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1

Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Among juvenile correctional facilities, 37 percent provided on-site substance abuse treatment and 59 percent conducted drug testing. States varied from 13 percent to 63 percent in providing onsite treatment in juvenile facilities. Facilities operated by p...

2002-01-01

2

Importation and Deprivation Explanations of Juveniles’ Adjustment to Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two theoretical explanations, importation and deprivation, are commonly used to explain inmate adjustment to the correctional environment. This study examined the relation- ship of selected importation and deprivation factors on juveniles’ anxiety levels while they were confined to institutions. Self-reported data collected from 3,986 juveniles and aggregate level data collected from interviews with administrators at 48 U.S. correctional facilities were

Angela R. Gover; Doris Layton Mackenzie; Gaylene Styve Armstrong

2000-01-01

3

Is Obesity a Problem in a Juvenile Correctional Facility?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study measured changes in body mass index (BMI) of male youths upon admission and 3 months after admission to a long-term juvenile correctional facility and identified potential causes of obesity in this population. Health records for 159 youths admitted during an 18-month period were used to calculate the BMI for each. The annual dietary assessment, standard meal plans, and

Kelly M. Robinson; Debbie Haupt-Hoffman; Barbara Stewart; Faye Schneider; Nancy Hamm; Vicki Garrison

2006-01-01

4

Juvenile Correctional Facilities. 1998 Minnesota Student Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on a voluntary survey designed to compare responses of adolescents in corrections with adolescents in public schools in 1998. Findings are highlighted in sections entitled: (1) "Youth, Their Families, and Their Environment"; (2) "Psychological Distress"; (3) "Sexual Activity"; (4) "School Perceptions"; and (5) "Antisocial and…

Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Harrison, Patricia A.; Hedger, Scott A.

5

Quality Teacher Impact on Learning in a Juvenile Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine teacher impact upon student learning at a correctional facility for adolescent boys. Improving teacher quality is directly related to the ability to produce higher levels of learning for K-12 students. Providing confirmation that teachers in correctional facilities can facilitate the learning of all…

Feinstein, Sheryl G., Ed.D.; Sorenson, David

2008-01-01

6

Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use Among Youth Entering Juvenile Correctional Facilities  

E-print Network

. Need for Alcohol and Drug TreatmentAlcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use Among Youth Entering Juvenile Correctional Facilities in Illinois: Prevalence and Treatment Need, 2000 George H. Ryan, Governor Linda Reneé Baker, Secretary U

Illinois at Chicago, University of

7

Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Youth in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This practice parameter presents recommendations for the mental health assessment and treatment of youths in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. Mental and substance-related disorders are significant public health problems affecting youths in juvenile justice settings. Sufficient time is necessary to conduct a comprehensive diagnostic assessment, in- terview collateral historians, and review pertinent records to identify primary and comorbid conditions. Potential

Christopher Thomas; William Bernet; Oscar G. Bukstein; Valerie Arnold; Joseph Beitchman; R. Scott Benson; Joan Kinlan; Jon McClellan; Jon Shaw; Saundra Stock; Louis Kraus; David Fassler; William Arroyo; Andres J. Pumariega; Diane H. Schetky

2005-01-01

8

Learning to C: Visual Arts Education as Strengths Based Practice in Juvenile Correctional Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Strength-based approaches, originating in juvenile justice as early as the late 1800s, situate the work of juvenile correctional facilities as assisting youth in utilizing their strengths and competencies to understand how they can be applied their lives to affect change and growth. While strengths-based approaches might have originated…

Oesterreich, Heather A.; Flores, Sara McNie

2009-01-01

9

Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Youth in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This practice parameter presents recommendations for the mental health assessment and treatment of youths in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. Mental and substance-related disorders are significant public health problems affecting youths in juvenile justice settings. Sufficient time is necessary to conduct a comprehensive diagnostic…

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2005

2005-01-01

10

Juvenile Corrections in the Philippines  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a discussion of the formal system of juvenile corrections in the Philippines, including laws and official procedures outlined in the juvenile code and brief descriptions of several correctional facilities located in the metropolitan area of Cagayan de Oro City. In addition, there is a discussion of another system of justice that has also been formalized by law

Donald J. Shoemaker

1997-01-01

11

Juvenile Offender Corrections Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The vocational education programs offered in Michigan's juvenile corrections institutions were reviewed. Information was collected from the following sources: review of student outcomes; student and teacher surveys; and team reviews and surveys of students at two residential training schools for juveniles (Maxley and Adrian training schools); site…

Michigan State Council on Vocational Education, Lansing.

12

The Status and Praxis of Arts Education and Juvenile Offenders in Correctional Facilities in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article briefly describes the results of a study, funded in 2001 by The National Art Education Foundation, of arts education in juvenile correctional facilities in the United States. It summarizes the results of a national survey, and it presents the Northeastern Training School* and STUDIO 200* as a model for community-based arts…

Williams, Rachel Marie-Crane

2008-01-01

13

Mental Disorders among Adolescents in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities: A Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis of 25 Surveys  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article presents a meta-analysis of all existing surveys on the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in adolescents in juvenile detention and correctional facilities in order to assess the prevalence of mental disorders. Findings indicate adolescents in detention are 10 times more likely to suffer from psychosis than the general adolescent…

Fazel, Seena; Doll, Helen; Langstrom, Niklas

2008-01-01

14

Boot camps and traditional correctional facilities for juveniles A comparison of the participants, daily activities, and environments ? ? An earlier version of this research was presented at the 1998 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology in Washington, DC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The environments of twenty-seven boot camps and twenty-two traditional facilities were examined in a national study of juvenile correctional facilities. Surveys with administrators and data from institutional files indicated that juveniles in the boot camps had less serious offending histories than did those in traditional facilities. Boot camp environments were more structured and most incorporated military basic training components. There

Angela R Gover; Doris Layton MacKenzie; Gaylene J Styve

2000-01-01

15

28 CFR 35.152 - Jails, detention and correctional facilities, and community correctional facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jails, detention and correctional facilities... Program Accessibility § 35.152 Jails, detention and correctional facilities...management of adult and juvenile justice jails, detention and correctional...

2012-07-01

16

28 CFR 35.152 - Jails, detention and correctional facilities, and community correctional facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jails, detention and correctional facilities... Program Accessibility § 35.152 Jails, detention and correctional facilities...management of adult and juvenile justice jails, detention and correctional...

2011-07-01

17

28 CFR 35.152 - Jails, detention and correctional facilities, and community correctional facilities.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jails, detention and correctional facilities... Program Accessibility § 35.152 Jails, detention and correctional facilities...management of adult and juvenile justice jails, detention and correctional...

2014-07-01

18

28 CFR 35.152 - Jails, detention and correctional facilities, and community correctional facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jails, detention and correctional facilities... Program Accessibility § 35.152 Jails, detention and correctional facilities...management of adult and juvenile justice jails, detention and correctional...

2013-07-01

19

Perceived Conditions of Confinement: A National Evaluation of Juvenile Boot Camps and Traditional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a national study of juvenile correctional facilities, the perceived environment of 22 juvenile boot camps was compared to the perceived environment of 22 traditional facilities. Self-report surveys completed by 4,121 juveniles recorded information on demographics, risk factors, and perceptions of the facility's environment. Compared to juveniles in traditional correctional facilities, boot camp residents consistently perceived the environment as significantly

Gaylene J. Styve; DorisLayton MacKenzie; Angela R. Gover; Ojmarrh Mitchell

2000-01-01

20

Prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the Texas juvenile correctional system.  

PubMed

Most studies assessing the burden of psychiatric disorders in juvenile correctional facilities have been based on small or male-only samples or have focused on a single disorder. Using electronic data routinely collected by the Texas juvenile correctional system and its contracted medical provider organization, we estimated the prevalence of selected psychiatric disorders among youths committed to Texas juvenile correctional facilities between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008 (N = 11,603). Ninety-eight percent were diagnosed with at least one of the disorders. Highest estimated prevalence was for conduct disorder (83.2%), followed by any substance use disorder (75.6%), any bipolar disorder (19.4%), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (18.3%), and any depressive disorder (12.6%). The estimated prevalence of psychiatric disorders among these youths was exceptionally high and showed patterns by sex, race/ethnicity, and age that were both consistent and inconsistent with other juvenile justice samples. PMID:22419644

Harzke, Amy Jo; Baillargeon, Jacques; Baillargeon, Gwen; Henry, Judith; Olvera, Rene L; Torrealday, Ohiana; Penn, Joseph V; Parikh, Rajendra

2012-04-01

21

Perceived conditions of confinement: a national evaluation of juvenile boot camps and traditional facilities.  

PubMed

In a national study of juvenile correctional facilities, the perceived environment of 22 juvenile boot camps was compared to the perceived environment of 22 traditional facilities. Self-report surveys completed by 4,121 juveniles recorded information on demographics, risk factors, and perceptions of the facility's environment. Compared to juveniles in traditional correctional facilities, boot camp residents consistently perceived the environment as significantly more controlled, active, and structured, and as having less danger from other residents. Boot camp juveniles also perceived the environment as providing more therapeutic and transitional programming. Overall, from the perspective of the juveniles, boot camps appear to provide a more positive environment conducive to effective rehabilitation considering almost all of the conditions measured. A major concern is that in both types of facilities, juveniles perceived themselves to occasionally be in danger from staff (rated as rarely to sometimes). PMID:10846373

Styve, G J; MacKenzie, D L; Gover, A R; Mitchell, O

2000-06-01

22

Juveniles within Adult Correctional Settings: Legal Pathways and Developmental Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing number of juvenile offenders are being processed through adult correctional systems in the United States. Changing conceptions of juvenile offenders and expansions to the criteria for juvenile transfer laws have created a number of new challenges for correctional systems, policy makers and researchers. In this article, we detail the legal mechanisms that bring adolescents into the adult system.

Jennifer L. Woolard; Candice Odgers; Lonn Lanza-Kaduce; Hayley Daglis

2005-01-01

23

Jail Pedagogy: Liberatory Education inside a California Juvenile Detention Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 2 million juveniles are arrested each year. Half are sentenced to serve terms of incarceration. Although many scholars have written about teaching in detention facilities, few directly address how prisoners are being taught. This research explores the experiences, teaching philosophy, and practices of correctional educators. To learn…

Flores, Jerry

2012-01-01

24

Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility  

PubMed Central

The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once under instructions to fake good (FG). Under SI, substance scales correctly classified about 60% to 85% of adolescents. Under FG, substance- and non-substance-abusing juveniles produced lower scores on substance scales. However, the Lie Scale (L) was able to detect more than 75% of deceptive profiles and about 77% of honest profiles. When scale L and the best substance scale were used in combination, only about 18% of faking substance abusers were not identified as either substance abusers or as underreporting. For feigning substance abusers, only about 10% of substance abusers were detected, with about 72% being categorized as faking and needing further assessment. PMID:15695741

Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

2010-01-01

25

The Comparative Risk of Mistreatment for Juveniles in Detention Facilities and State Prisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little research exists on the prevalence of victimization among young people in juvenile correctional facilities and adult jails and prisons. The limited extant research suggests that youth incarcerated in adult prisons and jails are at greater risk for physical and sexual abuse (Redding, 1999) compared to both adult inmates in the same facilities and youths in juvenile detention centers. Yet

Lacey Levitt

2010-01-01

26

Intensive Reading Instruction in Juvenile Correctional Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite 60 years of evidence linking juvenile illiteracy and delinquency, practitioners and policymakers have been painfully slow in the implementation of evidence-based reading interventions for incarcerated juveniles. We will present the Texas Juvenile Justice Tiered Instructional Model, an evidence-based reading program model created…

Williams, Jacob L.; Wexler, Jade; Roberts, Greg; Carpenter, Clint

2011-01-01

27

Students with Disabilities in Correctional Facilities. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This digest presents the major findings of a national survey of public and private facilities and state agencies on the prevalence of youth with disabilities in juvenile and adult correctional facilities in the United States and the educational and related services offered to them. Findings include: (1) a preliminary estimate of the prevalence of…

Quinn, Mary M.; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr.; Leone, Peter E.

28

Measuring treatment motivation in secure juvenile facilities.  

PubMed

The present study examined the validity and reliability of the Adolescent Treatment Motivation Questionnaire (ATMQ) in a sample of 264 adolescents in Dutch secure juvenile facilities. Confirmatory factor analysis of a single-factor model of "treatment motivation" showed a close fit to the data, indicating construct validity of the ATMQ. Concurrent validity was supported by significant relations between treatment motivation and living group climate. Internal consistency reliability in terms of Cronbach's alpha was good (.84). The ATMQ proved to be insensitive to the tendency to provide socially acceptable or desirable answers, which supports discriminant validity, and was unrelated to sex, age, and self-reported aggression of the adolescents. The ATMQ is a parsimonious instrument (11 items) enabling future research on treatment motivation in secure juvenile facilities. PMID:22627687

Van der Helm, G H P; Wissink, I B; De Jongh, T; Stams, G J J M

2013-08-01

29

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

30

Juveniles within Adult Correctional Settings: Legal Pathways and Developmental Considerations  

E-print Network

An increasing number of juvenile offenders are being processed through adult correctional systems in the United States. Changing conceptions of juvenile offenders and expansions to the criteria for juvenile transfer laws have created a number of new challenges for correctional systems, policy makers and researchers. In this article, we detail the legal mechanisms that bring adolescents into the adult system. Basic profiles of juveniles in adult settings are constructed and the unique challenges posed by this population of offenders are discussed. Issues related to the safety and management of juveniles within the adult system are evaluated within a developmental framework. Finally, we examine research and policy implications that emerge when a significant number of juveniles are required to spend their formative years of adolescence in an environment designed for adults. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the rate of violent crime among juveniles peaked and the image of juveniles as dangerous and out of control led to an expansion of mechanisms for processing and incarcerating youth within the United States adult criminal justice system. The number of

unknown authors

31

Juvenile sex offenders: development and correction.  

PubMed

This paper addresses the developmental nature of sexually abusive behaviors as they apply to juvenile male sexual offenders. Socialization and sexual victimization are discussed. Three case histories elucidate and support the discussion of the development of victim offending. Significant treatment issues of juvenile male sexual offenders center around the sexual assault cycle which provides a framework for sexual offenders to conceptualize and understand the cognitive, behavioral, psychological, and situational factors which have resulted in their offense(s). Although sexual offenders and sexual offenses are each unique, the sexual assault cycle offers a means of addressing essential commonalities in the treatment of juvenile sexual offenders. Sexual offender specific treatment is viewed as essential for decreasing the risk of further sexual offenses, and thus decreasing the incidence of sexual victimization. PMID:3676895

Ryan, G; Lane, S; Davis, J; Isaac, C

1987-01-01

32

Program Evaluation of Educational Programs. Wisconsin's Juvenile Corrections Schools at Lincoln Hills and Ethan Allen.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation was conducted of the educational programs and facilities at two male juvenile corrections schools in Wisconsin (Ethan Allen and Lincoln Hills). Surveys were developed in cooperation with administrative personnel at both schools and given to all students, instructors, and support staff. A total of 573 students, 76 teachers, and 140…

Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

33

From High School to Juvenile Corrections: The Downward Spiral  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) require pervasive supports that are typically addressed through behavior intervention plans. This article illustrates one student's ("Mark") journey from the general education high school campus, to an alternative discipline campus, and subsequent placement at a juvenile corrections setting. Also,…

Rueter, Jessica A.; Trice, John Nathan

2011-01-01

34

Juvenile Correctional Workers' Perceptions of Suicide Risk Factors and Mental Health Issues of Incarcerated Juveniles  

PubMed Central

Correctional staff knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of incarcerated juveniles' mental health needs, including suicide prevention, have not been studied empirically. This study measured juvenile correctional officers' knowledge and attitudes regarding suicide risk factors and mental health and substance abuse issues through administration of the Mental Health Knowledge and Attitude Test (MHKAT) before and after a staff training on suicide prevention. Seventy-six participants completed the pre- and post-training MHKAT. They demonstrated significant improvement in knowledge of and attitudes toward mental health treatment of incarcerated youth as reflected by higher post-training MHKAT scores. Findings suggest that correctional staff are receptive to increasing knowledge of critical mental health issues. Studies of the retention and implementation of this new knowledge by direct care staff over time and the optimal type and frequency of new staff training and continuing education are indicated. PMID:19809578

Penn, Joseph V.; Esposito, Christianne; Stein, L. A. R.; Lacher-Katz, Molly; Spirito, Anthony

2009-01-01

35

76 FR 11337 - Presidential Library Facilities; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NARA-07-0005] RIN 3095-AA82 Presidential Library Facilities; Correction AGENCY: National...and design standards for Presidential libraries and information required in NARA's...facility, and equipment as a Presidential library. DATES: This regulation is...

2011-03-02

36

The Metamorphosis of Juvenile Correctional Education: Incidental Conception to Intentional Inclusion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile Correctional Education has been evolving in the United States for over 360 years. From inclusion in an indentured servant/foster care type of placement legislated in the Massachusetts Colony in 1642, it has become manifest today as an entitlement regardless of juvenile justice disposition. The education for juveniles was wrapped in the…

Keeley, James H.

2004-01-01

37

Juvenile Corrections and the Exceptional Student. ERIC Digest #E509.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This digest summarizes available information on the educational needs of disabled youth in correctional facilities. The high incidence of disabilities among incarcerated youth is noted and explanations are offered (e.g., they may not be recognized as disabled). The following topics are addressed: entitlement of youths with disabilities in…

Leone, Peter E.; And Others

38

Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities  

SciTech Connect

For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned new construction at other facilities.

Crist, D. [Minnesota Department of Corrections, St. Paul, MN (United States); Spencer, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31

39

Plato and Rawls on Correctional Rehabilitation of Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adopting the perspectives of two innovators in Western thought, Plato and Rawis, this article addresses the issues of juvenile offenders' rehabilitation and consent. These philosophers have been chosen because they accept as an axiom society's obligation to offer offenders the chance to be rehabilitated. Furthermore, they both emphasize the need to develop reason and cognitive structures as a precondition for

Brenda Geiger

1996-01-01

40

Do staff attitudes vary by position?: A look at one juvenile correctional center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Correctional staff are a vital part of an inmate’s institutional experience. Prior research suggests interaction between staff\\u000a and inmates may be a function of worker attitudes toward crime and punishment. The current study examines attitudes about\\u000a crime causation and punishment by surveying correctional staff members at a single-purpose juvenile treatment center. Correctional\\u000a officers and treatment personnel exhibit different levels of

Jill A. Gordon

1999-01-01

41

Evaluation Process and Outcome in Juvenile Corrections: Musings on a Grim Tale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a review of some of the issues, dilemmas, and constraints in the evaluation of juvenile corrections. Included are such problems as: (1) adequate assessment criteria; (2) insufficient controls in experimental designs; (3) the conflict between humaneness and effectiveness; and (4) the measurement of program goals. A critique of six…

Sarri, Rosemary C.; Selo, Elaine

42

Juvenile Incarceration and the Pains Of Imprisonment  

Microsoft Academic Search

After legislatures criminalized a major portion of juvenile delinquency in the 1980s and 1990s, large numbers of incarcerated youth began serving their sentences in adult correctional facilities. To understand the ramifications of this practice, prior research studies compared the correctional experiences of youth in juvenile and adult facilities. Yet this research often minimized the pains of imprisonment for youth in

Jeffrey Fagan; Aaron Kupchik

2011-01-01

43

Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Correctional Facilities: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is estimated that up to one-fourth of the people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States pass through a correctional facility each year. The majority of persons who enter a correctional facility today will return home in the near future. Most inmates with HIV infection acquire it in the outside community; prison does not seem

Anne Spaulding; Becky Stephenson; Grace Macalino; William Ruby; Jennifer G. Clarke; Timothy P. Flanigan

2002-01-01

44

Treatment of Moderately Intellectually Disabled Delinquent Youth in a Dutch Juvenile Justice Facility with Closed and Open Units  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article will focus on a juvenile justice facility in the Netherlands, targeted at moderately intellectually disabled juveniles, who are sentenced because of serious crimes. All of the juveniles have a disruptive disorder (conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder) and 70% have comorbid psychiatric classifications. Treatment amounts to…

Lodewijks, Henny P. B.

2011-01-01

45

Adolescent Psycopathology Scale As A Screener For Incoming Juveniles Within Residential Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study examined the utility of the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale - Short Form (APS-SF) as a screening instrument for assessment of the mental health needs of incoming juveniles within a Department of Juvenile Justice residential facility. The APS-SF was compared to a well-validated, semi-structured diagnostic interview, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Diagnoses (KID-SCID), within a sample of 50

Catherine Hardee Drew

2009-01-01

46

Risk Factors for Chlamydia Among Young Women in a Northern California Juvenile Detention Facility: Implications for Community Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives\\/Goal: Chlamydia infections are increasing in California, with rates highest in young women aged 15 to 24. Juvenile detention facilities are important venues for screening high-risk youth who may not otherwise access care. We, therefore, sought to identify risk factors for urogenital chlamydia among young women in a county juvenile detention facility between 2002 and 2005. Study Design: With the

Diana D. Mcdonnell; Vivian Levy; Theresa J. M. Morton

2009-01-01

47

Trauma Affect Regulation Psychoeducation Group and Milieu Intervention Outcomes in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports outcomes of Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET), a group and milieu intervention, in three juvenile detention facilities, controlling for site, length of stay, ethnicity, number of arrests, mental health and traumatic stress problems, and cohort effects. Linear multiple regression results showed that every session of TARGET received in the first seven days of

Julian D. Ford; Josephine Hawke

2012-01-01

48

Educational Faculty Perceptions of the Learning Climate in a Juvenile Justice Residential Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The majority of educational faculty from a juvenile justice residential detention facility in rural Northeast Missouri who participated in a learning climate survey of their school seemed to agree that the environment for staff and students was generally physically safe and emotionally supportive; key factors for a positive learning climate. By…

Cox, Carolyn; Visker, Joseph; Hartman, Ashley

2011-01-01

49

Special Education in Juvenile Residential Facilities: Can Animals Help?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with emotional\\/behavioral disorders (EBD) are arguably one of the highest at-risk groups for dropping out before graduating high school. They are the group of students with disabilities who are most likely to be educated in residential facilities. Residential facilities such as Green Chimneys have incorporated animals into the treatment milieu with success. Animals have been used in various settings

Sally E. Thigpen; Stephanie K. Ellis; Rebecca G. Smith

50

Newly Identified HIV Infections in Correctional Facilities, United States, 2007  

PubMed Central

We used Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV Counseling and Testing System data from 2007 to determine the percentage and characteristics of persons newly identified as HIV-positive in US correctional facilities. The newly identified HIV positivity was 0.7%, and 30% of detainees newly identified with HIV were categorized as having low-risk heterosexual contact or no acknowledged risk. Correctional facilities should provide detainees with routine opt-out HIV testing, unless the prevalence of previously undiagnosed HIV infection has been documented to be less than 0.1%. PMID:22401522

Beltrami, John F.; MacGowan, Robin J.; Borkowf, Craig B.; Margolis, Andrew D.

