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1

Conditions of Confinement: Juvenile Detention and Corrections Facilities. Research Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The most comprehensive nationwide research ever conducted on the juvenile detention and corrections field was a study by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) assessing conditions of confinement for juveniles and determining the extent to which those conditions conform to recognized national professional standards. The…

Parent, Dale G.; And Others

2

Substance Abuse Treatment in Adult and Juvenile Correctional Facilities: Findings from the Uniform Facility Data Set 1997 Survey of Correctional Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents methodology and findings from the Uniform Facility Data Set (UFDS) 1997 Survey of Correctional Facilities, which surveyed about 7,600 adult and juvenile correctional facilities to identify those that provide on-site substance abuse treatment to their inmates or residents. The survey assesses substance abuse treatment provided…

Marsden, Mary Ellen, Ed.; Straw, Richard S., Ed.

3

Critical Factors in Mental Health Programming for Juveniles in Corrections Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juveniles with mental health and other specialized needs are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system, and while juvenile corrections have not historically provided standardized and evidence-based mental health services for its incarcerated youth, the demand is evident. The reality is that juveniles with serious mental illness are committed…

Underwood, Lee A.; Phillips, Annie; von Dresner, Kara; Knight, Pamela D.

2006-01-01

4

The Status and Praxis of Arts Education and Juvenile Offenders in Correctional Facilities in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article briefly describes the results of a study, funded in 2001 by The National Art Education Foundation, of arts education in juvenile correctional facilities in the United States. It summarizes the results of a national survey, and it presents the Northeastern Training School* and STUDIO 200* as a model for community-based arts…

Williams, Rachel Marie-Crane

2008-01-01

5

Pilot Implementation and Preliminary Evaluation of START:AV Assessments in Secure Juvenile Correctional Facilities  

PubMed Central

The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability: Adolescent Version (START:AV) is a new structured professional judgment guide for assessing short-term risks in adolescents. The scheme may be distinguished from other youth risk assessment and treatment planning instruments by its inclusion of 23 dynamic factors that are each rated for both vulnerability and strength. In addition, START:AV is also unique in that it focuses on multiple adverse outcomes—namely, violence, self-harm, suicide, unauthorized leave, substance abuse, self-neglect, victimization, and general offending—over the short-term (i.e., weeks to months) rather than long-term (i.e., years). This paper describes a pilot implementation and preliminary evaluation of START:AV in three secure juvenile correctional facilities in the southern United States. Specifically, we examined the descriptive characteristics and psychometric properties of START:AV assessments completed by 21 case managers on 291 adolescent offenders (250 boys and 41 girls) at the time of admission. Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility of completing START:AV assessments as part of routine practice. Findings also highlight differences in the characteristics of START:AV assessments for boys and girls and differential associations between the eight START:AV risk domains. Though results are promising, further research is needed to establish the reliability and validity of START:AV assessments completed in the field. PMID:23316116

Sellers, Brian G; Viljoen, Jodi L.; Cruise, Keith R.; Nicholls, Tonia L.; Dvoskin, Joel A.

2012-01-01

6

Children in Custody: Public Juvenile Facilities, 1985. Bureau of Justice Statistics Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A total of 1,040 publicly operated state and local juvenile detention, correction, and shelter facilities held 49,322 juvenile residents on February 1, 1985, an increase of 1% from the previous year. About 93% of the juveniles were accused of, or had been convicted for, acts which would be criminal offenses if committed by adults. Most of the rest…

Sickmund, Melissa; Baunach, Phyllis Jo

7

Jail Pedagogy: Liberatory Education inside a California Juvenile Detention Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 2 million juveniles are arrested each year. Half are sentenced to serve terms of incarceration. Although many scholars have written about teaching in detention facilities, few directly address how prisoners are being taught. This research explores the experiences, teaching philosophy, and practices of correctional educators. To learn…

Flores, Jerry

2012-01-01

8

Current Juvenile Corrections Professional Development Practices and Future Directions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Personnel in juvenile corrections (JC) work with students who have challenging academic, behavioral, and mental health needs. The complexity of the JC setting requires personnel to be highly skilled in effective practices to meet the demands of their job. Unfortunately, juvenile correctional personnel are neglected as an important link in the…

Gagnon, Joseph C.; Houchins, David E.; Murphy, Kristin M.

2012-01-01

9

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

10

Intensive Reading Instruction in Juvenile Correctional Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite 60 years of evidence linking juvenile illiteracy and delinquency, practitioners and policymakers have been painfully slow in the implementation of evidence-based reading interventions for incarcerated juveniles. We will present the Texas Juvenile Justice Tiered Instructional Model, an evidence-based reading program model created…

Williams, Jacob L.; Wexler, Jade; Roberts, Greg; Carpenter, Clint

2011-01-01

11

Helping Female Juveniles Improve their On-Task Behavior and Academic Performance Using a Self-Management Procedure in a Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to teach female juvenile offenders with disabilities a self-management procedure to help improve on-task behavior and academic performance during independent practice of math calculation facts. Students were taught to set goals and were provided with incentives for goal attainment. A reversal single-case design…

Caldwell, Stacy; Joseph, Laurice M.

2012-01-01

12

Program Evaluation of Educational Programs. Wisconsin's Juvenile Corrections Schools at Lincoln Hills and Ethan Allen.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation was conducted of the educational programs and facilities at two male juvenile corrections schools in Wisconsin (Ethan Allen and Lincoln Hills). Surveys were developed in cooperation with administrative personnel at both schools and given to all students, instructors, and support staff. A total of 573 students, 76 teachers, and 140…

Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

13

Reading Instruction for Students With High-Incidence Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to obtain (a) a national picture of the characteristics of special educators who provide reading or English instruction in juvenile corrections facilities and (b) characteristics of the schools in which they work and the students who they serve. In addition, the study was designed to gather information on teacher use of specific reading instructional strategies. A

Kimber L. Wilkerson; Joseph Calvin Gagnon; Loretta Mason-Williams

2012-01-01

14

Resiliency in Adolescent Males in a Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this qualitative study was to establish the existing positive factors in the lives of 18 juvenile males living in a low-security correctional facility in order to determine approaches which foster resiliency. Urie Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory, an approach to understanding human development within the context of the…

Feinstein, Sheryl; Baartman, Jyl; Buboltz, Michelle; Sonnichsen, Kim; Solomon, Rebekka

2008-01-01

15

Psychiatric stigma in correctional facilities.  

PubMed

While legislatively sanctioned discrimination against the mentally ill in general society has largely disappeared, it persists in correctional systems where inmates are denied earn-time reductions in sentences, parole opportunities, placement in less restrictive facilities, and opportunities to participate in sentence-reducing programs because of their status as psychiatric patients or their need for psychotropic medications. The authors discuss the prevalence of such problems from detailed examinations of several correctional systems and from the results of a national survey of correctional medical directors. PMID:7718934

Miller, R D; Metzner, J L

1994-01-01

16

Modeling the suppression effect of correctional programs on juvenile delinquency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of the effects of correctional programs on juvenile delinquency have observed that delinquents exhibit a sharp rise in their arrest rates up to the time of intervention. The drop to a lower rate following intervention has been labeled a suppression effect. A controversy has arisen regarding the nature of the suppression effect; some scholars attribute it to the effectiveness

Syni-An Hwang I

1990-01-01

17

From High School to Juvenile Corrections: The Downward Spiral  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) require pervasive supports that are typically addressed through behavior intervention plans. This article illustrates one student's ("Mark") journey from the general education high school campus, to an alternative discipline campus, and subsequent placement at a juvenile corrections setting. Also,…

Rueter, Jessica A.; Trice, John Nathan

2011-01-01

18

Rethinking Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on juvenile arrests, court processing, and admissions to juvenile correctional facilities offer important information to help rethink juvenile justice policy directions of the last decade. Most striking is the progress in reducing the involvement of status offenders within the juvenile justice system between 1974-1979. Less encouraging is that similar progress was not achieved in the case of delinquent offenders.

Barry Krisberg; Ira Schwartz

1983-01-01

19

Can Representativeness Decrease Youth Violence in Juvenile Detention Facilities?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the theory on Representative Bureaucracy, this study considers the minority representative role, which suggests that administrators who are minorities are more inclined to represent minority interests. This study examined whether officers perceive themselves as advocates based on shared demographics and whether they develop attitudes toward reducing youth violence. Considerably more researchers conduct studies in adult prisons than juvenile correctional

Ginger Silvera

2012-01-01

20

76 FR 11337 - Presidential Library Facilities; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NARA-07-0005] RIN 3095-AA82 Presidential Library Facilities; Correction AGENCY: National...and design standards for Presidential libraries and information required in NARA's...facility, and equipment as a Presidential library. DATES: This regulation is...

2011-03-02

21

Assessing the Security Vulnerabilities of Correctional Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Institute of Justice has tasked their Satellite Facility at Sandia National Laboratories and their Southeast Regional Technology Center in Charleston, South Carolina to devise new procedures and tools for helping correctional facilities to assess their security vulnerabilities. Thus, a team is visiting selected correctional facilities and performing vulnerability assessments. A vulnerability assessment helps to identi~ the easiest paths for inmate escape, for introduction of contraband such as drugs or weapons, for unexpected intrusion fi-om outside of the facility, and for the perpetration of violent acts on other inmates and correctional employees, In addition, the vulnerability assessment helps to quantify the security risks for the facility. From these initial assessments will come better procedures for performing vulnerability assessments in general at other correctional facilities, as well as the development of tools to assist with the performance of such vulnerability assessments.

Morrison, G.S.; Spencer, D.S.

1998-10-27

22

Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities  

SciTech Connect

For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned new construction at other facilities.

Crist, D. [Minnesota Department of Corrections, St. Paul, MN (United States); Spencer, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31

23

Effective Practices in Juvenile Correctional Education: A Study of the Literature and Research 1980-1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication, a literature review on effective practices in juvenile correctional education, is intended to challenge all who are in a position to influence the future course of the education of juvenile delinquents. It is based on the conviction that education can and must play a greater role in the lives of delinquent and at-risk youth in…

Coffey, Osa D.; Gemignani, Maia G.

24

Assessing Youth Strengths in a Residential Juvenile Correctional Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessments and case plans that identify and build upon the strengths of clients, their families and communities are increasingly being used in many fields of practice, but are only beginning to be introduced in juvenile justice settings. This article describes a strengths-based assessment tool developed specifically for use in juvenile justice…

Barton, William H.; Mackin, Juliette R.; Fields, Jerrold

2006-01-01

25

Facility-Level Characteristics Associated with Serious Suicide Attempts and Deaths from Suicide in Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about how facility-level characteristics affect the risk of suicide and suicide attempts in juvenile justice residential facilities. This leaves facility administrators and mental health providers without evidence-based guidance on how the facility itself affects risks. The current study uses data from two recently developed…

Gallagher, Catherine A.; Dobrin, Adam

2006-01-01

26

Juvenile Corrections and Public Health Collaborations: Opportunities for Improved Health Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most juveniles behind bars move in and out of facilities with short lengths of stay. Relatively few have longer sentences\\u000a for more serious crimes; they all return to the community. In 2003, law enforcement agencies reported 2.2 million arrests\\u000a of persons under age 18 (Snyder & Sickmund, 2006). The most serious charges in almost half of all juvenile arrests were

Michelle Staples-Horne; Kaiyti Duffy; Michele T. Rorie

27

Initiating Change in Massachusetts' Juvenile Correctional System: A Retrospective Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Massachusetts Department of Youth Services (DYS), which is the state agency responsible for handling juvenile offenders committed by the courts, has undergone several stages of organizational change in the past two decades. What is unusual about this state is that none of the transformations were forced by legislative mandate, as has been the case in many other jurisdictions. Amidst

Susan Guarino-Ghezzi

1988-01-01

28

Lessons Learned: Barriers and Solutions for Conducting Reading Investigations in Juvenile Corrections Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few research studies have investigated the effectiveness of instructional strategies for students in juvenile corrections. The dearth of research on effective instruction for this population may be due in part to difficulties encountered in carrying out methodologically rigorous studies in these settings. This article reports barriers and…

Mulcahy, Candace A.; Krezmien, Michael P.; Leone, Peter E.; Houchins, David E.; Baltodano, Heather

2008-01-01

29

Treatment of Moderately Intellectually Disabled Delinquent Youth in a Dutch Juvenile Justice Facility with Closed and Open Units  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article will focus on a juvenile justice facility in the Netherlands, targeted at moderately intellectually disabled juveniles, who are sentenced because of serious crimes. All of the juveniles have a disruptive disorder (conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder) and 70% have comorbid psychiatric classifications. Treatment amounts to…

Lodewijks, Henny P. B.

2011-01-01

30

Cognitive and academic functioning of juvenile detainees: Implications for correctional populations and public health  

PubMed Central

Cognitive functioning affects health. This study assessed cognitive functioning among participants in the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a stratified random sample of 1,829 newly detained juveniles (10-18 years old) from Cook County, Illinois. We examined receptive vocabulary, oral reading, arithmetic computation skills, and general intellectual abilities. Our sample exhibited impaired overall intellectual functioning and deficits in all areas. Males performed more poorly than females overall. More than three-quarters of males showed below average overall intellectual functioning, and nine in ten males had below average receptive vocabulary skills. Hispanic and African American males performed more poorly than non-Hispanic white males; The multiple systems that serve delinquent youth—correctional, health, legal, and rehabilitative—must collaborate to tailor needed services to the cognitive level of youth in the juvenile justice system. PMID:24352405

Lansing, Amy E.; Washburn, Jason J.; Abram, Karen M.; Thomas, Ursula C.; Welty, Leah J.; Teplin, Linda A.

2014-01-01

31

Cognitive and academic functioning of juvenile detainees: implications for correctional populations and public health.  

PubMed

Cognitive functioning affects health. This study assessed cognitive functioning among participants in the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a stratified random sample of 1,829 newly detained juveniles (10 to 18 years old) from Cook County, Illinois. The study examined receptive vocabulary, oral reading, arithmetic computation skills, and general intellectual abilities. The sample exhibited impaired overall intellectual functioning and deficits in all areas. Males performed more poorly than females. More than three quarters of males showed below average overall intellectual functioning, and 9 in 10 had below average receptive vocabulary skills. Hispanic and African American males performed more poorly than non-Hispanic White males. The multiple systems that serve delinquent youth--correctional, health, legal, and rehabilitative--must collaborate to tailor needed services to the cognitive level of youth in the juvenile justice system. PMID:24352405

Lansing, Amy E; Washburn, Jason J; Abram, Karen M; Thomas, Ursula C; Welty, Leah J; Teplin, Linda A

2014-01-01

32

General job stress and job-specific stress in juvenile correctional officers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measures of general job stress (Job Stress Index—JSI; Sandman, 1992) and appraisal of specific job-related stressors (SSOSQ; Anson et al., 1997) were administered to 413 juvenile correctional officers (JCOs) and to eighty-four of their supervisors. JCOs evaluated their work environment as more stressful on the JSI than workers in the normative sample on every job stress dimension except ‘time pressure’.

Stephen M. Auerbach; Ben G. Quick; Phillip O. Pegg

2003-01-01

33

The Baby Elmo Program: Improving teen father–child interactions within juvenile justice facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the Baby Elmo Program is to establish a low-cost, sustainable parenting and structured visitation program for non-custodial incarcerated teen parents. The program is taught and supervised by probation staff in juvenile detention facilities and unlike traditional programs, this intervention is not based on increasing the teen's abstract parenting knowledge, but rather in building a relationship between the

Rachel Barr; Natalie Brito; Jaclyn Zocca; Samantha Reina; Jennifer Rodriguez; Carole Shauffer

2011-01-01

34

Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

2009-01-01

35

Adapting Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports for Secure Juvenile Justice Settings: Improving Facility-Wide Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The popularity and success of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in public schools across the United States has led professionals to advocate for its implementation in secure juvenile settings. Statewide implementation efforts have been mounted in several jurisdictions, and a number of secure facilities are applying it with…

Jolivette, Kristine; Nelson, C. Michael

2010-01-01

36

Special Education in Juvenile Residential Facilities: Can Animals Help?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with emotional\\/behavioral disorders (EBD) are arguably one of the highest at-risk groups for dropping out before graduating high school. They are the group of students with disabilities who are most likely to be educated in residential facilities. Residential facilities such as Green Chimneys have incorporated animals into the treatment milieu with success. Animals have been used in various settings

Sally E. Thigpen; Stephanie K. Ellis; Rebecca G. Smith

37

Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents: Profiles of Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An exploratory study of resiliency profiles of male and female juvenile offenders committed to a juvenile correctional facility was conducted. The goal of the present study was to examine juvenile offenders' positive characteristics (e.g., adaptability, optimism, self-efficacy, tolerance of differences). To assess positive characteristics and…

Mowder, Melissa H.; Cummings, Jack A.; McKinney, Robert

2010-01-01

38

The Correctional Facility: The Environment Today and in the Future  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN SEVERAL WAYS, the forthcoming chapters will examine the current state of the art of the correctional facility library service-its history, environment, standards, training of professional personnel, research-and analyze the patterns of correctional library services as they exist across the country. Utilizing the perspective of criminology, this chapter is intended as a springboard for these discussions. It must be said

EDITH ELISABETH FLY

39

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs and Imeques C-mem-ini-kem acclimation facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O, kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning summer steelhead, fall chinook and coho salmon. In the spring of 1994, juvenile summer steelhead were acclimated at Bonifer and Minthorn. At Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, juvenile spring chinook were acclimated in the spring and fall. A total of 92 unmarked and 42 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 1, 1993 through May 2, 1994 and held at Minthorn. An estimated 234,432 green eggs were taken from 48 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and early rearing. Fingerlings were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for final rearing and release into the Umatilla River in 1995. Fall chinook and coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 1994. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated juvenile adult survival rates are detailed in this document.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1995-05-01

40

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions on the Umatilla River; 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from October 1993 through September 1994 in evaluating juvenile salmonid bypass facilities and juvenile salmonid passage through ladder facilities, and investigating passage conditions for juvenile fish at diversion dam facilities on the lower Umatilla River in northeastern Oregon. We also report on our progress in evaluating adult salmonid passage at and between dams on the lower Umatilla River and upriver migration using radio telemetry. Two principal studies are also included. Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile salmonid bypass facilities a Feed and Furnish canals, juvenile salmonid passage through fish ladders at Stanfield, Feed Canal, Westland, and Three Mile Falls dams, and the juvenile salmonid trap and haul procedures at Westland Canal. To investigate passage conditions at all passage facilities. Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids past diversions in the lower Umatilla River and their movement in the upper river after transport, using radio telemetry, and to assess factors for successful homing. These studies are part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

Knapp, Suzanne M.

1995-01-01

41

Warehousing or Rehabilitation? Public Schooling in the Juvenile Justice System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines juvenile correctional facilities, populations served, and educational programs offered. Statistics on social indicators for young African American males, who are overrepresented in the juvenile correctional system, create a profile of incarcerated youth. Examines the role of special education programs in placing young African American…

Morrison, Harriet R.; Epps, Beverly D.

2002-01-01

42

Turbine Passage of Juvenile and Adult Fish at a Warmwater Hydroelectric Facility in Northeastern Oklahoma: Monitoring Associated with Relicensing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimated annual turbine passage rates and susceptibilities of juvenile and adult fish at the Pensacola Dam hydroelectric facility on Grand Lake O' the Cherokees (Grand Lake) in northeastern Oklahoma as part of the relicensing of the facility. Our study was purposefully exploratory in that its primary objective was to determine if turbine passage of valuable fishes was sufficient to

Kent M. Sorenson; William L. Fisher; Alexander V. Zale

1998-01-01

43

Walking the Line: Teaching Remedial Writing in a Correctional Facility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When teaching remedial writing in a correctional facility, a teacher may carry assumptions shaped by formal education that do not always translate to a prison context. These include the idea that the classroom will provide a sphere of intellectual activity, immune from heavy-handed institutional intrusions; that students will want to get to know…

Crimmel, Henry Hays, III

44

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. This 1993 annual report details scheduled maintenance and other projects carried out during the year.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1994-05-01

45

Influenza outbreaks at two correctional facilities -- Maine, March 2011.  

PubMed

On March 8, 2011, the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) received a laboratory report of a positive influenza specimen from an intensive-care unit patient who was an inmate at a prison (facility A). That same day, the state medical examiner notified Maine CDC of an inmate death suspected to be have been caused by influenza at another, nearby prison (facility B). On March 9, Correctional Medical Services (CMS), which provides health services to both facilities, notified Maine CDC that additional inmates and staff members from both facilities were ill with influenza-like illness (ILI). CMS reported that influenza vaccination coverage among inmates was very low (<10%), and coverage among staff members was unknown but believed to be low. Maine CDC assisted CMS and the Maine Department of Corrections (DOC) in conducting an epidemiologic investigation to gather more information about the two cases, initiate case finding, and implement control measures, which included emphasizing respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette, closing both facilities to new admissions and transfers, and offering vaccination and antiviral drugs to inmates and staff members. This report describes the public health response and highlights the importance of collaboration between public health and corrections officials to identify quickly and mitigate communicable disease outbreaks in these settings, where influenza can spread rapidly in a large and concentrated population. Correctional facilities should strongly consider implementing the following measures during each influenza season: 1) offering influenza vaccination to all inmates and staff members, 2) conducting education on respiratory etiquette, and 3) making documentation regarding the vaccination status of inmates and staff members accessible. PMID:22475851

2012-04-01

46

Validation of Blockage Interference Corrections in the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A validation test has recently been constructed for wall interference methods as applied to the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The goal of this study was to begin to address the uncertainty of wall-induced-blockage interference corrections, which will make it possible to address the overall quality of data generated by the facility. The validation test itself is not specific to any particular modeling. For this present effort, the Transonic Wall Interference Correction System (TWICS) as implemented at the NTF is the mathematical model being tested. TWICS uses linear, potential boundary conditions that must first be calibrated. These boundary conditions include three different classical, linear. homogeneous forms that have been historically used to approximate the physical behavior of longitudinally slotted test section walls. Results of the application of the calibrated wall boundary conditions are discussed in the context of the validation test.

Walker, Eric L.

2007-01-01

47

GUIDELINES FOR WORKING IN AN ADULT PRISON OR JUVENILE FACILITY NOTE: This training guide is a compilation of the experience and suggestions of the Prison  

E-print Network

GUIDELINES FOR WORKING IN AN ADULT PRISON OR JUVENILE FACILITY NOTE: This training guide is a compilation of the experience and suggestions of the Prison Creative Arts Project from our more than 20 years of facilitating this work in prisons, juvenile facilities and high schools. It should be taken as recommendations

Eustice, Ryan

48

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from October 1991 through September 1992 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls and Westland dams on the Umatilla River. We also report on our progress from October 1991 through June 1992 in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). These are the study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR: (1) Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile fish bypass facility in the West Extension Irrigation District Canal at Three Mile Falls Dam and document juvenile salmonid passage through the juvenile fish bypass facility and east-bank adult fish ladder. To measure velocity and develop trap designs at Westland Dam. (2) Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

Knapp, Suzanne M.

1993-03-01

49

Metamorphosis: How Missouri Rehabilitates Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juveniles convicted of serious offenses usually end up in large correctional facilities that focus on punishment--not rehabilitation. The state of Missouri, however, has found a better way to help end the cycle of crime: by creating a network of small facilities that provide therapy and educational opportunities, it has dramatically reduced…

Dubin, Jennifer

2012-01-01

50

The Voices of Youth: Perspectives and Recommendations from Young Adults Involved in Juvenile Corrections. Information Brief. Volume 5, Issue 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief describes two exceptional model programs for adjudicated youth with disabilities: Woodland Hills Residential Facility in Duluth, Minnesota and the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Walter McGinnis High School in Red Wing, Minnesota. The brief shares best practices from research about these programs as well as insight, commentary, and…

Stenhjem, Pam

2006-01-01

51

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1990. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. Two of the Minthorn and all of the Bonifer pond outlet screens were replaced with vertical bars to alleviate clogging problems. A horizontal bar screen was installed in the water control structure at the largest spring at Bonifer to prevent fish from migrating upstream during acclimation. A pipe was installed under the railroad tracks at Bonifer to make unloading of fish from transport trucks easier and safer. The Minthorn access road was repaired to provide better access for delivery of fish to the facility and for general operations and maintenance.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1991-07-01

52

The Lived Experiences of Single Hispanic Mothers Raising Gang-Affiliated Male Youth Released from Texas Juvenile Justice Department State Facilities: A Phenomenological Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study (Moustakas, 1994) was to describe the experiences that single Hispanic mothers of gang-affiliated male juveniles face during their sons' reentry process after being released from a Texas Juvenile Justice Department state facility. Methods: After an extensive…

Rodriguez-Almendarez, Ruby

2013-01-01

53

HIV Subspecialty Care in Correctional Facilities Using Telemedicine.  

PubMed

In the United States, prisons and jails contain a population at high risk for HIV infection with a relatively large proportion known to be HIV positive. However, many incarcerated persons lack access to subspecialty HIV care due to barriers of geography and travel. Telemedicine clinics can remove these barriers, increasing access to expert, multidisciplinary care. With telemedicine, correctional facilities can provide up-to-date, evidence-based HIV management, which may lead to improved compliance, greater virologic suppression, improved CD4 T-cell counts, fewer adverse drug interactions, and decreased transmission in the community. While HIV care in prisons is an example of harnessing this technology, telemedicine can be used for the diagnosis and management of multiple acute and chronic diseases for underserved populations. PMID:25788612

Young, Jeremy D; Patel, Mahesh

2015-04-01

54

Missed opportunities for early HIV diagnosis in correctional facilities.  

PubMed

To quantify the extent that South Carolina HIV/AIDS cases could have been diagnosed during a prior arrest we designed a retrospective population-based cohort study linking case reports from HIV/AIDS Reporting System (HARS) and the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division database. Data from individuals newly diagnosed between January 2001 and December 2005 were linked with statewide arrest records from April 1991 through November 2005. Criminal history data for this report were derived from 28 state prisons and more than 250 law enforcement agencies (jails, lockups, detention centers). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to determine how demographic variables and arrest reasons affects receipt of HIV testing. There were 1961/4036 (48.6%) incident cases of HIV diagnosis that had at least one arrest prior to their first positive HIV test. When restricted to 1286/1961 (65.6%) individuals most likely to have been HIV-infected at the time of arrest, 592 (46%) were early testers (no AIDS within 1 year) and 694 (54%) developed AIDS more than 1 year of testing (late testers). After controlling for gender, age, race, behavioral risk and source of HIV report, the odds of being a late tester increased with age (p < 0.001). Overall, 3750 separate arrests were recorded for these 1286 individuals and 491 (13%) arrests were for drug and alcohol or sex crimes. Individuals with 4 or more arrests were more likely to be late testers when compared to those with fewer than 4 arrests (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.30; 95% confidence [CI] 2.28, 4.72). Correctional facilities present considerable opportunities to identify individuals with undiagnosed HIV infection. Providing correctional facilities with the infrastructure for implementation of routine HIV testing would consequently have a significant impact on the health status of the entire community. PMID:19909169

Duffus, Wayne A; Youmans, Eren; Stephens, Terri; Gibson, James J; Albrecht, Helmut; Potter, Roberto H

2009-12-01

55

Operation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1987 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1987.

Lofy, Peter T.

1988-12-01

56

Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1988.

Lofy, Peter T.

1989-12-01

57

The Relationship between Self-Esteem and AD/HD Characteristics in the Serious Juvenile Delinquents in Japan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to clarify the following 2 points: (1) whether self-esteem changes after correctional education, and (2) whether attention deficit/hyperactivity characteristics affect self-esteem. The subjects were 118 juveniles (all males) admitted to "A" juvenile correctional facility. Our findings indicated that during the…

Matsuura, Naomi; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Toichi, Motomi

2009-01-01

58

Health promotion and education in youth correctional facilities.  

PubMed

In 1997 a comprehensive perinatal/pediatric needs assessment was conducted in the two counties comprising the region. As a result, the Regional Perinatal Consortium of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, Inc. submitted both a perinatal and a pediatric plan that addressed the strengths and the needs of the region to the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services. One of thirteen pediatric action plans, Pediatric Health Care and Educational Services in Correctional Facilities, set the stage for the start of ongoing and wide-ranging health programs for the youth in one of the county youth detention centers. Beginning with "Alternatives to Violence," Consortium staff have met monthly with the incarcerated youth to plan and provide these much needed sessions. As expected, these sessions have produced many responses from the youth, some anticipated and many pleasantly surprising, as they have begun to recognize the helpful intent and nature of our programs. The youth are encouraged to participate in planning for upcoming programs and their input is appreciated and respected. As many of these teens are parents themselves, this program has also been able to incorporate parenting skills in some of the sessions, with a major focus on child abuse prevention. Health-education services for incarcerated youth open the door to an exciting frontier for pediatric nurses to deliver prevention in this much-needed setting. This program is a model for planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs in the pediatric arena. PMID:12024350

Greene, E; Lucarelli, P; Shocksnider, J

1999-01-01

59

Juvenile Counselor Validation Report and Technical Adequacy Report. Standards and Training for Corrections Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These two reports describe the research, analysis, and results of the second phase of a three-phase research study sponsored by the Standards and Training for Corrections Program (STC) of the California Board of Corrections. The validation report consists of seven chapters. Following an introductory chapter that explains the rationale for the…

California State Board of Corrections, Sacramento.

