chloride (dichloromethane) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol.

  12. ACUTE TOXICITY AND BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF ACRYLATES AND METHACRYLATES TO JUVENILE FATHEAD MINNOWS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylate and methacrylate esters are reactive monomers that are used primarily in the synthesis of acrylic plastics and polymers. Ninety-six hour flow-through acute toxicity tests were conducted with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) using 6 acrylates and 6 methacrylates. Nin...

  13. Toxicity of dispersant application: Biomarkers responses in gills of juvenile golden grey mullet (Liza aurata).

    PubMed

    Milinkovitch, Thomas; Godefroy, Joachim; Théron, Michaël; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène

    2011-10-01

    Dispersant use in nearshore areas is likely to increase the exposure of aquatic organisms to petroleum. To measure the toxicity of this controversial response technique, golden grey mullets (Liza aurata) were exposed to mechanically dispersed oil, chemically dispersed oil, dispersant alone in seawater, water-soluble fraction of oil and to seawater as a control treatment. Several biomarkers were assessed in the gills (enzymatic antioxidant activities, glutathione content, lipid peroxidation) and in the gallbladder (polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons metabolites). The significant differences between chemically dispersed oil and water soluble fraction of oil highlight the environmental risk to disperse an oil slick when containment and recovery can be conducted. The lack of significance between chemically and mechanically dispersed oil suggests that dispersant application is no more toxic than the natural dispersion of the oil slick. The results of this study are of interest in order to establish dispersant use policies in nearshore areas. PMID:21592637

  14. Interactive effects of mosquito control insecticide toxicity, hypoxia, and increased carbon dioxide on larval and juvenile eastern oysters and hard clams.

    PubMed

    Garcia, R N; Chung, K W; Key, P B; Burnett, L E; Coen, L D; Delorenzo, M E

    2014-04-01

    Mosquito control insecticide use in the coastal zone coincides with the habitat and mariculture operations of commercially and ecologically important shellfish species. Few data are available regarding insecticide toxicity to shellfish early life stages, and potential interactions with abiotic stressors, such as low oxygen and increased CO2 (low pH), are less understood. Toxicity was assessed at 4 and 21 days for larval and juvenile stages of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, using two pyrethroids (resmethrin and permethrin), an organophosphate (naled), and a juvenile growth hormone mimic (methoprene). Acute toxicity (4-day LC50) values ranged from 1.59 to >10 mg/L. Overall, clams were more susceptible to mosquito control insecticides than oysters. Naled was the most toxic compound in oyster larvae, whereas resmethrin was the most toxic compound in clam larvae. Mortality for both species generally increased with chronic insecticide exposure (21-day LC50 values ranged from 0.60 to 9.49 mg/L). Insecticide exposure also caused sublethal effects, including decreased swimming activity after 4 days in larval oysters (4-day EC50 values of 0.60 to 2.33 mg/L) and decreased growth (shell area and weight) in juvenile clams and oysters after 21 days (detected at concentrations ranging from 0.625 to 10 mg/L). Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and a combination of hypoxia and hypercapnia caused mortality in larval clams and increased resmethrin toxicity. These data will benefit both shellfish mariculture operations and environmental resource agencies as they manage the use of mosquito control insecticides near coastal ecosystems. PMID:24531857

  15. Acute toxicity of carbamazepine to juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): effects on antioxidant responses, hematological parameters and hepatic EROD.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Zlabek, Vladimir; Velisek, Josef; Grabic, Roman; Machova, Jana; Kolarova, Jitka; Li, Ping; Randak, Tomas

    2011-03-01

    Awareness of residual pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in the aquatic environment is growing as investigations into these pollutants are increasing and analytical detection techniques are improving. However, the toxicological effects of PhACs have not been adequately researched. In this study, the toxic effects of carbamazepine (CBZ), an anticonvulsant drug commonly present in surface and groundwater, was studied in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, by acute semi-static bioassay. Blood parameters, liver xenobiotic-metabolizing response and tissue antioxidant status were evaluated. Compared to the control group, fish exposed to CBZ (96 h LC50) showed significantly higher Er, Hb, MCHC, monocytes, neutrophil granulocytes and plasma enzymes activity, and significantly lower MCV and lymphocytes. CF and HSI were not significantly different among groups such as hepatic EROD. SOD, CAT, GPx and GR activity was significantly higher in liver of experimental groups, but decreased significantly in brain and gill. In general, antioxidant enzyme activity in intestine and muscle was less evident than in liver. Oxidative stress indices (levels of LPO and CP) were significantly higher in gill and brain, despite a trend to increased values were manifested in the remaining tissues. In short, CBZ-induced stress responses in different tissues were reflected in the oxidant stress indices and hematological parameters. However, before those parameters are used as special biomarkers for monitoring residual pharmaceuticals in aquatic environment, more detailed experiments in laboratory need to be performed in the future. PMID:20971511

  16. Animal Toxicity of Hairpin Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Varies with the Turn Unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamide (1) targeted to the androgen receptor consensus half-site was found to exert antitumor effects against prostate cancer xenografts. A previous animal study showed that 1, which has a chiral amine at the α-position of the γ-aminobutyric acid turn (γ-turn), did not exhibit toxicity at doses less than 10 mg/kg. In the same study, a polyamide with an acetamide at the β-position of the γ-turn resulted in animal morbidity at 2.3 mg/kg. To identify structural motifs that cause animal toxicity, we synthesized polyamides 1–4 with variations at the α- and β-positions in the γ-turn. Weight loss, histopathology, and serum chemistry were analyzed in mice post-treatment. While serum concentration was similar for all four polyamides after injection, dose-limiting liver toxicity was only observed for three polyamides. Polyamide 3, with an α-acetamide, caused no significant evidence of rodent toxicity and retains activity against LNCaP xenografts. PMID:24015881

  17. Developmental and reproductive toxicity of inorganic arsenic: animal studies and human concerns.

    PubMed

    Golub, M S; Macintosh, M S; Baumrind, N

    1998-01-01

    Information on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of inorganic arsenic is available primarily from studies in animals using arsenite and arsenate salts and arsenic trioxide. Inorganic arsenic has been extensively studied as a teratogen in animals. Data from animal studies demonstrate that arsenic can produce developmental toxicity, including malformation, death, and growth retardation, in four species (hamsters, mice, rats, rabbits). A characteristic pattern of malformations is produced, and the developmental toxicity effects are dependent on dose, route, and the day of gestation when exposure occurs. Studies with gavage and diet administration indicate that death and growth retardation are produced by oral arsenic exposure. Arsenic is readily transferred to the fetus and produces developmental toxicity in embryo culture. Animal studies have not identified an effect of arsenic on fertility in males or females. When females were dosed chronically for periods that included pregnancy, the primary effect of arsenic on reproduction was a dose-dependent increase in conceptus mortality and in postnatal growth retardation. Human data are limited to a few studies of populations exposed to arsenic from drinking water or from working at or living near smelters. Associations with spontaneous abortion and stillbirth have been reported in more than one of these studies, but interpretation of these studies is complicated because study populations were exposed to multiple chemicals. Thus, animal studies suggest that environmental arsenic exposures are primarily a risk to the developing fetus. In order to understand the implications for humans, attention must be given to comparative pharmacokinetics and metabolism, likely exposure scenarios, possible mechanisms of action, and the potential role of arsenic as an essential nutrient. PMID:9644328

  18. A review of toxicity studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-02-01

    We summarized the findings of in vivo toxicity studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in laboratory animals. The large majority addressed the pulmonary toxicity of SWCNTs in rodents. Inhalation, pharyngeal aspiration, and intratracheal instillation studies revealed that SWCNTs caused acute and chronic inflammation, granuloma formation, collagen deposition, fibrosis, and genotoxic effects in the lungs. Pulmonary toxicity of well-dispersed SWCNTs was more potent than less dispersed ones. Airway exposure to SWCNTs also induced cardiovascular diseases in mice. Oxidative stress was caused by the administration of SWCNTs. Injected SWCNTs were distributed throughout most of the organs including the brain, mainly retained in the lungs, liver, and spleen, and eliminated through the kidney and bile duct. Orally administered SWCNTs are suggested to be absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract to the blood circulation in mice and rats. Although no definitive study on the carcinogenicity of SWCNTs is available at present, evidence of carcinogenicity has not been reported in toxicity studies cited in this review. Overall, the available data provides initial information on SWCNT toxicity. To further clarify their toxicity and risk assessment, studies should be conducted using well-characterized SWCNTs, standard protocols, and the relevant route and doses of human exposure. PMID:26619783

  19. Acute phenanthrene toxicity to juvenile diploid and triploid African catfish (Clarias gariepinus): Molecular, biochemical, and histopathological alterations.

    PubMed

    Karami, Ali; Romano, Nicholas; Hamzah, Hazilawati; Simpson, Stuart L; Yap, Chee Kong

    2016-05-01

    Information on the biological responses of polyploid animals towards environmental contaminants is scarce. This study aimed to compare reproductive axis-related gene expressions in the brain, plasma biochemical responses, and the liver and gill histopathological alterations in diploid and triploid full-sibling juvenile African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). Fish were exposed for 96 h to one of the two waterborne phenanthrene (Phe) concentrations [mean measured (SD): 6.2 (2.4) and 76 (4.2) μg/L]. In triploids, exposure to 76 μg/L Phe increased mRNA level of fushi tarazu-factor 1 (ftz-f1). Expression of tryptophan hydroxylase2 (tph2) was also elevated in both ploidies following the exposure to 76 μg/L Phe compared to the solvent control. In triploids, 76 μg/L Phe increased plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels compared to the other Phe-exposed group. It also elevated lactate and glucose contents relative to the other groups. In diploids, however, biochemical biomarkers did not change. Phenanthrene exposures elevated glycogen contents and the prevalence of histopathological lesions in the liver and gills of both ploidies. This study showed substantial differences between diploids and triploids on biochemical and molecular biomarker responses, but similar histopathological alterations following acute Phe exposures. PMID:26845363

  20. Ammonia toxicity induces glutamine accumulation, oxidative stress and immunosuppression in juvenile yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Gong, Shiyan; Li, Qing; Yuan, Lixia; Meng, Fanxing; Wang, Rixin

    2016-01-01

    A study was carried to test the response of yellow catfish for 28days under two ammonia concentrations. Weight gain of fish exposure to high and low ammonia abruptly increased at day 3. There were no significant changes in fish physiological indexes and immune responses at different times during 28-day exposure to low ammonia. Fish physiological indexes and immune responses in the treatment of high ammonia were lower than those of fish in the treatment of low ammonia. When fish were exposed to high ammonia, the ammonia concentration in the brain increased by 19-fold on day 1. By comparison, liver ammonia concentration reached its highest level much earlier at hour 12. In spite of a significant increase in brain and liver glutamine concentration, there was no significant change in glutamate level throughout the 28-day period. The total superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in the brain gradually decreased from hour 0 to day 28. Liver SOD, GPX and GR activities reached the highest levels at hour 12, and then gradually decreased. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance brain and liver content gradually increased throughout the 28-day period. Lysozyme, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase activities in the liver reached exceptionally low levels after day 14. This study indicated that glutamine accumulation in the brain was not the major cause of ammonia poisoning, the toxic reactive oxygen species is not fully counter acted by the antioxidant enzymes and immunosuppression is a process of gradual accumulation of immunosuppressive factors. PMID:26811908

  1. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child). PMID:26511087

  2. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  3. Consensus report on the future of animal-free systemic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Leist, Marcel; Hasiwa, Nina; Rovida, Costanza; Daneshian, Mardas; Basketter, David; Kimber, Ian; Clewell, Harvey; Gocht, Tilman; Goldberg, Alan; Busquet, Francois; Rossi, Anna-Maria; Schwarz, Michael; Stephens, Martin; Taalman, Rob; Knudsen, Thomas B; McKim, James; Harris, Georgina; Pamies, David; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since March 2013, animal use for cosmetics testing for the European market has been banned. This requires a renewed view on risk assessment in this field. However, in other fields as well, traditional animal experimentation does not always satisfy requirements in safety testing, as the need for human-relevant information is ever increasing. A general strategy for animal-free test approaches was outlined by the US National Research Council`s vision document for Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century in 2007. It is now possible to provide a more defined roadmap on how to implement this vision for the four principal areas of systemic toxicity evaluation: repeat dose organ toxicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity and allergy induction (skin sensitization), as well as for the evaluation of toxicant metabolism (toxicokinetics) (Fig. 1). CAAT-Europe assembled experts from Europe, America and Asia to design a scientific roadmap for future risk assessment approaches and the outcome was then further discussed and refined in two consensus meetings with over 200 stakeholders. The key recommendations include: focusing on improving existing methods rather than favoring de novo design; combining hazard testing with toxicokinetics predictions; developing integrated test strategies; incorporating new high content endpoints to classical assays; evolving test validation procedures; promoting collaboration and data-sharing of different industrial sectors; integrating new disciplines, such as systems biology and high throughput screening; and involving regulators early on in the test development process. A focus on data quality, combined with increased attention to the scientific background of a test method, will be important drivers. Information from each test system should be mapped along adverse outcome pathways. Finally, quantitative information on all factors and key events will be fed into systems biology models that allow a probabilistic risk assessment with flexible

  4. Toxic metals in food products originating from locally reared animals in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, A.; Al-Rashdan, A.; Al-Awadhi, A.; Mahgoub, B.; Al-Amiri, H.

    1996-12-31

    The toxicity of certain heavy metals such as Pb, Hg and Cd is well documented. The effect of environmental pollution on contamination of foods and on their safety for human consumption is a serious global public concern, and data on this subject have been reported by several investigators. Since traces of heavy metals are found in almost every food commodity, an estimation of the intake of food contaminants is essential and differs considerably from country to country. In Kuwait, data are not available on the levels of toxic metals in foods consumed by the various age groups nor are there any Kuwaiti standards at present on the permissible limits of these metals in various food commodities. Hence, the dietary intake of these elements cannot be determined accurately. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of certain toxic metals in locally produced animal products. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Reproductive and developmental toxicity of degradation products of refrigerants in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Naya, Masato; Yoshida, Kikuo; Nagaosa, Ryuichi

    2010-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the results of animal studies on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of the degradation products of refrigerants, including trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), carbonyl fluoride (CF), hydrogen fluoride (HF) and formic acid (FA). Excessive CO(2) in the atmosphere is testicular and reproductive toxic, embryolethal, developmentally neurotoxic and teratogenic in experimental animals. As for CO, maternal exposure causes prenatal and postnatal lethality and growth retardation, skeletal variations, cardiomegaly, blood biochemical, immunological and postnatal behavioral changes, and neurological impairment in offspring of several species. Very early studies of CO in rats and guinea pigs reported fetal malformations in exposed dams. The results of toxicological studies on sodium fluoride (NaF) were used to obtain insight into the toxicity of CF and HF, because CF is rapidly hydrolyzed in contact with water yielding CO(2) and HF, and NaF is similar in kinetics and dynamics to HF. Increased fetal skeletal variation, but not malformation, was noted after the maternal administration of NaF. Rat multiple-generation studies revealed that NaF caused retarded ossification and degenerative changes in the lung and kidney in offspring. There is a lack of information about the toxicity of TFA and FA. PMID:19755147

  6. Subchronic metabolic effects and toxicity of a simulated pulp mill effluent on juvenile lake trout, Salmo trutta m. lacustris.

    PubMed

    Oikari, A; Linström-Seppä, P; Kukkonen, J

    1988-12-01

    Juvenile lake trout (Salmo trutta m. lacustris) were exposed for 7 weeks to 0.05X and 0.2X 96-hr LC50 concentrations of simulated bleached kraft pulp mill effluent (KME - Sa + CP). A sulfate soap preparation, composed mainly of resin and fatty acids, with added chlorophenols (CP, tri-, tetra-, and penta-CP) was used as the toxicant mixture. Concentrations of free CP in plasma and free and conjugated CP in bile were proportional to their concentrations in the water. The greatest total gradient between bile and water CP was 5.2 X 10(4) for pentachlorophenol. The activity of a liver polysubstrate monooxygenase (PSMO) system, assayed with three model substrates, increased 40 to 67% due to KME - Sa + CP. However, the increase was not directly dependent on the exposure concentration. In contrast to PSMO, activities of conjugating enzymes (p-nitrophenol UDP-glucuronosyl and glutathione transferases) were decreased in the liver. Increased concentration of glutathione was noted in the liver and kidney. In addition, a small (9%) but significant decrease in blood hemoglobin concentration was observed at the higher exposure concentration. Although growth rate of lake trout was markedly decreased due to KME - Sa + CP, hydromineral balance and carbohydrate metabolism in fish were unaffected, indicating possible physiological compensation. On the other hand, lethality tests with lake trout preexposed to KME - Sa + CP at 0.2 X LC50 revealed decreased tolerance, whereas at the lower exposure concentration it was unchanged. We therefore conclude that various physiological adjustments in trout during subchronic exposures were not adaptive in terms of short-term tolerance. PMID:3265913

  7. Comparative effects of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis on clearance rates in juveniles of four bivalve molluscs from Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Leverone, Jay R; Shumway, Sandra E; Blake, Norman J

    2007-04-01

    The effects of Karenia brevis (Gymnodiniales, Gymnodiniaceae) on the feeding activity of juveniles of four species of bivalve mollusc were examined in the laboratory to assess the potential impacts on these important shellfish populations from Florida. Clearance rates were determined under short-term (one hour) static and long-term (two days) flow-through conditions using both whole and lysed cultures of K. brevis. Under short-term conditions, the bay scallop, Argopecten irradians, was the most sensitive species, exhibiting a 79% reduction in clearance rate at 1000 cells ml(-1) of whole K. brevis culture compared to the control (no K. brevis). The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was the least responsive, showing a 38% reduction in clearance rate between the same treatments. The green mussel, Perna viridis, and the northern quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria, displayed intermediate responses. Similar results were also observed during long-term exposures to a continuous supply of K. brevis. Bay scallops showed a significant decline in clearance rate at 100 cells ml(-1) after 24h exposure; clearance rate of oysters was not affected by K. brevis at this concentration. No mortality was observed for any species during these brief exposures. The prospect for recovery of bay scallop populations in Florida estuaries where they were once abundant may be hampered by recurring blooms of K. brevis. Reduced clearance rates in M. mercenaria at high K. brevis densities could translate into poor growth of cultured Florida hard clams. On the other hand, P. viridis, which also showed reduced clearance rates at high K. brevis concentrations, might be negatively impacted by K. brevis blooms, thereby affecting their ability to spread into estuaries hampered by recurring toxic algal blooms. PMID:17182073

  8. Does the presence of microplastics influence the acute toxicity of chromium(VI) to early juveniles of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps)? A study with juveniles from two wild estuarine populations.

    PubMed

    Luís, Luís G; Ferreira, Pedro; Fonte, Elsa; Oliveira, Miguel; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-07-01

    Toxicological interactions between microplastics (MP) and other environmental contaminants are of grave concern. Here, the potential influence of MP in the short-term toxicity of chromium to early juveniles of Pomatoschistus microps was investigated. Three null hypotheses were tested: (1) exposure to Cr(VI) concentrations in the low ppm range does not induce toxic effects on juveniles; (2) the presence of microplastics in the water does not influence the acute toxicity of Cr(VI) to juveniles; (3) the environmental conditions of the natural habitat where fish developed do not influence their sensitivity to Cr(VI)-induced acute stress. Fish were collected in the estuaries of Minho (M-est) and Lima (L-est) Rivers (NW Iberian Peninsula) that have several abiotic differences, including in the water and sediment concentrations of various environmental contaminants. After acclimatization to laboratory conditions, two 96h acute bioassays were carried out with juveniles from both estuaries to: (i) investigate the effects of Cr(VI) alone; (ii) investigate the effects of Cr(VI) in the presence of MP (polyethylene spheres 1-5μm ∅). Cr(VI) alone induced mortality (96h-LC50s: 14.4-30.5mg/l) and significantly decreased fish predatory performance (≤74%). Thus, in the range of concentrations tested (5.6-28.4mg/l) Cr(VI) was found to be toxic to P. microps early juveniles, therefore, we rejected hypothesis 1. Under simultaneous exposure to Cr(VI) and MP, a significant decrease of the predatory performance (≤67%) and a significant inhibition of AChE activity (≤31%) were found. AChE inhibition was not observed in the test with Cr(VI) alone and MP alone caused an AChE inhibition ≤21%. Mixture treatments containing Cr(VI) concentration ≥3.9mg/l significantly increased LPO levels in L-est fish, an effect that was not observed under Cr(VI) or MP single exposures. Thus, toxicological interactions between Cr(VI) and MP occurred, therefore, we rejected hypothesis 2. In the

  9. Effects of condensed organic matter on PCBs bioavailability in juvenile swine, an animal model for young children.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Matthieu; Rychen, Guido; Fournier, Agnès; Jondreville, Catherine; Feidt, Cyril

    2014-06-01

    The exposure assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contaminated soils is a critical issue in terms of human health, especially since little reliable information on transfer of PCBs to humans via involuntary soil ingestion is available. Indeed, young children with their hand-to-mouth activity may be exposed to contaminated soils. The current study addresses the impact of soil organic matter (OM) condensation on bioavailability of sequestrated NDL-PCBs. Three artificial soils (ASs) were prepared according to OECD guideline 207. One standard soil (SS), devoid of OM, and two amended versions of this SS with fulvic acid (FA) or activated carbon (AC) were prepared to obtain 1% organic mass. This study involved fourteen juvenile male swine as a digestive physiology model of young children. Animals were randomly distributed into 4 contaminated groups (3 replicates) and a control one (2 replicates). During 10d, the piglets were fed AS or a corn oil spiked with 19200 ng of Aroclor 1254 per g of dry matter (6000 ng g(-1) of NDL-PCBs) to achieve an exposure dose of 1200 ng NDL-PCBskg(-1) of body weight per day. After 10d of oral exposure, NDL-PCBs in adipose tissue, liver and muscles were analyzed by GC-MS, after extraction and purification. Two distinct groups of treatments were found: on the one hand oil, SS and FA, on the other hand C and AC. This study highlights that condensed OM (AC) strongly reduces bioavailability whereas the less condensed one (FA) does not seem to have a significant effect. This result has to be considered as a first major step for further relative bioavailability studies involving mixture of different humic substances. PMID:24289980

  10. Toxic effects of three strobilurins (trifloxystrobin, azoxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl) on mRNA expression and antioxidant enzymes in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Jiang, Chao; Wu, Zhuo-Qi; Gong, Yu-Xin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2013-12-01

    The strobilurins are used widely in the world as effective fungicidal agents to control Asian soybean rust. In this study, the early life stage of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), which is one of the most important aquaculture species in China, was chosen to measure the acute toxicity of three common strobilurin-derived fungicides (trifloxystrobin (TFS), azoxystrobin (AZ) and kresoxim-methyl (KM)). As endpoints, normal developmental parameters (lethal concentration (LC₅₀) and average heart rate), expression of relative genes, and three antioxidant enzyme activities in the developing juveniles were recorded during a 48 h exposure. The results revealed that values of LC₅₀ were TFS 0.051 (0.046-0.058) mg L⁻¹, AZ 0.549 (0.419-0.771) mg L⁻¹ and KM 0.338 (0.284-0.407) mg L⁻¹ for juveniles. For the potential toxicity mechanisms, these three fungicides increased catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activity and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, significantly inhibited expressions of three growth-related genes (IGF-1, IGF-2 and GHR) and two energy-related-genes (CCK and PYY), and caused pronounced up-regulation a stress-gene (HSP70). The present study demonstrated potential toxic effects of TFS, AZ and KM on the early development of C. idella. Overall, three strobilurins (TFS, AZ and KM) might cause serious damages to the aquatic species; therefore, their pollution supervision in water ecological environment should be strengthened. PMID:24210350

  11. In vitro cytotoxicity testing of 30 reference chemicals to predict acute human and animal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Barile, F.A.; Arjun, S.; Borges, L. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted in cooperation with the Scandinavian Society of Cell Toxicology, as part of the Multicenter Evaluation for In Vitro Cytotoxicity (MEIC), and was designed to develop an in vitro model for predicting acute human and animal toxicity. The technique relies on the ability of cultured transformed rat lung epithelial cells (L2) to incorporate radiolabled amino acids into newly synthesized proteins in the absence or presence of increasing doses of the test chemical, during a 24-hr incubation. IC50 values were extrapolated from the dose-response curves after linear regression analysis. Human toxic blood concentrations estimated from rodent LD50 values suggest that our experimental IC50's are in close correlation with the former. Validation of the data by the MEIC committee shows that our IC50 values predicted human lethal dosage as efficient as rodent LD50's. It is anticipated that this and related procedures may supplement or replace currently used animal protocols for predicting human toxicity.

  12. Is Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Responsible for the Toxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex

    2013-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, which are produced by dinoflagellates of the genera Prorocentrum and Dinophysis, are responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning in humans. In laboratory animals, these toxins cause epithelial damage and fluid accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract, and at high doses, they cause death. These substances have also been shown to be tumour promoters, and when injected into the brains of rodents, OA induces neuronal damage reminiscent of that seen in Alzheimer’s disease. OA and certain of its derivatives are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases, which play many roles in cellular metabolism. In 1990, it was suggested that inhibition of these enzymes was responsible for the diarrhetic effect of these toxins. It is now repeatedly stated in the literature that protein phosphatase inhibition is not only responsible for the intestinal effects of OA and derivatives, but also for their acute toxic effects, their tumour promoting activity and their neuronal toxicity. In the present review, the evidence for the involvement of protein phosphatase inhibition in the induction of the toxic effects of OA and its derivatives is examined, with the conclusion that the mechanism of toxicity of these substances requires re-evaluation. PMID:23381142

  13. Nutritional evaluation of silage made from the toxic weed Parthenium hysterophorus in animals.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, T R; Murthy, B S; Rao, P V

    1993-07-01

    After ensilation, the toxic Compositae weed Parthenium hysterophorus was devoid of the toxic principle parthenin. Laboratory-scale ensilation indicated that no parthenin was detectable after 5 wk of anaerobic fermentation. For animal feeding studies, silage was made on a large scale from Parthenium mixed with maize or from Parthenium alone. Crossbred bull and buffalo bull calves were fed diets containing the silages, or control diet without silage, for 12 wk. The animals consumed both silages with relish, and body weight gains of silage-fed calves did not differ from those of the controls. The digestibilities of dry matter, fibre and nitrogen-free extract were greater with the control diet, but the biological value of proteins tended to be greater with the silage-containing diets. Haematological studies indicated no significant differences between experimental and control groups in selected parameters, except for a reduction in blood urea nitrogen in the animals fed silage. The possible causes for these biochemical alterations are discussed. Since the nutritive value of Parthenium silage compares favourably with the standard diet, and Parthenium seeds collected from the silage did not germinate, we suggest that ensilation can be used as an additional method in the containment and eradication of these plants, which grow wild in India. PMID:8340030

  14. Predicting human drug toxicity and safety via animal tests: can any one species predict drug toxicity in any other, and do monkeys help?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jarrod; Thew, Michelle; Balls, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Animals are still widely used in drug development and safety tests, despite evidence for their lack of predictive value. In this regard, we recently showed, by producing Likelihood Ratios (LRs) for an extensive data set of over 3,000 drugs with both animal and human data, that the absence of toxicity in animals provides little or virtually no evidential weight that adverse drug reactions will also be absent in humans. While our analyses suggest that the presence of toxicity in one species may sometimes add evidential weight for risk of toxicity in another, the LRs are extremely inconsistent, varying substantially for different classes of drugs. Here, we present further data from analyses of other species pairs, including non-human primates (NHPs), which support our previous conclusions, and also show in particular that test results inferring an absence of toxicity in one species provide no evidential weight with regard to toxicity in any other species, even when data from NHPs and humans are compared. Our results for species including humans, NHPs, dogs, mice, rabbits, and rats, have major implications for the value of animal tests in predicting human toxicity, and demand that human-focused alternative methods are adopted in their place as a matter of urgency. PMID:26753942

  15. Using Online Tool (iPrior) for Modeling ToxCast™ Assays Towards Prioritization of Animal Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Sushko, Yurii; Novotarskyi, Sergii; Körner, Robert; Brandmaier, Stefan; Tetko, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The use of long-term animal studies for human and environmental toxicity estimation is more discouraged than ever before. Alternative models for toxicity prediction, including QSAR studies, are gaining more ground. A recent approach is to combine in vitro chemical profiling and in silico chemical descriptors with the knowledge about toxicity pathways to derive a unique signature for toxicity endpoints. In this study we investigate the ToxCast™ Phase I data regarding their ability to predict long-term animal toxicity. We investigated thousands of models constructed in an effort to predict 61 toxicity endpoints using multiple descriptor packages and hundreds of in vitro assays. We investigated the use of in vitro assays and biochemical pathways on model performance. We identified 10 toxicity endpoints where biologically derived descriptors from in vitro assays or pathway perturbations improved the model prediction ability. In vivo toxicity endpoints proved generally challenging to model. Few models were possible to readily model with a balanced accuracy (BA) above 0.7. We also constructed in silico models to predict the outcome of 144 in vitro assays. This showed better statistical metrics with 79 out of 144 assays having median balanced accuracy above 0.7. This suggests that the in vitro datasets have a better modelability than in vivo animal toxicities for the given datasets. Moreover, we published an online platform (http://iprior.ochem.eu) that automates large-scale model building and analysis. PMID:25747436

  16. Extrapolation of inhaled particulate toxicity data from experimental animals to humans. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.L.; Steele, V.E.; Hatch, G.E.

    1988-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the past three years to develop methodology and assess various tissues and tissue-sensitivity endpoints with the ultimate goal of validating a proposed extrapolation model. This model allows the quantitative extrapolation of inhaled particulate toxicology data from experimental animals to man. Methodology was developed to accurately measure nucleotide levels in small tissue samples, to determine cellular toxicant levels, to isolate tissue or cells at various levels of the respiratory tract, and to culture animal and human cells for identical treatment conditions. The tissues assessed were nasal turbinate epithelial, olfactory epithelial, and alveolar macrophages. Nasal and pulmonary lavage fluids were also studied. These comprehensive, comparative animal-to-human extrapolation studies were unique in that, for the first time, tissue response was measured as a function of actual cellular dose, and common endpoints were used for the same target-cell types in different species. The described cell-sensitivity model could then be used to provide quantitative animal-to-human extrapolation values for inhaled particulates, which will be extremely valuable for human risk assessment.

  17. Effect of indigenous animals on chronic end points in freshwater sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reynoldson, T.B.; Day, K.E.; Clarke, C.; Milani, D. )

    1994-06-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted using three species of benthic invertebrates, Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, and Hexagenia limbata, with various densities of the oligochaete worm Tubifex tubifex. It was shown that indigenous animals, simulated by the presence of Tubifex tubifex, did not affect survival of the test species (P [>=] 0.05) but did reduce growth in all three test species and in two species at the lowest tested densities, equivalent to 1,460 worms per square meter. At densities of Tubifex tubifex equivalent to 20,000 m[sup [minus]2], the growth of Chironomus riparius was reduced by >90%, Hyalella azteca by >60%, and Hexagenia limbata by almost 50%. The densities of oligochaetes are equivalent to those found in many contaminated sites. Therefore, it is concluded that the presence of indigenous organisms can confound the interpretation of toxicity test results, based on chronic end points. It is recommended that removal of organisms by considered before toxicity tests are conducted with freshwater sediments from sites with large populations of benthic invertebrates, especially oligochaete worms.

  18. Acute toxicity of 2-butyne-1,4-diol in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Jedrychowski, R A; Czajkowska, T; Stetkiewicz, J; Stetkiewicz, I

    1992-04-01

    Acute toxicity of 2-butyne-1,4-diol (BYD) was evaluated in laboratory animals. The evaluation involved acute oral and dermal toxicity in rats, dermal and ocular irritation in rabbits and skin sensitization in guinea pigs. The oral LD50 values for BYD were 132 mg kg-1 in male rats and 176 mg kg-1 in female rats. Post-mortem histology showed severe damage in lungs, liver and kidneys. In surviving rats, moderate to severe degenerative changes were observed in the liver but only mild lesions in the kidneys. In acute dermal toxicity studies the test chemical was applied either as a solid substance or as 40% aqueous solution at a dose of 5 g kg-1 for 24 h. Within 48 h of application of the diluted test material, half of the rats died. Liver and kidneys were the primary targets and different stages of degeneration, including necrosis, were observed. No deaths occurred after application of the solid substance. In rabbits, BYD was slightly irritant to skin and eyes. No allergic contact dermatitis was observed in guinea pigs. PMID:1556377

  19. Aquatic toxicity of four veterinary drugs commonly applied in fish farming and animal husbandry.

    PubMed

    Kołodziejska, Marta; Maszkowska, Joanna; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Steudte, Stephanie; Kumirska, Jolanta; Stepnowski, Piotr; Stolte, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Doramectin (DOR), metronidazole (MET), florfenicol (FLO), and oxytetracycline (OXT) are among the most widely used veterinary drugs in animal husbandry or in aquaculture. Contamination of the environment by these pharmaceuticals has given cause for concern in recent years. Even though their toxicity has been thoroughly analyzed, knowledge of their ecotoxicity is still limited. We investigated their aquatic toxicity using tests with marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), green algae (Scenedesmus vacuolatus), duckweed (Lemna minor) and crustaceans (Daphnia magna). All the ecotoxicological tests were supported by chemical analyses to confirm the exposure concentrations of the pharmaceuticals used in the toxicity experiments, since deviations from the nominal concentration can result in underestimation of biological effects. It was found that OXT and FLO have a stronger adverse effect on duckweed (EC50=3.26 and 2.96mgL(-1) respectively) and green algae (EC50=40.4 and 18.0mgL(-1)) than on bacteria (EC50=108 and 29.4mgL(-1)) and crustaceans (EC50=114 and 337mgL(-1)), whereas MET did not exhibit any adverse effect in the tested concentration range. For DOR a very low EC50 of 6.37×10(-5)mgL(-1) towards D. magna was determined, which is five orders of magnitude lower than values known for the toxic reference compound K2Cr2O7. Our data show the strong influence of certain veterinary drugs on aquatic organisms and contribute to a sound assessment of the environmental hazards posed by commonly used pharmaceuticals. PMID:23689096

  20. The two faces of selenium-deficiency and toxicity--are similar in animals and man.

    PubMed Central

    Koller, L D; Exon, J H

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to demonstrate the close parallelism of daily requirements, biological activity and minimum and maximum tolerable levels of selenium for animals and man. In addition, the carcinogenic/anticarcinogenic properties of selenium are discussed and a postulate of how these dichotomous effects may occur in accordance with selenium-induced immunomodulation is presented. A review of pertinent literature pertaining to the biological action of selenium in animals and man, including deficiency, toxicity, carcinogenicity and effects on immunity, is included to support these concepts. The predominant biochemical action of selenium in both animals and man is to serve as an antioxidant via the selenium-dependent enzyme, glutathione peroxidase, and thus protect cellular membranes and organelles from peroxidative damage. The signs and symptoms of selenium deficiency closely simulate each other for animals and man. Severe deficiency is characterized by cardiomyopathy while moderate deficiency results in less severe, myodegenerative syndromes such as muscular weakness and pain as well as a variety of other selenium-associated diseases. Clinical manifestations of many of these disorders require contributory factors, such as stress, to precipitate symptoms which are documented for animals and implicated for humans. Current evidence suggests that a daily selenium consumption for man of approximately 30 micrograms is necessary to prevent the selenium-deficient syndrome, Keshan disease, while approximately 90 micrograms/day/adult should be the minimum daily requirement for optimum biological performance. Recognizing that humans in several countries do not meet the proposed minimum daily requirement of 90 micrograms, several compelling reasons are presented in deriving this minimal daily nutritional intake. Selenosis can occur in laboratory animals, livestock, and humans following long-term exposure to selenium concentrations as low as 5 mg selenium

  1. Usefulness of sediment toxicity tests with estuarine plants and animals to indicate municipal and industrial effluent impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Weber, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The environmental impact of municipal and industrial effluents has been predicted from results from single species toxicity tests. The goal of these tests is to ensure that water quality criteria and the designated use of the waterbody is not impacted. Recently, the focus of some effluent toxicity evaluation has centered on determining the effluent impact on the sediment in the receiving water. This study evaluated the toxicities of several sediment samples collected above and below six outfalls to the Pensacola Bay system. Toxicities were determined using three macrophytic plants and four animal species. The sediments, with few exceptions, exhibited a low level of toxicity. The mysid shrimp was more sensitive than Ampelisca, Leptocheirus and the sheepshead minnow. The sensitivities of the plants, Echinochloa crusgalli, Scirpus robustus and Sesbania macrocarpa, were comparable to those of the animal species. The toxicity of time sediment, when compared to that of the effluent, determined using standard single species of plants and animals was less. Overall, the sediment toxicity tests were useful in providing insight on the impact of effluents. However, the application and usefulness of this assessment tool is highly dependent upon a variety of factors, including the geomorphological characteristics of the receiving waters.

  2. Additional Evidence that Juvenile Oyster Disease Is Caused by a Member of the Roseobacter Group and Colonization of Nonaffected Animals by Stappia stellulata-Like Strains†

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Katherine J.; Barber, Bruce J.; Singer, John T.