2012-01-01

51

Stress and Satisfaction among Juvenile Correctional Workers: A Test of Competing Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the past three decades, there have been increasing investigations of correctional employees' reactions to their work, especially in terms of job-related stress and satisfaction. The vast majority of this research, however, has been conducted in adult facilities. To help address this limitation in the literature, we use a secondary dataset…

Blevins, Kristie R.; Cullen, Francis T.; Frank, James; Sundt, Jody L.; Holmes, Stephen T.

2006-01-01

52

High School Education in Correctional Facilities. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of "Get tough on crime" and "Three strikes" in the 1980s and 1990s, correctional facilities have become overloaded with prisoners who are often repeat offenders. 51% of those imprisoned have a GED or high school diploma. Out of the remaining 49%, 36% of inmates had not completed the ninth grade and approximately a quarter of them…

Walker, Karen

2006-01-01

53

Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents: Profiles of Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An exploratory study of resiliency profiles of male and female juvenile offenders committed to a juvenile correctional facility was conducted. The goal of the present study was to examine juvenile offenders' positive characteristics (e.g., adaptability, optimism, self-efficacy, tolerance of differences). To assess positive characteristics and…

Mowder, Melissa H.; Cummings, Jack A.; McKinney, Robert

2010-01-01

54

[Temperament and character-traits as protective factors among adolescents in juvenile residential facilities].  

PubMed

Although adolescents in juvenile residential facilities are at high risk for mental disorders, not all of these adolescents develop psychiatric symptoms. The aim of our study was to define traits protecting these adolescents. A total of 314 adolescents of 20 juvenile residential facilities were examined using standardized assessment instruments (Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI)). Educators of the facilities filled out a sociodemographic questionnaire for each participant. Adolescents were divided into two groups (resilient vs. mental problems) by CBCL-Cut-off-Scores. Analyses were based on these two groups. Resilient youth differed from youth with psychiatric symptoms in temperament- and character-traits (e. g. self-directedness F = 28.4, p < .001, d = 0.64) with small to moderate effect sizes (d = 0.36 to 0.64). Resilient adolescents lived in larger facilities (U = 9080, p = .025). No associations were found between gender and resilience, as well as age at placement in the facility and duration of the stay in the facility and resilience. Significant differences in temperament- and character-traits between resilient adolescents and adolescents with mental problems were identified. Especially character-traits could be a basis for developing strategies for promoting mental health and further resilience factors, as social support. PMID:24693806

Witt, Andreas; Schmid, Marc; Fegert, Jörg M; Plener, Paul L; Goldbeck, Lutz

2014-01-01

55

Validation of Blockage Interference Corrections in the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A validation test has recently been constructed for wall interference methods as applied to the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The goal of this study was to begin to address the uncertainty of wall-induced-blockage interference corrections, which will make it possible to address the overall quality of data generated by the facility. The validation test itself is not specific to any particular modeling. For this present effort, the Transonic Wall Interference Correction System (TWICS) as implemented at the NTF is the mathematical model being tested. TWICS uses linear, potential boundary conditions that must first be calibrated. These boundary conditions include three different classical, linear. homogeneous forms that have been historically used to approximate the physical behavior of longitudinally slotted test section walls. Results of the application of the calibrated wall boundary conditions are discussed in the context of the validation test.

Walker, Eric L.

2007-01-01

56

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions on the Umatilla River; 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from October 1993 through September 1994 in evaluating juvenile salmonid bypass facilities and juvenile salmonid passage through ladder facilities, and investigating passage conditions for juvenile fish at diversion dam facilities on the lower Umatilla River in northeastern Oregon. We also report on our progress in evaluating adult salmonid passage at and between dams on the lower Umatilla River and upriver migration using radio telemetry. Two principal studies are also included. Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile salmonid bypass facilities a Feed and Furnish canals, juvenile salmonid passage through fish ladders at Stanfield, Feed Canal, Westland, and Three Mile Falls dams, and the juvenile salmonid trap and haul procedures at Westland Canal. To investigate passage conditions at all passage facilities. Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids past diversions in the lower Umatilla River and their movement in the upper river after transport, using radio telemetry, and to assess factors for successful homing. These studies are part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

Knapp, Suzanne M.

1995-01-01

57

Juveniles in Adult Prisons and Jails: A National Assessment. Monograph.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of youth under 18 confined to adult prisons has more than doubled in the past decade. A nationwide study of juveniles in adult correctional facilities was undertaken to help policymakers form an effective response to this situation. The study determined the extent of juvenile confinement in facilities around the country. It also…

Austin, James; Johnson, Kelly Dedel; Gregoriou, Maria

58

The Ohio Department of Youth Services Juvenile Prison Library System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article is an introduction to The Ohio Department of Youth Services librarians and the services they provide. Information about each juvenile prison facility is revealed and provides an explanation of guidelines and standards for prison libraries. Sixty-eight questions were asked in four in-person interviews to present a profile of the librarians working within juvenile correctional facility high schools and

Deidra N. Herring

2009-01-01

59

Juvenile Sexual Offending: Causes, Consequences, and Correction. New and Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comprehensive resource on juvenile sexual offense, this book provides information on the abused and the abuser, and on the cycle of abuse and appropriate treatment. Part 1 provides an overview of "The Problem of Juvenile Sexual Offending," including: (1) "Sexually Abusive Youth: Defining the Population" (G. Ryan); and (2) "Incidence and…

Ryan, Gail, Ed.; Lane, Sandy, Ed.

60

Turbine Passage of Juvenile and Adult Fish at a Warmwater Hydroelectric Facility in Northeastern Oklahoma: Monitoring Associated with Relicensing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimated annual turbine passage rates and susceptibilities of juvenile and adult fish at the Pensacola Dam hydroelectric facility on Grand Lake O' the Cherokees (Grand Lake) in northeastern Oklahoma as part of the relicensing of the facility. Our study was purposefully exploratory in that its primary objective was to determine if turbine passage of valuable fishes was sufficient to

Kent M. Sorenson; William L. Fisher; Alexander V. Zale

1998-01-01

61

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. This 1993 annual report details scheduled maintenance and other projects carried out during the year.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1994-05-01

62

Community College Education in a Juvenile Residential Treatment Facility: A Case Study of the Academic Achievement of Incarcerated Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Development Under College Level Outreach and Extension Program (D.U.C.L.O.U.X.) was an educational program designed to increase the level of quality education received by incarcerated juveniles. The objective was to provide an advanced level of education, in the form of basic level community college courses, to academically challenge responsible incarcerated juveniles and reduce the risk of recidivism. The D.U.C.L.O.U.X. program

Kelli DuCloux

2003-01-01

63

The Voices of Youth: Perspectives and Recommendations from Young Adults Involved in Juvenile Corrections. Information Brief. Volume 5, Issue 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief describes two exceptional model programs for adjudicated youth with disabilities: Woodland Hills Residential Facility in Duluth, Minnesota and the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Walter McGinnis High School in Red Wing, Minnesota. The brief shares best practices from research about these programs as well as insight, commentary, and…

Stenhjem, Pam

2006-01-01

64

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1989 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and

Peter T. Lofy; Gerald D. Rowan

1990-01-01

65

Juvenile Correction Education: A Review of Current Literature. Technical Assistance Bulletin No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin reports the results of a review of research about the educational process used in detention and training schools to identify elements that would assist in adapting law-related education (LRE) materials and strategies to juvenile justice settings. Findings and recommendations are summarized according to the following categories: goals…

Rider-Hankins, Peg

66

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from October 1991 through September 1992 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls and Westland dams on the Umatilla River. We also report on our progress from October 1991 through June 1992 in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). These are the study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR: (1) Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile fish bypass facility in the West Extension Irrigation District Canal at Three Mile Falls Dam and document juvenile salmonid passage through the juvenile fish bypass facility and east-bank adult fish ladder. To measure velocity and develop trap designs at Westland Dam. (2) Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

Knapp, Suzanne M.

1993-03-01

67

Metamorphosis: How Missouri Rehabilitates Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juveniles convicted of serious offenses usually end up in large correctional facilities that focus on punishment--not rehabilitation. The state of Missouri, however, has found a better way to help end the cycle of crime: by creating a network of small facilities that provide therapy and educational opportunities, it has dramatically reduced…

Dubin, Jennifer

2012-01-01

68

Restructuring Juvenile Corrections in California: A Report to the State Legislature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth corrections in California is at a crossroads. In response to the near universal recognition of California's failed approach to youth corrections, Governor Schwarzenegger, with support from the California Legislature, has launched one of the largest restructuring initiatives of youth corrections in state history. Reforms currently underway…

Nadel-Hayes, Sele; Macallair, Daniel

2005-01-01

69

Community Treatment Programs for Juveniles: A Best-Evidence Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A significant challenge facing the juvenile justice system is the task of transitioning and reintegrating juveniles from youth corrections facilities back into the community. This challenge, in part, is related to determining whether the referred community programs are effective. This article summarizes the literature on the effectiveness of…

Underwood, Lee A.; von Dresner, Kara Sandor; Phillips, Annie L.

2006-01-01

70

Listening to Juvenile Offenders: Can Residential Treatment Prevent Recidivism?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores clients’ perspectives on their treatment in two different residential correctional facilities for juvenile male offenders. Although a wealth of literature has investigated risk factors for recidivism, little is known about how youth offenders experience the treatment or deterrence aspects of institutional confinement. Through an ethnographic study of two correctional facilities and in-depth interviews with 19 young men,

Laura S. Abrams

2006-01-01

71

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1990. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. Two of the Minthorn and all of the Bonifer pond outlet screens were replaced with vertical bars to alleviate clogging problems. A horizontal bar screen was installed in the water control structure at the largest spring at Bonifer to prevent fish from migrating upstream during acclimation. A pipe was installed under the railroad tracks at Bonifer to make unloading of fish from transport trucks easier and safer. The Minthorn access road was repaired to provide better access for delivery of fish to the facility and for general operations and maintenance.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1991-07-01

72

77 FR 63849 - Facility Security Officer Training Requirements; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG-2012-0908] Facility Security Officer Training Requirements...the development of a Facility Security Officer training program. The notice contains an inaccurate Internet link to RSVP for the...

2012-10-17

73

Operation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1987 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1987.

Lofy, Peter T.

1988-12-01

74

Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1988.

Lofy, Peter T.

1989-12-01

75

Motivational Interviewing Training for Juvenile Correctional Staff in California: One Year Initial Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports initial results of a program designed to train California corrections staff (n = 576) in motivational interviewing (MI), a method of communication that is based on a client-centered, collaborative style. After three days of training, participants made significant gains in terms of knowledge of MI principles and reflective…

Hohman, Melinda; Doran, Neal; Koutsenok, Igor

2009-01-01

76

Pit-Tag Studies with Juvenile Salmonids at the Chandler Canal Fish Collection Facility, Yakima River : Annual Report 1990.  

SciTech Connect

Juvenile salmonid survival studies planned for the Yakima Basin will require the release and recapture of large numbers of marked fish. Before these studies can be implemented, information is needed about potential recovery rates of marked fish at proposed sampling sites. The type of mark employed and the efficiency of the equipment used to capture and examine fish for marks must be evaluated since accurate survival estimates depend on their reliability. Recovery rates are expected to vary with species and life stage as well as environmental factors such as river flow and water temperature. The purpose of this study was to assess the mark-recovery capabilities of the Chandler facility and a mobile juvenile fish trap installed temporarily at West Richland, Washington near the mouth of the Yakima River.

Ruehle, Thomas E.; McCutcheon, Clinton Scott

1994-09-01

77

28 CFR 115.388 - Data review for corrective action.  

...for corrective action. 115.388 Section 115.388 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Data Collection and Review § 115.388 Data...

2014-07-01

78

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01

79

76 FR 55256 - Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt Bond Purposes; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...on the definition of solid waste disposal facilities for purposes of the rules applicable to tax-exempt bonds issued...governments that issue tax-exempt bonds to finance...and to taxpayers that use those facilities...that are the subject of this correction...

2011-09-07

80

Correctional facilities as partners in reducing HIV disparities.  

PubMed

The United States now has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The majority of prison and jail inmates come from predominantly nonwhite and medically underserved communities. Although incarceration has adverse effects on both individual and community health, prisons and jails have also been used successfully as venues to provide health services to people with HIV who frequently lack stable health care. We review demographic trends shaping the difficulties in providing care to incarcerated people with HIV and recommend the Centers for AIDS Research Collaboration on HIV in Corrections as a model of interdisciplinary collaboration in addressing those difficulties. PMID:23673887

Rich, Josiah D; DiClemente, Ralph; Levy, Judith; Lyda, Karen; Ruiz, Monica S; Rosen, David L; Dumont, Dora

2013-06-01

81

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1993-08-01

82

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document.

C. M. Obi

2000-12-01

83

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1990-1991 Progress Reports  

SciTech Connect

We report on our effort from October 1990 through March 1991 to prepare for the evaluation of the juvenile fish bypass facility in the West Extension Irrigation District Canal at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. We also report on our preliminary activities to prepare for future evaluations at Maxwell and Westland diversion dams. A detailed sampling plan was written to guide our efforts in the evaluation process and associated preparatory activities were conducted. In the sampling plan, we developed experimental designs for evaluating the passage of juvenile salmonids through the bypass system including the evaluation at design flow of injury and mortality rates, and passage of juvenile salmonids through and over the screens. We designed and fabricated fish nets for screen leakage tests, and holding facilities for test fish. Modifications to improve evaluation activities were incorporated into the collection facility, and our sampling gear. We designed and fabricated collection systems for the juvenile fish bypass facilities at Maxwell and Westland diversion dams. Preliminary monitoring of system operation was performed at Westland Diversion Dam. We offer recommendations for improving preparations and designs of future evaluations, and also recommend that a detailed evaluation of the Maxwell and Westland juvenile facilities, including evaluation of fish condition and fish passage through or over the screens, be conducted.

Knapp, Suzanne M.

1992-06-01

84

The Effects of Two Types of Exposure on Attitudes toward Aspects of Juvenile Delinquency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tracks the attitude changes of a group of abnormal psychology students following a tour of a juvenile correctional facility and a presentation by four of the inmates. A 25-item semantic differential scale revealed a noticeable improvement in the students' attitudes towards juvenile delinquents after the visit. (MJP)

LeUnes, Arnold; And Others

1996-01-01

85

Suicide and Deliberate Self-injurious Behavior in Juvenile Correctional Facilities: A Review  

PubMed Central

Objective: Describe the rates of suicidal ideation, self-injury, and suicide among detained youth as well as risk factors and preventive measures that have been attempted. Method: Literature searches in PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Social Science Citation Index were undertaken to identify published studies written in English. Governmental data was also included from English-speaking nations. Results: The adjusted risk of suicide was 3 to 18 times higher than age-matched controls. The prevalence of lifetime suicidal ideation ranged from 16.9% to 59% while lifetime self-injury ranged from 6.2% to 44%. Affective disorders, borderline personality traits, substance use disorders, impulse control disorders, and anxiety disorders were associated with suicidal thoughts and self-injury. Screening for suicidal ideation upon entry was associated with a decreased rate of suicide. Conclusions: All youth should be screened upon admission. Identified co-morbid disorders should also be treated. PMID:23667357

Casiano, Hygiea; Katz, Laurence Y.; Globerman, Daniel; Sareen, Jitender

2013-01-01

86

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

NONE

1997-10-01

87

The Effect of Music Therapy on Executive Function Skills in Male, Incarcerated Adults in a Correctional Facility  

E-print Network

The Recidivism Problem.....................................................................................................5 Executive Function and Criminality...................................................................................8 Current... the county jail in which the study took place. ‘Corrections’ involve the community supervision, confinement and rehabilitation of adults and juveniles convicted of offenses and the confinement of individuals awaiting trial or adjudication (Kyckelhahn, 2012...

Ellis, Elisha

2014-05-31

88

Juvenile Confinement in Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

Mendel, Richard A.

2012-01-01

89

Perceptions of German prison officials while visiting American correctional facilities: an example of a fruitful international collaboration.  

PubMed

In June 2007, a group of 15 prison psychologists, social workers, wardens, and correctional administrators from across Germany visited the northeast United States for the purpose of conducting tours of various kinds of correctional facilities. The trip was organized through a collaborative effort from the authors over a period of 2 years. This article describes the correctional facilities visited and observations made by the Germans during their correctional facility tours and will focus on the similarities and differences between the German and American correctional systems. The article clearly reflects how international academic collaborations can provide a variety of benefits for those willing to physically venture beyond boarders. PMID:20656898

Dammer, Harry R; Bindzus, Dieter; Martens, Harald

2011-10-01

90

Role Model for a Psychological Counselor in a Rehabilitation-Oriented Correctional Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a reason to believe that rehabilitation-oriented facilities have not reached their full potential as correctional institutions. Moreover, the failure to do so seems related, at least in part, to a lack of sufficient treatment personnel to help sustain functioning at an optimum level. If this is so, the psychological counselor can be of significant use to these institutions.

Richard E. Lawrence; George W. Krieger; Loy O. Bascue

1977-01-01

91

AIDS in correctional facilities: Current status of legal issues critical to policy development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Administrators of correctional facilities have created specific policies directed toward detecting and controlling health risks created by inmates who are infected with the HIV virus or who have AIDS. This article examines the legal issues that influence the development and implementation of those policies. It discusses the constitutionality of testing and segregation and the reasons currently advanced for each of

Susan Jacobs

1995-01-01

92

78 FR 45983 - Acceptability of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a Corrective Action Program (CAP), voluntarily submitted by...describe elements of an acceptable CAP for fuel cycle facilities. DATES...NRC's PDR, Room O1-F21, One White Flint North, 11555 Rockville...determines that the licensee's CAP is effective, the licensee...

2013-07-30

93

Scoring the Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank-High School Form in Facility Placed Male Juvenile Delinquents: Maladjustment or Artifact of Placement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank (ISB):High School Form has been used to distinguish between normal and abnormal adolescents, it has been hypothesized that in facility placed juvenile delinquents' highly conflictual responses (i.e., those that index maladjustment) reflect removal from home and agency placement rather than long-term…

Noonan, John R.; Von, Judith M.

94

Comparing State- Versus Facility-Level Effects on Crowding in U.S. Correctional Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on prison crowding underscores the potential importance of both state- and facility-level effects on crowding, although empirical research has not assessed these relative effects because of the sole focus on states as units of analysis. This article describes findings from bi-level analyses of crowding across 459 state-operated…

Steiner, Benjamin; Wooldredge, John

2008-01-01

95

28 CFR 115.377 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...contractors and volunteers. 115.377 Section 115.377 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Discipline § 115.377 Corrective action for...

2013-07-01

96

28 CFR 115.377 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...contractors and volunteers. 115.377 Section 115.377 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Discipline § 115.377 Corrective action for...

2012-07-01

97

Prevalence and screening of mental disorders in short-term correctional facilities.  

PubMed

A majority of people incarcerated in correctional facilities have been affected by mental problems at least once in their lifetime. Among them, 12 to 25% suffer from severe and persistent mental disorders at the time of admission. Certain "profiles" are more likely to be detected than others. This is why the main objectives of this research are to establish, in both male and female offenders admitted in short-term detention facilities, the rate of those who have received medical diagnoses of mental disorders, the rate of screening for "mental health problems" at admission and the psychiatric diagnoses (last five years) most strongly associated with a positive screening. Using computerized medical and prison files, it can be established that 61% of the 671 offenders sent to a short-term correctional facility received, during 2002-2007, at least one diagnosis for mental disorder. A total of 227 subjects (33.8%) obtained a positive score to the indicator of mental health problem." In the case of men, correctional services workers identified as mental health problems: psychotic disorders, adjustment reactions, "neurotic"/anxiety disorders, being coupled to drug dependence. Positively detected women tend to exhibit problems of anxiety, personality disorder and substance related disorders. This study highlights, the difficulties faced by correctional services workers in detecting recent depressive disorders both in men and women offenders and also difficulties to detect recent affective psychoses. PMID:20079534

Lafortune, Denis

2010-01-01

98

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1989. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. An automatic dialing system was incorporated into the alarm system at the Minthorn facility. A security company has replaced the function of the Umatilla Tribal Police which was to contact fisheries personnel in case of an alarm. The configuration of the alarm system was upgraded to activate the alarm faster and provide better access to project personnel with a pager system. A survey was completed in 1988 by Thomas Bumstead of Albrook Hydraulics Lab in Pullman, WA. to determine potential measures to address the change in course of the Umatilla River around Minthorn as a result of the flood of 1986. Options and recommendations were submitted in a report in 1989. Fish Management Consultants Inc. submitted the final reports of evaluations for both the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities. A total of 150 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from December through March and held at Minthorn. Forty-two pairs were spawned (37 pairs from Minthorn and 5 pairs collected and immediately spawned at Threemile Dam). The 241,682 eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and later moved to Oak Springs Hatchery for rearing. An estimated 368 adult hatchery steelhead returned to the Umatilla River in 1988-89 (based on Threemile Dam trap counts and harvest below Threemile Dam) these, and 349 were released upriver. Of seven returned to the Bonifer trap where the smolts were initially released. Acclimation of 79,984 spring chinook salmon and 22,274 steelhead was completed at Bonifer in spring of 1989. At Minthorn, 157,299 coho salmon and 29,852 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Acclimation of 78,825 fall chinook salmon at Minthorn and 80,750 spring chinook salmon completed in the fall. at Bonifer was successfully Control groups were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1989 and 1990. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon, two experiments for spring chinook salmon (spring and fall releases) and one experiment for summer steelhead were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the juvenile salmonid trap located at Westland Diversion. Because the fish in each release were not uniquely fish size and migration timing were used to discern general trends. Data suggested that juvenile salmonids started showing up at the trap 4 days after release until July 14, when sampling was discontinued. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids to test summer steelhead broodstock from the Umatilla River for monitoring purposes and to certify eggs as pathogen-free.

Lofy, Peter T.; Rowan, Gerald D.