60

77 FR 63849 - Facility Security Officer Training Requirements; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG-2012-0908] Facility Security Officer Training Requirements...the development of a Facility Security Officer training program. The notice contains an inaccurate Internet link to RSVP for the...

2012-10-17

61

Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in Reducing Aggression of Individuals at the Juvenile Correction and Rehabilitation Center  

PubMed Central

Background: In the present era, delinquency in children and adolescents is undoubtedly a difficult and upsetting issue attracting the attention of many experts such as psychologists, sociologists, and criminologists. These experts often try to answer why a number of children and adolescents engage in various crimes such as aggressive and anti-social crimes. They also try to find out how these crimes can be prevented. Objectives: The present study investigates the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy training (MBCT) in reducing aggression in a juvenile correction and rehabilitation center of Zahedan province during years 1991 to 1992. Materials and Methods: This experimental study included an experimental and a control group with a pretest, posttest, and follow-up approach. The Buss and Perry aggression questionnaire (1992) was used for data collection. The sample group included 22 (10 experimental and 12 control groups) adolescent males in a juvenile correction and rehabilitation center of Zahedan province who were selected through a census method. Using a matching method based on the pre-test scores of the aggression questionnaire, they were then divided into two equivalent categories and were randomly assigned to the two groups. Mindfulness-based cognitive training took the group training in 8 sessions administered on experimental group. The follow-up test was conducted two weeks after the end of the posttest sessions. The results were analyzed using ANCOVA. Results: The results of ANCOVA showed that mindfulness-based cognitive training could significantly reduce aggression during posttest and follow-up test phases in the experimental group, compared to the control group (P < 0.01). Moreover, the results indicated the effectiveness of this method in significantly reducing anger, physical aggression, and hostility during posttest and follow-up test phases (P < 0.05). However, no significant reduction was observed in the verbal aggression subscale. Conclusions: According to the results of the present study, mindfulness-based cognitive training seems to be effective for reducing aggressive behaviors. PMID:24971290

Milani, Atefeh; Nikmanesh, Zahra; Farnam, Ali

2013-01-01

62

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1993-08-01

63

A national survey of substance abuse treatment for juvenile offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite consensus about the value of substance abuse treatment for delinquent youth, information about its prevalence and availability is inadequate and inconsistent. This article presents findings about treatment and other correctional service provision from a national survey of directors of 141 juvenile institutional and community corrections (CC) facilities. Educational\\/General Educational Development programming and drug and alcohol education were the most

Douglas W. Young; Richard Dembo; Craig E. Henderson

2007-01-01

64

Juvenile Justice and Students with Disabilities: State Infrastructure and Initiatives. inForum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to data collected in 2003 by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), just over 96,000 youth were incarcerated in juvenile correctional facilities throughout the United States (not including those being held in detention). An additional 10,000 youth were in state prisons or adult jails during the same time,…

Muller, Eve

2006-01-01

65

28 CFR 115.388 - Data review for corrective action.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for corrective action. 115.388 Section 115.388 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Data Collection and Review § 115.388 Data...

2014-07-01

66

28 CFR 115.388 - Data review for corrective action.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for corrective action. 115.388 Section 115.388 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Data Collection and Review § 115.388 Data...

2012-07-01

67

28 CFR 115.388 - Data review for corrective action.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for corrective action. 115.388 Section 115.388 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Data Collection and Review § 115.388 Data...

2013-07-01

68

41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Property for Correctional Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management...property for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency management...for the care or rehabilitation of criminal offenders; (b) Law enforcement purposes, if...

2012-01-01

69

41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Property for Correctional Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management...property for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency management...for the care or rehabilitation of criminal offenders; (b) Law enforcement purposes, if...

2014-01-01

70

41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Property for Correctional Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management...property for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency management...for the care or rehabilitation of criminal offenders; (b) Law enforcement purposes, if...

2013-07-01

71

Patient health satisfaction survey in connecticut correctional facilities.  

PubMed

Although routine in the community, patient satisfaction surveys are relatively rare in correctional settings. This article describes the development of an instrument specifically adapted to the correctional environment and population, the statewide implementation of the survey, the initial results, and the quality improvement initiatives evolving from this effort. PMID:24659759

Tanguay, Sandra; Trestman, Robert; Weiskopf, Connie

2014-04-01

72

Motivational Interviewing Training for Juvenile Correctional Staff in California: One Year Initial Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports initial results of a program designed to train California corrections staff (n = 576) in motivational interviewing (MI), a method of communication that is based on a client-centered, collaborative style. After three days of training, participants made significant gains in terms of knowledge of MI principles and reflective…

Hohman, Melinda; Doran, Neal; Koutsenok, Igor

2009-01-01

73

Public health response to a measles outbreak in a large correctional facility, Queensland, 2013.  

PubMed

This report documents the prompt, co-ordinated and effective public health response to a measles outbreak in Queensland in 2013. There were 17 cases in a large, high-security, regional correctional facility, a setting with unique challenges. Recommendations are provided to reduce the likelihood and magnitude of measles outbreaks in correctional facilities. Commun Dis Intell 2014;38(4):E294-E297. PMID:25631590

Chatterji, Madhumati; Baldwin, Anne M; Prakash, Rajendra; Vlack, Susan A; Lambert, Stephen B

2014-01-01

74

Juvenile Confinement in Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

Mendel, Richard A.

2012-01-01

75

The effect of rapid and sustained decompression on barotrauma in juvenile brook lamprey and Pacific lamprey: implications for passage at hydroelectric facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fish passing downstream through hydroelectric facilities may pass through hydroturbines where they experience a rapid decrease in barometric pressure as they pass by turbine blades, which can lead to barotraumas including swim bladder rupture, exopthalmia, emboli, and hemorrhaging. In juvenile Chinook salmon, the main mechanism for injury is thought to be expansion of existing gases (particularly those present in the

Alison HA Colotelo; Brett D. Pflugrath; Richard S. Brown; Colin J. Brauner; Robert P. Mueller; Thomas J. Carlson; Zhiqun Deng; Martin L. Ahmann; Bradly A. Trumbo

2012-01-01

76

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01

77

Adolescent Fathers Who Are Incarcerated Juvenile Offenders: Explanatory Study of the Co-Occurrence of Two Problem Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We identify explanatory risk variables associated with the co-occurrence of two problem behaviors: juvenile offending and adolescent fatherhood. Data were gathered from a 5-year prospective, longitudinal study of 531 incarcerated juvenile offenders as they transitioned from youth correction facilities back into the community. Of the total sample,…

Unruh, Deanne; Bullis, Michael; Yovanoff, Paul

2004-01-01

78

Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use Among Youth Entering Juvenile Correctional Facilities  

E-print Network

.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment Funded by the U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment under the data in this report requires the permission of the Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse. Melanie;#12;Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Table of Contents iii Contents Page List of Tables

Illinois at Chicago, University of

79

Juvenile Salmonid Pit-Tag Studies at Prosser Dam and the Chandler Canal Fish Collection Facility, Yakima River, 1991 and 1992 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 1991 and 1992, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the second and third years of a 3-year study to estimate juvenile salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) timing and survival characteristics related to passage through the Prosser Dam complex, including the Chandler Canal and the Chandler fish collection facility, on the Yakima River. Yearling chinook (O. tshawyacha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch) were collected at the Chandler facility, PIT tagged, and released at various locations in the Yakima River, Chandler Canal, and the Chandler facility. Individual fish were subsequently detected at PIT-tag detection monitors at the Chandler facility and/or McNary Dam on the Columbia River. Survival through various reaches, PIT-tag detection efficiency, and Chandler Canal fish entrainment proportion parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood techniques. The research objectives in 1991 and 1992 were to: (1) assess the effects of passage through the Chandler Canal and the Chandler facility on the survival of juvenile salmonids, (2) determine the entrainment rate of juvenile salmonids into the Chandler Canal as a function of river flow, and (3) determine the efficiency and reliability of the PIT-tag monitoring system at the Chandler facility. The initial 1990 research plan was expanded in 1991 and 1992 to include several more release locations and many more release days.

Ruehle, Thomas E.; Sandford, Benjamin P.

1996-01-01

80

Correctional Facilities as Partners in Reducing HIV Disparities  

PubMed Central

The U.S. now has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The majority of prison and jail inmates come from predominantly nonwhite and medically underserved communities. Although incarceration has adverse effects on both individual and community health, prisons and jails have also been used successfully as venues to provide health services to people with HIV who frequently lack stable health care. We review demographic trends shaping the difficulties in providing care to incarcerated people with HIV, and recommend the Centers for AIDS Research Collaboration on HIV in Corrections (CFAR-CHIC) as a model of interdisciplinary collaboration in addressing those difficulties. PMID:23673887

Rich, Josiah D.; DiClemente, Ralph; Levy, Judith; Lyda, Karen; Ruiz, Monica; Rosen, David L.; Dumont, Dora

2013-01-01

81

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document.

C. M. Obi

2000-12-01

82

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1989. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. An automatic dialing system was incorporated into the alarm system at the Minthorn facility. A security company has replaced the function of the Umatilla Tribal Police which was to contact fisheries personnel in case of an alarm. The configuration of the alarm system was upgraded to activate the alarm faster and provide better access to project personnel with a pager system. A survey was completed in 1988 by Thomas Bumstead of Albrook Hydraulics Lab in Pullman, WA. to determine potential measures to address the change in course of the Umatilla River around Minthorn as a result of the flood of 1986. Options and recommendations were submitted in a report in 1989. Fish Management Consultants Inc. submitted the final reports of evaluations for both the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities. A total of 150 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from December through March and held at Minthorn. Forty-two pairs were spawned (37 pairs from Minthorn and 5 pairs collected and immediately spawned at Threemile Dam). The 241,682 eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and later moved to Oak Springs Hatchery for rearing. An estimated 368 adult hatchery steelhead returned to the Umatilla River in 1988-89 (based on Threemile Dam trap counts and harvest below Threemile Dam) these, and 349 were released upriver. Of seven returned to the Bonifer trap where the smolts were initially released. Acclimation of 79,984 spring chinook salmon and 22,274 steelhead was completed at Bonifer in spring of 1989. At Minthorn, 157,299 coho salmon and 29,852 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Acclimation of 78,825 fall chinook salmon at Minthorn and 80,750 spring chinook salmon completed in the fall. at Bonifer was successfully Control groups were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1989 and 1990. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon, two experiments for spring chinook salmon (spring and fall releases) and one experiment for summer steelhead were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the juvenile salmonid trap located at Westland Diversion. Because the fish in each release were not uniquely fish size and migration timing were used to discern general trends. Data suggested that juvenile salmonids started showing up at the trap 4 days after release until July 14, when sampling was discontinued. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids to test summer steelhead broodstock from the Umatilla River for monitoring purposes and to certify eggs as pathogen-free.

Lofy, Peter T.; Rowan, Gerald D.

1990-03-01

83

28 CFR 115.377 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...contractors and volunteers. 115.377 Section 115.377 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Discipline § 115.377 Corrective action for...

2013-07-01

84

The effect of rapid and sustained decompression on barotrauma in juvenile brook lamprey and Pacific lamprey: implications for passage at hydroelectric facilities  

SciTech Connect

Fish passing downstream through hydroelectric facilities may pass through hydroturbines where they experience a rapid decrease in barometric pressure as they pass by turbine blades, which can lead to barotraumas including swim bladder rupture, exopthalmia, emboli, and hemorrhaging. In juvenile Chinook salmon, the main mechanism for injury is thought to be expansion of existing gases (particularly those present in the swim bladder) and the rupture of the swim bladder ultimately leading to exopthalmia, emboli and hemorrhaging. In fish that lack a swim bladder, such as lamprey, the rate and severity of barotraumas due to rapid decompression may be reduced however; this has yet to be extensively studied. Another mechanism for barotrauma can be gases coming out of solution and the rate of this occurrence may vary among species. In this study, juvenile brook and Pacific lamprey acclimated to 146.2 kPa (equivalent to a depth of 4.6 m) were subjected to rapid (<1 sec; brook lamprey only) or sustained decompression (17 minutes) to a very low pressure (13.8 kPa) using a protocol previously applied to juvenile Chinook salmon. No mortality or evidence of barotraumas, as indicated by the presence of hemorrhages, emboli or exopthalmia, were observed during rapid or sustained decompression, nor following recovery for up to 120 h following sustained decompression. In contrast, mortality or injury would be expected for 97.5% of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to a similar rapid decompression to these very low pressures. Additionally, juvenile Chinook salmon experiencing sustained decompression died within 7 minutes, accompanied by emboli in the fins and gills and hemorrhaging in the tissues. Thus, juvenile lamprey may not be susceptible to barotraumas associated with hydroturbine passage to the same degree as juvenile salmonids, and management of these species should be tailored to their specific morphological and physiological characteristics.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mueller, Robert P.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.

2012-10-01

85

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

NONE

1997-10-01

86

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site:;\\u000a;\\u000a 25-41-03, EMAD Facility;\\u000a;

Mark Krauss

2010-01-01

87

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Bypass Facilities and Passage at Water Diversions on the Lower Umatilla River; 1991-1995 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Outdated juvenile and adult fish passage facilities were recently reconstructed at the five major irrigation dams on the lower Umatilla River, Oregon to meet National marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design standards. Changes in design at juvenile fish bypass facilities included reduced mesh size on the rotating drum screens, larger screening area, a more oblique orientation of the drum screens to canal flow, improved screen seals, replacement of bypass portals with vertical slot bypass channels, and increased bypass pipe diameters. Weir-and-pool adult fish ladders and jump pools were replaced with vertical-slot ladders. From 1991--1995, they investigated injury and travel rate of juvenile fish moving through the facilities, and efficiency of screens in preventing fish entry into the canals. Water velocities in front of canal screens, at bypass channel entrances, and at ladder diffusers were measured to assess adherence to NMFS criteria and identify hydraulic patterns. Biological evaluations were conducted by releasing and recapturing marked yearling summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), yearling spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and subyearling fall chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in varying locations within the fish passage facilities.

Cameron, William A.; Knapp, Suzanne M.; Carmichael, Richard W.

1997-07-01

88

Factors Related to Recidivism Among Delinquent Youths in a State Correctional Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying and remediating variables accounting for recidivism has been a persistent and often controversial challenge. We investigated factors that may be related to recidivism among delinquent youths committed to a state correctional facility. Data were collected by examining the records of 147 recidivists and 147 non-recidivists. Our findings are consistent with previous research showing age of first offense and first

Antonis Katsiyannis; Teara Archwamety

1997-01-01

89

Tagging and Tracking System for Prisons and Correctional Facilities ? A Design Roadmap  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prisons and correctional facilities, particularly within Europe, have moved away from the traditional role of restrictive management and into one more akin to mentoring and re-education. This change of direction coupled with staffing shortages creates the need for security systems capable of self-management to relieve prison staff of the more fundamental tasks of managing movement and interaction and allow them

Catherine Louise Mulholland; Roy Sterritt; Patricia O'Hagan; Edward Hanna

2008-01-01

90

Comparing State- Versus Facility-Level Effects on Crowding in U.S. Correctional Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on prison crowding underscores the potential importance of both state- and facility-level effects on crowding, although empirical research has not assessed these relative effects because of the sole focus on states as units of analysis. This article describes findings from bi-level analyses of crowding across 459 state-operated…

Steiner, Benjamin; Wooldredge, John

2008-01-01

91

Social Support and Sense of Program Belonging Discriminate between Youth-Staff Relationship Types in Juvenile Correction Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the association between personal and social characteristics of incarcerated juvenile offenders and youth-staff relationship types. Employing the three relationship categories identified in a typology by Marsh and Evans (2009), multinomial logistic regression indicated that youth reporting higher levels of social support and…

Marsh, Shawn C.; Evans, William P.; Williams, Michael J.

2010-01-01

92

Telepsychiatry in Correctional Facilities: Using Technology to Improve Access and Decrease Costs of Mental Health Care in Underserved Populations  

PubMed Central

Objective: It is unclear if telepsychiatry, a subset of telemedicine, increases access to mental health care for inmates in correctional facilities or decreases costs for clinicians or facility administrators. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how utilization of telepsychiatry affected access to care and costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Methods: A literature review complemented by a semistructured interview with a telepsychiatry practitioner. Five electronic databases, the National Bureau of Justice, and the American Psychiatric Association Web sites were searched for this research, and 49 sources were referenced. The literature review examined implementation of telepsychiatry in correctional facilities in Arizona, California, Georgia, Kansas, Ohio, Texas, and West Virginia to determine the effect of telepsychiatry on inmate access to mental health services and the costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Results: Telepsychiatry provided improved access to mental health services for inmates, and this increase in access is through the continuum of mental health care, which has been instrumental in increasing quality of care for inmates. Use of telepsychiatry saved correctional facilities from $12,000 to more than $1 million. The semistructured interview with the telepsychiatry practitioner supported utilization of telepsychiatry to increase access and lower costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Conclusions: Increasing access to mental health care for this underserved group through telepsychiatry may improve living conditions and safety inside correctional facilities. Providers, facilities, and state and federal governments can expect increased savings with utilization of telepsychiatry. PMID:24355894

Deslich, Stacie Anne; Thistlethwaite, Timothy; Coustasse, Alberto

2013-01-01

93

Behind bars: the compelling case for academic health centers partnering with correctional facilities.  

PubMed

Academic health centers (AHCs), particularly those that are publicly funded institutions, have as their mission the treatment of disadvantaged populations, the training of the next generation of clinicians, and the development and dissemination of new knowledge to reduce the burden of disease and improve the health of individuals and populations. Incarcerated populations have the most prevalent and acute disease burden and health disparities in the United States, even in comparison with inner-city populations. Yet, only a small proportion of AHCs have reached out to incarcerated populations to fulfill their mission. Those AHCs that have partnered with correctional facilities have overcome concerns about the value and popularity of "training behind bars"; the cost, liability, and pragmatics of caring for a medically complicated population; and the viability of correctional health research and extramural research funding. They have done so to great benefit to patients, students, and faculty. Partnering with correctional facilities to provide health care offers opportunities for AHCs to fulfill their core missions of clinical service, education, and research, while also enhancing their financial stability, to the benefit of all. In this Commentary, the authors discuss, based on their experiences, these concerns, how existing partnerships have overcome them, and the benefits of such relationships to both AHCs and correctional facilities. PMID:25054416

Trestman, Robert L; Ferguson, Warren; Dickert, Jeff

2015-01-01

94

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (includes ROTC No. 1, date 01\\/25\\/1999)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. Located in Area 25

1999-01-01

95

A National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment for Juvenile Offenders  

PubMed Central

Despite consensus about the value of substance abuse treatment for delinquent youth, information about its prevalence and availability is inadequate and inconsistent. This paper presents findings about treatment and other correctional service provision from a national survey of directors of 141 juvenile institutional and community corrections facilities. Educational/GED programming and drug and alcohol education were the most prevalent types of correctional and substance abuse services. Other common services included physical health services and mental health assessment, provided to about 60% of youth across facilities, and mental health counseling, life and communication skills, and anger management, provided to about half the youth. Substance abuse treatment, as with most other services, were more prevalent in large, state-funded residential facilities (where 66% provided treatment), than local detention centers (20%) and community corrections facilities (56%). More detailed data showed that the number of youth attending treatment in all types of facilities on any given day was very low. PMID:17383550

Young, Douglas W.; Dembo, Richard; Henderson, Craig E.

2008-01-01

96

Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective action alternatives to the 'no-action' alternative, as the basis for the Draft Corrective Action Decision for the site. The history and nature of the contamination and previous investigations are summarized in Section 2. Also included in Section 2 is an evaluation of human and environmental targets and potential exposure pathways. Section 3 describes the corrective action goals and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). Section 4 describes four alternatives, Section 5 analyzes the alternatives in detail, and Section 6 compares the alternatives. Section 6 also includes a summary and a recommended corrective action.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-04-20

97

Ongoing Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Among Inmates at a State Correctional Facility  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We sought to determine hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence, associated exposures, and incidence among male inmates at a state correctional facility. Methods. A cross-sectional serological survey was conducted in June 2000, and susceptible inmates were retested in June 2001. Results. At baseline, 230 inmates (20.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=18.2%, 22.9%) exhibited evidence of HBV infection, including 11 acute and 11 chronic infections. Inmates with HBV infection were more likely than susceptible inmates to have injected drugs (38.8% vs 18.0%; adjusted prevalence odds ratio [OR]=3.0; 95% CI=1.9, 4.9), to have had more than 25 female sex partners (27.7% vs 17.5%; adjusted prevalence OR=2.0; 95% CI=1.4, 3.0), and to have been incarcerated for more than 14 years (38.4% vs 17.6%; adjusted prevalence OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.1, 2.6). One year later, 18 (3.6%) showed evidence of new HBV infection. Among 19 individuals with infections, molecular analysis identified 2 clusters involving 10 inmates, each with a unique HBV sequence. Conclusions. We documented ongoing HBV transmission at a state correctional facility. Similar transmission may occur at other US correctional facilities and could be prevented by vaccination of inmates. PMID:16186457

Khan, Amy J.; Simard, Edgar P.; Bower, William A.; Wurtzel, Heather L.; Khristova, Marina; Wagner, Karla D.; Arnold, Kathryn E.; Nainan, Omana V.; LaMarre, Madeleine; Bell, Beth P.

2005-01-01

98

The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-05-01

99

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation; 1991 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1991. Major repairs to one Minthorn pump were required and flood damage at Minthorn necessitated the replacement of rock and gravel around the pump house and steelhead brood holding area. Several modifications to the steelhead brood holding pond were also made to help reduce mortality. These changes appeared to be successful as evidenced by the reduced number of mortalities. Total prespawn mortality in 1990-91 was 10.4%. This compares to 20.0 to 39.0% for the previous three years at Minthorn. A total of 202 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from November, 1990 through April, 1991 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 410,356 eggs were taken from 64 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and initial rearing. The fish were then transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for further rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 347 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:l spawning ratio, a total of 601,548 eggs were taken from 159 females. They were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. Acclimation of 100,505 spring chinook salmon and 42,610 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1991. At Minthorn, 152,974 coho and 79,672 fall chinook salmon were acclimated and released. In the fall, 81,144 spring chinook salmon were held at Bonifer for a three-day post-transport recovery period. Control groups of spring and fall chinook salmon and summer steelhead were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1991 and 1992. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon and two experiments for spring chinook salmon were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Because of high spring flows in the Umatilla River however, the trap was not opened until mid-June and few fish were trapped, suggesting most had already migrated downriver. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1992-06-01

100

The Effects of a Self-Management Procedure on the On-Task Behavior, Academic Productivity, and Academic Accuracy of Female Students with Disabilities in a Juvenile Correctional High School Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students served in juvenile correctional school settings often arrive with histories of trauma, aversive educational experiences, low achievement, and other severe risk factors that impeded psychosocial development, educational progress, and occupational outcomes. Schools serving adjudicated youth must address a higher percentage of severe…

Caldwell, Stacy Lynette

2010-01-01

101

A High Risk of Hospitalization Following Release From Correctional Facilities in Medicare Beneficiaries  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE Little is known about the risk of individuals who are released from correctional facilities, a time where their may be discontinuity in care. OBJECTIVE To study the risk for hospitalizations among former inmates soon after their release from correctional facilities. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Data from Medicare administrative claims for 110 419 fee-for-service beneficiaries who were released from a correctional facility from 2002 through 2010 and controls matched by age, sex, race, Medicare status, and residential zip code. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hospitalization rates and specifically those for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions 7, 30, and 90 days after release. RESULTS Of 110 419 released inmates, 1559 individuals (1.4%) were hospitalized within 7 days after release; 4285 individuals (3.9%) within 30 days; and 9196 (8.3%) within 90 days. The odds of hospitalization was higher for released inmates compared with those of matched controls (within 7 days: odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% CI, 2.3-2.8]; within 30 days: OR, 2.1 [95% CI, 2.0-2.2]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.7-1.9]). Compared with matched controls, former inmates were more likely to be hospitalized for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (within 7 days: OR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.4-2.1]; within 30 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.8]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.7]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE About 1 in 70 former inmates are hospitalized for an acute condition within 7 days of release, and 1 in 12 by 90 days, a rate much higher than in the general population. PMID:23877707

Wang, Emily A.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2014-01-01

102

Implementation of the WICS Wall Interference Correction System at the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) is operational at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) of NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) for semispan and full span tests in the solid wall (slots covered) configuration. The method is based on the wall pressure signature method for computing corrections to the measured parameters. It is an adaptation of the WICS code operational at the 12 ft pressure wind tunnel (12ft PWT) of NASA Ames Research Center (NASA ARC). This paper discusses the details of implementation of WICS at the NTF including tunnel calibration, code modifications for tunnel and support geometry, changes made for the NTF wall orifices layout, details of interfacing with the tunnel data processing system, and post-processing of results. Example results of applying WICS to a semispan test and a full span test are presented. Comparison with classical correction results and an analysis of uncertainty in the corrections are also given. As a special application of the code, the Mach number calibration data from a centerline pipe test was computed by WICS. Finally, future work for expanding the applicability of the code including online implementation is discussed.

Iyer, Venkit; Everhart, Joel L.; Bir, Pamela J.; Ulbrich, Norbert

2000-01-01

103

Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-09. Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report. NCJ 228416  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-79) (PREA) requires the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) to carry out a comprehensive statistical review and analysis of the incidents and effects of prison rape for each calendar year. This report fulfills the requirement under Sec. 4(c)(2)(B)(ii) of the Act to provide a list of juvenile

Beck, Allen J.; Harrison, Paige M.; Guerino, Paul

2010-01-01

104

Juvenile Offenders' Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic/racial backgrounds) and prospectively predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent…

Mauricio, Anne M.; Little, Michelle; Chassin, Laurie; Knight, George P.; Piquero, Alex R.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino

2009-01-01

105

A Need For Correction: Reforming New York's Juvenile Justice System. Child Welfare Watch. Vol. 18, Fall 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the wake of a U.S. Justice Department investigation that found widespread use of excessive force by staff at upstate psychiatric care facilities for mentally ill children, this new edition of Child Welfare Watch identifies shortcomings in mental health services and explores possible solutions, including the expansion of alternatives to…

White, Andrew; Hemphill, Clara; Hurley, Kendra

2009-01-01

106

Nurse retention in a correctional facility: a study of the relationship between the nurses' perceived barriers and benefits.  

PubMed

Retention of nursing staff is more complex in a correctional facility. After a period of 3 years, only 20% of the staff remained employed at this study facility. Without retention of qualified correctional nurses, there are decreases in access to care, gaps in continuity of care, and less time for mentorship. Trained correctional nurses improve patient and staff safety, provide more education, and are more team-oriented. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and benefits to nursing staff satisfaction with their job and the likelihood that they will continue to work in correctional settings. Practice and patient care will be favorably impacted if correctional nurses are provided with services such as new hire orientation, clinical ladder programs to recruit and retain nursing staff, and teambuilding. PMID:23446873

Chafin, W Sue; Biddle, Wendy L

2013-04-01

107

Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

Evans, G.C.

1994-06-01

108

Juvenile Offenders’ Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic\\/racial backgrounds) and prospectively\\u000a predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent in a supervised setting.\\u000a Results indicated that supervised time suppressed age-related growth

Anne M. Mauricio; Michelle Little; Laurie Chassin; George P. Knight; Alex R. Piquero; Sandra H. Losoya; Delfino Vargas-Chanes

2009-01-01

109

Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, December 2000)  

SciTech Connect

This document is an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) that has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD) Decontamination Facility. CAU 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. The purpose of this addendum is to provide a rationale for the recommendation of a revised preferred alternative corrective action for CAU 254. This preferred alternative corrective action, Alternative 3, consists of the removal of accessible soil/sediment and all building material above ground level from the CAU 254 Site. This alternative is being recommended because a cost-effective technology is now available to dismantle the contaminated building and ensure complete removal of all CAU 254 CADD-identified contaminants of concern and any associated contamination. This preferred closure method alternative reduces the potential for future exposure pathways. Procedures will be developed, presented in the Corrective Action Plan, and implemented to ensure worker health and safety, protection of human health and the environment, and to meet all unrestricted release requirements in accordance with applicable state and federal regulations.

DOE /NV

2000-12-12

110

Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This title from the National Academy Press (NAP) is available in print and online. Users can read the full text online for free at the NAP site in Open Book format. Written by the National Research Council's Panel on Juvenile Crime, this book offers "an authoritative review of the best available data and analysis" on America's youth crime problem. The study discusses patterns and trends in crimes by children and adolescents, desistance, contributing factors to delinquency, and a range of proposed solutions.