    2000-01-01

    Juvenile oyster disease (JOD) causes significant annual mortalities of hatchery-produced Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, cultured in the Northeast. We have reported that a novel species of the α-proteobacteria Roseobacter group (designated CVSP) was numerically dominant in JOD-affected animals sampled during the 1997 epizootic on the Damariscotta River, Maine. In this study we report the isolation of CVSP bacteria from JOD-affected oysters during three separate epizootics in 1998. These bacteria were not detected in nonaffected oysters at the enzootic site, nor in animals raised at a JOD-free site. Animals raised at the JOD enzootic site that were unaffected by JOD were stably and persistently colonized by Stappia stellulata-like strains. These isolates (designated M1) inhibited the growth of CVSP bacteria in a disk-diffusion assay and thus may have prevented colonization of these animals by CVSP bacteria in situ. Laboratory-maintained C. virginica injected with CVSP bacteria experienced statistically significant elevated mortalities compared to controls, and CVSP bacteria were recovered from these animals during the mortality events. Together, these results provide additional evidence that CVSP bacteria are the etiological agent of JOD. Further, there are no other descriptions of specific marine α-proteobacteria that have been successfully cultivated from a defined animal host. Thus, this system presents an opportunity to investigate both bacterial and host factors involved in the establishment of such associations and the role of the invertebrate host in the ecology of these marine α-proteobacteria. PMID:10966410

  3. Characteristics of structures and lesions of the eye in laboratory animals used in toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Tomohiro, Masayuki; Sasaki, Shoji; Otake, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Histopathology of the eye is an essential part of ocular toxicity evaluation. There are structural variations of the eye among several laboratory animals commonly used in toxicity studies, and many cases of ocular lesions in these animals are related to anatomical and physiological characteristics of the eye. Since albino rats have no melanin in the eye, findings of the fundus can be observed clearly by ophthalmoscopy. Retinal atrophy is observed as a hyper-reflective lesion in the fundus and is usually observed as degeneration of the retina in histopathology. Albino rats are sensitive to light, and light-induced retinal degeneration is commonly observed because there is no melanin in the eye. Therefore, it is important to differentiate the causes of retinal degeneration because the lesion occurs spontaneously and is induced by several drugs or by lighting. In dogs, the tapetum lucidum, a multilayered reflective tissue of the choroid, is one of unique structures of the eye. Since tapetal cells contain reflecting crystals in which a high level of zinc has been demonstrated chemically, drug-induced tapetum degeneration is possibly related to zinc chelation. The eye of the monkey has a macula similar to that of humans. The macula consists only of cones with a high density, and light falls directly on the macula that plays an important role in visual acuity. Macular degeneration occurring in monkeys resembles histopathologically that of humans. Hence, the eye of the monkey is a suitable model to investigate macular degeneration and to assess drug-induced macular lesions. PMID:26538807

  4. Selective cytoprotective effect of histamine on doxorubicin-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, DJMartinel; Nicoud, MB; Sterle, HA; Carabajal, E; Tesan, F; Perazzo, JC; Cremaschi, GA; Rivera, ES; Medina, VA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the potential protective effect of histamine on Doxorubicin (Dox)-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in different rodent species and in a triple-negative breast tumor-bearing mice model. Male Sprague Dawley rats and Balb/c mice were divided into four groups: control (received saline), histamine (5 mg/kg for rats and 1 mg/kg for mice, daily subcutaneous injection starting 24 h before treatment with Dox), Dox (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected three times a week for 2 weeks) and Dox+histamine (received both treatments). Tissue toxicity was evaluated by histopathological studies and oxidative stress and biochemical parameters. The combined effect of histamine and Dox was also investigated in vitro and in vivo in human MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer model. Heart and liver of Dox-treated animals displayed severe histological damage, loss of tissue weight, increased TBARS levels and DNA damage along with an augment in serum creatine kinase-myocardial band. Pretreatment with histamine prevented Dox-induced tissue events producing a significant preservation of the integrity of both rat and mouse myocardium and liver, through the reduction of Dox-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Histamine treatment preserved anti-tumor activity of Dox, exhibiting differential cytotoxicity and increasing the Dox-induced inhibition of breast tumor growth. Findings provide preclinical evidence indicating that histamine could be a promising candidate as a selective cytoprotective agent for the treatment of Dox-induced cardiac and hepatic toxicity, and encourage the translation to clinical practice. PMID:27551485

  5. Comparison of toxicities of acellular pertussis vaccine with whole cell pertussis vaccine in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Sato, H

    1991-01-01

    There is no suitable animal model for pertussis encephalopathy in humans. In this study, we have compared the toxicity of acellular pertussis vaccine with whole cell pertussis vaccine in mice or guinea pigs. Two lots of acellular and two lots of whole cell vaccine produced in different countries were assayed in the test. 1. There was no statistical difference in mouse protective potency between these acellular or whole cell pertussis vaccines. 2. There were no differences in chemical ingredients between acellular and whole cell pertussis vaccines except for protein nitrogen content. The protein nitrogen content of whole cell vaccine was at least three times higher than that of the acellular product. 3. Anti-PT antibody productivity of the acellular vaccine was higher than that of the whole cell vaccine. 4. Anti-agglutinogen antibody productivity of the whole cell vaccine was higher than that of the acellular vaccine. 5. There was no pyrogenic activity with the acellular vaccine, but high pyrogenicity was seen with whole cell vaccine. 6. There was high body-weight decreasing toxicity in mice and guinea pigs by the whole cell vaccine. 7. The mice died when they received whole cell pertussis vaccine iv, but no deaths occurred in the mice which received acellular pertussis vaccine. PMID:1778317

  6. Accumulation and Toxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Cells and Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Jarockyte, Greta; Daugelaite, Egle; Stasys, Marius; Statkute, Urte; Poderys, Vilius; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2016-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of negatively charged superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH3T3, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal influenced by SPIONs injected into experimental animals, were visualized and investigated. Cellular uptake and distribution of the SPIONs in NIH3T3 after staining with Prussian Blue were investigated by a bright-field microscope equipped with digital color camera. SPIONs were localized in vesicles, mostly placed near the nucleus. Toxicity of SPION nanoparticles tested with cell viability assay (XTT) was estimated. The viability of NIH3T3 cells remains approximately 95% within 3–24 h of incubation, and only a slight decrease of viability was observed after 48 h of incubation. MRI studies on Wistar rats using a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner were showing that SPIONs give a negative contrast in the MRI. The dynamic MRI measurements of the SPION clearance from the injection site shows that SPIONs slowly disappear from injection sites and only a low concentration of nanoparticles was completely eliminated within three weeks. No functionalized SPIONs accumulate in cells by endocytic mechanism, none accumulate in the nucleus, and none are toxic at a desirable concentration. Therefore, they could be used as a dual imaging agent: as contrast agents for MRI and for traditional optical biopsy by using Prussian Blue staining. PMID:27548152

  7. Accumulation and Toxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Cells and Experimental Animals.

    PubMed

    Jarockyte, Greta; Daugelaite, Egle; Stasys, Marius; Statkute, Urte; Poderys, Vilius; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2016-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of negatively charged superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe₃O₄) nanoparticles (SPIONs) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH3T3, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal influenced by SPIONs injected into experimental animals, were visualized and investigated. Cellular uptake and distribution of the SPIONs in NIH3T3 after staining with Prussian Blue were investigated by a bright-field microscope equipped with digital color camera. SPIONs were localized in vesicles, mostly placed near the nucleus. Toxicity of SPION nanoparticles tested with cell viability assay (XTT) was estimated. The viability of NIH3T3 cells remains approximately 95% within 3-24 h of incubation, and only a slight decrease of viability was observed after 48 h of incubation. MRI studies on Wistar rats using a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner were showing that SPIONs give a negative contrast in the MRI. The dynamic MRI measurements of the SPION clearance from the injection site shows that SPIONs slowly disappear from injection sites and only a low concentration of nanoparticles was completely eliminated within three weeks. No functionalized SPIONs accumulate in cells by endocytic mechanism, none accumulate in the nucleus, and none are toxic at a desirable concentration. Therefore, they could be used as a dual imaging agent: as contrast agents for MRI and for traditional optical biopsy by using Prussian Blue staining. PMID:27548152

  8. Reproductive toxicity of commercial PCB mixtures: LOAELs and NOAELs from animal studies.

    PubMed Central

    Golub, M S; Donald, J M; Reyes, J A

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the developmental/reproductive toxicity of commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures in animals and reports on the "no-observable-adverse-effect levels" (NOAELs) and "lowest-observable-adverse-effect levels" (LOAELs) from these studies. Identification of the lowest effective doses for reproductive toxicity of PCB mixtures is difficult because a variety of reproductive and developmental effects have been reported in several species using different commercial mixtures. Factors to be considered include sensitivity of the end point, sensitivity of species, study quality, biological plausibility, and relevance to humans. End points affected at the lowest doses (sensitive end points) included postnatal growth, development, and function. Among species for whom sensitive end points have been evaluated, a LOAEL of 0.25 mg/kg/day was identified for rodents on the basis of developmental delays in growth and behavioral function, and a LOAEL of 0.008 mg/kg/day was identified for nonhuman primates based on postnatal skin hyperpigmentation. NOAELs were not identifiable for these sensitive end points because effects were reported at the lowest doses tested. PMID:1954934

  9. Reproducibility of toxicity test data as a function of mouse strain, animal lot, and operator. [for bisphenol A polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco was evaluated for reproducibility. The variables addressed were strain of mouse, lot of animals, and operator. There was a significant difference in response between Swiss Webster mice and ICR mice, with the latter exhibiting greater resistance. These two strains of mice are not interchangeable in this procedure. Variation between individual animals was significant and unavoidable. In view of this variation, between-lot and between-operator variations appear to have no practical significance. The significant variation between individual animals stresses the need for average values based on at least four animals, and preferably values based on at least two experiments and eight animals. Efforts to compare materials should be based on the evaluation of relatively simple responses using substantial numbers of animals, rather than on elaborate evaluation of single animals

  10. Anticancer activities against cholangiocarcinoma, toxicity and pharmacological activities of Thai medicinal plants in animal models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating cancer with increasing worldwide incidence and mortality rates, is largely ineffective. The discovery and development of effective chemotherapeutics is urgently needed. Methods/Design The study aimed at evaluating anticancer activities, toxicity, and pharmacological activities of the curcumin compound (CUR), the crude ethanolic extracts of rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Ginger: ZO) and Atractylodes lancea thung. DC (Khod-Kha-Mao: AL), fruits of Piper chaba Hunt. (De-Plee: PC), and Pra-Sa-Prao-Yhai formulation (a mixture of parts of 18 Thai medicinal plants: PPF) were investigated in animal models. Anti-cholangiocarcinoma (anti-CCA) was assessed using CCA-xenograft nude mouse model. The antihypertensive, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, and anti-ulcer activities and effects on motor coordination were investigated using Rota-rod test, CODA tail-cuff system, writhing and hot plate tests, carrageenan-induced paw edema test, brewer's yeast test, and alcohol-induced gastric ulcer test, respectively. Acute and subacute toxicity tests were performed according to the OECD guideline for testing of chemicals with modification. Results Promising anticancer activity against CCA in nude mouse xenograft model was shown for the ethanolic extract of AL at all oral dose levels (1000, 3000, and 5000 mg/kg body weight) as well as the extracts of ZO, PPF, and CUR compound at the highest dose level (5000, 4000, and 5000 mg/kg body weight, respectively). PC produced no significant anti-CCA activity. Results from acute and subacute toxicity tests both in mice and rats indicate safety profiles of all the test materials in a broad range of dose levels. No significant toxicity except stomach irritation and general CNS depressant signs were observed. Investigation of pharmacological activities of the test materials revealed promising anti-inflammatory (ZO, PPF, and AL), analgesic (CUR and PPF), antipyretic

  11. Comparative animal and plant toxicities of 10 treated effluents discharged to near-coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Weber, D.E.; Stanley, R.S.

    1998-09-01

    The chemical quality and acute and chronic toxicities of 10 effluents discharged to near-coastal areas in Northwest Florida were determined using standard and nonstandard toxicity tests. The primary objectives of the study were to evaluate and compare the toxicities of different types of effluents and to assess the ability of a variety of toxicity tests to differentiate effluent-specific effects. Focus was placed on animal-plant sensitivity comparisons because phytotoxicity is rarely determined for effluents discharged to coastal estuaries. The standard toxicity test organisms included two algae, two invertebrates, and two fish. In addition, effluent toxicity was evaluated using three rapid bioassays and an early-seedling-growth toxicity test. Most concentrations of potentially toxic inorganic and organic contaminants in the effluents were low, a finding that contrasted with the sometimes elevated biochemical oxygen demand and nutrient concentrations. With the exception of their effects on algae, the toxicities of most effluents were considered moderate. Chronic effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia and Mysidopsis bahia were observed consistently for five effluents; the lowest first-effect levels were typically 35 or 71% effluent. Inhibitory effects on fish and macrophyte seedling growth were infrequent, as were those determined using the three rapid bioassays. Nine of the ten effluents were either phytotoxic or phytostimulatory to algae; first effects were noted in some cases at effluent concentrations less than 6%.

  12. An Animal Model for the Juvenile Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Veronica; Rosso, Natalia; Dal Ben, Matteo; Raseni, Alan; Boschelle, Manuela; Degrassi, Cristina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr; Avellini, Claudio; Tiribelli, Claudio; Gazzin, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) are the hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome; worrisome is the booming increase in pediatric age. To recreate the full spectrum of juvenile liver pathology and investigate the gender impact, male and female C57Bl/6 mice were fed with high fat diet plus fructose in the drinking water (HFHC) immediately after weaning (equal to 3-years old human), and disease progression followed for 16 weeks, until adults (equal to 30-years old human). 100% of subjects of both genders on HFHC diet developed steatosis in 4weeks, and some degree of fibrosis in 8weeks, with the 86% of males and 15% of females presenting a stage 2 fibrosis at 16weeks. Despite a similar final liver damage both groups, a sex difference in the pathology progression was observed. Alterations in glucose homeostasis, dyslipidemia, hepatomegaly and obese phenotype were evident from the very beginning in males with an increased hepatic inflammatory activity. Conversely, such alterations were present in females only at the end of the HFHC diet (with the exception of insulin resistance and the hepatic inflammatory state). Interestingly, only females showed an altered hepatic redox state. This juvenile model appears a good platform to unravel the underlying gender dependent mechanisms in the progression from NAFLD to NASH, and to characterize novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27391242

  13. A roadmap for the development of alternative (non-animal) methods for systemic toxicity testing - t4 report*.

    PubMed

    Basketter, David A; Clewell, Harvey; Kimber, Ian; Rossi, Annamaria; Blaauboer, Bas; Burrier, Robert; Daneshian, Mardas; Eskes, Chantra; Goldberg, Alan; Hasiwa, Nina; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Jaworska, Joanna; Knudsen, Thomas B; Landsiedel, Robert; Leist, Marcel; Locke, Paul; Maxwell, Gavin; McKim, James; McVey, Emily A; Ouédraogo, Gladys; Patlewicz, Grace; Pelkonen, Olavi; Roggen, Erwin; Rovida, Costanza; Ruhdel, Irmela; Schwarz, Michael; Schepky, Andreas; Schoeters, Greet; Skinner, Nigel; Trentz, Kerstin; Turner, Marian; Vanparys, Philippe; Yager, James; Zurlo, Joanne; Hartung, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new products (such as nanoparticles or cell therapies), the limited predictivity of traditional tests for human health effects, duration and costs of current approaches, and animal welfare considerations. The latter holds especially true in the context of the scheduled 2013 marketing ban on cosmetic ingredients tested for systemic toxicity. Based on a major analysis of the status of alternative methods (Adler et al., 2011) and its independent review (Hartung et al., 2011), the present report proposes a roadmap for how to overcome the acknowledged scientific gaps for the full replacement of systemic toxicity testing using animals. Five whitepapers were commissioned addressing toxicokinetics, skin sensitization, repeated-dose toxicity, carcinogenicity, and reproductive toxicity testing. An expert workshop of 35 participants from Europe and the US discussed and refined these whitepapers, which were subsequently compiled to form the present report. By prioritizing the many options to move the field forward, the expert group hopes to advance regulatory science. PMID:22307314

  14. The toxic effects on the stress and immune responses in juvenile rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile Sebastes schlegelii (mean length 13.7±1.7cm, and mean weight 55.6±4.8g) were exposed for 4 weeks with the different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) concentration (0, 30, 60, 120 and 200mg/L). The plasma cortisol and heat shock protein 70 was evaluated as stress indicators. Plasma cortisol was significantly increased in response to the dietary chromium exposure over 120mg/kg at 2 and 4 weeks. Heat shock protein 70 was also notably increased over 120mg/kg at 2 weeks and over 60mg/kg at 4 weeks. In the immune response, immunoglobulin M was considerably increased in the concentration of 240mg/kg at 2 weeks and over 120mg/kg at 4 weeks. Lysozyme activity was considerably induced by the dietary hexavalent chromium exposure. A significant increase in plasma lysozyme activity was observed at 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 60mg/kg after 4 weeks, kidney lysozyme was also increased over 120mg/kg at 2 and 4 weeks. The results demonstrate that dietary Cr exposure can induce a significant stress and immune stimulation. PMID:26991846

  15. Se-methylselenocysteine offers selective protection against toxicity and potentiates the antitumour activity of anticancer drugs in preclinical animal models

    PubMed Central

    Cao, S; Durrani, F A; Tóth, K; Rustum, Y M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Identification and development of drugs that can effectively modulate the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy remain an unmet challenge. We evaluated the effects of Se-methylselenocysteine (MSC) on the toxicity and antitumour activity of cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan in animal models. Methods: Cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin were administered by a single i.v. injection and irinotecan by i.v. weekly × 4 schedules. For the combination, MSC was administered daily via the oral route for 7 days in mice and daily for 14 days in rats before and concurrent with drug administration. Results: Se-methylselenocysteine significantly protected against organ-specific toxicity induced by lethal doses of cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. These include diarrhoea, stomatitis, alopecia, bladder, kidney, and bone marrow toxicities. Protection from lethal toxicity by MSC was associated with enhanced antitumour activity in rats bearing advanced Ward colorectal carcinoma and in nude mice bearing human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, FaDu, and A253 xenografts. Conclusions: Se-methylselenocysteine offers selective protection against organ-specific toxicity induced by clinically active agents and enhances further antitumour activity, resulting in improved therapeutic index. These data provided the rationale for the need to clinically evaluate MSC as selective modulator of the antitumour activity and selectivity of anticancer drugs. PMID:24619073

  16. The putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 inhibits methylmercury-associated animal toxicity and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    VanDuyn, Natalia; Nass, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative motor disorder worldwide, and results in the progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Gene-environment interactions are believed to play a significant role in the vast majority of PD cases, yet the toxicants and the associated genes involved in the neuropathology are largely ill-defined. Recent epidemiological and biochemical evidence suggests that methylmercury (MeHg) may be an environmental toxicant that contributes to the development of PD. Here, we report that a gene coding for the putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 in Caenorhabditis elegans modulates whole animal and DA neuron sensitivity to MeHg. In this study, we demonstrate that genetic knockdown of MRP-7 results in a twofold increase in Hg levels and a dramatic increase in stress response proteins associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, and mitochondria, as well as an increase in MeHg-associated animal death. Chronic exposure to low concentrations of MeHg induces MRP-7 gene expression, while exposures in MRP-7 genetic knockdown animals results in a loss of DA neuron integrity without affecting whole animal viability. Furthermore, transgenic animals expressing a fluorescent reporter behind the endogenous MRP-7 promoter indicate that the transporter is expressed in DA neurons. These studies show for the first time that a multidrug resistance protein is expressed in DA neurons, and its expression inhibits MeHg-associated DA neuron pathology. PMID:24266639

  17. Differences in alarm calls of juvenile and adult European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus): Findings on permanently marked animals from a semi-natural enclosure.

    PubMed

    Schneiderov, Irena; Schnitzerov, Petra; Uhlikov, Jitka; Brandl, Pavel; Zouhar, Jan; Matejů, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The European ground squirrel (Spermophilus citellus) emits alarm calls that warn conspecifics of potential danger. Although it has been observed that inexperienced juveniles of this species emit alarm calls that sound similar to those of adults, studies focusing on juvenile alarm calls are lacking. We analyzed the acoustic structure of alarm calls emitted by six permanently marked European ground squirrels living in a semi-natural enclosure when they were juveniles and after 1 year as adults. We found that the acoustic structure of the juvenile alarm calls was significantly different from those of adults and that the alarm calls underwent nearly the same changes in all studied individuals. All juveniles emitted alarm calls consisting of one element with almost constant frequency, but their alarm calls included a second frequency-modulated element after their first hibernation as adults. Our data show that the duration of the first element is significantly shorter in adults than in juveniles. Additionally, the frequency of the first element is significantly higher in adults than in juveniles. Similar to previous findings in other Palearctic ground squirrel species, our data are inconsistent with the assumption that juvenile mammals emit vocalizations with higher fundamental frequencies than adults. However, our results do not support the previously suggested hypothesis that juvenile ground squirrels conceal information regarding their age in their alarm calls because we found significant differences in alarm calls of juveniles and adults. PMID:26152313

  18. Testing strategies for embryo-fetal toxicity of human pharmaceuticals. Animal models vs. in vitro approaches: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Chapin, Robert E; Haenen, Bert; Jacobs, Abigail C; Piersma, Aldert

    2012-06-01

    Reproductive toxicity testing is characterized by high animal use. For registration of pharmaceutical compounds, developmental toxicity studies are usually conducted in both rat and rabbits. Efforts have been underway for a long time to design alternatives to animal use. Implementation has lagged, partly because of uncertainties about the applicability domain of the alternatives. The reproductive cycle is complex and not all mechanisms of development can be mimicked in vitro. Therefore, efforts are underway to characterize the available alternative tests with regard to the mechanism of action they include. One alternative test is the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST), which has been studied since the late 1990s. It is a genuine 3R "alternative" assay as it is essentially animal-free. A meeting was held to review the state-of-the-art of various in vitro models for prediction of developmental toxicity. Although the predictivity of individual assays is improving, a battery of several assays is likely to have even higher predictivity, which is necessary for regulatory acceptance. The workshop concluded that an important first step is a thorough survey of the existing rat and rabbit studies, to fully characterize the frequency of responses and the types of effects seen. At the same time, it is important to continue the optimization of in vitro assays. As more experience accumulates, the optimal conditions, assay structure, and applicability of the alternative assays are expected to emerge. PMID:22449444

  19. Chlorine gas inhalation: human clinical evidence of toxicity and experience in animal models.

    PubMed

    White, Carl W; Martin, James G

    2010-07-01

    Humans can come into contact with chlorine gas during short-term, high-level exposures due to traffic or rail accidents, spills, or other disasters. By contrast, workplace and public (swimming pools, etc.) exposures are more frequently long-term, low-level exposures, occasionally punctuated by unintentional transient increases. Acute exposures can result in symptoms of acute airway obstruction including wheezing, cough, chest tightness, and/or dyspnea. These findings are fairly nonspecific, and might be present after exposures to a number of inhaled chemical irritants. Clinical signs, including hypoxemia, wheezes, rales, and/or abnormal chest radiographs may be present. More severely affected individuals may suffer acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Up to 1% of exposed individuals die. Humidified oxygen and inhaled beta-adrenergic agents are appropriate therapies for victims with respiratory symptoms while assessments are underway. Inhaled bicarbonate and systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids also have been reported anecdotally to be beneficial. Chronic sequelae may include increased airways reactivity, which tends to diminish over time. Airways hyperreactivity may be more of a problem among those survivors that are older, have smoked, and/or have pre-existing chronic lung disease. Individuals suffering from irritant-induced asthma (IIA) due to workplace exposures to chlorine also tend to have similar characteristics, such as airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, and to be older and to have smoked. Other workplace studies, however, have indicated that workers exposed to chlorine dioxide/sulfur dioxide have tended to have increased risk for chronic bronchitis and/or recurrent wheezing attacks (one or more episodes) but not asthma, while those exposed to ozone have a greater incidence of asthma. Specific biomarkers for acute and chronic exposures to chlorine gas are currently lacking. Animal models for chlorine gas

  20. Workshop overview: scientific and regulatory challenges for the reduction, refinement, and replacement of animals in toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Purchase, I F; Botham, P A; Bruner, L H; Flint, O P; Frazier, J M; Stokes, W S

    1998-06-01

    Public concern for animal welfare has been expressed through legislative control of animal use for experimental purposes since the first legislation was introduced in 1876 in the United Kingdom. Legislative control of animal use has been introduced in virtually every developed country, with major initiatives in Europe (1986) and the United States (1966 and 1985). Advances in scientific thinking resulted in the development of the concept of the three Rs--refinement, reduction, and replacement--by Russell and Burch in 1959. The field has expanded substantially since, with specialist scientific journals dedicated to alternatives, World Congresses organized to discuss the scientific and philosophical issues, and European and U.S. validation organizations being launched. Current scientific attention is focused on validation of alternative methods. The underlying scientific principles of chemical toxicity are complicated and insufficiently understood for alternative methods for all toxicity endpoints of importance in protecting human health to be available. Important lessons have been learned about how to validate methods, including the need to have prediction models available before the validation is undertaken, the need to understand the variability of the animal-based data which is to be used as the validation standard, and the need to have well-managed validation programs. Future progress will depend on the development of novel methods, which can now be validated through international collaborative efforts. PMID:9710950

  1. [Health effects of solar cell component material. Toxicity of indium compounds to laboratory animals determined by intratracheal instillations].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the increasing interest being paid to the issue of the global environment, the production of solar cells has increased rapidly in recent years. Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a new efficient thin film used in some types of solar cell. Indium is a constitutive element of CIGS thin-film solar cells. It was thought that indium compounds were not harmful until the beginning of the 1990s because there was little information regarding the adverse health effects on humans or animals arising from exposure to indium compounds. After the mid-1990s, data became available indicating that indium compounds can be toxic to animals. In animal studies, it has been clearly demonstrated that indium compounds cause pulmonary toxicity and that the dissolution of indium compounds in the lungs is considerably slow, as shown by repeated intratracheal instillations in experimental animals. Thus, it is necessary to pay much greater attention to human exposure to indium compounds, and precautions against possible exposure to indium compounds are paramount with regard to health management. PMID:23718969

  2. Acute and Subacute Toxicity Studies on Rutin-Rich Tartary Buckwheat Dough in Experimental Animals.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tatsuro; Morishita, Toshikazu; Noda, Takahiro; Ishiguro, Koji

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the toxicity of rutin-rich dough from the Tartary buckwheat variety 'Manten-Kirari,' acute and subacute toxicity studies (10,000 and 5,000 mg/kg flour, respectively) were performed using rats. In the acute toxicity study, no toxic symptoms were observed and no rats died during the test. Body weight in the 'Manten-Kirari'-treated group was not significantly different when compared with that of the control group. On pathologico-anatomic observation, no unusual symptoms were observed in the 'Manten-Kirari'-treated group when compared with the control group. In the subacute toxicity study, no toxic symptoms were observed and no rats died during the test. Body weight and food intake in the 'Manten-Kirari'-treated and common buckwheat groups were not significantly different when compared with the control group. However, some investigated properties, such as urine protein and serum albumin, were significantly different in the 'Manten-Kirari' and common buckwheat groups when compared with the control group. However, these changes were not caused by toxicity, but by transient changes. On pathologico-anatomic observation, some abnormalities were observed in the liver, kidneys, heart, lung, bronchi and pituitary gland in some rats. However, the incidental rates in the 'Manten-Kirari' and common buckwheat groups did not differ when compared to controls. Therefore, these abnormalities may be caused by natural generation. Based on these results, we concluded that dough at a dose of 5,000 mg flour/kg is at a non effect level. PMID:26052149

  3. Size-Dependent Toxicity Differences of Intratracheally Instilled Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles: Conclusions of a Subacute Animal Experiment.

    PubMed

    Máté, Zsuzsanna; Horváth, Edina; Kozma, Gábor; Simon, Tímea; Kónya, Zoltán; Paulik, Edit; Papp, András; Szabó, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Incomplete information on toxicological differences of micro- and nanometer-sized particles raised concerns about the effects of the latter on health and environment. Besides chemical composition, size and surface-to-volume ratio of nanoparticles (NPs) can affect toxicity. To investigate size-dependent toxicity differences, we used particles made of dioxide of the neurotoxic heavy metal manganese (Mn), typically found in inhaled metal fumes, in three size ranges (size A, 9.14 ± 1.98 nm; size B, 42.36 ± 8.06 nm; size C, 118.31 ± 25.37 nm). For modeling the most frequent route of exposure to Mn, NPs were given to rats for 6 weeks by intratracheal instillation. Of each NP size, 3 or 6 mg/kg body weight was given while control animals were vehicle treated. Neurotoxicity was assessed by measuring spontaneous locomotor activity in an open field and by recording spontaneous and evoked electrical activity from the somatosensory cortical area. Mn content of brain, lung, and blood, measured by ICP-MS, were correlated to the observed functional alterations to see the relationship between Mn load and toxic effects. Body weight gain and organ weights were measured as general toxicological indices. The toxicity of size A and size B NPs proved to be stronger compared to size C NPs, seen most clearly in decreased body weight gain and altered spontaneous cortical activity, which were also well correlated to the internal Mn dose. Our results showed strong effect of size on NP toxicity, thus, beyond inappropriateness of toxicity data of micrometer-sized particles in evaluation of NP exposure, differentiation within the nano range may be necessary. PMID:26384687

  4. Resistance to toxic plants: The right animal in the right pasture at the right time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neurotoxic poisonous plants negatively impact livestock on many western rangelands, which results in annual economic losses of millions of dollars from animal deaths, increased management and treatment costs, and if animals are deferred from grazing, the underutilization of otherwise highly nutritio...

  5. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  6. Hazard evaluation of soil contaminants with aquatic animals and plant toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, A.; Burks, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Deleterious effects upon the biota should be one of the principal characteristics used to perform the initial assessment of contamination and the acceptable level of clean-up at hazardous waste sites. Acute toxicity tests are probably the best means for conducting rapid preliminary assessment of distribution and extent of toxic conditions at a site. On the other hand acute toxicity tests may not be adequate indicators of potential effects at critical life stages or responses to longer term exposure to contaminants. Chronic toxicity tests are generally more sensitive than acute tests, and can be used to predict {open_quotes}no effect{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} levels of contamination. In addition, chronic tests provide a better index of field population responses and more closely mimic actual exposure in the field. Partial chronic tests such as the 7 d Ceriodaphnia sp. survival and reproduction test and 7 d fathead minnow survival and growth test are widely used to predict effects upon critical stages in the life cycle of chemical and mixtures. The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the potential hazard of contaminants at an abandoned oil refinery upon aquatic ecosystems within the vicinity. A battery of acute and partial chronic toxicity tests were used to evaluate potential effects of contaminated soil and leachates of soil upon rice seed germination and root growth, Ceriodaphnia acute survival, fathead minnow acute survival, Microtox acute response, 7 d Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction, and 7 d fathead minnow survival and growth. The specific tests used to accomplish the overall objective included; (1) To estimate phytotoxicity of the soil at the selected contaminated areas within the refinery, (2) to determine potential for leaching at the selected contaminated areas within the refinery, and (3) to assess the relative toxicity of each of the six contaminated areas in the refinery. 13 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Acrylamide: Inhibition of formation in processed food and mitigation of toxicity in cells, animals, and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potentially toxic acrylamide is largely derived from the heat-unducing reactions between the amino group of the amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose in plant derived foods including cereals, coffees, almonds, and potatoes. This review surveys and consolidates the followi...

  8. Comparative toxicity of PCBs and related compounds in various species of animals

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, E.E.

    1985-05-01

    There are several basic principles that apply to the clinicopathologic syndrome produced by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). They are as follows: the degree of halogenation and position of the halogen atoms determine the potency of PCB, PBB, CDD, CDF and CN; in a given species of animals, the clinicopathologic syndrome induced by PCB is comparable to that induced by polybrominated biphenyls (PBB), chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDD), chlorinated dibenzofurans (CDF), and chlorinated naphthalenes (CN) when an equitoxic dose is achieved; the clinicopathologic syndrome is different in each species of animals; different species of animals vary in their susceptibility to intoxication; intoxication is more readily effected in young animals than in adults; at lethal doses the time between exposure and death is prolonged (> 2 weeks).

  9. Ending the use of animals in toxicity testing and risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Andrew N

    2015-10-01

    This article discusses the use of animals for the safety testing of chemicals, including pharmaceuticals, household products, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. It reviews changes in safety testing technology and what those changes mean from the perspective of industrial innovation, public policy and public health, economics, and ethics. It concludes that the continuing use of animals for chemical safety testing should end within the decade as cheaper, quicker, and more predictive technologies are developed and applied. PMID:26364779

  10. Farm Animal Models of Organic Dust Exposure and Toxicity: Insights and Implications for Respiratory Health

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Chakia J.; Gerald, Carresse L.; Waterman, Jenora T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Modern food animal production is a major contributor to the global economy, owing to advanced intensive indoor production facilities aimed at increasing market readiness and profit. Consequences of these advances are accumulation of dusts, gases and microbial products that diminish air quality within production facilities. Chronic inhalation exposure contributes to onset and exacerbation of respiratory symptoms and diseases in animals and workers. This article reviews literature regarding constituents of farm animal production facility dusts; animal responses to production building and organic dust exposure, and the effect of chronic inhalation exposure on pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation. Recent findings –Porcine models of production facility and organic dust exposures reveal striking similarities to observations of human cells, tissues and clinical data. Oxidative stress plays a key role in mediating respiratory diseases in animals and humans, and enhancement of antioxidant levels through nutritional supplements can improve respiratory health. Summary – Pigs are well adapted to the exposures common to swine production buildings and thus serve as excellent models for facility workers. Insight for understanding mechanisms governing organic dust associated respiratory diseases may come from parallel comparisons between farmers and the animals they raise. PMID:25636160

  11. Acute, sub-chronic oral toxicity studies and evaluation of antiulcer activity of Sooktyn in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Phool; Sachan, Neetu; Kishore, Kamal; Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Sooktyn (SKN), mineralo-herbal drug which is being used largely by the patients for its extremely good therapeutic value to treat the gastric ulcers. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the toxicity studies and antiulcer activity of SKN. Acute and sub-chronic toxicities were studied in male and female Wistar rats. A single acute SKN of 2 000 mg/kg was administered by oral gavage for acute toxicity. Sub-chronic doses were 400 and 800 mg/kg/day. The major toxicological end points examined included animal body weight and food intake, selected tissue weights, and detailed gross necropsy. In addition, we examined blood elements: hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte count, total leukocyte count and MCH, MCHC and platelets as well as biochemical parameters: urea, sugar, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, and creatinine. Also, anti-ulcer activity was carried out by employing indomethacin, ethanol, pylorus ligation, and hypothermic-stress-induced ulcer models. LD50 may be greater than 2 000 mg/kg (orally) for SKN and there were no signs of toxicity on 28 days sub-chronic oral administration of 400 and 800 mg/kg of SKN in rats on the basis of blood elements and biochemical parameters. The ulcer indices decrease in all ulcer models with 66.62%, 61.24%, 80.18%, and 74.76% in indomethacin, ethanol, pylorus ligation, and hypothermic-stress-induced ulcer models, respectively. The results suggest that SKN has no signs of toxicity at 2 000 mg/kg body weight of rats orally; sub-chronically. The drug is safe and has antiulcer activity. PMID:22837960

  12. Highly efficient and lowly toxic docetaxel nanoemulsions for intravenous injection to animals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Du, Lina; Wang, Chenyun; Liu, Yan; Mei, Xingguo; Jin, Yiguang

    2011-07-01

    Hypersensitivity many occur with commercial docetaxel injections containing Tween 80 and ethanol. An alternative formulation of docetaxel, an oil-in-water nanoemulsion was prepared using the high-pressure homogenization method. It was composed of medium-chain triglyceride, oleic acid, egg lecithin, and poloxamer. These ingredients are known as safe agents for intravenous (i.v.) injection. The nanoemulsion had a small size of 169 nm, and a high surface charge with the zeta potential of -33.9 mV. It maintained well stable even under high centrifugation. Acute toxicity of i.v. injection, erythrocyte hemolysis experiment, and rabbit ear vein irritation test showed no toxicity for the docetaxel nanoemulsion. The docetaxel nanoemulsion led to a larger apparent distribution volume and area under curve than the docetaxel injection after i.v. administration to rats. The histopathological test of tumor further demonstrated the highly anticancer efficiency of the docetaxel nanoemulsion. Thus, the nanoemulsion is a promising delivery system for docetaxel with highly anticancer efficiency and low toxicity. PMID:21812321

  13. Subchronic toxicity and genotoxicity of diiodomethyl-p-tolylsulfone (DIMPTS) in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Berdasco, Nancy Anne M; Pitt, Jeffrey A; Saghir, Shakil A; Spencer, Pamela J

    2012-04-01

    These studies were conducted to determine subchronic toxicity and genotoxicity of the biocide diiodomethyl-p-tolysulfone (DIMPTS) in rats and dogs. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats and Beagle dogs were administered DIMPTS for 90-days via the diet at 0, 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg/day to rats and via capsules at 0, 2, 10, and 60 mg/kg/day to dogs. In rats, the only treatment-related finding was squamous metaplasia of the salivary gland duct in the 80 mg/kg/day group. In dogs, female body weights in the high-dose group were significantly lower than controls. Altered clinical pathology parameters were considered secondary to inflammatory changes observed in some of the dogs. Treatment-related alterations were found in the thyroid glands, salivary glands, GI-tract in the mid- and/or high-dose groups. DIMPTS was negative in the four in vitro and one in vivo genotoxicity assays. The toxicological effects noted in the two mammalian species are consistent with the principal toxic effects of iodine, and are proposed to arise from release of iodide from the DIMPTS molecule with toxic sequelae. PMID:22210449

  14. Relative sensitivity of developmental and immune parameters in juvenile versus adult male rats after exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate

    SciTech Connect

    Tonk, Elisa C.M.; Verhoef, Aart; Gremmer, Eric R.; Loveren, Henk van; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2012-04-01

    The developing immune system displays a relatively high sensitivity as compared to both general toxicity parameters and to the adult immune system. In this study we have performed such comparisons using di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) as a model compound. DEHP is the most abundant phthalate in the environment and perinatal exposure to DEHP has been shown to disrupt male sexual differentiation. In addition, phthalate exposure has been associated with immune dysfunction as evidenced by effects on the expression of allergy. Male wistar rats were dosed with corn oil or DEHP by gavage from postnatal day (PND) 10–50 or PND 50–90 at doses between 1 and 1000 mg/kg/day. Androgen-dependent organ weights showed effects at lower dose levels in juvenile versus adult animals. Immune parameters affected included TDAR parameters in both age groups, NK activity in juvenile animals and TNF-α production by adherent splenocytes in adult animals. Immune parameters were affected at lower dose levels compared to developmental parameters. Overall, more immune parameters were affected in juvenile animals compared to adult animals and effects were observed at lower dose levels. The results of this study show a relatively higher sensitivity of juvenile versus adult rats. Furthermore, they illustrate the relative sensitivity of the developing immune system in juvenile animals as compared to general toxicity and developmental parameters. This study therefore provides further argumentation for performing dedicated developmental immune toxicity testing as a default in regulatory toxicology. -- Highlights: ► In this study we evaluate the relative sensitivities for DEHP induced effects. ► Results of this study demonstrate the age-dependency of DEHP toxicity. ► Functional immune parameters were more sensitive than structural immune parameters. ► Immune parameters were affected at lower dose levels than developmental parameters. ► Findings demonstrate the susceptibility of the

  15. Disrupting self-assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic protein oligomers by "molecular tweezers" - from the test tube to animal models.

    PubMed

    Attar, Aida; Bitan, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, therapy for diseases caused by abnormal protein folding and aggregation (amyloidoses) is limited to treatment of symptoms and provides only temporary and moderate relief to sufferers. The failure in developing successful disease-modifying drugs for amyloidoses stems from the nature of the targets for such drugs - primarily oligomers of amyloidogenic proteins, which are distinct from traditional targets, such as enzymes or receptors. The oligomers are metastable, do not have well-defined structures, and exist in dynamically changing mixtures. Therefore, inhibiting the formation and toxicity of these oligomers likely will require out-of-the-box thinking and novel strategies. We review here the development of a strategy based on targeting the combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are key to the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins using lysine (K)-specific "molecular tweezers" (MTs). Our discussion includes a survey of the literature demonstrating the important role of K residues in the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins and the development of a lead MT derivative called CLR01, from an inhibitor of protein aggregation in vitro to a drug candidate showing effective amelioration of disease symptoms in animal models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:23859557

  16. Influence of genetic composition of test-animal populations on chronic toxicity studies used for risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, N A; Wolff, G L; Nelson, C J

    1985-01-01

    A lifespan exposure of mice to benzidine dihydrochloride was conducted for 33 m using both sexes of two populations of mice with the same gene pool. One population was the genetically homogeneous F1 hybrid produced by crossing BALB/cStCrlC3Hf/Nctr males with C57BL/6jfC3Hf/Nctr females. The second population consisted of genetically heterogenous monohybrid cross (MC) offspring produced by mating the F1 hybrids inter se. Data comparisons were made to determine if gene distribution among members of a population affects the response to a toxic insult. Endpoints tested consisted of mortality, liver tumor incidence and time of tumor onset, mortality from reticulum-cell sarcoma, and body weights. In most instances it was noted that among animals not dosed (controls), the F1 population had lower background incidence of lesions and lived longer than the MC population. However, among the dosed animals, the F1 mice were generally more susceptible to the toxic agent and developed higher incidences of the chemically induced lesions than did the MC population. The F1 hybrid population gave a more conservative estimate of risk than did the MC population. The calculation of the liver tumor risk for these two populations showed that lifespan exposure to benzidine would be predicted to result in a larger number (higher risk) when using the F1 data. A 4.5-fold difference in the toxic response was observed between the F1 females and the MC males. This emphasizes the importance of gene distribution in risk estimation studies. PMID:4032486

  17. Influence of genetic composition of test-animal populations on chronic toxicity studies used for risk estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Littlefield, N.A.; Wolff, G.L.; Nelson, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A lifespan exposure of mice to benzidine dihydrochloride was conducted for 33 m using both sexes of two populations of mice with the same gene pool. One population was the genetically homogeneous F/sub 1/ hybrid produced by crossing BALB/cStCrlC3Hf/Nctr males with C57BL/6JfC3Hf/Nctr females. The second population consisted of genetically heterogenous monohybrid cross (MC) offspring produced by mating the F/sub 1/ hybrids inter se. Data comparisons were made to determine if gene distribution among members of a population affects the response to a toxic insult. Endpoints tested consisted of mortality, liver tumor incidence and time of tumor onset, mortality from reticulum-cell sarcoma, and body weights. In most instances it was noted that among animals not dosed (controls), the F/sub 1/ population has lower background incidence of lesions and lived longer than the MC population. However, among the dosed animals, the F/sub 1/ mice were generally more susceptible to the toxic agent and developed higher incidences of the chemically induced lesions than did the MC population. The F/sub 1/ hybrid population gave a more conservative estimate of risk than did the MC population. The calculation of the liver tumor risk for these two populations showed that lifespan, exposure to benzidine would be predicted to result in a larger number (higher risk) when using the F/sub 1/ data. A 4.5-fold difference in the toxic response was observed between the F/sub 1/ females and the MC males. This emphasizes the importance of gene distribution in risk estimation studies.

  18. Fungicidal activity of AKWATON and in vitro assessment of its toxic effects on animal cells.

    PubMed

    Oulé, Mathias Kégnon; Staines, Kenton; Lightly, Tasia; Roberts, Loren; Traoré, Yannick Léandre; Dickman, Michael; Bernier, Anne-Marie; Diop, Lamine

    2015-01-01

    Acquired superficial fungal infections are among the most common infections. It is necessary to create new effective and non-toxic disinfectants. AKWATON is a new disinfectant of the polymeric guanidine family. Its fungicidal activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes and its in vitro toxicity assessment were determined in this study. The MIC, minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) and time required for its fungicidal activity at the MFC were evaluated using the official methods of analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists, with modifications as recommended by the Canadian General Standards Board. The toxic effects of AKWATON and of four commercial disinfectants were evaluated on rat pancreatic (C2C12) and muscle (RnM5F) cells, using the trypan blue and MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] methods. The MIC, MFC and time required for the fungicidal activity of AKWATON at the MFC were 0.025 % (w/v), 0.045 % (w/v) and 2.5 min, respectively. Cell cultures and the different tests carried out showed that the AKWATON-based disinfectant killed fewer cells than the commercial disinfectants, sparing 80 % of C2C12 cells and 65 % of RnM5F cells, whilst some of the well-known disinfectants currently on the market killed 85-100 % of cells. This study demonstrates that AKWATON has great potential as an odourless, colourless, non-corrosive and safe disinfectant for use in hospitals, the agriculture industry, farming and household facilities. PMID:25411261

  19. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  20. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  1. Naturally occurring toxic factors in plants and animals used as food.