1990-03-01

99

Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective action alternatives to the 'no-action' alternative, as the basis for the Draft Corrective Action Decision for the site. The history and nature of the contamination and previous investigations are summarized in Section 2. Also included in Section 2 is an evaluation of human and environmental targets and potential exposure pathways. Section 3 describes the corrective action goals and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). Section 4 describes four alternatives, Section 5 analyzes the alternatives in detail, and Section 6 compares the alternatives. Section 6 also includes a summary and a recommended corrective action.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-04-20

100

Ongoing Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Among Inmates at a State Correctional Facility  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We sought to determine hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence, associated exposures, and incidence among male inmates at a state correctional facility. Methods. A cross-sectional serological survey was conducted in June 2000, and susceptible inmates were retested in June 2001. Results. At baseline, 230 inmates (20.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=18.2%, 22.9%) exhibited evidence of HBV infection, including 11 acute and 11 chronic infections. Inmates with HBV infection were more likely than susceptible inmates to have injected drugs (38.8% vs 18.0%; adjusted prevalence odds ratio [OR]=3.0; 95% CI=1.9, 4.9), to have had more than 25 female sex partners (27.7% vs 17.5%; adjusted prevalence OR=2.0; 95% CI=1.4, 3.0), and to have been incarcerated for more than 14 years (38.4% vs 17.6%; adjusted prevalence OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.1, 2.6). One year later, 18 (3.6%) showed evidence of new HBV infection. Among 19 individuals with infections, molecular analysis identified 2 clusters involving 10 inmates, each with a unique HBV sequence. Conclusions. We documented ongoing HBV transmission at a state correctional facility. Similar transmission may occur at other US correctional facilities and could be prevented by vaccination of inmates. PMID:16186457

Khan, Amy J.; Simard, Edgar P.; Bower, William A.; Wurtzel, Heather L.; Khristova, Marina; Wagner, Karla D.; Arnold, Kathryn E.; Nainan, Omana V.; LaMarre, Madeleine; Bell, Beth P.

2005-01-01

101

Lessons from a Juvenile Training School: Survival and Growth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the lessons learned by youths confined to a maximum-security juvenile correctional facility. Using data from an ethnographic study of a cottage of violent offenders in one state's end-of-the-line training school, the author describes the lessons the institution and its staff members hoped to teach the young people in their…

Inderbitzin, Michelle

2006-01-01

102

Juvenile Delinquent Girls Reflect Learning in Schools and Offer Suggestions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative methods were used to conduct interviews of 41 female juvenile delinquents residing in a correctional facility to understand how participants would have improved learning in their former school if they had been the teachers. A total of 27 of 41 participants provided 70 comments that resulted in 93 meaning units/codes that emerged into 4…

Sanger, Dixie; Stremlau, Aliza; Ritzman, Mitzi; Snow, Pamela

2010-01-01

103

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Bypass Facilities and Passage at Water Diversions on the Lower Umatilla River; 1991-1995 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Outdated juvenile and adult fish passage facilities were recently reconstructed at the five major irrigation dams on the lower Umatilla River, Oregon to meet National marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design standards. Changes in design at juvenile fish bypass facilities included reduced mesh size on the rotating drum screens, larger screening area, a more oblique orientation of the drum screens to canal flow, improved screen seals, replacement of bypass portals with vertical slot bypass channels, and increased bypass pipe diameters. Weir-and-pool adult fish ladders and jump pools were replaced with vertical-slot ladders. From 1991--1995, they investigated injury and travel rate of juvenile fish moving through the facilities, and efficiency of screens in preventing fish entry into the canals. Water velocities in front of canal screens, at bypass channel entrances, and at ladder diffusers were measured to assess adherence to NMFS criteria and identify hydraulic patterns. Biological evaluations were conducted by releasing and recapturing marked yearling summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), yearling spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and subyearling fall chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in varying locations within the fish passage facilities.

Cameron, William A.; Knapp, Suzanne M.; Carmichael, Richard W.

1997-07-01

104

The High Cost of Health Care Within the Juvenile Justice System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Correctional facilities experience increasing costs and demands while resources remain limited. This paper provides a matrix to identify and compare categorized health care costs. Methods: A 525-bed, primarily male, long-term juvenile correctional system's costs were categorized as either general health or mental health, and further divided as fixed, intermediate, or variable costs, depending on several factors. Results: Mental health costs

Debra H. Tennyson

2003-01-01

105

Our Nation's Schools--A Report Card: "A" in School Violence and Vandalism. Preliminary Report of the Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency, Based on Investigations, 1971-1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 1971 the Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency has held 55 days of hearings and received testimony from 419 witnesses on topics including the extent and causes of drug abuse, runaway youth, school dropouts, and the confinement of juveniles in detention and correctional facilities. A questionnaire designed to obtain…

Bayh, Birch

106

Implementation of the WICS Wall Interference Correction System at the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) is operational at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) of NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) for semispan and full span tests in the solid wall (slots covered) configuration. The method is based on the wall pressure signature method for computing corrections to the measured parameters. It is an adaptation of the WICS code operational at the 12 ft pressure wind tunnel (12ft PWT) of NASA Ames Research Center (NASA ARC). This paper discusses the details of implementation of WICS at the NTF including tunnel calibration, code modifications for tunnel and support geometry, changes made for the NTF wall orifices layout, details of interfacing with the tunnel data processing system, and post-processing of results. Example results of applying WICS to a semispan test and a full span test are presented. Comparison with classical correction results and an analysis of uncertainty in the corrections are also given. As a special application of the code, the Mach number calibration data from a centerline pipe test was computed by WICS. Finally, future work for expanding the applicability of the code including online implementation is discussed.

Iyer, Venkit; Everhart, Joel L.; Bir, Pamela J.; Ulbrich, Norbert

2000-01-01

107

Implementation of the WICS Wall Interference Correction System at the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) is operational at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) of NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) for semispan and full span tests in the solid wall (slots covered) configuration, The method is based on the wall pressure signature method for computing corrections to the measured parameters. It is an adaptation of the WICS code operational at the 12 ft pressure wind tunnel (12ft PWT) of NASA Ames Research Center (NASA ARC). This paper discusses the details of implementation of WICS at the NTF including, tunnel calibration, code modifications for tunnel and support geometry, changes made for the NTF wall orifices layout, details of interfacing with the tunnel data processing system, and post-processing of results. Example results of applying WICS to a semispan test and a full span test are presented. Comparison with classical correction results and an analysis of uncertainty in the corrections are also given. As a special application of the code, the Mach number calibration data from a centerline pipe test was computed by WICS. Finally, future work for expanding the applicability of the code including online implementation is discussed.

Iyer, Venkit; Martin, Lockheed; Everhart, Joel L.; Bir, Pamela J.; Ulbrich, Norbert

2000-01-01

108

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2007. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2007. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. Two additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2007. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during these additional inspections are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2007 are included in Appendix C.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-03-01

109

A National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment for Juvenile Offenders  

PubMed Central

Despite consensus about the value of substance abuse treatment for delinquent youth, information about its prevalence and availability is inadequate and inconsistent. This paper presents findings about treatment and other correctional service provision from a national survey of directors of 141 juvenile institutional and community corrections facilities. Educational/GED programming and drug and alcohol education were the most prevalent types of correctional and substance abuse services. Other common services included physical health services and mental health assessment, provided to about 60% of youth across facilities, and mental health counseling, life and communication skills, and anger management, provided to about half the youth. Substance abuse treatment, as with most other services, were more prevalent in large, state-funded residential facilities (where 66% provided treatment), than local detention centers (20%) and community corrections facilities (56%). More detailed data showed that the number of youth attending treatment in all types of facilities on any given day was very low. PMID:17383550

Young, Douglas W.; Dembo, Richard; Henderson, Craig E.

2008-01-01

110

The Effects of a Self-Management Procedure on the On-Task Behavior, Academic Productivity, and Academic Accuracy of Female Students with Disabilities in a Juvenile Correctional High School Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students served in juvenile correctional school settings often arrive with histories of trauma, aversive educational experiences, low achievement, and other severe risk factors that impeded psychosocial development, educational progress, and occupational outcomes. Schools serving adjudicated youth must address a higher percentage of severe…

Caldwell, Stacy Lynette

2010-01-01

111

Harmonic measurements, analysis, and power factor correction in a modern steel manufacturing facility  

SciTech Connect

Maximizing electric power transfer directly affects the productivity of an electric arc furnace operation. Arc furnaces and rolling mill loads operate at power factors that result in penalty charges and lower bus voltages. In addition, the nonlinear characteristics of the furnace arcs and rolling mill drives generate significant harmonic currents that flow through the plant and utility power system. These harmonic currents cause system voltage distortion and power loss in the system, and can interact with power factor correction capacitor banks leading to equipment failures. This paper presents the analytical technique used to correct power factor in a modern steel manufacturing facility. The study included field measurements, harmonic analysis, and filter design work to reduce the amount of harmonic distortion in the plant. The modeling of arc furnaces and rolling mills for a harmonic analysis study is also discussed. The solutions recommended in this paper to increase power factor and reduce harmonics can be applied to other steel manufacturing facilities to improve power quality and therefore plant productivity.

Andrews, D. [North Star Steel, Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Plant Engineering] [North Star Steel, Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Plant Engineering; Bishop, M.T.; Witte, J.F. [Cooper Power Systems, Franksville, WI (United States). Systems Engineering Group] [Cooper Power Systems, Franksville, WI (United States). Systems Engineering Group

1996-05-01

112

Correction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Age and duration of Mississippi Valley type ore-mineralizing events: Correction Geology, v. 23, p. 233 236 (March 1995) An error has been discovered in the calculation of the estimate for the duration of a Mississippi Valley type (MVT) mineralization event. In the original paper, the rate of apparent polar wander (APW) for North America was expressed in degrees of drift per million years (8/m.y.) rather than in million years per degree of drift (m.y./8). This inversion resulted in an incorrect estimate for the time required to form a typical MVT ore deposit. The correct value for the rate of APW is 2.7 6 0.7 m.y./8 from the Lower Devonian to the Upper Triassic, based on locations of the eight reference paleopoles of Van der Voo (1993). The original equation is correct and is repeated as follows: 2(a1 2 - a1 3) × rate of APW 5 duration of mineralization. The revised estimate for the average length of time it takes to form an MVT ore deposit is 25.2 6 6.5 m.y. using the correct value for the an MVT ore deposit is 25.2 6 6.5 m.y. using the correct value for the rate of APW (Table 1). Note that the paleopole statistics for Central Tennessee have changed slightly from the original paper, incorpo-rating additional data. The updated pole position is at 111.98E, 50.58N (a1 2 = 4.08, a1 3 = 2.18, azimuth = 698) (Lewchuk and Symons, 1996).

1996-06-01

113

Linear and second order optics corrections for the KEK Accelerator Test Facility final focus beam line  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the linear and second order optics corrections for the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2) final focus beam line are described. The beam optics of the ATF2 beam line is designed based on a local chromaticity correction scheme similar to the ILC final focus system. Beam measurements in 2012 revealed skew sextupole field errors that were much larger than expected from magnetic field measurements. The skew sextupole field error was a critical limitation of the beam size at the ATF2 virtual interaction point (IP). Therefore, four skew sextupole magnets were installed to correct the field error in August 2012. By using the four skew sextupole magnets, the predicted tolerances of the skew sextupole field errors of the ATF2 magnets were increased. Furthermore, analyzing field maps of the sextupole magnets identified the source of the skew sextupole field error. After the field error source was removed, the IP vertical beam size could more easily be focused to less than 65 nm.

Okugi, T.; Araki, S.; Bambade, P.; Kubo, K.; Kurado, S.; Masuzawa, M.; Marin, E.; Naito, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tomas, R.; Urakawa, J.; White, G.; Woodley, M.

2014-02-01

114

Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, December 2000)  

SciTech Connect

This document is an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) that has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD) Decontamination Facility. CAU 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. The purpose of this addendum is to provide a rationale for the recommendation of a revised preferred alternative corrective action for CAU 254. This preferred alternative corrective action, Alternative 3, consists of the removal of accessible soil/sediment and all building material above ground level from the CAU 254 Site. This alternative is being recommended because a cost-effective technology is now available to dismantle the contaminated building and ensure complete removal of all CAU 254 CADD-identified contaminants of concern and any associated contamination. This preferred closure method alternative reduces the potential for future exposure pathways. Procedures will be developed, presented in the Corrective Action Plan, and implemented to ensure worker health and safety, protection of human health and the environment, and to meet all unrestricted release requirements in accordance with applicable state and federal regulations.

DOE /NV

2000-12-12

115

The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-05-01

116

A Need For Correction: Reforming New York's Juvenile Justice System. Child Welfare Watch. Vol. 18, Fall 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the wake of a U.S. Justice Department investigation that found widespread use of excessive force by staff at upstate psychiatric care facilities for mentally ill children, this new edition of Child Welfare Watch identifies shortcomings in mental health services and explores possible solutions, including the expansion of alternatives to…

White, Andrew; Hemphill, Clara; Hurley, Kendra

2009-01-01

117

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation; 1991 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1991. Major repairs to one Minthorn pump were required and flood damage at Minthorn necessitated the replacement of rock and gravel around the pump house and steelhead brood holding area. Several modifications to the steelhead brood holding pond were also made to help reduce mortality. These changes appeared to be successful as evidenced by the reduced number of mortalities. Total prespawn mortality in 1990-91 was 10.4%. This compares to 20.0 to 39.0% for the previous three years at Minthorn. A total of 202 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from November, 1990 through April, 1991 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 410,356 eggs were taken from 64 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and initial rearing. The fish were then transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for further rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 347 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:l spawning ratio, a total of 601,548 eggs were taken from 159 females. They were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. Acclimation of 100,505 spring chinook salmon and 42,610 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1991. At Minthorn, 152,974 coho and 79,672 fall chinook salmon were acclimated and released. In the fall, 81,144 spring chinook salmon were held at Bonifer for a three-day post-transport recovery period. Control groups of spring and fall chinook salmon and summer steelhead were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1991 and 1992. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon and two experiments for spring chinook salmon were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Because of high spring flows in the Umatilla River however, the trap was not opened until mid-June and few fish were trapped, suggesting most had already migrated downriver. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1992-06-01

118

Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

Evans, G.C.

1994-06-01

119

The involuntary medication of Jared Loughner and pretrial jail detainees in nonmedical correctional facilities.  

PubMed

In United States v. Loughner the Ninth Circuit will soon address the constitutionality of involuntarily medicating an incompetent pretrial defendant through a Harper order that could serve to render him competent to stand trial without the added procedural protection of a judicial hearing. Judicial support for applying Harper orders to pretrial defendants is likely to be used to justify Harper orders for pretrial jail detainees, allowing them to be involuntarily medicated in a jail setting, even though the place of involuntary medication was not at issue in the Loughner case. Because of the critical clinical, ethics-related, and legal concerns for such practice, the potential misapplication of the Loughner ruling should be considered by the Ninth Circuit before rendering its decision. This is, however, unlikely because the Ninth Circuit has just determined that Loughner will continue to be involuntarily medicated, regardless of whether this occurs in a hospital or in a nonmedical correctional facility. PMID:22396347

Felthous, Alan R

2012-01-01

120

Juvenile Offenders' Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic/racial backgrounds) and prospectively predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent…

Mauricio, Anne M.; Little, Michelle; Chassin, Laurie; Knight, George P.; Piquero, Alex R.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino

2009-01-01

121

Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-09. Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report. NCJ 228416  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-79) (PREA) requires the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) to carry out a comprehensive statistical review and analysis of the incidents and effects of prison rape for each calendar year. This report fulfills the requirement under Sec. 4(c)(2)(B)(ii) of the Act to provide a list of juvenile

Beck, Allen J.; Harrison, Paige M.; Guerino, Paul

2010-01-01

122

The effect of a cognitive treatment program for male and female juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

This study assessed the effectiveness of a cognitive intervention treatment program for juvenile offenders, which is called the Juvenile Cognitive Intervention Program. The program was provided to incarcerated delinquents at three juvenile correctional facilities in Wisconsin. The results indicated that using the How I Think (HIT) Questionnaire as a measure of change, significant improvement in reducing cognitive distortions were found across age groups and gender, and included individuals who were unable to successfully complete the program the first time and then completed it successfully. The HIT is a measure of cognitive distortions that are associated with delinquent thinking patterns and behavior. Cognitive change is a major focus of treatment programs in juvenile corrections as there has been substantive research demonstrating a link to reduced delinquent and later criminal behavior. PMID:23123384

McGlynn, Adrea Hahn; Hahn, Philip; Hagan, Michael P

2013-09-01

123

Prevention and control of tuberculosis in correctional and detention facilities: recommendations from CDC. Endorsed by the Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, the National Commission on Correctional Health Care, and the American Correctional Association.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) control can be particularly problematic in correctional and detention facilities, in which persons from diverse backgrounds and communities are housed in close proximity for varying periods. This report provides a framework and general guidelines for effective prevention and control of TB in jails, prisons, and other correctional and detention facilities. Recommendations were developed on the basis of published guidelines and a review of the scientific literature. Effective TB-prevention and -control measures in correctional facilities include early identification of persons with TB disease through entry and periodic follow-up screening; successful treatment of TB disease and latent TB infection; appropriate use of airborne precautions (e.g., airborne infection isolation, environmental controls, and respiratory protection); comprehensive discharge planning; and thorough and efficient contact investigation. These measures should be instituted in close collaboration with local or state health department TB-control programs and other key partners. Continuing education of inmates, detainees, and correctional facility staff is necessary to maximize cooperation and participation. To ensure TB-prevention and -control measures are effective, periodic program evaluation should be conducted. PMID:16826161

2006-07-01

124

Mapping a Process of Negotiated Identity among Incarcerated Male Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on theories of youth identity transitions, this study maps a process of negotiated identity among incarcerated young men. Data are drawn from ethnographic study of three juvenile correctional institutions and longitudinal semistructured interviews with facility residents. Cross-case analysis of 10 cases that finds youth offenders adapted…

Abrams, Laura S.; Hyun, Anna

2009-01-01

125

Voluntary STD testing and treatment program at a metropolitan correctional facility: evaluation of test acceptability and associated risk factors.  

PubMed

Few studies have addressed challenges of diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) within correctional facilities. Initiatives that screen all inmates can be cost-prohibitive, while symptom-based screening undoubtedly fails to recognize significant numbers of asymptomatically infected persons. This study discusses a voluntary STD screening and treatment program developed at the Douglas County (Nebraska) Department of Corrections where student volunteers interviewed, screened, and educated 456 inmates. Inmate urine samples and interview responses about risk behaviors and motivators for participation in the screening program were analyzed. The results support the ongoing project method to screen and treat inmates in the community correctional facility. Risk factor analysis suggests that targeted testing and treatment efforts may have a role in providing cost-effective care for STD among the incarcerated population. PMID:24352406

Brown, Christopher K; Earley, Mary; Shaikh, Raees; Fickenscher, Jillian; Ott, Jessica; Person, Austin; Islam, K M Monirul; Simonsen, Kari; Sandkovsky, Uriel; Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Foxall, Mark; Margalit, Ruth

2014-01-01

126

Juvenile Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... Juvenile Arthritis? Most forms of juvenile arthritis are autoimmune disorders, which means that the body’s immune system—which ... the self, these proteins are called autoantibodies. Like autoimmune disorders, autoinflammatory conditions also cause inflammation. And like autoimmune ...

127

Implementing a Reentry Framework at a Correctional Facility: Challenges to the Culture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Implementation research is emerging in the field of corrections, but few studies have examined the complexities associated with implementing change among frontline workers embedded in specific organizational cultures. Using a mixed methods approach, the authors examine the challenges faced by correctional workers in a work release correctional

Rudes, Danielle S.; Lerch, Jennifer; Taxman, Faye S.

2011-01-01

128

Telepsychiatry in juvenile justice settings.  

PubMed

Telepsychiatry is emerging as a valuable means of providing mental health care in juvenile justice settings. Youth in the juvenile justice system have high levels of psychiatric morbidity. State and local juvenile justice systems frequently struggle to provide specialized psychiatric care, as these systems have limited resources and often operate in remote locations. Case studies in the use of telepsychiatry to provide improved care in juvenile corrections in 4 states are described, along with a review of advantages and disadvantages of telepsychiatry in these settings. PMID:21092916

Kaliebe, Kristopher E; Heneghan, James; Kim, Thomas J

2011-01-01

129

Functional requirements for the man-vehicle systems research facility. [identifying and correcting human errors during flight simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Ames Research Center proposed a man-vehicle systems research facility to support flight simulation studies which are needed for identifying and correcting the sources of human error associated with current and future air carrier operations. The organization of research facility is reviewed and functional requirements and related priorities for the facility are recommended based on a review of potentially critical operational scenarios. Requirements are included for the experimenter's simulation control and data acquisition functions, as well as for the visual field, motion, sound, computation, crew station, and intercommunications subsystems. The related issues of functional fidelity and level of simulation are addressed, and specific criteria for quantitative assessment of various aspects of fidelity are offered. Recommendations for facility integration, checkout, and staffing are included.

Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.; Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.; Jex, H. R.; Mcruer, D. T.; Schulman, T. M.; Stapleford, R. L.

1980-01-01

130

Spatial correction factors for YALINA Booster facility loaded with medium and low enriched fuels  

SciTech Connect

The Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used in analyses of subcritical assemblies to correct the experimental reactivity as function of the detector position. Besides the detector position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the energy weighting function of the detector, the detector size, the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons, and the reactivity of the subcritical assembly. This work focuses on the dependency of the correction factor on the detector material and it investigates the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly loaded with medium (36%) and low (10%) enriched fuels. (authors)

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Inst. for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, 99 Academician A.K.Krasin Str, Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

2012-07-01

131

Statistical Calibration and Validation of a Homogeneous Ventilated Wall-Interference Correction Method for the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel experiments will continue to be a primary source of validation data for many types of mathematical and computational models in the aerospace industry. The increased emphasis on accuracy of data acquired from these facilities requires understanding of the uncertainty of not only the measurement data but also any correction applied to the data. One of the largest and most critical corrections made to these data is due to wall interference. In an effort to understand the accuracy and suitability of these corrections, a statistical validation process for wall interference correction methods has been developed. This process is based on the use of independent cases which, after correction, are expected to produce the same result. Comparison of these independent cases with respect to the uncertainty in the correction process establishes a domain of applicability based on the capability of the method to provide reasonable corrections with respect to customer accuracy requirements. The statistical validation method was applied to the version of the Transonic Wall Interference Correction System (TWICS) recently implemented in the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The TWICS code generates corrections for solid and slotted wall interference in the model pitch plane based on boundary pressure measurements. Before validation could be performed on this method, it was necessary to calibrate the ventilated wall boundary condition parameters. Discrimination comparisons are used to determine the most representative of three linear boundary condition models which have historically been used to represent longitudinally slotted test section walls. Of the three linear boundary condition models implemented for ventilated walls, the general slotted wall model was the most representative of the data. The TWICS code using the calibrated general slotted wall model was found to be valid to within the process uncertainty for test section Mach numbers less than or equal to 0.60. The scatter among the mean corrected results of the bodies of revolution validation cases was within one count of drag on a typical transport aircraft configuration for Mach numbers at or below 0.80 and two counts of drag for Mach numbers at or below 0.90.