2001-01-01

111

Determinants of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Inmates at Mangaung Maximum Correctional Facility in Bloemfontein, South Africa  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Correctional facilities house large number of inmates who are at high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB); however factors associated with TB among inmates at Mangaung Correctional Centre have not been studied. Study Population and Methods. We undertook a case control study and reviewed a total of 1140 medical records of inmates treated for TB between 2009 and 2010. Cases were selected randomly from the medical records of inmates who were treated. Data collected were analysed using STATA version 12.0 and determinants of TB were evaluated using multiple logistic regression analyses. Factors with P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results. Prevalence of TB was 8.8% and 52% of inmates with TB were aged 31–40 years; 58% of the TB cases were HIV positive and 34% of them had CD4 cell count 350 cells/mm3. Factors associated with TB among inmates were HIV coinfection (OR: 4.2; 95% CI: 2.64–7.00); previous history of TB disease (OR: 3.58; 95% CI: 2.25–5.70); and smoking (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.16–3.81). Conclusion. Interventions to improve TB detection such as regular screening of inmates with such factors need to be reinforced to control transmission of TB among inmates and the community. PMID:25866677

Nyasulu, Peter; Mogoere, Serame; Umanah, Teye; Setswe, Geoffrey

2015-01-01

112

Drug Use among Residents of Juvenile Correctional Center in Kerman, Iran, and its Relationship with Personality Dimensions and Self-concept  

PubMed Central

Background Identifying the status of substance misuse and its psychosocial correlates among residents of juvenile correctional centers, as a high risk group, could potentially illuminate the roadmap to prevention of drug use in this group. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 93 individuals aged 13 to 18 were enrolled. A self-administered questionnaire was completed and dropped in a sealed box. It consisted of 4 parts of Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale, NEO Personality Inventory, drug use questions, and demographic variables. All questionnaires were well adapted in the Persian language. MANOVA was used to compare the subscale scores between the drug users and nonusers. Findings All respondents were male and 40% were illiterate. More than 40% had drug dependent fathers. Use of cigarette, opium, and alcohol in the previous 30 days was reported by 31.9, 52.2, and 15.9% of respondents, respectively. In this population, the score of 3 of the 5 personality factors (i.e., neuroticism, extraversion, and openness) were higher than in the general population (P < 0.001). More than 88% of subjects had negative self-concept. Both the scores of personality and self-concept showed no significant difference based on the status of drug use. Conclusion Prevalence of lifetime and last-month drug use was found to be high. Regarding the profiles of personality and self-concept, more comprehensive evidence-based interventions are needed for improvement of their mental health. PMID:25140214

Gousheh, Amin; Ziaaddini, Hassan; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Nakhaee, Nouzar

2014-01-01

113

The Effect of Music Therapy on Executive Function Skills in Male, Incarcerated Adults in a Correctional Facility  

E-print Network

, bipolar disorder), psychotic disorder, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder, substance-related disorders, traumatic brain injury, adjustment disorders, autism-spectrum disorder, delirium and, more closely linked to criminality... with psychiatric disorders. The current study will be conducted in a correctional setting, where inmates may or may not have psychiatric disorders. Music therapy in the correctional facility will be discussed more in chapter two. Additional research...

Ellis, Elisha

2014-05-31

114

Correct dosing of artemether-lumefantrine for management of uncomplicated malaria in rural Tanzania: do facility and patient characteristics matter?  

PubMed Central

Background Use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), such as artemether-lumefantrine (AL), requires a strict dosing schedule that follows the drugs’ pharmacokinetic properties. The quality of malaria case management was assessed in two areas in rural Tanzania, to ascertain patient characteristics and facility-specific factors that influence correct dosing of AL for management of uncomplicated malaria. Methods Exit interviews were conducted with patients attending health facilities for initial illness consultation. Information about health workers’ training and supervision visits was collected. Health facilities were inventoried for capacity and availability of medical products related to care of malaria patients. The outcome was correct dosing of AL based on age and weight. Logistic regression was used to assess health facility factors and patient characteristics associated with correct dosing of AL by age and weight. Results A total of 1,531 patients were interviewed, but 60 pregnant women were excluded from the analysis. Only 503 (34.2%) patients who received AL were assessed for correct dosing. Most patients who received AL (85.3%) were seen in public health facilities, 75.7% in a dispensary and 91.1% in a facility that had AL in stock on the survey day. Overall, 92.1% (463) of AL prescriptions were correct by age or weight; but 85.7% of patients received correct dosing by weight alone and 78.5% received correct dosing by age alone. In multivariate analysis, patients in the middle dosing bands in terms of age or weight, had statistically significant lower odds of correct AL dosing (p?correct AL dosing. Conclusion Although malaria treatment guidelines indicate AL dosing can be prescribed based on age or weight of the patient, findings from this study show that patients within the middle age and weight dosing bands were least likely to receive a correct dose by either measure. Clinicians should be made aware of AL dosing errors for patients aged three to 12 years and advised to use weight-based prescriptions whenever possible. PMID:24325267

2013-01-01

115

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site:;\\u000a;\\u000a 25-41-03, EMAD Facility;\\u000a 25-99-20,

Mark Burmeister

2009-01-01

116

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four

David Strand

2006-01-01

117

Treatment and reintegration of violent juvenile offenders: Experimental results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Violent juvenile crime has become the focus of policy debates on the philosophy of juvenile justice systems and the efficacy of rehabilitation. The Violent Juvenile Offender (VJO) Program was an experiment to test correctional interventions for chronically violent juvenile offenders. Programs in four sites tested an intervention model with four central elements: reintegration, case management, social learning processes, and a

Jeffrey A. Fagan

1990-01-01

118

Correction.  

PubMed

The printed version of last month's article Effects of snake envenomation: a guide for emergency nurses (Emergency Nurse. 22, 9, 24-29) does not describe correctly the pain relief patients with snakebite should receive. Such patients should be given paracetamol or opiate-based medication according to local guidelines. We apologise for the error. PMID:25746866

2015-03-01

119

Special Education and Juvenile Justice: An Overview and Analysis of Prevention and Intervention Policy and Program Developments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a serious overpopulation of special needs youth in Ohio's juvenile justice system. This study raises policy questions relating to gaining a deeper understanding of the reasons why there is an overpopulation of children with disabilities in youth correctional facilities and what can be done to reduce the need for future incarcerations.…

Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, 2006

2006-01-01

120

Functional requirements for the man-vehicle systems research facility. [identifying and correcting human errors during flight simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Ames Research Center proposed a man-vehicle systems research facility to support flight simulation studies which are needed for identifying and correcting the sources of human error associated with current and future air carrier operations. The organization of research facility is reviewed and functional requirements and related priorities for the facility are recommended based on a review of potentially critical operational scenarios. Requirements are included for the experimenter's simulation control and data acquisition functions, as well as for the visual field, motion, sound, computation, crew station, and intercommunications subsystems. The related issues of functional fidelity and level of simulation are addressed, and specific criteria for quantitative assessment of various aspects of fidelity are offered. Recommendations for facility integration, checkout, and staffing are included.

Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.; Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.; Jex, H. R.; Mcruer, D. T.; Schulman, T. M.; Stapleford, R. L.

1980-01-01

121

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-09-29

122

78 FR 45983 - Acceptability of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities...RG) to describe elements of an acceptable...

2013-07-30

123

Implementing a Reentry Framework at a Correctional Facility: Challenges to the Culture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Implementation research is emerging in the field of corrections, but few studies have examined the complexities associated with implementing change among frontline workers embedded in specific organizational cultures. Using a mixed methods approach, the authors examine the challenges faced by correctional workers in a work release correctional

Rudes, Danielle S.; Lerch, Jennifer; Taxman, Faye S.

2011-01-01

124

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 117 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 26-41-01, Pluto Disassembly Facility, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 117 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 117 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From May 2008 through February 2009, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117, Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 117. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities indicated that the final action levels were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) reported as total Aroclor and radium-226. A corrective action was implemented to remove approximately 50 cubic yards of PCB-contaminated soil, approximately 1 cubic foot of radium-226 contaminated soil (and scabbled asphalt), and a high-efficiency particulate air filter that was determined to meet the criteria of a potential source material (PSM). Electrical and lighting components (i.e., PCB-containing ballasts and capacitors) and other materials (e.g., mercury-containing thermostats and switches, lead plugs and bricks) assumed to be PSM were also removed from Building 2201, as practical, without the need for sampling. Because the COC contamination and PSMs have been removed, clean closure of CAS 26-41-01 is recommended, and no use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU. No further action is necessary because no other contaminants of potential concern were found above preliminary action levels. The physical end state for Building 2201 is expected to be eventual demolition to slab. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • Clean closure is the recommended corrective action for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 117. • Corrective Action Unit 117 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Mark Burmeister

2009-06-01

125

Statistical Calibration and Validation of a Homogeneous Ventilated Wall-Interference Correction Method for the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel experiments will continue to be a primary source of validation data for many types of mathematical and computational models in the aerospace industry. The increased emphasis on accuracy of data acquired from these facilities requires understanding of the uncertainty of not only the measurement data but also any correction applied to the data. One of the largest and most critical corrections made to these data is due to wall interference. In an effort to understand the accuracy and suitability of these corrections, a statistical validation process for wall interference correction methods has been developed. This process is based on the use of independent cases which, after correction, are expected to produce the same result. Comparison of these independent cases with respect to the uncertainty in the correction process establishes a domain of applicability based on the capability of the method to provide reasonable corrections with respect to customer accuracy requirements. The statistical validation method was applied to the version of the Transonic Wall Interference Correction System (TWICS) recently implemented in the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The TWICS code generates corrections for solid and slotted wall interference in the model pitch plane based on boundary pressure measurements. Before validation could be performed on this method, it was necessary to calibrate the ventilated wall boundary condition parameters. Discrimination comparisons are used to determine the most representative of three linear boundary condition models which have historically been used to represent longitudinally slotted test section walls. Of the three linear boundary condition models implemented for ventilated walls, the general slotted wall model was the most representative of the data. The TWICS code using the calibrated general slotted wall model was found to be valid to within the process uncertainty for test section Mach numbers less than or equal to 0.60. The scatter among the mean corrected results of the bodies of revolution validation cases was within one count of drag on a typical transport aircraft configuration for Mach numbers at or below 0.80 and two counts of drag for Mach numbers at or below 0.90.

Walker, Eric L.

2005-01-01

126

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis En Español Read in Chinese Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, ...

127

Correcting the expression of miRNA-155 represses PP2Ac and enhances the release of IL-2 in PBMCs of juvenile SLE patients.  

PubMed

MicroRNA-155 is involved in immune cell, differentiation, maturation and function. MiR-155 showed variable dysregulated expression in autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. MiR-155 was previously confirmed to directly target CAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which was previously identified as a positive regulator of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). PP2A is a key negative regulator of interleukin-2, which is an important immune modulator and was previously shown to be decreased in SLE. In this study we aimed at investigating the regulation of PP2A by miR-155 and hence its role in juvenile SLE disease pathogenesis. MiR-155 showed significant downregulation in PBMCs from juvenile SLE and juvenile familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and significant upregulation in PBMCs from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. In SLE, miR-155 expression was negatively correlated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score and proteinuria and was positively correlated with white blood cell (WBC) count. The mRNA of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac) showed significant upregulation in PBMCs from SLE and FMF but not in JIA patients. Additionally, the relative expression of PP2Ac mRNA was positively correlated with SLEDAI score. Forced expression of miR-155 led to decreased relative expression of PP2Ac mRNA and increased IL-2 release in cultured-stimulated PBMCs. This study suggests for the first time the possible role of an miR-155-PP2Ac loop in regulating IL-2 release and identifies miR-155 as a potential therapeutic target in juvenile SLE disease through relieving IL-2 from the inhibitory role of PP2A. PMID:25253569

Lashine, Y A; Salah, S; Aboelenein, H R; Abdelaziz, A I

2015-03-01

128

78 FR 47154 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Swap Execution Facilities; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...correct the reference to ``section c(5)'' to read ``section c(4).'' Dated: July 31, 2013. Christopher J. Kirkpatrick, Deputy Secretary of the Commission. [FR Doc. 2013-18773 Filed 8-2-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE...

2013-08-05

129

The Prison Adjustment of Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

While young adult offenders have traditionally been characterized as making a poor adjustment to institutional life, the juvenile incarcerated in an adult facility represents a potentially greater problem. This study examined adjustment after separating the young violent offenders into two groups: those who committed their crimes prior to age 17 and those who committed crimes between 17 and 21. Juvenile

Marilyn D. McShane; Frank P. Williams

1989-01-01

130

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-11-18

131

Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C among entrants to Maryland correctional facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in correctional institutions has been established, data are sparse regarding\\u000a the comorbidities of hepatitis B virus (HBV), HCV, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), all of which may complicate the\\u000a management of HCV. This study sought to estimate the prevalence and correlates associated with HCV prevalence among entrants\\u000a into the Maryland Division of

Liza Solomon; Colin Flynn; Kelly Muck; John Vertefeuille

2004-01-01

132

Development of corrective measures and site stabilization technologies for shallow land burial facilities at semiarid sites  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the corrective measures task performed for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program has been to develop and test methods that can be used to correct any actual or anticipated problems with new and existing shallow land burial (SLB) sites in a semiarid environment. These field tests have not only evaluated remedial actions, but have also investigated phenomena suspected of being a possible problem at semiarid SLB sites. The approach we have taken in developing remedial action and site closure technologies for low-level waste sites is to recognize that physical and biological processes affecting site integrity are interdependent, and therefore, cannot be treated as separate problems. The field experiments performed for this task were to identify, evaluate, and model erosion control technologies, field test second generation biointrusion barriers, determine by field experiments the extent of upward radionuclide migration due to moisture cycling, and measure the effects of subsidence on remedial action of other system components. Progress made in each of these research areas is described.

Nyhan, J.W.; Abeele, W.V.

1986-01-01

133

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

G. N. Doyle

2002-02-01

134

Manual of Standards for Juvenile Training Schools and Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual of standards for juvenile training schools and services contains 487 American Correctional Association standards for the accreditation of juvenile training schools (youth development centers, villages, correction centers, treatment centers, service centers, homes for boys and girls, camps, and ranches). Standards presented are…

Commission on Accreditation for Corrections, Rockville, MD.

135

HIV/AIDS among Inmates of and Releasees from US Correctional Facilities, 2006: Declining Share of Epidemic but Persistent Public Health Opportunity  

PubMed Central

Because certain groups at high risk for HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) come together in correctional facilities, seroprevalence was high early in the epidemic. The share of the HIV/AIDS epidemic borne by inmates of and persons released from jails and prisons in the United States (US) in 1997 was estimated in a previous paper. While the number of inmates and releasees has risen, their HIV seroprevalence rates have fallen. We sought to determine if the share of HIV/AIDS borne by inmates and releasees in the US decreased between 1997 and 2006. We created a new model of population flow in and out of correctional facilities to estimate the number of persons released in 1997 and 2006. In 1997, approximately one in five of all HIV-infected Americans was among the 7.3 million who left a correctional facility that year. Nine years later, only one in seven (14%) of infected Americans was among the 9.1 million leaving, a 29.3% decline in the share. For black and Hispanic males, two demographic groups with heightened incarceration rates, recently released inmates comprise roughly one in five of those groups' total HIV-infected persons, a figure similar to the proportion borne by the correctional population as a whole in 1997. Decreasing HIV seroprevalence among those admitted to jails and prisons, prolonged survival and aging of the US population with HIV/AIDS beyond the crime-prone years, and success with discharge planning programs targeting HIV-infected prisoners could explain the declining concentration of the epidemic among correctional populations. Meanwhile, the number of persons with HIV/AIDS leaving correctional facilities remains virtually identical. Jails and prisons continue to be potent targets for public health interventions. The fluid nature of incarcerated populations ensures that effective interventions will be felt not only in correctional facilities but also in communities to which releasees return. PMID:19907649

Spaulding, Anne C.; Seals, Ryan M.; Page, Matthew J.; Brzozowski, Amanda K.; Rhodes, William; Hammett, Theodore M.

2009-01-01

136

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25 R-MAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25, Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 3110, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--891-VOL I-Rev. 1, dated July 2003, provides details of demolition, waste disposal, and use restriction (UR) modification for Corrective Action Unit 113, Area 25 R-MAD Facility. Demolition was completed on July 15, 2010, when the last of the building debris was disposed. Final field activities were concluded on August 30, 2010, after all equipment was demobilized and UR signs were posted. This work was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-02-24

137

Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles

Snyder, Howard N.

138

The Center of Juvenile and Criminal Justice  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With offices in such gritty locales as Oakland and the nation's capital, it follows that The Center of Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) is well-positioned to offer well-thought out policy research and technical assistance in the field of juvenile and criminal justice. Founded in 1985, the CJCJ works in a number of arenas, such as sentencing reform and community-based alternatives to juvenile detention. A good place to start for first-time visitors is the publications area, which contains links to recent works created by staff members on juvenile justice, adult corrections, and sentencing. One highlight of the site is the juvenile justice area. Here visitors can learn about the CJCJ's work in the state of California with alternative sentencing options and also view video clips from their conference on youth reform.

139

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (includes ROTC No. 1, date 01/25/1999)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 254 was used between 1963 through 1973 for the decontamination of test-car hardware and tooling used in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program. The CAS is composed of a fenced area measuring approximately 119 feet by 158 feet that includes Building 3126, an associated aboveground storage tank, a potential underground storage area, two concrete decontamination pads, a generator, two sumps, and a storage yard. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to resolve the problem statement identified during the Data Quality Objectives process that decontamination activities at this CAU site may have resulted in the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) onto building surfaces, down building drains to associated leachfields, and to soils associated with two concrete decontamination pads located outside the building. Therefore, the scope of the corrective action field investigation will involve soil sampling at biased and random locations in the yard using a direct-push method, scanning and static radiological surveys, and laboratory analyses of all soil/building samples. Historical information provided by former NTS employees indicates that solvents and degreasers may have been used in the decontamination processes; therefore, potential COCs include volatile/semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, asbestos, gamma-emitting radionuclides, plutonium, uranium, and strontium-90. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

1999-07-29

140

Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a “Non-Impacted Class” which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into “survey units” and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three “Class 1,” four “Class 2,” and one “Class 3” survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the building’s interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically “clean,” or free of contamination.

Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

2010-09-30

141

Policies and Practices in the Delivery of HIV Services in Correctional Agencies and Facilities: Results from a Multi-Site Survey  

PubMed Central

HIV risk is disproportionately high among incarcerated individuals. Corrections agencies have been slow to implement evidence-based guidelines and interventions for HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. The emerging field of implementation science focuses on organizational interventions to facilitate adoption and implementation of evidence-based practices. A survey of among CJ-DATS correctional agency partners revealed that HIV policies and practices in prevention, detection and medical care varied widely, with some corrections agencies and facilities closely matching national guidelines and/or implementing evidence-based interventions. Others, principally attributed to limited resources, had numerous gaps in delivery of best HIV service practices. A brief overview is provided of a new CJ-DATS cooperative research protocol, informed by the survey findings, to test an organization-level intervention to reduce HIV service delivery gaps in corrections. PMID:24078624

Belenko, Steven; Hiller, Matthew; Visher, Christy; Copenhaver, Michael; O’Connell, Daniel; Burdon, William; Pankow, Jennifer; Clarke, Jennifer; Oser, Carrie

2013-01-01

142

Juvenile Justice Reform: State Experiences. Criminal Justice Paper #4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Community-based programs in the juvenile justice system present a promising alternative to the disappointing results achieved by large institutional facilities. A diverse group of states has found that intensive, individualized services provided in small, family-like residential settings or in the juvenile's own home yield comparable or reduced…

Pierce, Robert; Yondorf, Barbara

143

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-03-01

144

Social Work and Juvenile Probation: Historical Tensions and Contemporary Convergences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work's weak presence in the field of corrections is peculiar, given that those involved in the criminal and juvenile justice systems are undeniably among the vulnerable and oppressed populations that the profession has traditionally served. The field of juvenile probation shares roots with the profession of social work but lacks a strong…

Peters, Clark M.

2011-01-01

145

Reform the Nation's Juvenile Justice System. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Across the nation, juvenile courts and corrections systems are littered with poorly conceived strategies that increase crime, endanger young people and damage their future prospects, waste billions of taxpayer dollars, and violate people's deepest held principles about equal justice under the law. While juvenile justice is largely a state and…

Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2009

2009-01-01

146

Juvenile Scleroderma Network  

MedlinePLUS

... your family can help. What if Juvenile Scleroderma Network earned a penny every time you searched the ... com and be sure to enter Juvenile Scleroderma Network as the charity you want to support. Just ...

147

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act. Fiscal Year 2009-2010 Report. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards…

Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

2012-01-01

148

A Comparative Analysis of Organizational Structure and Inmate Subcultures in Institutions for Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study provides a partial test of the importation and deprivation models of prisonization by examining inmate subcultures in ten different cottage units in four institutions for juvenile offenders. A typology of juvenile institutions based on both the correctional goals pursued and the methods of intervention and social control distinguishes four different treatment models used in institutions for juveniles. Matching

Barry C. Feld

1981-01-01

149

Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

Snyder, Howard N.

150

Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in 1999, 33…

Snyder, Howard N.

151

Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

Puzzanchera, Charles

2009-01-01

152

Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; Butcher et al., 1992) was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once…

Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

2005-01-01

153

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

Pat Matthews

2007-09-01

154

American Correctional Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Correctional Association is the oldest, and largest international correctional association in the world. ACA serves all disciplines within the corrections profession and is dedicated to excellence in every aspect of the field. The topics covered on this site are wide-ranging, from professional development and certification, to standards and accreditation, network and consulting, research and publications, conferences and exhibits and technology and testing. ACA is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the American Corrections system. A key feature of the website, is that it provides information about professional development programs and workshops as well as professional certification for an adult and juvenile correctional staff.

155

History Overtakes the Juvenile Justice System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many of juvenile justice's problems can be traced to the 19th century when parens patriae programs and facilities were established with little attention to their influence upon one another. As newer programs for status offenders were begun, older centers received mainly hardened delinquents, and their policies became more punitive. Without guidance or understanding whole systems grew punitive. A solution to

Theodore N. Ferdinand

1991-01-01

156

Creative Art Therapy for Incarcerated Male Juveniles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document begins by briefly outlining the problems of juveniles incarcerated in correctional institutions, including the problems of overcrowding and recidivism. It asserts that creative art therapy is designed to provide a therapeutic atmosphere for understanding and change and documents the use of creative art therapy techniques with…

Treanor, Virginia; Newlon, Betty J.

157

Delinquency Control and Juvenile Justice in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an overview of the recent developments in juvenile justice in China. With the improvement in the overall economy, there has been a genuine rise in delinquency. This paper describes the trend of youth crimes, and how informal grassroots networks and formal correctional institutions play their roles in delinquency control. The author argues that the inseparable relationship between

Dennis S. W. Wong

1999-01-01

158

Recombinant factor VIIa to correct coagulopathy in patients with traumatic brain injury presenting to outlying facilities before transfer to the regional trauma center.  

PubMed

Timely correction of coagulopathy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) improves mortality. Recombinant, activated factor VII (VIIa) has been identified as an effective method to correct coagulopathy in patients with TBI. We performed a retrospective study (January 1, 2008-December 31, 2009) of all patients with TBI and coagulopathy (international normalized ratio (INR) > 1.5) transferred to our Level I trauma center. Twenty-three patients with coagulopathy and TBI were transferred to our trauma center, 100 per cent sustained a fall, and 100 per cent were taking warfarin at the time of injury. Ten patients received VIIa to correct coagulopathy before transfer, whereas 13 did not. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes in patients who received VIIa with those who did not. When comparing the VIIa group with the no-VIIa group there was no difference in age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale score, injury severity score, transfer time, or INR at outlying facility. Both groups received one unit of plasma before arrival at our trauma center; patients in the VIIa group received a single 1.2 mg dose of VIIa at the outlying facility. Upon arrival to our trauma center the VIIa group had a lower INR (1.0 vs 3.0, P = 0.02) and lower mortality (0% vs 39%, P = 0.03). In coagulopathic patients with TBI presenting to outlying institutions with limited resources to quickly provide plasma, VIIa efficiently corrects coagulopathy before transfer to definitive care at the regional trauma center. More rapid correction of coagulopathy with VIIa in this patient population may improve mortality. PMID:22273315

Brown, Carlos V R; Sowery, Lauren; Curry, Eardie; Valadka, Alex B; Glover, Cynthia S; Grabarkewitz, Kim; Green, Terry; Hail, Steve; Admire, John

2012-01-01

159

3Q/4Q99 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 1999 - Volumes I, II, and III  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1999.

Chase, J.

2000-04-19

160

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post-closure-posting requirements for the mounded/capped basement structure, as well as for the entire CAU, are addressed in Section 4.2.10. The site contains radiologically impacted surfaces and hazardous materials. Based on review of the historical information for CAU 116 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 116 using the SAFER process. CAUs that may be closed using the SAFER process have conceptual corrective actions that are clearly identified. Consequently, corrective action alternatives can be chosen prior to completing a corrective action investigation, given anticipated investigation results. The SAFER process combines elements of the data quality objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to plan and conduct closure activities. The DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the SAFER process. The purpose of the investigation phase is to verify the adequacy of existing information used to determine the chosen corrective action. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty during the planning and decision-making phases of the project. The SAFER process allows for technical decisions to be made based on information gathered during site visits, interviews, meetings, research, and a consensus of opinion by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) team members. Any uncertainties are addressed by documented assumptions that are verified by sampling and analysis, data evaluation, onsite observations, and contingency plans, as necessary. Closure activities may proceed simultaneously with site characterization as sufficient data are gathered to confirm or disprove the assumptions made during selection of the corrective action. If, at any time during the closure process, new information is discovered that indicates that closure activities should be revised, closure activities will be reevaluated as appropriate. Based on a detailed review of historical documentation, there is sufficient process know

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-12-01

161

National Juvenile Defender Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Formerly affiliated with the National Bar Association, the National Juvenile Defender Center separated from the ABA in 2005 becoming an independent organization. The NJDC is a support center for public defenders, caseworkers and other groups working with juveniles or juvenile crime issues. Included on the site are publications related to juvenile justice cases and standards. The site also publishes training curriculum on basic skills and strategies for working with juveniles and delinquency proceedings, as well as information on adolescent development and strategies for communication with teens. The NJDC primarily presents itself as a legal resource for public defenders, but it is also a great resource for those in the criminal justice field and anyone working with juvenile or at-risk populations.

162

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

NA

2006-03-01

163

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

David Strand

2006-09-01

164

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2005-2006 Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), formerly named the Board of Corrections, the administrator of funding. California counties receiving state funds for Juvenile Justice…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2007-01-01

165

Adolescent neglect, juvenile delinquency and the risk of recidivism.  

PubMed

Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental rejection and family relationships are instrumental in explaining juvenile conduct problems. This study sought to determine whether neglect is associated with recidivism for moderate and high risk juvenile offenders in Washington State. Statewide risk assessments and administrative records for child welfare, juvenile justice, and adult corrections were analyzed. The sample was diverse (24 % female, 13 % African American, 8 % Hispanic, 5 % Native American) and included all moderate and high risk juvenile offenders screened by juvenile probation between 2004 and 2007 (n = 19,833). Official records from child protection were used to identify juvenile offenders with a history of child neglect and to identify juvenile offenders with an ongoing case of neglect. Event history models were developed to estimate the risk of subsequent offending. Adolescents with an ongoing case neglect were significantly more likely to continue offending as compared with youth with no official history of neglect. These findings remain even after controlling for a wide range of family, peer, academic, mental health, and substance abuse covariates. Interrupting trajectories of offending is a primary focus of juvenile justice. The findings of the current study indicate that ongoing dependency issues play a critical role in explaining the outcomes achieved for adolescents in juvenile justice settings. The implications for improved collaboration between child welfare and juvenile justice are discussed. PMID:23334336

Ryan, Joseph P; Williams, Abigail B; Courtney, Mark E

2013-03-01

166

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23

167

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Correction Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the F-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23

168

What Is Juvenile Arthritis?  

MedlinePLUS

... They also try to prevent, identify, and treat problems that result from the arthritis. Most children with arthritis need a blend of treatments – some treatments include drugs, and others do not. How Can You Help Your Child Live Well With Juvenile Arthritis? Juvenile ...

169

Renewing Juvenile Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) was commissioned by Sierra Health Foundation to critically examine California's juvenile justice system and consider the potential role of foundations in promoting systemic reform. The information gathered by CJCJ researchers for this report suggests that foundations can perform a key leadership…

Macallair, Daniel; Males, Mike; Enty, Dinky Manek; Vinakor, Natasha

2011-01-01

170

Juvenile Justice in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why has youth crime been increasing in the developing countries, and how well have their juvenile justice systems coped with this trend? This anthology profiles delinquency rates and juvenile justice systems in China, India, Japan, Macao, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Thailand and Turkey. Each nation's distinctive response to youth crime is described in the contexts of:

Preston Elrod; Minoru Yokoyma

2006-01-01

171

Can Juvenile Justice Survive?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is an account of the findings of Project MIJJIT, a group of stud ies undertaken by the Academy for Contemporary Problems of Co lumbus, Ohio, under the sponsorship of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Significant findings summarized here concern the growth of programs providing grants-in-aid from state governments to local counties for the support of juvenile

John P. Conrad

1981-01-01

172

Experimental demonstration of a global dispersion-free steering correction at the new linac test facility at SLAC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The performance of future linear colliders will depend critically on beam-based alignment and feedback systems. In ILC and CLIC it is planned to perform dispersion-free steering in the main linacs. To this end the beams are accelerated with different gradients to evaluate the dispersion. The steering is performed by minimizing the average offset of the different beams in the beam position monitors and, at the same time, the difference between the beam trajectories. The experimental verification of the dispersion-free steering algorithm is essential to prove its effectiveness and to prepare the commissioning of such machines. The algorithm should take an orbit measurement at every cycle (train to train), estimate the correction from this information, and, from the system response matrices, apply the correction. We have successfully tested dispersion-free steering at FACET, including an adaptive system-identification algorithm, where the system response matrix is measured dynamically and automatically.