    PubMed

    Strong, F M

    1966-03-19

    Toxic components of natural foodstuffs are discussed, with special reference to lathyrogens, pressor amines, azoxyglycosides, and labile sulfur compounds. The osteolathyrogen, gamma-glutamyl-beta-aminopropionitrile, in sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus) seeds induces skeletal deformities and aortic rupture, probably by interfering with normal maturation of collagen fibres. Neurolathyrism in man may be caused by beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha,beta-diaminopropionic acid, a neurotoxin recently identified in Lathyrus sativus seeds. Histamine, tyramine, noradrenaline, serotonin and other pressor amines occur in fruits and fermented foods such as bananas, pineapples, cheese and wine. Consumption of such foods by patients taking monoamine oxidase-inhibiting drugs (e.g. tranylcypromine) may produce serious hypertensive crises. Cycad nuts, widely used as human food in tropical and subtropical areas, contain a potent carcinogen, methyl azoxymethanol, which is more or less removed prior to use by leaching in water. Consumption of plants of the onion, cabbage and cress families introduces into the body such toxic chemicals as benzyl cyanide, goitrin and thiocyanates. The lachrymatory substance in onions is propenyl sulfenic acid. PMID:5905948

  2. Acrylamide: inhibition of formation in processed food and mitigation of toxicity in cells, animals, and humans.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel

    2015-06-01

    Potentially toxic acrylamide is largely derived from the heat-inducing reactions between the amino group of the amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose in plant-derived foods including cereals, coffees, almonds, olives, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. This review surveys and consolidates the following dietary aspects of acrylamide: distribution in food, exposure and consumption by diverse populations, reduction of the content in different food categories, and mitigation of adverse in vivo effects. Methods to reduce acrylamide levels include selecting commercial food with a low acrylamide content, selecting cereal and potato varieties with low levels of asparagine and reducing sugars, selecting processing conditions that minimize acrylamide formation, adding food-compatible compounds and plant extracts to food formulations before processing that inhibit acrylamide formation during processing of cereal products, coffees, teas, olives, almonds, and potato products, and reducing multiorgan toxicity (antifertility, carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, teratogenicity). The herein described observations and recommendations are of scientific interest for food chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology, but also have the potential to benefit nutrition, food safety, and human health. PMID:25989363

  3. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment. PMID:26728251

  4. Does Oral Ingestion of Piper sarmentosum Cause Toxicity in Experimental Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zaiton; Megat Mohd Nordin, Nor Anita; Othman, Faizah

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportion in Malaysia and worldwide. Scientific studies have shown that herbal plant Piper sarmentosum exhibits an antidiabetic property. Despite the extensive usage and studies of this herb as alternative medicine, there is paucity of the literature on the safety information of this plant. Thus, the present study aimed to observe the subacute toxic effects of Piper sarmentosum aqueous extract (PSAE) on the haematological profile, liver, and kidney in rats. The extract was administered by oral gavage to 6 male and female Sprague Dawley rats in daily dose of 50 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 2000 mg/kg for 28 consecutive days. The control group received normal saline. General behavior of the rats, adverse effects, and mortality were observed for 28 days. The haematological and biochemical parameters were determined at baseline and after the treatment. PSAE did not show abnormality on the body weight and gross observation of internal organs. The haematological, biochemical and histopathological profiles showed minimal changes and variation within normal clinical range except for significant increase in serum potassium level that suggests the need of regular monitoring. Nevertheless, these findings suggested that PSAE up to 2000 mg/kg/day did not show subacute toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats. PMID:24228062

  5. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment. PMID:26728251

  6. Aluminum in the central nervous system (CNS): toxicity in humans and animals, vaccine adjuvants, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C A; Tomljenovic, L

    2013-07-01

    We have examined the neurotoxicity of aluminum in humans and animals under various conditions, following different routes of administration, and provide an overview of the various associated disease states. The literature demonstrates clearly negative impacts of aluminum on the nervous system across the age span. In adults, aluminum exposure can lead to apparently age-related neurological deficits resembling Alzheimer's and has been linked to this disease and to the Guamanian variant, ALS-PDC. Similar outcomes have been found in animal models. In addition, injection of aluminum adjuvants in an attempt to model Gulf War syndrome and associated neurological deficits leads to an ALS phenotype in young male mice. In young children, a highly significant correlation exists between the number of pediatric aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines administered and the rate of autism spectrum disorders. Many of the features of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity may arise, in part, from autoimmune reactions, as part of the ASIA syndrome. PMID:23609067

  7. Toxic effects of two sources of dietborne cadmium on the juvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum L. and tissue-specific accumulation of related minerals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Chi, Shuyan; Liu, Hongyu; Dong, Xiaohui; Yang, Qihui; Zhang, Shuang; Tan, Beiping

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, juvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum L. were fed diets contaminated by two different sources of cadmium: squid viscera meal (SVM-Cd, organic form) and cadmium chloride (CdCl2-Cd, inorganic form). The Cd concentrations in fish diet were approximate 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0mg Cd kg(-1) for both inorganic and organic forms. In the control diet (0.312mg Cd kg(-1) diet, Cd mainly come from fish meal), no cadmium was added. The experiment lasted for 16 weeks and a statistically significant inverse relationship was observed between specific growth rate (SGR) and the concentration of dietary Cd. The SGR of cobia fed a diet with SVM-Cd increased at the lowest doses and decreased with the increasing level of dietary SVM. Fish fed diet contaminated SVM-Cd had significantly higher SGR than those fed diets contaminated CdCl2-Cd among the high Cd level diets treatments. The dietary Cd levels also significantly affected the survival rate of the fish. Among the hematological characteristics and plasma constituents, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activities and alkaline phosphatase activities in serum and liver increased and hepatic superoxide dismutase activity decreased with the increasing dietary Cd levels. The cobia fed diet contaminated by high level of CdCl2-Cd had significantly higher ALP activity than cobia fed diet contaminated by high level of SVM-Cd. The results from these studies indicate no differences in toxicity response to dietborne SVM-Cd and CdCl2-Cd at a low level of Cd. However, at a higher level, cobia was more sensitive to dietborne CdCl2-Cd than SVM-Cd. Based on quadratic regression of SGR, The Cd concentrations was 3.617mg kg(-1) in the optimal diet, Cd source was SVM (126mg Cd kg(-1) in SVM) which stimulate the growth of cobia and the added level was determined to be 26.7g kg(-1) diet in the present study. Cd accumulations in the kidney of cobia fed both types of Cd were higher than other tissues, and the order of Cd accumulation in tissues

  8. Improved dispersion method of multi-wall carbon nanotube for inhalation toxicity studies of experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Taquahashi, Yuhji; Ogawa, Yukio; Takagi, Atsuya; Tsuji, Masaki; Morita, Koichi; Kanno, Jun

    2013-01-01

    A multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) product Mitsui MWNT-7 is a mixture of dispersed single fibers and their agglomerates/aggregates. In rodents, installation of such mixture induces inflammatory lesions triggered predominantly by the aggregates/agglomerates at the level of terminal bronchiole of the lungs. In human, however, pulmonary toxicity induced by dispersed single fibers that reached the lung alveoli is most important to assess. Therefore, a method to generate aerosol predominantly consisting of dispersed single fibers without changing their length and width is needed for inhalation studies. Here, we report a method (designated as Taquann method) to effectively remove the aggregate/agglomerates and enrich the well-dispersed singler fibers in dry state without dispersant and without changing the length and width distribution of the single fibers. This method is base on two major concept; liquid-phase fine filtration and critical point drying to avoid re-aggregation by surface tension. MWNT-7 was suspended in Tert-butyl alcohol, freeze-and-thawed, filtered by a vibrating 25 µm mesh Metallic Sieve, snap-frozen by liquid nitrogen, and vacuum-sublimated (an alternative method to carbon dioxide critical point drying). A newly designed direct injection system generated well-dispersed aerosol in an inhalation chamber. The lung of mice exposed to the aerosol contained single fibers with a length distribution similar to the original and the Taquann-treated sample. Taquann method utilizes inexpensive materials and equipments mostly found in common biological laboratories, and prepares dry powder ready to make well-dispersed aerosol. This method and the chamber with direct injection system would facilitate the inhalation toxicity studies more relevant to human exposure. PMID:23824017

  9. Rapid Sublethal Toxicity Assessment Using Bioluminescent Caenorhabditis elegans, a Novel Whole-Animal Metabolic Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Lagido, Cristina; McLaggan, Debbie; Flett, Aileen; Pettitt, Jonathan; Glover, L. Anne

    2009-01-01

    Sublethal metabolic effects are informative toxicological end points. We used a rapid quantitative metabolic end point, bioluminescence of firefly luciferase expressing Caenorhabditis elegans, to assess effects of sublethal chronic exposure (19 h) to the oxidative stress agent and environmental pollutant cadmium (provided as chloride salt). Bioluminescence declined in a concentration-dependent manner in the concentration range tested (0–30μM Cd), with comparable sensitivity to reproduction and developmental assay end points (after 67 and 72 h, respectively). Cd concentrations that resulted in 20% reduction in bioluminescence (EC20) were 11.8–13.0μM, whereas the reproduction EC20 (67 h exposure) was 10.2μM. At low concentrations of Cd (≤ 15μM), the decline in bioluminescence reflected a drop in ATP levels. At Cd concentrations of 15–30μM, decreased bioluminescence was attributable both to effects of Cd on ATP levels and decreased production of luciferase proteins, concomitant with a decline in protein levels. We show that whole-animal bioluminescence is a valid toxicological end point and a rapid and sensitive predictor of effects of Cd exposure on development and reproduction. This provides a platform for high-throughput sublethal screening and will potentially contribute to reduction of testing in higher animals. PMID:19299418

  10. Juvenile Firesetting.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brittany; Freeman, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile firesetting is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Male gender, substance use, history of maltreatment, interest in fire, and psychiatric illness are commonly reported risk factors. Interventions that have been shown to be effective in juveniles who set fires include cognitive behavior therapy and educational interventions, whereas satiation has not been shown to be an effective intervention. Forensic assessments can assist the legal community in adjudicating youth with effective interventions. Future studies should focus on consistent assessment and outcome measures to create more evidence for directing evaluation and treatment of juvenile firesetters. PMID:26593122

  11. A perspective on acetaldehyde concentrations and toxicity in man and animals.

    PubMed

    Brecher, A S; Hellman, K; Basista, M H

    1997-01-01

    Acetaldehyde (AcH) at a concentration of 593 mM lowers the natural fluorescence of commercial human serum by 12%. It also lowers the fluorescence of a beta-naphthylamine standard curve (recovery) in serum by 17%. These results contrast with earlier reports showing that 447 mM AcH had no effect upon fluorescence of serum or a beta-naphthylamine standard curve in serum. Because 447 mM AcH and 593 mM AcH represent 2.5% and 3.3% AcH, it is apparent that there is a narrow window between which AcH may affect fluorescence by adduct formation with blood components and exogenous fluorophores. Nonetheless, serum has the capacity to bind > 2.5% (> 447 mM) AcH without alteration in fluorescence, suggesting that serum has a great carrying capacity for AcH, undoubtedly in the form of adducts to nucleophiles. These results are discussed in the light of toxicity of AcH and ethanol, the probable significance of the approximately 30 microM free AcH that is reported in chronic alcoholics and the planning of in vitro and in vivo studies with AcH. PMID:9305465

  12. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

  13. Directly toxic effects of plant chemicals which may occur in human and animal foods.

    PubMed

    Seawright, A A

    1995-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are among the most significant plant chemicals causing disease in animals and humans. After absorption from the gut, the compounds are converted to electrophilic pyrroles in the liver which, apart from causing damage to this organ, may escape to cause injury to extraheptic tissues such as the lungs, heart, and kidneys. A group of compounds more recently found to be associated with neurotoxicity are various polyhydroxyalkaloids which are able to interfere with polysaccharide metabolism. They are able to inhibit lysosomal monosaccharidases by virtue of their structural resemblance to the transition state of particular sugar molecules. The resulting lysosomal storage diseases have pathology identical to that of the respective congenital and heritable lysosomal storage diseases which occur in animals and humans. Consumption of cycad plants by cattle may cause a neurotoxicity characterised mainly by a posterior sensory ataxia. In recent years, cycads are considered to be a risk factor for a spectrum of progressive neuro degenerative diseases of humans in the Western Pacific region. The known toxins in the plant are the methylazoxymethanol glycosides which are hepatotoxic and carcinogenic, and the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid beta-methylaminoalanine. A plant carcinogen which can be of great abundance in the nutritional environment is the illudine norsesquiterpene glucoside ptaquiloside which is found in bracken fern. This is the only plant carcinogen which causes natural outbreaks of bladder and/or intestinal cancer in livestock. Many legumes contain phytooestrogens, notably isoflavones. Consumption of these compounds at high levels by sheep can cause extensive lesions of the genitalia of females and castrated males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582621

  14. Juvenile Prostitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1986-01-01

    Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

  15. The development of response surface pathway design to reduce animal numbers in toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study describes the development of Response Surface Pathway (RSP) design, assesses its performance and effectiveness in estimating LD50, and compares RSP with Up and Down Procedures (UDPs) and Random Walk (RW) design. Methods A basic 4-level RSP design was used on 36 male ICR mice given intraperitoneal doses of Yessotoxin. Simulations were performed to optimise the design. A k-adjustment factor was introduced to ensure coverage of the dose window and calculate the dose steps. Instead of using equal numbers of mice on all levels, the number of mice was increased at each design level. Additionally, the binomial outcome variable was changed to multinomial. The performance of the RSP designs and a comparison of UDPs and RW were assessed by simulations. The optimised 4-level RSP design was used on 24 female NMRI mice given Azaspiracid-1 intraperitoneally. Results The in vivo experiment with basic 4-level RSP design estimated the LD50 of Yessotoxin to be 463 μg/kgBW (95% CI: 383–535). By inclusion of the k-adjustment factor with equal or increasing numbers of mice on increasing dose levels, the estimate changed to 481 μg/kgBW (95% CI: 362–566) and 447 μg/kgBW (95% CI: 378–504 μg/kgBW), respectively. The optimised 4-level RSP estimated the LD50 to be 473 μg/kgBW (95% CI: 442–517). A similar increase in power was demonstrated using the optimised RSP design on real Azaspiracid-1 data. The simulations showed that the inclusion of the k-adjustment factor, reduction in sample size by increasing the number of mice on higher design levels and incorporation of a multinomial outcome gave estimates of the LD50 that were as good as those with the basic RSP design. Furthermore, optimised RSP design performed on just three levels reduced the number of animals from 36 to 15 without loss of information, when compared with the 4-level designs. Simulated comparison of the RSP design with UDPs and RW design demonstrated the superiority of RSP. Conclusion

  16. Carbonyl emission and toxicity profile of diesel blends with an animal-fat biodiesel and a tire pyrolysis liquid fuel.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, R; Guillén-Flores, J; Martínez, J D

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, two diesel fuels, an animal-fat biodiesel and two diesel blends with the animal-fat biodiesel (50vol.%) and with a tire pyrolysis liquid (TPL) fuel (5vol.%) have been tested in a 4-cylinder, 4-stroke, turbocharged, intercooled, 2.0L Nissan diesel automotive engine (model M1D) with common-rail injection system and diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). Carbonyl emissions have been analyzed both before and after DOC and specific reactivity of carbonyl profile has been calculated. Carbonyl sampling was carried out by means of a heated line, trapping the gas in 2,4-DNPH cartridges. The eluted content was then analyzed in an HPLC system, with UV-VIS detection. Results showed, on the one hand, an increase in carbonyl emissions with the biodiesel fraction in the fuel. On the other hand, the addition of TPL to diesel also increased carbonyl emissions. These trends were occasionally different if the emissions were studied after the DOC, as it seems to be selectivity during the oxidation process. The specific reactivity was also studied, finding a decrease with the oxygen content within the fuel molecule, although the equivalent ozone emissions slightly increased with the oxygen content. Finally, the emissions toxicity was also studied, comparing them to different parameters defined by different organizations. Depending on the point of study, emissions were above or below the established limits, although acrolein exceeded them as it has the least permissive values. PMID:24184046

  17. Animal model for the study of methanol toxicity: Comparison of folate-reduced rat responses with published monkey data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.W.; Garner, C.D.; Terzo, T.S. )

    1994-01-01

    We attempted to develop a rodent model that exhibits characteristics of human methanol toxicities such as acidosis and visual dysfunction, which are correlated with an accumulation of formate, a toxic metabolite of methanol. Initially three groups of Long-Evans rats with different levels of liver folate were prepared and examined for formate accumulation after methanol administration (3.5 g/kg). The folate-reduced (FR) rats prepared by feeding a folate-deficient diet with 1% succinylsulfathiazole yielded blood formate levels equivalent to those found in methanol-intoxicated humans and developed signs of the visual system toxicity (a manuscript on the latter aspect is in preparation). Responses of FR rats to a variety of methanol exposure scenarios were then investigated, and the results were compared with those reported in the literature for monkeys. Formate accumulation and/or lethality were used as toxic parameters for this comparative evaluation. In FR rats dosed orally with 3 g/kg, the blood formate concentration was 9.2 mmol/L at 24 h postadministration and increased to 15.6 mmol/L at 48 h. The same dose given to monkeys yielded a plateau of 7.4 mmol/L at 12 h after methanol administration, and stayed at this level for an additional 12 h. After a 6-h exposure to 1200 ppm and 2000 ppm methanol, the blood formate concentrations in FR rats were increased by 370% and 636% above the endogenous level, respectively. However, blood formate did not accumulate above the endogenous level when monkeys were exposed to methanol up to 2000 ppm for 6 h. Under acute inhalation exposure conditions, FR rats exposed to 3000 ppm methanol, 20 h/d, could not survive more than 4 d. Moreover, monkeys survived for more than 4 d even after an exposure to 10,000 ppm. Thus, these results indicate that FR rats are more sensitive to methanol challenges than monkeys, and suggest that the FR rat could be a congruous animal model for evaluating the health effects of methanol in humans.

  18. Evaluation of plant and animal protein sources as partial or total replacement of fish meal in diets for juvenile Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A feeding trial was conducted in a closed system with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) juveniles (mean weight, 2.84 g) to examine the effects of total replacement of fish meal (FM), with and without supplementation of DL-methionine (Met) and L-lysine (Lys), by plant protein sources. Fish were f...

  19. Studies on toxicity of OTEC plant components on marine animals from the Gulf of Mexico. Final report, September 1, 1978-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataramiah, A.; Lakshmi, G.J.; Best, C.; Gunter, G.; Hartwig, E.; Wilde, P.

    1981-06-01

    Ammonia and chlorine were chosen for toxicity studies as they pose the greatest potential environmental threat. Acute and chronic bioassays determined the LT/sub 50/, LC/sub 50/ and the behavior of mullet (Mugil cephalus), sargassum shrimp (Latreutes focorum) and filefish (Monocanthus hispidus). The chronic bioassays were carried out mainly in sublethal concentrations of ammonia and chlorine. The findings indicate that high concentrations of ammonia and chlorine from the OTEC plants are toxic to marine animals. Also the level of toxicity is related to the species, their habitats and life stages.

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  1. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  2. Acute toxicity of resmethrin, malathion and methoprene to larval and juvenile American lobsters (Homarus amemcanus) and analysis of pesticide levels in surface waters after Scourge™, Anvil™ and Altsoid™ application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zulkosky, Ann M.; Ruggieri, Joseph P.; Terracciano, Stephen A.; Brownawell, Bruce J.; McElroy, Anne E.

    2005-01-01

    Acute toxicity and immune response, combined with temperature stress effects, were evaluated in larval and juvenile American lobsters (Homarus americanus) exposed to malathion, resmethrin and methoprene. These pesticides were used to control West Nile virus in New York in 1999, the same year the American lobster population collapsed in western Long Island Sound (LIS). Whereas the suite of pesticides used for mosquito control changed in subsequent years, a field study was also conducted to determine pesticide concentrations in surface waters on Long Island and in LIS after operational applications. The commercial formulations used in 2002 and 2003—Scourge, Anvil and Altosid—contain the active ingredients resmethrin, sumithrin and methoprene, respectively. Concentrations of the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were also measured as a proxy for pesticide exposure. Acute mortality in Stage I-II larval lobsters demonstrated that they are extremely sensitive to continuous resmethrin exposure. Resmethrin LC50s for larval lobsters determined under flow-through conditions varied from 0.26–0.95 μg L−1 in 48- and 96-h experiments at 16°C, respectively. Increased temperature (24°C) did not significantly alter resmethrin toxicity. Malathion and methoprene were less toxic than resmethrin. The 48-h LC50 for malathion was 3.7 μg L−1 and methoprene showed no toxicity at the highest (10 μg L−1) concentration tested. Phenoloxidase activity was used as a measure of immune response for juvenile lobsters exposed to sublethal pesticide concentrations. In continuous exposures to sublethal doses of resmethrin (0.03 μg L−1) or malathion (1 μg L−1) for 7 d at 16 or 22°C, temperature had a significant effect on phenoloxidase activity (P ≤ 0.006) whereas pesticide exposure did not (P = 0.880). The analytical methods developed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LC-TOF-MS) provided high sensitivity with mass

  3. Juvenile Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gmuca, Sabrina; Weiss, Pamela F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide a comprehensive update of the pathogenesis, diagnostic imaging, treatments, and disease activity measurements of juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). Recent findings Genetic and microbiome studies have provided new information regarding possible pathogenesis of JSpA. Recent work suggests that children with JSpA have decreased thresholds for pain in comparison to healthy children. Additionally, pain on physical examination and abnormalities on ultrasound of the entheses are not well correlated. Treatment guidelines for juvenile arthritis, including JSpA, were published by the American College of Rheumatology and are based on active joint count and presence of sacroiliitis. Recent studies have established the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in the symptomatic treatment of axial disease, though their efficacy for halting progression of structural damage is less clear. Newly developed disease activity measures for JSpA include the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score and the JSpA Disease Activity index. In comparison to other categories of juvenile arthritis, children with JSpA are less likely to attain and sustain inactive disease. Summary Further microbiome and genetic research may help elucidate JSpA pathogenesis. More randomized therapeutic trials are needed and the advent of new composite disease activity measurement tools will hopefully allow for the design of these greatly needed trials. PMID:26002028

  4. Toxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity studies in the animal models are done to determine the dose level recommended for the treatment of disease as drug. This guideline enables the characterization of adverse effects following repeated daily inhalation exposure to a test. This chapter includes oral and dermal toxicity studies which are discussed as per OECD guidelines. Both acute and subacute toxicity studies are given special emphasis. PMID:26939270

  5. Amelioration of Acute Mercury Toxicity by a Novel, Non-Toxic Lipid Soluble Chelator N,N′bis-(2-mercaptoethyl)isophthalamide: Effect on Animal Survival, Health, Mercury Excretion and Organ Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, David; Buchanan, Roger; Gupta, Niladri; Haley, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    The toxic effects of mercury are known to be complex with specific enzyme inhibitions and subsequent oxidative stress adding to the damaging effects. There are likely other factors involved, such as the development of impaired metal ion homeostasis and depletion of thiol and selenium based metabolites such as cysteine and selenium. Much of the toxicity of mercury occurs at the intracellular level via binding of Hg2+ to thiol groups in specific proteins. Therefore, amelioration of mercury toxicity by the use of chelation would likely be enhanced by the use of a chelator that could cross the cell membrane and the blood brain barrier. It would be most favorable if this compound was of low toxicity, had appropriate pharmacokinetics, bound and rendered mercury cation non-toxic and had antioxidant properties. Herein we report on such a chelator, N,N′-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)isophthalamide (NBMI), and, using an animal model, show that it prevented the toxic effects associated with acute exposure induced by injected mercury chloride. PMID:22573916

  6. Salivary biochemical markers as potential acute toxicity parameters for acute radiation injury: A study on small experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Soni, S; Agrawal, P; Kumar, N; Mittal, G; Nishad, D K; Chaudhury, N K; Bhatnagar, A; Basu, M; Chhillar, N

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have been evaluating several biodosimetric/screening approaches to assess acute radiation injury, related to mass causality. Keeping in mind this background, we hypothesized that effect of whole-body irradiation in single fraction in graded doses can affect the secretion of various salivary components that could be used as acute radiation injury/toxicity marker, which can be used in screening of large population at the time of nuclear accidents/disaster. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats treated with whole-body cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of dose 1-5 Gy (dose rate: 0.95 Gy/min) were included in this study. Whole mixed saliva was collected from all animals before and after radiation up to 72 h postradiation. Saliva was analyzed for electrolytes, total protein, urea, and amylase. Intragroup comparison of salivary parameters at different radiation doses showed significant differences. Potassium was significantly increased as the dose increased from 1 Gy to 5 Gy (p < 0.01) with effect size of difference (r > 0.5). Sodium was significantly altered after 3-5 Gy (p < 0.01, r > 0.5), except 1 and 2 Gy, whereas changes in sodium level were nonsignificant (p > 0.5). Urea, total protein, and amylase levels were also significantly increased as the radiation dose increased (p < 0.01) with large effect size of difference (r > 0.5). This study suggests that salivary parameters were sensitive toward radiation even at low radiation dose which can be used as a predictor of radiation injury. PMID:25813962

  7. Juvenile Spondyloarthropathies.

    PubMed

    Adrovic, Amra; Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-08-01

    Juvenile spondyloarthropathies represent a clinical entity separate from the adult disease. Initial clinical signs of juvenile spondyloarthropathies often include lower extremity arthritis and enthesopathy, without axial involvement at the disease onset. Asymmetrical oligoarthritis of lower extremities is typically seen in this type of arthritis. Enthesopathy, which is the hallmark of the disease, is most commonly seen in the Achilles tendon, being manifested by heel pain. Anterior uveitis and HLA-B27 positivity are seen in a proportion of cases. Sacroiliitis is generally asymptomatic in the pediatric population. Ineffective treatment of childhood disease results in disease progression to typical adult form of ankylosing spondylitis. Therefore, early diagnosis and classification remains one of the most relevant questions in pediatric rheumatology. It should be kept in mind that the disease could be misdiagnosed as FMF or Behçet's syndrome in countries with a high incidence of those conditions. This review revises available classification criteria, clinical manifestations and therapeutic options for patients with juvenile spondyloarthropathies. PMID:27402112

  8. Interim report on the genetic and animal toxicity testing of SRC-I products, intermediates, and waste materials. Appendix D. Acute animal studies reports

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdowicz, B.Z.; Kelly, C.M.

    1983-09-01

    Appendix D is a collection of 25 individual reports on the toxicity of SRC-I products, intermediates and residues to rabbits, rats and guinea pigs with acute oral, dermal and inhalation exposure. It includes also eye and dermal irritation tests in rabbits and guinea pigs and dermal sensitization studies in albino guinea pigs. (LTN)

  9. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  10. PROFILE OF TOXIC RESPONSE TO SEDIMENTS USING WHOLE-ANIMAL AND IN VITRO SUBMITOCHONDRIAL PARTICLE (SMP) ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid bioassy for monitoring acute toxicity of wastewater, ground water, and soil and sediment extracts using submitochondrial particles (SMP) has been developed. The assay utilizes the mitochondrial electron transfer enzyme complex present in all eukaryotic cells. Prior develo...

  11. Fighting Juvenile Gun Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, David; Grant, Heath; Rowe, Wendy; Jacobs, Nancy

    This bulletin describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's efforts to fight juvenile gun violence. The Office awarded four community demonstration grants to implement "Partnerships To Reduce Juvenile Gun Violence." Partnership goals include increasing the effectiveness of existing strategies by enhancing and coordinating…

  12. Juvenile Justice & Youth Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, James C.

    Youth violence and the juvenile justice system in the United States are explored. Part 1 takes stock of the situation. The first chapter discusses the origins and evaluation of the juvenile justice system, and the second considers the contributions of the Federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act to the existing juvenile justice…

  13. [Juvenile arthritides].

    PubMed

    Horneff, G

    2010-10-01

    Arthritis in children represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The diagnostic spectrum is broad and a very precise indication for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, especially in small children, is important. In addition to acute arthritides - viral arthritis, reactive arthritis, Lyme arthritis and septic arthritis - secondary chronic arthritis related to an underlying disease as well as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic inflammatory systemic disease in children, need to be considered. This overview is a guide to the diagnosis of arthritis in childhood and to evidence-based therapy of JIA in particular. This consists of a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, systemic and intraarticular corticosteroids, traditional DMARDs such as sulfasalazine, methotrexate and leflunomide, the TNF inhibitors etanercept, adalimumab and, with restrictions, infliximab, other biopharmaceuticals such as anakinra, canakinumab and rilonacept, and tocilizumab and finally, abatacept. PMID:20798949

  14. Application of a novel integrated toxicity testing strategy incorporating "3R" principles of animal research to evaluate the safety of a new agrochemical sulfoxaflor.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Rasoulpour, Reza J; Saghir, Shakil; Marty, Sue; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Billington, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Plant protection products (PPPs) and the active substance(s) contained within them are rigorously and comprehensively tested prior to registration to ensure that human health is not impacted by their use. In recent years, there has been a widespread drive to have more relevant testing strategies (e.g., ILSI/HESI-ACSA and new EU Directives), which also take account of animal welfare, including the 3R (replacement, refinement, and reduction) principles. The toxicity potential of one such new active substance, sulfoxaflor, a sulfoximine insecticide (CAS #946578-00-3), was evaluated utilizing innovative testing strategies comprising: (1) an integrated testing scheme to optimize information obtained from as few animals as possible (i.e., 3R principles) through modifications of standard protocols, such as enhanced palatability study design, to include molecular endpoints, additional neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity parameters in a subchronic toxicity study, and combining multiple test guidelines into one study protocol; (2) generation of toxicokinetic data across dose levels, sexes, study durations, species, strains and life stages, without using satellite animals, which was a first for PPP development, and (3) addition of prospective mode of action (MoA) endpoints within repeat dose toxicity studies as well as proactive inclusion of specific MoA studies as an integral part of the development program. These novel approaches to generate key data early in the safety evaluation program facilitated informed decision-making on the need for additional studies and contributed to a more relevant human health risk assessment. This supplement also contains papers which describe in more detail the approach taken to establish the MoA and human relevance framework related to toxicities elicited by sulfoxaflor in the mammalian toxicology studies: developmental toxicity in rats mediated via the fetal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ( Ellis-Hutchings et al. 2014 ); liver

  15. Evidence for neurotoxicity associated with amoxicillin in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Atli, O; Demir-Ozkay, U; Ilgin, S; Aydin, T H; Akbulut, E N; Sener, E

    2016-08-01

    Amoxicillin (AMX) is one of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics for children, and childhood is the period to have the highest risk for toxicity cases including drug-induced adverse reactions. Some neurological adverse effects (anxiety, hyperactivity, confusion, convulsions, and behavioral changes) have been reported related to AMX treatment. In the present study, we aimed to determine the neurotoxic effects of AMX administration at clinically relevant doses in female juvenile rats. AMX was administered in single oral daily doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for 14 days. According to our results, while AMX administration caused a significant increase in the immobility time of animals, swimming time of these animals significantly decreased. AMX administration significantly reduced the onset of pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions. The serotonin levels of brain tissues in the AMX-administered groups were decreased significantly, which is thought to be related to depression. The glutamate levels in brain tissues increased significantly in AMX-administered groups, which is thought to be related to convulsion. Otherwise, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were significantly decreased in brain tissues of AMX-administered groups. In conclusion, AMX administration triggered depression and shortened the time of the appearance of first seizure in juvenile rats. Also, altered brain neurotransmitter levels and increased oxidative stress observed in our study were thought to be the possible underlying mechanisms of AMX-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26429924

  16. Predicting chronic copper and nickel reproductive toxicity to Daphnia pulex-pulicaria from whole-animal metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nadine S; Kirwan, Jennifer A; Johnson, Craig; Yan, Norman D; Viant, Mark R; Gunn, John M; McGeer, James C

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of omics approaches in environmental research has enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying toxicity; however, extrapolation from molecular effects to whole-organism and population level outcomes remains a considerable challenge. Using environmentally relevant, sublethal, concentrations of two metals (Cu and Ni), both singly and in binary mixtures, we integrated data from traditional chronic, partial life-cycle toxicity testing and metabolomics to generate a statistical model that was predictive of reproductive impairment in a Daphnia pulex-pulicaria hybrid that was isolated from an historically metal-stressed lake. Furthermore, we determined that the metabolic profiles of organisms exposed in a separate acute assay were also predictive of impaired reproduction following metal exposure. Thus we were able to directly associate molecular profiles to a key population response - reproduction, a key step towards improving environmental risk assessment and management. PMID:26854702

  17. Determination of Toxic Activities in Bothrops spp. Snake Venoms Using Animal-Free Approaches: Correlation Between In Vitro Versus In Vivo Assays.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Letícia Lopes; Stransky, Stephanie; Guerra-Duarte, Clara; Flor-Sá, Ana; Schneider, Francisco Santos; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro toxic effects of 5 Bothrops spp. snake venoms, which are part of the antigenic mixture used for the production of Brazilian antivenom, and evaluate their correlation with the in vivo toxic activities of Bothrops spp. venoms. The correlation analysis could be helpful for the replacement of living animals experimentation for in vitro bioassay. Cytotoxicity, L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), proteolitic (serine and metalloproteinase), hyaluronidase (Hyal), and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities were estimated and the correlation coefficient was determined for each activity in relation to lethality, edema, hemorrhage and necrosis induced in live animals by B. jararaca, B. alternatus, B. jararacussu, B. neuwiedi, and B. moojeni venoms. The lethal activity in mice was highly related to Hyal activity (r = 0.94, p < .05), edema related to PLA2 activity (r = 0.94, p < .05), whereas the necrotizing activity showed high correlation with LAAO activity (r = 0.83, p < .05). A very significant correlation between in vitro cytotoxicity and LAAO activities was also observed (r = 0.97, p < .05). PMID:26160116

  18. Disrupting Self-Assembly and Toxicity of Amyloidogenic Protein Oligomers by “Molecular Tweezers” - from the Test Tube to Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Aida; Bitan, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, therapy for diseases caused by abnormal protein folding and aggregation (amyloidoses) is limited to treatment of symptoms and provides only temporary and moderate relief to sufferers. The failure in developing successful disease-modifying drugs for amyloidoses stems from the nature of the targets for such drugs – primarily oligomers of amyloidogenic proteins, which are distinct from traditional targets, such as enzymes or receptors. The oligomers are metastable, do not have well-defined structures, and exist in dynamically changing mixtures. Therefore, inhibiting the formation and toxicity of these oligomers likely will require out-of-the-box thinking and novel strategies. We review here the development of a strategy based on targeting the combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are key to the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins using lysine (K)-specific “molecular tweezers” (MTs). Our discussion includes a survey of the literature demonstrating the important role of K residues in the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins and the development of a lead MT derivative called CLR01, from an inhibitor of protein aggregation in vitro to a drug candidate showing effective amelioration of disease symptoms in animal models of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. PMID:23859557

  19. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenix, P.J.; Kernan, W.J.; Tassinari, M.S.; Schunior, A.; Waber, D.P.; Howes, A.; Tarbell, N.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy.

  20. OVERVIEW: USING MODE OF ACTION AND LIFE STAGE INFORMATION TO EVALUATE THE HUMAN RELEVANCE OF ANIMAL TOXICITY DATA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript summarizes a workshop aimed at developing a framework to determine the relevancy of animal modes-of-action for extrapolation to humans. A complete mode of action human relevance analysis - as distinct from mode of action (MOA) analysis alone - depends on robust info...

  1. Overview: Using Mode of Action and Life Stage Information to Evaluate the Human Relevance of Animal Toxicity Data

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, Jennifer; Carney, E W.; Corley, Rick A.; Crofton, Kevin M.; DeSesso, John M.; Foster, Paul M.; Kavlock, Robert; Kimmel, Gary; Klaunig, James E.; Meek, M E.; Preston, R J.; Slikker, William; Tabacova, Sonia; Williams, Gary M.; Wiltse, J; Zoeller, R T.; Fenner-Crisp, P; Patton, D E.

    2005-10-01

    A complete mode of action human relevance analysis--as distinct from mode of action (MOA) analysis alone--depends on robust information on the animal MOA, as well as systematic comparison of the animal data with corresponding information from humans. In November 2003, the International Life Sciences Institute's Risk Science Institute (ILSI RSI) published a 2-year study using animal and human MOA information to generate a four-part Human Relevance Framework (HRF) for systematic and transparent analysis of MOA data and information. Based mainly on non-DNA-reactive carcinogens, the HRF features a ''concordance'' analysis of MOA information from both animal and human sources, with a focus on determining the appropriate role for each MOA data set in human risk assessment. With MOA information increasingly available for risk assessment purposes, this article illustrates the further applicability of the HRF for reproductive, developmental, neurologic, and renal endpoints, as well as cancer. Based on qualitative and quantitative MOA considerations, the MOA/human relevance analysis also contributes to identifying data needs and issues essential for the dose-response and exposure assessment steps in the overall risk assessment.

  2. EVALUATING THE TOXICITY OF URBAN PATTERNS OF OXIDANT GASES. 1. AN AUTOMATED CHRONIC GASEOUS ANIMAL INHALATION EXPOSURE FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automated animal inhalation exposure facility was designed to conduct chronic exposures of rodents to gaseous pollutants. The facility consisted of 3 walk-in chambers with modular cages to allow for exposure of up to a maximum of 480 mice or 240 adult rats. Critical parameters...

  3. Strategic focus on 3R principles reveals major reductions in the use of animals in pharmaceutical toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Törnqvist, Elin; Annas, Anita; Granath, Britta; Jalkesten, Elisabeth; Cotgreave, Ian; Öberg, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    The principles of the 3Rs, Replacement, Reduction and Refinement, are being increasingly incorporated into legislations, guidelines and practice of animal experiments in order to safeguard animal welfare. In the present study we have studied the systematic application of 3R principles to toxicological research in the pharmaceutical industry, with particular focus on achieving reductions in animal numbers used in regulatory and investigatory in vivo studies. The work also details major factors influencing these reductions including the conception of ideas, cross-departmental working and acceptance into the work process. Data from 36 reduction projects were collected retrospectively from work between 2006 and 2010. Substantial reduction in animal use was achieved by different strategies, including improved study design, method development and project coordination. Major animal savings were shown in both regulatory and investigative safety studies. If a similar (i.e. 53%) reduction had been achieved simultaneously within the twelve largest pharmaceutical companies, the equivalent reduction world-wide would be about 150,000 rats annually. The results point at the importance of a strong 3R culture, with scientific engagement, collaboration and a responsive management being vital components. A strong commitment in leadership for the 3R is recommended to be translated into cross-department and inter-profession involvement in projects for innovation, validation and implementation. Synergies between all the three Rs are observed and conclude that in silico-, in vitro- and in vivo-methods all hold the potential for applying the reduction R and should be consequently coordinated at a strategic level. PMID:25054864

  4. Strategic Focus on 3R Principles Reveals Major Reductions in the Use of Animals in Pharmaceutical Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Törnqvist, Elin; Annas, Anita; Granath, Britta; Jalkesten, Elisabeth; Cotgreave, Ian; Öberg, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    The principles of the 3Rs, Replacement, Reduction and Refinement, are being increasingly incorporated into legislations, guidelines and practice of animal experiments in order to safeguard animal welfare. In the present study we have studied the systematic application of 3R principles to toxicological research in the pharmaceutical industry, with particular focus on achieving reductions in animal numbers used in regulatory and investigatory in vivo studies. The work also details major factors influencing these reductions including the conception of ideas, cross-departmental working and acceptance into the work process. Data from 36 reduction projects were collected retrospectively from work between 2006 and 2010. Substantial reduction in animal use was achieved by different strategies, including improved study design, method development and project coordination. Major animal savings were shown in both regulatory and investigative safety studies. If a similar (i.e. 53%) reduction had been achieved simultaneously within the twelve largest pharmaceutical companies, the equivalent reduction world-wide would be about 150,000 rats annually. The results point at the importance of a strong 3R culture, with scientific engagement, collaboration and a responsive management being vital components. A strong commitment in leadership for the 3R is recommended to be translated into cross-department and inter-profession involvement in projects for innovation, validation and implementation. Synergies between all the three Rs are observed and conclude that in silico-, in vitro- and in vivo-methods all hold the potential for applying the reduction R and should be consequently coordinated at a strategic level. PMID:25054864

  5. Juvenile Delinquency: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile Delinquency is a term which is often inaccurately used. This article clarifies definitions, looks at prevalence, and explores the relationship between juvenile delinquency and mental health. Throughout, differences between males and females are explored. (Contains 1 table.)

  6. Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

  7. Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in 1999, 33…

  8. Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puzzanchera, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

  9. Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles…

  10. Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

  11. Juveniles in court.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Matthew F; Scott, Charles L

    2010-01-01

    Nineteenth-century American reformers were concerned about the influence of immaturity and development in juvenile offenses. They responded to their delinquent youths through the creation of juvenile courts. This early American juvenile justice system sought to treat children as different from adults and to rehabilitate wayward youths through the state's assumption of a parental role. Although these rehabilitative goals were never fully realized, the field of American child psychiatry was spawned from these efforts on behalf of delinquent youths. Early child psychiatrists began by caring for juvenile offenders. The function of a child psychiatrist with juvenile delinquents expanded beyond strictly rehabilitation, however, as juvenile courts evolved to resemble criminal adult courts-due to landmark Supreme Court decisions and also juvenile legislation between 1966 and 1975. In response to dramatically increased juvenile violence and delinquency rates in the 1980s, juvenile justice became more retributional, and society was forced to confront issues such as capital punishment for juveniles, their transfer to adult courts, and their competency to stand trial. In the modern juvenile court, child psychiatrists are often asked to participate in the consideration of such issues because of their expertise in development. In that context we review the role of psychiatrists in assisting juvenile courts. PMID:21080770

  12. Concepts Shaping Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Rob White's paper explores ways in which community building can be integrated into the practices of juvenile justice work. He provides a model of what can be called "restorative social justice", one that builds upon the juvenile conferencing model by attempting to fuse social justice concerns with progressive juvenile justice practices.

  13. Juvenile Court Statistics - 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Youth Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This report is a statistical study of juvenile court cases in 1972. The data demonstrates how the court is frequently utilized in dealing with juvenile delinquency by the police as well as by other community agencies and parents. Excluded from this report are the ordinary traffic cases handled by juvenile court. The data indicate that: (1) in…

  14. Toxicity of tetramethylammonium hydroxide: review of two fatal cases of dermal exposure and development of an animal model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hsun; Wang, Chao-Ling; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Chai, Chee-Yin; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Ho, Chi-Kung

    2011-07-01

    To document two cases of patients who were fatally exposed to tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) on the skin and to establish a rat model to investigate the effects of dermal exposure to TMAH. The charts of two workers who died from occupational accidental exposure to TMAH were reviewed. The 4-hour lethal dose (LD₅₀) of TMAH was determined by applying solutions mimicking the two most common industrially used concentrations (2.38% and 25%) of TMAH to the skin of Sprague-Dawley rats. Exposure of the rat's skin to 2.38% or 25% TMAH generated LD₅₀ values of 85.9 mg/kg and 28.7 mg/kg, respectively. Application of either concentration of TMAH to the skin produced a rapid, significant increase in the rate of respiration. The serum concentrations of tetramethylammonium (TMA) also changed significantly with time of exposure to both concentrations of TMAH. The level of blood urea nitrogen decreased significantly in rats exposed to the 2.38% TMAH, and rats exposed to the 25% solution had a significant decrease in the serum concentration of sodium. Injection of atropine after 5 minutes of exposure did not significantly overcome any of the toxic effects observed with either solution of TMAH. The preliminary results in the rat model indicated that the lethality of TMAH cannot be fully explained by the severity of the patients' chemical burns, and the physiologic effects on respiratory and kidney functions were probably involved. PMID:21310775

  15. A review of implications of antiquality and toxic components in unconventional feedstuffs advocated for use in intensive animal production in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Aregheore, E M

    1998-02-01

    There are a number of unconventional feed resources in Nigeria. Most are rich sources of plant protein. Since protein is the most expensive and limiting nutrient in tropical livestock nutrition, these unconventional feed resources may fill a gap in protein deficiency. However, most contain antiquality and toxic components which make them unsafe as protein and carbohydrate sources in livestock nutrition. The presence of saponins, lectins, tannins, trypsin inhibitors, cyanogenic glucoside and others in African locust bean meal (Parkia filicoidea Welw), avocado seed meal (Persea americana), bambara groundnut meal (Voandzeia subterranea), cocoa by-product meal (Theobroma coca), coffee pulp meal (Coffee arabica), mango seed kernel meal (Mangifera indica), rubber seed meal (Hevea brasiliensis), sesame seed (Sesamum indicum L) and shear-butter cake (Vitellaria paradoxa, G) are not uncommon and make rations prepared with them unpalatable and unacceptable to animals. They also interfere with nutrient bioavailability and utilization. Drying, soaking, leaching and fermentation are simple means of detoxifying these feed sources to reduce the presence of antiquality and toxic components. PMID:9467208

  16. Toxicity bioassays: Water pollution effects on aquatic animals and plants. June 1986-February 1990 (A bibliography from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Report for June 1986-February 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity-bioassay studies of water-pollution effects on reproduction, growth, and mortality of aquatic animals and plants. Industrial and agricultural water pollutants such as metals, chemicals, pesticides, and herbicides are evaluated and tested. Standard fishes and algal assays are used to determine effects of potential toxicants. (This updated bibliography contains 145 citations, 51 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  17. Toxicity bioassays: water-pollution effects on aquatic animals and plants. June 1986-June 1989 (Citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Report for June 1986-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity bioassay studies of water-pollution effects on reproduction, growth, and mortality of aquatic animals and plants. Industrial and agricultural water pollutants such as metals, chemicals, pesticides, and herbicides are evaluated and tested. Standard fishes and algal assays are used to determine effects of potential toxicants. (This updated bibliography contains 94 citations, 32 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  18. Sensitivity of juvenile freshwater crayfish Cherax destructor (Decapoda: Parastacidae) to trace metals.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahnaz; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2007-11-01

    Juvenile Cherax destructor was investigated as a potential test species for toxicity testing of trace metals in Australian freshwater systems. Adult male and female C. destructor were bred in the laboratory to obtain 4-week old juveniles, which were used in the toxicity tests. Animals were exposed to a range of concentrations of the trace metals ions copper (377-1275 microg/L), cadmium (377-1275 microg/L), nickel (300-1013 mg/L) and iron (36-168 mg/L) in static-renewal 96-h bioassays. The 96-h LC50 value for cadmium was 379, 494 microg/L for copper, 50 mg/L for iron and 327 mg/L for nickel demonstrating a decreasing toxicity of these metals to C. destructor. Comparison of LC50 values for metals for this species with those for other aquatic organisms reveals that C. destructor is less sensitive to trace metals than most other tested species. PMID:17011034

  19. Harmonization of animal clinical pathology testing in toxicity and safety studies. The Joint Scientific Committee for International Harmonization of Clinical Pathology Testing.