Walker, Eric Lee

2005-01-01

132

Outbreaks of infection caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Canadian correctional facility  

PubMed Central

Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been identified in prison settings in the United States. The present study investigated two clusters of skin and soft tissue infection caused by community-acquired (CA) MRSA in a correctional facility in southern Ontario. Methods Outbreak investigations were conducted by the responsible public health authority. Strain relatedness was assessed through comparison of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antibiograms. Results Two distinct outbreaks of CAMRSA-associated disease occurred in 2002 and 2004. Most patients presented with abscesses in the lower extremities. All isolates had identical DNA banding patterns on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One-half of the affected inmates resided in a cellblock with one other affected inmate. No other risk factors were identified. Conclusions One of the first outbreaks of CAMRSA infections in a correctional facility in Canada is documented. Taken in conjunction with outbreaks elsewhere, this suggests that residence in correctional facilities may be a risk factor for CAMRSA infection. PMID:18159517

Main, Cheryl L; Jayaratne, Padman; Haley, Allan; Rutherford, Candy; Smaill, Fiona; Fisman, David N

2005-01-01

133

Native American Ethnicity and Childhood Maltreatment as Variables in Perceptions and Adjustments to Boot Camp vs. “Traditional” Correctional Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 302 juveniles confined in two separate correctional facilities in a Western plains state was assessed to examine the relationship between child maltreatment and other delinquency risk factors, and Native American ethnicity on perceptions of the institutional environments and psychological adjustment in a boot camp and traditional facility. The results indicate few differences between Native and non-Native American

Angela R. Gover

2005-01-01

134

76 FR 55255 - Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt Bond Purposes; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...on the definition of solid waste disposal facilities for purposes of the rules applicable to tax-exempt bonds issued...governments that issue tax-exempt bonds to finance...and to taxpayers that use those facilities...that are the subject of this document are...

2011-09-07

135

78 FR 11903 - Acceptability of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...whether a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) submitted by the licensee of...NRC's PDR, Room O1-F21, One White Flint North, 11555 Rockville...determines that the licensee's CAP is effective, the licensee enters the violation in its CAP, and other criteria in...

2013-02-20

136

The Burden of Infectious Disease Among Inmates of and Releasees From US Correctional Facilities, 1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. This study developed national estimates of the burden of selected infec- tious diseases among correctional inmates and releasees during 1997. Methods. Data from surveys, surveillance, and other reports were synthesized to de- velop these estimates. Results. During 1997, 20% to 26% of all people living with HIV in the United States, 29% to 43% of all those infected with

Theodore M. Hammett; Mary Patricia Harmon; William Rhodes

2002-01-01

137

78 FR 47154 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Swap Execution Facilities; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 37 RIN 3038-AD18 Core Principles and Other Requirements for Swap...Acceptable Practices in, Compliance With Core Principles [Corrected] 2. On page 33600, in the second column, under the heading Core Principle 3 of Section 5h of the...

2013-08-05

138

Gaps between HIV/AIDS policies and treatment in correctional facilities.  

PubMed

In this article the authors examined correctional policy and its impact on the incidence of HIV/AIDS in prison population. Using data from the Florida Correctional System, they find that HIV/AIDS is still the leading cause of death. Improved treatment and care may have led to declines in AIDS-related mortality but the prison population continues to experience a much higher risk of mortality than he general population in spite of changes in the treatment and provision of care to infected patients. The dominance of HIV-related deaths indicates that treatment and voluntary testing policy have been ineffective. The authors argue that the persistence of HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths is largely attributable to continuing unequal distribution of health care resources between identified and unidentified HIV-infected inmates. Their analysis suggests that future changes in HIV/AIDS policy ib testing and treatment can contribute to improvement in health conditions of infected inmates. PMID:12638386

Amankwaa, A A; Bavon, A L; Amankwaa, L C

2001-01-01

139

Juvenile Prostitution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

Csapo, Marg

1986-01-01

140

Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C among entrants to Maryland correctional facilities.  

PubMed

Although high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in correctional institutions has been established, data are sparse regarding the comorbidities of hepatitis B virus (HBV), HCV, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), all of which may complicate the management of HCV. This study sought to estimate the prevalence and correlates associated with HCV prevalence among entrants into the Maryland Division of Correction and the Baltimore City Detention Center. Participants included all newly incarcerated entrants between January 28 and March 28, 2002. Excess sera with identifiers removed from samples drawn for routine syphilis testing were assayed for antibodies to HIV and HCV and for HBV surface antigen and surface and total core antibodies. Separately, all HIV-positive specimens were tested using the serological testing algorithm for recent HIV seroconversion. Of the 1,081 inmates and 2,833 detainees, reactive syphilis serology was noted in 0.6% of the combined population; HIV seroprevalence was 6.6%; HCV prevalence was 29.7%; and 25.2% of detainees and prisoners had antigen or core or surface antibodies to HBV. A multivariate analysis of predictors of HCV positivity indicated that detainees, women, whites, older age groups, those who were HIV seropositive, and individuals with past or present infection with HBV were significantly more likely to be positive for HCV. These data indicate that hepatitis C remains an important public health concern among entrants to jail and prison and is complicated with coinfections that need to be addressed for effective treatment. PMID:15047781

Solomon, Liza; Flynn, Colin; Muck, Kelly; Vertefeuille, John

2004-03-01

141

The National Incidence of Juvenile Suicide In Adult Jails and Juvenile Detention Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used a national probability sample to compare the suicide rate among adolescents in adult jails, juvenile detention facilities, and the general population. Results showed the rate for adolescents in adult jails was more than 3.5 times larger than in the general population, while suicides in juvenile facilities were lower. (JAC)

Flaherty, Michael G.

1983-01-01

142

HIV in correctional facilities: role of self-report in case identification.  

PubMed

For treatment of HIV/AIDS in jails and prisons to be effective, these institutions must identify as many HIV-positive inmates as they can. We compare HIV status among a drug-addicted jail population determined through a physical examination and a voluntary HIV testing program, with self-reported status in an interview. Of 360 subjects interviewed and given physical examinations, approximately one third (110) took the voluntary HIV test and all were negative, and only 1 was identified as HIV-positive in the physical. However, 7 (2%) stated in the interview that they were HIV positive, none of whom took the HIV test. Five of the 7 also self-reported injection drug use and having shared needles. We conclude that inmate self-report is an important pathway for HIV case finding in correctional institutions. PMID:16475890

Lyons, Thomas; Goldstein, Paul; Kiriazes, Jean

2006-02-01

143

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

G. N. Doyle

2002-02-01

144

The Prison Adjustment of Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

While young adult offenders have traditionally been characterized as making a poor adjustment to institutional life, the juvenile incarcerated in an adult facility represents a potentially greater problem. This study examined adjustment after separating the young violent offenders into two groups: those who committed their crimes prior to age 17 and those who committed crimes between 17 and 21. Juvenile

Marilyn D. McShane; Frank P. Williams

1989-01-01

145

HIV/AIDS among inmates of and releasees from US correctional facilities, 2006: declining share of epidemic but persistent public health opportunity.  

PubMed

Because certain groups at high risk for HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) come together in correctional facilities, seroprevalence was high early in the epidemic. The share of the HIV/AIDS epidemic borne by inmates of and persons released from jails and prisons in the United States (US) in 1997 was estimated in a previous paper. While the number of inmates and releasees has risen, their HIV seroprevalence rates have fallen. We sought to determine if the share of HIV/AIDS borne by inmates and releasees in the US decreased between 1997 and 2006. We created a new model of population flow in and out of correctional facilities to estimate the number of persons released in 1997 and 2006. In 1997, approximately one in five of all HIV-infected Americans was among the 7.3 million who left a correctional facility that year. Nine years later, only one in seven (14%) of infected Americans was among the 9.1 million leaving, a 29.3% decline in the share. For black and Hispanic males, two demographic groups with heightened incarceration rates, recently released inmates comprise roughly one in five of those groups' total HIV-infected persons, a figure similar to the proportion borne by the correctional population as a whole in 1997. Decreasing HIV seroprevalence among those admitted to jails and prisons, prolonged survival and aging of the US population with HIV/AIDS beyond the crime-prone years, and success with discharge planning programs targeting HIV-infected prisoners could explain the declining concentration of the epidemic among correctional populations. Meanwhile, the number of persons with HIV/AIDS leaving correctional facilities remains virtually identical. Jails and prisons continue to be potent targets for public health interventions. The fluid nature of incarcerated populations ensures that effective interventions will be felt not only in correctional facilities but also in communities to which releasees return. PMID:19907649

Spaulding, Anne C; Seals, Ryan M; Page, Matthew J; Brzozowski, Amanda K; Rhodes, William; Hammett, Theodore M

2009-01-01

146

Juvenile Delinquency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author discusses juvenile delinquency in an attempt to understand its growth and the trends it has taken in the United States during the 20th century. He gives careful consideration to the study, "Unraveling Delinquency", written by the Gluecks in 1950, one of the most comprehensive in this entire area. Results from more recent studies…

Seiferth, Berniece

147

Native American Ethnicity and Childhood Maltreatment as Variables in Perceptions and Adjustments to Boot Camp vs. "Traditional" Correctional Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of 302 juveniles confined in two separate correctional facilities in a Western plains state was assessed to examine the relationship between child maltreatment and other delinquency risk factors, and Native American ethnicity on perceptions of the institutional environments and psychological adjustment in a boot camp and traditional…

Gover, Angela R.

2005-01-01

148

41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes? 102-75...Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response Purposes § 102-75...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes?...

2013-07-01

149

41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes? 102-75...Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response Purposes § 102-75...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes?...

2012-01-01

150

41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes? 102-75...Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response Purposes § 102-75...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes?...

2010-07-01

151

41 CFR 102-75.815 - What happens if property conveyed for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is found...Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response Purposes § 102-75...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is...

2012-01-01

152

41 CFR 102-75.815 - What happens if property conveyed for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is found...Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response Purposes § 102-75...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is...

2010-07-01

153

41 CFR 102-75.815 - What happens if property conveyed for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is found...Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response Purposes § 102-75...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is...

2011-01-01

154

41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes? 102-75...Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response Purposes § 102-75...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes?...

2011-01-01

155

41 CFR 102-75.815 - What happens if property conveyed for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is found...Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response Purposes § 102-75...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is...

2013-07-01

156

Families on Probation: Court-Ordered Parenting Skills Classes for Parents of Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

What are sociolegal, cultural, and emotional premises beneath conceptualizations of parenting skills for parents of juvenile offenders? This study examined court-ordered parenting skills classes taught by juvenile probation department personnel at a Northern California juvenile detention facility. Three conflicting perspectives arose in the classes: the juvenile court's perspective, where delinquency was framed as a result of poor parenting that state

Laurie Schaffner

1997-01-01

157

Manual of Standards for Juvenile Training Schools and Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual of standards for juvenile training schools and services contains 487 American Correctional Association standards for the accreditation of juvenile training schools (youth development centers, villages, correction centers, treatment centers, service centers, homes for boys and girls, camps, and ranches). Standards presented are…

Commission on Accreditation for Corrections, Rockville, MD.

158

Program use of effective drug abuse treatment practices for juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

This study examined the extent to which organizational context predicted use of consensus-based elements of effective substance abuse treatment practices with juvenile offenders. Participants were either directors of substance abuse treatment programs located in residential facilities (institutional sample) or directors of community-based treatment agencies providing services to adolescents in their home communities (community sample). The two settings differed significantly in the number and types of effective practices they were using. Community programs were more likely to have staff qualified to deliver substance abuse treatment, involve families in treatment, and assess their treatment outcomes. In contrast, institutional programs were more likely to provide comprehensive services. Resources dedicated to training, internal support for new programming, and network connectedness with non-criminal-justice facilities were associated with greater use of effective practices. These findings highlight the importance of establishing corrections-community partnerships designed to promote continuity of care for juvenile offenders. PMID:17383552

Henderson, Craig E; Young, Douglas W; Jainchill, Nancy; Hawke, Josephine; Farkas, Sarah; Davis, R Meghan

2007-04-01

159

Housekeeping Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 288: Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly/Treatability Test Facility Chemicals Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order was entered into by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense to identify sites of potential historical contamination and implement corrective actions based on public health and environmental considerations. The facilities subject to this agreement include the Nevada Test Site (NTS), parts of the Tonopah Test Range, parts to the Nellis Air Force Range, the Central Nevada Test Area, and the Project Shoal Area. Corrective Action Sites (CASs) are areas potentially requiring corrective actions and may include solid waste management units, individual disposal, or release sites. Based on geography, technical similarity, agency responsibility, or other appropriate reasons, CASs are grouped together into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for the purposes of determining corrective actions. This report contains the Closure Verification Forms for cleanup activities that were performed at 11 CASs within CAU 288 on the NTS. The Housekeeping Closure Verification Form for each CAS provides the location, directions to the site, general description, and photographs of the site before and after cleanup activities. Housekeeping activities at these sites included removal of debris, crates containing contaminated materials, chemicals, and other material. Based on these activities, no further action is required at these CASs.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-04-24

160

Drug-susceptible tuberculosis outbreak in a state correctional facility housing HIV-infected inmates--South Carolina, 1999-2000.  

PubMed

During 1999-2000, South Carolina's Department of Corrections (SCDC), Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), and CDC investigated an outbreak of drug-susceptible tuberculosis (TB) that occurred in a state correctional facility housing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected inmates. All culture-confirmed case-patients have been linked by IS6110-based DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. This report describes the outbreak investigation and illustrates the need for increased vigilance for TB in settings in which HIV-infected persons congregate. PMID:11105766

2000-11-24

161

Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles

Snyder, Howard N.

162

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-03-01

163

American Correctional Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Correctional Association is the oldest, and largest international correctional association in the world. ACA serves all disciplines within the corrections profession and is dedicated to excellence in every aspect of the field. The topics covered on this site are wide-ranging, from professional development and certification, to standards and accreditation, network and consulting, research and publications, conferences and exhibits and technology and testing. ACA is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the American Corrections system. A key feature of the website, is that it provides information about professional development programs and workshops as well as professional certification for an adult and juvenile correctional staff.

2006-11-12

164

HIV\\/AIDS among Inmates of and Releasees from US Correctional Facilities, 2006: Declining Share of Epidemic but Persistent Public Health Opportunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because certain groups at high risk for HIV\\/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus\\/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) come together in correctional facilities, seroprevalence was high early in the epidemic. The share of the HIV\\/AIDS epidemic borne by inmates of and persons released from jails and prisons in the United States (US) in 1997 was estimated in a previous paper. While the number of inmates

Anne C. Spaulding; Ryan M. Seals; Matthew J. Page; Amanda K. Brzozowski; William Rhodes; Theodore M. Hammett; Anastasia P. Litvintseva

2009-01-01

165

Can Juvenile Justice Survive?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the findings of a group of studies relating to major issues in juvenile justice. Findings concern the growth of programs providing grants-in-aid from state governments to local counties for support of juvenile justice programs; constitutional questions regarding juvenile court services; and the waiver of juvenile court jurisdiction.…

Conrad, John P.

1981-01-01

166

Juvenile Justice & Youth Violence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth violence and the juvenile justice system in the United States are explored. Part 1 takes stock of the situation. The first chapter discusses the origins and evaluation of the juvenile justice system, and the second considers the contributions of the Federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act to the existing juvenile justice…

Howell, James C.

167

Exocrine pancreatic function in juvenile diabetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 11 juvenile diabetics and 13 control subjects, the secretin-pancreozymin test was performed. Doudenal-volume losses were corrected by use of radioactive vitamin B12 as marker substance. As compared to normal subjects, juvenile diabetics had significantly decreased pancreatic outputs of amylase, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and to a lesser degree, of bicarbonate. Clinical evidence of disease of the exocrine pancreas was missing. There

F. Tympner; S. Domschke; L. Demling

1975-01-01

168

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

Pat Matthews

2007-09-01

169

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility • 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 114. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. • If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

Mark Burmeister

2009-08-01

170

Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; Butcher et al., 1992) was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once…

Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

2005-01-01

171

Reform the Nation's Juvenile Justice System. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Across the nation, juvenile courts and corrections systems are littered with poorly conceived strategies that increase crime, endanger young people and damage their future prospects, waste billions of taxpayer dollars, and violate people's deepest held principles about equal justice under the law. While juvenile justice is largely a state and…

Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2009

2009-01-01

172

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post-closure-posting requirements for the mounded/capped basement structure, as well as for the entire CAU, are addressed in Section 4.2.10. The site contains radiologically impacted surfaces and hazardous materials. Based on review of the historical information for CAU 116 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 116 using the SAFER process. CAUs that may be closed using the SAFER process have conceptual corrective actions that are clearly identified. Consequently, corrective action alternatives can be chosen prior to completing a corrective action investigation, given anticipated investigation results. The SAFER process combines elements of the data quality objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to plan and conduct closure activities. The DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the SAFER process. The purpose of the investigation phase is to verify the adequacy of existing information used to determine the chosen corrective action. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty during the planning and decision-making phases of the project. The SAFER process allows for technical decisions to be made based on information gathered during site visits, interviews, meetings, research, and a consensus of opinion by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) team members. Any uncertainties are addressed by documented assumptions that are verified by sampling and analysis, data evaluation, onsite observations, and contingency plans, as necessary. Closure activities may proceed simultaneously with site characterization as sufficient data are gathered to confirm or disprove the assumptions made during selection of the corrective action. If, at any time during the closure process, new information is discovered that indicates that closure activities should be revised, closure activities will be reevaluated as appropriate. Based on a detailed review of historical documentation, there is sufficient process know

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-12-01

173

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

David Strand

2006-09-01

174

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

NA

2006-03-01

175

Teaching about Juvenile Justice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces the development of the U.S. juvenile justice system. Delineates procedures of the contemporary juvenile justice system and provides hypothetical cases for teaching concepts related to it. (BSR)

Bjorklun, Eugene C.

1988-01-01

176

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... Us My Cart Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Orthopedic > Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Health Issues Listen Juvenile Idiopathic ... Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & Emergencies ...

177

Juvenile Scleroderma Network  

MedlinePLUS

... your family can help. What if Juvenile Scleroderma Network earned a penny every time you searched the ... com and be sure to enter Juvenile Scleroderma Network as the charity you want to support. Just ...

178

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act. Fiscal Year 2009-2010 Report. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards…

Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

2012-01-01

179

A Comparative Analysis of Organizational Structure and Inmate Subcultures in Institutions for Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study provides a partial test of the importation and deprivation models of prisonization by examining inmate subcultures in ten different cottage units in four institutions for juvenile offenders. A typology of juvenile institutions based on both the correctional goals pursued and the methods of intervention and social control distinguishes four different treatment models used in institutions for juveniles. Matching

Barry C. Feld

1981-01-01

180

Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in 1999, 33…

Snyder, Howard N.

181

Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

Snyder, Howard N.

182

Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

Puzzanchera, Charles

2009-01-01

183

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23

184

Juveniles in court.  

PubMed

Nineteenth-century American reformers were concerned about the influence of immaturity and development in juvenile offenses. They responded to their delinquent youths through the creation of juvenile courts. This early American juvenile justice system sought to treat children as different from adults and to rehabilitate wayward youths through the state's assumption of a parental role. Although these rehabilitative goals were never fully realized, the field of American child psychiatry was spawned from these efforts on behalf of delinquent youths. Early child psychiatrists began by caring for juvenile offenders. The function of a child psychiatrist with juvenile delinquents expanded beyond strictly rehabilitation, however, as juvenile courts evolved to resemble criminal adult courts-due to landmark Supreme Court decisions and also juvenile legislation between 1966 and 1975. In response to dramatically increased juvenile violence and delinquency rates in the 1980s, juvenile justice became more retributional, and society was forced to confront issues such as capital punishment for juveniles, their transfer to adult courts, and their competency to stand trial. In the modern juvenile court, child psychiatrists are often asked to participate in the consideration of such issues because of their expertise in development. In that context we review the role of psychiatrists in assisting juvenile courts. PMID:21080770

Soulier, Matthew F; Scott, Charles L

2010-01-01

185

Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, and 2068-U, all previously located at the Buildings 9720-15/ 9754-1 site (Facility Identification {number sign}0-010117), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This site is commonly referred to as the Rust Garage Facility'' and will be so referenced in this document hereafter. This document presents a comprehensive summary of all environmental assessment investigations conducted at the Rust Garage Facility and the corrective action measures that are proposed for remediation of subsurface petroleum contamination identified at the facility. This document is written in accordance with the regulatory requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-15-.06(7). The Corrective Action Plan for the Rust Garage Facility incorporates all elements of both the Corrective Action Plan Format and the Environmental Assessment Report/Corrective Action Plan guidelines that are applicable to the facility. However, in cases where the latter guideline elements offered the more precise and clear presentation of applicable information, they were used in place of elements detailed in the Corrective Action Plan Format.

Bohrman, D.E.; Ingram, E.M. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States))

1992-04-01

186

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The following is an addendum to the 'Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Nevada Test Site, Nevada', DOE/NV/11718--306, dated April 1999. This addendum includes Use Restriction Information forms and survey maps for CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), that were inadvertently left out of the Closure Report when it was published as a final document.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-06-01

187

The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each year, telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, and passive integrated transponder tags) are surgically implanted into thousands of fish to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One passage route that is of particular concern is through hydroturbines, where fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries that include barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from

Thomas J. Carlson; Richard S. Brown; John R. Stephenson; Brett D. Pflugrath; Alison HA Colotelo; Andrew J. Gingerich; Piper L. Benjamin; Mike J. Langeslay; Martin L. Ahmann; Robert L. Johnson; John R. Skalski; Adam G. Seaburg; Richard L. Townsend

2012-01-01

188

Creative Art Therapy for Incarcerated Male Juveniles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document begins by briefly outlining the problems of juveniles incarcerated in correctional institutions, including the problems of overcrowding and recidivism. It asserts that creative art therapy is designed to provide a therapeutic atmosphere for understanding and change and documents the use of creative art therapy techniques with…

Treanor, Virginia; Newlon, Betty J.

189

Responding to Juvenile Crime: Lessons Learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the dispositional options for delinquent youths have diversified over the past 20 years, the debate about the most effective treatment of young offenders continues. This article reviews the existing evaluations of various juvenile corrections alternatives. In contrast to the conclusions of scholars in the late 1970s that \\

Peter W. Greenwood

1996-01-01

190

Juvenile polyposis syndrome.  

PubMed

Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34. Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes. Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum, juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis. In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found. Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway. It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-called "landscaper mechanism" where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma. Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment, follow-up and screening of at risk individuals. Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome. In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome. PMID:22171123

Brosens, Lodewijk Aa; Langeveld, Danielle; van Hattem, W Arnout; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan A

2011-11-28

191

Juvenile polyposis syndrome  

PubMed Central

Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34. Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes. Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum, juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis. In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found. Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway. It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-called “landscaper mechanism” where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma. Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment, follow-up and screening of at risk individuals. Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome. In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome. PMID:22171123

Brosens, Lodewijk AA; Langeveld, Danielle; van Hattem, W Arnout; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan A

2011-01-01

192

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereinafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereinafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction of Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30

193

Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect

This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

MCCARTHY, M.M.