Latina, A.; Pfingstner, J.; Schulte, D.; Adli, E.; Decker, F. J.; Lipkowitz, N.

2014-04-01

173

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The following is an addendum to the 'Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Nevada Test Site, Nevada', DOE/NV/11718--306, dated April 1999. This addendum includes Use Restriction Information forms and survey maps for CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), that were inadvertently left out of the Closure Report when it was published as a final document.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-06-01

174

73 FR 36964 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in State and Local Government Services; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Detention Facilities and Correctional Facilities New provisions...construction of cells in detention and correctional facilities. Alterations...Board for judicial, detention, and correctional facilities (1998...school multistory dormitory facilities, accessible prison cells, and social service...as courthouses, jails,......

2008-06-30

175

Juvenile Court and Its Systems of Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The history of juvenile justice reforms in the United States and many other parts of the Western world is an uneven one (Sutton, 1988). Reforms that brought about juvenile justice are a consequence of modern-day efforts to deal with the most stubborn and\\u000a defiant juveniles. Although troubled juveniles and juvenile crime have always existed, what has changed is the manner

Simon I. Singer

176

Special Issues in Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the original juvenile court founded in Cook County, Illinois, to current juvenile court systems across the United States, the philosophy of juvenile justice has reflected society’s predominant views on youth and adolescence. The first juvenile courts developed during the industrial revolution when social reformers were concerned about the dangers children faced in the workplace. In the early 1900s, compulsory

Keith R. Cruise

2006-01-01

177

Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect

This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

MCCARTHY, M.M.

1999-08-01

178

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This CR provides documentation and justification for the closure of CAU 118 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative and closure activities conducted in accordance with the CAU 118 SAFER Plan: Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The SAFER Plan provides information relating to site history as well as the scope and planning of the investigation. This CR also provides the analytical and radiological survey data to confirm that the remediation goals were met as specified in the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approved the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (Murphy, 2006), which recommends closure in place with use restrictions (URs).

Mark Burmeister

2007-09-01

179

Screening for Hepatitis C as a Prevention Enhancement (SHAPE) for HIV: An Integration Pilot Initiative in a Massachusetts County Correctional Facility  

PubMed Central

Objectives The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) and the Barnstable County Sheriff's Department (BCSD) in Massachusetts initiated a pilot program in July 2009 offering education and hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody testing to inmates and detainees, concurrent with routine HIV testing. The initiative was implemented to assess the feasibility of integrating HCV screening into an HIV screening program in a correctional setting and the efficacy of linking HCV antibody-positive inmates to clinical care upon release. Methods Through the Screening for Hepatitis C as a Prevention Enhancement initiative, HCV and HIV testing were offered to inmates and detainees shortly after admission, and by request at any time during incarceration. In preparation for release, referrals were made to community-based medical providers for HCV follow-up care. Data from BCSD were compared with routine surveillance data received by MDPH. Confirmatory HCV test results received by April 15, 2012, were considered indicators of appropriate post-release clinical care. Results From July 2009 through December 2011, 22% (n=596) and 25% (n=667) of 2,716 inmates/detainees accepted HCV and HIV testing, respectively. Of those tested for HCV antibody, 20.5% (n=122) were positive. Of those tested for HIV antibody, 0.8% (n=5) were positive. Of the inmates who tested HCV positive at BCSD and had been released, 37.8% were identified as receiving post-release medical care. Conclusions We determined that integration of HCV education and screening into correctional facilities is feasible and reveals high rates of HCV infection. Although this model presupposes programmatic infrastructure, elements of the service design and integration could inform a range of correctional programs. Effective linkage to care, while substantial, was not routine based on our analysis, and may require additional resources given its cost and complexity. PMID:24385643

Nettle, Eduardo; Church, Daniel; Bourassa, Lori; Sherwin, Vicki; Cranston, Kevin; Carr, Robert; Fukuda, H. Dawn; DeMaria, Alfred

2014-01-01

180

CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

NA

2006-03-01

181

A study of 128 deaths in New York City correctional facilities (1971-1976): implications for prisoner health care.  

PubMed

During a 5 1/2 year period, January, 1971 through July, 1976, 128 deaths occurred in New York City. The epidemiology of prisoner deaths including suicide was examined in a large incarcerated population. Each death was categorized according to the International Classification of Diseases. The mean age of the prisoner death was 34 years. Only 3 deaths occurred among females. Ethnic distribution of these deaths was similar to the prison population. Deaths of prisoners fell into 2 categories: external causes (suicide, accidents, homicide, legal intervention) and nonviolent causes. External causes accounted for 71 deaths. The leading cause of death was suicide, accounting for 52 deaths. Suicides occurred in all time periods of incarceration. The highest rate was in the 35 to 44 year age group. History of drug or alcohol abuse was reported by 69 per cent of the suicides. One-third of the prisoners committing suicides had histories of previous attempts or previous mental hospitalizations. Except for 2 individuals, the method was hanging. For the most part, prisoners at risk for suicide exhibited a common pattern and were identifiable. During the last 2 1/2 years of the study period, deaths were reviewed by a prisoner death committee. Deficiencies of care in deaths of nonviolent causation were categorized as "provider," "corrections," or "system." The most common deficiency in care was delay in hospitalization of prisoners requiring care. PMID:682709

Novick, L F; Remmlinger, E

1978-09-01

182

Target Strength Measurements of Juvenile Blueback Herring from the Mohawk River, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

Target strength (TS) was estimated from in situ and ex situ measurements of juvenile blueback herring Alosa aestivalis during their fall downriver migration at the Crescent Hydroelectric Project in the Mohawk River, New York. The blueback herring is an ecologically important anadromous species that must transit fish passage facilities at hydroelectric dams. Measurements of TS are necessary to distinguish juvenile

Christopher W. D. Gurshin

2012-01-01

183

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004. Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Board of Corrections (BOC) as the administrator of funding. A 2001 Senate Bill extended the funding and changed the program's name to the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2005-01-01

184

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24

185

Adolescence And Juvenile Justice Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores an often overlooked area in the analysis of juvenile justice policy — the influence of changing conceptions of adolescence. It is our view that over time juvenile delinquents have been defined as either victims (and hence, not responsible for their actions) or offenders (and hence, at least in part responsible). This shifting conceptualization has influenced juvenile justice

M. Joan McDermott; John H. Laub

1986-01-01

186

BURROWING ABILITY OF JUVENILE CLAMS  

E-print Network

BURROWING ABILITY OF JUVENILE CLAMS Marine Biological Laboratory FEB7- iL55 WOODS HOLE, MASS BURH);»1NG ABILITY OF JUVENILE CLAMS By John P. Baptist Fishery Biologist Special Scientific Report, to study the burrowing ability of juvenile clams, Mya arenaria, (2-22rnmo long), while exposed to various

187

Juvenile Court Abolition. Debate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contends that the juvenile court system should be abolished because its paternalistic underpinnings fundamentally are inconsistent with children's rights. Asserts that current theories of human rights are tied to competency, which has been used historically to exclude women and minority groups from the category of rights holders. (CFR)

Federle, Katherine Hunt

1994-01-01

188

Treating the Juvenile Offender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This authoritative, highly readable reference and text is grounded in the latest knowledge on how antisocial and criminal behavior develops in youth and how it can effectively be treated. Contributors describe proven ways to reduce juvenile delinquency by targeting specific risk factors and strengthening young people's personal, family, and…

Hoge, Robert D., Ed.; Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Boxer, Paul, Ed.

2008-01-01

189

Juvenile Silver Carp  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

These juvenile silver carps are used to find potential physical, biological or chemical controls as part of an integrated pest management approach for natural resource managers. Asian carp are invasive species that could pose substantial environmental risks and economic impacts if they become estab...

190

Juvenile Bighead Carp  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

These juvenile bighead carps are used to find potential physical, biological or chemical controls as part of an integrated pest management approach for natural resource managers. Asian carp are invasive species that could pose substantial environmental risks and economic impacts if they become esta...

191

Juvenile Justice in Maryland.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This four part guide provides secondary students with information about Maryland laws, courts, and legal system. The first section examines the nature and causes of increasing involvement of youth in crime, and identifies those crimes most commonly committed by juveniles. A special section on shoplifting is included. Section II examines the nature…

Vetter, Donald P.; Frederick, Charles

192

Juvenile Offender Recidivism: An Examination of Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between…

Calley, Nancy G.

2012-01-01

193

28 CFR 115.363 - Reporting to other confinement facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...confinement facilities. 115.363 Section 115.363 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Official Response Following A Resident Report §...

2014-07-01

194

Law-Related Education Programs in Juvenile Justice Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This documents consists of a list by state of programs sponsored by the American Bar Association to teach law related education in correctional institutions and other juvenile justice settings. The directory lists 14 programs in institutional schools and diversion programs in 17 states. Under the diversion programs, first time or misdemeanor…

American Bar Association, Chicago, IL. Special Committee on Youth Education for Citizenship.

195

Adolescent Neglect, Juvenile Delinquency and the Risk of Recidivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental…

Ryan, Joseph P.; Williams, Abigail B.; Courtney, Mark E.

2013-01-01

196

The Shackling ofThe Shackling ofThe Shackling ofThe Shackling of Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders  

E-print Network

1 The Shackling ofThe Shackling ofThe Shackling ofThe Shackling of Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders: The Debate inThe Debate inThe Debate inThe Debate-nine percent of juvenile offenses that year were non-violent status offenses.10 Most public defenders

Mazzotti, Frank

197

Juvenile polyposis syndrome  

PubMed Central

Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant predisposition to the occurrence of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis of JPS is based on the occurrence of numerous colon and rectum polyps or any number of polyps with family history and, in the case of juvenile polyps, their occurrence also outside the large intestine. The JPS is caused by mutations in SMAD4 and BMPR1A. Products of the SMAD4 gene are involved in signal transduction in the transforming growth factor ? pathway and BMPR1A protein is a receptor belonging to the family of transmembrane serine/threonine kinases. Both proteins are responsible for processes determining appropriate development of colonic mucosa. The JPS belongs to the group of hamartomatous polyposes. The hamartomatous polyposis syndromes constitute a group of diseases in which manifestations differ slightly and only molecular diagnostics gives the possibility of verifying the clinical diagnosis. PMID:25097590

Cichy, Wojciech; Klincewicz, Beata

2014-01-01

198

Juvenile polyposis syndrome.  

PubMed

Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant predisposition to the occurrence of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis of JPS is based on the occurrence of numerous colon and rectum polyps or any number of polyps with family history and, in the case of juvenile polyps, their occurrence also outside the large intestine. The JPS is caused by mutations in SMAD4 and BMPR1A. Products of the SMAD4 gene are involved in signal transduction in the transforming growth factor ? pathway and BMPR1A protein is a receptor belonging to the family of transmembrane serine/threonine kinases. Both proteins are responsible for processes determining appropriate development of colonic mucosa. The JPS belongs to the group of hamartomatous polyposes. The hamartomatous polyposis syndromes constitute a group of diseases in which manifestations differ slightly and only molecular diagnostics gives the possibility of verifying the clinical diagnosis. PMID:25097590

Cichy, Wojciech; Klincewicz, Beata; Plawski, Andrzej

2014-06-29

199

Prevention of Juvenile Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theme of this paper is the prevention of juvenile violence through pro-active responses based on modern biological and neurological knowledge, rather than after-the-fact legal responses based on a doctrine of free will, moral responsibility, and revenge and punishment. Prevention programs are of two types: interdisciplinary and social-developmental. Interdisciplinary approaches are based on biology, psychology, sociology, law, and urban planning

C. Ray Jeffery

1998-01-01

200

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) describes a heterogeneous group of several disease subtypes characterized by\\u000a arthritis beginning before the age of 16 years and where symptoms persist for more than 6 weeks. All subtypes of JIA are of\\u000a unknown cause. Although the pathogenesis for each subtype is likely to be different, JIA is generally regarded to be an autoimmune

Günther E. Dannecker; Martin N. Arbogast; Carol B. Lindsley; H. Schacherl; H. J. Girschick; C. Huemer; A. Heiligenhaus; U. Neudorf

201

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17

202

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile primary osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Research studies PubMed Recent literature Conditions > Juvenile primary osteoporosis On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed January 2013 What is juvenile primary osteoporosis? Juvenile primary osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized ...

203

Offenders in Juvenile Court, 1994. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile courts in the United States processed more than 1.5 million delinquency cases in 1994, representing a 5% increase over the 1993 caseload and a 41% increase over the number of cases handled in 1985. These figures are taken from "Juvenile Court Statistics, 1994," the latest in a series of annual reports on cases handled by courts with…

Butts, Jeffrey A.

204

Juvenile Firesetting: A Research Overview. Juvenile Justice Bulletin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2002, the National Association of State Fire Marshals (NASFM) began developing applied research initiatives to help professionals curtail juvenile firesetting. The project included a review of the research literature, a conference of researchers and professionals involved in preventing juvenile firesetting, and a final report, upon which this…

Putnam, Charles T.; Kirkpatrick, John T.

2005-01-01

205

Morphometric criteria for sexing juvenile human skeletons using the ilium.  

PubMed

Previous attempts to sex juvenile skeletons have focused on the application of qualitative or semi-quantitative techniques. This study applies a variety of geometric morphometric methods, including eigenshape analysis, to this problem. Six metric criteria for the ilia were tested with the aim of investigating previous ideas concerning sexually diagnostic characters. This study uses 25 ilia from juveniles of known age and sex from Christ Church, Spitalfields, London. Ninety-six percent of juvenile ilia were correctly identified as male or female using the shape of the greater sciatic notch. Identification accuracy is shown to improve with age for several criteria. Males were identified to a higher accuracy than females. Application of geometric techniques improves the understanding of the relationship between age, sex, and shape and the clarity with which these relationships can be quantified. Archaeological and forensic relevance of the results are discussed with recommendations for future application. PMID:18366560

Wilson, Laura A; MacLeod, Norman; Humphrey, Louise T

2008-03-01

206

Extracardiac juvenile rhabdomyoma of the larynx: a rare pathological finding.  

PubMed

The extracardiac juvenile rhabdomyoma is extremely rare in the field of Otorhinolaryngology. The tumour usually arises from the soft tissue of the face or from mucosal sites, especially the oropharynx and the oral cavity but only sporadic endolaryngeal cases have been described in literature so far with predominance of young males. Here, we describe the very rare case of endolaryngeal extracardiac juvenile rhabdomyoma in a 42-year-old male. Clinical examination showed a mass of the right vocal cord, resembling a cystic lesion. Microlaryngoscopy revealed a non-encapsulated lesion and histopathology including immunohistochemistry which consecutively led to the correct diagnosis. This case suggests that the endolaryngeal extracardiac juvenile rhabdomyoma can be easily confused with a vocal cord cyst. Malignant transformations have not been reported but recurrences have been described. When total excision cannot be accomplished, reoperation or narrow follow-up is indicated to prevent advanced revision surgeries. PMID:23124718

Sharma, Shachi J; Kreisel, Melanie; Kroll, Tobias; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Klussmann, Jens P; Wittekindt, Claus

2013-02-01

207

Juvenile Dermatomyositis Presenting With Anasarca  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generalized edema can occur during the course of juvenile dermatomyositis. In this article, a 4-year-old boy with generalized nonpitting edema and proximal weakness is reported. Characteristic cutaneous lesions, laboratory tests, results of electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings resulted in a diagnosis of juvenile dermatomyositis. He was treated with corticosteroids and methotrexate. It is concluded that the generalized edema may

Semra Saygi; Füsun Alehan; Esra Baskin; Umut Selda Bayrakci; Esra Meltem Kayahan Ulu; Namik Ozbek

2008-01-01

208

Juvenile Justice in Rural America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Producing a much-needed organized body of literature about rural juvenile justice, 14 papers (largely from the 1979 National Symposium on Rural Justice) are organized to identify current issues, identify forces causing changes in current systems, review programs responding to rural juvenile justice problems, and provide planning models to aid…

Jankovic, Joanne, Ed.; And Others

209

Psychopathology in Female Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The aim was to document the spectrum of present and lifetime psychological disorders in female juvenile offenders, and to examine the relations between mental health status and socio-demographic, family and trauma variables. Method: One hundred juvenile offenders were matched with a comparison group of 100 females on age and…

Dixon, Angela; Howie, Pauline; Starling, Jean

2004-01-01

210

Juvenile Justice in the Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

In his engaging narrative history of the rise and workings of America's first juvenile court, David S. Tanenhaus explores the fundamental and enduring question of how the law should treat the young. Sifting through almost 3,000 previously unexamined Chicago case files from the early twentieth century, Tanenhaus reveals how children's advocates slowly built up a separate system for juveniles, all

David S. Tanenhaus

2004-01-01

211

Juvenile justice and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Addressing the mental health needs of youth in the juvenile justice system is a key imperative for all stakeholders interested in preventing and reducing juvenile delinquency. Despite the substantially higher rates of mental health disorders among these youth, services and approaches are fraught with barriers including inadequate assessment, fragmentation, and deficit-based intervention. Comprehensive, system-level reform is necessary to better address

Carol MacKinnon-Lewis; Martha C. Kaufman; James M. Frabutt

2002-01-01

212

A Century of Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its inception in Illinois in 1899, the juvenile court has become a remarkable legal and social institution all over the developed world, one that plays a singular role in modern government. At its founding, the juvenile court was intended to reverse longstanding legal traditions, and place the child's interests first in areas of law ranging from dependency to delinquency.

David S. Tanenhaus; Margaret K. Rosenheim; Franklin E. Zimring; Bernardine Dohrn

2002-01-01

213

Iatrogenic effect of juvenile justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The present study uses data from a community sample of 779 low-SES boys to investigate whether intervention by the juvenile justice system is determined, at least in part, by particular indi- vidual, familial and social conditions, and whether intervention by the juvenile courts during adoles- cence increases involvement in adult crime. Method: The study considers self-reported crime in childhood

Uberto Gatti; Richard E. Tremblay; Frank Vitaro

2009-01-01

214

Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The central question examined in this address is, “Do children's crimes make them adults?” I begin by focusing on the concept and history of adolescence in our society, I then examine the development and philosophy of the juvenile justice system. Adolescent development and juvenile justice are brought together around the concepts of maturity, judgment, and competence, followed by a brief

N. Dickon Reppucci

1999-01-01

215

Psychopathology in female juvenile offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The aim was to document the spectrum of present and lifetime psychological disorders in female juvenile offenders, and to examine the relations between mental health status and socio- demographic, family and trauma variables. Method: One hundred juvenile offenders were matched with a comparison group of 100 females on age and socioeconomic status (SES). Psychological profiles and trauma histories of

Angela Dixon; Pauline Howie; Jean Starling

2004-01-01

216

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2007-2008 Report. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile-justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA) (formerly named the Board of Corrections) the administrator of funding. A 2001 California Senate bill extended the funding and changed the…

Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

2010-01-01

217

Reforming Our Expectations about Juvenile Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Typing the term "juvenile justice reform" into a Google[TM] search will result in 60 pages of entries. But what is meant by juvenile justice reform? What does it look like? How will one know when it is achieved? This article defines juvenile justice reform, discusses the principles of effective reform, and describes the practice of juvenile

Rodriguez, Pamela F.; Baille, Daphne M.

2010-01-01

218

Miranda Rights: Implications for Juveniles with Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile delinquency in the United States has been a persistent concern for decades. Consequently, because more juveniles have been referred to juvenile court and the arrest rate of preteen offenders has increased to almost three times that of older youth, the persistent and often controversial issue of the capacity of juvenile offenders to waive…

Katsiyannis, Antonis; Barrett, David E.; Losinski, Mickey L.

2011-01-01

219

The Watershed of Juvenile Justice Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an overview of current policy debates surrounding reform in the juvenile justice system. New data on trends in juvenile crime and the justice system are also presented. These data reveal that while juvenile arrests have declined, the juvenile justice system has become more formal and restrictive and more oriented toward punishment. The authors also present their views

Barry Krisberg; Ira M. Schwartz; Paul Litsky; James Austin

1986-01-01

220

Addendum to the corrective action plan for Underground Storage Tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1: Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID {number_sign}0-010117  

SciTech Connect

This document represents an addendum to the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U located at Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The site of the four underground storage tanks is commonly referred to as the Rust Garage Facility. The original CAP was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review in May 1992. During the time period after submission of the original CAP for the Rust Garage Facility, Y-12 Plant Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program personnel continued to evaluate improvements that would optimize resources and expedite the activities schedule presented in the original CAP. Based on these determinations, several revisions to the original corrective action process options for remediation of contaminated soils are proposed. The revised approach will involve excavation of the soils from the impacted areas, on-site thermal desorption of soil contaminants, and final disposition of the treated soils by backfilling into the subject site excavations. Based on evaluation of the corrective actions with regard to groundwater, remediation of groundwater under the Y-12 Plant CERCLA Program is proposed for the facility.

Not Available

1994-01-01

221

Juvenile Crime Victims in the Justice System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The literature on juvenile justice is largely concerned with offenders: topics such as juvenile courts, the rights of juvenile\\u000a offenders, the adjudication of juveniles as adults, and the effectiveness of delinquency prevention programs. But juveniles\\u000a have contact with the justice system in another role—in the role of victims—and this is not an intersection that has been\\u000a addressed nearly so intensively

David Finkelhor; Mallie J. Paschall; Patricia Y. Hashima

222

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

2012-07-01

223

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

2013-07-01

224

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

2011-07-01

225

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

2010-07-01

226

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

2014-07-01

227

Juvenile Angiofibroma: Evolution of Management  

PubMed Central

Juvenile angiofibroma is a rare benign lesion originating from the pterygopalatine fossa with distinctive epidemiologic features and growth patterns. The typical patient is an adolescent male with a clinical history of recurrent epistaxis and nasal obstruction. Although the use of nonsurgical therapies is described in the literature, surgery is currently considered the ideal treatment for juvenile angiofibroma. Refinement in preoperative embolization has provided significant reduction of complications and intraoperative bleeding with minimal risk of residual disease. During the last decade, an endoscopic technique has been extensively adopted as a valid alternative to external approaches in the management of small-intermediate size juvenile angiofibromas. Herein, we review the evolution in the management of juvenile angiofibroma with particular reference to recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22164185

Nicolai, Piero; Schreiber, Alberto; Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea

2012-01-01

228

A Giant Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma  

PubMed Central

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) are locally growing highly vascular tumours. They are treated primarily by surgical excision ranging from open approach to endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old male with a giant nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibroma obliterating the pterygopalatine fossa bilaterally, invasing the sphenoid bone and extending to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically with endoscopic approach and discharged as cured without any complication. PMID:23714961

Yüce, Salim; Uysal, ?smail Önder; Do?an, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; ?alk, ?smail; Müderris, Suphi

2012-01-01

229

3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

Chase, J.

2000-05-12

230

Tried as an adult, housed as a juvenile: a tale of youth from two courts incarcerated together.  

PubMed

Research has questioned the wisdom of housing juveniles who are convicted in criminal court in facilities with adult offenders. It is argued that minors transferred to criminal court should not be incarcerated with adults, due to a greater likelihood of developing criminal skills, being victimized, and attempting suicide. Alternatively, it has been suggested that the other option, housing these youth with minors who have committed less serious crimes and who are therefore adjudicated in juvenile courts, might have unintended consequences for juvenile court youth. The present study utilizes a sample of youth incarcerated in one secure juvenile facility, with some offenders processed in juvenile court (n = 261) and others processed in adult court (n = 103). We investigate whether youth transferred to adult court engage in more institutional offending (in particular, violence) and experience less victimization than their juvenile court counterparts. Results indicate that although adult court youth had a greater likelihood of being convicted of violent commitment offenses than juvenile court youth, the former engaged in less offending during incarceration than the latter. In addition, no significant differences in victimization were observed. These findings suggest that the concern about the need for separate housing for adult court youth is unfounded; when incarcerated together, those tried in adult court do not engage in more institutional violence than juvenile court youth. PMID:23914921

Bechtold, Jordan; Cauffman, Elizabeth

2014-04-01

231

Does Completion of Juvenile Drug Court Deter Adult Criminality?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile drug courts have been developed with the explicit mission of reducing juvenile substance use and related delinquency, and adult crime. Research has shown that juvenile drug courts continue to be popular and effective alternatives to other juvenile court initiatives in terms of decreasing juvenile recidivism. This study is the first to focus on the link between juvenile drug court

W. Craig Carter; R. Donald Barker

2011-01-01

232

Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Measles: What to Know Vaccines: FAQs ... What to Expect Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) ...

233

Juvenile Sex Offender Treatment at State-Operated Correctional Institutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's criminal justice system faces enormous challenges across a broad spectrum of issues. Sex offenses are one such issue posing unique problems to criminal justice practitioners. Research on adult sex offenders indicates offense patterns begin early in life, usually around preor postadolescence. This underscores the importance ofjuvenile sex offender rehabilitative intervention to curb individuals' offense histories before they escalate in

Allen D. Sapp; Michael S. Vaughn

1990-01-01

234

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has recently placed an item of interest online. This item, from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention (OJJDP), is the 1999 national report on Juvenile Offenders and Victims, "the most comprehensive source of information about juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and about the response of the juvenile justice system to these problems." The report is offered in seven chapters in .pdf format.

Sickmund, Melissa.

235

On the Prevention of Juvenile Crime  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Crimes committed by juveniles are among the most urgent social problems. Juvenile crime is as prevalent as crime itself is, and it has not been solved completely in any society and cannot be solved through law enforcement measures alone. In this article, the authors discuss the dynamics and structure of juvenile crime in Russia and present data…

Lelekov, V. A.; Kosheleva, E. V.

2008-01-01

236

TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY Juvenile Delinquency, Justice 332  

E-print Network

1 TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY Juvenile Delinquency, Justice 332 Class Information Where: Barnett Room received funds from the United States Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency will also include a brief history and the functioning of the juvenile justice system. Required Books

Gering, Jon C.

237

Guidelines for Juvenile Information Sharing. OJJDP Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The juvenile information sharing (JIS) guidelines were prepared by the Center for Network Development (CND) for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The guidelines suggest a course of action for key agency and organization stakeholders involved in a state or local effort to implement and sustain juvenile information…

Mankey, Jennifer; Baca, Patricia; Rondenell, Stephanie; Webb, Marilyn; McHugh, Denise

2006-01-01

238

Assessing Juvenile Sexual Offenders' Risk for Reoffending  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research was to investigate how best to identify juvenile sexual offenders who are likely to reoffend. The juvenile justice records of 112 male juvenile sexual offenders were examined. Information obtained during evaluation at a specialized, community-based program was compared with records of subsequent sexual and nonsexual reoffending. Certain characteristics of the referral offense and aspects of

WAYNE R. SMITH; CAREN MONASTERSKY

1986-01-01

239

Delinquency and Abuse Among Juvenile Sexual Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background information obtained from 450 male juvenile sexual offenders and their families was examined to explore two important questions: Are juvenile sexual offenders referred for more serious offenses more likely to have a history of aggressiveness or delinquency? Are more serious sexual offenses committed by juveniles who themselves have previously been victims of abuse? The results did not indicate a

WAYNE R. SMITH

1988-01-01

240

JUVENILE LAW AND PROCEDURES Class Information  

E-print Network

, juvenile offending. Methods of Instruction: During the course we will have lecture, group work, studentJUVENILE LAW AND PROCEDURES Class Information: Justice Systems, 333 Mondays from 6:30 p.m. to 9 in this course follow the successful completion of Justice Systems 307, The Legal System. Textbooks: The Juvenile

Gering, Jon C.

241

Why do juvenile fish utilise mangrove habitats?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hypotheses to discern the strong positive association between juvenile fish and mangrove habitat were tested with field and laboratory experiments. Artificial mangrove structure in the field attracted slightly more juvenile fish than areas without structure. Artificial structure left to accumulate fouling algae attracted four-times the total number of juvenile fish than areas without structure or areas with clean structure.

Pia Laegdsgaard; Craig Johnson

2001-01-01

242

Prevention of Serious and Violent Juvenile Offending. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin explores the proximal risk factors for juvenile offending, reviews the early developmental precursors to violent offending, and summarizes approaches to prevention. It also discusses components of intervention programs, limitations of single-focus prevention, examples of multi systemic interventions, and limitations of prevention…

Wasserman, Gail A.; Miller, Laurie S.; Cothern, Lynn

243

Juvenile offender recidivism: an examination of risk factors.  

PubMed

One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between recidivism and nine specific variables: offense type, age at initial involvement in juvenile justice, child welfare system involvement, termination of parental rights, parental criminal history, family support, program completion status, length of treatment stay, and discharge placement. Offender type was the only factor found to have a significant impact on recidivism with general and substance-involved offenders more likely to recidivate than sex offenders. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:22574843

Calley, Nancy G

2012-01-01

244

A Century of Juvenile Justice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The millennium marks the beginning of a second century for the formal system of juvenile justice in the United States. From its inception, the central focus of the system has been delinquency, an amorphous construct that includes not only "criminal" behavior but also an array of youthful actions that offend prevailing social norms. Thus, the…

Harris, Philip W.; Welsh, Wayne N.; Butler, Frank

245

Reading Achievement and Juvenile Delinquency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The reading achievement of 31 male juvenile delinquents was analyzed and compared to previous reading research on similar subjects. The subjects were nine learning disabled students, five emotionally handicapped students, five educable mentally handicapped students, and twelve students who were in the process of being evaluated for special…

Hill, Nancy C.; Atkinson, Tommy

246

Juvenile Court: Today and Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses whether juveniles who commit criminal law violations should be tried in the same courts as adults. Addresses the issue of transfers that is a legal mechanism used to move youth to criminal court. Considers alternative proposals for handling youth brought to the judicial system and the role of the federal government. (CMK)

Update on Law-Related Education, 2000

2000-01-01

247

An update on juvenile dermatomyositis.  