    PubMed

    Weingand, K; Brown, G; Hall, R; Davies, D; Gossett, K; Neptun, D; Waner, T; Matsuzawa, T; Salemink, P; Froelke, W; Provost, J P; Dal Negro, G; Batchelor, J; Nomura, M; Groetsch, H; Boink, A; Kimball, J; Woodman, D; York, M; Fabianson-Johnson, E; Lupart, M; Melloni, E

    1996-02-01

    Ten scientific organizations formed a joint international committee to provide expert recommendations for clinical pathology testing of laboratory animal species used in regulated toxicity and safety studies. For repeated-dose studies in rodent species, clinical pathology testing is necessary at study termination. Interim study testing may not be necessary in long-duration studies provided that it has been done in short-duration studies using dose levels not substantially lower than those used in the long-duration studies. For repeated-dose studies in nonrodent species, clinical pathology testing is recommended at study termination and at least once at an earlier interval. For studies of 2 to 6 weeks in duration in nonrodent species, testing is also recommended within 7 days of initiation of dosing, unless it compromises the health of the animals. If a study contains recovery groups, clinical pathology testing at study termination is recommended. The core hematology tests recommended are total leukocyte (white blood cell) count, absolute differential leukocyte count, erythrocyte (red blood cell) count, evaluation of red blood cell morphology, platelet (thrombocyte) count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit (or packed cell volume), mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. In the absence of automated reticulocyte counting capabilities, blood smears from each animal should be prepared for reticulocyte counts. Bone marrow cytology slides should be prepared from each animal at termination. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time (or appropriate alternatives) and platelet count are the minimum recommended laboratory tests of hemostasis. The core clinical chemistry tests recommended are glucose, urea nitrogen, creatinine, total protein, albumin, calculated globulin, calcium, sodium, potassium, total cholesterol, and appropriate hepatocellular and hepatobiliary tests. For hepatocellular

  20. Toxic Identification and Evaluation of Androgen Receptor Antagonistic Activities in Acid-Treated Liver Extracts of High-Trophic Level Wild Animals from Japan.

    PubMed

    Misaki, Kentaro; Suzuki, Go; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Takahashi, Shin; Someya, Masayuki; Takigami, Hidetaka; Tajima, Yuko; Yamada, Tadasu K; Amano, Masao; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-10-01

    Sulfuric acid-treated liver extracts of representative high-trophic level Japanese animals were analyzed by toxic identification and evaluation (TIE) with chemically activated luciferase expression (CALUX) and chemical analysis to elucidate androgen receptor (AR) antagonistic activities and potential contributions of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The activities were detected in striped dolphins (n = 5), Stejneger's beaked whales (n = 6), golden eagle (n = 1), and Steller's sea eagle (n = 1) with CALUX-flutamide equivalents (FluEQs) as follow: 38 (20-52), 47 (21-96), 5.0, and 80 μg FluEQ/g-lipid, respectively. The AR antagonism was detected in limited number of specimens at lower levels for finless porpoise, raccoon dog, and common cormorant. Theoretical activities (Theo-FluEQs) were calculated using the concentration of OCPs and PCBs and their IC25-based relative potency (REP) values. These total contribution to CALUX-FluEQ was 126%, 84%, 53%, 55%, and 44% for striped dolphin, Steller's sea eagle, Stejneger's beaked whale, finless porpoise, and golden eagle, respectively, and the main contributor was p,p'-DDE. However, most of the activities for raccoon dog (7.6%) and common cormorant (17%) could not be explained by OCPs and PCBs. This suggests other unknown compounds could function as AR antagonists in these terrestrial species. PMID:26321157

  1. Juvenile Confinement in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

  2. Helpful Juvenile Detention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive, research-based rationale for rejecting "get-tough," punitive approaches to juvenile detention and implementing "helpful programs" in detention settings instead. Offers a review of the information that explains why and how juvenile detention should be a first step in the treatment of young offenders, rather than simply a…

  3. Standards for Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flicker, Barbara

    1977-01-01

    The Juvenile Justice Standards Project at New York University has proposed a plan to restructure family court procedure. These standards, outlined here by a former project director, cover significant aspects of the relationship of juveniles to social institutions. (Editor/RK)

  4. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yagnik, Vipul D.

    2011-01-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice. PMID:24765310

  5. Guide to Juvenile Restitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Anne L., Ed.

    This guide is designed to assist programs in developing, expanding, or improving restitution activities for juvenile offenders. The guide is divided into five major sections. Part I focuses on the most fundamental decisions for restitution programs: program philosophy and goals, organizational structure, location within the juvenile justice…

  6. Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, Jessica

    This handbook is designed to teach communities how to develop an effective juvenile firesetter intervention program. The six chapters of this handbook can be viewed as the six building blocks essential to construct a successful program. The cornerstone of the blueprint is understanding the personality profiles of juvenile firesetters and their…

  7. Juvenile Delinquency in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Irving, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Contains nine articles which describe the causes and treatment of juvenile delinquency in China. Focuses on the social causes of delinquency, family factors shaping juvenile crimes and mistakes, criminal peer groups, psychological factors related to delinquency, and the role of education in prevention of delinquency. (JDH)

  8. Renewing Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macallair, Daniel; Males, Mike; Enty, Dinky Manek; Vinakor, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) was commissioned by Sierra Health Foundation to critically examine California's juvenile justice system and consider the potential role of foundations in promoting systemic reform. The information gathered by CJCJ researchers for this report suggests that foundations can perform a key leadership…

  9. Feasibility of repeated testing for learning ability in juvenile primates for pediatric safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Rose, C; Luetjens, C M; Grote-Wessels, S; Weinbauer, G F

    2015-11-01

    Assessment of learning ability in nonhuman primate (NHP) models is sometimes requested by regulatory authorities. The double choice object discrimination task using a Wisconsin General Testing Apparatus (WGTA) approach is typically being applied. In this study, the WGTA approach was performed on 66 juvenile cynomolgus monkeys aged 8-9 months in the predose phase of juvenile toxicity assessment. In addition, reversal learning data of seven control animals/gender were obtained for the weeks 25 and 52 of dosing. Gender differences in the number of days required to pass the habituation, learning or reversal learning phases were statistically comparable, males and females may be combined for statistical analysis. At first instance, the habituation phase was passed on average after 6.4 days, and the learning test on average after 8.6 days with improvement to 2.0-2.6 days for habituation and 6.4-6.7 days for learning in weeks 52. Power analysis (α = 0.05, one-sided t-test) revealed a sample size of 8 and 41 to predict a 50% and 20% difference, respectively. In conclusion, examination for learning ability, but not for memory ability (during repeated testing) is feasible in juvenile NHPs using the WGTA approach. PMID:26361857

  10. Selective Toxicity of Persian Gulf Sea Cucumber (Holothuria parva) and Sponge (Haliclona oculata) Methanolic Extracts on Liver Mitochondria Isolated from an Animal Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seydi, Enayatollah; Motallebi, Abbasali; Dastbaz, Maryam; Dehghan, Sahar; Salimi, Ahmad; Nazemi, Melika; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Natural products isolated from marine environments are well known for their pharmacodynamic potential in diverse disease treatments, such as for cancer or inflammatory conditions. Sea cucumbers are marine animals of the phylum Echinoderm and the class Holothuroidea, with leathery skin and gelatinous bodies. Sponges are important components of Persian Gulf animal communities, and the marine sponges of the genus Haliclona have been known to display broad-spectrum biological activity. Many studies have shown that sea cucumbers and sponges contain antioxidants and anti-cancer compounds. Objectives: This study was designed to determine the selective toxicity of Persian Gulf sea cucumber (Holothuria parva) and sponge (Haliclona oculata) methanolic extracts on liver mitochondria isolated from an animal model of hepatocellular carcinoma, as part of a national project that hopes to identify novel potential anticancer candidates among Iranian Persian Gulf flora and fauna. Materials and Methods: To induce hepatocarcinogenesis, rats were given diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injections (200 mg/kg i.p. by a single dose), and then the cancer was promoted with 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) (0.02 w/w) for two weeks. Histopathological evaluations were performed, and levels of liver injury markers and a specific liver cancer marker (alpha-fetoprotein), were determined for confirmation of hepatocellular carcinoma induction. Finally, mitochondria were isolated from cancerous and non-cancerous hepatocytes. Results: Our results showed that H. parva methanolic extracts (250, 500, and 1000 µg/mL) and H. oculata methanolic extracts (200, 400, and 800 µg/mL) increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), mitochondrial swelling, and cytochrome c release in the mitochondria obtained from cancerous hepatocytes, but not in mitochondria obtained from non-cancerous liver hepatocytes. These extracts also induced caspase-3 activation, which is

  11. Juvenile Justice in California, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Justice, Sacramento. Bureau of Criminal Statistics and Special Services.

    This publication provides an overview of the processing of juvenile delinquency cases through the California juvenile justice system; provides information to aid administrators, planners, and researchers in the administration of juvenile justice; and maintains baseline data for further studies of the system. Information on juvenile arrests and…

  12. Workshop summary: phosgene-induced pulmonary toxicity revisited: appraisal of early and late markers of pulmonary injury from animal models with emphasis on human significance.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, J; Carson, A; Costa, D L; Gordon, T; Kodavanti, U; Last, J A; Matthay, M A; Pinkerton, K E; Sciuto, A M

    2007-08-01

    pulmonary threshold dose. Exposure concentrations high enough to elicit an increased acute extravasation of plasma constituents into the alveolus may also be associated with surfactant dysfunction, intra-alveolar accumulation of fibrin and collagen, and increased recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells. Although the exact mechanisms of toxicity have not yet been completely elucidated, consensus was reached that the acute pulmonary toxicity of phosgene gas is consistent with a simple, irritant mode of action at the site of its initial deposition/retention. The acute concentration x time mortality relationship of phosgene gas in rats is extremely steep, which is typical for a local, directly acting pulmonary irritant gas. Due to the high lipophilicity of phosgene gas, it efficiently penetrates the lower respiratory tract. Indeed, more recent published evidence from animals or humans has not revealed appreciable irritant responses in central and upper airways, unless exposure was to almost lethal concentrations. The comparison of acute inhalation studies in rats and dogs with focus on changes in BAL fluid constituents demonstrates that dogs are approximately three to four times less susceptible to phosgene than rats under methodologically similar conditions. There are data to suggest that the dog may be useful particularly for the study of mechanisms associated with the acute extravasation of plasma constituents because of its size and general morphology and physiology of the lung as well as its oronasal breathing patterns. However, the study of the long-term sequelae of acute effects is experimentally markedly more demanding in dogs as compared to rats, precluding the dog model to be applied on a routine base. The striking similarity of threshold concentrations from single exposure (increased protein in BAL fluid) and repeated-exposure 3-mo inhalation studies (increased pulmonary collagen deposition) in rats supports the notion that chronic changes depend on acute

  13. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eileen P; Otonichar, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Sexual offending by juveniles accounts for a sizable percentage of sexual offenses, especially against young children. In this article, recent research on female juvenile sex offenders (JSOs), risk factors for offending in juveniles, treatment, and the ways in which these youth may differ from general delinquents will be reviewed. Most JSOs do not go on to develop paraphilic disorders or to commit sex offenses during adulthood, and as a group, they are more similar to nonsexual offending juvenile delinquents than to adult sex offenders. Recent research has elucidated some differences between youth who commit sex offenses and general delinquents in the areas of atypical sexual interests, the use of pornography, and early sexual victimization during childhood. PMID:27222141

  14. Polyneuropathy in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Vogelgesang, S A; Gutierrez, J; Klipple, G L; Katona, I M

    1995-07-01

    We describe 2 patients in whom juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) was associated with well defined clinical polyneuropathies, and review the clinical and serological data. Light and electron microscopy were used to study muscle and nerve tissues from one patient. Neuropathy in our patients was associated with ulcerative skin lesions and elevated serum levels of factor VIII related antigen. Light microscopic studies of muscle revealed perifascicular atrophy and microinfarcts consistent with juvenile DM. Light microscopy of the affected sural nerve showed axonal degeneration. Electron microscopy of the same nerve demonstrated capillary endothelial inclusions characteristic of those observed as manifestations of early endothelial injury in juvenile DM muscle tissue. Polyneuropathy in patients with juvenile DM is a rare complication and is likely due to ischemia secondary to endothelial damage. PMID:7562774

  15. Do benthic sediment characteristics explain the distribution of juveniles of the deposit-feeding sea cucumber Australostichopus mollis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Matthew J.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2010-10-01

    Despite the economic importance of many deposit-feeding sea cucumbers, the ecology of their juveniles is poorly understood and factors influencing juvenile habitat selection remain largely unexplained. We investigated the importance of the characteristics of the available sediment in determining the highly localised distribution of juveniles of the deposit-feeding Australasian sea cucumber Australostichopus mollis. Wild-caught juveniles were displaced to non-juvenile habitats with surface sediments characterised by lower total organic content (TOM) and nitrogen content, higher chlorophyll- a content and coarser grain size profiles compared to juvenile sites. The growth of displaced individual animals was monitored over 9 months and compared to control animals caged in the juvenile habitats. Displaced juvenile sea cucumbers had high survival rates that did not differ significantly from juvenile habitats. Displaced juveniles exhibited significantly higher specific growth rate (SGR) than those at juvenile sites ( p < 0.001), although the growth of individuals was highly variable within individual cages and among sites. The lower TOM and nitrogen content, and coarser grain size profiles at non-juvenile sites did not result in reductions in juvenile survival or growth. Higher microphytobenthic activity may have resulted in the higher growth rates observed at shallow non-juvenile sites. The SGR of juveniles over the first 6 months of the experiment ranged between 0.45% d - 1 and 0.74% d - 1 for all sites. This was followed by marked growth limitation between 6 and 9 months either as a result of increasing juvenile biomass in cages or seasonal growth limitation. A subsequent reduction in juvenile density resulted in markedly increased growth over the following 3 month period. Juvenile A. mollis show an ability to exploit a variety of benthic sediment food sources, indicating that their highly localised distribution is not due to differences in the food quality of

  16. Juvenile crime and criminal justice: resolving border disputes.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Rising juvenile crime rates during the 1970s and 1980s spurred state legislatures across the country to exclude or transfer a significant share of offenders under the age of eighteen to the jurisdiction of the criminal court, essentially redrawing the boundary between the juvenile and adult justice systems. Jeffrey Fagan examines the legal architecture of the new boundary-drawing regime and how effective it has been in reducing crime. The juvenile court, Fagan emphasizes, has always had the power to transfer juveniles to the criminal court. Transfer decisions were made individually by judges who weighed the competing interests of public safety and the possibility of rehabilitating young offenders. This authority has now been usurped by legislators and prosecutors. The recent changes in state law have moved large numbers of juveniles into the adult system. As many as 25 percent of all juvenile offenders younger than eighteen, says Fagan, are now prosecuted in adult court. Many live in states where the age boundary between juvenile and criminal court has been lowered to sixteen or seventeen. The key policy question is: do these new transfer laws reduce crime? In examining the research evidence, Fagan finds that rates of juvenile offending are not lower in states where it is relatively more common to try adolescents as adults. Likewise, juveniles who have been tried as adults are no less likely to re-offend than their counterparts who have been tried as juveniles. Treating juveniles as adult criminals, Fagan concludes, is not effective as a means of crime control. Fagan argues that the proliferation of transfer regimes over the past several decades calls into question the very rationale for a juvenile court. Transferring adolescent offenders to the criminal court exposes them to harsh and sometimes toxic forms of punishment that have the perverse effect of increasing criminal activity. The accumulating evidence on transfer, the recent decrease in serious juvenile

  17. Toxicity bioassays: Water-pollution effects on aquatic animals and plants. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity bioassay studies of water pollution effects on reproduction, growth, and mortality of aquatic fauna and flora. Industrial and agricultural water pollutants such as heavy metals, chemicals, pesticides, and herbicides are evaluated and tested. Standard fish and algal assays are used to determine effects of potential toxicants. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Toxicity bioassays: Water pollution effects on aquatic animals and plants. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity bioassay studies of water pollution effects on reproduction, growth, and mortality of aquatic fauna and flora. Industrial and agricultural water pollutants such as heavy metals, chemicals, pesticides, and herbicides are evaluated and tested. Standard fish and algal assays are used to determine effects of potential toxicants. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile polyposis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the third type, known as juvenile polyposis coli, affected individuals develop polyps only in their colon. People with generalized juvenile polyposis and juvenile polyposis coli typically develop polyps during childhood. Most juvenile polyps ...

  20. Juvenile Incarceration and Health.

    PubMed

    Barnert, Elizabeth S; Perry, Raymond; Morris, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Addressing the health status and needs of incarcerated youth represents an issue at the nexus of juvenile justice reform and health care reform. Incarcerated youth face disproportionately higher morbidity and higher mortality compared to the general adolescent population. Dental health, reproductive health, and mental health needs are particularly high, likely as a result of lower access to care, engagement in high-risk behaviors, and underlying health disparities. Violence exposure and injury also contribute to the health disparities seen in this population. Further, juvenile incarceration itself is an important determinant of health. Juvenile incarceration likely correlates with worse health and social functioning across the life course. Correctional health care facilities allow time for providers to address the unmet physical and mental health needs seen in this population. Yet substantial challenges to care delivery in detention facilities exist and quality of care in detention facilities varies widely. Community-based pediatricians can serve a vital role in ensuring continuity of care in the postdetention period and linking youth to services that can potentially prevent juvenile offending. Pediatricians who succeed in understanding and addressing the underlying social contexts of their patients' lives can have tremendous impact in improving the life trajectories of these vulnerable youth. Opportunities exist in clinical care, research, medical education, policy, and advocacy for pediatricians to lead change and improve the health status of youth involved in the juvenile justice system. PMID:26548359

  1. Seasonal effects of leached mirex on selected estuarine animals.

    PubMed

    Tagatz, M E; Borthwick, P W; Forester, J

    1975-01-01

    Four 28-day seasonal experiments were conducted using selected estuarine animals in outdoor tanks that received continuous flow of mirex-laden water. Mirex (dodecachlorooctahydro-1,3,4-metheno-2H-cyclobuta [cd] pentalene) leached from fire ant bait (0.3% mirex) by fresh water and then mixed with salt water was toxic to blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus), pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) but not to sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus), at concentrations less than 0.53 mug/L in water. The amount of leaching was greatest in summer and least in spring. Greatest mortality occurred in summer at the highest water temperature and concentration of mirex; least mortality occurred in spring at the next to the lowest temperature and at the lowest concentration. Earliest deaths of blue crabs occurred after six days of exposure and shrimps after two days. Small juvenile crabs were more sensitive to leached mirex than were large juveniles. Mirex did not appear to affect growth or frequency of molting in crabs. All exposed animals concentrated mirex. Among animals that survived for 28 days, sheepshead minnows concentrated mirex 40,800X above the concentration in the water, blue crabs 2,300X, pink shrimp 10,000X, and grass shrimp 10,800X. Sand substrata contained mirex up to 770X that in the water. Most control and exposed animals in samples examined histologically had normal tissues, but alteration in gills of some exposed fish and natural pathogens in some exposed and control crabs and shrimp were observed. The experiments demonstrated that mirex can be leached from bait by fresh water, concentrated by estuarine organisms, and can be toxic to crabs and shrimps. PMID:1190846

  2. Epidemiology of juvenile violence.

    PubMed

    Farrington, D P; Loeber, R

    2000-10-01

    It is difficult to review the epidemiology of juvenile violence because few studies focus specifically on this topic as opposed to childhood aggression or delinquency in general. More research is needed specifically on juvenile violence, which is generally measured using official records or self-reports. Self-report research shows that a substantial fraction of the male juvenile population commits violence, and that very few violent acts are followed by arrests or convictions. Racial differences in violence may be explainable by reference to racial differences in community contexts. There is a great deal of versatility in juvenile violence. Juveniles who commit one type of violent offense also tend to commit other types and nonviolent offenses. Violent offenders tend to be persistent or frequent offenders, and there is little difference between violent offenders and nonviolent but equally frequent offenders. Nevertheless, there is some degree of specialization in violence. More research is needed to investigate whether risk factors exist for violence that are not risk factors for serious nonviolent delinquency (e.g., biologic factors). Violent juveniles tend to have co-occurring problems such as victimization, substance abuse, and school failure. Often, they might be described as multiple-problem youth. There is considerable continuity from childhood aggression to juvenile violence. An early age of onset of violence predicts a large number of violent offenses. The major long-term risk factors for juvenile violence are individual (high impulsiveness and low intelligence, possibly linked to the executive functions of the brain), family (poor supervision, harsh discipline, child physical abuse, a violent parent, large family size, poverty, a broken family), peer delinquency, gang membership, urban residence, and living in a high-crime neighborhood (characterized by gangs, guns, and drugs in the United States). More research is needed on interactions among risk factors

  3. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eileen P

    2016-01-01

    Public policy has tended to treat juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) as adult sex offenders in waiting, despite research that contradicts this notion. Although as a group, JSOs are more similar to general delinquents than to adult sex offenders, atypical sexual interests and sexual victimization during childhood may be a pathway for sexual offending that differentiates some JSOs from their nonsexually delinquent peers. Developmental considerations must be considered in risk assessment evaluations of these youth. This article reviews theories of sexual offending in youth, risk factors for juvenile offending and reoffending, psychopathology in JSOs, risk assessment, and treatment. PMID:26593121

  4. Toxic Hazards Research Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macewen, J. D.; Vernot, E. H.

    1971-01-01

    The activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period of June 1970 through May 1971 reviewed. Modification of the animal exposure facilities primarily for improved human safety but also for experimental integrity and continuity are discussed. Acute toxicity experiments were conducted on hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) both singly and in combination with carbon dioxide (CO). Additional acute toxicity experiments were conducted on oxygen difluoride (OF2) and chlorine pentafluoride (ClF5). Subacute toxicity studies were conducted on methylisobutylketone and dichloromethane (methylene dichloride). The interim results of further chronic toxicity experiments on monomethylhydrazine (MMH) are also described.

  5. FRAMEWORK FOR VALIDATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF IN VITRO TOXICITY TESTS: REPORT OF THE VALIDATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMITTEE OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS CENTER FOR ALTERNATIVES TO ANIMAL TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In toxicology the development and application of in vitro alternatives to reduce or replace animal testing, or to lessen the distress and discomfort of laboratory animals, is a rapidly developing trend. owever, at present there is no formal administrative process to organize, coo...

  6. Potential impacts of blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis on the growth, survival and juvenile recruitment of the non-native green mussel Perna viridis in southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Katherine; Jean, Fred; Thébault, Julien; Volety, Aswani K

    2016-01-01

    Red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis are frequent along the Gulf coast of Florida and it is unclear what tolerance the green mussel Perna viridis, a recently introduced species to coastal waters, has toward these events. Established populations of P. viridis were monitored along the coastal waters of Estero Bay, Florida before, during and following two consecutive red tide blooms to assess the potential effects on growth, survival and juvenile recruitment. Upon onset of the bloom, growth rates fell from 6 to 10 mm month(-1) (March 2011-November 2011) to less than 3 mm month(-1). In the succeeding years, K. brevis blooms were present, and average growth of individually tagged mussels remained below 3 mm month(-1). During growth monitoring the use of calcein as an internal marker was tested with positive staining results and no observed effect on growth or survival. In March 2012, following the first red tide bloom, a population-wide mortality event was observed. Following this event, increased mortality rates were observed with peaks during onset of the bloom in the fall of 2012 and 2013. Juvenile recruitment was also limited during years in which blooms persisted into the spring spawning period suggesting gamete and/or larval sensitivity to K. brevis. Although it cannot be conclusively determined that the cause of reduced growth and survival is due to red tide events, the parallels observed suggest that K. brevis is a factor in the observed changes in population structure. PMID:26647288

  7. Juvenile Battens Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayton, Romayne

    1987-01-01

    Ten children diagnosed with juvenile Battens disease were tested over a three-year period in general intelligence, memory, listening and speech, motor skills, and general learning. Results showed that the patients followed a predetermined pattern but that the time span for development of memory, communication, and behavior problems varied greatly.…

  8. Treating the Juvenile Offender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Robert D., Ed.; Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Boxer, Paul, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This authoritative, highly readable reference and text is grounded in the latest knowledge on how antisocial and criminal behavior develops in youth and how it can effectively be treated. Contributors describe proven ways to reduce juvenile delinquency by targeting specific risk factors and strengthening young people's personal, family, and…

  9. Toxicity of the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Isabel C G; Saker, Martin L; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Wiegand, Claudia; Vasconcelos, Vítor M

    2004-10-01

    The effect of two strains of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii on the survivorship, somatic growth, and detoxification processes of juvenile Daphnia magna were investigated. Both strains of C. raciborskii (and also Ankistrodesmus falcatus, used as the control) were given to newborn D. magna at equivalent biovolumes. The survival curves for D. magna subjected to the two C. raciborskii treatments differed from those of the starved and fed treatments. After 48 h of exposure, the percentage of D. magna surviving after exposure to Cylin-A (a cylindrospermopsin-producing strain isolated from Australia) and Cylin-P (a non-cylindrospermopsin-producing strain isolated from Portugal) was 10.00% and 93.33%, respectively. The strain that produces cylindrospermopsin caused the greatest toxic effect in juvenile D. magna. Statistically significant differences in D. magna body size between the four treatments (Cylin-A, Cylin-P, A. falcatus, and starved) were detected after 48 h of exposure. The juvenile D. magna that received the two C. raciborskii treatments showed an increase in size (relative to their size at T(0)) of 2.54% and 38.14%, respectively. These values were statistically significantly different than those of the A. falcatus-fed control (55.54%) and the starved control (11.47%). In both C. raciborskii treatments there was a tendency for increased GST enzyme activities after 24 h of exposure. Cylindrospermopsin was detected (HPLC-MS/MS) in D. magna tissues after 24 and 48 h (0.025 and 0.02 ng animal(-)1, respectively). The results of this study indicate that C. raciborskii can affect the fitness and growth potential of juvenile D. magna. PMID:15352261

  10. CADMIUM AS A RESPIRATORY TOXICANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer,...

  11. Lowering the isoelectric point of the Fv portion of recombinant immunotoxins leads to decreased nonspecific animal toxicity without affecting antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Onda, M; Nagata, S; Tsutsumi, Y; Vincent, J J; Wang, Q; Kreitman, R J; Lee, B; Pastan, I

    2001-07-01

    Recombinant immunotoxins are genetically engineered proteins in which the Fv portion of an antibody is fused to a toxin. Our laboratory uses a 38-kDa form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A termed PE38 for this purpose. Clinical studies with immunotoxins targeting CD25 and CD22 have shown that dose-limiting side effects are attributable to liver damage and other inflammatory toxicities. We recently showed that mutating exposed surface neutral residues to acidic residues in the framework region of the Fv portion of an immunotoxin targeting CD25 [anti-Tac(scFv)-PE38] lowered its isoelectric point (pI) and decreased its toxicity in mice without impairing its cytotoxic or antitumor activities. We have now extended these studies and made mutations that change basic residues to neutral or acidic residues. Initially the pI of the mutant Fv (M1) of anti-Tac(scFv)-PE38 was decreased further. Subsequently, mutations were made in two other immunotoxins, SS1(dsFv)-PE38 targeting ovarian cancer and B3(dsFv)-PE38 targeting colon and breast cancers. We have found that all these mutant molecules fully retained specific target cell cytotoxicity and antitumor activity but were considerably less toxic to mice. Therefore, lowering the pI of the Fv may be a general approach to diminish the nonspecific toxicity of recombinant immunotoxins and other Fv fusion proteins without losing antitumor activity. PMID:11431343

  12. Blocking Aβ seeding-mediated aggregation and toxicity in an animal model of Alzheimer's Disease: A novel therapeutic strategy for neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Eleuteri, Simona; Di Giovanni, Saviana; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Mike; Adame, Antony; Trejo, Margarita; Wrasidlo, Wolf; Wu, Fang; Fraering, Patrick C.; Masliah, Eliezer; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2014-01-01

    Aβ accumulation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies suggest that process of Aβ nucleated polymerization is essential for Aβ fibril formation, pathology spreading and toxicity. Therefore, targeting this process represent an effective therapeutic strategy to slow or block disease progression. To discover compounds that might interfere with the Aβ seeding capacity, toxicity and pathology spreading, we screened a focused library of FDA-approved drugs in vitro using a seeding polymerization assay and identified small molecule inhibitors that specifically interfered with Aβ seeding-mediated fibril growth and toxicity. Mitoxantrone, bithionol and hexachlorophene were found to be the strongest inhibitors of fibril growth and protected primary cortical neuronal cultures against Aβ-induced toxicity. Next, we assessed the effects of these three inhibitors in vivo in the mThy1-APPtg mouse model of AD (8-month-old mice). We found that mitoxantrone and bithionol, but not hexachlorophene, stabilized diffuse amyloid plaques, reduced the levels of Aβ42 oligomers and ameliorated synapse loss, neuronal damage and astrogliosis. Together, our findings suggest that targeting fibril growth and Aβ seeding capacity constitutes a viable and effective strategy for protecting against neurodegeneration and disease progression in AD. PMID:25173807

  13. Combinatorial QSAR Modeling of Rat Acute Toxicity by Oral Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) toxicity models have become popular tools for identifying potential toxic compounds and prioritizing candidates for animal toxicity tests. However, few QSAR studies have successfully modeled large, diverse mammalian toxicity end...

  14. Animal Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Johnny; Chauffert, Bruno; Bouyer, Florence

    The development of a new anticancer drug is a long, complex and multistep process which is supervised by regulatory authorities from the different countries all around the world [1]. Application of a new drug for admission to the market is supported by preclinical and clinical data, both including the determination of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, antitumour activity, therapeutic index, etc. As preclinical studies are associated with high cost, optimization of animal experiments is crucial for the overall development of a new anticancer agent. Moreover, in vivo efficacy studies remain a determinant panel for advancement of agents to human trials and thus, require cautious design and interpretation from experimental and ethical point of views.

  15. Predator-prey role reversals, juvenile experience and adult antipredator behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Choh, Yasuyuki; Ignacio, Maira; Sabelis, Maurice W.; Janssen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Although biologists routinely label animals as predators and prey, the ecological role of individuals is often far from clear. There are many examples of role reversals in predators and prey, where adult prey attack vulnerable young predators. This implies that juvenile prey that escape from predation and become adult can kill juvenile predators. We show that such an exposure of juvenile prey to adult predators results in behavioural changes later in life: after becoming adult, these prey killed juvenile predators at a faster rate than prey that had not been exposed. The attacks were specifically aimed at predators of the species to which they had been exposed. This suggests that prey recognize the species of predator to which they were exposed during their juvenile stage. Our results show that juvenile experience affects adult behaviour after a role reversal. PMID:23061011

  16. Studies on toxicity of OTEC plant components on marine animals from the Gulf of Mexico. Annual report for period October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataramiah, A.; Lakshmi, G.J.; Best, C.; Gunter, G.; Hartwig, E.; Wilde, P.

    1981-06-01

    This project was undertaken as a part of the OTEC environmental studies plan on the toxicity of OTEC working fluids to marine organisms. Ammonia and chlorine were chosen as they pose the greatest potential environmental threat. Acute and chronic bioassays determined the LT/sub 50/, LC/sub 50/ and the behavior of mullet (Mugil cephalus), sargassum shrimp (Latreutes fucorum) and filefish (Monocanthus hispidus).

  17. Effect of water pH on the toxicity of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol to four species of freshwater animals

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, L.T.; Markee, T.; Vande Venter, F.; Spehar, R.; Erickson, R.

    1994-12-31

    2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (TCP) is a weak acid with a pH of approximately 7.2 which is expected to have a significant effect upon its toxicity. Lumbriculus variegatus, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, and Hyalella azteca were exposed to TCP in 96 h flow-through toxicity tests. For the first two species, simultaneous tests were conducted at three pH values (7.0, 7.8, 8.6). The other two species were tested at six pH values conducted in two sets of three simultaneous tests (6.2, 7.4, 8.6 and 6.8, 8.0, 9.2). All species tested showed decreased sensitivity to TCP with increased pH of the water. Over the pH range tested, LC50s for L. variegatus varied by about 5-fold, for P. promelas by 12-fold, for H. azteca by 10-fold, and for O. mykiss by 1.5-fold. The effects of pH on TCP toxicity to P. promelas was also tested in 30 day chronic tests at pH 7.0, 7.8 and 8.6. Survival in these tests was affected by pH similarly to the acute tests. Growth also was less severely affected at higher pH.

  18. KEPONE (TRADEMARK): CHRONIC EFFECTS ON EMBRYO, FRY, JUVENILE, AND ADULT SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS ('CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS')

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the toxicity of Kepone to, and uptake by embryo, fry, juvenile, and adult sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) using intermittent-flow toxicity tests. Concentrations of Kepone and percentage of adult fish surviving in a 28-day exposure were--Control, 95...

  19. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  20. [Juvenile psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xin-Ying; Liu, Dong-Ming; Liu, Xiang-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    A case of juvenile psoriatic arthritis in a 12 year-old boy was reported. The patient had a history of one and half a year of bilateral heel pain, followed by pain in the right knee and ankle and right hip joint. He developed psoriatic lesions affecting his nails and skin. He had increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) contents. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27 was detected but serum rheumatoid factor was not in the patient. A skin biopsy revealed psoriasis and ultrasonography demonstrated synovitis in right knee and ankle. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis was diagnosed based on his physical, laboratory and skin biopsy findings. A treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and sulfasalazine produced no effect. Leflunomide in conjunction with anti-TNF biologic agents (Etanercept) was administered, followed by symptomatic improvement 2 weeks later. PMID:17706035

  1. Enhanced Generalization of Auditory Conditioned Fear in Juvenile Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Wataru; Pan, Bing-Xing; Yang, Chao; Thakur, Siddarth; Morozov, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    Increased emotionality is a characteristic of human adolescence, but its animal models are limited. Here we report that generalization of auditory conditioned fear between a conditional stimulus (CS+) and a novel auditory stimulus is stronger in 4-5-wk-old mice (juveniles) than in their 9-10-wk-old counterparts (adults), whereas nonassociative…

  2. Use of mechanism-based and exposure biomarkers to assess fumonisin toxicity in humans, animals and plants and efficacy of processing methods using mechanism-based bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Fumonisins (FB) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticillioides and several other Fusarium species. They are known causes of animal and plant diseases and suspected causes of human diseases where maize is consumed in large amounts and diets are likely to be deficient in critical nut...

  3. Juvenile Toxicology: Relevance and Challenges for Toxicologists and Pathologists

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Amera K.; Catlin, Natasha R.; Quist, Erin M.; Steinbach, Thomas J.; Dixon, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) Education Committee and the STP Reproductive Special Interest Group held a North Carolina regional meeting entitled, “Juvenile Toxicology: Relevance and Challenges for Toxicologists and Pathologists” on March 13, 2015, at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Toxicology Program in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The purpose of this regional meeting was to familiarize attendees with the topic of juvenile toxicity testing and discuss its relevance to clinical pediatric medicine, regulatory perspectives, challenges of appropriate study design confronted by toxicologists, and challenges of histopathologic examination and interpretation of juvenile tissues faced by pathologists. The 1-day meeting was a success with over 60 attendees representing industry, government, research organizations, and academia. PMID:26220944

  4. Juvenile Toxicology: Relevance and Challenges for Toxicologists and Pathologists.

    PubMed

    Remick, Amera K; Catlin, Natasha R; Quist, Erin M; Steinbach, Thomas J; Dixon, Darlene

    2015-12-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) Education Committee and the STP Reproductive Special Interest Group held a North Carolina regional meeting entitled, "Juvenile Toxicology: Relevance and Challenges for Toxicologists and Pathologists" on March 13, 2015, at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Toxicology Program in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The purpose of this regional meeting was to familiarize attendees with the topic of juvenile toxicity testing and discuss its relevance to clinical pediatric medicine, regulatory perspectives, challenges of appropriate study design confronted by toxicologists, and challenges of histopathologic examination and interpretation of juvenile tissues faced by pathologists. The 1-day meeting was a success with over 60 attendees representing industry, government, research organizations, and academia. PMID:26220944

  5. Acute and sub-chronic (28 days) oral toxicity evaluation of tincture Baccharis trimera (Less) Backer in male and female rodent animals.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Andreia R H; Reginato, Fernanda Z; Guex, Camille G; Figueredo, Kássia C; da C Araldi, Isabel C; de Freitas, Robson B; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Mazzanti, Cinthia Melazzo de Andrade; Hübscher, Gilberti H; de F Bauermann, Liliane

    2016-02-01

    The infusion of Baccharis trimera (Less) DC, popularly known as "carqueja" (broom), is popularly used in the treatment of hepatic and digestive problems. In this study, we evaluated the acute and sub-chronic oral toxicities of B. trimera tincture on male and female Wistar rats according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, guidelines 423 e 407, respectively). The B. trimera tincture was administered by oral gavage in a single dose (2000 mg/kg) in doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg daily for 28 days. Blood was collected to analyze hematological and biochemical parameters. Kidneys and liver were homogenized to determine lipid peroxidation and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activities. In acute treatment, tincture did not induce any signs of toxicity or mortality. Daily oral administration produced no significant changes in the hematological and biochemical parameters, except for the hepatic enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) that showed a reduction in both sexes. Moreover, the B. trimera tincture did not increase lipid peroxidation or affected ALA-D and CAT activities. In conclusion, the tincture of B. trimera may be considered relatively safe in this protocol. PMID:26522812

  6. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on growth and craniofacial proportion

    SciTech Connect

    Schunior, A.; Zengel, A.E.; Mullenix, P.J.; Tarbell, N.J.; Howes, A.; Tassinari, M.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Many long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have short stature, as well as craniofacial and dental abnormalities, as side effects of central nervous system prophylactic therapy. An animal model is presented to assess these adverse effects on growth. Cranial irradiation (1000 cGy) with and without prednisolone (18 mg/kg i.p.) and methotrexate (2 mg/kg i.p.) was administered to 17- and 18-day-old Sprague-Dawley male and female rats. Animals were weighed 3 times/week. Final body weight and body length were measured at 150 days of age. Femur length and craniofacial dimensions were measured directly from the bones, using calipers. For all exposed groups there was a permanent suppression of weight gain with no catch-up growth or normal adolescent growth spurt. Body length was reduced for all treated groups, as were the ratios of body weight to body length and cranial length to body length. Animals subjected to cranial irradiation exhibited microcephaly, whereas those who received a combination of radiation and chemotherapy demonstrated altered craniofacial proportions in addition to microcephaly. Changes in growth patterns and skeletal proportions exhibited sexually dimorphic characteristics. The results indicate that cranial irradiation is a major factor in the growth failure in exposed rats, but chemotherapeutic agents contribute significantly to the outcome of growth and craniofacial dimensions.

  7. Juvenile Mentoring Program: A Progress Review. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotney, Laurence C.; Mertinko, Elizabeth; Lange, James; Baker, Tara Kelley

    The greatest support offered by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention for youth mentoring has been through the Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP), which provides one-to-one mentoring for youth at risk of delinquency, gang involvement, educational failure, or dropping out of school. Information on JUMP has been collected through…

  8. Transgenic mouse lines expressing rat AH receptor variants - A new animal model for research on AH receptor function and dioxin toxicity mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo

    2009-04-15

    Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W) rats are exceptionally resistant to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity mainly because of their mutated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In H/W rats, altered splicing of the AHR mRNA generates two AHR proteins: deletion (DEL) and insertion (INS) variants, with the INS isoform being predominantly expressed. To gain further insight into their functional properties, cDNAs of these and rat wild-type (rWT) isoform were transferred into C57BL/6J-derived mice by microinjection. The endogenous mouse AHR was eliminated by selective crossing with Ahr-null mice. A single mouse line was obtained for each of the three constructs. The AHR mRNA levels in tissues were generally close to those of C57BL/6 mice in INS and DEL mice and somewhat higher in rWT mice; in testis, however, all 3 constructs exhibited marked overexpression. The transgenic mouse lines were phenotypically normal except for increased testis weight. Induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by TCDD occurred similarly to that in C57BL/6 mice, but there tended to be a correlation with AHR concentrations, especially in testis. In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, the transgenics did not display any major gender difference in susceptibility to the acute lethality and hepatotoxicity of TCDD; rWT mice were highly sensitive, DEL mice moderately resistant and INS mice highly resistant. Co-expression of mouse AHR and rWT resulted in augmented sensitivity to TCDD and abolished the natural resistance of female C57BL/6 mice, whereas mice co-expressing mouse AHR and INS were resistant. Thus, these transgenic mouse lines provide a novel promising tool for molecular studies on dioxin toxicity and AHR function.