1999-08-01

194

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2006. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2006. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. One additional inspection was performed after a precipitation event that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2006. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during this inspection, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklist and field notes completed during this additional inspection is included in Appendix A of this report. Precipitation records for 2006 are included in Appendix C of this report.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-03-01

195

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30

196

Juvenile Crime in Rural Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increases in juvenile crime over a ten-year period caused the Idaho legislature to overhaul the juvenile justice system. A state Department of Juvenile Justice and a balance system for juveniles were created, providing an impressive range of services. The Fifth Judicial District has two detention centers that house juvenile probation officers, a courtroom, a judge's chamber, a clerk's office, a

Linda E. Wright

1997-01-01

197

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2005-2006 Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), formerly named the Board of Corrections, the administrator of funding. California counties receiving state funds for Juvenile Justice…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2007-01-01

198

National Juvenile Defender Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Formerly affiliated with the National Bar Association, the National Juvenile Defender Center separated from the ABA in 2005 becoming an independent organization. The NJDC is a support center for public defenders, caseworkers and other groups working with juveniles or juvenile crime issues. Included on the site are publications related to juvenile justice cases and standards. The site also publishes training curriculum on basic skills and strategies for working with juveniles and delinquency proceedings, as well as information on adolescent development and strategies for communication with teens. The NJDC primarily presents itself as a legal resource for public defenders, but it is also a great resource for those in the criminal justice field and anyone working with juvenile or at-risk populations.

2007-03-18

199

[Juvenile polyposis syndrome].  

PubMed

Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of juvenile polyps and predisposition to cancer of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Characteristic feature of juvenile polyps are irregular cystic glands filled with mucus not observed in other colorectal cancer syndromes. Germline mutations in the SMAD4 and BMPR1A genes are found in 40% of the JP individuals. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and higher frequency of gastric polyposis are associated mostly with SMAD4 mutations. PMID:22920200

Vasov?ák, P; Foretová, L; Puchmajerová, A; K?epelová, A

2012-01-01

200

Forensic Evaluation of Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Grisso, T. (1998). Forensic evaluation of juveniles. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press. ISBN 156887037X, 9781568870373\\u000aPublisher summary: In recent years, juvenile courts and juvenile attorneys have come to rely heavily on mental health professionals for evaluations of youths in delinquency cases. Evaluation questions include the youth's competence to stand trial, competence to waive Miranda rights prior to giving a

Thomas Grisso

1998-01-01

201

Juvenile Crime and Responses  

E-print Network

Abstract: This article describes the juvenile crime trend and responses to juvenile delinquency in Hong Kong since the 1970s. It explores how changing conceptions of the causes of juvenile crime have influenced delinquency control policies. Although Hong Kong has a relatively low crime rate, the heavy emphasis on the use of custodial programs over community-based programs is obvious. Whereas the scope of delinquency literature is narrow and the legal professional’s opinion is rather conservative, new initiatives to further advance the juvenile justice system are difficult.

Dennis S. W. Wong; Dennis S. W. Wong

202

Tuberculosis outbreak in a housing unit for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in a correctional facility: transmission risk factors and effective outbreak control.  

PubMed

In 1995, an outbreak of tuberculosis (TB) occurred among residents of a correctional-facility housing unit for inmates infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We isolated and treated patients who were suspected to have TB. To determine risk factors for in-prison transmission of TB, we conducted a case-control study to compare inmate case patients infected with a distinct outbreak strain of TB with control subjects who resided in the HIV unit. We identified 15 case patients during a 4-month period. Among inmates with a CD4 count of <100 cells/mm(3), case patients were more likely than control subjects to spend >/=20 hours per week in a communal day room (odds ratio, 42; P=.002) and were less likely to have a television in their single-person room (odds ratio, 0.10; P=.003). The communal day room was a likely site of transmission. Successful collaboration between the correctional system and public health departments halted the outbreak. PMID:11803502

Mohle-Boetani, Janet C; Miguelino, Vanessa; Dewsnup, Daniel H; Desmond, Edward; Horowitz, Evalyn; Waterman, Stephen H; Bick, Joseph

2002-03-01

203

Adolescent neglect, juvenile delinquency and the risk of recidivism.  

PubMed

Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental rejection and family relationships are instrumental in explaining juvenile conduct problems. This study sought to determine whether neglect is associated with recidivism for moderate and high risk juvenile offenders in Washington State. Statewide risk assessments and administrative records for child welfare, juvenile justice, and adult corrections were analyzed. The sample was diverse (24 % female, 13 % African American, 8 % Hispanic, 5 % Native American) and included all moderate and high risk juvenile offenders screened by juvenile probation between 2004 and 2007 (n = 19,833). Official records from child protection were used to identify juvenile offenders with a history of child neglect and to identify juvenile offenders with an ongoing case of neglect. Event history models were developed to estimate the risk of subsequent offending. Adolescents with an ongoing case neglect were significantly more likely to continue offending as compared with youth with no official history of neglect. These findings remain even after controlling for a wide range of family, peer, academic, mental health, and substance abuse covariates. Interrupting trajectories of offending is a primary focus of juvenile justice. The findings of the current study indicate that ongoing dependency issues play a critical role in explaining the outcomes achieved for adolescents in juvenile justice settings. The implications for improved collaboration between child welfare and juvenile justice are discussed. PMID:23334336

Ryan, Joseph P; Williams, Abigail B; Courtney, Mark E

2013-03-01

204

Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, and 2068-U, all previously located at the Buildings 9720-15/ 9754-1 site (Facility Identification {number_sign}0-010117), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This site is commonly referred to as the ``Rust Garage Facility`` and will be so referenced in this document hereafter. This document presents a comprehensive summary of all environmental assessment investigations conducted at the Rust Garage Facility and the corrective action measures that are proposed for remediation of subsurface petroleum contamination identified at the facility. This document is written in accordance with the regulatory requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-15-.06(7). The Corrective Action Plan for the Rust Garage Facility incorporates all elements of both the Corrective Action Plan Format and the Environmental Assessment Report/Corrective Action Plan guidelines that are applicable to the facility. However, in cases where the latter guideline elements offered the more precise and clear presentation of applicable information, they were used in place of elements detailed in the Corrective Action Plan Format.

Bohrman, D.E.; Ingram, E.M. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1992-04-01

205

Juvenile Delinquency Intervention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three meta-analyses by C. J. Garrett (1984, 1985), P. Kaufman (1985), and W. S. Davidson and others (1984) of juvenile delinquency interventions are summarized. This systematic literature review indicates that interventions to reduce juvenile delinquency may have small, but meaningful, impacts. Promising avenues for future research are suggested.…

Lipsey, Mark W.

1988-01-01

206

Trunk asymmetry in juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Trunk asymmetry (TA) is a common phenomenon in children, but its incidence in juveniles is not known. The present cross sectional study reports TA in normal juveniles and provides data which describe the evolution of TA from early childhood to adolescence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The scoliometer readings in both standing and sitting forward bending position (FBP) of 3301 children,

Theodoros B Grivas; Elias S Vasiliadis; Constantinos Mihas; Georgios Triantafyllopoulos; Angelos Kaspiris

2008-01-01

207

Juvenile Rights. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These classroom materials are part of the Project Benchmark series designed to teach secondary students about our legal concepts and systems. This unit focuses on juvenile rights and responsibilities under the law. The materials outline juvenile rights and responsibilities in the areas of parental control, education, free expression, search and…

Eaneman, Paulette S.; And Others

208

A Qualitative Study of Juvenile Offenders, Student Engagement, and Interpersonal Relationships: Implications for Research Directions and Preventionist Approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background factors that correlate with juvenile delinquency are consistent across the interdisciplinary literature base. Yet, information about the process of how risks relate to outcomes, especially within school settings, is limited. Researchers used qualitative methods to examine school and interpersonal experiences from the perspective of juvenile offenders and their families. Sixteen families were recruited from juvenile probation facilities in 2

Janay B. Sander; Jill D. Sharkey; Roger Olivarri; Diane A. Tanigawa; Tory Mauseth

2010-01-01

209

Reporting Crimes Against Juveniles. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin addresses the issue of reporting crimes against juveniles, describing findings from the National Crime Victimization Survey, which gathers information from citizens on crime, including whether and how they are reported. The survey also collects information about characteristics of victimizations, the nature of the incident location,…

Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

210

The Attack on Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

As juvenile crime increased during the last two decades, the juvenile justice system came under unprecedented scrutiny and criticism for its perceived inability to respond to this increase and to provide interventions that might thwart juvenile crime. As this offending became more lethal, with juvenile homicide rates increasing by more than 200 percent in some jurisdictions, the abolishment of the

Russell K. Van Vleet

1999-01-01

211

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24

212

No Place for Kids: The Case for Reducing Juvenile Incarceration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

States confine juvenile offenders in many types of facilities, including group homes, residential treatment centers, boot camps, wilderness programs, or country-run youth facilities (some of them locked, others secured only through staff supervision). But the largest share of committed youth--about 40 percent of the total--are held in locked…

Mendel, Richard A.

2011-01-01

213

Juvenile crime and the transformation of juvenile justice: Is there a juvenile crime wave?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current get-tough juvenile policy reforms are based on an assumption that juvenile crime has been increasing for some time. Official and victimization data on juvenile crime are examined to see whether such a trend can be documented. The data show many conflicting trends, but the article argues that the most consistent interpretation is that juvenile crime, with the exception of

Thomas J. Bernard

1999-01-01

214

Reporting Crimes Against Juveniles  

E-print Network

s. The American justice system is in the midst of an effort to evaluate and reform its handling of the criminal victimization of children and youth. Juveniles are unusually vulnerable to crime victimization (Hashima and Finkelhor, 1999), but concerns have been raised about the effectiveness and sensitivity of the justice system's response to these crimes. The findings presented in this Bulletin indicate that a majority of victimizations of juveniles ages 12 to 17 are not being reported to police or other authorities. Even serious victimizations involving weapons and injury are significantly less likely to be reported when they happen to juveniles than when they happen to adults. A variety of factors may contribute to the underreporting of crimes against juveniles, including adolescent concerns about personal autonomy and fears of being blamed or not taken seriously, family concerns about the negative impact of the justice system on children, and the general perception that non

David Finkelhor; Richard Ormrod

1999-01-01

215

Juvenile Justice Confounded  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study questions treatment services offered to children in trouble and suggests mental health services be specifically strengthened. Excerpted from Juvenile Justice Confounded: Pretensions and Realities of Treatment Services'' published in 1972 by National Council on Crime and Delinquency. (DS)

Polier, Justine Wise

1972-01-01

216

Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterized by levodopa-responsive parkinsonism with onset before age 40 years and a slowly progressive course. Families with this condition have been described predominantly in Japanese population, occasionally under different names including an autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism with diurnal fluctuation (AR-EPDF) or a familial form of juvenile parkinsonism. Recently, the causative

Masaaki Saito; Mieko Maruyama; Ken Ikeuchi; Hiroshi Kondo; Atsushi Ishikawa; Tatsuhiko Yuasa; Shoji Tsuji

2000-01-01

217

Corrective Action Glossary  

SciTech Connect

The glossary of technical terms was prepared to facilitate the use of the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) issued by OSWER on November 14, 1986. The CAP presents model scopes of work for all phases of a corrective action program, including the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI), Corrective Measures Study (CMS), Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI), and interim measures. The Corrective Action Glossary includes brief definitions of the technical terms used in the CAP and explains how they are used. In addition, expected ranges (where applicable) are provided. Parameters or terms not discussed in the CAP, but commonly associated with site investigations or remediations are also included.

Not Available

1992-07-01

218

Major Mental Disorders, Substance Use Disorders, Comorbidity, and HIV-AIDS Risk Behaviors in Juvenile Detainees  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study determined the prevalence of 20 HIV-AIDS risk behaviors of four groups of juvenile detainees: those with major mental disorders alone, those with substance use disorders alone, those with comorbid mental and substance use disorders, and those without any major mental or substance use disorder. Methods Interviewers administered the AIDS Risk Behavior Assessment to 800 randomly selected juvenile detainees aged ten to 18 years who were initially arrested between 1997 and 1998. Diagnoses were determined with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, Version 2.3. Results The sample included 340 females and 460 males. As with the other groups of detainees, youths with major mental disorders had a high prevalence of most HIV-AIDS risk behaviors, much higher than the rates found among youths in the general population. Comorbid substance use disorders substantially increased risk; 96 percent of youths in this group had been sexually active, 62 percent had had multiple partners within the past three months, and 59 percent had had unprotected vaginal sex in the past month. Among youths with a substance use disorder, either alone or with a comorbid major mental disorder, more than 63 percent had engaged in five or more sexual risk behaviors. Conclusions Delinquents with substance use disorders, either with or without comorbid major mental disorders, are at particular risk of HIV-AIDS. The juvenile justice and public health systems must provide HIV-AIDS interventions as well as mental health and substance abuse treatment. Greater coordination between community services and correctional facilities can reduce the prevalence of HIV-AIDS risk behaviors of juvenile delinquents and stem the spread of HIV infection among young people. PMID:16020814

Teplin, Linda A.; Elkington, Katherine S.; McClelland, Gary M.; Abram, Karen M.; Mericle, Amy A.; Washburn, Jason J.

2005-01-01

219

Male Versus Female Substance Abuse Patterns Among Incarcerated Juvenile Offenders: Comparing Strain and Social Learning Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study explores gender differences in substance use among a juvenile correctional population. Hypotheses derived from general strain theory and differential association\\/social learning theory are evaluated in order to examine the relative importance of family transitions, family dysfunctions, victimization, and peer substance use. The data include information on approximately 5,000 incarcerated juveniles (89 percent males, 11 percent females). Comparisons

Joan L. Neff; Dennis E. Waite

2007-01-01

220

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004 Report Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document summarizes a report focusing on California counties receiving funds from Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) programs. This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among at-risk and young offenders. The Board of Corrections

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2005-01-01

221

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004. Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Board of Corrections (BOC) as the administrator of funding. A 2001 Senate Bill extended the funding and changed the program's name to the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2005-01-01

222

The total effects of boot camps that house juveniles: A systematic review of the evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boot camp programs were first introduced in the 1980s, became increasingly popular as a correctional sanction, and were widely adopted and implemented throughout the United States. This study involved an examination of the prevalence of state run boot camps for juvenile delinquents and a systematic review of the existing evaluations of boot camp programs that house juveniles. In addition to

Benjamin Meade; Benjamin Steiner

2010-01-01

223

Building bridges between the parole officer and the families of serious juvenile offenders: a preliminary report on a family-based parole program.  

PubMed

Responding to a model of juvenile offender case supervision that called for a new intervention paradigm to guide the work of probation and parole officers, the present article reports on the use of a family-based parole initiative known as the Growing Up FAST program. Developed in part as a tool for use within this new intervention paradigm, the Growing Up FAST parole program targets serious youthful offenders who have been released from juvenile correctional facilities and their families. Based on elements contained within the "what works" literature and the Balanced and Restorative Justice model, this program recognizes the central role that field staff can play in rehabilitation efforts. Demographic information and formative data regarding the first set of families to participate in this program are presented, then program limitations and lessons learned as part of the initial offering of this parole initiative are discussed. PMID:12808739

Gavazzi, Stephen M; Yarcheck, Courtney M; Rhine, Edward E; Partridge, Charles R

2003-06-01

224

UNSAFE SEX AND DRUG USE IN JUVENILE DETAINEES IN THE NORTHERN THAILAND  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine whether drug use was associated with participation in unprotected intercourse and to explore the factors that influenced drug use and sexual behaviors among juvenile detainees in Thailand. The study used qualitative and quantitative approaches to identify factors that affected sex and drug-use behaviors of 96 juvenile detainees in detention facility in Northern

Oraphin Krissanakriangkrai; Supaphitt Mikanmak

2008-01-01

225

Target Strength Measurements of Juvenile Blueback Herring from the Mohawk River, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

Target strength (TS) was estimated from in situ and ex situ measurements of juvenile blueback herring Alosa aestivalis during their fall downriver migration at the Crescent Hydroelectric Project in the Mohawk River, New York. The blueback herring is an ecologically important anadromous species that must transit fish passage facilities at hydroelectric dams. Measurements of TS are necessary to distinguish juvenile

Christopher W. D. Gurshin

2012-01-01

226

Guns and Juvenile Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a nationally representative panel data set of U.S. high school students, this paper investigates the effect of gun availability at home on robbery, burglary, theft, and property damage for juveniles. Controlling for a very large number of personal and family characteristics and exploiting the time variation in criminal activity and gun availability, we show that gun availability at home

Erdal Tekin

2006-01-01

227

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most enigmatic problems in rheumatology has been juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Firstly, the classification has often depended on clinical features that have variations between patients. Secondly, there are different classification schemes in usage and there are few objective serologic tests that help to resolve the differences between the criteria sets. Thirdly, only recently have significant advances been

Andrea T. Borchers; Carlo Selmi; Gurtej Cheema; Carl L. Keen; Yehuda Shoenfeld; M. Eric Gershwin

2006-01-01

228

Juvenile intervertebral disc calcification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile intervertebral disc calcification is a rare but well described disorder of childhood. The syndrome consists of specific roentgenologic changes: calcification of nucleus pulposus in the intervertebral discs and occasional flattening and anterior wedging of the adjacent vertebral bodies. These changes can be accompanied by clinical symptoms such as neck pain, torticollis, general malaise and slight fever. The etiology and

Lisbet Rosenkrantz Grage; Mogens Egeblad

1992-01-01

229

Juvenile animal abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal abuse has long been recognized as a sign of family violence and a warning sign of future aggression in children and adolescents. As leaders in youth violence prevention, pediatric nurse practitioners need to be aware of the prevalence and types of juvenile animal cruelty and its relationship to human violence. In doing so, they can champion for health care

Mary Muscari

2004-01-01

230

Some comments on the residential treatment of juvenile sex offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Residential treatment center programs for juvenile sex offenders typically have been based on a quasi-corrections model of treatment adapted from the treatment of adult incarcerated offenders. This paper describes the strengths and weaknesses of such a program in one center and discusses how staff appeared to have replicated the power and control and secrecy thinking of the offenders in interactions

Buell E. Goocher

1994-01-01

231

Opinions of Female Juvenile Delinquents on Communication, Learning and Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to survey the opinions of female juvenile delinquents residing in a correctional center about the role of teachers and schools in serving students involved in violence. The term violence referred to behaviors and actions including threats or intentional harm to individuals or property (Van Hasselt & Hersen, 1999). A…

Sanger, Dixie; Spilker, Anna; Wiliiams, Nicole; Belau, Don

2007-01-01

232

Adolescent Neglect, Juvenile Delinquency and the Risk of Recidivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental…

Ryan, Joseph P.; Williams, Abigail B.; Courtney, Mark E.

2013-01-01

233

Adult Versus Juvenile Sanctions: Voices of Incarcerated Youths  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports findings from face-to-face interviews with youthful offenders in Florida, about half of whom had been transferred to the adult system and half of whom were retained in the juvenile system. The focus is on the youths’global assessments of the impact of their correctional experiences relevant to subsequent offending. The overall impact of each recalled correctional disposition was

Lonn Lanza-Kaduce; Charles E. Frazier; Donna M. Bishop

2002-01-01

234

State Correctional Education Programs. State Policy Update.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Secure state correctional facilities currently house more than 1.8 million adults, and nearly 4.4 million adults fall under state-administered community corrections. A state's approach to corrections and the communication between the state correctional components can have a large impact on the state's correctional education program. Decentralized…

Tolbert, Michelle

235

28 CFR 91.2 - Definitions.  

...and operation of adult and juvenile correctional facilities...assistance and an assessment of recidivism rates. (g) Correctional...correctional facilities for adults or juveniles that can free conventional...corrections program for adult or juvenile offenders of not more...

2014-07-01

236

Juvenile Offender Recidivism: An Examination of Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between recidivism and nine specific variables: offense type, age at initial involvement in

Nancy G. Calley

2012-01-01

237

Juvenile polyposis syndrome  

PubMed Central

Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant predisposition to the occurrence of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis of JPS is based on the occurrence of numerous colon and rectum polyps or any number of polyps with family history and, in the case of juvenile polyps, their occurrence also outside the large intestine. The JPS is caused by mutations in SMAD4 and BMPR1A. Products of the SMAD4 gene are involved in signal transduction in the transforming growth factor ? pathway and BMPR1A protein is a receptor belonging to the family of transmembrane serine/threonine kinases. Both proteins are responsible for processes determining appropriate development of colonic mucosa. The JPS belongs to the group of hamartomatous polyposes. The hamartomatous polyposis syndromes constitute a group of diseases in which manifestations differ slightly and only molecular diagnostics gives the possibility of verifying the clinical diagnosis. PMID:25097590

Cichy, Wojciech; Klincewicz, Beata

2014-01-01

238

[Characteristics of juvenile court cases with pervasive developmental disorder].  

PubMed

Forty-eight juvenile delinquency cases, who were sent to a family court between April, 2002 and March, 2005, and diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD), were examined regarding the following characteristics: (1) demographic, cognitive and social profiles (sex, age, intellectual development, school register), (2) diagnostic subclasses of PDD, and (3) types (classification), causes, and backgrounds of delinquency. While the PDD group revealed no noticeable differences in the distributions of sex, age, school register status, and intellectual abilities, compared with a general delinquent juvenile population, the PDD group showed a much higher rate of sexual offences and antisocial behaviors based on the confusion due to limited interpersonal abilities. Forty-two (87.5%) were diagnosed with Asperger's disorder, with an IQ within the normal range. In more than half of the cases, offensive conducts occurred in their inappropriate a Hemprs to approach others, caused by the underdevelopment of social abilities. In other cases, the primary handicap and associated symptoms of PDD, as well as the obsessive pursuit of a scientific/experimental interest, played some role in the development of delinquency. In dealing with delinquent cases of juveniles with PDD, it seems very important to keep in mind the characteristics of PDD, and cooperate with professionals and organizations of other fields related to juvenile mental health, such as child psychiatrists, social welfare facilities, and institutions of the Ministry of Justice (juvenile detention home, juvenile training school, and probationary office). PMID:16761693

Kumagami, Takashi

2006-01-01

239

Prevention of Juvenile Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theme of this paper is the prevention of juvenile violence through pro-active responses based on modern biological and neurological knowledge, rather than after-the-fact legal responses based on a doctrine of free will, moral responsibility, and revenge and punishment. Prevention programs are of two types: interdisciplinary and social-developmental. Interdisciplinary approaches are based on biology, psychology, sociology, law, and urban planning

C. Ray Jeffery

1998-01-01

240

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) describes a heterogeneous group of several disease subtypes characterized by\\u000a arthritis beginning before the age of 16 years and where symptoms persist for more than 6 weeks. All subtypes of JIA are of\\u000a unknown cause. Although the pathogenesis for each subtype is likely to be different, JIA is generally regarded to be an autoimmune

Günther E. Dannecker; Martin N. Arbogast; Carol B. Lindsley; H. Schacherl; H. J. Girschick; C. Huemer; A. Heiligenhaus; U. Neudorf

241

[Tardive juvenile glaucoma].  