PubMed

Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare, severe, autoimmune disease characterized by a small-vessel vasculopathy that primarily affects skin and muscle, but also lung, joints, gut and heart. Nowadays prompt recognition of this entity and aggressive treatment, when needed, improves outcomes and has decreased mortality that, before corticosteroid became a mainstay in therapy, could reach 40%. PMID:25034096

Boccaletti, V; Di Nuzzo, S; Feliciani, C; Fabrizi, G; Pagliarello, C

2014-10-01

248

Juvenile Justice: The Second Revolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging trends in the administration of juvenile justice, although viewed today as gradual adjustments in policy and practice, may eventually be interpreted as a revolutionary shift comparable to the earlier movement that established separate courts for children. The focus of this potential second revolution is on the diversion of noncriminal, status offenders from institutional confinement and the adoption of more

Frank Hellum

1979-01-01

249

Juvenile offenders and mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author reviews the significance of the presence of mental illnesses to the juvenile justice system. He acknowledges the absence of a satisfactory system for classifying mental disorders among children and adolescents and sketches what so far is known about certain childhood disorders which appear to have a special significance for delinquent behaviour. He reviews studies on the overlap between

Thomas Grisso

1999-01-01

250

Juvenile Justice and Substance Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laurie Chassin focuses on the elevated prevalence of substance use disorders among young offenders in the juvenile justice system and on efforts by the justice system to provide treatment for these disorders. She emphasizes the importance of diagnosing and treating these disorders, which are linked both with continued offending and with a broad…

Chassin, Laurie

2008-01-01

251

Academic Potential among African American Adolescents in Juvenile Detention Centers: Implications for Reentry to School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study explores Black adolescent detainees' academic potential and motivation to return to school, to inform best practices and policies for juvenile reentry to educational settings. Adolescent detainees (N = 1,576) who were recruited from 1 male and 1 female youth detention facility, responded to surveys that assessed postdetention educational…

Toldson, Ivory A.; Woodson, Kamilah M.; Braithwaite, Ronald; Holliday, Rhonda C.; De La Rosa, Mario

2010-01-01

252

Juvenile Male Sexual Offenders: The Quality of Motivation System of Assessment and Treatment Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile male sexual offenders completed the Quality of Motivation Questionnaire (QMQ) upon entry into a residential treatment facility. The concepts of Quality of Motivation (QM) Theory are presented to explain the QMQ scores. Recommendations of treatment issues for therapists are prioritized according to QM Theory and presented in a treatment…

LeGrand, Scott; Martin, R. Chris

2001-01-01

253

Classification of Severe Male Juvenile Offenders Using the MACI Clinical and Personality Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classifications for severe juvenile offenders and ones that include mental health needs are lacking. Thus, in this study, adolescent male offenders (N = 652) committed to a residential facility were clustered on personality and clinical scales of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (Millon, 1993) into 5 groups (including 4 found in other…

Taylor, Jeanette; Kemper, Therese Skubic; Loney, Bryan R.; Kistner, Janet A.

2006-01-01

254

Library Outreach to Juvenile Offenders in Intensive Supervision Probation Programs (Community Centered House Arrest)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The American Library Association encourages public libraries to extend their services to people in jails and detention centers, but there is little research that shows exactly how many libraries do so. Research shows that 54% of juveniles arrested are not sent to residential facilities but instead receive court ordered probation into an Intensive…

Brumfield, Elizabeth Jean

2008-01-01

255

Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Panel on Juvenile Crime: Prevention, Treatment, and Control.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book discusses patterns and trends in crimes committed by children and adolescents, analyzing youth crime as a subset of general crime and studying the impact of race and gender. It evaluates different approaches to forecasting future crime rates. Data come from a national panel that examined what is known about juvenile crime and its…

McCord, Joan, Ed.; Widom, Cathy Spatz, Ed.; Crowell, Nancy A., Ed.

256

The Impact of Juvenile Justice Reforms in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines changes in the juvenile justice system after passage of the comprehensive Juvenile Justice Act (1986) and the impact those changes have had on juvenile offenders in India. Specifically, this study examines how changes in the juvenile justice system impacted the types of cases brought before the juvenile courts and the types of dispositions imposed on delinquent children.

Sesha Kethineni; Tricia Klosky

2000-01-01

257

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: spontaneous resolution.  

PubMed

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare, benign tumor that occurs most often in adolescent males. Common practice is to excise the tumor with open or endoscopic surgery. We report the case of a 17-year-old male who presented in 1995 with a mass filling the left posterior nasal cavity. A diagnosis of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma was obtained with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient elected to have no treatment. On annual scans, the lesion changed little until 1998, when it began to gradually decrease in size. Although it is not well proven, the natural history of these tumors seems to be regression over time. This case supports the argument that a policy of watchful waiting with regular imaging studies may postpone or eliminate the need for surgery and its attendant risks. PMID:18800325

Spielmann, Patrick M; Adamson, Richard; Cheng, Kenneth; Sanderson, Robert J

2008-09-01

258

A juvenile ankylosaur from China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Juvenile ankylosaur specimens are very rare. A new ankylosaur, Liaoningosaurus paradoxus gen. et sp. nov., is described based on a beautifully preserved juvenile ankylosaur specimen from the famous Yixian Formation of Liaoning, China. Liaoningosaurus has a large bony plate (somewhat shell-like) shielding the abdomen. This discovery represents the first record of such a structure among dinosaurs. Although it has a number of distinct features seen in the family Ankylosauridae, a cladistic analysis placed Liaoningosaurus in the sister-family Nodosauridae. The 'intermediate' status of this taxon between the two ankylosaur families further supports the monophyly of Ankylosauria. This finding also documents the smallest known ankylosaur specimen and first complete nodosaurid specimen from Asia.

Xu, Xing; Wang, Xiao-Lin; You, Hai-Lu

2001-06-01

259

Perceptions about substance use among male adolescents in juvenile detention.  

PubMed

Although adolescents in juvenile detention represent a vulnerable population who are exposed to situations that foster risk-taking behaviors, few studies have been conducted with detained adolescents to determine their perceptions regarding substance use. Ethnographic interviews and observations were conducted with 20 male adolescents who resided in a large metropolitan area juvenile detention facility, to discover their substance use beliefs and the decisions they make to continue or discontinue substance use or abuse. The participants described how they initiated substance use and said that they had rarely made active decisions about substance use until they were detained. They explained the decisions they made, while they were in detention, to stop or cut down their substance use after release. They talked about the problems they anticipated when they returned home and how they hoped to balance their resolutions with their reputations and obligations. Time-out in juvenile detention may offer nurses the opportunity to capitalize on the potential readiness of detained adolescents to make resolution decisions regarding risky behaviors. Findings from a similar study conducted with 20 detained adolescent women were reported elsewhere. PMID:11512185

Anderson, N L

1999-10-01

260

Factors associated with parenting among incarcerated juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

In regard to the injured offender, research indicates that violent victimization represents only one facet of a constellation of associated risks and consequences, including promiscuity and adolescent parenthood. A relationship between firearm injuries and self-reported promiscuity among incarcerated juvenile offenders has previously been noted. The present study was an attempt to gain additional insight into the larger consequences of violent injuries. Information pertaining to the fathering of children was collected from 258 incarcerated male adolescents from the Richmond, Virginia, metropolitan area during a two-year period. It was hypothesized that adolescent parenting would be associated with firearm injuries. The results indicated that 20% of the juvenile offenders fathered at least one child. Analyses revealed a significant relationship between firearm injuries and increased prevalence of adolescent parenting. Continued involvement in illegal activities, as indicated by a second commitment to a juvenile correctional center, also was associated with increased prevalence of adolescent parenting, while race and involvement in drug selling or violent offending were not. The social and economic implications of these findings, particularly in terms of the health care and social service delivery systems, are discussed. PMID:10730691

McLaughlin, C R; Reiner, S M; Reams, P N; Joost, T F

1999-01-01

261

A glovebox with three levels of containment and clean room facilities for growing and handling biological material at physiologically correct gas compositions and with optimal quality assessment for tissue-engineering, ex vivo expansion, manipulation and gene therapy.  

PubMed

Traditional two levels of containment provide enclosure and underpressure in order to avoid hazardous material to flow towards e.g. a crewmember and thereby cause severe harm. The present-day demands for laboratory safety have revealed a paradox: In the laboratory overpressure is needed to prevent contamination of biological material and under pressure is needed to prevent the pollution of the environment. A new type of combined workbench/incubator has been constructed to meet future regulatory demands for handling and growing human biological cellular material at safe constant physiological conditions: A so-called three levels of containment glovebox/workbench. This new invention avoids the hazards of prior technology. It sets new standards for proper handling of biological materials and will meet the coming safety demands from the growing field of tissue engineering and ex vivo biotechnology. The invention is computer controlled, has a build in cleaning facility for assuring a particle free and aseptic working facility. We now have invented a solution to the above paradox concerning laboratory safety that seems to fulfil the need for safe biological experiments in microgravity. This concept has already been applied into ground-based research and is expected in a few years also to be applied similarly in the ISS environment. Furthermore, handling biological material mimicking in vivo conditions ex vivo requires precise and stabile monitoring and regulation of the isotherm and isobar conditions. Handling stem cells requires in addition low to very low oxygen tension to mimic the stem cells natural habitats. Besides that, the ex vivo gaseous atmosphere and temperature surrounding the cells has to be of same correct composition and temperature as found in the body in order to mimic in vivo situations in such way, that scientifically correct, reproducible and comparable results can be achieved. This fact is strengthened by forthcoming regulations as being prepared by several international regulatory bodies. The new concept will find its use in microgravity biotechnology and will set new standards on ground and in microgravity in the field of basic research, tissue-engineering, production of patient specific cells and tissue, embryo-genesis and in vitro fertilisation, ex vivo expansion of blood progenitor cells, gene therapy etc. PMID:15002617

Villadsen, J A; Voeten, R G H M; Mosborg Peterson, P

2002-07-01

262

Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

2014-08-01

263

Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

2014-09-01

264

[HL-A and chronic juvenile polyarthritis].  

PubMed

The authors determined the HLA groups in 1000 blood donors, in 62 subjects suffering from ankylosing spondylarthritis, and in 32 subjects suffering from chronic juvenile polyarthritis. The results confirm those of other authors as regards the occurrence of W27 antigen in ankylosing spondylarthritis. The examination of the subjects suffering from chronic juvenile polyarthritis made it possible to subdivide this population into 4 groups: (1) Chronic juvenile polyarthritis evolving towards ankylosing spondylarthritis; (2) Chronic juvenile polyarthritis with sacroilitis; (3) Chronic juvenile polyarthritis without sacroiliac involvement; and (4) Rhematoid juvenile polyarthritis. They showed that the presence of W27 antigen was very high in groups (1) and (2) and very low in groups (3) and (4). Determination of the presence of W27 antigen makes it possible to place the patient in one of these groups and the future will show whether this classification is of any therapeutic consequence. PMID:981931

Veys, E M; Coigne, E; Mielants, H; Verbruggen, A

1976-01-01

265

Juvenile salmon usage of the skeena river estuary.  

PubMed

Migratory salmon transit estuary habitats on their way out to the ocean but this phase of their life cycle is more poorly understood than other phases. The estuaries of large river systems in particular may support many populations and several species of salmon that originate from throughout the upstream river. The Skeena River of British Columbia, Canada, is a large river system with high salmon population- and species-level diversity. The estuary of the Skeena River is under pressure from industrial development, with two gas liquefaction terminals and a potash loading facility in various stages of environmental review processes, providing motivation for understanding the usage of the estuary by juvenile salmon. We conducted a juvenile salmonid sampling program throughout the Skeena River estuary in 2007 and 2013 to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of different species and populations of salmon. We captured six species of juvenile anadromous salmonids throughout the estuary in both years, and found that areas proposed for development support some of the highest abundances of some species of salmon. Specifically, the highest abundances of sockeye (both years), Chinook in 2007, and coho salmon in 2013 were captured in areas proposed for development. For example, juvenile sockeye salmon were 2-8 times more abundant in the proposed development areas. Genetic stock assignment demonstrated that the Chinook salmon and most of the sockeye salmon that were captured originated from throughout the Skeena watershed, while some sockeye salmon came from the Nass, Stikine, Southeast Alaska, and coastal systems on the northern and central coasts of British Columbia. These fish support extensive commercial, recreational, and First Nations fisheries throughout the Skeena River and beyond. Our results demonstrate that estuary habitats integrate species and population diversity of salmon, and that if proposed development negatively affects the salmon populations that use the estuary, then numerous fisheries would also be negatively affected. PMID:25749488

Carr-Harris, Charmaine; Gottesfeld, Allen S; Moore, Jonathan W

2015-01-01

266

Juvenile Salmon Usage of the Skeena River Estuary  

PubMed Central

Migratory salmon transit estuary habitats on their way out to the ocean but this phase of their life cycle is more poorly understood than other phases. The estuaries of large river systems in particular may support many populations and several species of salmon that originate from throughout the upstream river. The Skeena River of British Columbia, Canada, is a large river system with high salmon population- and species-level diversity. The estuary of the Skeena River is under pressure from industrial development, with two gas liquefaction terminals and a potash loading facility in various stages of environmental review processes, providing motivation for understanding the usage of the estuary by juvenile salmon. We conducted a juvenile salmonid sampling program throughout the Skeena River estuary in 2007 and 2013 to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of different species and populations of salmon. We captured six species of juvenile anadromous salmonids throughout the estuary in both years, and found that areas proposed for development support some of the highest abundances of some species of salmon. Specifically, the highest abundances of sockeye (both years), Chinook in 2007, and coho salmon in 2013 were captured in areas proposed for development. For example, juvenile sockeye salmon were 2–8 times more abundant in the proposed development areas. Genetic stock assignment demonstrated that the Chinook salmon and most of the sockeye salmon that were captured originated from throughout the Skeena watershed, while some sockeye salmon came from the Nass, Stikine, Southeast Alaska, and coastal systems on the northern and central coasts of British Columbia. These fish support extensive commercial, recreational, and First Nations fisheries throughout the Skeena River and beyond. Our results demonstrate that estuary habitats integrate species and population diversity of salmon, and that if proposed development negatively affects the salmon populations that use the estuary, then numerous fisheries would also be negatively affected. PMID:25749488

Carr-Harris, Charmaine; Gottesfeld, Allen S.; Moore, Jonathan W.

2015-01-01

267

Aaron Kupchip, Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Judging Juveniles, Aaron Kupchik addresses some of the contextual and sociolegal issues that arise from the growing number of adolescents prosecuted in criminal rather than juvenile court. Testing the assumption held by policy makers and academics that juveniles processed in criminal court are subjected to an entirely different model of justice, Kupchik utilizes a rigorous, mixed-methods research design to

Jennifer N. Grimes

2007-01-01

268

JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES Mental Health Issues in California's Juvenile Justice System  

E-print Network

MAY 2010 JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES Mental Health Issues in California's Juvenile Justice consultation, and review the policy briefs. ·Dr.WilliamArroyo, Medical Director,LosAngelesCountyDepartmentofMentalHealth,localofficials,andpractitionersconfrontingtheinadequacies of the juvenile justice system. The following policy briefs are included in this series: ·MentalHealth

Kammen, Daniel M.

269

Juvenile hormone titer versus juvenile hormone synthesis in female nymphs and adults of the German  

E-print Network

Juvenile hormone titer versus juvenile hormone synthesis in female nymphs and adults of the German of Forensic Medicine, Ignaz Harrerstr, 79, 5020 Salzburg, Austria Abstract Patterns of juvenile hormone have. However, data have been mainly obtained in vitro, and refer to hormone synthesized by isolated corpora

Piulachs, M. Dolors

270

Black Juveniles in the Juvenile Justice System: A Cause for Alarm.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the representation of black youth in the juvenile justice system, describes changes in juvenile justice philosophy, and discusses policy implications. Black youth are overrepresented at all stages of the juvenile justice system compared to white youth. Positivist theories explain this overrepresentation as the result of…

LeFlore, Larry

271

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME, TASK FORCE REPORT, REPORT ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CONSULTANTS PAPERS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF THE JUVENILE COURT SYSTEM AND THE PREVENTION OF DELINQUENCY. THE COMMISSION'S RECOMMENDATIONS ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY INCLUDE THE AREAS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, HOUSING AND RECREATION, FAMILIES, INVOLVING YOUTHS IN COMMUNITY LIFE, SCHOOLS, AND EMPLOYMENT. THE APPENDIXES, WHICH CONSTITUTE THE…

President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.

272

The Penal Model of Juvenile Justice: Is Juvenile Court Delinquency Jurisdiction Obsolete?  

Microsoft Academic Search

An inability to reconcile society's need for protection from juvenile crime with the use of nonpunitive measures has troubled the juvenile justice system since its inception. Society long ago adopted a paternalistic attitude toward juvenile crime, treating such behavior not as a question of law enforcement, but as a social and psychological problem requiring therapeutic interventions and state assumption of

Stephen Wizner; Mary F. Keller

1977-01-01

273

The Significance of Comparative Analysis of Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The premise of this special issue is that an understanding of juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice in other countries would provide each country with new information, fresh theoretical perspectives, and ideas for understanding and addressing the problem of juvenile delinquency. The comparative approach exposes the reader to information, regarding innovations and historically successful programs for each respective country to consider.

GALAN M. JANEKSELA

1992-01-01

274

National Implications in Juvenile Justice: The Influence of Juvenile Mentoring Programs on At Risk Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1972 the federal government created the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act that procured funding for various governmental programs to combat the sudden increase in juvenile crime. A provision of this Act set out the creation of mentoring programs to help decrease the juvenile crime rate and dropout rates in secondary schools. This…

Belshaw, Scott H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

2007-01-01

275

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy  

MedlinePLUS

... understanding juvenile myoclonic epilepsy? adolescent ; autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; calcium ; cell ; cell membrane ; channel ; chloride ; epilepsy ; family history ; GABA ; gene ; genetics ; idiopathic ; inheritance ; ...

276

Juvenile offenders: competence to stand trial.  

PubMed

This article details the legal background and assists the reader in the preparation and practical conduct of evaluations regarding juvenile adjudicative competency. The material is presented to be useful as a guide to direct questions of competency and covers aspects of evaluation that include: legal standard for competency to stand trial, developmental immaturity, current practice in juvenile competency to stand trial, forensic evaluation of juvenile competency to stand trial, organizing the evaluation, collateral sources of information, psychiatric evaluation of juvenile adjudicative competency, assessment of mental disorder and intellectual disability, assessment of developmental status, assessment of functional abilities for adjudicative competence, and reaching the forensic opinion. PMID:23107566

Soulier, Matthew

2012-12-01

277

"Children of the city": juvenile justice, property, and place in England and Scotland, 1945-60.  

PubMed

This article uses cases studies of Dundee and Manchester to explain juvenile property-offending in terms of young people's use of objects and spaces in the period 1945-60. A composite picture is assembled of objects stolen, which reflects growth of the specifically "teenage" consumer market as well as continued significance of young people's contribution to family economies. Concerns about youth, property, and space were reported in newspapers in terms of vandalism and hooliganism. "Play" and "nuisance" were overlapping and contested categories; re-education of young people in the correct use of place, space, and property was a key aim of the postwar juvenile justice system. PMID:21328805

Jackson, Louise A; Bartie, Angela

2011-01-01

278

The impact of incarceration on juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

Increasingly, research points to the negative effects of incarcerating youth offenders, particularly in adult facilities. Literature published since 2000 suggests that incarceration fails to meet the developmental and criminogenic needs of youth offenders and is limited in its ability to provide appropriate rehabilitation. Incarceration often results in negative behavioral and mental health consequences, including ongoing engagement in offending behaviors and contact with the justice system. Although incarceration of youth offenders is often viewed as a necessary means of public protection, research indicates that it is not an effective option in terms of either cost or outcome. The severe behavioral problems of juvenile offenders are a result of complex and interactive individual and environmental factors, which elicit and maintain offending behavior. Therefore, the focus of effective treatment must be on addressing such criminogenic needs and the multiple "systems" in which the young person comes from. Recent research demonstrates that in order to achieve the best outcomes for youth offenders and the general public, community-based, empirically supported intervention practices must be adopted as an alternative to incarceration wherever possible. PMID:23454219

Lambie, Ian; Randell, Isabel

2013-04-01

279

Phase I archaeological survey of the proposed timber harvest area near the Regional Correctional Facility on the Fort Knox Military Reservation, Hardin County, Kentucky. Final report, September-October 1995  

SciTech Connect

In September 1995, the Fort Knox contract archaeology staff conducted a Phase I archaeological survey of a proposed timber harvest area near the Regional Correctional Facility on the Fort Knox Military Reservation, Hardin County, Kentucky. The proposed timber harvest area is approximately 122 m (400 feet) wide and 25 m (80 feet) long, encompassing approximately 0.30 ha (0.74 acres). Only selected trees will be harvested. The total area surveyed is 580 m long and 325 m wide, encompassing approximately 6.7 ha (16.5 acres). The survey resulted in the discovery of one archaeological site, outside the proposed timber harvest area. Site 15Hd498 is a small lithic scatter, which is considered potentially eligible for the National Register in part due to field conditions not conducive to the adequate investigation of its horizontal or vertical extent. Since 15Hd498 lies completely outside the proposed timber area, it is recommended that the timber harvest be conducted as proposed.

Schenian, P.A.; Mocas, S.T.

1995-10-01

280

Juvenile mortality in captive lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) at Basle Zoo and its relation to nutrition and husbandry.  

PubMed

Since 1956, when the Basle Zoo (Switzerland) initiated the breeding of lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis), 43% of the lesser kudu juveniles died before reaching an age of 6 mo. In this study, the objective was to obtain the pathological findings, nutritional history, and family tree information in order to evaluate the influence of husbandry on juvenile mortality in these animals. The main cause of death was white muscle disease (WMD), diagnosed in 14 cases (26%) of the deceased juveniles. Although enclosure size had remained constant and animal accessibility to the public was constantly high, both herd size and juvenile mortality had increased from 1956-2004. The diet consumed by the whole group in 2004 had deficient levels of vitamin E and selenium. The increasing linear trend of the mortality rate since the 1960s was significant, and there was a significant correlation between herd size and overall juvenile mortality. In contrast, there was no correlation between herd size and the occurrence of juvenile mortality associated specifically with WMD. Other investigated factors (sex, inbreeding, and season) had no significant effect on overall mortality up to 6 mo of age or on mortality associated with WMD. These results characterize both a dietary and a husbandry problem, and are supported by a lack of similar juvenile mortality in another facility where the diet was supplemented with vitamin E, animal numbers were kept low, and the enclosure structure offered more retreat options for the animals. PMID:18432100

Besselmann, Dorothea; Schaub, Daniela; Wenker, Christian; Völlm, Jürg; Robert, Nadia; Schelling, Claude; Steinmetz, Hanspeter; Clauss, Marcus

2008-03-01

281

The color of juvenile justice: racial disparities in dispositional decisions.  

PubMed

Existing research on dispositional decisions typically models the outcome as merely placed or not placed. However, this does not accurately reflect the wide variation in residential options available to juvenile court actors. In this research, we combine data from ProDES, which tracks adjudicated youth in Philadelphia, with data from the Program Design Inventory, which describes over 100 intervention programs, to further examine the factors that influence court actors' decision making in selecting an appropriate program for a juvenile offender. We find that even after controlling for legal and needs-based factors, race continues to exert a significant influence, with decision makers being significantly more likely to commit minority youth to facilities using physical regimen as their primary modality and reserving smaller, therapeutic facilities for their white counterparts. Using focal concerns theory as an explanatory lens, we suggest that court actors in this jurisdiction employ a racialized perceptual shorthand of youthful offenders that attributes both higher levels of blame and lower evaluations of reformability to minority youth. PMID:24468439

Fader, Jamie J; Kurlychek, Megan C; Morgan, Kirstin A

2014-03-01

282

Predictors of support for juvenile sex offender registration: educated individuals recognize the flaws of juvenile registration.  

PubMed

We investigated demographic predictors of support for juvenile sex offender registration policies, including education level, gender, political orientation, and age. Participants were 168 individuals recruited from public places in a Midwest community (45% women; M age = 42). In line with hypotheses, as education level increased, support for juvenile registration decreased, as did the belief that juvenile registration protects the community. In addition, as education level increased, belief that the juvenile understood his actions decreased, as did support for juvenile registration when it is framed as ineffective at reducing sex crime. These beliefs mediated the relationship between education level and diminished support for juvenile registration. Implications of these results for the advancement of effective juvenile sex offender policy are discussed. PMID:23428153

Stevenson, Margaret C; Smith, Amy C; Sekely, Ady; Farnum, Katlyn S

2013-01-01

283

Perspective of a Juvenile Court Judge.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses drug-exposed infants from the perspective of a juvenile court judge. Experience in Los Angeles County (California) illustrates the following common problems in the juvenile courts: (1) high court caseload; (2) lack of legal representation and overloaded case workers; and (3) lack of resources mandated by law. (SLD)

Boland, Paul

1991-01-01

284

Deterring Juvenile Crime: Age of Jurisdiction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the deterrent effects of imposing juvenile versus adult status on youth offenders. Sugqests that, because the adult law enforcement system may be reluctant to handle younger delinquents as harshly as older youth, adult status can serve as a deterrent to juvenile crime only for youth aged 17 or older. (Author/MJL)

Ruhland, David. J; And Others

1982-01-01

285

The Juvenile Court: A Status Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief monograph provides an historical perspective of the development of juvenile courts which, instead of developing as intended, have become paternalistic and punitive, paralleling the impact of a criminal court. The report examines the jurisdiction of the juvenile court as an organization, its judicial and prejudicial procedures, its use…

National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Center for Studies of Crime and Delinquency.

286

Juvenile Justice: Time for New Direction?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assesses the effectiveness of the juvenile justice system in preventing delinquency and rehabilitating delinquents. The six articles in this special issue also discuss status offenders and gender issues, examine the Chicago Area Project, and discuss the future of juvenile justice policy and research. (JAC)

Galvin, Jim, Ed.

1983-01-01

287

Wilderness/Adventure Programs for Juvenile Offenders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over 80 wilderness/adventure programs have emerged as a valuable alternative to traditional treatment for juvenile offenders, especially in combination with other services. Participants are referred from many points in the juvenile justice system by agents who should have a thorough understanding of wilderness programs so as to prepare the…

Kimball, Richard Owen

288

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report offers the Congress, state legislators, and other state and local policymakers, professors and teachers, juvenile justice professionals, and concerned citizens solid answers to the most frequently asked questions about the nature of juvenile crime and victimization and about the justice system's response. Citing FBI and other data…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

289

Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

Fishman, H. Charles

2006-01-01

290

Juvenile Obesity, Physical Activity, and Lifestyle Changes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because many obese children become obese adults, the recent rapid increase in juvenile obesity poses a major public health challenge. Enhanced physical activity is a cornerstone in a multidisciplinary approach to preventing and treating juvenile obesity. Giving exercise recommendations focused for obese youth is critical. Cutting down on sedentary…

Bar-Or, Oded

2000-01-01

291

Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Juvenile Sex Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment…

Sahlstrom, Kimberly J.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

2008-01-01

292

A Critique of Diversionary Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasingly zealous support today for diversion of youth from the juvenile justice system is a consequence of several widely held notions: (1) Traditional strategies for dealing with juvenile offenders have not worked; ( 2) informal diversion is used both widely and effectively now; and (3) the most humane treatment of troubled youth is based upon the parens patriae philosophy

Bruce Bullington; James Sprowls; Daniel Katkin; Mark Phillips

1978-01-01

293

Changes in Juvenile Justice in China.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses rising juvenile and youth crime in China, highlighting the essence of Chinese Marxist criminological thought and changing conceptions of delinquency from the postrevolutionary period to the present; examining official responses to delinquency and the recent development of juvenile justice; and suggesting that current delinquency control…

Wong, Dennis S. W.