  9. Juvenile psittacine environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth; Rupley, Agnes E

    2015-05-01

    Environmental enrichment is of great import to the emotional, intellectual, and physical development of the juvenile psittacine and their success in the human home environment. Five major types of enrichment include social, occupational, physical, sensory, and nutritional. Occupational enrichment includes exercise and psychological enrichment. Physical enrichment includes the cage and accessories and the external home environment. Sensory enrichment may be visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or taste oriented. Nutritional enrichment includes variations in appearance, type, and frequency of diet, and treats, novelty, and foraging. Two phases of the preadult period deserve special enrichment considerations: the development of autonomy and puberty. PMID:25902270

  10. Juvenile Justice in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankovic, Joanne, Ed.; And Others

    Producing a much-needed organized body of literature about rural juvenile justice, 14 papers (largely from the 1979 National Symposium on Rural Justice) are organized to identify current issues, identify forces causing changes in current systems, review programs responding to rural juvenile justice problems, and provide planning models to aid…

  11. Psychopathology in Female Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Angela; Howie, Pauline; Starling, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Background: The aim was to document the spectrum of present and lifetime psychological disorders in female juvenile offenders, and to examine the relations between mental health status and socio-demographic, family and trauma variables. Method: One hundred juvenile offenders were matched with a comparison group of 100 females on age and…

  12. Iatrogenic Effect of Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatti, Uberto; Tremblay, Richard E.; Vitaro, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Background: The present study uses data from a community sample of 779 low-SES boys to investigate whether intervention by the juvenile justice system is determined, at least in part, by particular individual, familial and social conditions, and whether intervention by the juvenile courts during adolescence increases involvement in adult crime.…

  13. Juvenile Crime. Opposing Viewpoints Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, A. E., Ed.

    Books in the Opposing Viewpoints Series present debates about current issues that can be used to teach critical reading and thinking skills. The variety of opinions expressed in this collection of articles and book excerpts explores many aspects of juvenile crime. It is a commonly held view that the number of crimes committed by juveniles is…

  14. Mental Illness and Juvenile Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Lee A.; Washington, Aryssa

    2016-01-01

    Within the past decade, reliance on the juvenile justice system to meet the needs of juvenile offenders with mental health concerns has increased. Due to this tendency, research has been conducted on the effectiveness of various intervention and treatment programs/approaches with varied success. Recent literature suggests that because of interrelated problems involved for youth in the juvenile justice system with mental health issues, a dynamic system of care that extends beyond mere treatment within the juvenile justice system is the most promising. The authors provide a brief overview of the extent to which delinquency and mental illness co-occur; why treatment for these individuals requires a system of care; intervention models; and the juvenile justice systems role in providing mental health services to delinquent youth. Current and future advancements and implications for practitioners are provided. PMID:26901213

  15. Mental Illness and Juvenile Offenders.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Lee A; Washington, Aryssa

    2016-02-01

    Within the past decade, reliance on the juvenile justice system to meet the needs of juvenile offenders with mental health concerns has increased. Due to this tendency, research has been conducted on the effectiveness of various intervention and treatment programs/approaches with varied success. Recent literature suggests that because of interrelated problems involved for youth in the juvenile justice system with mental health issues, a dynamic system of care that extends beyond mere treatment within the juvenile justice system is the most promising. The authors provide a brief overview of the extent to which delinquency and mental illness co-occur; why treatment for these individuals requires a system of care; intervention models; and the juvenile justice systems role in providing mental health services to delinquent youth. Current and future advancements and implications for practitioners are provided. PMID:26901213

  16. Effects of juvenile hormone on eggs and adults of the cat flea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    PubMed

    Meola, R W; Dean, S R; Bhaskaran, G

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile hormone III plays a major role in regulating feeding and reproduction in the adult cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché). Both blood consumption and egg production increased in a dose-dependent manner up to a maximum at 1,250 ppm when fleas were continuously exposed to concentrations up to 12,500 ppm juvenile hormone. Histological studies demonstrated that juvenile hormone III also stimulated cellular differentiation of salivary gland epithelia, midgut epithelia, and fat body cells, enhancing the ability of the adult flea to digest blood and synthesize vitellogenins for the maturing oocytes. In unfed fleas, exposure of adults to concentrations of > or = 1,000 ppm juvenile hormone III applied to filter paper resulted in membrane lysis and destruction of salivary gland and midgut epithelial cells, fat body cells, and ovarian tissue. Unlike juvenile hormone mimics, which have potent ovicidal effects in fleas, juvenile hormone had little effect in preventing egg hatch; 58% of the eggs laid by fleas treated with 12,500 ppm juvenile hormone III hatched, and a concentration of 30,000 ppm was required to reduce hatch to 2% in untreated eggs exposed to treated filter paper for 2 h. Compared with the juvenile hormone mimic pyriproxyfen, juvenile hormone III was less toxic to fed adult fleas. However, at a concentration of 12,500 ppm, juvenile hormone killed approximately 45% of the adults and caused autolysis and yolk resorption in the developing oocytes. Thus, at high concentrations, juvenile hormone appears to have a pharmacological effect on fleas, which is highly unusual in insects. PMID:11268696

  17. Towards An Advanced Graphene-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent: Sub-acute Toxicity and Efficacy Studies in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy; Hoang, Dung Minh; Mullick Chowdhury, Sayan; Lee, Stephen; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Wadghiri, Youssef Z.; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical Gd3+-based T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) are suboptimal or unsuitable, especially at higher magnetic fields (>1.5 Tesla) for advanced MRI applications such as blood pool, cellular and molecular imaging. Herein, towards the goal of developing a safe and more efficacious high field T1 MRI CA for these applications, we report the sub-acute toxicity and contrast enhancing capabilities of a novel nanoparticle MRI CA comprising of manganese (Mn2+) intercalated graphene nanoparticles functionalized with dextran (hereafter, Mangradex) in rodents. Sub-acute toxicology performed on rats intravenously injected with Mangradex at 1, 50 or 100 mg/kg dosages 3 times per week for three weeks indicated that dosages ≤50 mg/kg could serve as potential diagnostic doses. Whole body 7 Tesla MRI performed on mice injected with Mangradex at a potential diagnostic dose (25 mg/kg or 455 nanomoles Mn2+/kg; ~2 orders of magnitude lower than the paramagnetic ion concentration in a typical clinical dose) showed persistent (up to at least 2 hours) contrast enhancement in the vascular branches (Mn2+ concentration in blood at steady state = 300 ppb, per voxel = 45 femtomoles). The results lay the foundations for further development of Mangradex as a vascular and cellular/ molecular MRI probe. PMID:26625867

  18. Enhanced ubiquitin-dependent degradation by Nedd4 protects against α-synuclein accumulation and toxicity in animal models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sian E.; Hallett, Penelope J.; Moens, Thomas; Smith, Gaynor; Mangano, Emily; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Liu, Ji-Long; Isacson, Ole; Tofaris, George K.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by accumulation and misfolding of α-synuclein. Although the level of α-synuclein in neurons is fundamentally linked to the onset of neurodegeneration, multiple pathways have been implicated in its degradation, and it remains unclear which are the critical ubiquitination enzymes that protect against α-synuclein accumulation in vivo. The ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 targets α-synuclein to the endosomal–lysosomal pathway in cultured cells. Here we asked whether Nedd4-mediated degradation protects against α-synuclein-induced toxicity in the Drosophila and rodent models of Parkinson's disease. We show that overexpression of Nedd4 can rescue the degenerative phenotype from ectopic expression of α-synuclein in the Drosophila eye. Overexpressed Nedd4 in the Drosophila brain prevented the α-synuclein-induced locomotor defect whereas reduction in endogenous Nedd4 by RNAi led to worsening motor function and increased loss of dopaminergic neurons. Accordingly, AAV-mediated expression of wild-type but not the catalytically inactive Nedd4 decreased the α-synuclein-induced dopaminergic cell loss in the rat substantia nigra and reduced α-synuclein accumulation. Collectively, our data in two evolutionarily distant model organisms strongly suggest that Nedd4 is a modifier of α-synuclein pathobiology and thus a potential target for neuroprotective therapies. PMID:24388974

  19. Use of neomysis mercedis (crustacea: mysidacea) for estuarine toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, O.M.; Fujimura, R.W.; Finlayson, B.J. )

    1993-03-01

    The mysid Neomysis mercedis was examined as a test organism for use in acute toxicity tests at intermediate salinities characteristic of estuarine waters. Several sensitive invertebrate species are available for marine assessments (mysids) and freshwater tests (cladocerans), but few are available for estuarine toxicity tests. Observations in the laboratory indicate that Neomysis mercedis can be reared successfully at a temperature of 17[degrees]C, a salinity of 2%, and a population density less than 5/L. Brine shrimp nauplii Artemia salina, algae, and commercial foods were used to sustain mysid cultures. Neomysis mercedis is vivaparous and can complete its life cycle in 3-4 months. Neomysis mercedis is as sensitive as or more sensitive to toxicants than the marine mysid Mysidopsis bahia and the freshwater cladocerans Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Simocephalus serrulatus. The mean 96-h LC50 values (concentrations lethal to half the test animals) for N. mercedis, in increasing order, were 0.20 [mu]g/L for thiobencarb, and for malathion, 14 [mu]g/L for carbofuran, 150 [mu]g/L for copper sulfate, 280 [mu]g/L for thiobencarb, and 1,600 [mu]g/L for molinate. Neonates (5 d postrelease) were generally more sensitive than older juveniles. Coefficients of variation (100[center dot]SD/mean) of LC50 values varied from 21 to 35%. 37 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Maternal immune activation increases seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Zhang, Xin-Ting; Li, Jun; Yu, Lin; Wang, Ji-Wen; Lei, Ge-Fei; Sun, Ruo-Peng; Li, Bao-Min

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological data suggest a relationship between maternal infection and a high incidence of childhood epilepsy in offspring. However, there is little experimental evidence that links maternal infection with later seizure susceptibility in juvenile offspring. Here, we asked whether maternal immune challenge during pregnancy can alter seizure susceptibility and seizure-associated brain damage in adolescence. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or normal saline (NS) on gestational days 15 and 16. At postnatal day 21, seizure susceptibility to kainic acid (KA) was evaluated in male offspring. Four groups were studied, including normal control (NS-NS), prenatal infection (LPS-NS), juvenile seizure (NS-KA), and "two-hit" (LPS-KA) groups. Our results demonstrated that maternal LPS exposure caused long-term reactive astrogliosis and increased seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring. Compared to the juvenile seizure group, animals in the "two-hit" group showed exaggerated astrogliosis, followed by worsened spatial learning ability in adulthood. In addition, prenatal immune challenge alone led to spatial learning impairment in offspring but had no effect on anxiety. These data suggest that prenatal immune challenge causes a long-term increase in juvenile seizure susceptibility and exacerbates seizure-induced brain injury, possibly by priming astroglia. PMID:25982885

  1. Cadmium Toxicity and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bernhoft, Robin A.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable toxicity with destructive impact on most organ systems. It is widely distributed in humans, the chief sources of contamination being cigarette smoke, welding, and contaminated food and beverages. Toxic impacts are discussed and appear to be proportional to body burden of cadmium. Detoxification of cadmium with EDTA and other chelators is possible and has been shown to be therapeutically beneficial in humans and animals when done using established protocols. PMID:23844395

  2. Miranda Rights: Implications for Juveniles with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Barrett, David E.; Losinski, Mickey L.

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency in the United States has been a persistent concern for decades. Consequently, because more juveniles have been referred to juvenile court and the arrest rate of preteen offenders has increased to almost three times that of older youth, the persistent and often controversial issue of the capacity of juvenile offenders to waive…

  3. Toxicity of o,p′-DDE to medaka d-rR strain after a one-time embryonic exposure by in ovo nanoinjection: An early through juvenile life cycle assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villalobos, Sergio A.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Pastva, Stephanie D.; Blankenship, Alan L.; Meadows, John C.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Giesy, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicity of o,p???-DDE (1,1-dichloro-2-(p-chlorophenyl)-2-(o- chlorophenyl) ethylene) was evaluated in embryos of medaka (Oryzias latipes) following a one time exposure via nanoinjection. Medaka eggs (early gastrula) were injected with 0.5 nl of triolein (vehicle control) or 0.5 nl of 4 graded doses (0.0005-0.5 ng/egg) of o,p???-DDE in triolein. Embryos were allowed to develop, and fry were reared. Embryonic survival was monitored daily during the first 10 d until hatching and thereafter, on a weekly basis until day 59, at which time the fish were monitored for sexual maturity until day 107. In general, o,p???-DDE caused a dose- and time-dependent mortality. No changes in mortality were observed between the last two time points (day 38 and 59, respectively), and hence a 59 day-LD50 of 346 ng o,p???-DDE/egg was derived from the linear dose-response relationship. Prior to late stage death, only isolated cases of cardiovascular lesions and spinal deformities were observed, but were not dose-dependent. The lowest observable adverse effect level (LOAEL), based on upper 95% CI for regression line=0.0018 mg/kg, and the LOAEL based on exposure doses=0.5 mg/kg. Likewise, the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) based on linear extrapolation to 100% survival=0.0000388 mg/kg, while the NOAEL based on exposure doses=0.05 mg/kg. The nanoinjection medaka model has potential in the study of hormonally active compounds in the environment. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Protective role of a methanolic extract of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) against Pb toxicity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings: beneficial effects for a plant of a nutraceutical used with animals.

    PubMed

    Lamhamdi, Mostafa; Bakrim, Ahmed; Bouayad, Noureddin; Aarab, Ahmed; Lafont, René

    2013-10-01

    Spinach extracts contain powerful natural antioxidants and have been used to improve the response of animal cells to various stress factors. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of a methanolic extract of spinach (SE) used at two concentrations (21.7 and 217 ppm) on the growth, certain enzymes and antioxidant systems in wheat seedlings under lead stress. When wheat seedlings were grown for 7 days in a solution containing Pb(NO3)2 (3 mM), germination and growth were impaired, while signs of oxidative stress were observed. SE (217 ppm) pretreatment was able to protect seedlings from Pb toxicity by both reducing Pb uptake and Pb-induced oxidative stress. As a consequence, almost normal germination, elongation, biomass and α-amylase activity were restored by SE (217 ppm) pretreatment of wheat seedlings, in spite of the presence of Pb. Our results support the protective role and the antioxidant effect of SE against Pb. These results show an amazing similarity to the effects of SE in animals, which suggests that providing "nutraceuticals" to plants could improve their "health" status. PMID:23645001

  5. Multi-scale biomarker evaluation of the toxicity of a commercial azo dye (Disperse Red 1) in an animal model, the freshwater cnidarian Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Laetitia; Pech, Nicolas; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Moreau, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Acute (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) and chronic (7 days) tests have been performed to evaluate the effects of the commercial azo dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) using various biomarkers in the freshwater invertebrate Hydra attenuata. Morphological changes have been selected to calculate ecotoxicological thresholds for sublethal and lethal DR1 concentrations. A multinomial logistic model showed that the probability of each morphological stage occurrence was function of concentration, time and interaction between both. Results of oxidative balance parameter measurements (72 h and 7 days) suggest that polyps set up defense mechanisms to limit lipid peroxidation caused by DR1. DR1 exposure at hormetic concentrations induces increase of asexual reproductive rates. This result suggests (1) an impact on the fitness-related phenotypical traits and (2) trade-offs between reproduction and maintenance to allow the population to survive harsher conditions. Changes in serotonin immuno-labeling in polyps showing alterations in feeding behavior suggest that chronic DR1 exposure impaired neuronal processes related to ingesting behavior in H. attenuata. This ecotoxicity study sheds light on the possible serotonin function in Hydra model and reports for the first time that serotonin could play a significant role in feeding behavior. This study used a multi-scale biomarker approach investigating biochemical, morphological, reproductive and behavioral endpoints in Hydra attenuata. This organism is proposed for a pertinent animal model to assess ecotoxicological impact of pollutant mixtures in freshwater environment. PMID:27019466

  6. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Makhasana, Jashika Adil Shroff; Kulkarni, Meena A; Vaze, Suhas; Shroff, Adil Sarosh

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor arising predominantly in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. It is an aggressive neoplasm and shows a propensity for destructive local spread often extending to the base of the skull and into the cranium. Clinically, however, it is obscure with painless, progressive unilateral nasal obstruction being the common presenting symptom with or without epistaxis and rhinorrhea. Diagnosis of JNA is made by complete history, clinical examination, radiography, nasal endoscopy and by using specialized imaging techniques such as arteriography, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathology reveals a fibrocellular stroma with spindle cells and haphazard arrangement of collagen interspersed with an irregular vascular pattern. A case report of JNA with rare intra-oral manifestation in a 17-year-old male patient is presented in the article. JNA being an aggressive tumor may recur posttreatment. Thus, early diagnosis, accurate staging, and adequate treatment are essential in the management of this lesion. PMID:27601836

  7. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Makhasana, Jashika Adil Shroff; Kulkarni, Meena A; Vaze, Suhas; Shroff, Adil Sarosh

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor arising predominantly in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. It is an aggressive neoplasm and shows a propensity for destructive local spread often extending to the base of the skull and into the cranium. Clinically, however, it is obscure with painless, progressive unilateral nasal obstruction being the common presenting symptom with or without epistaxis and rhinorrhea. Diagnosis of JNA is made by complete history, clinical examination, radiography, nasal endoscopy and by using specialized imaging techniques such as arteriography, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathology reveals a fibrocellular stroma with spindle cells and haphazard arrangement of collagen interspersed with an irregular vascular pattern. A case report of JNA with rare intra-oral manifestation in a 17-year-old male patient is presented in the article. JNA being an aggressive tumor may recur posttreatment. Thus, early diagnosis, accurate staging, and adequate treatment are essential in the management of this lesion. PMID:27601836

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential. PMID:24808703

  9. Enuresis, Firesetting, and Cruelty to Animals: Does the Ego Triad Show Predictive Validity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavkin, Michael Lawrence

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis tested in this study was that the presence of enuresis and cruelty to animals in juvenile firesetters would be significantly related to recidivistic firesetting. No relationship was found between firesetting recidivism and enuresis. However, juveniles who were identified as being cruel to animals were more likely to engage in…

  10. BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY OF TRIALKYLTIN COMPOUNDS: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triethyltin (TET) and trimethyltin (TMT) are neurotoxic organotin compounds which produce different patterns of toxicity in adult animals. Exposure to TET produces behavioral toxicity (decreased motor activity, grip strength, operant response rate and startle response amplitude) ...

  11. Maturity-related changes in venom toxicity of the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon leopoldi.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Kim N; Klingelhöfer, Ines; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Morlock, Gertrud; Wilke, Thomas

    2014-12-15

    Aquatic venomous animals such as stingrays represent a largely untapped source for venom-based drug development. However, the major challenge for a potential drug development pipeline is the high inter- and intraspecific variability in toxicity and venom composition. As of today, little is known about maturity-driven changes in these traits in stingrays. The present study investigates the differences in toxicity and venom composition in different maturity stages of the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon leopoldi. This species can be found in the Xingú River basin (Brazil), where it mainly feeds on invertebrates, while being predated by other stingrays or large catfishes. P. leopoldi, as commonly known for stingrays, can cause severe injuries with the venomous dentine spine located at its tails. The toxicity of tissue extracts of juvenile and mature specimens was recorded on a myoblast cell culture bioassay. Venom composition and bioactivity of compounds were analyzed with planar chromatography linked to an Aliivibrio fischeri bioassay. Results revealed a decrease in venom toxicity during maturation, but no changes in venom composition. These findings may indicate that toxicity in mature specimens becomes evolutionary less important, probably due to a decrease in predation pressure. PMID:25449099

  12. Juvenile Angiofibroma: Evolution of Management

    PubMed Central

    Nicolai, Piero; Schreiber, Alberto; Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma is a rare benign lesion originating from the pterygopalatine fossa with distinctive epidemiologic features and growth patterns. The typical patient is an adolescent male with a clinical history of recurrent epistaxis and nasal obstruction. Although the use of nonsurgical therapies is described in the literature, surgery is currently considered the ideal treatment for juvenile angiofibroma. Refinement in preoperative embolization has provided significant reduction of complications and intraoperative bleeding with minimal risk of residual disease. During the last decade, an endoscopic technique has been extensively adopted as a valid alternative to external approaches in the management of small-intermediate size juvenile angiofibromas. Herein, we review the evolution in the management of juvenile angiofibroma with particular reference to recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22164185

  13. Examining the Effects of External or Internal Radiation Exposure of Juvenile Mice on Late Morbidity after Infection with Influenza A.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ravi S; Johnston, Carl J; Groves, Angela M; DeDiego, Marta L; St Martin, Joe; Reed, Christina; Hernady, Eric; Miller, Jen-Nie; Love, Tanzy; Finkelstein, Jacob N; Williams, Jacqueline P

    2015-07-01

    A number of investigators have suggested that exposure to low-dose radiation may pose a potentially serious health risk. However, the majority of these studies have focused on the short-term rather than long-term effects of exposure to fixed source radiation, and few have examined the effects of internal contamination. Additionally, very few studies have focused on exposure in juveniles, when organs are still developing and could be more sensitive to the toxic effects of radiation. To specifically address whether early-life radiation injury may affect long-term immune competence, we studied 14-day-old juvenile pups that were either 5 Gy total-body irradiated or injected internally with 50 μCi soluble (137)Cs, then infected with influenza A virus at 26 weeks after exposure. After influenza infection, all groups demonstrated immediate weight loss. We found that externally irradiated, infected animals failed to recover weight relative to age-matched infected controls, but internally (137)Cs contaminated and infected animals had a weight recovery with a similar rate and degree as controls. Externally and internally irradiated mice demonstrated reduced levels of club cell secretory protein (CCSP) message in their lungs after influenza infection. The externally irradiated group did not recover CCSP expression even at the two-week time point after infection. Although the antibody response and viral titers did not appear to be affected by either radiation modality, there was a slight increase in monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 expression in the lungs of externally irradiated animals 14 days after influenza infection, with increased cellular infiltration present. Notably, an increase in the number of regulatory T cells was seen in the mediastinal lymph nodes of irradiated mice relative to uninfected mice. These data confirm the hypothesis that early-life irradiation may have long-term consequences on the immune system, leading to an altered antiviral response

  14. Examining the Effects of External or Internal Radiation Exposure of Juvenile Mice on Late Morbidity after Infection with Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ravi S.; Johnston, Carl J.; Groves, Angela M.; DeDiego, Marta L.; St Martin, Joe; Reed, Christina; Hernady, Eric; Miller, Jen-nie; Love, Tanzy; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Williams, Jacqueline P.

    2015-01-01

    A number of investigators have suggested that exposure to low-dose radiation may pose a potentially serious health risk. However, the majority of these studies have focused on the short-term rather than long-term effects of exposure to fixed source radiation, and few have examined the effects of internal contamination. Additionally, very few studies have focused on exposure in juveniles, when organs are still developing and could be more sensitive to the toxic effects of radiation. To specifically address whether early-life radiation injury may affect long-term immune competence, we studied 14-day-old juvenile pups that were either 5 Gy total-body irradiated or injected internally with 50 μCi soluble 137Cs, then infected with influenza A virus at 26 weeks after exposure. After influenza infection, all groups demonstrated immediate weight loss. We found that externally irradiated, infected animals failed to recover weight relative to age-matched infected controls, but internally 137Cs contaminated and infected animals had a weight recovery with a similar rate and degree as controls. Externally and internally irradiated mice demonstrated reduced levels of club cell secretory protein (CCSP) message in their lungs after influenza infection. The externally irradiated group did not recover CCSP expression even at the two-week time point after infection. Although the antibody response and viral titers did not appear to be affected by either radiation modality, there was a slight increase in monocyte chemo-attractant protein (MCP)-1 expression in the lungs of externally irradiated animals 14 days after influenza infection, with increased cellular infiltration present. Notably, an increase in the number of regulatory T cells was seen in the mediastinal lymph nodes of irradiated mice relative to uninfected mice. These data confirm the hypothesis that early-life irradiation may have long-term consequences on the immune system, leading to an altered antiviral response. PMID

  15. 4-H PetPALS Juvenile Diversion Program Supports At-Risk Youth and Seniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Connie L.; Miller, Lucinda B.

    2014-01-01

    The 4-H PetPALS Juvenile Diversion Program provides a partnership opportunity with Extension and the juvenile court system to positively impact lives of at-risk youth. At-risk youth are taught by 4-H PetPALS adult volunteer leaders and 4-H PetPALS members to value and respect the human-animal bond, as well as to understand and empathize with…

  16. Standardization of the juvenile mussel bioassay: Dietary requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, L.W.; Klaine, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    Optimizing a feeding regime is essential for establishing juvenile mussels (Utterbackia imbecillus) as a standard toxicity test organism. Although very little is known about their dietary requirements, these juveniles appear to derive adequate nourishment for survival and growth in batch culture from a diet of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris and Ankistrodesmus falcatus. However, results of previous studies have suggested that mussel diet in culture prior to exposure influences the sensitivity of these organisms to aqueous copper and cadmium exposure. Dietary components included three species of live algae (A. falcatus, C. vulgaris, and Scenedesmus quadricauda) and a suspension of rehydrated, dried Spirulina sp. Less than 24-hr laboratory cultured juveniles were fed all four components or combinations of three algal species daily to determine which mixtures promoted maximal growth. Preliminary data showed growth of control mussels receiving no food was comparable to those organisms fed all four algal species in combination. The greatest increase in shell length of juvenile mussels over 6 days was obtained with the tri-algal combination of A. falcatus, C. vulgaris, and S. quadricauda. The mixture resulting in the least growth included A. falcatus, S. quadricauda, and dried Spirulina sp.

  17. Managing juvenile Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Quarrell, Oliver W J; Nance, Martha A; Nopoulos, Peggy; Paulsen, Jane S; Smith, Jonathan A; Squitieri, Ferdinando

    2013-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a well-recognized progressive neurodegenerative disorder that follows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Onset is insidious and can occur at almost any age, but most commonly the diagnosis is made between the ages of 35 and 55 years. Onset ≤20 years of age is classified as juvenile HD (JHD). This age-based definition is arbitrary but remains convenient. There is overlap between the clinical pathological and genetic features seen in JHD and more traditional adult-onset HD. Nonetheless, the frequent predominance of bradykinesia and dystonia early in the course of the illness, more frequent occurrence of epilepsy and myoclonus, more widespread pathology, and larger genetic lesion means that the distinction is still relevant. In addition, the relative rarity of JHD means that the clinician managing the patient is often doing so for the first time. Management is, at best, symptomatic and supportive with few or no evidence-based guidelines. In this article, the authors will review what is known of the condition and present some suggestions based on their experience. PMID:24416077

  18. Ofloxacin induces apoptosis in microencapsulated juvenile rabbit chondrocytes by caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Zhiguo; Cao Xiaojuan; Peng Shuangqing Wang Changyong; Li Qianqian; Wang Yimei; Liu Mifeng

    2008-01-15

    Quinolones (QNs)-induced arthropathy is an important toxic effect in immature animals leading to restriction of their therapeutic use in pediatrics. However, the exact mechanism still remains unclear. Recently, we have demonstrated that ofloxacin, a typical QN, induces apoptosis of alginate microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes by disturbing the {beta}{sub 1} integrin functions and inactivating the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. In this study, we extend our initial observations to further elucidate the mechanism(s) of ofloxacin-induced apoptosis by utilizing specific caspase inhibitors. Pretreatment with both caspase-9-specific inhibitor zLEHD-fmk and caspase-8 inhibitor zIETD-fmk attenuated ofloxacin-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3 of chondrocyte in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescent dye staining, enzyme activity assay and immunoblotting. Furthermore, the activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3 stimulated by ofloxacin was significantly inhibited in the presence of zIETD-fmk while pretreatment with zLEHD-fmk only blocked the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Ofloxacin also stimulated a concentration-dependent translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol and a decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, which was completely inhibited by zIETD-fmk. In addition, ofloxacin was found to increase the level of Bax, tBid, p53 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, The current results indicate that the caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway is primarily involved in the ofloxacin-induced apoptosis of microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes.

  19. Age-related thermal response: the cellular resilience of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Clark, M S; Thorne, M A S; Burns, G; Peck, L S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding species' responses to environmental challenges is key to predicting future biodiversity. However, there is currently little data on how developmental stages affect responses and also whether universal gene biomarkers to environmental stress can be identified both within and between species. Using the Antarctic clam, Laternula elliptica, as a model species, we examined both the tissue-specific and age-related (juvenile versus mature adult) gene expression response to acute non-lethal warming (12 h at 3 °C). In general, there was a relatively muted response to this sub-lethal thermal challenge when the expression profiles of treated animals, of either age, were compared with those of 0 °C controls, with none of the "classical" stress response genes up-regulated. The expression profiles were very variable between the tissues of all animals, irrespective of age with no single transcript emerging as a universal biomarker of thermal stress. However, when the expression profiles of treated animals of the different age groups were directly compared, a very different pattern emerged. The profiles of the younger animals showed significant up-regulation of chaperone and antioxidant transcripts when compared with those of the older animals. Thus, the younger animals showed evidence of a more robust cellular response to warming. These data substantiate previous physiological analyses showing a more resilient juvenile population. PMID:26364303

  20. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  1. A New Mass Mortality of Juvenile Protoceratops and Size-Segregated Aggregation Behaviour in Juvenile Non-Avian Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Hone, David W. E.; Farke, Andrew A.; Watabe, Mahito; Shigeru, Suzuki; Tsogtbaatar, Khishigjav

    2014-01-01

    Background Monodominant bonebeds are a relatively common occurrence for non-avian dinosaurs, and have been used to infer associative, and potentially genuinely social, behavior. Previously known assemblages are characterized as either mixed size-classes (juvenile and adult-sized specimens together) or single size-classes of individuals (only juveniles or only adult-sized individuals within the assemblage). In the latter case, it is generally unknown if these kinds of size-segregated aggregations characterize only a particular size stage or represent aggregations that happened at all size stages. Ceratopsians (“horned dinosaurs”) are known from both types of assemblages. Methods/Principal Findings Here we describe a new specimen of the ceratopsian dinosaur Protoceratops andrewsi, Granger and Gregory 1923 from Mongolia representing an aggregation of four mid-sized juvenile animals. In conjunction with existing specimens of groups of P. andrewsi that includes size-clustered aggregations of young juveniles and adult-sized specimens, this new material provides evidence for some degree of size-clustered aggregation behaviour in Protoceratops throughout ontogeny. This continuity of size-segregated (and presumably age-clustered) aggregation is previously undocumented in non-avian dinosaurs. Conclusions The juvenile group fills a key gap in the available information on aggregations in younger ceratopsians. Although we support the general hypothesis that many non-avian dinosaurs were gregarious and even social animals, we caution that evidence for sociality has been overstated and advocate a more conservative interpretation of some data of ‘sociality’ in dinosaurs. PMID:25426957

  2. Amazing Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Kuwari, Najat Saad

    2007-01-01

    "Animals" is a three-part lesson plan for young learners with a zoo animal theme. The first lesson is full of activities to describe animals, with Simon Says, guessing games, and learning stations. The second lesson is about desert animals, but other types of animals could be chosen depending on student interest. This lesson teaches…

  3. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile Paget disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... juvenile Paget disease: Genetic Testing Registry: Hyperphosphatasemia with bone disease These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ... familial osteoectasia hyperostosis corticalis deformans juvenilis hyperphosphatasemia ... idiopathic idiopathic hyperphosphatasia JPD juvenile Paget's ...

  4. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  5. Variation in animal response to different toxicants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The variation in response of different lots of male Swiss albino mice to pyrolysis effluents from surgical cotton and from bisphenol A polycarbonate, and to pure carbon monoxide, is discussed. The variation appeared to be less with the pyrolysis gases from polycarbonate than with pure carbon monoxide.

  6. Characteristics of adopted juvenile delinquents.

    PubMed

    Kim, W J; Zrull, J P; Davenport, C W; Weaver, M

    1992-05-01

    There have been many reports describing the uniqueness of adopted children and adolescents' delinquent behaviors in terms of both their delinquent characteristics and courts' treatment of them. A total of 43 adopted juveniles, 32 extrafamilial (1.0%) and 11 intrafamilial (0.3%) adoptions were initially identified out of 3,280 juvenile delinquents. The adopted subjects were then compared with the demographically matched and offense matched nonadopted subjects. The family variables, such as marital and employment status of parents, were significantly different. However, there were only a few discernible trends, and in general there were no significant differences between the adopted and nonadopted juveniles in terms of their offense characteristics and dispositions. PMID:1592787

  7. Comparative bacteriology of juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Cato, E P; Smibert, R M; Burmeister, J A; Palcanis, K G; Ranney, R R

    1985-01-01

    Statistical comparisons of the floras associated with juvenile periodontitis, severe periodontitis, and moderate periodontitis indicated that differences in the bacterial compositions of affected sites in these populations were not statistically significant. The subgingival flora of affected juvenile periodontitis sites was statistically significantly different from the adjacent supragingival flora and from the subgingival floras of people with healthy gingiva and of children with developing (experimental) gingivitis. However, the subgingival flora of affected juvenile periodontitis sites was not significantly different from the flora of sites with gingival index scores of 1 or 2 in adults with developing (experimental) gingivitis. Of 357 bacterial taxa among over 18,000 isolates, 54 non-treponemal species, 2 treponemal species, and mycoplasma were most associated with diseased periodontal sulci. These species comprised an increasing proportion of the flora during developing gingivitis and constituted over half of the cultivable flora of diseased sites. PMID:3988344

  8. Workshop Report: Juvenile toxicity testing protocols for chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increased awareness of the specific position of children when it comes to hazards of xenobiotic exposures. Children are not small adults, since their exposure patterns, compound kinetics and metabolism, and sensitivity of their developing organs may differ extensively fr...

  9. Families, Juvenile Justice and Children's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme issue of this bulletin is a discussion of youth with emotional disturbances who are in the juvenile justice system and how to meet their needs. Articles include: (1) "Responding to the Mental Health Needs of Youth in the Juvenile Justice System" (Susan Rotenberg); (2) "Prevalence of Mental Disorders among Youth in the Juvenile Justice…

  10. Sex Differences in Attributions of Juvenile Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagatun, Inger J.

    This paper is an application of attribution theory to the processing of juvenile delinquents in an attempt to understand the differential treatment of female and male offenders within the juvenile justice system. The paper explores the attributions of juvenile delinquency both by male and female minors, by male and female parents, and by male and…

  11. Guidelines for Juvenile Information Sharing. OJJDP Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mankey, Jennifer; Baca, Patricia; Rondenell, Stephanie; Webb, Marilyn; McHugh, Denise

    2006-01-01

    The juvenile information sharing (JIS) guidelines were prepared by the Center for Network Development (CND) for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The guidelines suggest a course of action for key agency and organization stakeholders involved in a state or local effort to implement and sustain juvenile information…

  12. On the Prevention of Juvenile Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelekov, V. A.; Kosheleva, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    Crimes committed by juveniles are among the most urgent social problems. Juvenile crime is as prevalent as crime itself is, and it has not been solved completely in any society and cannot be solved through law enforcement measures alone. In this article, the authors discuss the dynamics and structure of juvenile crime in Russia and present data…

  13. Reforming Our Expectations about Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Pamela F.; Baille, Daphne M.

    2010-01-01

    Typing the term "juvenile justice reform" into a Google[TM] search will result in 60 pages of entries. But what is meant by juvenile justice reform? What does it look like? How will one know when it is achieved? This article defines juvenile justice reform, discusses the principles of effective reform, and describes the practice of juvenile…

  14. Do Juveniles Bully More than Young Offenders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireland, Jane L.

    2002-01-01

    Study compares bullying behavior among juvenile and young offenders. Ninety-five male juvenile and 196 male young offenders completed two questionnaires, measuring bullying directly and behaviors indicative of "being bullied" or of "bullying others". Juveniles perceived a higher extent of bullying and reported significantly more physical,…

  15. Intensive Reading Instruction in Juvenile Correctional Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jacob L.; Wexler, Jade; Roberts, Greg; Carpenter, Clint

    2011-01-01

    Despite 60 years of evidence linking juvenile illiteracy and delinquency, practitioners and policymakers have been painfully slow in the implementation of evidence-based reading interventions for incarcerated juveniles. We will present the Texas Juvenile Justice Tiered Instructional Model, an evidence-based reading program model created…

  16. Mobilizing Communities To Prevent Juvenile Crime. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bownes, Donna; Ingersoll, Sarah

    Through Title V Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Programs (Community Prevention Grants), the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) allocated $20 million in fiscal year 1997 to states to complement law enforcement and justice system efforts by helping local communities foster strong families and nurture…

  17. Special Education and the Juvenile Justice System. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Sue; Warboys, Loren

    This bulletin summarizes provisions of federal law as they pertain to special education and juvenile justice. It discusses provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 1997 including: the definition of disability; free appropriate public education; identification, referral, and evaluation; the individualized education program…

  18. Race as a Factor in Juvenile Arrests. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Carl E.; Snyder, Howard E.

    This bulletin examines the effect of race on police decisions to take juvenile offenders into custody. Analysis of 1997 and 1998 data on 17 states from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System indicates that there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that police are more likely to arrest nonwhite juvenile…

  19. Prevention of Serious and Violent Juvenile Offending. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Gail A.; Miller, Laurie S.; Cothern, Lynn

    This bulletin explores the proximal risk factors for juvenile offending, reviews the early developmental precursors to violent offending, and summarizes approaches to prevention. It also discusses components of intervention programs, limitations of single-focus prevention, examples of multi systemic interventions, and limitations of prevention…

  20. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yahnke, Amy E.; Grue, Christian E.; Hayes, Marc P.; Troiano, Alexandra T.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  1. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyether sulfone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Olcomendy, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polyether sulfone was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Animal response times were relatively short at pyrolysis temperatures of 600 to 800 C, with death occurring within 6 min. The principal toxicant appeared to be a compound other than carbon monoxide.

  2. Toxic action/toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hathway, D E

    2000-02-01

    Some six or so physiological systems, essential to normal mammalian life, are involved in poisoning; an intoxication that causes severe injury to any one of them could be life threatening. Reversible chemical reactions showing Scatchard-type binding are exemplified by CO, CN- and cyclodiene neurotoxin insecticide intoxications, and by antigen-antibody complex formation. Haemoglobin (Hb) molecular biology accounts for the allosteric co-operativity and other characteristics of CO poisoning, CN- acts as a powerful cytochrome oxidase inhibitor, and antigen binding in a deep antibody cleft between two domains equipped with epitopes for antigen-binding groups explains hapten-specific immune reactions. Covalent chemical reactions with second-order (SN2) kinetics characterize Hg and Cd poisonings, the reactions of organophosphates and phosphonates with acetylcholinesterase and neurotoxic esterase and the reaction sequence whereby Paraquat accepts electrons and generates superoxide under aerobic conditions. Indirect carcinogens require cytochrome P450 activation to form DNA adducts in target-organ DNA and cause cancer, but a battery of detoxifying enzymes clustered with the P450 system must be overcome. Thus, S-metabolism competes ineffectively with target DNA for reactive vinyl chloride (VC) metabolites, epoxide hydrolase is important to the metabolism and carcinogenicity of alfatoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene, etc.), and the non-toxic 2-naphthylhydroxylamine N-glucuronide acts as a transport form in 2-naphthylamine bladder cancer. VC liver-cancer pathogenesis is explicable in terms of the presence of the glutathione S-transferase detoxifying system in hepatocytes and its absence from the fibroblastic elements, and of the VC concentrations reaching the liver by different administrative routes. In VC carcinogenicity, chemical reactions give imidazo-cyclization products with nucleoside residues of target DNA, and in benzene leukaemia, Z

  3. Contrasting movement strategies among juvenile albatrosses and petrels.

    PubMed

    de Grissac, Sophie; Börger, Luca; Guitteaud, Audrey; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Animal movement is a fundamental eco-evolutionary process yet the behaviour of juvenile animals is largely unknown for many species, especially for soaring seabirds which can range widely over the oceans at low cost. We present an unprecedented dataset of 98 juvenile albatrosses and petrels (nine species), tracked for the first three months after independence. There was a startling diversity within and among species in the type and scale of post-natal movement strategies, ranging from area-restricted to nomadic patterns. Spatial scales were clustered in three groups that ranged from <3000 km to >6000 km from the natal nest. In seven of the nine species, the orientation of flight paths and other movement statistics showed strong similarities between juveniles and adults, providing evidence for innate orientation abilities. Our results have implications for understanding the development of foraging behaviour in naïve individuals and the evolution of life history traits such as survival, lifespan and breeding strategy. PMID:27189182

  4. Contrasting movement strategies among juvenile albatrosses and petrels

    PubMed Central

    de Grissac, Sophie; Börger, Luca; Guitteaud, Audrey; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Animal movement is a fundamental eco-evolutionary process yet the behaviour of juvenile animals is largely unknown for many species, especially for soaring seabirds which can range widely over the oceans at low cost. We present an unprecedented dataset of 98 juvenile albatrosses and petrels (nine species), tracked for the first three months after independence. There was a startling diversity within and among species in the type and scale of post-natal movement strategies, ranging from area-restricted to nomadic patterns. Spatial scales were clustered in three groups that ranged from <3000 km to >6000 km from the natal nest. In seven of the nine species, the orientation of flight paths and other movement statistics showed strong similarities between juveniles and adults, providing evidence for innate orientation abilities. Our results have implications for understanding the development of foraging behaviour in naïve individuals and the evolution of life history traits such as survival, lifespan and breeding strategy. PMID:27189182

  5. Factors affecting attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Sahlstrom, Kimberly J; Jeglic, Elizabeth L

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment amenability were negative. No differences in attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders were found between those who had been victims of sexual abuse and those that had not. Sex offenses committed by juvenile female sex offenders were viewed to be more serious and require more intervention than those committed by juvenile male sex offenders. PMID:19042245

  6. Transfer of Juvenile Cases to Criminal Court.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jung; Kraus, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    The first juvenile court was founded in 1899 with the focus on rehabilitation of a juvenile offender as opposed to punishment in adult court. Determining culpability and disposition for adolescents has become a source of much discussion. With serious crimes, juvenile delinquents may be transferred from juvenile court to adult criminal court; this practice became more prevalent in the past century. However, growing knowledge of adolescent development has mitigated the culpability of youth offenders and resulted in judicial decisions influential to juvenile dispositions. PMID:26593117

  7. [Sex-linked juvenile retinoschisis].

    PubMed

    François, P; Turut, P; Soltysik, C; Hache, J C

    1976-02-01

    About 13 observations of sexe linked juvenile retinoschisis, the authors describe the ophthalmoscopic, fluorographic and functional aspects of the disease whose caracteristics are:--its sexe linked recessive heredity; --its clinical characterestics associating: a microcystic macular degeneration, peripheral retinal lesions, vitreous body alterations, --an electroretinogram of the negative type. PMID:132916

  8. Juvenile Court: Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Discusses whether juveniles who commit criminal law violations should be tried in the same courts as adults. Addresses the issue of transfers that is a legal mechanism used to move youth to criminal court. Considers alternative proposals for handling youth brought to the judicial system and the role of the federal government. (CMK)

  9. Juvenile Criminals: Who Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonov, A. I.; Lebed, O. L.

    2005-01-01

    Many adolescents who were born in the late 1970s and 1980s in Russia became juvenile criminals due to the change in the social structure, the proclamation of the values of the comfortable way of life, the institution of property ownership and so forth. Many young people have to help relatives who are in need, and this as well often causes them to…

  10. Juvenile Justice and Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chassin, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Laurie Chassin focuses on the elevated prevalence of substance use disorders among young offenders in the juvenile justice system and on efforts by the justice system to provide treatment for these disorders. She emphasizes the importance of diagnosing and treating these disorders, which are linked both with continued offending and with a broad…

  11. Juvenile Diabetes and Rehabilitation Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, J. Blair; Gregg, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    Severe complications of diabetes are more likely to occur with the juvenile diabetic and problems of psychosocial adjustment are recurring and difficult. Implications for the rehabilitation counselor are discussed in terms of employment considerations, the effects of complications, genetic counseling, and cooperation with other professionals.…

  12. Vascular transcriptional alterations produced by juvenile obesity in Ossabaw swine.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Lee, Sewon; Zhang, Hanrui; Cui, Jian; Zuidema, Mozow Y; Zhang, Cuihua; Hill, Michael A; Perfield, James W; Ibdah, Jamal A; Booth, Frank W; Davis, J Wade; Laughlin, M Harold; Rector, R Scott

    2013-06-01

    We adopted a transcriptome-wide microarray analysis approach to determine the extent to which vascular gene expression is altered as a result of juvenile obesity and identify obesity-responsive mRNAs. We examined transcriptional profiles in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), perivascular fat adjacent to the LAD, and descending thoracic aorta between obese (n = 5) and lean (n = 6) juvenile Ossabaw pigs (age = 22 wk). Obesity was experimentally induced by feeding the animals a high-fat/high-fructose corn syrup/high-cholesterol diet for 16 wk. We found that expression of 189 vascular cell genes in the LAD and expression of 165 genes in the thoracic aorta were altered with juvenile obesity (false discovery rate ≤ 10%) with an overlap of only 28 genes between both arteries. Notably, a number of genes found to be markedly upregulated in the LAD of obese pigs are implicated in atherosclerosis, including ACP5, LYZ, CXCL14, APOE, PLA2G7, LGALS3, SPP1, ITGB2, CYBB, and P2RY12. Furthermore, pathway analysis revealed the induction of proinflammatory and pro-oxidant pathways with obesity primarily in the LAD. Gene expression in the LAD perivascular fat was minimally altered with juvenile obesity. Together, we provide new evidence that obesity produces artery-specific changes in pretranslational regulation with a clear upregulation of proatherogenic genes in the LAD. Our data may offer potential viable drug targets and mechanistic insights regarding the molecular precursors involved in the origins of overnutrition and obesity-associated vascular disease. In particular, our results suggest that the oxidized LDL/LOX-1/NF-κB signaling axis may be involved in the early initiation of a juvenile obesity-induced proatherogenic coronary artery phenotype. PMID:23592636

  13. Effects of different food doses on cadmium toxicity to Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Kluettgen, B.; Ratte, H.T. )

    1994-10-01

    Chronic toxicity tests were conducted with Daphnia magma using cadmium concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 [mu]g/L Cd with algae doses of 0.8, 4, 8, and 16 [center dot] 10[sup 6] cells/d of Chlorella saccharophila for each. In this way, the authors were able to determine the effects of cadmium on the life-table data of individuals, under different nutritional conditions. The development of juveniles was found to be inhibited by cadmium at low food doses, whereas body length and reproduction were strongly affected at higher food levels. The molting interval of adults and the development rate of embryos proved to be unaffected by cadmium. Cadmium-stressed animals lived longer than did the unstressed controls. The intrinsic rate of natural increase was generally reduced by cadmium, independent of the food dose.