PubMed

The authors present the case of a young woman with the diagnosis of late juvenile glaucoma. The treatment began in the very moment of the diagnosis but the lack of compliance, as well as the associated risk factors, led to a evolution difficult to control only through medical therapy, which is why we also used laser and surgical treatment. At present, the anatomical and functional status is stable but the long-term prognosis is reserved. PMID:19065915

Armegioiu, Monica; Craiu, Andreea; Beraru, Vlad; Constantin, Camelia; Malcea, Cristina

2008-01-01

242

Scared Straight and Other Juvenile Awareness Programs for Preventing Juvenile Delinquency: A Systematic Review of the Randomized Experimental Evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scared Straight and other programs involve organized visits to prison facilities by juvenile delinquents or at-risk kids to deter them from delinquency. Despite several research studies and reviews questioning their effectiveness, they remain in use and have now been tried in at least six nations. The authors report here on the results of a systematic review of randomized experimental tests

ANTHONY PETROSINO; CAROLYN TURPIN-PETROSINO; JOHN BUEHLER

2003-01-01

243

Mild form of treacher collins syndrome imitating juvenile otosclerosis.  

PubMed

Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an inherited developmental disorder. More than 40% of individuals with TCS have conductive hearing loss attributed to external and middle ear anomalies. Mild cases of TCS often pass undiagnosed at birth or early childhood. The disease may be manifested as conductive hearing loss in teenagers and may resemble juvenile otosclerosis. Patients could suffer from slight facial variabilities including retrognathia (as in our case) and others, which point out to a possible middle ear anomaly. Surgical corrections of middle ear anomalies including TCS generally lead to poorer outcomes comparing with juvenile otosclerosis, which should be discussed with parents during preoperative counselling. PMID:22953143

Zeleník, Karol; Komínek, Pavel

2012-01-01

244

Mild Form of Treacher Collins Syndrome Imitating Juvenile Otosclerosis  

PubMed Central

Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an inherited developmental disorder. More than 40% of individuals with TCS have conductive hearing loss attributed to external and middle ear anomalies. Mild cases of TCS often pass undiagnosed at birth or early childhood. The disease may be manifested as conductive hearing loss in teenagers and may resemble juvenile otosclerosis. Patients could suffer from slight facial variabilities including retrognathia (as in our case) and others, which point out to a possible middle ear anomaly. Surgical corrections of middle ear anomalies including TCS generally lead to poorer outcomes comparing with juvenile otosclerosis, which should be discussed with parents during preoperative counselling. PMID:22953143

Zelenik, Karol; Kominek, Pavel

2012-01-01

245

Juvenile dermatomyositis presenting with anasarca.  

PubMed

Generalized edema can occur during the course of juvenile dermatomyositis. In this article, a 4-year-old boy with generalized nonpitting edema and proximal weakness is reported. Characteristic cutaneous lesions, laboratory tests, results of electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings resulted in a diagnosis of juvenile dermatomyositis. He was treated with corticosteroids and methotrexate. It is concluded that the generalized edema may appear as the presenting cutaneous manifestation of juvenile dermatomyositis. PMID:18984850

Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun; Baskin, Esra; Bayrakci, Umut Selda; Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan; Ozbek, Namik

2008-11-01

246

A Wall Correction Program Based on Classical Methods for the National Transonic Facility (Solid Wall or Slotted Wall) and the 14x22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel at NASA LaRC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Fortran subroutine CMWALL is described, which is an implementation of the collective information from classical methods-based wall corrections. These methods use established closed-form expressions which were developed based on simple linear potential-based methods. This is a simple and rapid tool to calculate corrections due to wall interference in the National Transonic Facility (Solid Wall or Slotted Wall) or the 14x22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel at NASA LaRC. It is designed to be easily implemented in the existing tunnel data reduction programs, either as real-time or post-point. It is however important to realize that the method is based on the simplifying assumptions of linearity, small model and attached flow. The computed results are thus to be viewed as first-cut estimates, to be refined further using more complex methods based on measured wall pressures (known as wall signature methods).

Hemsch, Michael J. (Technical Monitor); Iyer, Venkit

2004-01-01

247

Pathways and Predictors of Juvenile Justice Involvement for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Youths: A Focus on Gender  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the growth of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) youths in court and correctional involvement, studies of their delinquency and juvenile justice involvement are quite limited, and the literature becomes almost nonexistent when examining gender differences. Using case file analysis of 150 Native Hawaiian\\/part-Hawaiian and Pacific Islander juvenile offenders, this article addresses this dearth of research by showing

Lisa Pasko; David T. Mayeda

2011-01-01

248

Juvenile Offenders with Behavioral Disorders, Learning Disabilities, and No Disabilities: Self-Reports of Personal, Family, and School Characteristics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 266 juvenile offenders found 37.1 percent had been in special education, with most classified as having behavioral disorders or learning disabilities. Juveniles with special education experience were more likely to need corrective lenses, to have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and to have taken medication for emotional…

Zabel, Robert H.; Nigro, Frank A.

1999-01-01

249

Runaway Juvenile Crime?: The context of juvenile arrests in America  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of homicide arrests have declined by 30% over the last three years. A new JPI analysis of the 1995 FBI data showed that 85 % of the counties in America experienced no juvenile homicides, and 93.4% experienced one, or no juvenile homicides. Recent data shows America arrests kids for running away from home at 65 times the rate

Jason Ziedenberg; Vincent Schiraldi

1998-01-01

250

Juvenile Justice Bulletin: Aftercare Services. Juvenile Justice Practices Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin examines aftercare services that provide youth with comprehensive health, education, family, and vocational services upon their release from the juvenile justice system. Aftercare can be defined as reintegrative services that prepare out-of-home placed juveniles for reentry into the community by reestablishing the necessary…

Gies, Steve V.

251

Addendum to the corrective action plan for Underground Storage Tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1: Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID {number_sign}0-010117  

SciTech Connect

This document represents an addendum to the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U located at Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The site of the four underground storage tanks is commonly referred to as the Rust Garage Facility. The original CAP was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review in May 1992. During the time period after submission of the original CAP for the Rust Garage Facility, Y-12 Plant Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program personnel continued to evaluate improvements that would optimize resources and expedite the activities schedule presented in the original CAP. Based on these determinations, several revisions to the original corrective action process options for remediation of contaminated soils are proposed. The revised approach will involve excavation of the soils from the impacted areas, on-site thermal desorption of soil contaminants, and final disposition of the treated soils by backfilling into the subject site excavations. Based on evaluation of the corrective actions with regard to groundwater, remediation of groundwater under the Y-12 Plant CERCLA Program is proposed for the facility.

Not Available

1994-01-01

252

Assessing Correctional Rehabilitation: Policy, Practice, and Prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theme that has persisted throughout the history of American cor- rections is that efforts should be made to reform offenders. In partic- ular, at the beginning of the 1900s, the rehabilitative ideal was enthusiastically trumpeted and helped to direct the renovation of the correctional system (e.g., implementation of indeterminate sentenc- ing, parole, probation, a separate juvenile justice system). For

Francis T. Cullen; Paul Gendreau

253

Psychopathology in Female Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The aim was to document the spectrum of present and lifetime psychological disorders in female juvenile offenders, and to examine the relations between mental health status and socio-demographic, family and trauma variables. Method: One hundred juvenile offenders were matched with a comparison group of 100 females on age and…

Dixon, Angela; Howie, Pauline; Starling, Jean

2004-01-01

254

Rubella and juvenile chronic arthritis.  

PubMed Central

A 9-year-old boy with a clinical illness similar to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis was found to have rubella virus in the synovial fluid. There was complete remission of symptoms after 3 months. The role of rubella virus as a possible possible aetiological agent in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. PMID:7247445

Smith, M F; Haycock, G B; Grahame, R

1981-01-01

255

Juvenile sarcoidosis after BCG vaccination  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the case of a 2-year-old boy with juvenile sarcoidosis, in whom the cutaneous lesions first arose at the site of and soon after a BCG vaccination. Juvenile sarcoidosis is rare, and the pattern of clinical features is distinct from the adult form of sarcoidosis, possibly related to immunologic development. The cause of sarcoidosis is unknown, although there is

Genevieve E. N. Osborne; Eleanor Mallon; Susan C. Mayou

2003-01-01

256

Juvenile Justice in Rural America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Producing a much-needed organized body of literature about rural juvenile justice, 14 papers (largely from the 1979 National Symposium on Rural Justice) are organized to identify current issues, identify forces causing changes in current systems, review programs responding to rural juvenile justice problems, and provide planning models to aid…

Jankovic, Joanne, Ed.; And Others

257

Iatrogenic Effect of Juvenile Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The present study uses data from a community sample of 779 low-SES boys to investigate whether intervention by the juvenile justice system is determined, at least in part, by particular individual, familial and social conditions, and whether intervention by the juvenile courts during adolescence increases involvement in adult crime.…

Gatti, Uberto; Tremblay, Richard E.; Vitaro, Frank

2009-01-01

258

Juvenile Crime. Opposing Viewpoints Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Books in the Opposing Viewpoints Series present debates about current issues that can be used to teach critical reading and thinking skills. The variety of opinions expressed in this collection of articles and book excerpts explores many aspects of juvenile crime. It is a commonly held view that the number of crimes committed by juveniles is…

Sadler, A. E., Ed.

259

Juvenile Sex Offenders in Diversion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to address the treatment of juvenile sex offenders within diversion programs. Using data from 32 diversion programs in Colorado during the 1998–1999 fiscal year, the study observed the demographic and legal characteristics of 112 juvenile (Mean age = 14.64) sex offenders referred to diversion programs for seven types of sex assault, incest, and indecent exposure charges.

Justin S. Campbell; Cherise Lerew

2002-01-01

260

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: an update  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most com- mon chronic arthropathy of childhood. Previous ter- minology identified this entity as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The 7 subsets of JIA identified under the new classification system are discussed, as are current treatments. A differential diagnosis of JIA is included as this condition continues to be diagnosed by exclu- sion. Recent studies, which

S Singh; KR Jat

2008-01-01

261

Iatrogenic effect of juvenile justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The present study uses data from a community sample of 779 low-SES boys to investigate whether intervention by the juvenile justice system is determined, at least in part, by particular indi- vidual, familial and social conditions, and whether intervention by the juvenile courts during adoles- cence increases involvement in adult crime. Method: The study considers self-reported crime in childhood

Uberto Gatti; Richard E. Tremblay; Frank Vitaro

2009-01-01

262

Psychopathology in female juvenile offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The aim was to document the spectrum of present and lifetime psychological disorders in female juvenile offenders, and to examine the relations between mental health status and socio- demographic, family and trauma variables. Method: One hundred juvenile offenders were matched with a comparison group of 100 females on age and socioeconomic status (SES). Psychological profiles and trauma histories of

Angela Dixon; Pauline Howie; Jean Starling

2004-01-01

263

Gender Role Expectations of Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the development of two five-item Likert scales that classify juveniles' gender role expectations as highly traditional to nontraditional. One is composed of behavioral expectations that juveniles define as traditionally feminine and the other is composed of expectations they define as traditionally masculine. With a sample of junior and senior high school students, correlational and factor analyses of

Neal Shover; Stephen Norland; Jennifer James

1978-01-01

264

Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The central question examined in this address is, “Do children's crimes make them adults?” I begin by focusing on the concept and history of adolescence in our society, I then examine the development and philosophy of the juvenile justice system. Adolescent development and juvenile justice are brought together around the concepts of maturity, judgment, and competence, followed by a brief

N. Dickon Reppucci

1999-01-01

265

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2007-2008 Report. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile-justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA) (formerly named the Board of Corrections) the administrator of funding. A 2001 California Senate bill extended the funding and changed the…

Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

2010-01-01

266

Criminal and behavioral aspects of juvenile sexual homicide.  

PubMed

This preliminary research provides a descriptive, systematic study of juvenile sexual homicide. Fourteen incarcerated juveniles, identified through a department of corrections computer search, were assessed using a structured diagnostic interview, an author-designed clinical interview, and a review of correctional files and other available records. Five of the offenders' victims survived the homicidal attack, but their cases were nevertheless included in this study as the offenders' intent was clearly to kill their victim, and the victim's survival was merely by chance. All victims were female and all offenders were male. Their crimes typically occurred in the afternoon, and involved a low-risk victim of the same race who lived in the offender's neighborhood. The sexual component of the crime consisted of vaginal rape in over one-half of the cases. Weapons, typically a knife or bludgeon, were used in all but one case. Thirteen of these youths had a prior history of violence, and twelve had previous arrests. Chaotic, abusive backgrounds and poor adjustment in school were typical for these boys. A conduct disorder diagnosis was present in twelve of the youths, and violent sexual fantasies were experienced by one-half of the sample. The findings in this study suggest that juvenile sexual murderers comprise less than 1% of juvenile murderers, and are likely to be an emotionally and behaviorally disturbed population with serious familial, academic, and environmental vulnerabilities. PMID:9544541

Myers, W C; Burgess, A W; Nelson, J A

1998-03-01

267

Juvenile JusticeA System Divided  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing public focus on the effects of juvenile crime on society has dramatically impacted juvenile justice policy decisions in recent years. Historically, juvenile justice policy makers have attempted to address juvenile crime by promoting policies that address the rehabilitative needs of the offender. However, throughout the last 20 years of the 20th century, policy makers have advocated more punitive

W. Jeff Hinton; Patricia L. Sims; Mary Ann Adams; Charles West

2007-01-01

268

JUVENILE LAW AND PROCEDURES Class Information  

E-print Network

JUVENILE LAW AND PROCEDURES Class Information: Justice Systems, 333 Mondays from 6:30 p.m. to 9 in this course follow the successful completion of Justice Systems 307, The Legal System. Textbooks: The Juvenile of the organization, functioning and jurisdiction of the juvenile courts and other juvenile justice agencies

Gering, Jon C.

269

Recidivism of juvenile homicide offenders.  

PubMed

Serious offenses against persons perpetrated by juveniles raise fundamental questions about the background, causes, and prevention of future crime. The current study addresses the potential of future crime of all juvenile homicide offenders (JHOs) in the Netherlands in the period 1992-2007. In contrast to former research on recidivism of JHOs, which has been merely descriptive, the present study integrates theoretical perspectives as to why some of these juveniles turn back to crime, while others do not. To this end, relationships are investigated between recidivism behavior and risk factors. Results indicate that male JHOs, and JHOs who maintain relationships with delinquents, run a greater risk of reoffending. PMID:21484856

Vries, Anne M; Liem, Marieke

2011-01-01

270

Juvenile diabetes mellitus in Ethiopians.  

PubMed

The clinical features seen in 27 Ethiopian juvenile diabetics, which were similar to those of juvenile diabetics elsewhere, are summarized in this first published report from an African country of childhood diabetes. Control was difficult and admission to hospital frequent because of poverty, uncontrolled diets and irregular supplies of insulin. This group of childhood diabetics represents 9.8% of patients attending a diabetic clinic in Addis Ababa. Survey of the published information on diabetes mellitus in African populations reveals that most series do contain several children and a significant number of teenagers. It is concluded that juvenile diabetes mellitus is not rare in African countries. PMID:395728

Lester, F T

1979-01-01

271

Juvenile Justice: Detention Using Staff Supervision Rather Than Architectural Barriers. Report to Congressional Requesters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes information on juvenile detention facilities using staff supervision rather than architectural barriers, such as barred windows and locked doors. Results of a survey of staff secure facilities are detailed in the appendix and eight tables of data are provided. Topics covered in the appendix, which comprises most the…

General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

272

Predicting Secure Detention Placement for African-American Juvenile Offenders: Addressing the Disproportionate Minority Confinement Problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disproportionate minority contact and confinement (DMC) are significant problems within the juvenile justice system in the United States. Minority youth are more often arrested, court referred, placed in locked facilities, and transferred to adult criminal courts. In fact, African American youth are 6 times more likely than White youth to experience a secure facility placement. Standardized risk assessments have been

Christopher A. Mallett; Patricia Stoddard-Dare

2010-01-01

273

Corrections ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

�5754 CORRECTIONS #12;MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Differentiated kidney epithelial cells repair injured, specifically Flow Cytometry Core. This work was supported by the National Cancer Institute Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence at MIT-Harvard (U54-CA151884), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National

Epstein, Irving R.

274

Juvenile Crime Victims in the Justice System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The literature on juvenile justice is largely concerned with offenders: topics such as juvenile courts, the rights of juvenile\\u000a offenders, the adjudication of juveniles as adults, and the effectiveness of delinquency prevention programs. But juveniles\\u000a have contact with the justice system in another role—in the role of victims—and this is not an intersection that has been\\u000a addressed nearly so intensively

David Finkelhor; Mallie J. Paschall; Patricia Y. Hashima

275

Social work and juvenile probation: historical tensions and contemporary convergences.  

PubMed

Social work's weak presence in the field of corrections is peculiar, given that those involved in the criminal andjuvenile justice systems are undeniably among the vulnerable and oppressed populations that the profession has traditionally served. The field of juvenile probation shares roots with the profession of social work but lacks a strong connection to it today. Traditional explanations focus on the reluctance of social workers to engage clients in coercive environments, but historical analysis suggests that this account tells only part of the story. An examination of social work's origins shows that issues involving gender stereotyping and the failure of theory help explain social workers' diminished role in juvenile probation. In recent decades, changes in attitudes regarding gender and working with coerced clients, as well as evidence of effective interventions, suggest that social workers may be ready to reengage meaningfully with juvenile probation and other corrections work. This article outlines steps in professional education and workforce development that would move the profession toward reintegrating social work into the corrections field. PMID:22308668

Peters, Clark M

2011-10-01

276

A Giant Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma  

PubMed Central

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) are locally growing highly vascular tumours. They are treated primarily by surgical excision ranging from open approach to endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old male with a giant nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibroma obliterating the pterygopalatine fossa bilaterally, invasing the sphenoid bone and extending to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically with endoscopic approach and discharged as cured without any complication. PMID:23714961

Yuce, Salim; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Dogan, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; Salk, Ismail; Muderris, Suphi

2012-01-01

277

Culvert Testing Program for Juvenile Salmonid Passage  

SciTech Connect

In partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has undertaken a phased program conducted by an interdisciplinary team of experts to address the hydraulic and behavioral issues associated with juvenile salmonid fish passage through culvert systems. Juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) is the initial test subject. This program addresses the testing and assessment of culvert designs, along with associated measurements of hydraulic conditions and fish behavior, occurring in full-scale physical models of culvert systems deployed in an experimental test bed. The proposed approach includes the use of three kinds of models. First, a conceptual model of fish passage is developed to guide the design of hydraulic and behavioral testing and to interpret the results. Second, mathematical models of culvert hydraulics provide information to design the full-scale test facility and to guide design of the hydraulic a nd behavioral testing program. Third, full-scale physical models of culverts in a test bed are used to evaluate fish passage quantitatively. Using the knowledge and data from previous studies, this program will encompass the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a full-scale, controlled culvert test bed. Experiments in the testing apparatus will measure the hydraulic conditions (mean velocity, turbulence, and water depth) associated with various culvert designs under various slopes and flow regimes and then relate these measures to repeatable, quantitative measures of fish passage success. After construction in late spring, 2001, preliminary trials will be conducted in summer 2001.

Pearson, Walter H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Richmond, Marshall C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schafer, Jim (Washington State Department of Transportation)

2002-01-01

278

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare fatal hematopoietic disorder of early childhood. We are presenting a case of 9-month-old female child who was admitted with abdominal distension, irritability, and hepatosplenomegaly. Peripheral blood film examination showed leukoerythroblastosis with leukocytosis, absolute monocytosis, microcytic hypo chromic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow examination showed myeloid hyperplasia, Hb HPLC revealed normal HbF (1.3 %) and HbA2 (2.9 %). There was absolute gamma globulinemia and DCT positivity. Cytogenetic studies revealed a normal karyotype with absence of Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, monosomy 7 or any other chromosomal abnormality. Diagnosis of JMML was rendered according to the diagnostic criteria laid down by WHO classification 2008 with presence of peripheral blood monocytosis >1 × 10(9)/L, blasts <20 % of leucocytes in blood or nucleated cells in bone marrow, absence of Ph chromosome, presence of immature granulocytes in the blood and WBC count >10 × 10(9)/L. The patient was then started on a regimen of chemotherapy to which she gave a promising response. PMID:24426365

Sethi, Neha; Kushwaha, Shivani; Dhingra, Bhawana; Pujani, Mukta; Chandra, Jagdish; Shukla, Shailaja

2013-09-01

279

Managing juvenile Huntington's disease  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Huntington’s disease (HD) is a well-recognized progressive neurodegenerative disorder that follows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Onset is insidious and can occur at almost any age, but most commonly the diagnosis is made between the ages of 35 and 55 years. Onset ?20 years of age is classified as juvenile HD (JHD). This age-based definition is arbitrary but remains convenient. There is overlap between the clinical pathological and genetic features seen in JHD and more traditional adult-onset HD. Nonetheless, the frequent predominance of bradykinesia and dystonia early in the course of the illness, more frequent occurrence of epilepsy and myoclonus, more widespread pathology, and larger genetic lesion means that the distinction is still relevant. In addition, the relative rarity of JHD means that the clinician managing the patient is often doing so for the first time. Management is, at best, symptomatic and supportive with few or no evidence-based guidelines. In this article, the authors will review what is known of the condition and present some suggestions based on their experience. PMID:24416077

Quarrell, Oliver W. J.; Nance, Martha A.; Nopoulos, Peggy; Paulsen, Jane S.; Smith, Jonathan A.; Squitieri, Ferdinando

2013-01-01

280

Update in juvenile myositis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review This update on childhood idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) reviews recent progress in the field of translational science and clinical research over the past 12–18 months. Recent findings Several new studies, including results from the international genome-wide association study, point to abnormalities of the adaptive immune system in childhood IIMs. Circulating T-follicular helper cells promote plasma cell differentiation and have been found in high levels in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), which may account the frequency of autoantibodies seen in this disease. One of the latest to be identified in JDM targets the protein NXP-2 and is associated with an increased risk of calcinosis in young patients. The first randomized controlled clinical trial in refractory adult and childhood IIMs was reported this year. B-cell depletion with the anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, failed to achieve its primary end point, but patients with JDM did show good improvement in disease activity. A new international definition of disease remission in JDM has been agreed, which will aid disease assessment in future therapeutic trials. Summary The challenges of studying a rare disease such as JDM have been overcome by several collaborative studies and have led to significant progress in understanding the cause, treatment and prognosis of childhood IIMs. PMID:24061078

Nistala, Kiran; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

2013-01-01

281

Juveniles tried as adults: the age of the juvenile matters.  