2001-01-01

294

Principles of Child Development and Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

udges, prosecutors, and public defenders in juvenile delinquency court routinely encounter offenders of both sexes who are psychologically very different from their adult counterparts. Thus, an understanding of the principles of child and adolescent development and a consideration of chil- dren's mental health are useful to decision-makers at all levels of the juvenile justice system. Indeed, knowledge of the basic

DAVID E. ARREDONDO

295

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2006 National Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents comprehensive information on juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and on the juvenile justice system. This report brings together the latest available statistics from a variety of sources and includes numerous tables, graphs, and maps, accompanied by analyses in clear, nontechnical language. The report offers Congress,…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

2006-01-01

296

Variables Related to Recidivism among Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated predictors of recidivism among juvenile delinquents. Mental health and probation files were reviewed for 138 male juveniks. To assess the extent of recidivism throughout their juvenile years, only data from participants who remained in juvenik jurisdiction until the age of 18 were included in the analyses. Demographic, behavioral, familial, school-related, and crime-related variables were examined Additionaly, the

Julye Myner; Jennifer Santman; Gordon G. Cappelletty; Barry F. Perlmutter

1998-01-01

297

Moral Development of Solo Juvenile Sex Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral…

Van Vugt, Eveline; Stams, Geert Jan; Dekovic, Maja; Brugman, Daan; Rutten, Esther; Hendriks, Jan

2008-01-01

298

Skills training as treatment for juvenile delinquents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viewing skills deficits as parameters of juvenile offender dysfunctioning, and considering skills training as a treatment modality represent relatively new strategies for rehabilitation. Data from a police diversion project (the Dallas Police Department's Youth Services Program) are presented, indicating that levels of certain physical, emotional, and intellectual skills are related to rearrest recidivism for juvenile offenders. The results of providing

Thomas R. Collingwood; Robert W. Genthner

1980-01-01

299

Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

2004-01-01

300

Juvenile hormone regulation of Drosophila aging  

PubMed Central

Background Juvenile hormone (JH) has been demonstrated to control adult lifespan in a number of non-model insects where surgical removal of the corpora allata eliminates the hormone’s source. In contrast, little is known about how juvenile hormone affects adult Drosophila melanogaster. Previous work suggests that insulin signaling may modulate Drosophila aging in part through its impact on juvenile hormone titer, but no data yet address whether reduction of juvenile hormone is sufficient to control Drosophila life span. Here we adapt a genetic approach to knock out the corpora allata in adult Drosophila melanogaster and characterize adult life history phenotypes produced by reduction of juvenile hormone. With this system we test potential explanations for how juvenile hormone modulates aging. Results A tissue specific driver inducing an inhibitor of a protein phosphatase was used to ablate the corpora allata while permitting normal development of adult flies. Corpora allata knockout adults had greatly reduced fecundity, inhibited oogenesis, impaired adult fat body development and extended lifespan. Treating these adults with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene restored all traits toward wildtype. Knockout females remained relatively long-lived even when crossed into a genotype that blocked all egg production. Dietary restriction further extended the lifespan of knockout females. In an analysis of expression profiles of knockout females in fertile and sterile backgrounds, about 100 genes changed in response to loss of juvenile hormone independent of reproductive state. Conclusions Reduced juvenile hormone alone is sufficient to extend the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. Reduced juvenile hormone limits reproduction by inhibiting the production of yolked eggs, and this may arise because juvenile hormone is required for the post-eclosion development of the vitellogenin-producing adult fat body. Our data do not support a mechanism for juvenile hormone control of longevity simply based on reducing the physiological costs of egg production. Nor does the longevity benefit appear to function through mechanisms by which dietary restriction extends longevity. We identify transcripts that change in response to juvenile hormone independent of reproductive state and suggest these represent somatically expressed genes that could modulate how juvenile hormone controls persistence and longevity. PMID:23866071

2013-01-01

301

Genetic heterogeneity in juvenile NCL  

SciTech Connect

The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of related lysosomal storage diseases classified according to the age of onset, clinical syndrome, and pathology. The clinical syndromes include myoclonus, visual failure, progressive dementia, ataxia and generalized tonic clonic seizures in varying combinations depending on the age of onset and pathology. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive in most cases, except for several families with the adult form (Kufs` disease) which have autosomal dominant inheritance. Linkage for the infantile (Halatia-Santavuori) form (CLN1), characterized ultrastructurally by lysosomal granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD), has been demonstrated with markers on chromosome lp, while the gene for the typical juvenile (Spielmeyer-Vogt) form (CLN3), characterized by fingerprint-profile inclusions, has been linked to chromosome 16p. The gene locations of the late infantile (Jansky-Bielschowsky) and adult (Kufs` disease) forms are unknown, although it has recently been shown that the late infantile form does not link to chromosome 16p. We describe three siblings, including a pair of monozygotic twins, with juvenile onset NCL with GROD in whom linkage to the CLN3 region of chromsome 16p has been excluded. This would suggest that there is genetic heterogeneity not only among the different clinical syndromes, but also among identical clinical syndromes with different ultrastructural characteristics. Preliminary studies of linkage to chromosome 1p employing the microsatellite marker HY-TM1 have been uninformative. Further studies with other chromosome 1 markers are underway.

Hart, Y.M.; Andermann, E.; Mitchison, H.M. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

1994-09-01

302

Juvenile Gaucher disease simulating osteomyelitis  

SciTech Connect

A case in which several imaging procedures suggested juvenile Gaucher disease in a child who presented with symptomatology of osteomyelitis is discussed. The 20-month girl was given a Technetium-99m radionuclide skeletal examination which revealed intense uptake of tracer agents along the shaft of the right femur. It was also found that the liver and spleen were dramatically Ga-67 avid. The bone pain symptomatology suggested an osteomyelitis of the femur, but skeletal scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled bone tracer demonstrated photopenic areas involving the femur, suggesting that the bone pain may have been due to marrow packed with Gaucher cells. This overexpansion of the marrow may lead to microfractures with remodeling seen radiographically as periosteal new bone and scintigraphically as increased periosteal deposition of tracer agent. The radiogallium study was useful to exclude an underlying osteomyelitis in the involved femurs. Although juvenile Gaucher disease is unusual, it should be considered in any child who presents with the constellation of hepatosplenomegaly and bone pain simulating osteomyelitis.

Miller, J.H.; Ortega, J.A.; Heisel, M.A.

1981-10-01

303

Issues in Education for the Youthful Offender in Correctional Institutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The introduction to the survey of educational programs for juvenile offenders in correctional institutions briefly outlines the educational problems and priorities in the prison setting. Chapter one discusses the history of such programs over the last 150 years, especially considering the use and biases of intelligence tests during the last 50…

Dell'Apa, Frank

304

ISIS Facility: Facility Design Challenges  

E-print Network

driven · Safety ­ People ­ Environment Facility Design Goals #12;Facility Design Challenges · TechnicalISIS Facility: Facility Design Challenges Matt Fletcher Head, Design Division ISIS Department development #12;Additional Liquid Metal Target Challenges Design and Operational Features of a Mercury Target

McDonald, Kirk

305

Challenging the Myths: 1999 National Report Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin, extracted from "Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report," examines juvenile crime statistics, demonstrating that the predictions in the early 1990s of the emergence of juvenile superpredators (juveniles for whom violence is a way of life) is not supported by current data. Research indicates that levels of predatory…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

306

Juvenile Drug Courts: Understanding the Importance of Dimensional Variability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile drug courts have emerged as “innovative” responses to juvenile drug offenders, but comparatively little is known about their operations. Using Goldkamp's typology of adult drug courts and secondary analyses of Cooper and Bartlett's data from a national-level survey of juvenile drug courts, this article first describes these courts and then analyzes the variability in key dimensions of juvenile drug

John J. Sloan III; John Ortiz Smykla

2003-01-01

307

Reviving Juvenile Justice in a Get-Tough Era  

Microsoft Academic Search

State and local jurisdictions throughout the United States enacted a wide array of new juvenile justice policies in recent years. Many of these policies were intended to make the juvenile justice system tougher, but others improved prevention, increased reha- bilitation, and enhanced the restorative features of the juvenile justice system. This article describes the most prominent new ideas in juvenile

JEFFREY A. BUTTS; DANIEL P. MEARS

2001-01-01

308

Profile of Incarcerated Juveniles: Comparison of Male and Female Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effective methods of identifying potential juvenile offenders are critical when developing prevention programs within both state and national juvenile justice systems. The characteristics of juvenile offenders in a large juvenile justice system are examined in this study. Participants live in a Midwestern city with a high rate of crime as…

Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Dell, Rex; Davis, Candice; Guerrieri, Karen

2008-01-01

309

Juvenile Offenders with Mental Health Needs: Reducing Recidivism Using Wraparound  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The rate of youth with mental health needs is disproportionately high in juvenile justice. Wraparound planning involves families and providers in coordinating juvenile justice, mental health, and other services and supports. This study compares data from two groups of juvenile offenders with mental health problems: 106 youth in a juvenile justice…

Pullmann, Michael D.; Kerbs, Jodi; Koroloff, Nancy; Veach-White, Ernie; Gaylor, Rita; Sieler, Dede

2006-01-01

310

Attitudes regarding life sentences for juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

Twice in recent years, the U.S. Supreme Court has considered the constitutionality of life sentences without the possibility of parole (LWOP) for juvenile offenders. Given the public nature of this issue, there is scant information on beliefs about imposing LWOP on juveniles. Attitudes on related issues suggest two possibilities. On the one hand, because public opinion regarding juvenile offenders has become somewhat less punitive recently, LWOP may be viewed as excessively harsh punishment. On the other hand, portrayal of some juvenile offenders as superpredators suggests that LWOP may still have public support. We used survey methodology and the unique "ninth justice paradigm" to examine how an offender's age influences beliefs about the appropriateness of LWOP, and the relationship between those beliefs and punishment-related ideologies. Results showed that, except in the case of murder, the majority of respondents disfavored imposing LWOP on juveniles, though a subset approved broad use of LWOP even for young offenders. In fact, after removing from consideration those who oppose LWOP under any circumstances, youthfulness of the offender has little impact on the beliefs about the types of crimes in which LWOP should be imposed (Study 1) or the mean sentence lengths imposed on juvenile offenders (Study 2). Respondents' punishment goals influenced their attitudes, as did beliefs about the likelihood of rehabilitation and reform. Harsh judgments of juveniles who commit serious crimes may result from dispositional attributions of youthful offenders as irredeemable. PMID:23646918

Greene, Edie; Evelo, Andrew J

2013-08-01

311

Juvenile curfews: are they an effective and constitutional means of combating juvenile violence?  

PubMed

Curfew ordinances have become a popular way to attempt to combat juvenile crime and victimization. Although the Supreme Court has yet to hear a curfew case, several constitutional challenges have been brought in lower federal courts. The cases are replete with psychological assumptions for which there is limited empirical evidence. In applying the "strict scrutiny" standard, several courts have also questioned whether juvenile curfews are narrowly tailored to further the State's interest in reducing juvenile crime and victimization. While public opinion and reports from several police jurisdictions support the utility of juvenile curfews, recent empirical studies indicate that curfews are not effective at reducing juvenile offending or victimization. This paper argues that the emerging evidence does not support the use of juvenile curfews and urges policy makers and the courts to examine the efficacy of curfew legislation. Directions for future research that could be helpful to the courts in applying the Bellotti factors to curfew cases are also suggested. PMID:11241685

Fried, C S

2001-01-01

312

Law & psychiatry: punishing juveniles who kill.  

PubMed

Punishment of juvenile murderers forces policy makers to weigh the developmental immaturity of adolescents against the heinousness of their crimes. The U.S. Supreme Court has progressively limited the severity of punishments that can be imposed on juveniles, holding that their impulsivity, susceptibility to peer pressure, and more fluid character render them less culpable for their actions. Having eliminated the death penalty as a punishment, the Court recently struck down mandatory life sentences without prospect of parole. The decision is interesting for its emphasis on rehabilitation, opening the door to further restrictions on punitive sentences for juveniles-and perhaps for adults too. PMID:23032673

Appelbaum, Paul S

2012-10-01

313

A Guide To Test Instruments for Entry and Exit Assessment in Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Educational Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1999 Florida Legislature revised the laws pertaining to the assessment of students in Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) facilities. Revisions identified specific requirements for measuring student academic progress in the basic skill areas of reading, writing, and mathematics. Following the passage of this legislation, the Department of…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Bureau of Instructional Support and Community Services.

314

Social reward among juvenile mice  

PubMed Central

Mammalian social relationships, such as mother–offspring attachments and pair bonds, can directly affect reproductive output. However, conspecifics approach one another in a comparatively broad range of contexts, so conceivably there are motivations for social congregation other than those underlying reproduction, parental care or territoriality. Here, we show that reward mediated by social contact is a fundamental aspect of juvenile mouse sociality. Employing a novel social conditioned place preference (SCPP) procedure, we demonstrate that social proximity is rewarding for juvenile mice from three inbred strains (A/J, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), while mice from a fourth strain (BALB/cJ) are much less responsive to social contact. Importantly, this strain-dependent difference was not related to phenotypic variability in exploratory behavior or contextual learning nor influenced by the genetic background associated with maternal care or social conditioning. Furthermore, the SCPP phenotype was expressed early in development (postnatal day 25) and did not require a specific sex composition within the conditioning group. Finally, SCPP responses resulted from an interaction between two specifiable processes: one component of the interaction facilitated approach toward environments that were associated with social salience, whereas a second component mediated avoidance of environmental cues that predicted social isolation. We have thus identified a genetically prescribed process that can attribute value onto conditions predicting a general form of social contact. To our knowledge, this is the first definitive evidence to show that genetic variation can influence a form of social valuation not directly related to a reproductive behavior. PMID:17212648

Panksepp, J B; Lahvis, G P

2007-01-01

315

Pathways and Predictors of Juvenile Justice Involvement for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Youths: A Focus on Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the growth of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) youths in court and correctional involvement, studies of their delinquency and juvenile justice involvement are quite limited, and the literature becomes almost nonexistent when examining gender differences. Using case file analysis of 150 Native Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian and…

Pasko, Lisa; Mayeda, David T.

2011-01-01

316

Female and Male Juvenile Offenders with Disabilities: Differences in the Barriers to Their Transition to the Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examined differences between young women and men who were incarcerated juvenile offenders with disabilities in Oregon in terms of the barriers they faced in their transition from the correctional system back into the community. Data were gathered on 72 females and 276 males, all of whom presented disabilities and who were…

Unruh, Deanne; Bullis, Michael

2005-01-01

317

78 FR 38014 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2013-06-25

318

77 FR 70994 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2012-11-28

319

75 FR 53958 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2010-09-02

320

75 FR 16177 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2010-03-31

321

77 FR 24687 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

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2012-04-25

322

75 FR 70216 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2010-11-17

323

78 FR 65297 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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2013-10-31

324

78 FR 58288 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2013-09-23

325

77 FR 50486 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2012-08-21

326

76 FR 39075 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2011-07-05

327

76 FR 61672 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2011-10-05

328

78 FR 17184 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2013-03-20

329

77 FR 3453 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2012-01-24

330

76 FR 26280 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP (OJJDP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

2011-05-06

331

Juvenile participation in conversations with probation officers.  

PubMed

Juvenile probation work comprises a mixture of repressive and empowering strategies, since probation officers need to control young offenders' conduct and at the same time help the offender to take responsibility and live life within the margins of society. This ambiguous nature of juvenile probation work may confuse the communication between probation officers and juveniles. Interviews with offenders of Moroccan origin and their probation officers in the Netherlands show that both parties are unhappy with the mutual communication. According to the youngsters, a restrictive policy is inevitable but might be more effective if this would go together with an empowering approach. Interactional analysis of the conversations shows that the lack of juvenile participation is caused by professional conversational dominance, as seen in topic control, poor role clarification, and a cross-examining style of the conversations. PMID:21429957

van Nijnatten, Carolus; Stevens, Gonneke

2012-05-01

332

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Patients and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding juvenile hyaline fibromatosis? autosomal ; ... many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary . See also Understanding Medical Terminology . References (6 links) ...

333

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile Batten disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Batten Disease Diagnostic and Clinical Research Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center Batten Disease Support and Research Association: Centers of Excellence Gene Review: Neuronal ... might also find information on the diagnosis or management of juvenile Batten disease in ...

334

Screening Incarcerated Juveniles Using the MAYSI-2.  

PubMed

The high prevalence of mental health disorders among incarcerated juveniles is a matter of national and global concern. Juvenile justice personnel need accurate screening measures that identify youth requiring immediate mental health services. The purpose of this study was threefold: (a) to examine the utility of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument, Version 2 (MAYSI-2) in identifying juveniles with mental health concerns in a large sample of juveniles (N = 4,009), (b) to provide data regarding rates of identified mental health needs in incarcerated youth, and (c) to provide descriptive comparisons to other studies using the MAYSI-2. Mean scores of subscales were compared with the MAYSI-2 normative samples and other recent studies. Results indicated that this population has a high occurrence of mental health symptoms and there is high variability in the severity of the symptoms. In addition, a multivariate analysis of variance test found significant differences in mental health problems across ethnic groups. PMID:25431437

Gilbert, Amy L; Grande, Todd L; Hallman, Janelle; Underwood, Lee A

2015-01-01

335

Mother-Son Relationships of Juvenile Felons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mother-son relationships of juvenile felons were examined. Subjects were 67 mother-son dyads from father-absent families and were divided into three groups: violent felon, nonviolent felon, and normal control. During the assessment session, mothers and sons completed self-report inventories and engaged in an interaction task that was audiorecorded. Consistent with prior research, mother-son relationships in families with juvenile offenders were

Scott W. Henggeler; Cindy L. Hanson; Charles M. Borduin; Sylvia M. Watson; Molly A. Brunk

1985-01-01

336

Correlates of moral development in juvenile delinquents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Moral reasoning and development have been the focus of considerable research in the past two decades, stimulated primarily\\u000a by Kohlberg’s formulation of the stages of moral development. Studies of juvenile delinquents have indicated that youthful\\u000a offenders are at lower developmental stages of moral reasoning than their nondeliquent counterparts. Some research has also\\u000a examined patterns among juvenile delinquents with respect to

Carol Veneziano; Louis Veneziano

1988-01-01

337

Moral development of solo juvenile sex offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13–19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral judgement was assessed with the Sociomoral Reflection Measure –

Eveline Van Vugt; Geert Jan Stams; Maja Dekovic; Daan Brugman; Esther Rutten; Jan Hendriks

2008-01-01

338

Micropropagation of juvenile and mature american beech  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to micropropagate juvenile and mature American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) resistant to\\u000a beech bark disease. Shoot tips (from juvenile seedlings and root sprouts of mature trees) and buds from branches of mature\\u000a trees, were cultured and multiplied on aspen culture medium supplemented with 0.89 M 6-benzyladenine, 0.27 M ?-naphthaleneacetic\\u000a acid, 20 g l-1 sucrose,

Melanie J. Barker; Paula M. Pijut; Michael E. Ostry; David R. Houston

1997-01-01

339

Small Vertical Raceways for Rearing Juvenile Salmon  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a micro-vertical raceway, a small floating container, for rearing small populations of fish. The container is a 170.6-L polyethylene drum fitted to a controlled water supply. An array of these containers was used to rear juvenile salmon simultaneously in 60 groups (200 fish each) to 6.0-g size. We compared growth rates of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared

Ron Heintz; John Joyce

1992-01-01

340

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site's Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 342. The scope of this document consists of the following: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit.

DOE /NV

1999-05-26

341

Reducing violence in serious juvenile offenders using intensive treatment.  

PubMed

This study reports on the reduction in violent offending in a population of serious and violent juvenile offenders following an intensive institutional treatment program. The treatment group (N=101) is compared to a similar group that was assessed but not treated (N=147). All youth were sent to the program from a juvenile corrections institution where they had received the customary rehabilitation services. The results show a significant reduction in the prevalence of recidivism in the treated group after controlling for time at risk in the community and other covariates. The effects of non-random group assignment were reduced by including a propensity score analysis procedure in the outcome analysis. Untreated comparison youth appeared to be about twice as likely to commit violent offenses as were treated youth (44% vs. 23%). Similarly, treated youth had significantly lower hazard ratios for recidivism in the in the community than the comparison youth, even after accounting for the effects of non-random group assignment. PMID:16112731

Caldwell, Michael F; Van Rybroek, Gregory J

2005-01-01

342

Rating Personality Characteristics to Juvenile Offense Categories: Differences Between Status Offenders and Juvenile Delinquents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the Jesness Inventories, a test series designed for use in the classification and treatment of disturbed children and adolescents, of 72 male juvenile offenders to see whether personality differences existed between the profiles of juvenile delinquents and status offenders. Considers treatment ramifications and empirical evidence as aids…

Stott, Michael W. R.; Olczak, Paul V.

1978-01-01

343

Assessing the Mental Health Status of Youth in Juvenile Justice Settings. Juvenile Justice Bulletin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Bulletin reports the results of a study that used the Voice DISC, a computerized, self-administered version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC), to screen for psychiatric disorders in youth newly admitted to juvenile assessment centers. The Voice DISC offers the following advantages for use in the juvenile justice system:…

Wasserman, Gail A.; Ko, Susan J.; McReynolds, Larkin S.

2004-01-01

344

Female Juvenile Delinquency: Misunderstood by the Juvenile Justice System, Neglected by Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of juvenile delinquency has focused primarily on conduct disorder and aggression in males, while relatively little attention has been paid to females who commit delinquent acts. This article offers a critical review of the existing theories of and research on female delinquency and the juvenile justice system's response to female delinquency. The inadequacies and persistence of historical theories

Stephanie Hoyt; David G. Scherer

1998-01-01

345

Academic Achievement Among Juvenile Detainees.  

PubMed

The literature has long pointed to heightened frequencies of learning disabilities (LD) within the population of law offenders; however, a systematic appraisal of these observations, careful estimation of these frequencies, and investigation of their correlates and causes have been lacking. Here we present data collected from all youth (1,337 unique admissions, mean age 14.81, 20.3% females) placed in detention in Connecticut (January 1, 2010-July 1, 2011). All youth completed a computerized educational screener designed to test a range of performance in reading (word and text levels) and mathematics. A subsample (n = 410) received the Wide Range Achievement Test, in addition to the educational screener. Quantitative (scale-based) and qualitative (grade-equivalence-based) indicators were then analyzed for both assessments. Results established the range of LD in this sample from 13% to 40%, averaging 24.9%. This work provides a systematic exploration of the type and severity of word and text reading and mathematics skill deficiencies among juvenile detainees and builds the foundation for subsequent efforts that may link these deficiencies to both more formal, structured, and variable definitions and classifications of LD, and to other types of disabilities (e.g., intellectual disability) and developmental disorders (e.g., ADHD) that need to be conducted in future research. PMID:24064502

Grigorenko, Elena L; Macomber, Donna; Hart, Lesley; Naples, Adam; Chapman, John; Geib, Catherine F; Chart, Hilary; Tan, Mei; Wolhendler, Baruch; Wagner, Richard

2013-09-24

346

Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage  

SciTech Connect

A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-02-01

347

A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation.  

PubMed

In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS. PMID:22163918

Weiland, Mark A; Deng, Z Daniel; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J; Thronas, Aaron I; Eppard, M Brad

2011-01-01

348

A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 1. Engineering Design and Instrumentation  

PubMed Central

In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS. PMID:22163918

Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, M. Brad

2011-01-01

349

The healthcare of older inmates in the correctional setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Australia, like other western nations, is experiencing a new trend within its prison population—the ageing inmate. This ‘greying’ of the population presents a unique challenge for the correctional environment. Specific needs of this population may not be well met within a correctional facility due to the physical environment layout and surroundings, restricted health service access and unaccommodating facilities and programmes.

Emily Potter; Andrew J Cashin; Lynn Chenoweth; Yun-Hee Jeon

2007-01-01

350

Glucocorticoids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

Glucocorticoid (GC) drugs are a potent and rapidly effective therapeutic option for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). These medications are mainly used for the management of the extra-articular features of systemic-onset disease. A course of low-dose prednisone may be considered for achieving a rapid disease control in patients with severe polyarthritis refractory to other therapies or while awaiting the full therapeutic effect of a recently initiated disease-modifying antirheumatic drug or biologic agent. Short-term systemic GC administration may also be indicated for chronic iridocyclitis unresponsive to topical therapy. The general objective of GC therapy is to limit the maximum dose and exposure to the highest doses to what is needed to achieve disease control, and then to gradually taper the dose until the minimum level sufficient to maintain disease quiescence over time is reached. High-dose intravenous 'pulse' methylprednisolone administration is sometimes chosen to treat the most severe or acute disease manifestations of systemic JIA, particularly macrophage activation syndrome. Intra-articular GC injection is a safe and rapidly effective treatment for synovitis in children with chronic arthritis. Triamcinolone hexacetonide is the optimal GC preparation for pediatric patients. Local injection therapy is used most frequently to treat oligoarthritis, but the strategy of performing multiple injections to induce disease remission, while simultaneously initiating therapy with second-line or biologic agents, has also been proposed for children with polyarticular JIA. Administration of GCs is associated with potentially deleterious adverse effects, some of which can be irreversible. This highlights the need of a judicious use of these medications and careful monitoring of their toxicity. The recently published recommendations for the management of JIA provide useful guidance to the clinicians for the administration of GCs in children with chronic arthritis. PMID:25227183

Schiappapietra, Benedetta; Varnier, Giulia; Rosina, Silvia; Consolaro, Alessandro; Martini, Alberto; Ravelli, Angelo

2015-01-01

351

SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS  

EPA Science Inventory

Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

352

Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Juvenile sand lance collected in a beach seine by USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA.  Like surf smelt, sand lance are an important forage fish in Puget Sound.  ...

353

Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Three size classes of juvenile surf smelt collected in a beach seine by USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA. ...

354

Regional homogeneity of resting-state brain abnormalities in violent juvenile offenders: a biomarker of brain immaturity?  

PubMed

The authors investigated whether male violent juvenile offenders demonstrate any differences in local functional connectivity indicative of delayed maturation of the brain that may serve as a biomarker of violence. Twenty-nine violent juvenile offenders and 28 age-matched controls were recruited. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) method was used to analyze resting-state magnetic resonance images. Violent offenders showed significantly lower ReHo values in the right caudate, right medial prefrontal cortex, and left precuneus, and higher values in the right supramarginal gyrus than the controls. These regions had both high sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing between the two groups suggesting that dysfunction in these regions can be used to correctly classify those individuals who are violent. Dysfunction in the right medial prefrontal-caudate circuit may, therefore, represent an important biomarker of violence juvenile males. PMID:25716485

Chen, Chen; Zhou, Jiansong; Liu, Chunhong; Witt, Katrina; Zhang, Yingdong; Jing, Bin; Li, Chun; Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Lingjiang

2015-01-01

355

Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.  

PubMed

There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s. PMID:2122167

Frazier, H C

1990-01-01

356

Effects of eutrophication and sedimentation on juvenile corals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated effects of eutrophication and sedimentation on juvenile abundance, juvenile mortality and community structure of scleractinian corals on fringing reefs on the west coast of Barbados, West Indies, in 1989. Juvenile abundance was lower on cutrophic\\/high-sediment reefs than less eutrophic\\/lowsediment reefs, but juvenile size was larger on the former. The larger size could result from size-selective mortality against

M. Wittenberg; W. Hunte

1992-01-01

357

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

DOE /NV

1998-12-08

358

Modeling juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain  

E-print Network

Modeling juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain E. Ashley Steel Peter Guttorp NRCSET juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain E. Ashley Steel and Peter Guttorp National Research.S.A SUMMARY We describe movement patterns of hatchery-raised, juvenile, spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus

Washington at Seattle, University of

359

Juvenile Justice and Public Policy: Toward a National Agenda.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some of the most critical and troubling issues in juvenile justice are addressed to serve as a catalyst and resource for developing sound juvenile justice public policy decisions. The following chapters examine juvenile court policies, special issues, and cost-effective interventions, and present findings of a national survey of public attitudes…

Schwartz, Ira M., Ed.