  14. Antipredator vigilance of juvenile and adult thirteen-lined ground squirrels and the role of nutritional need.

    PubMed

    Arenz; Leger

    2000-03-01

    Juvenile thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Spermophilus tridecemlineatus, are less vigilant (i.e. they spend less time visually scanning the environment) than adults. To determine whether nutritional need was a potential cause of this difference, we supplemented two groups of free-ranging juveniles during the predispersal stage, while juveniles were still near and around the natal burrows. The high-energy food group (HEF: 11 squirrels) received peanut butter and oats while the low-energy food group (LEF: seven squirrels) received lettuce. Adults (14 squirrels) were also supplemented, but due to their greater home range sizes, it was not feasible to classify them as either HEF or LEF. To evaluate the effect of supplementation on antipredator vigilance, the behavioural act of visually scanning for predators, we videotaped individuals while they were foraging above ground during 5-min observation periods. Each squirrel was observed and weighed during three time periods over 23 days. From the videotape, we extracted measures of time spent vigilant, locomoting and foraging. All three categories of squirrels gained mass over the study period, but the HEF juveniles rapidly exceeded that of the LEF juveniles. Early in the study, LEF and HEF juveniles did not significantly differ in either body mass or time budgets, and, initially, both juvenile groups were similar to adults in the amount of time devoted to vigilance. Later in the study, the behaviour of HEF juveniles closely resembled that of adults (increased time devoted to vigilance and decreased time devoted to foraging), while LEF juveniles decreased vigilance and increased their foraging time. This study indicates that for thirteen-lined ground squirrels the lower vigilance of juveniles is due, at least in part, to the greater nutritional needs of young animals with consequent increases in foraging, which is largely incompatible with vigilance. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID

  15. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Panel on Juvenile Crime: Prevention, Treatment, and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Joan, Ed.; Widom, Cathy Spatz, Ed.; Crowell, Nancy A., Ed.

    This book discusses patterns and trends in crimes committed by children and adolescents, analyzing youth crime as a subset of general crime and studying the impact of race and gender. It evaluates different approaches to forecasting future crime rates. Data come from a national panel that examined what is known about juvenile crime and its…

  16. The Human-Animal Bond and the Elementary School Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebbe, Linda Lloyd

    1991-01-01

    Discusses research on the significance of the human-animal relationship among various populations (elderly, children, business executives, displaced children, institutionalized children, juvenile offenders, and emotionally disturbed children). Describes experiences of incorporating the human-animal bond into an elementary school guidance and…

  17. Causes of toxicity in stormwater runoff from sawmills

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, H.C.; Elphick, J.R.; Potter, A.; Chao, E.; Konasewich, D.; Zak, J.B.

    1999-07-01

    Samples of stormwater runoff from nine sawmills in British Columbia, Canada, were tested for acute toxicity with juvenile rainbow trout over a 23-month period. Forty-two of the 58 samples tested exhibited toxicity. Causes of toxicity were investigated using toxicity identification evaluation techniques. Toxicity was attributed to divalent cations, particularly zinc, in 32 of the samples. The low hardness associated with most of the samples increased the potential for metal toxicity. For example, the LC50 of zinc was 14 {micro}g/L at a hardness of 5 mg/L. Toxicity in the remaining samples was largely attributed to tannins and lignins and was associated with areas of bulk log handling. No evidence was found to indicate that antisapstain chemicals applied to freshly cut wood contributed to toxicity.

  18. Developmental Toxicity of Endocrine Disrupters Bisphenol A and Vinclozolin in a Terrestrial Isopod

    PubMed Central

    van Gestel, C. A. M.; Soares, A. M. V. M.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the effects of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on invertebrates are still largely underrepresented. This work aims to fill this gap by assessing the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) and vinclozolin (Vz) on the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (common rough woodlouse). Male adult and sexually undifferentiated juvenile woodlice were exposed to the toxicants. Effects on molting regime and growth were investigated independently for males and female woodlice after sexual differentiation. Both chemicals elicited developmental toxicity to P. scaber by causing overall decreased growth. Nevertheless, BPA induced molting, whereas Vz delayed it. Although the LC50 values for juvenile and adult survival were fairly similar, juvenile woodlice showed an increased chronic sensitivity to both chemicals, and female woodlice were most the sensitive to BPA. We recommend the use of adults, juveniles, female, and male woodlice, as well as a large range of toxicant concentrations, to provide valuable information regarding differential dose responses, effects, and threshold values for EDCs. PMID:20148245

  19. Developmental toxicity of endocrine disrupters bisphenol A and vinclozolin in a terrestrial isopod.

    PubMed

    Lemos, M F L; van Gestel, C A M; Soares, A M V M

    2010-08-01

    Studies of the effects of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on invertebrates are still largely underrepresented. This work aims to fill this gap by assessing the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) and vinclozolin (Vz) on the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (common rough woodlouse). Male adult and sexually undifferentiated juvenile woodlice were exposed to the toxicants. Effects on molting regime and growth were investigated independently for males and female woodlice after sexual differentiation. Both chemicals elicited developmental toxicity to P. scaber by causing overall decreased growth. Nevertheless, BPA induced molting, whereas Vz delayed it. Although the LC50 values for juvenile and adult survival were fairly similar, juvenile woodlice showed an increased chronic sensitivity to both chemicals, and female woodlice were most the sensitive to BPA. We recommend the use of adults, juveniles, female, and male woodlice, as well as a large range of toxicant concentrations, to provide valuable information regarding differential dose responses, effects, and threshold values for EDCs. PMID:20148245

  20. A Practical Approach to Juvenile Dermatomyositis and Juvenile Scleroderma.

    PubMed

    McCann, Liza J; Pain, Clare E

    2016-02-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis and juvenile scleroderma are rare multisystem autoimmune disorders. Although they share some pathognomonic hallmarks with adult onset myositis or scleroderma, there are significant differences in presentation, characteristics and associated features when the diseases present in childhood. In view of this, and the rarity of the conditions, it is important for care to be led by teams with expertise in pediatric rheumatology conditions. Prognosis has improved significantly in the West; likely due to early diagnosis and aggressive treatment with immunosuppressive medications. However, this trend is not replicated in the developing world. Early recognition of these diseases is crucial to achieve rapid and sustained remission and prevent disease or medication associated complications. This article aims to provide a practical overview for recognition, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions. PMID:26489640

  1. Do Adult Phenotypes Reflect Selection on Juvenile Performance? A Comparative Study on Performance and Morphology in Lizards.

    PubMed

    Herrel, Anthony; Lopez-Darias, Marta; Vanhooydonck, Bieke; Cornette, Raphaël; Kohlsdorf, Tiana; Brandt, Renata

    2016-09-01

    When competing for food or other resources, or when confronted with predators, young animals may be at a disadvantage relative to adults because of their smaller size. Additionally, the ongoing differentiation and growth of tissues may constrain performance during early ontogenetic stages. However, juveniles must feed before they can become reproductively active adults and as such the adult phenotype may be the result of an ontogenetic filter imposing selection on juvenile phenotype and performance. Here we present ontogenetic data on head morphology and bite force for different lizard species. We test whether adults reflect selection on juveniles by comparing slopes of growth trajectories before and after sexual maturity in males and females and by examining the variance in head morphology and bite force in juveniles versus adults. Finally, we also present the first results of a selection study where animals were measured, marked and released, and recaptured the subsequent year to test whether head morphology and bite force impact survival. PMID:27400973

  2. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  3. [Biological models in studying of staphylococci enterotoxin toxicity].

    PubMed

    Shepeliakovskaia, A O; Semushina, S G; Murashev, A N; Adameĭko, I I; Brovko, F A

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxins--superantigens--are the main toxic agents of staphylococci. Currently, an important role of these proteins is estabished in both toxicity itself--toxic shock and in the development of autoimmune diseases. Enterotoxin studies are carried out in several directions including the search for novel molecular targets, studies in cell tests and establishment of toxicity in animal models. Methods of studying toxicity in animal models: monkeys, mice and rabbits are examined in the review. Methods of animal priming to achieve lethality, features of using various lines of mice during analysis of individual enterotoxins are discussed. Methods of studying enterotoxin-neutralizing compounds in animal models are discussed. PMID:25536781

  4. [Toxic polyneuropathies].

    PubMed

    Neundörfer, B

    1992-08-01

    Toxic factors may have damaging effects on the peripheral nerves at different sites: on the axon, on the myelin sheath, on the cell bodies and on the vasa nervorum. The toxic neuropathies can be divided up into polyneuropathies induced by drugs, by industrial, environmental and stimulant poisons. Mostly symmetrical sensory symptoms and signs are the first disturbances, often followed by symmetrical motor pareses. Some polyneuropathies induced by amiodarone, benzene, lead, cimetidine, chloroquine, dapsone, gentamycin, gold, imipramine, hexacarbons, nialamide, penicillin, triorthocresylphosphate and vincristine are primarily dominated by motory losses. Polyneuropathies induced by amitriptyline, ethylene, oxide, lead, chlorprothixene, heroin, hydralazine, methaqualone, nialamide and penicillin show an asymmetrical distribution pattern of the neural losses. In some types of toxic polyneuropathies the cranial nerves and the autonomic nerves are particularly involved. The clinical symptomatology of the most important types of toxic neuropathies are described shortly. The best therapy is, of course, termination of exposure to the toxic substance concerned. PMID:1509644

  5. From cradle to early grave: juvenile mortality in European shags Phalacrocorax aristotelis results from inadequate development of foraging proficiency.

    PubMed

    Daunt, F; Afanasyev, V; Adam, A; Croxall, J P; Wanless, S

    2007-08-22

    In most long-lived animal species, juveniles survive less well than adults. A potential mechanism is inferior foraging skills but longitudinal studies that follow the development of juvenile foraging are needed to test this. We used miniaturized activity loggers to record daily foraging times of juvenile and adult European shags Phalacrocorax aristotelis from fledging to the following spring. Juveniles became independent from their parents 40 days post-fledging. They compensated for poor foraging proficiency by foraging for approximately 3 h d(-1) longer than adults until constrained by day length in early November. Thereafter, juvenile foraging time tracked shortening day length up to the winter solstice, when foraging time of the two age classes converged and continued to track day length until early February. Few individuals died until midwinter and mortality peaked in January-February, with juvenile mortality (including some of the study birds) five times that of adults. In their last two weeks of life, juveniles showed a marked decline in foraging time consistent with individuals becoming moribund. Our results provide compelling evidence that juveniles compensate for poor foraging proficiency by increasing foraging time, a strategy that is limited by day length resulting in high winter mortality. PMID:17504733

  6. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c)...

  7. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... testing toxic substances. Guidelines for testing the toxicity of substances, including testing that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR 1500.232. A... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances....

  8. Crocodylus acutus (American Crocodile). Long distance juvenile movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crespo, Rafael; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Mazzotti, Frank; Cherkiss, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    the distance traveled ranged from 0.3 km to 90.2 km. The data showed that the smaller alligators moved greater distance than larger ones (Lance et al. 2011. Southeast Nat. 10:389–398). An ongoing 30 year mark and recapture study for Crocodylus acutus in Florida allowed us to look at long distance movement (>30 km) of juveniles (30km). Initial and most recent captures as a juvenile were used to analyze distances moved (Fig. 1). These distances were measured linearly between capture locations. Maximum linear distances of 76.3 km and 69.6 km were recorded for animals 4838 and 6662. All crocodiles moved from nesting habitat through potentially optimal nursery habitat prior to reaching their recapture locations. These juvenile long distance movements could be due to larger crocodiles facilitating their dispersal from the nest location (Lance et al. 2011. op. cit.). These data (Table 1.) support that there is exchange of individuals among the nesting colonies and our ongoing efforts to monitor this threatened species allow us to make observations of how juvenile crocodiles are moving throughout the landscape in an ecosystem currently undergoing restoration.

  9. Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  10. Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... and complications from bites Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies Spay or neuter ...

  11. Rethinking guideline toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Shakil Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    The guidelines for risk assessment of plant protection products (PPPs) and other non-pharmaceuticals were developed over three decades ago and have generally not been updated to incorporate advancements in toxicology and exposure sciences. These guidelines recommend using maximum-tolerated-dose (MTD) even when human relevance of such high doses is mostly limited due to orders of magnitude margin-of-exposure. Conducting animal studies at such high doses often requires further mode-of-action (MoA) studies elucidating human relevance. In order to improve data, ILSI/HESI-ACSA technical committee proposed a tiered approach with emphasis on determining systemic dose of parent and/or metabolite(s) in test animals as biological effects are reflective of systemic rather than administered dose. Any deviation from linearity in systemic dose (saturation of absorption or elimination) in animal studies may have profound toxic effect(s) not expected to occur in likely human exposure scenarios and should be avoided. Toxicity studies should ideally be conducted at kinetically linear doses or slightly above the point of departure from linearity or kinetically-derived maximum dose (KMD) as the systemic dose nonlinearity is a more sensitive parameter occurring much earlier than the MTD endpoints. Therefore, determining systemic dose, especially KMD, in study animals is an improvement to hazard assessment of PPPs and other non-pharmaceuticals allowing toxicologists to better understand findings in animals at systemically linear as well as nonlinear doses to likely human exposures which can easily be accomplished using core study animals as outlined below. Determining systemic dose in studies will also increase the understanding of initial potential MoA of a PPPs and other non-pharmaceuticals and reduce the use of animals by avoiding unnecessary additional MoA studies. PMID:25980640

  12. Predators reverse the direction of density dependence for juvenile salmon mortality.

    PubMed

    Ward, Darren M; Nislow, Keith H; Folt, Carol L

    2008-06-01

    The effect of predators on prey populations depends on how predator-caused mortality changes with prey population density. Predators can enforce density-dependent prey mortality and contribute to population stability, but only if they have a positive numerical or behavioral response to increased prey density. Otherwise, predator saturation can result in inversely density-dependent mortality, destabilizing prey populations and increasing extinction risk. Juvenile salmon and trout provide some of the clearest empirical examples of density-dependent mortality in animal populations. However, although juvenile salmon are very vulnerable to predators, the demographic effects of predators on juvenile salmon are unknown. We tested the interactive effects of predators and population density on the mortality of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) using controlled releases of salmon in natural streams. We introduced newly hatched juvenile salmon at three population density treatments in six study streams, half of which contained slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), a common generalist predator (18 release sites in total, repeated over two summers). Sculpin reversed the direction of density dependence for juvenile salmon mortality. Salmon mortality was density dependent in streams with no sculpin, but inversely density dependent in streams where sculpin were abundant. Such predator-mediated inverse density dependence is especially problematic for prey populations suppressed by other factors, thereby presenting a fundamental challenge to persistence of rare populations and restoration of extirpated populations. PMID:18317816

  13. Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

  14. Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2014-08-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

  15. Safety profiles of gadolinium chelates in juvenile rats differ according to the risk of dissociation.

    PubMed

    Fretellier, Nathalie; Maazouz, Meryam; Luseau, Alexandrine; Baudimont, Fannie; Jestin-Mayer, Gaëlle; Bourgery, Simon; Rasschaert, Marlène; Bruneval, Patrick; Factor, Cécile; Mecieb, Fatiha; Idée, Jean-Marc; Corot, Claire

    2014-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the safety of two gadolinium chelates (GCs), used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, in juvenile rats. Juvenile rats received five intravenous administrations (between postnatal day [PND] 4 and 18) of gadoteric acid (macrocyclic ionic GC), gadodiamide (linear nonionic GC) or saline, and sacrificed at PND 25. Gadodiamide induced mortality, alopecia and hyperpigmentation of dorsal skin. Two gadodiamide-treated rats presented severe epidermal and dermal lesions. No abnormal signs were detected following administration of gadoteric acid. Higher tissue gadolinium concentrations were found in the gadodiamide group compared to the gadoteric acid group. Dissociation of gadodiamide was observed in skin and liver, with the presence of dissociated and soluble gadolinium. In conclusion, repeated administration of gadoteric acid was well tolerated by juvenile rats. In contrast, gadodiamide induced significant toxicity and more marked tissue gadolinium retention (at least partly in the dissociated and soluble form). PMID:25462783

  16. Behavioral Thermoregulation and Trade-Offs in Juvenile Lobster Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Travis V; McGaw, Iain J

    2016-02-01

    Water temperature influences the behavior and distribution patterns of both larval and adult American lobster Homarus americanus. However, very little is known about the responses of juvenile lobsters. The juvenile life stage is a critical period; high levels of mortality, combined with specific behavioral responses, can disconnect larval settlement from patterns of abundance of adults. We assessed behavioral thermoregulation in juvenile lobsters, and determined how thermal preferences can be altered by the presence of shelter and food. Juvenile lobsters avoided temperatures higher than 20 °C and lower than 8 °C, and had a mean temperature preference of 16.2 ± 1 °C. This preference was unaffected by prior acclimation, origin (laboratory-raised or wild), or size. When the animals were subjected to a temperature change (5-20 °C), activity rates peaked at 15 °C, and remained stable thereafter. Activity rates did not change when a shelter was added. The addition of food resulted in an increase in activity associated with food handling. When juvenile lobsters were offered a choice between temperature, shelter, and food, they always chose the environment with a shelter, even when it was in a thermally unfavorable temperature. Juveniles also spent more time in a thermally unfavorable environment when food was present; however, acquisition of a shelter was prioritized over food. Although juveniles had a similar thermal preference to adults, they are more vulnerable to predation; the innate shelter-seeking behavior of juveniles overrode their thermal preference. While temperature is an important environmental factor affecting the physiology, distribution, and growth of aquatic ectotherms, our findings suggest that trade-off behaviors occur in order to maintain optimal fitness and survival of the individual. PMID:26896176

  17. Patterns of activity expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Dubofsky, E A; Simpson, S D; Chabot, Christopher C; Watson, Winsor H

    2013-09-01

    Adult American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, possess endogenous circadian and circatidal clocks controlling visual sensitivity and locomotion, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine the types of activity rhythms expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs (n = 24) when exposed to a 14:10 light/dark cycle (LD) for 10 days, followed by 10 days of constant darkness (DD). Horseshoe crab activity was recorded with a digital time-lapse video system that used an infrared-sensitive camera so animals could be monitored at night. In LD, 15 animals expressed daily patterns of activity, 6 displayed a circatidal pattern, and the remaining 3 were arrhythmic. Of the 15 animals with daily patterns of locomotion, 7 had a significant preference (P < 0.05) for diurnal activity and 3 for nocturnal activity; the remainder did not express a significant preference for day or night activity. In DD, 13 horseshoe crabs expressed circatidal rhythms and 8 maintained a pattern of about 24 h. Although these results suggest the presence of a circadian clock influencing circatidal patterns of locomotion, these apparent circadian rhythms may actually represent the expression of just one of the two bouts of activity driven by the putative circalunidian clocks that control their tidal rhythms. Overall, these results indicate that, like adults, juvenile horseshoe crabs express both daily and tidal patterns of activity and that at least one, and maybe both, of these patterns is driven by endogenous clocks. PMID:24088795

  18. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  19. Digitalis toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    These are symptoms of digitalis toxicity: Confusion Irregular pulse Loss of appetite Nausea , vomiting , diarrhea Fast heartbeat Vision changes (unusual), including blind spots, blurred vision, changes in how colors look, or ...

  20. Antimony Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  1. Juvenile Osprey Navigation during Trans-Oceanic Migration

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Travis W.; Bierregaard, Richard O.; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Holdaway, Richard N.; Sagar, Paul

    2014-01-01

    To compensate for drift, an animal migrating through air or sea must be able to navigate. Although some species of bird, fish, insect, mammal, and reptile are capable of drift compensation, our understanding of the spatial reference frame, and associated coordinate space, in which these navigational behaviors occur remains limited. Using high resolution satellite-monitored GPS track data, we show that juvenile ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) are capable of non-stop constant course movements over open ocean spanning distances in excess of 1500 km despite the perturbing effects of winds and the lack of obvious landmarks. These results are best explained by extreme navigational precision in an exogenous spatio-temporal reference frame, such as positional orientation relative to Earth's magnetic field and pacing relative to an exogenous mechanism of keeping time. Given the age (<1 year-old) of these birds and knowledge of their hatching site locations, we were able to transform Enhanced Magnetic Model coordinate locations such that the origin of the magnetic coordinate space corresponded with each bird's nest. Our analyses show that trans-oceanic juvenile osprey movements are consistent with bicoordinate positional orientation in transformed magnetic coordinate or geographic space. Through integration of movement and meteorological data, we propose a new theoretical framework, chord and clock navigation, capable of explaining the precise spatial orientation and temporal pacing performed by juvenile ospreys during their long-distance migrations over open ocean. PMID:25493430

  2. Juvenile Osprey Navigation during Trans-Oceanic Migration.

    PubMed

    Horton, Travis W; Bierregaard, Richard O; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Holdaway, Richard N; Sagar, Paul

    2014-01-01

    To compensate for drift, an animal migrating through air or sea must be able to navigate. Although some species of bird, fish, insect, mammal, and reptile are capable of drift compensation, our understanding of the spatial reference frame, and associated coordinate space, in which these navigational behaviors occur remains limited. Using high resolution satellite-monitored GPS track data, we show that juvenile ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) are capable of non-stop constant course movements over open ocean spanning distances in excess of 1500 km despite the perturbing effects of winds and the lack of obvious landmarks. These results are best explained by extreme navigational precision in an exogenous spatio-temporal reference frame, such as positional orientation relative to Earth's magnetic field and pacing relative to an exogenous mechanism of keeping time. Given the age (<1 year-old) of these birds and knowledge of their hatching site locations, we were able to transform Enhanced Magnetic Model coordinate locations such that the origin of the magnetic coordinate space corresponded with each bird's nest. Our analyses show that trans-oceanic juvenile osprey movements are consistent with bicoordinate positional orientation in transformed magnetic coordinate or geographic space. Through integration of movement and meteorological data, we propose a new theoretical framework, chord and clock navigation, capable of explaining the precise spatial orientation and temporal pacing performed by juvenile ospreys during their long-distance migrations over open ocean. PMID:25493430

  3. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME, TASK FORCE REPORT, REPORT ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CONSULTANTS PAPERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.

    THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF THE JUVENILE COURT SYSTEM AND THE PREVENTION OF DELINQUENCY. THE COMMISSION'S RECOMMENDATIONS ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY INCLUDE THE AREAS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, HOUSING AND RECREATION, FAMILIES, INVOLVING YOUTHS IN COMMUNITY LIFE, SCHOOLS, AND EMPLOYMENT. THE APPENDIXES, WHICH CONSTITUTE THE…

  4. The JDAI Story: Building a Better Juvenile Detention System. Pathways to Juvenile Detention Reform. Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Rochelle

    This monograph describes the work of five Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) sites designed to streamline and rationalize local juvenile detention systems and to reduce overcrowding in juvenile detention centers, thus improving conditions and saving jurisdictions money in overtime and additional staff and millions of dollars to…

  5. Black Juveniles in the Juvenile Justice System: A Cause for Alarm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFlore, Larry

    This report examines the representation of black youth in the juvenile justice system, describes changes in juvenile justice philosophy, and discusses policy implications. Black youth are overrepresented at all stages of the juvenile justice system compared to white youth. Positivist theories explain this overrepresentation as the result of…

  6. A Juvenile Justice System for the 21st Century. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilchik, Shay

    This bulletin describes the objectives and elements of an effective juvenile justice system and suggests legislative and administrative strategies for its implementation. An effective juvenile justice system must meet the three objectives of holding the juvenile offender accountable, enabling the offender to become a capable and productive…

  7. National Implications in Juvenile Justice: The Influence of Juvenile Mentoring Programs on At Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belshaw, Scott H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    In 1972 the federal government created the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act that procured funding for various governmental programs to combat the sudden increase in juvenile crime. A provision of this Act set out the creation of mentoring programs to help decrease the juvenile crime rate and dropout rates in secondary schools. This…

  8. Runaway Juvenile Crime? The Context of Juvenile Arrests in America. Research in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziedenberg, Jason; Schiraldi, Vincent

    The Violent and Repeat Juvenile Offender Act of 1997 (S-10) was to be debated in the Senate in spring 1998. This bill would blur the distinction between juvenile and adult criminal systems, making it easier to imprison children as young as 14. Supporters of S-10 were citing statistics to indicate that juvenile crime was on the rise. In fact, the…

  9. A Handbook for Juveniles and Parents on Maine's Juvenile Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehnert, Irene

    This guide explains Maine's juvenile justice system so that juveniles and/or their parents can know what to expect or what to do in a situation involving juveniles, public officials and the law. Although it is geographically specific, it could serve as a model to other states. The booklet can serve as a checklist to make sure law enforcement…

  10. Vaginal calculi in a juvenile harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Norman, Stephanie A; Garner, Michael M; Berta, Susan; Dubpernell, Sandra; Klope, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    A large number of vaginal calculi were observed in a juvenile harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) stranded on Whidbey Island, Washington. Vaginal calculi have been reported in other species, but not in harbor porpoises. Histologic examination of the urinary tract revealed mucosal hyperplasia most likely attributable to the calculi. The calculi were numerous (>30), composed completely of struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate), and on culture yielded Enterococcus spp., a bacterium not usually associated with struvite urolith formation in domestic animals. The only other lesion of note was severe hepatic lipidosis, and its relationship to the development of the vaginal calculi is unknown. PMID:22946417

  11. A note on averting goats to a toxic but palatable plant, Leucaena leucocephala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conditioned taste aversions are a useful tool to reduce livestock consumption of toxic plants. The forage legume Leucaena leucocephala (leucaena) is both toxic and palatable. The objective of this study was to determine if goats could be aversively conditioned to avoid leucaena. Adult and juvenil...

  12. Confirmation of the absence of tetrodotoxin and its analogues in the juveniles of the Japanese fire-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, captive-reared from eggs in the laboratory using HILIC-LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yuta; Chiba, Chikafumi; Konoki, Keiichi; Cho, Yuko; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2015-07-01

    The tetrodotoxin (TTX) contents of the Japanese fire-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, captive-reared from eggs to metamorphosed juveniles with a non-toxic diet for 70 weeks, as well as wild-caught juvenile newts, were investigated using a high-resolution hydrophilic interaction chromatography-LC-MS. TTX was detected in 0- to 22-week-old captive-reared juvenile newts but was not detected (<15 ng/g) in the 36- to 70-week-old newts, while significant levels of TTX (1.3-14 μg/g) were detected in the wild-caught juveniles. PMID:25986913

  13. [Transgenic animals and animal welfare

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Under the pressure of a public vote in Switzerland (7 June 1998) on an initiative to ban the production, use and patenting of transgenic animals, their value for biomedical research and development is intensely debated. In addition, the Swiss legislation has adopted (1992) a constitutional obligation to "take into account the dignity of creatures". The term "dignity of creatures", however, can be interpreted in anthropocentric or biocentric ways. The government has now formulated the legal implications of this term for transgenic animals and plants in various laws including the animal and environmental protection laws. This paper gives arguments for a fair evaluation of trangenic animals from an animal welfare point of view where not only the costs of animal suffering must be considered but also the probability of potential benefit for man. A self-confident research community should allow such an evaluation procedure even in view of an outcome which could ban many uses of transgenic animals PMID:11208266

  14. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. PMID:24038158

  15. Predator-induced neophobia in juvenile cichlids.

    PubMed

    Meuthen, Denis; Baldauf, Sebastian A; Bakker, Theo C M; Thünken, Timo

    2016-08-01

    Predation is an important but often fluctuating selection factor for prey animals. Accordingly, individuals plastically adopt antipredator strategies in response to current predation risk. Recently, it was proposed that predation risk also plastically induces neophobia (an antipredator response towards novel cues). Previous studies, however, do not allow a differentiation between general neophobia and sensory channel-specific neophobic responses. Therefore, we tested the neophobia hypothesis focusing on adjustment in shoaling behavior in response to a novel cue addressing a different sensory channel than the one from which predation risk was initially perceived. From hatching onwards, juveniles of the cichlid Pelvicachromis taeniatus were exposed to different chemical cues in a split-clutch design: conspecific alarm cues which signal predation risk and heterospecific alarm cues or distilled water as controls. At 2 months of age, their shoaling behavior was examined prior and subsequent to a tactical disturbance cue. We found that fish previously exposed to predation risk formed more compact shoals relative to the control groups in response to the novel disturbance cue. Moreover, the relationship between shoal density and shoal homogeneity was also affected by experienced predation risk. Our findings indicate predator-induced, increased cross-sensory sensitivity towards novel cues making neophobia an effective antipredator mechanism. PMID:26578223

  16. Acute and chronic toxicity of the benzoylurea pesticide, lufenuron, in the fish, Colossoma macropomum.

    PubMed

    Rafaela Leão Soares, Priscila; Lucas Corrêa de Andrade, André; Pinheiro Santos, Thamiris; Caroline Barros Lucas da Silva, Stephannie; Freitas da Silva, Jadson; Rodrigues Dos Santos, Amanda; Hugo Lima da Silva Souza, Elton; Magliano da Cunha, Franklin; Wanderley Teixeira, Valéria; Sales Cadena, Marilia Ribeiro; Bezerra de Sá, Fabrício; Bezerra de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz; Gonçalves Cadena, Pabyton

    2016-10-01

    Lufenuron is a benzoylurea insecticide that interfere in chitin synthesis in insects. Although lufenuron is widely used in agriculture and aquaculture, rare are studies described that relates to possible toxic effects in fish. This work aimed to evaluate acute and chronic toxic effects of benzoylurea pesticide (lufenuron) on biological parameters of Colossoma macropomum (Tambaqui). In the acute test, juveniles of Tambaqui were divided into control group and five experimental groups with exposure from 0.1 to 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron for 96 h. Animals were also submitted to chronic toxicity test for four months in concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/L of lufenuron, the concentration used in the treatment of ectoparasites in fish and 50% of LC50 96 h, respectively. The presence of hemorrhages was observed in eyes, fins and operculum of fish exposed to 0.7 and 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron. Histological analysis showed changes in the morphology of fish gills submitted to acute toxicity test, as lamellar aneurysm and blood congestion inside lamellae. Lufenuron promoted damage in fish retina as in ability to respond to stimuli in photoreceptors and in ON-bipolar cells in acute test. In chronic test, blood glucose analysis and morphometric parameters showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In general, Tambaqui exhibited behaviors associated with stress when exposed to lufenuron. Thus, lufenuron showed several toxic effects in relation to biological parameters in Tambaqui. This concerns about the use and discard of lufenuron, and indicates the requirement of environmental actions to prevent potential contamination of aquatic biota. PMID:27448754

  17. MEDLI Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of MEDLI, the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrument, which contains multiple sophisticated temperature sensors to measure atmospheric conditions and performance o...

  18. Animal cytomegaloviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Staczek, J

    1990-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are agents that infect a variety of animals. Human cytomegalovirus is associated with infections that may be inapparent or may result in severe body malformation. More recently, human cytomegalovirus infections have been recognized as causing severe complications in immunosuppressed individuals. In other animals, cytomegaloviruses are often associated with infections having relatively mild sequelae. Many of these sequelae parallel symptoms associated with human cytomegalovirus infections. Recent advances in biotechnology have permitted the study of many of the animal cytomegaloviruses in vitro. Consequently, animal cytomegaloviruses can be used as model systems for studying the pathogenesis, immunobiology, and molecular biology of cytomegalovirus-host and cytomegalovirus-cell interactions. PMID:2170830

  19. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  20. Biologic agents in juvenile spondyloarthropathies.

    PubMed

    Katsicas, María Martha; Russo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The juvenile spondyloarthropathies (JSpA) are a group of related rheumatic diseases characterized by involvement of peripheral large joints, axial joints, and entheses (enthesitis) that begin in the early years of life (prior to 16(th) birthday).The nomenclature and concept of spondyloarthropathies has changed during the last few decades. Although there is not any specific classification of JSpA, diseases under the spondyloarthropathy nomenclature umbrella in the younger patients include: the seronegative enthesitis and arthropathy (SEA) syndrome, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthritis. Moreover, the ILAR criteria for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis includes two categories closely related to spondyloarthritis: Enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis.We review the pathophysiology and the use of biological agents in JSpA. JSpA are idiopathic inflammatory diseases driven by an altered balance in the proinflammatory cytokines. There is ample evidence on the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-17 in the physiopathology of these entities. Several non-biologic and biologic agents have been used with conflicting results in the treatment of these complex diseases. The efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents, such as etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab, have been analysed in controlled and uncontrolled trials, usually showing satisfactory outcomes. Other biologic agents, such as abatacept, tocilizumab and rituximab, have been insufficiently studied and their role in the therapy of SpA is uncertain. Interleukin-17-blocking agents are promising alternatives for the treatment of JSpA patients in the near future. Recommendations for the treatment of patients with JSpA have recently been proposed and are discussed in the present review. PMID:26968522

  1. Juvenile justice and substance use.

    PubMed

    Chassin, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Laurie Chassin focuses on the elevated prevalence of substance use disorders among young offenders in the juvenile justice system and on efforts by the justice system to provide treatment for these disorders. She emphasizes the importance of diagnosing and treating these disorders, which are linked both with continued offending and with a broad range of negative effects, such as smoking, risky sexual behavior, violence, and poor educational, occupational, and psychological outcomes. The high rates of substance use problems among young offenders, says Chassin, suggest a large need for treatment. Although young offenders are usually screened for substance use disorders, Chassin notes the need to improve screening methods and to ensure that screening takes place early enough to allow youths to be diverted out of the justice system into community-based programs when appropriate. Cautioning that no single treatment approach has been proven most effective, Chassin describes current standards of "best practices" in treating substance use disorders, examines the extent to which they are implemented in the juvenile justice system, and describes some promising models of care. She highlights several treatment challenges, including the need for better methods of engaging adolescents and their families in treatment and the need to better address environmental risk factors, such as family substance use and deviant peer networks, and co-occurring conditions, such as learning disabilities and other mental health disorders. Chassin advocates policies that encourage wider use of empirically validated therapies and of documented best practices for treating substance use disorders. High relapse rates among youths successfully treated for substance use disorders also point to a greater need for aftercare services and for managing these disorders as chronic illnesses characterized by relapse and remission. A shortage of aftercare services and a lack of service coordination in the

  2. Juvenile xanthogranuloma: unusual intraoral finding.

    PubMed

    Collins, L; Banks, R; Robinson, M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis that usually presents as a self-limiting dermatological condition in young children. Rarely, extracutaneous sites may also be involved. We report a case in a 3-year-old girl that presented intraorally as a solitary, well-defined, soft, purple palatal swelling. Patients with these rare intraoral lesions may present to dentists and subsequently to oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Diagnosis requires histopathological analysis and immunohistochemical staining. Further investigation from other specialties is required to rule out involvement of other organ systems. PMID:25300889

  3. Juvenile Competency to Stand Trial.

    PubMed

    Stepanyan, Sofia T; Sidhu, Shawn S; Bath, Eraka

    2016-01-01

    Competency to stand trial is interpreted as a protected due process right for all defendants and is defined as a defendant's fundamental knowledge and understanding of the criminal charges being filed, roles and procedures within the courtroom, and a general ability to work with the defense counsel. Questions of competency are most often raised by the judge, defense, or the prosecution, and competency evaluations are most often completed by psychiatrists or psychologists with forensic training or work experience. Mental illness, intellectual disability, developmental disorders, and developmental immaturity are the 4 main factors considered in most juvenile competency evaluations. PMID:26593118

  4. Effects of copper pre-exposure routes on the energy reserves and subsequent copper toxicity in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Canli, M

    2006-10-01

    The hypothesis was tested that copper uptake routes affect the tolerance of Daphnia magna to copper and influence the energy reserves. These were determined in D. magna juveniles that had been exposed for 4 days to water borne and/or dietary copper (algae Pseudokichneriella subcapitata loaded with copper) at nominal concentrations of 0, 10, and 100 nM. Tolerance increased with dietary copper pre-exposure reflected in 24 and 48 h LC50 values of 466 and 398 nM at 100 nM pre-exposure versus 301 and 254 nM in controls, respectively. Control animals (no copper added to their exposure medium and diet) had the lowest lipid content and consequently the lowest energy content. The current study stresses the importance of addressing dietary exposure routes in metal toxicity assessments. PMID:16944514

  5. Juvenile Obesity, Physical Activity, and Lifestyle Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Or, Oded

    2000-01-01

    Because many obese children become obese adults, the recent rapid increase in juvenile obesity poses a major public health challenge. Enhanced physical activity is a cornerstone in a multidisciplinary approach to preventing and treating juvenile obesity. Giving exercise recommendations focused for obese youth is critical. Cutting down on sedentary…

  6. Special Education in Wisconsin's Juvenile Detention System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenz, Tamara; Langelett, George

    2004-01-01

    This study looks at incarcerated youth in the public juvenile detention facilities of Wisconsin. State percentages of youth in Wisconsin public schools with Emotional, Learning, Cognitive, and/or Low Incidence Disabilities are compared to percentages reported from the state and county operated juvenile detention facilities. The study investigates…

  7. Juvenile Justice in Indiana: Facing the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Doreen L.

    The Indiana juvenile justice system is charged with intervening on behalf of youthful offenders for the purposes of providing care, treatment, protection, or rehabilitation. This report provides an overview of the state's juvenile justice system, which has fallen under widespread criticism for many years. The following issues are identified: data…

  8. Role Socialization of Juvenile Court Probation Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petronio, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Tested the degree of association between probation officers' sent and received roles and role behavior in four juvenile courts. Found the role communicated to probation officers by their superiors was predictive of the role the probation officers perceived but not of the role as enacted with juveniles. (Author)

  9. Juvenile dispersal in Calomys venustus (Muridae: Sigmodontinae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priotto, José; Steinmann, Andrea; Provensal, Cecilia; Polop, Jaime

    2004-05-01

    Both spacing behaviour and dispersal movement are viewed as hierarchical processes in which the effects may be expressed at spatial scale. This research was carried out to examine the hypothesis that the presence of parents promotes the dispersal of juveniles from their natal nest and their father or mother home-range, in Calomys venustus.The study was carried out in four 0.25 ha fences (two controls and two experimentals), in a natural pasture. This study had two periods: Father Removal (FR) (August and December 1997; year one) and Mother Removal (MR) (August 1998 and January 1999; year two). For the FR treatment fathers were removed after juveniles were born, but in the MR treatment mothers were removed after the juveniles were weaned. The effect of parents on the dispersal distance of juveniles was analysed with respect to their natal nest and their mother and father home-range. Dispersal distance from the nest of C. venustus was independent of either male or female parent. Juveniles were more dispersing in relation to the centre of activity of their mothers than to that of their fathers, and females were more dispersing than males. Female juveniles overlap their home-range with their parents less than male juveniles do. The differences observed between female and male juveniles would be related to their different sexual maturation times, as well as to the female territoriality.

  10. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  11. Juvenile Offender Comprehensive Reentry Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Donnie W.