PubMed

Serious juvenile crimes require evaluation of a child as a criminal defendant in adult court. In such cases, it is crucial to understand jurors' attitudes, biases, and ability to follow legal instructions and maintain fairness. 308 undergraduate psychology students served as mock jurors, were randomly separated into four groups, and each group read the same realistic summary of a trial with the defendant's age presented as 13, 15, 17, or 21 years. Participants were asked to render guilty or not guilty verdicts and, if guilty, to suggest sentences. Chi-squared analysis indicated 13- and 15-year-old defendants were convicted less often than 17- and 21-year-old defendants, showing that jurors distinguished between juvenile defendants of different ages, but not minors and adults as defined by law. Additional analysis showed that age did not affect sentencing recommendations. Decision processes jurors use for juveniles tried as adults are discussed. PMID:22049670

Semple, Jaclyn K; Woody, William Douglas

2011-08-01

282

POLITICI DE PREVENIRE SI RESOCIALIZARE A MINORILOR DELICVENTI IN DOCUMENTE INTERNATIONALE - POLICIES OF PREVENTION AND RESOCIALIZATION OF JUVENILE OFFENDERS IN INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTS (Romanian version)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of criminal liability of the juvenile offender as well as the prevention and combating of juvenile delinquency have been and continue to represent an actuality in the criminal policy in modern states. It is presumed that the child needs special treatment in terms of criminal liability since he does not possess the correct representation of what his procedural

RAMONA ACSINTE

2010-01-01

283

The Effect of Job Involvement on Correctional Staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

The driving force of corrections is the staff of correctional facilities. It is important to understand how the work environment shapes the attitudes of correctional staff; yet, the effect of job involvement on correctional employees has received little, if any, attention. Most of the research to date has focused on job stress and job satisfaction among correctional staff. Only recently

Eric G. Lambert

284

Does Completion of Juvenile Drug Court Deter Adult Criminality?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile drug courts have been developed with the explicit mission of reducing juvenile substance use and related delinquency, and adult crime. Research has shown that juvenile drug courts continue to be popular and effective alternatives to other juvenile court initiatives in terms of decreasing juvenile recidivism. This study is the first to focus on the link between juvenile drug court

W. Craig Carter; R. Donald Barker

2011-01-01

285

Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Lessons Social Media: Connect With Us Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Juvenile ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

286

USE OF OTOLITHS TO SEPARATE JUVENILE STEELHEAD TROUT FROM JUVENILE RAINBOW TROUT1  

E-print Network

USE OF OTOLITHS TO SEPARATE JUVENILE STEELHEAD TROUT FROM JUVENILE RAINBOW TROUT1 J. T. RYBOCK', H are significantly larger than those of rainbow, size of otolith nuclei does not change with growth of either race provides a means to differentiate effectively juvenile steelhead trout and juvenile rainbow trout

287

JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES Mental Health Issues in California's Juvenile Justice System  

E-print Network

MAY 2010 JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES Mental Health Issues in California's Juvenile Justice System #12;Juvenile Justice Advisory Board This project was guided by a diverse group of key leaders from,LosAngelesCountyDepartmentofMentalHealth ·BarrieBecker,California State Director, Fight Crime: Invest in Kids ·JamesBell,Executive Director, W.HaywoodBurnsInstituteforJuvenileJustice

Kammen, Daniel M.

288

Juvenile periodontitis: an historical review.  

PubMed

A review of the literature on juvenile periodontitis has been undertaken. This paper traces the historical development of the appreciation of the condition. Some of the numerous early attempts to define a systemic background are noted, and the concept of 'periodontosis' and its subsequent influence, e.g. on epidemiological and clinical studies are discussed. The refining over the last 20 years of the concept of aggressive periodontal disease in the young is recorded. The patterns of bone loss in juvenile periodontitis and some forms of treatment are presented, together with evidence on its histopathology. Recent research has tended to concentrate on the microbiology and immunological background of juvenile periodontitis and a number of these studies are discussed. PMID:6752359

Saxby, M S

1982-09-01

289

Corrections to \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the above titled paper (ibid., vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 443-458, Jun 07), Fig. 11 was printed with some mathematical symbols missing in lines 3, 6, 8, and 13. The corrected figure and its caption are presented here.

Min Li; Yun-hui Liu

2007-01-01

290

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has recently placed an item of interest online. This item, from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention (OJJDP), is the 1999 national report on Juvenile Offenders and Victims, "the most comprehensive source of information about juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and about the response of the juvenile justice system to these problems." The report is offered in seven chapters in .pdf format.

Sickmund, Melissa.; Snyder, Howard N.

291

Juvenile sarcoidosis after BCG vaccination.  

PubMed

We report the case of a 2-year-old boy with juvenile sarcoidosis, in whom the cutaneous lesions first arose at the site of and soon after a BCG vaccination. Juvenile sarcoidosis is rare, and the pattern of clinical features is distinct from the adult form of sarcoidosis, possibly related to immunologic development. The cause of sarcoidosis is unknown, although there is much interest in the possibility of mycobacterial species operating as antigenic stimuli to initiate the disease. This case suggests that the Mycobacterium bovis present in the BGC vaccination may have been etiologically important in the development of sarcoidosis. PMID:12734491

Osborne, Genevieve E N; Mallon, Eleanor; Mayou, Susan C

2003-05-01

292

On the Prevention of Juvenile Crime  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Crimes committed by juveniles are among the most urgent social problems. Juvenile crime is as prevalent as crime itself is, and it has not been solved completely in any society and cannot be solved through law enforcement measures alone. In this article, the authors discuss the dynamics and structure of juvenile crime in Russia and present data…

Lelekov, V. A.; Kosheleva, E. V.

2008-01-01

293

AUGUST 2010 JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES  

E-print Network

AUGUST 2010 JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES Gender Responsiveness and Equity in California's Juvenile Justice System #12;Juvenile Justice Advisory Board This project was guided by a diverse group.WilliamArroyo,Medical Director,LosAngelesCountyDepartmentofMentalHealth ·BarrieBecker,California State Director, Fight Crime

Kammen, Daniel M.

294

The Shackling ofThe Shackling ofThe Shackling ofThe Shackling of Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders:Juvenile Offenders  

E-print Network

of unshackling further argue that most juvenile defendants are not charged with violent crimes, decreasing percent of juvenile arrests in 2006 included simple assault.8 In contrast, in 2006, property crimes are excessive; since most juveniles are arrested for property crimes or status offenses, the threat of courtroom

Mazzotti, Frank

295

76 FR 54978 - Special Immigrant Juvenile Petitions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCIS-2009-0004] RIN 1615-AB81 Special Immigrant Juvenile Petitions AGENCY: U.S. Citizenship...regulations governing the Special Immigrant Juvenile (SIJ) classification, and related...This proposed rule would require that juvenile court dependency be in effect at...

2011-09-06

296

Assessing Juvenile Sexual Offenders' Risk for Reoffending  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research was to investigate how best to identify juvenile sexual offenders who are likely to reoffend. The juvenile justice records of 112 male juvenile sexual offenders were examined. Information obtained during evaluation at a specialized, community-based program was compared with records of subsequent sexual and nonsexual reoffending. Certain characteristics of the referral offense and aspects of

WAYNE R. SMITH; CAREN MONASTERSKY

1986-01-01

297

Guidelines for Juvenile Information Sharing. OJJDP Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The juvenile information sharing (JIS) guidelines were prepared by the Center for Network Development (CND) for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The guidelines suggest a course of action for key agency and organization stakeholders involved in a state or local effort to implement and sustain juvenile information…

Mankey, Jennifer; Baca, Patricia; Rondenell, Stephanie; Webb, Marilyn; McHugh, Denise

2006-01-01

298

TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY Juvenile Delinquency, Justice 332  

E-print Network

1 TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY Juvenile Delinquency, Justice 332 Class Information Where: Barnett Room will also include a brief history and the functioning of the juvenile justice system. Required Books, ISBN 0-684-81195-2 Juvenile Justice, The System, Process and Law by Roland V. Del Carmen and Chad R

Gering, Jon C.

299

Gender differences in stalking behaviour among juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is emerging recognition that stalking is a problem behaviour among juveniles. As gender differences in the nature of stalking have been observed to exist in adult stalkers, it is important to ascertain whether gender differences are also apparent in juvenile perpetrators. This study compared the characteristics and motivations of stalking behaviour in an Australian sample of juvenile perpetrators (n = 299),

Rosemary Purcell; Michele Pathé; Paul Mullen

2010-01-01

300

What Can Be Done about Juvenile Homicide?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using information available regarding juvenile homicide, it is possible to draw several conclusions. First, a disproportionate number of juveniles who commit homicide reside in communities where the high incidence of poverty and the frequency of infant mortality indicate that life is not valued highly. Second, these juveniles are the products of violent, chaotic families. Third, kids who kill are likely

James Sorrells

1980-01-01

301

Collecting informed consent with juvenile justice populations: issues and implications for research.  

PubMed

Researchers must provide participants with opportunities to make informed decisions about whether to participate in research studies. Investigators conducting research with youth in the juvenile justice system face unique ethical, legal, and practical challenges to obtaining informed consent. Juvenile justice researchers must navigate multiple legal and ethical standards for collecting informed consent, take into account youths' dual vulnerabilities as children and prisoners, and overcome practical limitations to obtaining parental/guardian permission. Given the challenges and complexity of obtaining standard informed consent of youth in juvenile justice facilities, this paper provides suggestions for overcoming obstacles to recruiting these youth for research participation. It offers guidance for fostering the enrollment of juvenile justice youth in research studies using procedures that comply with ethical and legal standards for research with this dually vulnerable population. PMID:23629742

Wolbransky, Melinda; Goldstein, Naomi E S; Giallella, Christy; Heilbrun, Kirk

2013-01-01

302

Prevention of Serious and Violent Juvenile Offending. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin explores the proximal risk factors for juvenile offending, reviews the early developmental precursors to violent offending, and summarizes approaches to prevention. It also discusses components of intervention programs, limitations of single-focus prevention, examples of multi systemic interventions, and limitations of prevention…

Wasserman, Gail A.; Miller, Laurie S.; Cothern, Lynn

303

Mobilizing Communities To Prevent Juvenile Crime. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through Title V Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Programs (Community Prevention Grants), the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) allocated $20 million in fiscal year 1997 to states to complement law enforcement and justice system efforts by helping local communities foster strong families and nurture…

Bownes, Donna; Ingersoll, Sarah

304

A Century of Juvenile Justice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The millennium marks the beginning of a second century for the formal system of juvenile justice in the United States. From its inception, the central focus of the system has been delinquency, an amorphous construct that includes not only "criminal" behavior but also an array of youthful actions that offend prevailing social norms. Thus, the…

Harris, Philip W.; Welsh, Wayne N.; Butler, Frank

305

Trends in Serious Juvenile Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

Throughout the past decade, serious juvenile crime has been the focus of considerable attention by legislators, law enforcement personnel, academic criminologists, media, and the public. Despite this attention, however, misunderstanding, misperception, and confusion still exist and, in some instances, seem to dominate both research and public policy. Utilizing National Crime Survey (NCS) victimization data as an alternative to official and

JOHN H. LAUB

1983-01-01

306

Types of Juvenile Sex Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) account for a significant percentage of sex crimes committed in this country, researchers have only recently begun to study this population. One line of inquiry has been to investigate sub-types of offenders, in order to determine whether different types of offenders have different personality profiles and…

Bauman, Sheri

2002-01-01

307

An update on juvenile dermatomyositis.  

PubMed

Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare, severe, autoimmune disease characterized by a small-vessel vasculopathy that primarily affects skin and muscle, but also lung, joints, gut and heart. Nowadays prompt recognition of this entity and aggressive treatment, when needed, improves outcomes and has decreased mortality that, before corticosteroid became a mainstay in therapy, could reach 40%. PMID:25034096

Boccaletti, V; Di Nuzzo, S; Feliciani, C; Fabrizi, G; Pagliarello, C

2014-10-01

308

Juvenile Criminals: Who Are They?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many adolescents who were born in the late 1970s and 1980s in Russia became juvenile criminals due to the change in the social structure, the proclamation of the values of the comfortable way of life, the institution of property ownership and so forth. Many young people have to help relatives who are in need, and this as well often causes them to…

Antonov, A. I.; Lebed, O. L.

2005-01-01

309

Juvenile offender recidivism: an examination of risk factors.  

PubMed

One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between recidivism and nine specific variables: offense type, age at initial involvement in juvenile justice, child welfare system involvement, termination of parental rights, parental criminal history, family support, program completion status, length of treatment stay, and discharge placement. Offender type was the only factor found to have a significant impact on recidivism with general and substance-involved offenders more likely to recidivate than sex offenders. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:22574843

Calley, Nancy G

2012-01-01

310

Educational Follow-Up Study of Juveniles Released from Ethan Allen and Lincoln Hills Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the educational experiences of all 759 youth released from Wisconsin's two juvenile correctional institutions during 1979. School records, including transcripts from schools attended before and after release, were reviewed for each youth. Parole officers were interviewed whenever school records were in question. Only 3 percent of…

Pawasarat, John; And Others

311

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act. RAND Quarterly Report, October 2008. TR-621-LACPD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In July 2008, RAND Corporation staff conducted Correctional Program Checklist (CPC) assessments of five home-based programs (Asian Youth Center, Communities in Schools, Inter-Agency Drug Abuse Recovery Programs, Soledad Enrichment Action, and Stars Behavioral Health Group) as part of its ongoing evaluation of Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

2008-01-01

312

Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Panel on Juvenile Crime: Prevention, Treatment, and Control.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book discusses patterns and trends in crimes committed by children and adolescents, analyzing youth crime as a subset of general crime and studying the impact of race and gender. It evaluates different approaches to forecasting future crime rates. Data come from a national panel that examined what is known about juvenile crime and its…

McCord, Joan, Ed.; Widom, Cathy Spatz, Ed.; Crowell, Nancy A., Ed.

313

Much Ado About Something: Providing Mental Health Services to Remanded Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The public's concern for adolescent violent crimes in its communities has sparked a national trend of legislative action to send these juveniles to adult court to stand trial. The adult criminal justice system already is overburdened with adult offenders. Adult jail facilities often are ill-equipped to handle the emotional, medical, and mental health needs of this special population of offenders.

Gwen Levitt

1999-01-01

314

Library Outreach to Juvenile Offenders in Intensive Supervision Probation Programs (Community Centered House Arrest)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The American Library Association encourages public libraries to extend their services to people in jails and detention centers, but there is little research that shows exactly how many libraries do so. Research shows that 54% of juveniles arrested are not sent to residential facilities but instead receive court ordered probation into an Intensive…

Brumfield, Elizabeth Jean

2008-01-01

315

Juvenile Crime and Drug Abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results from an ongoing, longitudinal study of juvenile detainees focusing on the relationship between their drug use and delinquency\\/crime, are summarized. Three hundred and ninety-nine youths were first interviewed in 1986\\/87, and 41 percent were found to be urine positive for recent drug use at the time of detention. We reinterviewed 305 of the youths approximately one year later, and

Richard Dembo; Linda Williams; James Schmeidler; Eric D. Wish; Alan Getreu; Estrellita Berry

1992-01-01

316

Juvenile Delinquency: Symptom or Syndrome?  

PubMed Central

Dr. Stephenson discusses juvenile delinquency as a symptom of a variety of underlying problems, a syndrome or a disease entity. She describes research carried out in Vancouver in which multiple factors were found to be concerned, with three major types of delinquents identified. Delinquency is seen to be a symptom of relatively healthy adolescent development, of social disturbance or emotional disturbance. The research was supported by National Health Grant 609-7-194. PMID:20468781

Stephenson, P. Susan

1972-01-01

317

Juvenile Victims of Property Crimes  

E-print Network

improving the justice system’s response to crimes against children. OJJDP recognizes that children are at increased risk for crime victimization. Not only are children the victims of many of the same crimes that victimize adults, they are subject to other crimes, like child abuse and neglect, that are specific to childhood. The impact of these crimes on young victims can be devastating, and the violent or sexual victimization of children can often lead to an intergenerational cycle of violence and abuse. The purpose of OJJDP’s Crimes Against Children Series is to improve and expand the Nation’s efforts to better serve child victims by presenting the latest information about child victimization, including analyses of crime victimization statistics, studies of child victims and their special needs, and descriptions of programs and approaches that address these needs. Property crime is the most frequent kind of criminal victimization and one with important economic and psychological consequences, although it has not received the same public attention as violent crime in recent years. Property crime victimization rates are much higher for juveniles than for adults, but very little attention has been paid to property crimes against juveniles or the particular features that characterize these crimes. This Bulletin tries to fill this gap by examining the characteristics of property crimes against juveniles. It uses crime information from

John J. Wilson; Acting Administrator; David Finkelhor; Richard Ormrod

2000-01-01

318

Correctional Managed Health Care July 2010 -June 2011  

E-print Network

The Connecticut Department of Correction (CDOC) historically provided health services to inmates directly, using care to inmates within the DOC correctional facilities and halfway houses. Our services shallCorrectional Managed Health Care July 2010 - June 2011 CMHC ANNUAL REPORT Introduction Correctional

Kim, Duck O.

319

Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

2014-09-01

320

"Children of the city": juvenile justice, property, and place in England and Scotland, 1945-60.  

PubMed

This article uses cases studies of Dundee and Manchester to explain juvenile property-offending in terms of young people's use of objects and spaces in the period 1945-60. A composite picture is assembled of objects stolen, which reflects growth of the specifically "teenage" consumer market as well as continued significance of young people's contribution to family economies. Concerns about youth, property, and space were reported in newspapers in terms of vandalism and hooliganism. "Play" and "nuisance" were overlapping and contested categories; re-education of young people in the correct use of place, space, and property was a key aim of the postwar juvenile justice system. PMID:21328805

Jackson, Louise A; Bartie, Angela

2011-01-01

321

[Importance of aggressive treatment in juvenile dermatomyositis].  

PubMed

Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common idiopathic inflammatory myopathy in children. Its outcome depends on the precocity of the diagnosis and of the treatment, but predictive parameters for guiding the correct therapeutic and prognostic approaches to JDM are still lacking. We analysed the one-year-old outcomes of 20 JDM patients treated with methylprednisolone boluses, methotrexate, and cyclophosphamide, through a longitudinal retrospective study. The outcome variables included: the Childhood Myositis Assessment Score (CMAS); Manual Muscle Testing (MMT); the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ); the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ: physical score CHQ PhS and psycho-social score CHQ PsS), patient and parent Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), as well as laboratory data: ESR, LDH, CK, and ALT. Within all JDM patient groups, we discovered significant improvement in all disease activity parameters CMAS (p<0.001) and MMT (p<0.001), followed by a significant decrease in CHAQ (p<0.001), as well as parent VAS (p<0.001) and physician VAS (p<0.001). With regard to laboratory parameters, only CK (p=0.001) and LDH (p=0.013) levels were found to be significantly decreased, while there were no significant changes in ESR and ALT. The results of our study support the findings that the aggressive treatment of JDM patients improves their short-term outlook. PMID:16535995

Vojinovi?, Jelena; Riley, Phil; Maillard, Sue; Pilkington, Clarissa

2005-12-01

322

A Juvenile Justice System for the 21st Century. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin describes the objectives and elements of an effective juvenile justice system and suggests legislative and administrative strategies for its implementation. An effective juvenile justice system must meet the three objectives of holding the juvenile offender accountable, enabling the offender to become a capable and productive…

Bilchik, Shay

323

Juvenile Practice Is Not Child's Play: A Handbook for Attorneys Who Represent Juveniles in Texas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook is an attempt to summarize the most important aspects of juvenile law for a new practitioner, and to offer some additional ideas and strategies to any juvenile defense attorney. The goal is to help improve representation of juveniles across the state of Texas. References to useful books, cases, and statutes are included. The handbook…

2002

324

Juvenile hormone titer versus juvenile hormone synthesis in female nymphs and adults of the German  

E-print Network

Juvenile hormone titer versus juvenile hormone synthesis in female nymphs and adults of the German of Forensic Medicine, Ignaz Harrerstr, 79, 5020 Salzburg, Austria Abstract Patterns of juvenile hormone have. However, data have been mainly obtained in vitro, and refer to hormone synthesized by isolated corpora

Piulachs, M. Dolors

325

National Implications in Juvenile Justice: The Influence of Juvenile Mentoring Programs on At Risk Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1972 the federal government created the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act that procured funding for various governmental programs to combat the sudden increase in juvenile crime. A provision of this Act set out the creation of mentoring programs to help decrease the juvenile crime rate and dropout rates in secondary schools. This…

Belshaw, Scott H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

2007-01-01

326

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME, TASK FORCE REPORT, REPORT ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CONSULTANTS PAPERS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF THE JUVENILE COURT SYSTEM AND THE PREVENTION OF DELINQUENCY. THE COMMISSION'S RECOMMENDATIONS ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY INCLUDE THE AREAS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, HOUSING AND RECREATION, FAMILIES, INVOLVING YOUTHS IN COMMUNITY LIFE, SCHOOLS, AND EMPLOYMENT. THE APPENDIXES, WHICH CONSTITUTE THE…

President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.

327

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

...prosecutions against juveniles. 0.57 Section... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Criminal Division...prosecutions against juveniles. The...implementation of the Juvenile Justice and...

2014-07-01

328

Development and implementation of the cross-site evaluation of the CDC/HRSA corrections demonstration project.  

PubMed

U.S. prisons and jails have the nation's highest concentration of individuals infected with and at risk for HIV infection. Many correctional institutions offer 1-HIV care, but advances are oftentimes lost when individuals with a lack of health insurance and access to care are released into the community. In 1999 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Health Resources and Services Administration jointly funded seven health departments to address this need. These projects target soon-to-be-released inmates of jails, prisons, and juvenile facilities and offer enhanced discharge planning, case management, HIV prevention, disease screening, and staff training. The Evaluation and Program Support Center (EPSC) at Emory University and Abt Associates was funded to oversee a cross-site evaluation of these demonstration projects. This paper describes the process of developing a cross-site evaluation, the implementation of this evaluation, and lessons learned by the EPSC throughout this process. PMID:12092929

Arriola, Kimberly R Jacob; Kennedy, Sofia S; Coltharp, J Cameron; Braithwaite, Ronald L; Hammett, Theodore M; Tinsley, Melinda J

2002-06-01

329

Corrections, the Public Safety, and Offenders' Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the institutional mission and characteristics of local, state, and federal corrections facilities. Reviews the rights of prisoners and considers the interlocking components of a successful rehabilitation effort. Reports on future correctional issues such as in-house substance abuse programs and the aging of the prison population. (MJP)

Quinlan, J. Michael

1997-01-01

330

The impact of incarceration on juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

Increasingly, research points to the negative effects of incarcerating youth offenders, particularly in adult facilities. Literature published since 2000 suggests that incarceration fails to meet the developmental and criminogenic needs of youth offenders and is limited in its ability to provide appropriate rehabilitation. Incarceration often results in negative behavioral and mental health consequences, including ongoing engagement in offending behaviors and contact with the justice system. Although incarceration of youth offenders is often viewed as a necessary means of public protection, research indicates that it is not an effective option in terms of either cost or outcome. The severe behavioral problems of juvenile offenders are a result of complex and interactive individual and environmental factors, which elicit and maintain offending behavior. Therefore, the focus of effective treatment must be on addressing such criminogenic needs and the multiple "systems" in which the young person comes from. Recent research demonstrates that in order to achieve the best outcomes for youth offenders and the general public, community-based, empirically supported intervention practices must be adopted as an alternative to incarceration wherever possible. PMID:23454219

Lambie, Ian; Randell, Isabel

2013-04-01

331

75 FR 70013 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective...Fiscal Year 2011; Correction AGENCY: Centers for...HHS. ACTION: Correction notice...entitled, ``Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective...Effective Date. This correction is effective for...