360

Detecting Mental Disorder in Juvenile Detainees: Who Receives Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. We determined whether or not juvenile detainees with major men- tal disorders received treatment, and the variables that predicted who received services. Methods. Our sample was 1829 randomly selected juvenile detainees taking part in the Northwestern Juvenile Project. To determine need for mental health ser- vices, independent interviewers administered the Diagnostic Interview Sched- ule for Children and rated functional

Linda A. Teplin; Karen M. Abram; Gary M. McClelland; Jason J. Washburn; Ann K. Pikus

2005-01-01

361

The Effects of Parental Controls on Juvenile Gun Possession  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many factors influence a juvenile's choice to possess a gun, one being effective parenting. Parents play an important role in the socialization process of their children, including the development of prosocial and delinquent attitudes. This research hypothesizes that parents who enforce control tactics and discipline on juveniles influence the juvenile's decision to carry a gun regularly. The hypothesis was tested

Chris J. Keary; Phyllis E. Berry

2008-01-01

362

Rapid assay for insect juvenile hormone esterase activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rapid new assay is proposed for analyzing insect juvenile hormone esterase activity. The assay is based on >99% of radiolabeled juvenile hormone being extracted into an isooctane phase while >99% of the juvenile hormone acid remains in the basic aqueous-methanol phase. The assay is more rapid and less expensive than conventional chromatographic assays while yielding almost identical values of

B. D. Hammock; T. C. Sparks

1977-01-01

363

Developmental Antecedents of Sexual Coercion in Juvenile Sexual Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has linked adult sex offending behavior to a multiplicity of variables, including juvenile delinquency and the experience of childhood abuse. The purpose of this study was to explore developmental pathways among childhood abuse, juvenile delinquency, and personality dimensions possibly conducive to adolescent sexual coercion. Using a retrospective self-report inventory, we measured the extent to which juvenile sexual offenders

Grant M. Johnson; Raymond A. Knight

2000-01-01

364

Perceptions of Juvenile Offenders Who Were Abused as Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Should a history of child abuse be taken into consideration when a juvenile offender is punished? Although some research shows that child abuse is used as a mitigating factor for juvenile offenders (i.e., elicits less punitive sentences), surveys of juvenile court officials reveal that it is considered an aggravating factor. Specifically, in controlled mock jury studies in which child abuse

Margaret C. Stevenson

2009-01-01

365

Kids and Guns. 1999 National Report Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides information about the use of guns by children and adolescents, with related information on juvenile homicides and suicides. The annual number of juveniles killed with a firearm increased substantially between 1987 and 1993 as occurrences of other types of homicide remained constant. Since 1980, one in four murders of juveniles

Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

366

Juvenile Court Judges' Attitudes Toward Waiver Decisions in Indiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been an increase in the number of state laws subjecting juvenile offenders to tougher penalties and reducing the age at which an offender may be waived to criminal court. Indiana is one of the 46 states in which the juvenile court judge maintains the discretion to waive juvenile offenders to criminal court. An instrument was developed to measure

Jill M. D'Angelo

367

Contagion and Repeat Offending among Urban Juvenile Delinquents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research investigates the role of repeat offending and spatial contagion in juvenile delinquency recidivism using a database of 7166 male juvenile offenders sent to community-based programs by the Family Court of Philadelphia. Results indicate evidence of repeat offending among juvenile delinquents, particularly for drug offenders. The…

Mennis, Jeremy; Harris, Philip

2011-01-01

368

Gender Bias and Juvenile Justice Revisited: A Multiyear Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents a multiyear empirical examination of gender bias in the handling of juvenile court cases in Hawaii. Based on prior qualitative and quantitative data, it is hypothesized that once female juvenile offenders are found delinquent, they will be sanctioned more severely than male offenders by the juvenile court, holding other factors constant. Results from a series of analyses

John M. MacDonald; Meda Chesney-Lind

2001-01-01

369

Best Practices in Juvenile Accountability: Overview. JAIBG Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin examines the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grants (JAIBG) program, which asserts that juvenile offenders should be held accountable for their crimes as a matter of basic justice and to prevent and deter delinquency. It reviews the developmental perspective shaping…

Beyer, Marty

370

Mental Health Implications of the Juvenile Justice Standards  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years there has been increasing skepticism about the therapeutic promis of the juvinile court and increasing attention to due process for juveniles accused of delinquent offenses and other behaviors which might invoke juvenile court jurisdiction. Reflective of these trends are the model standards embodied in the IJA\\/ABA Juvenile Justice Standards, which provide for primary emphasis on the rights

Stephen J. Morse; Charles Whitebread II

1982-01-01

371

Juveniles in Adult Jails and Lockups: It's Your Move.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues relevant to juveniles in adult jails are discussed in this guide which is designed to aid concerned citizens who want to promote public interest and support for the removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. Statistics on the number of juveniles in adult jails, their ages, seriousness of offenses, and suicide rate are given. The…

Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

372

The Impact of Schools on Juvenile Substance Initiation and Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use data from the two rounds of the NLSY97 and the corresponding QED data to examine the effectiveness of school endowments and curricula in targeting juvenile use of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana. Our results support the notion that schools matter in reducing juvenile involvement in substance use. Higher discretionary dollars per pupil are linked to reduced rates of juvenile

Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes; Traci Mach; John D. Clapp

2004-01-01

373

Diet alters species recognition in juvenile toads  

PubMed Central

Whether environmental effects during juvenile development can alter the ontogeny of adult mating behaviour remains largely unexplored. We evaluated the effect of diet on the early expression of conspecific recognition in spadefoot toads, Spea bombifrons. We found that juvenile toads display phonotaxis behaviour six weeks post-metamorphosis. However, preference for conspecifics versus heterospecifics emerged later and was diet dependent. Thus, the environment can affect the early development of species recognition in a way that might alter adult behaviour. Evaluating such effects is important for understanding variation in hybridization between species and the nature of species boundaries. PMID:24088562

Pfennig, Karin S.; Rodriguez Moncalvo, Verónica G.; Burmeister, Sabrina S.

2013-01-01

374

Diet alters species recognition in juvenile toads.  

PubMed

Whether environmental effects during juvenile development can alter the ontogeny of adult mating behaviour remains largely unexplored. We evaluated the effect of diet on the early expression of conspecific recognition in spadefoot toads, Spea bombifrons. We found that juvenile toads display phonotaxis behaviour six weeks post-metamorphosis. However, preference for conspecifics versus heterospecifics emerged later and was diet dependent. Thus, the environment can affect the early development of species recognition in a way that might alter adult behaviour. Evaluating such effects is important for understanding variation in hybridization between species and the nature of species boundaries. PMID:24088562

Pfennig, Karin S; Moncalvo, Verónica G Rodriguez; Burmeister, Sabrina S

2013-10-23

375

Juvenile justice. A role for health professionals.  

PubMed

The United States is the only nation in the world that continues to execute its youth. The use of the death penalty against those who committed crimes as children is an act contrary to American standards of decency and fairness, as well as international law. The adolescent brain has not fully developed before the age of 18 years of age. Thus children do not have the same emotional and mental capacity as adults. Although juveniles should be held accountable for their crimes, the United States must not impose this most extreme punishment. The medical profession must take a stand to stop the execution of juvenile offenders in the United States. PMID:12545519

Brookman, Monica

2003-01-01

376

Habitat Suitability Index Models: Juvenile Spot  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop estuarine habitat models for juvenile spot (Leiostomus xanthurus). The models are scaled to produce an index of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1 (optimally suitable habitat) for estuarine areas of the continental United States. Habitat suitability indexes (HSI's) are designed for use with the habitat evaluation procedures developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Guideline for juvenile spot model applications and techniques for estimating model variables are described.

Stickney, Robert R.; Cuenco, Michael L.

1982-01-01

377

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam is used for holding and spawning adult fall chinook and coho salmon. Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and summer steelhead. The main goal of acclimation is to reduce stress from trucking prior to release and improve imprinting of juvenile salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. Juveniles are transported to the acclimation facilities primarily from Umatilla and Bonneville Hatcheries. This report details activities associated with operation and maintenance of the Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques, Thornhollow and Three Mile Dam facilities in 1996.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1997-06-01

378

Home Economists in Correctional Education: A New Area to Explore.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Individuals in prisons and correctional facilities have needs for constructive living that home economists can meet. This article explores the nature of correctional education, social education, vanguard programs, status of education in correctional institutions, the Florida International University Project, and the most prevalent needs of…

Crabtree, Myrna P.

1980-01-01

379

National Study of Vocational Education in Corrections. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A national study of vocational education in corrections was conducted to describe the current status of vocational education programs available to inmates in all types of correctional facilities. The study produced the following technical reports: a review and synthesis of the literature on correctional vocational education; a set of thirty-four…

Schroeder, Paul E.

380

Incidence and prevalence of juvenile arthritis in an urban population of southern Germany: a prospective study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To ascertain the incidence and prevalence of juvenile arthritis in a German urban population.?METHODS—All 766 paediatricians, orthopaedists, and rheumatologists working in practices or outpatient clinics in 12 south German towns were asked to report all patients who consulted them for juvenile arthritis during the year 1995. Patients with continuing symptoms were followed up for 9-12 months to obtain a final diagnosis. Extended measures of quality control were taken to control for known biases.?RESULTS—Of 457 reported cases, 294 were diagnosed with para-/postinfectious arthritis (PPA), 78 with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), and 18 with other forms of arthritis. Half of the PPA cases were classified as transient synovitis of the hip (SH). For JCA the reported annual incidence was 6.6 and the prevalence 14.8 per 100 000 subjects under 16 years of age. For PPA the reported incidence was 76 and the prevalence 4.4 per 100 000 subjects under 16. The incidence of rheumatic fever was clearly below 1 per 100 000 people under 16. A correction model was used to control for known biases and to adjust the estimates accordingly.?CONCLUSIONS—The results of this first prospective study on the incidence and prevalence of juvenile arthritis in Germany are consistent with a retrospective study performed in the Berlin area. Based on these results it was estimated that the annual frequency of juvenile arthritis in Germany is as follows: 750-900 incident JCA cases, 21 000 incident SH cases, and 21 000 incidence cases of other forms of PPA a year. The number of incidence cases of rheumatic fever is expected to be markedly lower than 150 a year. The total prevalence is expected to be 3600-4350 JCA cases, 2250-3000 SH cases, and the same number of other forms of PPA.?? PMID:11557650

von Koskull, S.; Truckenbrodt, H; Holle, R; Hormann, A

2001-01-01

381

Equal nonbreeding period survival in adults and juveniles of a long-distant migrant bird  

PubMed Central

In migrant birds, survival estimates for the different life-history stages between fledging and first breeding are scarce. First-year survival is shown to be strongly reduced compared with annual survival of adult birds. However, it remains unclear whether the main bottleneck in juvenile long-distant migrants occurs in the postfledging period within the breeding ranges or en route. Quantifying survival rates during different life-history stages and during different periods of the migration cycle is crucial to understand forces driving the evolution of optimal life histories in migrant birds. Here, we estimate survival rates of adult and juvenile barn swallows (Hirundo rusticaL.) in the breeding and nonbreeding areas using a population model integrating survival estimates in the breeding ranges based on a large radio-telemetry data set and published estimates of demographic parameters from large-scale population-monitoring projects across Switzerland. Input parameters included the country-wide population trend, annual productivity estimates of the double-brooded species, and year-to-year survival corrected for breeding dispersal. Juvenile survival in the 3-week postfledging period was low (S = 0.32; SE = 0.05), whereas in the rest of the annual cycle survival estimates of adults and juveniles were similarly high (S > 0.957). Thus, the postfledging period was the main survival bottleneck, revealing the striking result that nonbreeding period mortality (including migration) is not higher for juveniles than for adult birds. Therefore, focusing future research on sources of variation in postfledging mortality can provide new insights into determinants of population dynamics and life-history evolution of migrant birds. PMID:24683458

Grüebler, Martin U; Korner-Nievergelt, Fränzi; Naef-Daenzer, Beat

2014-01-01

382

Bioassays of compounds with potential juvenoid activity on Drosophila melanogaster: Juvenile hormone III, bisepoxide juvenile hormone III  

E-print Network

hormone III, bisepoxide juvenile hormone III and methyl farnesoates Lawrence G. Harshman a , Ki-Duck Song are relatively low in this insect (Sliter et al., 1987; Bownes and Rembold, 1987). Low levels of juvenile hormone) described atypical effects of topical administration of juvenile hormone to third instar (last instar) D

Hammock, Bruce D.

383

Refining and Resolving the Blur of Gault for Juvenile Capital Offenders in Texas: A World without the Juvenile Death Penalty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Texas's approach to juvenile capital offenders has been profoundly lacking any balance of the interests of accountability and rehabilitation. Texas has employed adult transfer for juvenile capital offenders with potential life imprisonment and possible parole in 40 years and determinate sentencing to adjudicate capital offenders in juvenile court, yielding a maximum sentence of 40 years in prison. Legislative initiatives in

David Mikhail

2006-01-01

384

Fig. 1 _ Juvenile menhaden injured by predators. Fish A is normal. EFFECT OF PREDATORS ON JUVENILE MENHADEN  

E-print Network

78 F G I J Fig. 1 _ Juvenile menhaden injured by predators. Fish A is normal. #12;EFFECT OF PREDATORS ON JUVENILE MENHADEN IN CLEAR & TURBID ESTUARIES Richard L. Kroger and J am e s F . Guthrie Little is known about the effects of pre da- tion on juvenile menhaden during their 6 to 9 months of est u a r i n

385

CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 528: POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS CONTAMINATION NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination is listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 528 was created to address polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination identified during the CAU 262 corrective action investigation. CAU 528 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): CAS 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-06-01

386

Educational Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is a compilation of nearly 100 projects and trends in school design. The projects were submitted for a 1999-2000 competition and focus on a variety of school facilities. These facilities range from early childhood to community colleges, including public, private, and alternative facilities. A jury of architects and educational…

American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

387

A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: Part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District started development of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS), a nonproprietary technology, in 2001 to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 federal dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters, and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in 2 or 3-dimensions as the fish passed at the facility for determining route of passage. The additional route of passage information, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities and through the FCRPS.

Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, Matthew B.

2011-05-26

388

Conceptualizing Juvenile Prostitution as Child Maltreatment: Findings from the National Juvenile Prostitution Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were conducted to identify the incidence (Study 1) and characteristics (Study 2) of juvenile prostitution cases known to law enforcement agencies in the United States. Study 1 revealed a national estimate of 1,450 arrests or detentions (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1,287—1,614) in cases involving juvenile prostitution during a 1-year period. In Study 2, exploratory data were collected from

Kimberly J. Mitchell; David Finkelhor; Janis Wolak

2010-01-01

389

Social familiarity and shoal formation in juvenile fishes.  

PubMed

The potential influence of social familiarity in shoal-choice decisions was investigated in two sympatric species of north temperate fishes, juvenile banded killifish Fundulus diaphanus and juvenile bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus. Groups of socially familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics were formed in the laboratory using wild-caught fishes. Juvenile F. diaphanus demonstrated a strong preference for familiar conspecific shoalmates, whereas juvenile L. macrochirus exhibited no preference for either unfamiliar or familiar conspecific shoalmates. The differential influence of familiarity on shoalmate choice in juveniles of these two species could be due to their different ecologies, local population densities and life histories. PMID:20666898

Lee-Jenkins, S S Y; Godin, J-G J

2010-02-01

390

Juvenile Drug Courts and Teen Substance Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile justice officials across the United States are embracing a new method of dealing with adolescent substance abuse. Importing a popular innovation from adult courts, state and local governments have started hundreds of specialized drug courts to provide judicial supervision and coordinate substance abuse treatment for drug-involved…

Butts, Jeffrey A., Ed.; Roman, John, Ed.

2004-01-01

391

Psychosocial factors in juvenile diabetes: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies assessing (1) the influence of psychosocial factors on the onset of juvenile diabetes, (2) the influence of psychosocial factors on the course of this disease, and (3) the influence of diabetes on the psychosocial development of the child are reviewed. Directions for future research are suggested.

Suzanne Bennett Johnson

1980-01-01

392

Predictors of juveniles' noncompliance with probation requirements.  

PubMed

Probation is the most common disposition for adjudicated youth, but little is known about which specific requirements are commonly imposed on juveniles, the requirements with which juveniles most often fail to comply, and how certain youth characteristics and/or imposed requirements might relate to probation noncompliance. An investigation of 120 archived files of youth represented by an urban public defender's office identified 29 probation requirements imposed on youth and 18 requirements with which youth commonly failed to comply. Results revealed that 52% of youth failed to comply with at least one probation requirement; prior probation noncompliance and race were both significantly associated with noncompliance in the examined probation disposition. In addition, the probability of probation noncompliance was significantly higher when youth received either of two substance-related probation requirements: drug tests or drug and alcohol counseling. Such results may prompt further investigation of juvenile probation-related predictors, identify areas of need for clinical service provision to foster successful completion of probation requirements, and help identify areas of potential biases among juvenile court personnel. PMID:24933176

NeMoyer, Amanda; Goldstein, Naomi E S; McKitten, Rhonda L; Prelic, Ana; Ebbecke, Jenna; Foster, Erika; Burkard, Casey

2014-12-01

393

Juvenile bolas spiders attract psychodid flies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large immature and mature female bolas spiders of the genus Mastophora attract certain male moths by aggressive chemical mimicry of those moth species' sex pheromones. These older spiders capture moths by swinging a “bolas” (i.e., a sticky globule suspended on a thread) at the approaching male moths. Juvenile bolas spiders do not use a bolas, but instead use their first

K. V. Yeargan; L. W. Quate

1996-01-01

394

Legal Lexicon, Social Labeling, and Juvenile Justice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of 52 theoretical papers on school crime and its relation to poverty, this chapter maintains that social labeling is a pervasive and necessary social phenomenon. However, inaccurate social labeling plagues contemporary juvenile justice systems. Relevant examples include legal adjudication categories such as status offender, persons in need of…

Feldman, Ronald A.

395

Early substance use by juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

Although the interconnection between delinquency and substance use in adolescence is well documented, considerably less is known about substance-use initiation in childhood for juvenile delinquent populations. This descriptive study examined early substance initiation in childhood as reported by adolescents who were incarcerated for juvenile offenses (93 males, 96 females; 58% African American, 42% European American). Youth were individually interviewed using an adapted version of substance-related questions from the National Household Survey. Juvenile justice system records were reviewed to characterize offense histories. A majority of males and females reported using at least one substance (other than cigarettes) such as alcohol, marijuana, or inhalants by age 13. Alcohol use reportedly occurred by age 10 for 17% of the youth. For a substantial portion, early initiation turned into frequent early use. For example, 32% of the males and 39% of the females reported drinking alcoholic beverages at a frequency of several times per month or greater by age 13. Limited evidence related early substance initiation with subsequent substance abuse. Offense status was related to early substance initiation for females but not males. The study provided clear evidence that very early substance use is a significant problem among youth who end up in the juvenile justice system and that we need to find out more about the environmental and social variables affecting very early substance initiation. PMID:12723900

Prinz, Ronald J; Kerns, Suzanne E U

2003-01-01

396

School Performance of Adolescents in Juvenile Court.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the educational experiences of 106 children and adolescents who appeared in juvenile court either as status offenders or delinquents. Concludes that poor academic performance, low self-esteem, and low school participation may be connected to antisocial and delinquent behavior. (FMW)

Finn, Jeremy D.; And Others

1988-01-01

397

Juvenile pemphigus vulgaris. A case report.  

PubMed

A 13-year-old South African Indian boy who presented with oral mucosal lesions and skin blisters due to juvenile pemphigus vulgaris is described. Treatment with high-dose oral corticosteroids produced a prompt clinical response. Pemphigus vulgaris is rare in the young and this may lead to misdiagnosis and inappropriate therapy. PMID:3563760

Jacyk, W K; Dyer, R B

1987-03-01

398

Gambling Behavior of Juvenile Offenders in Louisiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper was to determine the (1) frequency of and (2) types of prearrest gambling (3) prevalence of pathological gambling and (4) the associations of after school activities and gambling related symptoms among juvenile offenders in Louisiana, compared to a contemporaneous school sample. A gambling survey was administered to 343 (jail) and 1293 (prison) offenders, ages 10–19

James R. Westphal; Lera J. Johnson

2006-01-01

399

What is Influencing Juvenile Volume and Weight?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intuition predicts the more nutrients available during development, the larger the offspring. Larger amounts of ingested nutrients should increase juvenile size above that if lesser amounts of nutrients were consumed. The freshwater snail, Physa sp., is hermaphroditic and lays its encapsulated eggs in a mass of jelly-like material. The capsular fluid contains all of the available nutrients for the developing

Kozak Ellen; Steffen Rhiannon; Tarbutton Morgan; Wessel Jeff

2008-01-01

400

Radium rentention and dosimetry in juvenile beagles  

SciTech Connect

Retention of administered /sup 226/Ra was substantially greater in beagles injected as 3-month-old juveniles than as 1.4-year-old adults, but the measured /sup 222/Rn//sup 226/Ra ratio in bone was significantly less in juveniles for about the first 600 days after injection. An equation that describes the total-body biological retention R in beagles injected with /sup 226/Ra at 3 months of age at any time t (in days) after injection during the first 6.6 years is R = 0.331e/sup -0.206t/ + 0.245e/sup -0.00374t/ + 0.424e/sup -0.000114t/. The rate constant of the final term in the equation for juveniles is similar to that for young adults, suggesting that this component reflects the net turnover rate in the slowly remodeling component of adult bone. Compared to young adult beagles, animals injected as juveniles had a greater fraction of their retained /sup 226/Ra in parts of the skeleton containing much cortical bone, such as paws, and a smaller fraction in those parts containing much trabecular bone.

Lloyd, R.D.; Jones, C.W.; Bruenger, F.W.; Atherton, D.R.; Mays, C.W.

1983-05-01

401

EXPERIMENTAL Differential Gene Expression between Juvenile  

E-print Network

Genes Play a Role in the Regeneration of Membranous Bone Derrick C. Wan, M.D. Oliver O. Aalami, M-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmation of selected genes--BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-7; and osteopontin (OP amounts of BMP-2 and OP. Minimal difference in OC expression was observed between juvenile and adult dura

Derynck, Rik

402

Juvenile delinquency and adult aggression against women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present research assessed whether males who exhibited delinquent acts in their youth would be likely to demonstrate aggression against women as adults. Attitudinal information was also collected to see whether attitudes supporting aggression would mediate the relation between juvenile delinquency and adult aggression against women. Male undergraduates (N = 185) responded to a 68-item, comprehensive measure of delinquency that

Michelle Kalra

1996-01-01

403

Moratorium on the Death Penalty for Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Streib offers a sketch of the sentences and actual executions in the juvenile death penalty system for the past quarter-century. The ABA's moratorium calls for the complete prevention of the execution of offenders under age 18 at the time of their crimes.

Victor L. Streib

1998-01-01

404

Ways seen for attack on juvenile crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent report by the FBI shows a sharp increase in the number of crimes committed by juveniles as well as an increase in the viciousness of crimes. The author, in this opinion piece, believes a part of the solution to this problem is the censorship of mass forms of entertainment. The author claims he believes in the value of

Walter Lippmann

1954-01-01

405

Prevention of Potential Juvenile Delinquency Through Camping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A two-year demonstration project, to determine whether a short-term (30 days) summer camp experience could contribute to prevention of juvenile delinquency, found that camping induced positive attitudinal change and improved adjustment to school. The project involved 200 adolescent boys from varied social backgrounds who were selected on evidence…

Kiddie Kamp Corp., Boston, MA.

406

Youth for Justice. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth for Justice uses the power of active learning to teach youth practical information about the law while addressing the risks associated with being young in the United States today. This unique initiative is a law-related education (LRE) program supported by the United States Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency…

Nessel, Paula A.

407

Thoughts on Juvenile Justice Systems and Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article updates comments published in this journal in 1994 about the nature of the American juvenile justice system, which laid out reasons that it might not serve as a useful model for other nations. Since that time, the US system has moved further right towards the justice model and away from the welfare model. Individualistic philosophies and political conservatism

Malcolm W. Klein

2001-01-01

408

Discretionary Decision-Makin in Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social distribution of youths who engage in delinquent behavior is not ,exactly the same as that of youths who come into contact with the juvenile justice system. Thus a certain amount of discretion characterizes the decisions made at various points within the system. In seeking an understanding of the discretionary processes, researchers have tried to isolate elements related to

William H. Barton

1976-01-01

409

Naproxen induced pseudoporphyria in juvenile chronic arthritis.  

PubMed

We report 6 cases of porphyria-like skin reactions in children taking naproxen for juvenile chronic arthritis. The lesions mimicked either erythropoietic protoporphyria or porphyria cutanea tarda, with both forms occurring in 2 patients. Biochemical studies excluded abnormal porphyrin metabolism. PMID:1895270

Allen, R; Rogers, M; Humphrey, I

1991-06-01

410

Incestuous victimization by Juvenile Sex offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most research and clinical data dealing with child sexual abuse have focused on adult offenders (usually a parent or relative) and their child victims. More recently, however, the data are beginning to show that a sizeable number of these sexual encounters are being committed by juvenile offenders. Thus, parents and members of the helping professions are beginning to see that

Lois H. Pierce; Robert L. Pierce

1987-01-01

411

Language and Communication Difficulties in Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Studies of the prison population suggest that the numbers of prisoners with language and communication disorders is higher than that of the overall population. However, the prison population is heterogeneous and it is important to focus on specific areas of the population. This study focuses on juvenile offenders. Aims: The study aimed…

Bryan, Karen; Freer, Jackie; Furlong, Cheryl

2007-01-01

412

Rehabilitation of the Personality of Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Russian youth has in recent years been increasingly involved in crime, narcotics addiction, and alcoholism, possibly due to a failure of socialization in childhood. Researchers are seeking the origins of this phenomenon and searching for ways to combat it through rehabilitation of juvenile offenders. The essential nature of social and pedagogical…

Zaitsev, G. K.; Zaitsev, A. G.; Dmitriev, M. G.; Apal'kova, I. Iu.

2009-01-01

413

Juvenile Delinquency. Selected Studies in Social Problems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Excerpts from eight books present material on juvenile delinquency. Included are selections from the following: "Wayward Youth" by August Aichhorn, "The Gang" by Frederic M. Thrasher, "The Jack-Roller" by Clifford R. Shaw, "Street Corner Society" by William Foote Whyte, "Children Who Hate" by Fritz Redl and David Wineman, "The Addict in the…

Korn, Richard R., Ed.

414

Evaluation of a Comprehensive Juvenile Delinquency Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discribes a comprehensive juvenile delinquency diversion program serving a poverty community in a large urban center, and attempts to evaluate the problems and effects of the program. The target population was primarily minority-group truants, aged 10-15, who had been in trouble with the authorities. The program included recreational…

Young, Howard; And Others

415

OPTIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR GROWTH OF JUVENILE BLUEGILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Juvenile bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus (initial weight, 1.8-8.0 g), were individually marked and fed to excess during a 30-day constant temperature test; day length was 16 h. Fish were tested at temperature intervals of 2 degrees from 20 to 36C. The highest specific growth rate ...

416

AUGUST 2010 JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES  

E-print Network

.KurtKumli,Judge, Santa Clara County, Superior Court ·BarryKrisberg,Distinguished Senior Fellow, BerkeleyCenterforCriminalJustice,whichislocatedontheBCCJwebsite:www.bccj.berkeley.edu The Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice (BCCJ) at the UC Berkeley School of Law works to enhance public safetyAUGUST 2010 JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES Gender Responsiveness and Equity in California

Kammen, Daniel M.

417

Profile of incarcerated juveniles: comparison of male and female offenders.  

PubMed

Effective methods of identifying potential juvenile offenders are critical when developing prevention programs within both state and national juvenile justice systems. The characteristics of juvenile offenders in a large juvenile justice system are examined in this study. Participants live in a Midwestern city with a high rate of crime as indicated by federal standards. Both male and female subjects were currently incarcerated (N = 363). The article highlights a basic psychological and behavioral profile of these juveniles in an effort to determine characteristics that might identify future juvenile offenders. The authors believe that if future offenders can be identified, both school systems and community agencies may be better able to intervene in the cycle of juvenile crime and violence. PMID:19086673

Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Dell, Rex; Davis, Candice; Guerrieri, Karen

2008-01-01

418

Developmental incompetence to stand trial in juvenile courts.  

PubMed

Juveniles' competency to participate in delinquency proceedings has received increased attention in recent years. Developmental incompetence, whereby juveniles' incompetency is based upon their immaturity, as opposed to a mental disorder or developmental disability, is an evolving and important aspect of this area of law. The following paper reviews theories used to support the notion of developmental incompetence, as well as the extant empirical research on juveniles' competency-related abilities. Using a LexisNexis search, statutory and case laws pertaining to juvenile competency were identified across the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Only six states clearly allow developmental incompetence, whereas 17 have laws that do not include developmental immaturity as an acceptable basis of incompetence in juvenile courts. Developmental incompetence is likely to affect a relatively small proportion of juvenile cases, but has important implications for juvenile forensic practice. Recommendations are offered for forensic practitioners conducting this type of evaluation. PMID:22384998

O'Donnell, Philip C; Gross, Bruce

2012-07-01

419

RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

Not Available

1993-05-01

420

A Soldier of Service: An Interview with Playwright and Teaching Artist Dominique Cieri. Teaching At-Risk, Juvenile Justice, and the Holocaust  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inner-city public school classrooms, group homes, juvenile detention centers and facilities will be with Americans forever. Their populations can deflate, challenge, or improve any artist's skills and expertise. The author thinks of teaching artists who work these strenuous communities as soldiers of service, dedicated individuals who fight with…

Cobb, Catlin

2010-01-01

421

Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tank 2331-U at the Building 9201-1 Site, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tank 2331-U, previously located at Building 9201-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 2331-U, was removed on December 14, 1988. Based on the determination that groundwater at the Building 9201-1 Site is classified as a nondrinking water source, the applicable TDEC Closure Action Levels for remediation of petroleum

D. E. Bohrman; E. M. Ingram

1992-01-01

422

Hanford surplus facilities programs facilities listings and descriptions. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

On the Hanford Site, many surplus facilities exist (including buildings, stacks, tanks, cribs, burial grounds, and septic systems) that are scheduled to be decommissioned. Many of these facilities contain large inventories of radionuclides, which present potential radiological hazards on and off the Hanford Site. Some structures with limited structural deterioration present potential radiological and industrial safety hazards to personnel. Because of the condition of these facilities, a systematic surveillance and maintenance program is performed to identify and correct potential hazards to personnel and the environment until eventual decommissioning operations are completed.

Kiser, S.K.; Witt, T.L.

1994-01-01

423

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 -

Boehlecke

2004-01-01

424

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which

2002-01-01

425

Competitive exclusion in a discrete juvenile–adult model with continuous and seasonal reproduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

We develop a general discrete juvenile–adult population model that describes two competing species. We consider species in which the juveniles only compete with other juveniles, and the adults only compete with other adults, i.e. juveniles and adults of either species do not compete. This is typical of amphibians where juveniles (tadpoles) live in water and adults (frogs) live on land.

Azmy S. Ackleh; Ross A. Chiquet

2011-01-01

426

Influence of Waterway Development on Migrational Characteristics of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Willamette River, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the effects of Portland Harbor development in the lower Willamette River on the migration and behavior of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.), the habitat occupied by juvenile salmonids, and predation on juvenile salmonids by northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis. Juvenile salmonids were abundant in the lower Willamette River during spring; radio-tagged juvenile steelhead O. mykiss and yearling chinook salmon O.