    2004-01-01

    The literature provides ample evidence of the relationship of substance abuse to crime. Research over the last 20 years has established a strong correlation between substance abuse and juvenile delinquency (held, 1998). Currently, there are more than 350,000 juveniles on probation and in continuing care programs in the U.S. who have substance…

  12. Peer Relationships Among Institutionalized Juvenile Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preveaux, Neal E.; Ray, Glen E.; LoBello, Steven G.; Mehta, Sheila

    2004-01-01

    This study examined peer relationships (sociometric status and friendship) of institutionalized juvenile males ages 12 to 18. Results replicated previous studies using "normal" nondelinquent samples demonstrating that sociometrically popular status juveniles were evaluated higher on sociability and leadership than were average- or rejected-status…

  13. Genetic and clinical evaluation of juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Judy E; Ruttum, Mark S; Koeberl, Matthew J; Hassemer, Eryn L; Sidjanin, D J

    2009-04-01

    Juvenile retinoschisis is a rare retinal dystrophy caused by RS1 gene mutations.(1) Clinical examinations and molecular testing definitively diagnosed juvenile retinoschisis in 2 male infants, one of whom had a novel mutation not previously reported in the United States. Genetic testing may be the simplest way to confirm this diagnosis in infants. PMID:19393523

  14. Genetic and clinical evaluation of juvenile retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Judy E.; Ruttum, Mark S.; Koeberl, Matthew J.; Hassemer, Eryn L.; Sidjanin, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile retinoschisis is a rare retinal dystrophy caused by RS1 gene mutations.1 Clinical examinations and molecular testing definitively diagnosed juvenile retinoschisis in 2 male infants, one of whom had a novel mutation not previously reported in the United States. Genetic testing may be the simplest way to confirm this diagnosis in infants. PMID:19393523

  15. Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, H. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

  16. Moral Development of Solo Juvenile Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vugt, Eveline; Stams, Geert Jan; Dekovic, Maja; Brugman, Daan; Rutten, Esther; Hendriks, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral…

  17. Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2006 National Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    This report presents comprehensive information on juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and on the juvenile justice system. This report brings together the latest available statistics from a variety of sources and includes numerous tables, graphs, and maps, accompanied by analyses in clear, nontechnical language. The report offers Congress,…

  18. Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

    This report offers the Congress, state legislators, and other state and local policymakers, professors and teachers, juvenile justice professionals, and concerned citizens solid answers to the most frequently asked questions about the nature of juvenile crime and victimization and about the justice system's response. Citing FBI and other data…

  19. Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Juvenile Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahlstrom, Kimberly J.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment…

  20. Psychiatric Disorder in a Juvenile Assessment Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McReynolds, Larkin S.; Wasserman, Gail A.; DeComo, Robert E.; John, Reni; Keating, Joseph M.; Nolen, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile assessment centers (JACs) were developed to address service fragmentation and promote the sharing of information among agencies providing services to youth involved with the juvenile justice system. To date, there are no reports that describe the diagnostic profiles of the youth served by such centers. The authors hypothesize that the…

  1. Juvenile Delinquency: Research, Theory, and Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Bernice Milburn

    While this booklet on juvenile delinquency does not attempt a full review of the literature, it has been designed to further an understanding and appreciation of the social-psychological problems of deviant behavior. The booklet briefly covers the publicity which juvenile delinquency has been given in recent years, as well as the difficulties…

  2. Literacy Levels of Male Juvenile Justice Detainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheldall, Kevin; Watkins, Renae

    2004-01-01

    The assessment records detailing the reading and spelling performance of a group of male juvenile justice detainees admitted over a 3-month period were examined in an attempt to quantify the basic literacy levels of juvenile offenders. Results of student self-ratings of their reading ability were also analysed. The participants comprised 68 males…

  3. Gastrointestinal Pathology in Juvenile and Adult CFTR-Knockout Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingshen; Olivier, Alicia K.; Yi, Yaling; Pope, Christopher E.; Hayden, Hillary S.; Liang, Bo; Sui, Hongshu; Zhou, Weihong; Hager, Kyle R.; Zhang, Yulong; Liu, Xiaoming; Yan, Ziying; Fisher, John T.; Keiser, Nicholas W.; Song, Yi; Tyler, Scott R.; Goeken, J. Adam; Kinyon, Joann M.; Radey, Matthew C.; Fligg, Danielle; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Weiliang; Lynch, Thomas J.; Kaminsky, Paul M.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Miller, Samuel I.; Parekh, Kalpaj; Meyerholz, David K.; Hoffman, Lucas R.; Frana, Timothy; Stewart, Zoe A.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease caused by loss of a functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel in many epithelia of the body. Here we report the pathology observed in the gastrointestinal organs of juvenile to adult CFTR-knockout ferrets. CF gastrointestinal manifestations included gastric ulceration, intestinal bacterial overgrowth with villous atrophy, and rectal prolapse. Metagenomic phylogenetic analysis of fecal microbiota by deep sequencing revealed considerable genotype-independent microbial diversity between animals, with the majority of taxa overlapping between CF and non-CF pairs. CF hepatic manifestations were variable, but included steatosis, necrosis, biliary hyperplasia, and biliary fibrosis. Gallbladder cystic mucosal hyperplasia was commonly found in 67% of CF animals. The majority of CF animals (85%) had pancreatic abnormalities, including extensive fibrosis, loss of exocrine pancreas, and islet disorganization. Interestingly, 2 of 13 CF animals retained predominantly normal pancreatic histology (84% to 94%) at time of death. Fecal elastase-1 levels from these CF animals were similar to non-CF controls, whereas all other CF animals evaluated were pancreatic insufficient (<2 μg elastase-1 per gram of feces). These findings suggest that genetic factors likely influence the extent of exocrine pancreas disease in CF ferrets and have implications for the etiology of pancreatic sufficiency in CF patients. In summary, these studies demonstrate that the CF ferret model develops gastrointestinal pathology similar to CF patients. PMID:24637292

  4. Kindergarten Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Animation is one of the last lessons that come to mind when thinking of kindergarten art. The necessary understanding of sequencing, attention to small, often detailed drawings, and the use of technology all seem more suitable to upper elementary. With today's emphasis on condensing and integrating curriculum, consider developing animation lessons…

  5. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  6. Studies of certain sulfonamide drugs for use in juvenile chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, D.F.; Fryer, J.L.; Pilcher, K.S.

    1969-01-01

    In the work described in this paper, the efficacies of sulfisoxazole and sulfadimethoxine were compared to the efficacy of sulfamethazine. Experiments were designed to determine the rate of intestinal absorption, the rate of elimination from the blood, the effect on growth, and the toxicity of each drug in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). The comparative bacteriostatic activity against two common fish pathogens was also determined for each drug. 

  7. Cardiac toxicities of antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, H R; Parker, J L; Durrett, L R

    1978-01-01

    Isolated heart muscle preparations are useful in the study of cardiac toxicities of drugs and environmental chemicals: such tissues allow assessment of chemical effects on heart muscle that is free from indirect in vivo influences that can mask or even accentuate cardiac responses measured in the intact animal. In the present study, left atria of guinea pigs were used to demonstrate a direct cardiac depressant effect of greater-than-therapeutic concentrations of several aminoglycoside antibiotics. The toxic effect of these antibiotics seems to be a calcium-dependent event, and may prove useful to characterize contractile responses of the heart. Other antibiotic agents can also depress cardiovascular function, as summarized in this report, but mechanisms of action have not been clearly defined. PMID:720315

  8. Genetic heterogeneity in juvenile NCL

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Y.M.; Andermann, E.; Mitchison, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of related lysosomal storage diseases classified according to the age of onset, clinical syndrome, and pathology. The clinical syndromes include myoclonus, visual failure, progressive dementia, ataxia and generalized tonic clonic seizures in varying combinations depending on the age of onset and pathology. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive in most cases, except for several families with the adult form (Kufs` disease) which have autosomal dominant inheritance. Linkage for the infantile (Halatia-Santavuori) form (CLN1), characterized ultrastructurally by lysosomal granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD), has been demonstrated with markers on chromosome lp, while the gene for the typical juvenile (Spielmeyer-Vogt) form (CLN3), characterized by fingerprint-profile inclusions, has been linked to chromosome 16p. The gene locations of the late infantile (Jansky-Bielschowsky) and adult (Kufs` disease) forms are unknown, although it has recently been shown that the late infantile form does not link to chromosome 16p. We describe three siblings, including a pair of monozygotic twins, with juvenile onset NCL with GROD in whom linkage to the CLN3 region of chromsome 16p has been excluded. This would suggest that there is genetic heterogeneity not only among the different clinical syndromes, but also among identical clinical syndromes with different ultrastructural characteristics. Preliminary studies of linkage to chromosome 1p employing the microsatellite marker HY-TM1 have been uninformative. Further studies with other chromosome 1 markers are underway.

  9. Juvenile delinquency and adolescent fatherhood.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Atika; Gavazzi, Stephen M

    2011-08-01

    This study examined ecological risk factors associated with teen paternity in a sample of 2,931 male adolescents coming to the attention of juvenile courts across five midwestern counties. In contrast to previous studies documenting significantly higher rates of teen paternity among African American youth, we found that the European American court-involved youth in our sample were as likely to be teen fathers as their African American counterparts. However, an in-depth examination of the social ecologies of these court-involved youth revealed significant racial differences (regardless of the paternity status), with African American males reporting more prior offenses, delinquent peer associations, traumatic pasts, risky sexual behaviors, and educational risks as compared to European American youth, who reported greater involvement in substance use. Furthermore, logistic regression analyses revealed that after controlling for age and racial background, youth who reported greater exposure to trauma and prior offenses had significantly greater odds of having fathered a child. Surprisingly, youth who were teen fathers reported lower rates of behavioral problems as compared to their nonfathering peers. Given the cross-sectional nature of our data, interpretation of this result is limited. Overall, our findings underscore the need for developing a comprehensive understanding of the ecological risk and protective factors present in the lives of teen fathers coming in contact with the juvenile justice system, as an essential first step in designing effective and relevant intervention programs and services for this at-risk population. PMID:20508087

  10. Family transitions and juvenile delinquency.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Ryan D; Osgood, Aurea K; Oghia, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    There is a large body of research that shows children from non-intact homes show higher rates of juvenile delinquency than children from intact homes, partially due to weaker parental control and supervision in non-intact homes. What has not been adequately addressed in the research is the influence of changes in family structure among individual adolescents over time on delinquent offending. Using the first and third waves of the National Youth Study, we assess the effect of family structure changes on changes in delinquent offending between waves through the intermediate process of changes in family time and parental attachment. Although prior research has documented adolescents in broken homes are more delinquent than youth in intact homes, the process of family dissolution is not associated with concurrent increases in offending. In contrast, family formation through marriage or cohabitation is associated with simultaneous increases in offending. Changes in family time and parental attachment account for a portion of the family formation effect on delinquency, and prior parental attachment and juvenile offending significantly condition the effect of family formation on offending. PMID:20879178

  11. Juvenile Gaucher disease simulating osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Ortega, J.A.; Heisel, M.A.

    1981-10-01

    A case in which several imaging procedures suggested juvenile Gaucher disease in a child who presented with symptomatology of osteomyelitis is discussed. The 20-month girl was given a Technetium-99m radionuclide skeletal examination which revealed intense uptake of tracer agents along the shaft of the right femur. It was also found that the liver and spleen were dramatically Ga-67 avid. The bone pain symptomatology suggested an osteomyelitis of the femur, but skeletal scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled bone tracer demonstrated photopenic areas involving the femur, suggesting that the bone pain may have been due to marrow packed with Gaucher cells. This overexpansion of the marrow may lead to microfractures with remodeling seen radiographically as periosteal new bone and scintigraphically as increased periosteal deposition of tracer agent. The radiogallium study was useful to exclude an underlying osteomyelitis in the involved femurs. Although juvenile Gaucher disease is unusual, it should be considered in any child who presents with the constellation of hepatosplenomegaly and bone pain simulating osteomyelitis.

  12. Initial experience with a juvenile sheep model for evaluation of the pediatric intracorporeal ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xufeng; Li, Tieluo; Sanchez, Pablo; Watkins, Amelia; Li, Shuying; DeFilippi, Christopher; Wu, Zhongjun J.; Griffith, Bartley P

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of source material available in animal models appropriate to test pediatric-size blood pump design for assisting the left ventricle. A juvenile ovine animal model was developed to evaluate two pediatric ventricular assist devices (VAD). The child size Jarvik 2000 and CircuLite VADs were tested with this model. The 33 in vivo experiments were retrospectively studied to evaluate the reliability of the animal model. Methods Dorset hybrid juvenile sheep (20~36 kg) were used for evaluation of the small pediatric VADs. Under general anesthesia, a left lateral thoracotomy was performed through the fifth intercostal space. The devices were implanted between the left ventricle apex and the descending aorta without cardiopulmonary bypass. Heparin was continuously infused for anticoagulation therapy. Results Support duration averaged 26.7±19.6 days. 75.7% (25/33) experiments were completed as intended. Animals were docile and did not require sitters beyond the immediate operative period. Complication includes leg injury, graft infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, intravenous line disconnection, weight loss, renal failure, red urine (1 for each) and pulmonary failure in two. The activated clotting time (ACT) was adjusted via continuous intravenous heparin to 150-200 second. Reliable hemodynamics and biocompability data were collected for evaluate the pediatric intracorporeal VADs in the animal model. Conclusion The juvenile sheep model is a reliable, reproducible, and translatable for testing the Pediatric VADs. These experiments provided vital information for improvement of the devices and for clinical application in the future. PMID:23254234

  13. Acute toxicity of Roundup® herbicide to three life stages of the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica (Decapoda: Atyidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, P. K.; Muller, W. J.; Palmer, C. G.

    Glyphosate based herbicides, including Roundup®, are frequently used in the chemical control of weeds and invading alien plant species in South Africa. These herbicides ultimately get into water courses directly or indirectly through processes such as drifting, leaching, surface runoff and foliar spray of aquatic nuisance plants. Despite their widespread use, no water quality guideline exists to protect indigenous South African freshwater organisms from the toxic effects of these herbicides. The toxicity of the herbicide Roundup® was assessed using three different life stages of the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica, a prevalent species in South African freshwater ecosystems. Neonate (<7 days post hatching (dph)), juvenile (>7 dph and <20 dph) and adult (>40 dph) shrimps were exposed to varying concentrations (1.5-50 mg/L acid equivalence (a.e.)) of the herbicide in 48 and 96 h acute toxicity tests in order to determine the most sensitive life-stage. The results showed neonates to be more sensitive to Roundup® than both juveniles and adults with mean 96 h LC 50 values of 2.5, 7.0 and 25.3 mg/L a.e. respectively. The estimated 96 h LC 50 of neonates is much lower than the application rate (20-30 mg/L a.e.), although the application’s impact will depend on the dilution rate of the applied concentration in the environment. All three life-stages of unexposed animals exhibited active and coordinated movement but exposed shrimps were erratic and slow in their movements, with neonates showing most of these behavioral irregularities. This study shows that low levels of the herbicide Roundup® may adversely affect C. nilotica health and survival. Thus, the herbicide should be carefully managed to minimize any negative impact on non-target freshwater organisms.

  14. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  15. Piperidine alkaloids: Human and food animal teratogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Poisonous plants containing teratogen...

  16. Neonatal Amygdala Lesions Alter Responsiveness to Objects in Juvenile Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Toscano, Jessica E.; Bauman, Melissa; Mason, William A.; Amaral, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala is widely recognized to play a central role in emotional processing. In nonhuman primates, the amygdala appears to be critical for generating appropriate behavioral responses in emotionally salient contexts. One common finding is that macaque monkeys that receive amygdala lesions as adults are behaviorally uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. While control animals avoid these objects, amygdala-lesioned animals readily interact with them. Despite a large literature documenting the role of the amygdala in emotional processing in adult rhesus macaques, little research has assessed the role of the amygdala across the macaque neurodevelopmental trajectory. We assessed the behavioral responses of three-year-old (juvenile) rhesus macaques that received bilateral ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala or hippocampus at two weeks of age. Animals were presented with salient objects known to produce robust fear-related responses in macaques (e.g., snakes and reptile-like objects), mammal-like objects that included animal-like features (e.g., eyes and mouths) but not reptile-like features (e.g., scales), and non-animal objects. The visual complexity of objects was scaled to vary the objects' salience. In contrast to control and hippocampus-lesioned animals, amygdale-lesioned animals were uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. They readily retrieved food rewards placed near these objects and physically explored the objects. Furthermore, while control and hippocampus-lesioned animals differentiated between levels of object complexity, amygdala-lesioned animals did not. Taken together, these findings suggest that early damage to the amygdala, like damage during adulthood, permanently compromises emotional processing. PMID:21215794

  17. Animal learning.

    PubMed

    Castro, Leyre; Wasserman, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Pavlov and Thorndike pioneered the experimental study of animal learning and provided psychologists with powerful tools to unveil its underlying mechanisms. Today's research developments and theoretical analyses owe much to the pioneering work of these early investigators. Nevertheless, in the evolution of our knowledge about animal learning, some initial conceptions have been challenged and revised. We first review the original experimental procedures and findings of Pavlov and Thorndike. Next, we discuss critical research and consequent controversies which have greatly shaped animal learning theory. For example, although contiguity seemed to be the only condition that is necessary for learning, we now know that it is not sufficient; the conditioned stimulus (CS) also has to provide information about the occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). Also, animals appear to learn different things about the same stimuli when circumstances vary. For instance, when faced with situations in which the meaning of a CS changes, as in the case of acquisition and later extinction, animals seem to preserve the original knowledge (CS-US) in addition to learning about the new conditions (CS-noUS). Finally, we discuss how parallels among Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and human causal judgment suggest that causal knowledge may lie at the root of both human and animal learning. All of these empirical findings and theoretical developments prove that animal learning is more complex and intricate than was once imagined. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26272842

  18. Animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation. PMID:16501652

  19. Dermatopathy in juvenile Angus cattle due to vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Thomas J; Rood, Kerry A; Kelly, E Jane; Hall, Jeffery O

    2012-07-01

    In juvenile cattle, vitamin A deficiency is reported most commonly as a neurological condition; only rarely are there dermatologic manifestations. In the current study, alopecia, severe epidermal and follicular orthokeratosis, and acanthosis due to hypovitaminosis A are reported in 2 of 32 Angus calves, with a third animal suspected. Affected animals responded to vitamin A supplementation, and no additional calves displayed signs. Vitamin A acts on skin by regulating DNA transcription in keratinocytes, reducing the number of tonofilaments and desmosomes, both involved in cell-to-cell adhesion. Hence, adequate levels of dietary vitamin A are necessary for normal keratinocyte turnover, and deficiencies result in retention of keratinized cells (orthokeratosis). The present report reminds diagnosticians to consider vitamin A deficiency in cases of orthokeratotic dermatopathy in cattle. PMID:22585959

  20. Juvenile stress-induced alteration of maturation of the GABAA receptor alpha subunit in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jacobson-Pick, Shlomit; Elkobi, Alina; Vander, Shelly; Rosenblum, Kobi; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2008-11-01

    Profound evidence indicates that GABAA receptors are important in the control of physiological response to stress and anxiety. The alpha subunit type composition contributes significantly to the functional characterization of the GABAA receptors. The alpha2, alpha3, alpha5 subunits are predominately expressed in the brain during embryonic and early postnatal periods of normal rats, whilst alpha1 are most prominent during later developmental stages. In the present study, we examined the long-term effects of juvenile stress on GABA alpha subunit expression in adulthood in the amygdala and hippocampus. We applied the elevated platform stress paradigm at juvenility and used the open-field and startle response tests to assess anxiety level in adulthood. Juvenile stress effects without behavioural tests in adulthood were also examined since previous studies indicated that the mere exposure to these tests might be stressful for rats, enhancing the effects of the juvenile exposure to stress. In adulthood, we quantitatively determined the level of expression of alpha1, alpha2 and alpha3 in the hippocampus and amygdala. Our results indicate that subjecting juvenile stressed rats to additional challenges in adulthood results in an immature-like expression profile of these subunits. To test for potential functional implications of these alterations we examined the effects of the anxiolytic (diazepam) and the sedative (brotizolam) benzodiazepines on juvenile stressed and control rats following additional challenges in adulthood. Juvenile stressed rats were more sensitive to diazepam and less sensitive to brotizolam, suggesting that the alterations in GABA alpha subunit expression in these animals have functional consequences. PMID:18364065

  1. Cadmium as a respiratory toxicant

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Graham, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer, and kidney disease after prolonged exposure. Shorter-term exposure studies indicate that mechanisms thought to be involved in several of these chronic disease states (especially fibrosis and emphysema) are acutely activated. The evidence of toxicity is sufficiently clear that a TLV has been set and the International Agency for Research on Cancer has named Cd as a Group B1 substance (probable human carcinogen). The risk to Cd exposure is enhanced by its chemical and physical properties that result in bioaccumulation. Thus, even a low-level exposure over long periods of time would be expected to reach doses that could be toxic.

  2. Plasma steroid concentrations and male phallus size in juvenile alligators from seven Florida lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillette, L.J., Jr.; Woodward, A.R.; Crain, D.A.; Pickford, D.B.; Rooney, A.A.; Percival, H.F.

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal and juvenile alligators from contaminated Lake Apopka in central Florida exhibit abnormal plasma sex steroid concentrations as well as morphological abnormalities of the gonad and phallus. This study addresses whether similar abnormalities occur in juvenile alligators inhabiting six other lakes in Florida. For analysis, animals were partitioned into two subsets, animals 40-79 cm total length (1-3 years old) and juveniles 80-130 cm total length (3-7 years old). Plasma testosterone (T) concentrations were lower in small males from lakes Apopka, Griffin, and Jessup than from Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Similar differences were observed in the larger juveniles, with males from lakes Jessup, Apopka, and Okeechobee having lower plasma T concentrations than Lake Woodruff males. Plasma estradiol-17?? (E2) concentrations were significantly elevated in larger juvenile males from Lake Apopka compared to Lake Woodruff NWR. When compared to small juvenile females from Lake Woodruff NWR, females from lakes Griffin, Apopka, Orange, and Okeechobee had elevated plasma E2 concentrations. Phallus size was significantly smaller in males from lakes Griffin and Apopka when compared to males from Lake Woodruff NWR. An association existed between body size and phallus size on all lakes except Lake Apopka and between phallus size and plasma T concentration on all lakes except lakes Apopka and Orange. Multiple regression analysis, with body size and plasma T concentration as independent covariables, explained the majority of the variation in phallus size on all lakes. These data suggest that the differences in sex steroids and phallus size observed in alligators from Lake Apopka are not limited to that lake, nor to one with a history of a major pesticide spill. Further work examining the relationship of sex steroids and phallus size with specific biotic and abiotic factors, such as antiandrogenic or estrogenic contaminants, is needed.

  3. Toxicity of Pesticides. Agrichemical Fact Sheet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Winand K.

    This fact sheet gives the acute oral and dermal toxicity (LD 50) of over 250 pesticides in lab animals. The chemicals are categorized as fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, or miscellaneous compounds. One or more trade names are given for each pesticide. In addition, a brief explanation of toxicity determination is given. (BB)

  4. The facts about sunn hemp toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) is an annual plant widely grown in the tropics. The genus Crotalaria includes some species known to be toxic to animals. Development of seed producing cultivars for the continental USA at Auburn University, AL, has raised the question if its seed and forage are toxic...

  5. Effects of xenobiotics and phytotoxins on reproduction in food animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of natural toxicants and anthropogenic compounds on reproduction in food animals is significant in its economic impact. Confounding factors such as stress, nutritional status, season of the year, animal species involved, genetic variability, disease conditions, management factors, etc...

  6. A juvenile mouse pheromone inhibits sexual behaviour through the vomeronasal system.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, David M; Moeller, Lisa M; Osakada, Takuya; Horio, Nao; Li, Qian; Roy, Dheeraj S; Cichy, Annika; Spehr, Marc; Touhara, Kazushige; Liberles, Stephen D

    2013-10-17

    Animals display a repertoire of different social behaviours. Appropriate behavioural responses depend on sensory input received during social interactions. In mice, social behaviour is driven by pheromones, chemical signals that encode information related to age, sex and physiological state. However, although mice show different social behaviours towards adults, juveniles and neonates, sensory cues that enable specific recognition of juvenile mice are unknown. Here we describe a juvenile pheromone produced by young mice before puberty, termed exocrine-gland secreting peptide 22 (ESP22). ESP22 is secreted from the lacrimal gland and released into tears of 2- to 3-week-old mice. Upon detection, ESP22 activates high-affinity sensory neurons in the vomeronasal organ, and downstream limbic neurons in the medial amygdala. Recombinant ESP22, painted on mice, exerts a powerful inhibitory effect on adult male mating behaviour, which is abolished in knockout mice lacking TRPC2, a key signalling component of the vomeronasal organ. Furthermore, knockout of TRPC2 or loss of ESP22 production results in increased sexual behaviour of adult males towards juveniles, and sexual responses towards ESP22-deficient juveniles are suppressed by ESP22 painting. Thus, we describe a pheromone of sexually immature mice that controls an innate social behaviour, a response pathway through the accessory olfactory system and a new role for vomeronasal organ signalling in inhibiting sexual behaviour towards young. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding how a sensory system can regulate behaviour. PMID:24089208

  7. Suzaku Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the Suzaku spacecraft. Suzaku (originally known as Astro-E2) was launched July 10, 2005, and maintains a low-Earth orbit while it observes X-rays from the universe. The satel...

  8. Animal Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  9. Making Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, James

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author provides simple instructions for making an animation using "PowerPoint". He describes the process by walking readers through it for a sample image. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  10. Pulsar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Pulsars are thought to emit relatively narrow radio beams, shown as green in this animation. If these beams don't sweep toward Earth, astronomers cannot detect the radio signals. Pulsar gamma-ray e...

  11. Wild Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and other resources focuses on wild animals. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, magazines, and professional resources, as well as a class activity. (LRW)

  12. Challenging the Myths: 1999 National Report Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

    This bulletin, extracted from "Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report," examines juvenile crime statistics, demonstrating that the predictions in the early 1990s of the emergence of juvenile superpredators (juveniles for whom violence is a way of life) is not supported by current data. Research indicates that levels of predatory…

  13. 8 CFR 236.3 - Detention and release of juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detention and release of juveniles. 236.3 Section 236.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION... Aliens Prior to Order of Removal § 236.3 Detention and release of juveniles. (a) Juveniles. A juvenile...

  14. Juvenile Offenders with Mental Health Needs: Reducing Recidivism Using Wraparound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullmann, Michael D.; Kerbs, Jodi; Koroloff, Nancy; Veach-White, Ernie; Gaylor, Rita; Sieler, Dede

    2006-01-01

    The rate of youth with mental health needs is disproportionately high in juvenile justice. Wraparound planning involves families and providers in coordinating juvenile justice, mental health, and other services and supports. This study compares data from two groups of juvenile offenders with mental health problems: 106 youth in a juvenile justice…

  15. [Dangerous animals].

    PubMed

    Koljonen, Virve; Söderlund, Tim; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Gissler, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Contacts between humans and animals inevitably involve encounters possibly resulting in the human being injured. During the period of 2000 to 2014 almost 90 people died in this kind of conflict in Finland. Of these deaths, one third were associated with horses. In addition, over the same period 85 people died in traffic accidents in which an animal was hit by a car. Accidents requiring hospitalization occurred for approx. 8 000 people. PMID:27522833

  16. Deoxynivalenol and its toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sobrova, Pavlina; Adam, Vojtech; Vasatkova, Anna; Beklova, Miroslava; Zeman, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of several mycotoxins produced by certain Fusarium species that frequently infect corn, wheat, oats, barley, rice, and other grains in the field or during storage. The exposure risk to human is directly through foods of plant origin (cereal grains) or indirectly through foods of animal origin (kidney, liver, milk, eggs). It has been detected in buckwheat, popcorn, sorgum, triticale, and other food products including flour, bread, breakfast cereals, noodles, infant foods, pancakes, malt and beer. DON affects animal and human health causing acute temporary nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, and fever. This review briefly summarizes toxicities of this mycotoxin as well as effects on reproduction and their antagonistic and synergic actions. PMID:21217881

  17. Deoxynivalenol and its toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sobrova, Pavlina; Adam, Vojtech; Vasatkova, Anna; Beklova, Miroslava; Zeman, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2010-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of several mycotoxins produced by certain Fusarium species that frequently infect corn, wheat, oats, barley, rice, and other grains in the field or during storage. The exposure risk to human is directly through foods of plant origin (cereal grains) or indirectly through foods of animal origin (kidney, liver, milk, eggs). It has been detected in buckwheat, popcorn, sorgum, triticale, and other food products including flour, bread, breakfast cereals, noodles, infant foods, pancakes, malt and beer. DON affects animal and human health causing acute temporary nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, and fever. This review briefly summarizes toxicities of this mycotoxin as well as effects on reproduction and their antagonistic and synergic actions. PMID:21217881

  18. An animal welfare perspective on animal testing of GMO crops.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman; Rusche, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    The public discussion on the introduction of agro-genetic engineering focuses mainly on economical, ecological and human health aspects. The fact is neglected that laboratory animals must suffer before either humans or the environment are affected. However, numerous animal experiments are conducted for toxicity testing and authorisation of genetically modified plants in the European Union. These are ethically questionable, because death and suffering of the animals for purely commercial purposes are accepted. Therefore, recent political initiatives to further increase animal testing for GMO crops must be regarded highly critically. Based on concrete examples this article demonstrates that animal experiments, on principle, cannot provide the expected protection of users and consumers despite all efforts to standardise, optimise or extend them. PMID:18551237

  19. Beyond toxicity

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2014-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic plants, cyanide is a co-product of ethylene and camalexin biosynthesis. To maintain cyanide at non-toxic levels, Arabidopsis plants express the mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1. CYS-C1 knockout leads to an increased level of cyanide in the roots and leaves and a severe defect in root hair morphogenesis, suggesting that cyanide acts as a signaling factor in root development. During compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions, cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated. Moreover, CYS-C1 mutation increases both plant tolerance to biotrophic pathogens and their susceptibility to necrotrophic fungi, indicating that cyanide could stimulate the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. We hypothesize that CYS-C1 is essential for maintaining non-toxic concentrations of cyanide in the mitochondria to facilitate cyanide’s role in signaling. PMID:24398435

  20. Juvenile curfews: are they an effective and constitutional means of combating juvenile violence?

    PubMed

    Fried, C S

    2001-01-01

    Curfew ordinances have become a popular way to attempt to combat juvenile crime and victimization. Although the Supreme Court has yet to hear a curfew case, several constitutional challenges have been brought in lower federal courts. The cases are replete with psychological assumptions for which there is limited empirical evidence. In applying the "strict scrutiny" standard, several courts have also questioned whether juvenile curfews are narrowly tailored to further the State's interest in reducing juvenile crime and victimization. While public opinion and reports from several police jurisdictions support the utility of juvenile curfews, recent empirical studies indicate that curfews are not effective at reducing juvenile offending or victimization. This paper argues that the emerging evidence does not support the use of juvenile curfews and urges policy makers and the courts to examine the efficacy of curfew legislation. Directions for future research that could be helpful to the courts in applying the Bellotti factors to curfew cases are also suggested. PMID:11241685

  1. Law & psychiatry: punishing juveniles who kill.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2012-10-01

    Punishment of juvenile murderers forces policy makers to weigh the developmental immaturity of adolescents against the heinousness of their crimes. The U.S. Supreme Court has progressively limited the severity of punishments that can be imposed on juveniles, holding that their impulsivity, susceptibility to peer pressure, and more fluid character render them less culpable for their actions. Having eliminated the death penalty as a punishment, the Court recently struck down mandatory life sentences without prospect of parole. The decision is interesting for its emphasis on rehabilitation, opening the door to further restrictions on punitive sentences for juveniles-and perhaps for adults too. PMID:23032673

  2. Juvenile Huntington disease in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Emilia Mabel; Parisi, Virginia; Etcheverry, José Luis; Sanguinetti, Ana; Cordi, Lorena; Binelli, Adrian; Persi, Gabriel; Squitieri, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed demographic, clinical and genetic characteristics of juvenile Huntington disease (JHD) and it frequency in an Argentinean cohort. Age at onset was defined as the age at which behavioral, cognitive, psychiatric or motor abnormalities suggestive of JHD were first reported. Clinical and genetic data were similar to other international series, however, in this context we identified the highest JHD frequency reported so far (19.72%; 14/71). Age at onset of JHD is challenging and still under discussion. Our findings reinforce the hypothesis that clinical manifestations, other than the typical movement disorder, may anticipate age at onset of even many years. Analyses of JHD cohorts are required to explore it frequency in populations with different backgrounds to avoid an underestimation of this rare phenotype. Moreover, data from selected populations may open new pathways in therapeutic approaches and may explain new potential correlations between HD presentations and environmental or biological factors. PMID:26602194

  3. Sociologic perspectives on juvenile violence.

    PubMed

    Currie, E

    2000-10-01

    In sum, there are four sets of social factors that help us understand why juvenile violence appears when, and where, it does, and why some communities and entire societies are persistently wracked by youth violence whereas others are largely spared its worst expressions. When it comes to the first three factors in particular--deprivation, disorganization, and brutalization--the evidence for these links is as strong as anything in social science, and that evidence is supported by a variety of sources and a variety of methods of investigation. Such investigation includes the knowledge we gain through social intervention. Some of the most effective violence prevention programs are successful precisely because they confront and deflect the social forces that otherwise often lead to violence. Consider, for example, the home-visiting programs that work with poor parents in disorganized communities to lower the risks of child abuse; and some of the more "holistic" or "multisystemic" efforts to work with violent juvenile offenders. The best of these programs work by tackling the problems of social isolation and lack of supports in the community, as well as immediate issues of economic survival for vulnerable families and children. More generally, we know that the availability of steady and rewarding work in the future, of the kind that can reliably sustain a family, is one of the most important factors allowing some youths to "desist" from violence as they mature. These conclusions give us much to be encouraged about, and much to be alarmed about. On the one hand, understanding that youth violence often is rooted in a set of adverse social conditions that are identifiable, and potentially modifiable, is a fundamentally optimistic message. It reminds us that the level of juvenile violence we suffer in America today is neither fated nor inevitable. Other societies that are in many respects much like us suffer far less of it; so could we, and we increasingly understand some

  4. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  5. Social reward among juvenile mice

    PubMed Central

    Panksepp, J B; Lahvis, G P

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian social relationships, such as mother–offspring attachments and pair bonds, can directly affect reproductive output. However, conspecifics approach one another in a comparatively broad range of contexts, so conceivably there are motivations for social congregation other than those underlying reproduction, parental care or territoriality. Here, we show that reward mediated by social contact is a fundamental aspect of juvenile mouse sociality. Employing a novel social conditioned place preference (SCPP) procedure, we demonstrate that social proximity is rewarding for juvenile mice from three inbred strains (A/J, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), while mice from a fourth strain (BALB/cJ) are much less responsive to social contact. Importantly, this strain-dependent difference was not related to phenotypic variability in exploratory behavior or contextual learning nor influenced by the genetic background associated with maternal care or social conditioning. Furthermore, the SCPP phenotype was expressed early in development (postnatal day 25) and did not require a specific sex composition within the conditioning group. Finally, SCPP responses resulted from an interaction between two specifiable processes: one component of the interaction facilitated approach toward environments that were associated with social salience, whereas a second component mediated avoidance of environmental cues that predicted social isolation. We have thus identified a genetically prescribed process that can attribute value onto conditions predicting a general form of social contact. To our knowledge, this is the first definitive evidence to show that genetic variation can influence a form of social valuation not directly related to a reproductive behavior. PMID:17212648

  6. Animal Bioacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Neville H.

    Animals rely upon their acoustic and vibrational senses and abilities to detect the presence of both predators and prey and to communicate with members of the same species. This chapter surveys the physical bases of these abilities and their evolutionary optimization in insects, birds, and other land animals, and in a variety of aquatic animals other than cetaceans, which are treated in Chap. 20. While there are many individual variations, and some animals devote an immense fraction of their time and energy to acoustic communication, there are also many common features in their sound production and in the detection of sounds and vibrations. Excellent treatments of these matters from a biological viewpoint are given in several notable books [19.1,2] and collections of papers [19.3,4,5,6,7,8], together with other more specialized books to be mentioned in the following sections, but treatments from an acoustical viewpoint [19.9] are rare. The main difference between these two approaches is that biological books tend to concentrate on anatomical and physiological details and on behavioral outcomes, while acoustical books use simplified anatomical models and quantitative analysis to model vocalization frequency scaling in animals hearing sound production animal animal biological biological bioacoustics whole-system behavior. This latter is the approach to be adopted here.

  7. Animal Exposure During Burn Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaume, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    An animal exposure test system (AETS) was designed and fabricated for the purpose of collecting physiological and environmental (temperature) data from animal subjects exposed to combustion gases in large scale fire tests. The AETS consisted of an open wire mesh, two-compartment cage, one containing an exercise wheel for small rodents, and the other containing one rat instrumented externally for electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration. Cage temperature is measured by a thermistor located in the upper portion of the rat compartment. Animal activity is monitored by the ECG and the records indicate an increase in EMG (electromyograph) noise super-imposed by the increased activity of the torso musculature. Examples of the recordings are presented and discussed as to their significance regarding toxicity of fire gases and specific events occurring during the test. The AETS was shown to be a useful tool in screening materials for the relative toxicity of their outgassing products during pyrolysis and combustion.

  8. Animal Models of Ricin Toxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kejing; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Gardner, Donald J.; Pincus, Seth H.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of ricin toxicosis are necessary for testing the efficacy of therapeutic measures, as well studying the mechanisms by which ricin exerts its toxicity in intact animals. Because ricin can serve as a particularly well-characterized model of tissue damage, and the host response to that damage, studies of the mechanisms of ricin toxicity may have more general applicability. For example, our studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of ricin-induced hypoglycemia may help elucidate the relationship of type II diabetes, insulin resistance, and inflammation. Studies in non-human primates are most relevant for testing and developing agents having clinical utility. But these animals are expensive and limited in quantity, and so rodents are used for most mechanistic studies. PMID:21956160

  9. Survival, movement, and health of hatchery-raised juvenile Lost River suckers within a mesocosm in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hereford, Danielle M.; Burdick, Summer M.; Elliott, Diane G.; Dolan-Caret, Amari; Conway, Carla M.; Harris, Alta C.

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of endangered Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) in Upper Klamath Lake is limited by poor juvenile survival and failure to recruit into the adult population. Poor water quality, degradation of rearing habitat, and toxic levels of microcystin are hypothesized to contribute to low juvenile survival. Studies of wild juvenile suckers are limited in that capture rates are low and compromised individuals are rarely captured in passive nets. The goal of this study was to assess the use of a mesocosm for learning about juvenile survival, movement, and health. Hatchery-raised juvenile Lost River suckers were PIT (passive integrated transponder) tagged and monitored by three vertically stratified antennas. Fish locations within the mesocosm were recorded at least every 30 minutes and were assessed in relation to vertically stratified water-quality conditions. Vertical movement patterns were analyzed to identify the timing of mortality for each fish. Most mortality occurred from July 28 to August 16, 2014. Juvenile suckers spent daylight hours near the benthos and moved throughout the entire water column during dark hours. Diel movements were not in response to dissolved-oxygen concentrations, temperature, or pH. Furthermore, low dissolved-oxygen concentrations, high temperatures, high pH, high un-ionized ammonia, or high microcystin levels did not directly cause mortality, although indirect effects may have occurred. However, water-quality conditions known to be lethal to juvenile Lost River suckers did not occur during the study period. Histological assessment revealed severe gill hyperplasia and Ichthyobodo sp. infestations in most moribund fish. For these fish, Ichthyobodo sp. was likely the cause of mortality, although it is unclear if this parasite originated in the rearing facility because fish were not screened for this parasite prior to introduction. This study has demonstrated that we can effectively use a mesocosm equipped with antennas to learn

  10. Multigenerational acclimation of Daphnia magna to mercury: relationships between biokinetics and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Martin T K; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2005-11-01

    We examined the effects of multigenerational exposure of mercury (Hg) on Hg toxicity and biokinetics in a population of Daphnia magna. After chronic Hg exposure at 3.8 microg Hg/L, the first generation (F0) adults had an elevated 24-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of Hg (76 microg/L) when compared to the control adults (56 microg/L). The dissolved influx rate of Hg was depressed significantly in the Hg-treated adults, which was accompanied by a reduced ingestion rate and enhanced induction of metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP). The second-generation (F1) juveniles originating from the control and exposed lines had no major differences in these parameters (except the dietary assimilation efficiency). Recovery from Hg stress enhanced the vulnerability of F1 adults to Hg toxicity, with a reduced 48-h LC50 (44 microg/L) and a decreased concentration of MTLP (80% of control). Nevertheless, Hg-treated F1 adults had similar tolerance (in terms of LC50s) as the control line, indicating that D. magna acclimated to Hg stress after the first generation of exposure. No major difference occurred in the Hg biokinetics and toxicity among different groups of F2 daphnids. However, the F2 neonates produced by the Hg-treated F1 adults had much higher 48-h LC50 (149 microg/L) and MTLP concentration (148% of control) when there was continuous Hg exposure after birth. We concluded that acclimation to Hg stress occurred quickly in D. magna, though animals recovering from Hg stress were more vulnerable to Hg toxicity. Both ingestion rate and MTLP may not be good biomarkers of Hg stress in the field, because acclimation can be achieved through multigenerational exposure to elevated Hg concentrations. PMID:16398130

  11. Beta-adrenergic control of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation in hepatocytes from juvenile, adult and adrenalectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Cao, D; Alvarez Chiva, V; Mato, J M

    1983-01-01

    Changes in isoprenaline-sensitive phospholipid methyltransferase were studied in hepatocytes isolated from juvenile, mature and adrenalectomized rats. Isoprenaline produced greater stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation in juvenile and mature adrenalectomized rats than in mature animals. Similarly, isoprenaline stimulated phospholipid methyltransferase in juvenile and mature adrenalectomized rats but had no effect in mature animals. Isoprenaline-mediated activation of phospholipid methyltransferase in adrenalectomized rats was time- and dose-dependent. In hepatocytes isolated from adrenalectomized rats incubated with [Me-3H]methionine or [3H]-ethanolamine the addition of isoprenaline increased the amount of radioactivity incorporated into phosphatidylcholine. The activation by isoprenaline of phospholipid methyltransferase was abolished by the beta-blocker propranolol and by insulin. These results indicate that rat liver the occupation of functional beta-receptors causes a stimulation of phospholipid methylation. It is suggested that, as reported previously, cyclic AMP activates phospholipid methyltransferase. PMID:6320796

  12. [Modern elucidative strategies for scientific connotation of controlling toxic reactions while toxic herbs are used to the indication syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yong; Li, Jian; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiao-Juan; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2013-10-01

    One of effective measures for controlling toxic reactions is to use toxic herbs according to corresponding indication syndrome. It is important to develop toxicity theory of Chinese medicine in a sound and international way using modern language to elucidate its scientific connotation. We expect to explain scientific connotation of controlling toxic reaction while toxic herbs are used to the indication syndrome by using holistic research ideas and methods capable of reflecting governing exterior to infer interior, establish appropriate corresponding syndrome animal models by cutting into dose-effect/toxicity of toxic Chinese herbs, construct and analyze multi-layer molecular network using theories and technologies of metabonomics, network biology, and bioinformatics. PMID:24432691

  13. Toxicity of hexamethylenediamine.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2005-01-01

    Hexamethylendiamine (HMDA; CAS No. 124-09-4; 6055-52-3 for the dihydrochloride salt) is moderately toxic following acute doses/exposures with oral lethal doses in rats ranging from 750 to 1500 mg/kg. HMDA is extremely irritating to the skin and eyes and is not a sensitizer in guinea pigs. Repeated exposure inhalation studies have defined the upper respiratory tract to be the first target of HMDA. The irritation seen is proportional to the exposure concentration. Systemic damage is limited. Genetic testing is not extensive, but there is no indication of activity. HMDA is neither a developmental nor a reproductive toxin, but in one developmental study, the fetal No-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) was lower than that of the maternal animal. No carcinogenicity studies have been conducted. Documented human experience is limited, but indications of HMDA's irritative properties are found in the literature. HMDA does not persist or bioaccumulate in the environment. The chemical is not particularly toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates but is quite toxic to algae. HMDA is rapidly absorbed and metabolized by the rat with little tissue storage. PMID:15720033

  14. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, H A; Kvasnicka, J

    1978-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with seronegative systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis developed acute cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis and systemic corticosteroids resulted in complete recovery of the pericardial involvement. This was followed by complete remission of rheumatoid disease. Images PMID:686861

  15. Juvenile Arthritis: Discoveries Lead to Newer Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Juvenile Arthritis: Discoveries Lead to Newer Treatments Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... better for different subgroups of the disease. In recent years, FDA has approved several of these treatments. ...