David L. Ward; Anthony A. Nigro; Ruth A. Farr; Christopher J. Knutsen

1994-01-01

427

Developing Argument Skills in Severely Disadvantaged Adolescent Males in a Residential Correctional Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigate whether the intervention designed by Kuhn and Udell (2003) to develop argument skills could be implemented productively among adolescent males in a residential juvenile detention facility--boys who were educationally disengaged and severely disadvantaged academically as well as socially. Compared to a control group from the same…

De Fuccio, MaryAnne; Kuhn, Deanna; Udell, Wadiya; Callender, Kerry

2009-01-01

428

Health issues faced by adolescents incarcerated in the juvenile justice system.  

PubMed

Incarcerated adolescents have a high level of health problems when compared to those not incarcerated. These higher rates are in part due to inadequate coping skills. The purpose of this paper is to conduct a literature review of articles that focus on the health issues of incarcerated adolescents. This review provides an overview of the issue, strategies that nurses working in juvenile facilities can employ to increase their impact on the health of adolescent offenders, and research needs for the future. Thirty articles published around the world between the years 1995 and 2007 are reviewed and described. PMID:19702743

Griel Iii, Lester C; Loeb, Susan J

2009-01-01

429

The curfew bill as it relates to the juvenile and his family.  

PubMed

Curfew laws have been instituted in cities across the United States in an attempt to control the rise in juvenile crime. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a curfew law for Baltimore City based on interviews with city officals and concludes that the law in its present form will not bring about any significant change in the rate of delinquency. Alternative are suggested that might better get to the source of the problem. These include more youth and family counseling services, rehabilitative facilities, work study programs and shelter areas. PMID:596264

Plotkin, A L; Elias, G

1977-01-01

430

Growing up with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic pediatric illness in the United States. The disease encompasses a group of heterogeneous chronic arthritis conditions that begin before age 16 years and persist for more than 6 weeks. Formerly termed juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), JIA now includes polyarticular, oligoarticular, psoriatic, enthesitis-related arthritis, systematic arthritis, and undifferentiated arthritis. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory features. Treatment includes immunosuppressant therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDS), and biologic therapies. This can affect all aspects of an adolescent's life including physiologic, psychosocial, and spiritual components; therefore, this article discusses a comprehensive approach to care management with transition of care as a critical feature in adolescent healthcare. PMID:25333886

McKeever, Amy; Kelly, Michelle M

2015-01-01

431

American Corrections at the Crossroads: A Time to Reconsider Our Penal Philosophy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the history of punishment for crimes in American society and argues that the present system is racially biased. Alternatives, such as treatment, particularly for juveniles, are sorely needed, but are unlikely to replace the viciousness that characterizes justice and corrections for African Americans. (SLD)

Miller, Jerome G.

1993-01-01

432

Instructional Methods and Strategies. Teacher Training Module #7. Correctional/Special Education Training Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This module, which is one in a series of training packages intended to train educators working with handicapped adolescents and young adults in correctional settings, deals with identifying and using instructional strategies and methods that are critical to the instruction of handicapped juvenile and adult offenders. Addressed in the individual…

Sugai, George; And Others

433

A program of the National Institute of Justice National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center--  

E-print Network

Statistics, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and Office for Victims of Crime. #12;GuideA program of the National Institute of Justice National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology that include 99-IJ-R-034 awarded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U

Ellingson, Steven W.

434

Treatment advances in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an autoinflammatory condition that is distinct from other forms of childhood arthritis. Recently, biologic agents that specifically inhibit the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 have demonstrated remarkable clinical effectiveness and confirmed the importance of these cytokines in the disease process. Future studies are likely to optimize the care of children with systemic arthritis and further elucidate the disease pathogenesis. PMID:24765526

2014-01-01

435

Genetic Identification of F1 and Post-F1 Serrasalmid Juvenile Hybrids in Brazilian Aquaculture  

PubMed Central

Juvenile fish trade monitoring is an important task on Brazilian fish farms. However, the identification of juvenile fish through morphological analysis is not feasible, particularly between interspecific hybrids and pure species individuals, making the monitoring of these individuals difficult. Hybrids can be erroneously identified as pure species in breeding facilities, which might reduce production on farms and negatively affect native populations due to escapes or stocking practices. In the present study, we used a multi-approach analysis (molecular and cytogenetic markers) to identify juveniles of three serrasalmid species (Colossoma macropomum, Piaractus mesopotamicus and Piaractus brachypomus) and their hybrids in different stocks purchased from three seed producers in Brazil. The main findings of this study were the detection of intergenus backcrossing between the hybrid ? patinga (P. mesopotamicus×P. brachypomus)×? C. macropomum and the occurrence of one hybrid triploid individual. This atypical specimen might result from automixis, a mechanism that produces unreduced gametes in some organisms. Moreover, molecular identification indicated that hybrid individuals are traded as pure species or other types of interspecific hybrids, particularly post-F1 individuals. These results show that serrasalmid fish genomes exhibit high genetic heterogeneity, and multi-approach methods and regulators could improve the surveillance of the production and trade of fish species and their hybrids, thereby facilitating the sustainable development of fish farming. PMID:24594674

Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Senhorini, José Augusto; Foresti, Fausto; Martínez, Paulino; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

2014-01-01

436

Nuclear Facilities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In order to produce nuclear weapons, each country must have facilities to produce and refine the nuclear materials, conduct research on weapon design, and store the completed weapons. The interactives in this collection allow you to explore the nuclear facilities of the nuclear powers (both declared and undeclared).

Christopher Griffith

437

RCRA FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

438

Juvenile rainbow trout production in New York tributaries of Lake Ontario: implications for Atlantic salmon restoration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three Pacific salmonid species Onchorynchus spp. have replaced the extirpated Atlantic salmon Salmo salar as the main migratory salmonid in the Lake Ontario drainage. One of those species, the nonnative rainbow trout O. mykiss, has become widely distributed within the historical Atlantic salmon habitat, occupying an ecological niche similar to that of juvenile Atlantic salmon. Consequently, both a tributary's carrying capacity for Atlantic salmon and competition from established nonnative species are important when considering the feasibility of Atlantic salmon restoration. Estimation of juvenile rainbow trout production will help evaluate the capacity of tributaries to produce salmonids that occupy similar niches. Geostatistical methods were applied to standardized and efficiency-corrected electrofishing data from three of New York's best salmonid-producing streams to precisely estimate juvenile rainbow trout populations. Results indicated that each study stream could produce 20,000-40,000 age-0 and 4,000-10,000 age-1 and older rainbow trout per year. Statistical interpolation indicated areas of significantly different production potential and points of significant changes in productivity. Closer examination of the niche similarity and competitive potential of these two species is needed to properly interpret these estimates with regard to Atlantic salmon restoration.

McKenna, James E., Jr.; Johnson, James H.

2005-01-01

439

Hydrochemical state of intermediate culture pond for Chinese prawn juveniles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study deals with the hydrochemical state and management measures for the intermediate culture pond for Chinese prawn ( Penaeus orientalis) juveniles. The test result showed that the intermediate culture of Chinese prawn juvenile can be advanced to around March 20 in the Shanghai area if they are cultured in ponds in simple greenhouses of plastic knitting cloth. The density of juveniles introduced was about 35 million per hectare, survival was up to 55%.

Zang, Wei-Ling; Zhang, Jian-Da; Dai, Xi-Lin; Zhu, Zheng-Guo; Xu, Gui-Rong; Song, Lin-Hua; Li, Shi-Hua

1996-03-01

440

Risk Assessment for Juvenile Justice: A Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk assessment instruments are increasingly employed by juvenile justice settings to estimate the likelihood of recidivism\\u000a among delinquent juveniles. In concert with their increased use, validation studies documenting their predictive validity\\u000a have increased in number. The purpose of this study was to assess the average predictive validity of juvenile justice risk\\u000a assessment instruments and to identify risk assessment characteristics that

Craig S. Schwalbe

2007-01-01

441

Juvenile sparrows preferentially eavesdrop on adult song interactions  

E-print Network

compared the response of juvenile male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to simulated adult counter telemetry; song learning; Melospiza melodia; eavesdropping; song sparrow 1. INTRODUCTION Many species use

Beecher, Michael

442

Neurophysiological correlates of error monitoring and inhibitory processing in juvenile violent offenders.  

PubMed

Performance monitoring is crucial for well-adapted behavior. Offenders typically have a pervasive repetition of harmful-impulsive behaviors, despite an awareness of the negative consequences of their actions. However, the link between performance monitoring and aggressive behavior in juvenile offenders has not been closely investigated. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were used to investigate performance monitoring in juvenile non-psychopathic violent offenders compared with a well-matched control group. Two ERP components associated with error monitoring, error-related negativity (ERN) and error-positivity (Pe), and two components related to inhibitory processing, the stop-N2 and stop-P3 components, were evaluated using a combined flanker-stop-signal task. The results showed that the amplitudes of the ERN, the stop-N2, the stop-P3, and the standard P3 components were clearly reduced in the offenders group. Remarkably, no differences were observed for the Pe. At the behavioral level, slower stop-signal reaction times were identified for offenders, which indicated diminished inhibitory processing. The present results suggest that the monitoring of one's own behavior is affected in juvenile violent offenders. Specifically, we determined that different aspects of executive function were affected in the studied offenders, including error processing (reduced ERN) and response inhibition (reduced N2 and P3). However, error awareness and compensatory post-error adjustment processes (error correction) were unaffected. The current pattern of results highlights the role of performance monitoring in the acquisition and maintenance of externalizing harmful behavior that is frequently observed in juvenile offenders. PMID:25108171

Vilà-Balló, Adrià; Hdez-Lafuente, Prado; Rostan, Carles; Cunillera, Toni; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

2014-10-01

443

Wall interference assessment and corrections  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel wall interference assessment and correction (WIAC) concepts, applications, and typical results are discussed in terms of several nonlinear transonic codes and one panel method code developed for and being implemented at NASA-Langley. Contrasts between 2-D and 3-D transonic testing factors which affect WIAC procedures are illustrated using airfoil data from the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and Pathfinder 1 data from the National Transonic Facility. Initial results from the 3-D WIAC codes are encouraging; research on and implementation of WIAC concepts continue.

Newman, P. A.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Garriz, J. A.

1989-01-01

444

40 CFR 264.101 - Corrective action for solid waste management units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Corrective action for solid waste management units. 264.101 Section...FACILITIES Releases From Solid Waste Management Units § 264.101 Corrective action for solid waste management units. (a) The...

2014-07-01

445

40 CFR 264.101 - Corrective action for solid waste management units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Corrective action for solid waste management units. 264.101 Section...FACILITIES Releases From Solid Waste Management Units § 264.101 Corrective action for solid waste management units. (a) The...

2012-07-01

446

40 CFR 264.101 - Corrective action for solid waste management units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Corrective action for solid waste management units. 264.101 Section...FACILITIES Releases From Solid Waste Management Units § 264.101 Corrective action for solid waste management units. (a) The...

2013-07-01

447

Mental Health Screenings in Juvenile Detention Centers: Predictors of Mental Health Service Utilization and Recidivism  

E-print Network

meet criteria for mental illness. Unfortunately, the juvenile justice system does not consistently: Juveniles with mental illness problems are not getting the treatment services they need. FurthermoreMental Health Screenings in Juvenile Detention Centers: Predictors of Mental Health Service

Zhou, Yaoqi

448

78 FR 43920 - Meeting (Webinar) of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2013-07-22

449

75 FR 70293 - Meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2010-11-17

450

76 FR 53965 - Meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2011-08-30

451

78 FR 40189 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...OF JUSTICE Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OMB Number...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...305-1270, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

2013-07-03

452

78 FR 66383 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice Programs Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OMB Number...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...616-3649, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

2013-11-05

453

77 FR 70473 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Agency Information Collection Activities...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1121-0218] Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Agency...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...305-1270, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

2012-11-26

454

78 FR 42109 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...616-3649, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...collection: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

2013-07-15

455

77 FR 61641 - Meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2012-10-10

456

78 FR 69876 - Meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2013-11-21

457

75 FR 22163 - Meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2010-04-27

458

78 FR 56940 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...305-1270, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...CJ-15, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

2013-09-16

459

77 FR 39511 - Meeting (Webinar) of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2012-07-03

460

78 FR 9070 - Meeting (Webinar) of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2013-02-07

461

Pathways from child maltreatment to juvenile delinquency : sexualized behaviors and loneliness  

E-print Network

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency PreventionOffice of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Preventionjuvenile justice system. Child maltreatment itself remains one of the key predictors of juvenile delinquency

Peláez Merrick, Melissa Teresa

2008-01-01

462

77 FR 20649 - Meeting (Webinar) of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Justice AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...2)(C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

2012-04-05

463

75 FR 17956 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Agency Information Collection Activities...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1121-0219] Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Agency...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...353-9258, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

2010-04-08

464

28 CFR 2.4 - Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents. 2.4 Section...RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States... § 2.4 Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents....

2013-07-01

465

28 CFR 2.4 - Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents. 2.4 Section...RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States... § 2.4 Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents....

2012-07-01

466

28 CFR 2.4 - Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents. 2.4 Section...RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States... § 2.4 Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents....

2014-07-01

467

28 CFR 2.4 - Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents. 2.4 Section...RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States... § 2.4 Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents....

2011-07-01

468

28 CFR 0.94 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 0.94 Section 0.94 Judicial...Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is headed by an...

2010-07-01

469

New York Correction History Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the New York Correction History Society is "to pursue, preserve and promote the history of correction services in New York." The Society helps fulfill their mission via this site which has an ample offering of institutional history, inmate art, philosophical musings, and perspectives of the role of such facilities in the history of the Empire State. The homepage is a bit busy, visually speaking, and there isn't a formal index of subjects covered within, but a bit of careful investigation will yield some rich material. Visitors will note that one of the finds here is a virtual tour of Rikers Island from 1948, and it is nestled right next to a historical essay on the jail system in Westchester County. Further down near the bottom of the homepage, visitors can learn about a 1987 coloring book titled "Getting to Know Your New York City Department of Correction". There's much more to see here, and the site does a nice job of covering the various aspects of the correctional experience.

470

77 FR 37421 - Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2012 Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2012 Correction AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS...medical care provided by Indian Health Service facilities for Calendar Year 2012 for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries of...

2012-06-21

471

28 CFR 115.288 - Data review for corrective action.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for corrective action. 115.288 Section 115.288 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Data Collection and Review §...

2014-07-01

472

28 CFR 115.288 - Data review for corrective action.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for corrective action. 115.288 Section 115.288 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Data Collection and Review §...

2012-07-01

473

28 CFR 115.288 - Data review for corrective action.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for corrective action. 115.288 Section 115.288 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Data Collection and Review §...

2013-07-01

474

Facilities Utilization Program Implementation Handbook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Facilities Utilization Program Implementation Handbook (FUPIH) prescribes procedures for the review and the reporting on the utilization of NASA facilities. The Directors of NASA Field Installations should designate an Installation Official responsible for coordinating the assignment of buildings space and implementing the facilities utilization reviews and annual report preparation. The individual designated shall be known as the 'Facilities Utilization Officer (FUO).' Functional responsibilities of the FUO are detailed in NASA Management Instruction (NMI) 7234.1. It is recognized that titles used in the implementation of the Facilities Utilization Program may vary between field installations. The Facilities Utilization Program (FUP) is designed to provide a uniform and orderly process for meeting or addressing the following objectives: the establishment of sound facilities requirements to meet NASA's programmatic and institutional needs; the optimum allocation of available facilities and related resources to meet these requirements; and the early identification and request for required additional facilities resources. The detailed review and reporting system enacted by NMI 7234.1 should encourage more comprehensive utilization planning for all NASA facilities and ensure, to the maximum extent practicable, that all such facilities are put to their highest and best use consistent with NASA programmatic and institutional priorities. A principal purpose of the FUP is the early identification of NASA facilities which may be or may become underutilized or excess to NASA needs and to provide a timely reference point from which corrective actions (i.e., consolidation, elimination of duplication, improved utilization of disposal) may be taken. Because the supply of this handbook is limited, distribution should be controlled at the field installation level.

1987-01-01

475

Manners of Speaking: Linguistic Capital and the Rhetoric of Correctness in Late-Nineteenth-Century America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of arguments appeared in the late-nineteenth-century United States about "correctness" in language, arguments for and against enforcing a standard of correctness and arguments about what should count as correct in language. Insofar as knowledge about and facility with "correct" linguistic usage could affect one's standing in the social…

Herring, William Rodney, Jr.

2009-01-01

476

FACILITY DATABASE  

Cancer.gov

January 2008 LASP FACILTY Database Form 5.000 Issue Reporting Form This form is used to report data and/or program related issues regarding the FACILITY database, Supplemental, or the LASP Online Access System. Before submitting this form,

477

Health Facilities  

MedlinePLUS

Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

478

FACILITY DATABASE  

Cancer.gov

LASP Administrative Use Only Data Entry Start Date _______________ July 2007 LASP FACILTY Database Form 1.000 FACILITY DATABASE Principal Investigator – Data Entry Requirements This form is used to identify the level of data that each investigator

479

School Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the building designs of eight school athletic and recreational facilities, including the educational contexts and design goals. Includes information on architects and designers, construction cost, size, and occupancy date. Also provides photographs. (EV)

Athletic Business, 2002

2002-01-01

480

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, received sanitary effluent from four buildings within the Test Cell ''C'' Facility from the mid-1960s through approximately 1996. The Test Cell ''C'' Facility was used to develop nuclear propulsion technology by conducting nuclear test reactor studies. Based on the site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, herbicides, gamma emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, isotopic uranium, and strontium-90. A detailed conceptual site model is presented in Section 3.0 and Appendix A of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The conceptual model serves as the basis for the sampling strategy. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

USDOE/NV

1999-05-01

481

Boots Corrections Syllabus Page 1 Corrections  

E-print Network

and prisons, alternatives to incarceration (e.g., probation and parole), capital punishment, and the public of punishment and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on correctional law, policies, practices, issues) explain the history of corrections and the rationales for punishment 2) discuss the contemporary issues

O'Toole, Alice J.

482

Spare the Cell, Spoil the Child: The History and Philosophy of American Juvenile Justice  

E-print Network

Clyde B. "Delinquency and Justice." Juvenile Delinquency.delinquency to construct a story of American juvenile justicejuvenile justice had undergone considerable change. The World Wars had made delinquency

Burton, Chase

2011-01-01

483

Exploring the Role of the Internet in Juvenile Prostitution Cases Coming to the Attention of Law Enforcement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory analysis examines the role of the Internet in juvenile prostitution cases coming to the attention of law enforcement. The National Juvenile Prostitution Study (N-JPS) collected information from a national sample of law enforcement agencies about the characteristics of juvenile prostitution cases. In comparison to non-Internet juvenile prostitution cases, Internet juvenile prostitution cases involved younger juveniles and police were

Melissa Wells; Kimberly J. Mitchell; Kai Ji

2012-01-01

484

Specificity of the juvenile hormone binding protein: The geometrical isomers of juvenile hormone I  

PubMed Central

The binding of the geometrical isomers (?99% pure) of juvenile hormone I to the hemolymph juvenile hormone binding protein of Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) was analyzed. A technique is described for isomer separation by micropreparative high-resolution liquid chromatography. Analysis of competition was performed by using a “batch adsorption” hydroxylapatite binding assay. Competition studies indicate that the naturally occurring isomer, 2E,6E,10cis, is bound with the highest affinity. Optimal binding appears to depend most heavily upon the configuration of the 2,3 double bond. Juvenile hormone binding protein shows a higher affinity for the 2E than for the 2Z configuration. The 6,7 double bond is of less importance in determining binding activity, and isomerism about the epoxide appears least important in conferring binding activity. The binding site may be a groove along the surface of the binding protein interacting with the side chains of juvenile hormone, including the ester methyl group. The grouping of the side chains and the ester methyl group thus constitutes a distinct hydrophobic face, and the hydrophobic interactions are essential in maintenance of the bound ligand. PMID:16592479

Goodman, Walter; Schooley, David A.; Gilbert, Lawrence I.

1978-01-01

485

A Guide to Our Juvenile Delinquent System: The Family Court and the Juvenile Transgressor. [Volume II].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the criminal justice system in New York City led to the publication in December 1982 of "A Guide to Our Criminal Justice System." A portion of the guide dealt with the steps involved in the arrest to disposition of a juvenile. On July 1, 1983, the New York State Legislature's Act to "Recodify the Family Court Act" went into effect. The…

Addelston, Lorraine W., Ed.

486

Health status of juvenile offenders. A survey of young offenders appearing before the juvenile courts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the health needs of a sample of juvenile offenders appearing before a Manchester Court during the month of August 1992. Of the 192 subjects interviewed (74% of those listed), 19% had significant medical problems, 42% a history of substance abuse and 7% psychiatric problems requiring further treatment. Substantial numbers (26%) engaged in a variety of dangerous

M. Dolan; J. Holloway; S. Bailey; C. Smith

1999-01-01

487

Predictors of Support for Juvenile Sex Offender Registration: Educated Individuals Recognize the Flaws of Juvenile Registration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated demographic predictors of support for juvenile sex offender registration policies, including education level, gender, political orientation, and age. Participants were 168 individuals recruited from public places in a Midwest community (45% women; M age = 42). In line with hypotheses, as education level increased, support for…

Stevenson, Margaret C.; Smith, Amy C.; Sekely, Ady; Farnum, Katlyn S.

2013-01-01

488

Community-Based Juvenile Reentry Services: The Effects of Service Dosage on Juvenile and Adult Recidivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study the authors examined the influence of length of participation in a community-based reentry program on the odds of reconviction in the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems. A structured telephone survey of reentry program alumni was conducted with 75 transition-age (18-25 year-old) young men. Binary logistic regression analysis…

Abrams, Laura S.; Terry, Diane; Franke, Todd M.

2011-01-01

489

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1 and 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the

David A. Strand

2004-01-01

490

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to

David A. Strand

2005-01-01

491

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC 1 and 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to

David A. Strand

2004-01-01

492

The real face of juvenile polyposis syndrome  

PubMed Central

Colorectal cancers are mostly sporadic; some cases of familial clustering and autosomal dominant conditions are also known to occur. Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by the mutation of the SMAD4 or the BMPR1A genes. JPS is characterized by hamartomatous polyps developing in the upper and lower intestine. Contradicting previous studies, many of these polyps can go through malignant transformation. This paper reports the case of a male patient who was continuously treated for juvenile polyposis. During the eighteen years of treatment, more than hundred polyps were endoscopically removed from his gastrointestinal tract. The patient’s care was interrupted for eight years due to insufficient compliance. He was subsequently referred to our Department of Gastroenterology in severe clinical condition caused by metastatic colorectal cancer. He died after a short palliative therapy at the age of 31. His first-degree accessible relatives were further examined for juvenile polyposis syndrome. Several gastrointestinal polyps of different histological origin were observed in the deceased patient’s brother, who subsequently had to undergo a left lateral hemicolectomy. Genetic analyses revealed mutations of the BMPR1A gene in the clinically affected brother, the brother’s daughter, and in the deceased proband’s daughter. Indebt genetic analyses helped customize and deliver care to a very specific group of individuals. We were able to identify potential family members on whom preventive care and treatment could be focused and simultaneously prevented unnecessary clinical and invasive procedures on those who were healthy. Furthermore, these analyses helped prevent future unnecessary trauma or distress on the analyzed family. PMID:23205314

Tam, Beatrix; Salamon, Ágnes; Bajtai, Attila; Németh, Annamária; Kiss, János; Simon, László

2012-01-01

493

Cerebral complications in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

A study of 170 patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and a review of the literature indicate that this disease can significantly affect the central nervous system. Signs of CNS dysfunction were observed in 13 children. During the acute toxic stages the EEG is abnormal in many cases. Other manifestations of toxic encephalopathy such as irritability, drowsiness, stupor, convulsions and marked meningismus may be evident in severe cases. Meningitis is often suspected but ruled out by the finding of normal CSF. Steroids can rapidly improve the condition of these children. If `unexplained' seizures occur during the chronic stage, the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis should be entertained. PMID:4665094

Jan, James E.; Hill, Robert H.; Low, Morton D.

1972-01-01

494

Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon during Barge Transport  

SciTech Connect

To mitigate for fish losses related to passage through the Federal Columbia River Power System, an extensive fish transportation program using barges and trucks to move fish around and downstream of dams and reservoirs was implemented in 1981. Population modeling and other analyses to support Pacific salmon recovery efforts have assumed that the survival of juvenile salmonids during the transportation experience was 98%. To estimate survival during barge transport from Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River to a release area downstream of Bonneville Dam, a distance of 470 km, we used a novel adaptation of a release-recapture model with acoustic-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) smolts. A total of 1,494 yearling Chinook salmon were surgically implanted with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponders (PIT) and divided into three groups. The three tagged groups consisted of; (1) a group which was released into the raceway with the population of fish which were later loaded into transportation barges (R{sub B}), (2) a group which was held in a net-pen suspended within the general barge population until 5-6 h prior to barge evacuation, at which time they were confirmed to be alive and then released into the general barge population (R{sub A}), and (3) to validate a model assumption, a group which was euthanized and released into the barge population 2-8 h prior to barge evacuation (R{sub D}). Six replicates of these groups were loaded onto fish transport barges that departed Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River between 29 April and 13 May, 2010. Acoustic receiver arrays between 70 and 220 km downstream of the barge evacuation site were used to detect tagged fish and served as the basis for estimation of survival within the barge. Tag-life-corrected estimates of reach survival were calculated for barged and control fish in each of the six replicate trials. The ratio of survival from release to Rkm 153 for barged fish relative to control fish provided the estimate of within-barge survival. The replicate survival estimates ranged from 0.9503 (SE = 0.0253) to 1.0003 (SE = 0.0155). The weighted average of the replicate estimates of within-barge survival was computed to be = 0.9833 (SE = 0.0062). This study provides the first documentation that assumed survival of 98% inside barges during yearling Chinook salmon smolt transport appears to be justified. Survival of other species or stocks by barge or for any species/stock by truck remains unknown.

McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Skalski, J. R.; Deters, Katherine A.

2011-12-01

495

Extinguishing All Hope: Life-without-Parole for Juveniles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sentencing juveniles to life-without-parole (JLWOP) is a practice fraught with ethical dilemmas. Through in-depth interviews with 11 men living sentences of JLWOP, their narratives of their backgrounds and experiences as juveniles were studied. Common themes were identified, and 3 general categories of cases emerged from the narratives. Ethical…

Butler, Frank

2010-01-01

496

Indirect Benefits of Marine Protected Areas for Juvenile Abalone  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine protected areas (MPAs) designed to provide harvest refugia for red sea urchins ( Strongylocen- trotus franciscanus ) offer a unique opportunity to study the indirect effects of urchin fishing on subtidal communi- ties. Sea urchins may provide important cryptic microhabitat for juvenile abalone sheltering beneath urchin spines in shallow habitats worldwide. We investigated the abundance of juvenile (3-90 mm)

Laura Rogers-Bennett; John S. Pearse

2001-01-01

497

Introduction Juvenile hormones (JHs) are a family of sesquiterpenes that  

E-print Network

Introduction Juvenile hormones (JHs) are a family of sesquiterpenes that regulate a wide spectrum to be hormones may also function as biologically ac- tive "JH".2,3) Stringent regulation of JH and ecdysteroid there is a con- current spike (of ca. 50 nM) in molting hormone, a develop- Juvenile hormone esterase

Hammock, Bruce D.

498

Natal homing in juvenile loggerhead turtles ( Caretta caretta )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile loggerhead turtles ( Caretta caretta ) from West Atlantic nesting beaches occupy oceanic (pelagic) habitats in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, whereas larger juvenile turtles occupy shallow (neritic) habitats along the continental coastline of North America. Hence the switch from oceanic to neritic stage can involve a trans-oceanic migration. Several researchers have suggested that at the end of the

BRIAN W. B OWEN; ANNA L. B ASS; SHAIO-MEI CHOW; MEREDITH BOSTROM; KAREN A. BJORNDAL; ALAN B. B OLTEN; TOSHINORI OKUYAMA; BENJAMIN M. B OLKER; SHERYAN EPPERLY; ERIN LACASELLA; DONNA SHAVER; MARK DODD; SALLY R. H OPKINS; JOHN A. M USICK; MARK SWINGLE; KAREN RANKIN-BARANSKY; WENDY TEAS; WAYNE N. W ITZELL; PETER H. D UTTON

499

Juvenile Probation Initiatives in California and Their Effects. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past ten years, probation departments across the state of California have undertaken five major initiatives aimed at juvenile offenders and at-risk youths. Although these initiatives were concomitant with reductions in juvenile arrests and other positive outcomes, we cannot definitively attribute such observed statewide trends to these…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry

2005-01-01

500

Rethinking the study of juveniles’ attitudes toward the police  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on juveniles’ attitudes toward the police has been instrumental in finding that youths generally hold less favorable opinions of the police than do adults. However, a concern is that often the exact identity of ‘the police’ is never made explicitly known to juveniles. We argue in this paper that presuming a global definition of the police is problematic because

Adam M. Watkins; Michael O. Maume

2012-01-01