  16. Screening Incarcerated Juveniles Using the MAYSI-2.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy L; Grande, Todd L; Hallman, Janelle; Underwood, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of mental health disorders among incarcerated juveniles is a matter of national and global concern. Juvenile justice personnel need accurate screening measures that identify youth requiring immediate mental health services. The purpose of this study was threefold: (a) to examine the utility of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument, Version 2 (MAYSI-2) in identifying juveniles with mental health concerns in a large sample of juveniles (N = 4,009), (b) to provide data regarding rates of identified mental health needs in incarcerated youth, and (c) to provide descriptive comparisons to other studies using the MAYSI-2. Mean scores of subscales were compared with the MAYSI-2 normative samples and other recent studies. Results indicated that this population has a high occurrence of mental health symptoms and there is high variability in the severity of the symptoms. In addition, a multivariate analysis of variance test found significant differences in mental health problems across ethnic groups. PMID:25431437

  17. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile primary osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by a shortage of calcium and other minerals in bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone ... protein is involved in the regulation of bone mineral density. LRP5 gene mutations that cause juvenile primary ...

  18. Group sexual offending by juvenile females.

    PubMed

    Wijkman, Miriam; Weerman, Frank; Bijleveld, Catrien; Hendriks, Jan

    2015-06-01

    This study examined all group sexual offending cases in the Netherlands between 1995 and 2009 (n = 26) in which at least one juvenile female offender (n = 35) had been adjudicated. Information from court files showed that the majority of juvenile female group sexual offenders have (inter)personal problems and (sexual) abuse experiences. The aims of the offender groups in committing the offense could be categorized in three themes: harassing the victim, sexual gratification, and taking revenge. The reasons why juvenile female offenders participated in a group could be categorized into group dynamics versus instrumental reasons. The findings are contrasted with findings on juvenile male group sexual offenders. Implications of the findings for research and treatment are discussed. PMID:25504258

  19. Defective neutrophil chemotaxis in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R A; Page, R C; Wilde, G

    1977-01-01

    Neutrophil chemotaxis was evaluated in nine patients with juvenile periodontitis, with normal subjects and patients with the adult form of periodontitis as controls. Defective chemotactic responses were observed in neutrophils from seven of nine juvenile patients, and a reduced level of complement-derived chemotactic activity was demonstrated in serum from four patients. These determinations were normal in all the patients with adult periodontitis. Serum from five of the juvenile patients contained a heat-stable, non-dialyzable factor that markedly inhibited the chemotaxis of normal neutrophils. Thus the characteristic tissue destruction seen in juvenile periodontitis may be, at least in part, a consequence of a failure of host defense mechanisms. PMID:591063

  20. Juvenile participation in conversations with probation officers.

    PubMed

    van Nijnatten, Carolus; Stevens, Gonneke

    2012-05-01

    Juvenile probation work comprises a mixture of repressive and empowering strategies, since probation officers need to control young offenders' conduct and at the same time help the offender to take responsibility and live life within the margins of society. This ambiguous nature of juvenile probation work may confuse the communication between probation officers and juveniles. Interviews with offenders of Moroccan origin and their probation officers in the Netherlands show that both parties are unhappy with the mutual communication. According to the youngsters, a restrictive policy is inevitable but might be more effective if this would go together with an empowering approach. Interactional analysis of the conversations shows that the lack of juvenile participation is caused by professional conversational dominance, as seen in topic control, poor role clarification, and a cross-examining style of the conversations. PMID:21429957

  1. Toxic plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive performance is the single most important economic animal trait to the livestock industry and is reported to be 5 and 10 times more significant than carcass quality and growth traits respectively. Poisonous plants impact livestock reproductive function in a major way and have been shown...

  2. Fumonisins: Toxicokinetics, Mechanism of Action and Toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticillioides and F. proliferatum. They occur worldwide and are found predominantly in corn and in corn-based animal feeds. Of the fumonisins, fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most common and thoroughly studied. FB1 causes the same toxicities in animals a...

  3. Gossypol Toxicity from Cottonseed Products

    PubMed Central

    Gadelha, Ivana Cristina N.; Fonseca, Nayanna Brunna S.; Oloris, Silvia Catarina S.; Melo, Marília M.

    2014-01-01

    Gossypol is a phenolic compound produced by pigment glands in cotton stems, leaves, seeds, and flower buds (Gossypium spp.). Cottonseed meal is a by-product of cotton that is used for animal feeding because it is rich in oil and proteins. However, gossypol toxicity limits cottonseed use in animal feed. High concentrations of free gossypol may be responsible for acute clinical signs of gossypol poisoning which include respiratory distress, impaired body weight gain, anorexia, weakness, apathy, and death after several days. However, the most common toxic effects is the impairment of male and female reproduction. Another important toxic effect of gossypol is its interference with immune function, reducing an animal's resistance to infections and impairing the efficiency of vaccines. Preventive procedures to limit gossypol toxicity involve treatment of the cottonseed product to reduce the concentration of free gossypol with the most common treatment being exposure to heat. However, free gossypol can be released from the bound form during digestion. Agronomic selection has produced cotton varieties devoid of glands producing gossypol, but these varieties are not normally grown because they are less productive and are more vulnerable to attacks by insects. PMID:24895646

  4. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin in Refractory Juvenile Dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    de Inocencio, Jaime; Enríquez-Merayo, Eugenia; Casado, Rocío; González-Granado, Luis Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common form of juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. We report a child with steroid-dependent JDM refractory to hydroxychloroquine and subcutaneous methotrexate who experienced systemic reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin and was successfully treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin. This form of therapy has been shown to be safe, has a very low rate of adverse effects, does not require hospital admission, reduces the number of missed school days, and decreases the costs associated with treatment. PMID:26966131

  5. EVALUATION OF THE DORSET SHEEP AS A PREDICTIVE ANIMAL MODEL FOR THE RESPONSE OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-DEFICIENT HUMAN ERYTHOCYTES TO A PROPOSED SYSTEMIC TOXIC OZONE INTERMEDIATE, METHYL OLEATE OZONIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Erythrocytes of both glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD)-deficient humans and Dorest sheep, an animal model with an erythrocyte G-6-PD deficiency, responded in a dose-dependent manner to the oxidant stress of methyl oleate ozonide (MOO) as measured by decreases in G-6-PD a...

  6. Thallium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Galván-Arzate, S; Santamaría, A

    1998-09-30

    Thallium (T1+) is a toxic heavy metal which was accidentally discovered by Sir William Crookes in 1861 by burning the dust from a sulfuric acid industrial plant. He observed a bright green spectral band that quickly disappeared. Crookes named the new element 'Thallium' (after thallos meaning young shoot). In 1862, Lamy described the same spectral line and studied both the physical and chemical properties of this new element (Prick, J.J.G., 1979. Thallium poisoning. In: Vinkrn, P.J., Bruyn, G.W. (Eds.), Intoxication of the Nervous System, Handbook of Clinical Neurology, vol. 36. North-Holland, New York. pp. 239-278). PMID:9801025

  7. Social factors leading to juvenile delinquency.

    PubMed

    Sakuta, T

    1996-12-01

    According to the White Paper on Crime 1994 published by the Ministry of Justice in Japan, the delinquent rate in Japan was highest when juveniles were approximately 14 to 16 years old, and declined as they grew older. The analysis of juvenile offenders in Japan showed that 70% of them had two living parents, 90% of them from families which were financially stable or affluent. The breakdown of their parents attitudes showed, however, that 48.2% were classified as neglectful, followed by harshness at 30.3% and spoiling or overprotection at 17.3% in 1993 in Japan. In the following, social factors leading to juvenile delinquency were reviewed. Factors leading to juvenile delinquency were classified into social factors, school factors and home factors, and recent findings concerning those three factors were explained. A fairly clear outlook on the efforts required by society, schools and families to reduce juvenile delinquency was shown by revealing important factors leading juveniles to delinquency. PMID:9023445

  8. Adapting Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedman, John; Wedman, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The "Animals" program found on the Apple II and IIe system master disk can be adapted for use in the mathematics classroom. Instructions for making the necessary changes and suggestions for using it in lessons related to geometric shapes are provided. (JN)

  9. Animal Bioacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Neville

    Animals rely upon their acoustic and vibrational senses and abilities to detect the presence of both predators and prey and to communicate with members of the same species. This chapter surveys the physical bases of these abilities and their evolutionary optimization in insects, birds, and other land animals, and in a variety of aquatic animals other than cetaceans, which are treated in Chap. 20. While there are many individual variations, and some animals devote an immense fraction of their time and energy to acoustic communication, there are also many common features in their sound production and in the detection of sounds and vibrations. Excellent treatments of these matters from a biological viewpoint are given in several notable books [19.1,2] and collections of papers [19.3,4,5,6,7,8], together with other more specialized books to be mentioned in the following sections, but treatments from an acoustical viewpoint [19.9] are rare. The main difference between these two approaches is that biological books tend to concentrate on anatomical and physiological details and on behavioral outcomes, while acoustical books use simplified anatomical models and quantitative analysis to model whole-system behavior. This latter is the approach to be adopted here.

  10. Transgenic Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  11. Animal Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    2001-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on, outdoor science experiments designed to teach elementary school students about animal adaptation. The experiments focus on: how color camouflage affects an insect population; how spiderlings find a home; and how chameleons camouflage themselves by changing color. (SM)

  12. Subchronic oral toxicity of zinc in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Llobet, J.M.; Domingo, J.L.; Colomina, M.T.; Mayayo, E.; Corbella, J.

    1988-07-01

    It is well known that zinc has important biological functions. Clinical manifestations in zinc-deficient animals include growth retardation, testicular atrophy, skin changes, and poor appetite. On the other hand, high levels of dietary zinc have been shown to induce copper deficiency in rats and to interfere with the metabolism of calcium and iron. Little is known on the oral toxicity of zinc in mammals. However, some toxic effects in human subjects, rodents, and sheep have been reported. In order to extend the information about the oral toxicity of zinc, a semichronic toxicity study of zinc acetate in rats has been carried out in this paper.

  13. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  14. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  15. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  16. CHIRONOMIDAE TOXICITY TESTS--BIOLOGICAL BACKGROUND AND PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity tests must be based on an understanding of the test animal's life cycle. The first section of this report describes the biological information needed to develop toxicity test procedures. The second section describes three categories of toxicity test systems - short-expos...

  17. Developments in the Classification and Treatment of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Katz, James D.; Jones, Olcay Y.

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are rare, heterogeneous autoimmune diseases that share chronic muscle inflammation and weakness. JIIM broadly includes three major clinicopathologic groups: juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile polymyositis, and overlap myositis. A growing spectrum of clinicopathologic groups and serologic phenotypes defined by the presence of myositis-specific or myositis-associated autoantibodies are now recognized, each with differing demographics, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and prognoses. With the first multi-center collaborative studies and controlled trials using standardized preliminarily validated outcome measures, the therapy of juvenile myositis has advanced. Although daily oral corticosteroids remain the backbone of treatment, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are almost always used as adjunctive therapy. Methotrexate is the conventional DMARD for the initial therapy, either alone or combined with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone, and/or intravenous immunoglobulin for patients with moderate to severe disease. Cyclosporine may be added to these or serve as an alternative to methotrexate. Other drugs and biologic therapies, including mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and infliximab, might benefit selected patients with recalcitrant disease, unacceptable steroid toxicity, or patients with risk factors for poor prognosis. The treatment of cutaneous disease, calcinosis, and the role for rehabilitation are also discussed. PMID:24182859

  18. 77 FR 38751 - Codification of Animal Testing Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... the Federal Register on May 30, 1984 (49 FR 22522). These guidelines advised product manufacturers to... recommendations and Commission's animal testing policy more accessible and transparent to interested parties, the... defines the hazard category of ``highly toxic'' in terms of animal toxicity when groups of 10 or more...

  19. Difficult Decisions: Animal Rights--Do We Have the Right to Do Research on Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parakh, Jal S.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses who has the right to determine the use of animals in scientific research which includes medical experimentation and the toxicity testing of compounds, ranging from pesticides to cosmetics. Provides a list of questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  20. Life in varying environments: experimental evidence for delayed effects of juvenile environment on adult life history.

    PubMed

    Helle, Heikki; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio

    2012-05-01

    1. The effects of environment experienced during early development on phenotype as an adult has started to gain vast amounts of interest in various taxa. Some evidence on long-term effects of juvenile environment is available, but replicated experimental studies in wild animals are still lacking. 2. Here we report the first replicated experiment in wild mammals which examines the long-term effects of juvenile and adult environments on individual fitness (reproduction, survival and health). The early development of bank vole (Myodes glareolus) individuals took place in either food-supplemented or un-supplemented outdoor enclosures. After the summer, adult individuals were reciprocally changed to either a similar or opposite resource environment to overwinter. 3. Adult environment had an overriding effect on reproductive success of females so that females overwintering in food-supplemented enclosures had a higher probability of breeding and advanced the initiation of breeding. However, the characteristics of their litters were determined by juvenile environment: females initially grown in food-supplemented conditions subsequently produced larger litters with bigger pups and a male-biased sex ratio. 4. In males, individuals growing in un-supplemented conditions had the highest survival irrespective of adult environment during winter, whereas in females, neither the juvenile nor adult environments affected their survival significantly. The physiological condition of voles in spring, as determined by haematological parameters, was also differentially affected by juvenile (plasma proteins and male testosterone) and adult (haematocrit) environments. 5. Our results suggest that (i) life-history trajectories of voles are not strictly specialized to a certain environment and (ii) the plastic life-history responses to present conditions can actually be caused by delayed effects of the juvenile environment. More generally, the results are important for understanding

  1. NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate the proconvulsant effect of juvenile social isolation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Momeny, Majid; Shirzadian, Armin; Balaei, Maryam Rahimi; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Azizi, Romina; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei

    2016-03-01

    Experiencing psychosocial stress in early life, such as social isolation stress (SIS), is known to have negative enduring effects on the development of the brain and behavior. In addition to anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, we previously showed that juvenile SIS increases susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice through enhancing the nitrergic system activity in the hippocampus. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in proconvulsant effects of juvenile SIS. Applying 4 weeks of SIS to juvenile male mice at postnatal day 21-23, we observed an increased susceptibility to PTZ as well as anxiety and depressive-like behaviors in adult mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of NMDA receptor antagonists, MK-801 (0.05mg/kg) and ketamine (0.5mg/kg), reversed the proconvulsant effects of SIS in Isolated (and not social) housed animals. Co-administration of non-effective doses of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors, 7NI (25mg/kg) and L-NAME (10mg/kg), with NMDA receptor antagonists, MK-801 (0.01mg/kg) and ketamine (0.1mg/kg) attenuated the proconvulsant effects of juvenile SIS only in isolated housed mice. Also, using real time RT-PCR, we showed that hippocampal upregulation of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor may play a critical role in proconvulsant effects of juvenile SIS by dysregulation of NMDA/NO pathway. In conclusion, results of present study revealed that experiencing SIS during adolescence predisposes the co-occurrence of seizure disorders with psychiatric comorbidities and also, alteration of NMDA receptor structure and function in hippocampus plays a role in proconvulsant effects of juvenile SIS through enhancing the NMDA/NO pathway. PMID:26836272

  2. Social learning in juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris.

    PubMed

    Guttridge, Tristan L; van Dijk, Sander; Stamhuis, Eize J; Krause, Jens; Gruber, Samuel H; Brown, Culum

    2013-01-01

    Social learning is taxonomically widespread and can provide distinct behavioural advantages, such as in finding food or avoiding predators more efficiently. Although extensively studied in bony fishes, no such empirical evidence exists for cartilaginous fishes. Our aim in this study was to experimentally investigate the social learning capabilities of juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris. We designed a novel food task, where sharks were required to enter a start zone and subsequently make physical contact with a target in order to receive a food reward. Naive sharks were then able to interact with and observe (a) pre-trained sharks, that is, 'demonstrators', or (b) sharks with no previous experience, that is, 'sham demonstrators'. On completion, observer sharks were then isolated and tested individually in a similar task. During the exposure phase observers paired with 'demonstrator' sharks performed a greater number of task-related behaviours and made significantly more transitions from the start zone to the target, than observers paired with 'sham demonstrators'. When tested in isolation, observers previously paired with 'demonstrator' sharks completed a greater number of trials and made contact with the target significantly more often than observers previously paired with 'sham demonstrators'. Such experience also tended to result in faster overall task performance. These results indicate that juvenile lemon sharks, like numerous other animals, are capable of using socially derived information to learn about novel features in their environment. The results likely have important implications for behavioural processes, ecotourism and fisheries. PMID:22933179

  3. Movements and activity of juvenile Brown Treesnakes (Boiga irregularis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lardner, Bjorn; Savidge, Julie A.; Reed, Robert N.; Rodda, Gordon H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial ecology and foraging strategy of invasive animals is essential for success in control or eradication. We studied movements and activity in juvenile Brown Treesnakes on Guam, as this population segment has proven particularly difficult to control. Distance between daytime refugia (from telemetry of 18 juveniles, 423-800 mm snout-vent length) ranged from 0-118 m (n  =  86), with a grand mean of 43 m. There were tendencies for shorter snake movements on nights directly following a full moon and on dry nights, but variation among snakes was of a larger magnitude and would greatly reduce chances to detect moon or rain effects unless corrected for. Snake activity was estimated from audio recordings of signals from “tipping” radio transmitters, analyzed for pulse period and amplitude. Activity was highest in the hours immediately after sunset, and gradually declined throughout the night before dropping abruptly in conjunction with sunrise. Snake activity was higher on rainy nights, and tended to be highest during waning moons and when the moon was below the horizon. We conclude that small Brown Treesnakes forage actively and appear to move far enough to regularly encounter the traps and bait used on Guam for control purposes, suggesting that alternative explanations are required for their low capture rates with these control tools.

  4. An Empirical Evaluation of Juvenile Awareness Programs in the United States: Can Juveniles Be "Scared Straight"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klenowski, Paul M.; Bell, Keith J.; Dodson, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile awareness programs like Scared Straight became popular crime prevention strategies during the 1970s. Juvenile offenders and at-risk youth who participate in these programs are taken to prisons where inmates use confrontational methods to recount stories about violence, sex, and abuse perpetrated by fellow inmates while living a life…

  5. Reducing Racial Disparities in Juvenile Detention. Pathways to Juvenile Detention Reform 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoytt, Eleanor Hinton; Schiraldi, Vincent; Smith, Brenda V.; Ziedenberg, Jason

    In 1992, the Annie E. Casey Foundation launched a multiyear, multisite project known as the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI). This report focuses on reducing racial disparities in juvenile detention. The number of youth held in secure detention nationwide increased by 72% from 1985 to 1995. During this period, the number of white…

  6. Collaboration and Leadership in Juvenile Detention Reform. Pathways to Juvenile Detention Reform 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feely, Kathleen

    This report addresses governance and leadership prerequisites for implementing specific strategies essential to juvenile detention reform. Chapter 1, "Why Are Collaboration and Leadership Essential to Detention Reform?" discusses principles of collaboration and leadership that emerged from the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI).…

  7. Tracking Juvenile Recidivists: Three Options for Creating Statewide, Longitudinal Records of Juvenile Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooney, Teresa L.

    This document describes three options for a statewide statistical system for tracking recidivism of juvenile delinquents placed outside their homes in treatment programs. The information is intended for use by the state in allocating resources. The options described involve potential use of juvenile court records, placement data, and/or…

  8. Characteristics of Crimes against Juveniles. Crimes against Children Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

    This Bulletin reviews data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's 1997 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data file that pertain to juvenile victims, revealing that while juveniles made up 26% of the population of the 12 states participating in NIBRS in 1997, they accounted for only 12% of the reported crime victims. At the same…

  9. Toxic chemicals and toxic laws

    SciTech Connect

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.

    1991-08-30

    Recently there was consternation when it was discovered that a program intended to help minorities and the underprivileged in Detroit might have to be canceled. The reason was that some of the land on which new buildings were built was thought to contain toxic chemicals and therefore fell under the provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (or Superfund). This collision of two valuable programs illustrates how a program originally heralded to carry out a worthwhile goal can become flawed. Since 1980, when the Superfund Act was passed by an overwhelming majority in Congress, only 34 of 1,245 identified priority sites have been cleaned up while approximately 40% of the money has been spent in trial litigation and administrative oversight. Critics, many of them within the EPA, point out that if the chemical danger level had been scientifically determined, approximately 90% of the truly important sites could have been cleaned up by now and the money wisely spent. However, the program was designed so that Congress initially did not have to raise much money or raise taxes and instead could argue that the program would not cost the taxpayer anything because it soaked the corporations. What needs to be done First, priority decisions should be taken out of the hands of nonscientists and lawyers and placed in those of scientists who are knowledgeable about toxic agents, who can identify effective targets objectively and who can establish workable priorities for removal of toxic waste. Second, a significant fraction of the money should be dedicated to research and to new programs that are more cost-effective. The purpose is to get chemical manufacturers thinking about reducing pollutants and the cost of cleanup when they plan to manufacture a chemical.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of the Ontogenetic Variability in Plasma Composition of Juvenile and Adult Bothrops jararaca Snakes

    PubMed Central

    de Morais-Zani, Karen; Grego, Kathleen Fernandes; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae; Tanaka-Azevedo, Anita Mitico

    2013-01-01

    The ontogenetic variability in venom composition of some snake genera, including Bothrops, as well as the biological implications of such variability and the search of new molecules that can neutralize the toxic components of these venoms have been the subject of many studies. Thus, considering the resistance of Bothrops jararaca to the toxic action of its own venom and the ontogenetic variability in venom composition described in this species, a comparative study of the plasma composition of juvenile and adult B. jararaca snakes was performed through a proteomic approach based on 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, which allowed the identification of proteins that might be present at different levels during ontogenetic development. Among the proteins identified by mass spectrometry, antihemorrhagic factor Bj46a was found only in adult plasma. Moreover, two spots identified as phospholipase A2 inhibitors were significantly increased in juvenile plasma, which can be related to the higher catalytic PLA2 activity shown by juvenile venom in comparison to that of adult snakes. This work shows the ontogenetic variability of B. jararaca plasma, and that these changes can be related to the ontogenetic variability described in its venom. PMID:24062950

  11. SAR STUDY OF NASAL TOXICITY: LESSONS FOR MODELING SMALL TOXICITY DATASETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most toxicity data, particularly from whole animal bioassays, are generated without the needs or capabilities of structure-activity relationship (SAR) modeling in mind. Some toxicity endpoints have been of sufficient regulatory concern to warrant large scale testing efforts (e.g....

  12. Academic Achievement Among Juvenile Detainees.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, Elena L; Macomber, Donna; Hart, Lesley; Naples, Adam; Chapman, John; Geib, Catherine F; Chart, Hilary; Tan, Mei; Wolhendler, Baruch; Wagner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The literature has long pointed to heightened frequencies of learning disabilities (LD) within the population of law offenders; however, a systematic appraisal of these observations, careful estimation of these frequencies, and investigation of their correlates and causes have been lacking. Here we present data collected from all youth (1,337 unique admissions, mean age 14.81, 20.3% females) placed in detention in Connecticut (January 1, 2010-July 1, 2011). All youth completed a computerized educational screener designed to test a range of performance in reading (word and text levels) and mathematics. A subsample (n = 410) received the Wide Range Achievement Test, in addition to the educational screener. Quantitative (scale-based) and qualitative (grade-equivalence-based) indicators were then analyzed for both assessments. Results established the range of LD in this sample from 13% to 40%, averaging 24.9%. This work provides a systematic exploration of the type and severity of word and text reading and mathematics skill deficiencies among juvenile detainees and builds the foundation for subsequent efforts that may link these deficiencies to both more formal, structured, and variable definitions and classifications of LD, and to other types of disabilities (e.g., intellectual disability) and developmental disorders (e.g., ADHD) that need to be conducted in future research. PMID:24064502

  13. [Dangerous animals].

    PubMed

    Hasle, Gunnar

    2002-06-30

    As travellers seek ever more exotic destinations they are more likely to encounter dangerous animals. Compared to risks such as AIDS, traffic accidents and malaria, the risk is not so great; many travellers are, however, concerned about this and those who give pre-travel vaccines and advice should know something about it. This article is mainly based on medical and zoological textbooks. Venomous stings and bites may be prevented by adequate clothing and by keeping safe distance to the animals. Listening to those who live in the area is of course important. Travellers should not carry antisera with them, but antisera should be available at local hospitals. It should be borne in mind that plant eaters cause just as many deaths as large predators. In some cases it is necessary to carry a sufficiently powerful firearm. PMID:12555616

  14. Animal leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, William A

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global disease of animals, which can have a major economic impact on livestock industries and is an important zoonosis. The current knowledge base is heavily biased towards the developed agricultural economies. The disease situation in the developing economies presents a major challenge as humans and animals frequently live in close association. The severity of disease varies with the infecting serovar and the affected species, but there are many common aspects across the species; for example, the acute phase of infection is mostly sub-clinical and the greatest economic losses arise from chronic infection causing reproductive wastage. The principles of, and tests for, diagnosis, treatment, control and surveillance are applicable across the species. PMID:25388134

  15. Toxic terror

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of toxic materials in the environment explores the evolution of public awareness of the problem, public and governmental reaction, the effort to establish standards of safe levels and danger thresholds, and the struggle to implement and enforce environmental policy. Separate chapters deal with environmental premises and scientific realities, the DDT debate and birth of environmentalism, the disaster of Love Canal, pesticides, PCBs, PBBs, formaldehyde, dioxin, air pollution, water pollution, nuclear energy and radioactive materials, acid rain, and the status of American health. The book concludes with a chapter on the need for scientific research and hard evidence to either prove or disprove the pessimism of those who warn of a threat to human health and survival.

  16. 78 FR 65297 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

  17. 77 FR 50486 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

  18. 77 FR 24687 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

  19. 77 FR 3453 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

  20. 76 FR 61672 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

  1. 76 FR 39075 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

  2. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from synthetic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Soriano, J. A.; Kosola, K. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The screening test method was used to investigate toxicity in polyethylene, polystyrene, polymethyl methacrylate, polyaryl sulfone, polyether sulfone, polyphenyl sulfone, and polyphenylene sulfide. Changing from a rising temperature program to a fixed temperature program resulted on shorter times to animal responses. This effect was attributed in part to more rapid generation of toxicants. The toxicants from the sulfur containing polymers appeared to act more rapidly than the toxicants from the other polymers. It was not known whether this effect was due primarily to difference in concentration or in the nature of the toxicants. The carbon monoxide concentration found did not account for the results observed with the sulfur containing polymers. Polyphenyl sulfone appeared to exhibit the least toxicity among the sulfur containing polymers evaluated under these test conditions.

  3. Debris ingestion by juvenile marine turtles: an underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Santos, Robson Guimarães; Andrades, Ryan; Boldrini, Marcillo Altoé; Martins, Agnaldo Silva

    2015-04-15

    Marine turtles are an iconic group of endangered animals threatened by debris ingestion. However, key aspects related to debris ingestion are still poorly known, including its effects on mortality and the original use of the ingested debris. Therefore, we analysed the impact of debris ingestion in 265 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) over a large geographical area and different habitats along the Brazilian coast. We determined the death rate due to debris ingestion and quantified the amount of debris that is sufficient to cause the death of juvenile green turtles. Additionally, we investigated the original use of the ingested debris. We found that a surprisingly small amount of debris was sufficient to block the digestive tract and cause death. We suggested that debris ingestion has a high death potential that may be masked by other causes of death. An expressive part of the ingested debris come from disposable and short-lived products. PMID:25749316

  4. Toxicity testing using Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, P.J.; Dusenbery, D.B.; Williams, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a small free-living nematode that is representative of what may be the most abundant animal group. It has been promoted as a possible model organism for toxicity testing in the laboratory and in field evaluations in part because more is known about its biology than any other animal, Toxicity tests using C. elegans have been developed with lethality, reproduction, and behavior as end points. The tests have also been developed to varying degrees using standard laboratory media, water, and soil. The results of the tests when exposing C. elegans to a variety of metals, inorganic, and organic compounds indicate it is typically at least as sensitive as other species currently used, such as Daphnia and earthworms, and is generally much easier to maintain in the laboratory. The advantages and disadvantages of C. elegans and the state of development of the tests will be discussed.

  5. Development of cooperative territoriality in juvenile lions.

    PubMed

    Heinsohn, R; Packer, C; Pusey, A E

    1996-04-22

    African lions, Panthera leo, engage in many cooperative activities including hunting, care of young, and group territoriality, but the contribution of juvenile lions to these activities has never been documented. Here we present experimental evidence that juvenile lionesses make a gradual transition to group-territorial defence between weaning (8 months) and sexual maturity (42 months). When challenged by simulated intruders played from a loud-speaker, juvenile females (but not males) become progressively more likely to join the adult females in territorial defence with age, and their behaviour is affected by both the number of defending adults and the number of intruders. We interpret the ability of juveniles to assess relative numbers as an adaptation for assessing the risk of territorial conflict according to their own fighting ability, and the ability of their pride of successfully defend the territory. The difference between the sexes reflects the greater value of the natal territory to philopatric females. Adult females display a variety of strategies when defending the territory, including unconditional and conditional forms of cooperation. We show here that individuals display the rudiments of these strategies as juveniles. PMID:8637927

  6. Development of a Physiologically Based Model to Describe the Pharmacokinetics of Methylphenidate in Juvenile and Adult Humans and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Morris, Suzanne M.; Gearhart, Jeffery M.; Ruark, Christopher D.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Mattison, Donald R.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Young, John F.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread usage of methylphenidate (MPH) in the pediatric population has received considerable attention due to its potential effect on child development. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates to quantitatively evaluate species- and age-dependent enantiomer specific pharmacokinetics of MPH and its primary metabolite ritalinic acid. The PBPK model was first calibrated in adult humans using in vitro enzyme kinetic data of MPH enantiomers, together with plasma and urine pharmacokinetic data with MPH in adult humans. Metabolism of MPH in the small intestine was assumed to account for the low oral bioavailability of MPH. Due to lack of information, model development for children and juvenile and adult nonhuman primates primarily relied on intra- and interspecies extrapolation using allometric scaling. The juvenile monkeys appear to metabolize MPH more rapidly than adult monkeys and humans, both adults and children. Model prediction performance is comparable between juvenile monkeys and children, with average root mean squared error values of 4.1 and 2.1, providing scientific basis for interspecies extrapolation of toxicity findings. Model estimated human equivalent doses in children that achieve similar internal dose metrics to those associated with pubertal delays in juvenile monkeys were found to be close to the therapeutic doses of MPH used in pediatric patients. This computational analysis suggests that continued pharmacovigilance assessment is prudent for the safe use of MPH. PMID:25184666

  7. Development of a physiologically based model to describe the pharmacokinetics of methylphenidate in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Morris, Suzanne M; Gearhart, Jeffery M; Ruark, Christopher D; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Mattison, Donald R; Vitiello, Benedetto; Twaddle, Nathan C; Doerge, Daniel R; Young, John F; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The widespread usage of methylphenidate (MPH) in the pediatric population has received considerable attention due to its potential effect on child development. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates to quantitatively evaluate species- and age-dependent enantiomer specific pharmacokinetics of MPH and its primary metabolite ritalinic acid. The PBPK model was first calibrated in adult humans using in vitro enzyme kinetic data of MPH enantiomers, together with plasma and urine pharmacokinetic data with MPH in adult humans. Metabolism of MPH in the small intestine was assumed to account for the low oral bioavailability of MPH. Due to lack of information, model development for children and juvenile and adult nonhuman primates primarily relied on intra- and interspecies extrapolation using allometric scaling. The juvenile monkeys appear to metabolize MPH more rapidly than adult monkeys and humans, both adults and children. Model prediction performance is comparable between juvenile monkeys and children, with average root mean squared error values of 4.1 and 2.1, providing scientific basis for interspecies extrapolation of toxicity findings. Model estimated human equivalent doses in children that achieve similar internal dose metrics to those associated with pubertal delays in juvenile monkeys were found to be close to the therapeutic doses of MPH used in pediatric patients. This computational analysis suggests that continued pharmacovigilance assessment is prudent for the safe use of MPH. PMID:25184666

  8. Animal picobirnavirus.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Masachessi, Gisela; Mladenova, Zornitsa

    2014-01-01

    Picobirnavirus (PBV) is a small, non-enveloped, bisegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of vertebrate hosts. The name 'Picobirnavirus' derives from the prefix 'pico' (latin for 'small') in reference to the small virion size, plus the prefix 'bi' (latin for 'two') and the word 'RNA' to indicate the nature of the viral genome. The serendipitous discovery of PBV dates back to 1988 from Brazil, when human fecal samples collected during the acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were subjected for routine rotavirus surveillance by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and silver straining (S/S). The PAGE gels after silver staining showed a typical 'two RNA band' pattern, and it was identified as Picobirnavirus. Likewise, the feces of wild black-footed pigmy rice rats (Oryzomys nigripes) subjected for PAGE assay by the same research group in Brazil reported the presence of PBV (Pereira et al., J Gen Virol 69:2749-2754, 1988). PBVs have been detected in faeces of humans and wide range of animal species with or without diarrhoea, worldwide. The probable role of PBV as either a 'primary diarrhoeal agent' in 'immunocompetent children'; or a 'potential pathogen' in 'immunocompromised individuals' or an 'innocuous virus' in the intestine remains elusive and needs to be investigated despite the numerous reports of the presence of PBV in fecal samples of various species of domestic mammals, wild animals, birds and snakes; our current knowledge of their biology, etiology, pathogenicity or their transmission characteristics remains subtle. This review aims to analyse the veterinary and zoonotic aspects of animal Picobirnavirus infections since its discovery. PMID:25674589

  9. Juvenile cannabinoid treatment induces frontostriatal gliogenesis in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Bortolato, Marco; Bini, Valentina; Frau, Roberto; Devoto, Paola; Pardu, Alessandra; Fan, Yijun; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis abuse in adolescence is associated with a broad array of phenotypical consequences, including a higher risk for schizophrenia and other mental disturbances related to dopamine (DA) imbalances. The great variability of these sequelae likely depends on the key influence of diverse genetic vulnerability factors. Inbred rodent strains afford a highly informative tool to study the contribution of genetic determinants to the long-term effects of juvenile cannabinoid exposure. In this study, we analyzed the phenotypical impact of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN; 2mg/kg/day from postnatal day 35-48) in adolescent Lewis rats, an inbred strain exhibiting resistance to psychotomimetic effects of environmental manipulations. At the end of this treatment, WIN-injected animals displayed increased survival of new cells (mainly oligodendroglia precursors) in the striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC), two key terminal fields of DAergic pathways. To test whether these changes may be associated with enduring behavioral alterations, we examined the consequences of adolescent WIN treatment in adulthood (postnatal days 60-70), with respect to DA levels and metabolism as well as multiple behavioral paradigms. Rats injected with WIN exhibited increased turnover, but not levels, of striatal DA. In addition, cannabinoid-treated animals displayed increases in acoustic startle latency and novel-object exploration; however, WIN treatment failed to induce overt deficits of sensorimotor gating and social interaction. These results indicate that, in Lewis rats, juvenile cannabinoid exposure leads to alterations in frontostriatal gliogenesis, as well as select behavioral alterations time-locked to high DAergic metabolism, but not overt schizophrenia-related deficits. PMID:24630433

  10. Hepatic Responses of Juvenile Fundulus heteroclitus from Pollution-adapted and Nonadapted Populations Exposed to Elizabeth River Sediment Extract.

    PubMed

    Riley, Amanda K; Chernick, Melissa; Brown, Daniel R; Hinton, David E; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2016-07-01

    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) inhabiting the Atlantic Wood Industries region of the Elizabeth River, Virginia, have passed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) resistance to their offspring as evidenced by early life stage testing of developmental toxicity after exposure to specific PAHs. Our study focused on environmentally relevant PAH mixtures in the form of Elizabeth River sediment extract (ERSE). Juvenile (5 month) F1 progeny of pollution-adapted Atlantic Wood (AW) parents and of reference site (King's Creek [KC]) parents were exposed as embryos to ERSE. Liver alterations, including nonneoplastic lesions and microvesicular vacuolation, were observed in both populations. ERSE-exposed KC fish developed significantly more alterations than unexposed KC fish. Interestingly, unexposed AW killifish developed significantly more alterations than unexposed KC individuals, suggesting that AW juveniles are not fully protected from liver disease; rapid growth of juvenile fish may also be an accelerating factor for tumorigenesis. Because recent reports show hepatic tumor formation in adult AW fish, the differing responses from the 2 populations provided a way to determine whether embryo toxicity protection extends to juveniles. Future investigations will analyze older life stages of killifish to determine differences in responses related to chronic disease. PMID:26992886

  11. Multivariate analysis of toxicity experimental results of environmental endpoints. (FutureToxII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of hundreds of chemicals have been assessed in laboratory animal studies through EPA chemical regulation and toxicological research. Currently, over 5000 laboratory animal toxicity studies have been collected in the Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB). In addition...

  12. Resistance of juveniles of the Mediterranean pen shell, (Pinna nobilis) to hypoxia and interaction with warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Lorena; Hendriks, Iris; Steckbauer, Alexandra; Duarte, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Low oxygen zones in coastal and open ecosystems have expanded in recent decades, a trend that will accelerate with climatic warming. Exposure of nearshore animals to hypoxic waters and increasing temperature may be stressful and lead to impaired physiological performance. Here, we evaluate the effect of low oxygen concentrations in interaction with increased temperature on juveniles of a large Mediterranean bivalve, Pinna nobilis. We examine the response of survival and oxygen consumption of juveniles placed in water with normal and low oxygen concentrations (100% and 40%, respectively) along an increased temperature gradient (24, 26, 28 and 30 °C) during 4 days. To our knowledge, this is the first study on hypoxia and its combined effect with temperature on juveniles of this species. We show that the two stressors alone or in combination do not influence the physiological performance of juveniles for short periods (4 days). This result stands apart from a general trend pointing at ocean warming as additional stressor that could increase the vulnerability of benthic macrofauna to reduced oxygen concentrations.

  13. Juvenile corals can acquire more carbon from high-performance algal symbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, N. E.; van Oppen, M. J. H.; Willis, B. L.; Mieog, J. C.; Negri, A. P.

    2009-06-01

    Algal endosymbionts of the genus Symbiodinium play a key role in the nutrition of reef building corals and strongly affect the thermal tolerance and growth rate of the animal host. This study reports that 14C photosynthate incorporation into juvenile coral tissues was doubled in Acropora millepora harbouring Symbiodinium C1 compared with juveniles from common parentage harbouring Symbiodinium D in a laboratory experiment. Rapid light curves performed on the same corals revealed that the relative electron transport rate of photosystem II (rETRMAX) was 87% greater in Symbiodinium C1 than in Symbiodinium D in hospite. The greater relative electron transport through photosystem II of Symbiodinium C1 is positively correlated with increased carbon delivery to the host under the applied experimental conditions ( r 2 = 0.91). This may translate into a competitive advantage for juveniles harbouring Symbiodinium C1 under certain field conditions, since rapid early growth typically limits mortality. Both symbiont types exhibited severe reductions in 14C incorporation during a 10-h exposure to the electron transport blocking herbicide diuron (DCMU), confirming the link between electron transport through PSII and photosynthate incorporation within the host tissue. These findings advance the current understanding of symbiotic relationships between corals and their symbionts, providing evidence that enhanced growth rates of juvenile corals may result from greater translocation of photosynthates from Symbiodinium C1.

  14. Non-additive dietary effects in juvenile slider turtles, Trachemys scripta.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Sarah S; Murphy, Amber K; Berry, Jennifer A

    2010-02-01

    Non-additive dietary effects occur when nutritional gains from a mixed diet are greater than or less than that predicted by summing the gains from individual diet items. Both positive and negative effects occur in adult slider turtles, Trachemys scripta. Such effects may also be important to juvenile T. scripta as they ontogenetically switch from carnivorous to herbivorous diets. The purpose of this study was to determine if juveniles experience non-additive effects and to assess the underlying mechanism. Two feeding trials were conducted. In Trial 1, juveniles were fed 100% duckweed, Lemna valdiviana, 100% grass shrimp, Palaemontes paludosus, or a mixed diet containing 81% duckweed and 19% shrimp. In Trial 2, juveniles were fed 100% duckweed, Lemna minor, 100% cricket, Acheta domesticus, or one of three mixed diets containing duckweed and cricket in varying percentages (22%, 39% and 66% cricket). Similar to adults, a negative non-additive effect was demonstrated on the 19% shrimp and 22% cricket diets. However, the positive effect found in adults was not observed. Intake varied dramatically between the plant and animal diets, resulting in differences in transit time that could explain the non-additive effect. These results offer some insight into understanding ontogenetic diet shifts in turtles. PMID:19931632

  15. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

  16. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s. PMID:2122167

  17. Immunization Coverage Among Juvenile Justice Detainees.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, Gregory L; Glanz, Jason M; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Anoshiravani, Arash

    2015-07-01

    This study sought to (1) quantify the baseline immunization coverage of adolescents entering the juvenile justice system and (2) assess the effect of detention-based care on immunization coverage in youth. A cross-sectional retrospective chart review was performed of 279 adolescents detained at a large juvenile detention facility. Only 3% of adolescents had received all study immunizations prior to detention. Before detention, immunization coverage was significantly lower than that for the general adolescent population for all vaccines except the first doses of hepatitis A and varicella-zoster virus vaccines. Subsequent to detention, most individual immunization coverage levels increased and were significantly higher than in the general adolescent population. The routine administration of immunizations in the juvenile justice setting can help detained youth achieve levels of immunization coverage similar to their nondetained peers. PMID:26084948

  18. Psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    Malathi, N; Radhika, T; Thamizhchelvan, H; Ravindran, C; Ramkumar, S; Giri, GVV; Gopal, Deepika

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile ossifying fibroma is an uncommon, benign, bone-forming neoplasm with aggressive local growth that is distinguished from other fibro-osseous lesions primarily by its age of onset, clinical presentation and aggressive behavior. Although a benign entity, juvenile ossifying fibroma is known to be locally aggressive and has a high tendency to recur. Two distinctive microscopic patterns have been described: A trabecular variant and a psammomatoid variant. This latter variant is predominantly a craniofacial lesion and occurs rarely in the jaws. We present herein two cases of psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma involving the jaws. The first case was a mandibular lesion in a 31-year-old female whereas the second case presented with maxillary involvement in a 46-year-old female. In addition, the pathology of the lesion was analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:22144839

  19. Psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Malathi, N; Radhika, T; Thamizhchelvan, H; Ravindran, C; Ramkumar, S; Giri, Gvv; Gopal, Deepika

    2011-09-01

    Juvenile ossifying fibroma is an uncommon, benign, bone-forming neoplasm with aggressive local growth that is distinguished from other fibro-osseous lesions primarily by its age of onset, clinical presentation and aggressive behavior. Although a benign entity, juvenile ossifying fibroma is known to be locally aggressive and has a high tendency to recur. Two distinctive microscopic patterns have been described: A trabecular variant and a psammomatoid variant. This latter variant is predominantly a craniofacial lesion and occurs rarely in the jaws. We present herein two cases of psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma involving the jaws. The first case was a mandibular lesion in a 31-year-old female whereas the second case presented with maxillary involvement in a 46-year-old female. In addition, the pathology of the lesion was analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:22144839

  20. Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant test, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from May 12-21, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed an LC{sub 50} value of 1.12 mg Cu/L which is lower than the value of 2.02 mg Cu/L obtained in a previous test. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values.