2010-11-16

332

Survey of Indiana Correctional Institution Libraries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study of the adequacy of library facilities in Indiana's penal institutions was undertaken at the request of a state senate committee studying the Indiana Department of Correction. The penal libraries are judged to be inadequate and their major problems with personnel, materials, services, and physical facilities are listed. Also given are…

Indiana State Library, Indianapolis.

333

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report offers the Congress, state legislators, and other state and local policymakers, professors and teachers, juvenile justice professionals, and concerned citizens solid answers to the most frequently asked questions about the nature of juvenile crime and victimization and about the justice system's response. Citing FBI and other data…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

334

SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC BODY PLUMAGE IN JUVENILE CROSSBILLS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sexual dimorphism in color and pattern of contour feathers is rare in juvenile songbirds. We describe how captive-bred juvenile males of Scottish Crossbill (Loxia scotica) and nominate Red Crossbill (L. curvirostra curvirostra) can be differentiated from females prior to prebasic molt by an unstreaked patch on the males' upper breast. There may be a functional relationship between sexual dimorphism and

PIM EDELAAR; RON E. PHILLIPS; PETER KNOPS

2005-01-01

335

Changes in Juvenile Justice in China.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses rising juvenile and youth crime in China, highlighting the essence of Chinese Marxist criminological thought and changing conceptions of delinquency from the postrevolutionary period to the present; examining official responses to delinquency and the recent development of juvenile justice; and suggesting that current delinquency control…

Wong, Dennis S. W.

2001-01-01

336

Juvenile Crime and Sanctions in the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trends in juvenile crime in the Netherlands are described using police statistics and self-report studies. A sharp rise in juvenile crime is suggested by the police statistics, while the self-report studies reveal a more stable picture. Attention has been paid to explanations of this discrepancy. Furthermore, an overview is given of the penal interventions applied in the Netherlands and the

Karin Wittebrood

2003-01-01

337

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2006 National Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents comprehensive information on juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and on the juvenile justice system. This report brings together the latest available statistics from a variety of sources and includes numerous tables, graphs, and maps, accompanied by analyses in clear, nontechnical language. The report offers Congress,…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

2006-01-01

338

Juvenile Offender Comprehensive Reentry Substance Abuse Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature provides ample evidence of the relationship of substance abuse to crime. Research over the last 20 years has established a strong correlation between substance abuse and juvenile delinquency (held, 1998). Currently, there are more than 350,000 juveniles on probation and in continuing care programs in the U.S. who have substance…

Watson, Donnie W.

2004-01-01

339

Crisis Intervention Services in Juvenile Detention Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of mental disorders among juvenile detainees is estimated to be as high as 60 percent, and reports suggest that adolescents who are detained have a three- to fourfold risk of suicide. The transfer of juveniles who commit serious offenses to the adult legal system and the problems of overwhelmed child care agencies appear to have precipitated a shift

Charles A. Sanislow; John Chapman; Thomas H. McGlashan

2003-01-01

340

Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

2004-01-01

341

Counseling Juvenile Offenders: A Program Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the results of the effectiveness of counseling services provided by the Juvenile Counseling and Assessment Program of the Juvenile Court of Clarke County, Georgia. Individual and group counseling services were provided for 55 adjudicated delinquent youths for four to six months. The recidivism rates of the youths who had received…

Kadish, Tara E.; Glaser, Brian A.; Risler, Edwin A.; Calhoun, Georgia B.

1999-01-01

342

Juvenile recidivism and length of stay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Official data maintained by the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice of 16,779 juveniles released from commitment programs to the community or aftercare between July 1, 1998 and June 30, 2000 were examined in this study. No consistent relationship between length of confinement and recidivism was found. The effects of length of stay were mediated based on the risk level of

Kristin Parsons Winokur; Alisa Smith; Stephanie R. Bontrager; Julia L. Blankenship

2008-01-01

343

Therapeutic Wilderness Programs and Juvenile Recidivism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Very little is known about the effects of wilderness stress-challenge programs on juvenile recidivism. A quasi experimental design is used to assess the effects of participation in an Outward Bound type program on the recidivism of a sample of juvenile probationers. Findings indicate a one-year delinquency reduction effect, which is confined to those youth who successfully completed the program. While

Thomas C. Castellano; Irina R Soderstrom

1992-01-01

344

Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

Fishman, H. Charles

2006-01-01

345

The High Cost of Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Essay will discuss the high cost of incarcerating substantial numbers of minority juveniles and will advocate alternatives to detention. The author discusses how minority youth are disproportionately affected at multiple stages of the criminal justice process: arrests, detentions, adjudication, and disposition. The Essay further discusses the increased use of the prison system for juveniles. The Essay concludes with several

Diane Ridley Gatewood

1993-01-01

346

School of Biological Sciences Juvenile wood  

E-print Network

from juvenile to mature wood in Sitka spruce appears to occur ~ rings 12-13 (Brazier and Mobbs 1993 and Mobbs I D (1993) The influence of planting distance on structural wood yields of unthinned Sitka spruce breeding on the development of juvenile wood in Sitka spruce. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 35: 2951

347

[In]Subordination: Inmate Photography and Narrative Elicitation in a Youth Incarceration Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing urgency and social responsibility regarding the lives and experiences of incarcerated juveniles; the author utilizes a visual ethnographic methodology using participant photography in a prison facility in Louisiana to simultaneously invert the surveillance structure and add “layers of significance” (Pink, 2007) to the narrative process. The results, from the photographs and interviews with six incarcerated juvenile

Jonathan Arendt

2011-01-01

348

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

DOE /NV

1998-12-08

349

Corrective action plan for underground storage tank 0134-U at the Building 9204-2 Site, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tank (UST) 0134-U, previously located at Building 9204-2, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 0134-U, a 117-gallon UST, was removed on December 14, 1988. This document presents a comprehensive summary of all environmental assessment investigations conducted at the Building 9204-2 Site and the corrective action measures proposed for

D. E. Bohrman; E. M. Ingram; C. D. Potter; R. D. Adkison

1992-01-01

350

Attitudes regarding life sentences for juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

Twice in recent years, the U.S. Supreme Court has considered the constitutionality of life sentences without the possibility of parole (LWOP) for juvenile offenders. Given the public nature of this issue, there is scant information on beliefs about imposing LWOP on juveniles. Attitudes on related issues suggest two possibilities. On the one hand, because public opinion regarding juvenile offenders has become somewhat less punitive recently, LWOP may be viewed as excessively harsh punishment. On the other hand, portrayal of some juvenile offenders as superpredators suggests that LWOP may still have public support. We used survey methodology and the unique "ninth justice paradigm" to examine how an offender's age influences beliefs about the appropriateness of LWOP, and the relationship between those beliefs and punishment-related ideologies. Results showed that, except in the case of murder, the majority of respondents disfavored imposing LWOP on juveniles, though a subset approved broad use of LWOP even for young offenders. In fact, after removing from consideration those who oppose LWOP under any circumstances, youthfulness of the offender has little impact on the beliefs about the types of crimes in which LWOP should be imposed (Study 1) or the mean sentence lengths imposed on juvenile offenders (Study 2). Respondents' punishment goals influenced their attitudes, as did beliefs about the likelihood of rehabilitation and reform. Harsh judgments of juveniles who commit serious crimes may result from dispositional attributions of youthful offenders as irredeemable. PMID:23646918

Greene, Edie; Evelo, Andrew J

2013-08-01

351

Challenging the Myths: 1999 National Report Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin, extracted from "Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report," examines juvenile crime statistics, demonstrating that the predictions in the early 1990s of the emergence of juvenile superpredators (juveniles for whom violence is a way of life) is not supported by current data. Research indicates that levels of predatory…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

352

Social and Legal Policy Dimensions of Violent Juvenile Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of what to do about violent delinquents has existed since the juvenile court was established in 1899. Doubts about the efficacy of rehabilitation, together with persistently high rates of violent juvenile crime, placed violent juvenile offenders at the center of an ideological debate between proponents of traditional juvenile justice policies and those who would restrict or eliminate the

JEFFREY FAGAN

1990-01-01

353

The Overrepresentation of Juvenile Crime Proportions in Robbery Clearance Statistics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many, especially casual observers, interpret juvenile arrest statistics to bea measure of crime committed by juveniles. Others argue that clearancestatistics are a more representative index of the relative responsibility ofjuveniles. Using data from the FBI's National Incident-Based ReportingSystem, this paper explores the likelihoods of arrests for juvenile andadult robbery offenders. The findings show that juvenile robbery suspectsare 23% more likely

Howard N. Snyder

1999-01-01

354

Profile of Incarcerated Juveniles: Comparison of Male and Female Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effective methods of identifying potential juvenile offenders are critical when developing prevention programs within both state and national juvenile justice systems. The characteristics of juvenile offenders in a large juvenile justice system are examined in this study. Participants live in a Midwestern city with a high rate of crime as…

Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Dell, Rex; Davis, Candice; Guerrieri, Karen

2008-01-01

355

Get-Tough Juvenile Justice Reforms: The Florida Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Get-tough reforms aimed at juvenile offenders have become commonplace in the United States. In the last decade, almost every state has modified laws relating to juvenile crime in some way, and the direction of the reforms has been very clear. States are getting tougher on juvenile offenders either by shifting away from traditional rehabilitation models to punishment-oriented juvenile justice or

Charles E. Frazier; Donna M. Bishop; Lonn Lanza-Kaduce

1999-01-01

356

Reviving Juvenile Justice in a Get-Tough Era  

Microsoft Academic Search

State and local jurisdictions throughout the United States enacted a wide array of new juvenile justice policies in recent years. Many of these policies were intended to make the juvenile justice system tougher, but others improved prevention, increased reha- bilitation, and enhanced the restorative features of the juvenile justice system. This article describes the most prominent new ideas in juvenile

JEFFREY A. BUTTS; DANIEL P. MEARS

2001-01-01

357

Pathways and Predictors of Juvenile Justice Involvement for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Youths: A Focus on Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the growth of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) youths in court and correctional involvement, studies of their delinquency and juvenile justice involvement are quite limited, and the literature becomes almost nonexistent when examining gender differences. Using case file analysis of 150 Native Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian and…

Pasko, Lisa; Mayeda, David T.

2011-01-01

358

Sociologic perspectives on juvenile violence.  

PubMed

In sum, there are four sets of social factors that help us understand why juvenile violence appears when, and where, it does, and why some communities and entire societies are persistently wracked by youth violence whereas others are largely spared its worst expressions. When it comes to the first three factors in particular--deprivation, disorganization, and brutalization--the evidence for these links is as strong as anything in social science, and that evidence is supported by a variety of sources and a variety of methods of investigation. Such investigation includes the knowledge we gain through social intervention. Some of the most effective violence prevention programs are successful precisely because they confront and deflect the social forces that otherwise often lead to violence. Consider, for example, the home-visiting programs that work with poor parents in disorganized communities to lower the risks of child abuse; and some of the more "holistic" or "multisystemic" efforts to work with violent juvenile offenders. The best of these programs work by tackling the problems of social isolation and lack of supports in the community, as well as immediate issues of economic survival for vulnerable families and children. More generally, we know that the availability of steady and rewarding work in the future, of the kind that can reliably sustain a family, is one of the most important factors allowing some youths to "desist" from violence as they mature. These conclusions give us much to be encouraged about, and much to be alarmed about. On the one hand, understanding that youth violence often is rooted in a set of adverse social conditions that are identifiable, and potentially modifiable, is a fundamentally optimistic message. It reminds us that the level of juvenile violence we suffer in America today is neither fated nor inevitable. Other societies that are in many respects much like us suffer far less of it; so could we, and we increasingly understand some of the ways in which we could make that happen. We know that some programs designed to increase opportunities and supports for high-risk youth and families do work, and we know that there are broader social and economic policies--policies that are not abstract visions, but have actually been put into place in societies much like our own--that can significantly diminish the pressures toward violence that are bred by poverty and social insecurity among the young. But knowing what to do is one thing, and actually doing it is another. In this there is much reason for concern. The 7-year economic boom that began in the early 1990s has had salutary effects on youth violence, mainly by providing improved economic opportunities for low-income youth and, accordingly, diminishing the appeal of illegal activities. Despite that extraordinary burst of sustained prosperity, however, too many of America's youth remain impoverished, sometimes desperately so: the boom has had only limited effect on our disturbingly high rates of family poverty, which continue to tower above those of comparable industrial societies. And if the boom should come to an end, and we enter again into a period of rising joblessness for youth and young adults, then much, or all, of the recent gains could be quickly lost. The positive economic trends that have helped take the edge off serious juvenile violence in the past few years, in short, are both partial and fragile. Worse, some of our recent social and economic policies, at both state and federal levels, are working in the opposite direction. Some variants of welfare reform, for example, have tossed many vulnerable families off of public assistance without offering solid economic opportunities in its place. Many more families face this future as federal time limits on public welfare increasingly come into play. Given what we know about the links between deprivation and youth violence, this is not a development we can celebrate. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:11005004

Currie, E

2000-10-01

359

Biologic therapies for juvenile arthritis  

PubMed Central

A group of therapies with exciting potential has emerged for children and young people with severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) uncontrolled by conventional disease modifying drugs. Theoretical understanding from molecular biologic research has identified specific targets within pathophysiological pathways that control rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and JIA. This review identifies the pathways of autoimmunity to begin to show how biologic agents have been produced to replicate, mimic, or block culpable molecules and so promote or inhibit cellular activity or proliferation. Of these agents, cytokine antagonists have shown greatest promise, and early clinical studies of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockade have identified dramatic clinical benefit in many children with JIA. However, as will also be discussed, overlap of pathways within a complex immune system makes clinical response unpredictable and raises additional ethical and administrative concerns. PMID:12598373

Wilkinson, N; Jackson, G; Gardner-Medwin, J

2003-01-01

360

Osteopetrosis mimicking juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

A 5-month-old boy developed splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia with elevated white cells, monocytosis and immature granulocytes in the peripheral blood. Bone marrow showed dysplasia without blastosis. Increased colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage was found in the peripheral blood, mimicking granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor hypersensitivity. These findings fulfilled the diagnosis criteria for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), but no mutations in the CBL, NRAS, KRAS, or PTPN11 genes were detected. In addition to these findings severe hypogammaglobulinemia and elevated alkaline phosphatase were present. Bone X-ray showed dense and radiopaque bones with a bone-in-bone appearance characteristic of infantile malignant osteopetrosis (IMO). Genetic mutation in T-cell, immune regulator 1 (TCIRG1) was identified, confirming the diagnosis of IMO. Careful differential diagnosis including osteopetrosis, is therefore recommended in patients with clinical features and hematologic findings consistent with JMML. PMID:25335998

Hoyoux, Claire; Dresse, Marie Françoise; Forget, Patricia; Piette, Caroline; Rausin, Léon; Villa, Anna; Gothot, Andre; Florkin, Benoit

2014-10-01

361

Law & psychiatry: punishing juveniles who kill.  

PubMed

Punishment of juvenile murderers forces policy makers to weigh the developmental immaturity of adolescents against the heinousness of their crimes. The U.S. Supreme Court has progressively limited the severity of punishments that can be imposed on juveniles, holding that their impulsivity, susceptibility to peer pressure, and more fluid character render them less culpable for their actions. Having eliminated the death penalty as a punishment, the Court recently struck down mandatory life sentences without prospect of parole. The decision is interesting for its emphasis on rehabilitation, opening the door to further restrictions on punitive sentences for juveniles-and perhaps for adults too. PMID:23032673

Appelbaum, Paul S

2012-10-01

362

CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 528: POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS CONTAMINATION NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination is listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 528 was created to address polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination identified during the CAU 262 corrective action investigation. CAU 528 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): CAS 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-06-01

363

Conceptualizing juvenile prostitution as child maltreatment: findings from the National Juvenile Prostitution Study.  

PubMed

Two studies were conducted to identify the incidence (Study 1) and characteristics (Study 2) of juvenile prostitution cases known to law enforcement agencies in the United States. Study 1 revealed a national estimate of 1,450 arrests or detentions (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1,287-1,614) in cases involving juvenile prostitution during a 1-year period. In Study 2, exploratory data were collected from a subsample of 138 cases from police records in 2005. The cases are broadly categorized into three main types: (a) third-party exploiters, (b) solo prostitution, and (c) conventional child sexual abuse (CSA) with payment. Cases were classified into three initial categories based on police orientation toward the juvenile: (a) juveniles as victims (53%), (b) juveniles as delinquents (31%), and (c) juvenile as both victims and delinquents (16%). When examining the status of the juveniles by case type, the authors found that all the juveniles in CSA with payment cases were treated as victims, 66% in third-party exploiters cases, and 11% in solo cases. Findings indicate law enforcement responses to juvenile prostitution are influential in determining whether such youth are viewed as victims of commercial sexual exploitation or as delinquents. PMID:19926628

Mitchell, Kimberly J; Finkelhor, David; Wolak, Janis

2010-02-01

364

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile primary osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... caused by a shortage of calcium and other minerals in bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone ... protein is involved in the regulation of bone mineral density. LRP5 gene mutations that cause juvenile primary ...

365

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Patients and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding juvenile hyaline fibromatosis? autosomal ; ... many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary . See also Understanding Medical Terminology . References (6 links) ...

366

Corrective action plan for underground storage tank 0134-U at the Building 9204-2 Site, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tank (UST) 0134-U, previously located at Building 9204-2, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 0134-U, a 117-gallon UST, was removed on December 14, 1988. This document presents a comprehensive summary of all environmental assessment investigations conducted at the Building 9204-2 Site and the corrective action measures proposed for remediation of subsurface petroleum product contamination identified at the site. This document is written in accordance with the regulatory requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC).

Bohrman, D.E.; Ingram, E.M. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)); Potter, C.D.; Adkison, R.D. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1992-08-01

367

Environmental assessment report and corrective action plan for underground storage tank 2310-U, Pine Ridge West Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the Environmental Assessment Report and Corrective Action Plan for Underground Storage Tank (UST) 2310-U, located at the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 2310-U was a 200-gallon gasoline UST that was excavated and removed on November 17, 1989. This document presents a comprehensive summary of all environmental assessment investigations conducted at the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station, and the corrective action measures proposed for remediation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) soil contamination identified at the site.

Bohrman, D.E.; Ingram, E.M. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1993-02-01

368

Changing the Guard: Male Correctional Officers' Attitudes toward Women as Co-Workers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed male correctional officers at four correctional facilities concerning their attitudes toward their role as correctional officers and corrections in general. Respondents (n=178) gave their attitudes toward working with women as correctional officers. Significantly related to "pro-women" attitudes were quality of working relationship with…

Walters, Stephen

1993-01-01

369

Evaluation of Juveniles' Competence to Stand Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Kruh, I., & Grisso, T. (2008). Evaluation of juveniles’ competence to stand trial. In series: Best Practices in Forensic Mental Health Assessment. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195323076, 9780195323078.\\u000aSummary: Forensic mental health assessment has grown into a specialization informed by research and professional guidelines. This volume addresses best approaches to practice for evaluations in the juvenile\\/family area.

Ivan Kruh; Thomas Grisso

2008-01-01

370

Juvenile Probation Officers’ Mental Health Decision Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed case records for 583 juvenile delinquency intakes in four county juvenile probation offices; 14.4% were receiving\\u000a mental health or substance use services at case opening, and 24.9% were newly identified during probation contact. Youths\\u000a were significantly more likely to be newly identified if they were repeat offenders, if their probation officer knew more\\u000a about mental health and if

Gail A. Wasserman; Larkin S. McReynolds; Andria L. Whited; Joseph M. Keating; Hana Musabegovic; Yanling Huo

2008-01-01

371

Synovial cyst in juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small synovial cysts are a common manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis; large brachial cysts, however, are a rare\\u000a sign of the disease and they must be differentiated from other soft tissue swelling which are not related to articular involvement.\\u000a We describe the case of three children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who came to our attention with large synovial cysts.\\u000a Ultrasonographic

L. Dell’Era; P. Vercellesi; L. V. Forzenigo; V. Carnelli; F. Corona

2008-01-01

372

Juvenile Stature Estimation: A Chilean Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Limited analysis has been conducted for estimating stature derived from the long bone lengths of juvenile skeletons. Juvenile\\u000a stature estimation can be particularly useful in the forensic setting, which may have applications for use as a proxy for\\u000a nutritional health. Stature equations developed by Ruff (Am J Phys Anthropol 133:698–716, 2007) and Smith (J Forensic Sci\\u000a 52:538–546, 2007) derived from

Rebecca Sutphin; Ann H. Ross

373

A model of aftercare for female juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the early 1980s, California's prison system has witnessed a boom. Of this growth, females represent the fastest growing population in both the adult and juvenile systems, often with youth feeding into the adult system. Although girls are the fastest-growing population in the juvenile justice system, there is a blatant lack of gender-specific programs to match this growth. Researchers have

Vivian Y. Lee

2005-01-01

374

Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny.  

PubMed

Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals. PMID:25081817

Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R Ewan

2014-09-01

375

RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

Not Available

1993-05-01

376

Use of Physical Force as an Offense Characteristic in Subtyping Juvenile Sexual Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile sexual offenders were grouped based on whether they had ever used physical force or threats of force to commit an offense using self-reports on the Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI) and clinical records review. Subjects were 101 male offenders, 12 to 19 years, residing at a residential treatment facility. Cross-tabulation of self-report and records review were done to define three

Catherine Butz; Steve Spaccarelli

1999-01-01

377

A synopsis of ‘hydropeaking’ studies on the response of juvenile Atlantic salmon to experimental flow alteration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In insular Newfoundland, Canada, studies were conducted from 1999 to 2003 on the effects of ‘simulated’ hydropeaking power\\u000a generation on juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). In 1999, Atlantic salmon parr were released into an experimental reach below a hydroelectric facility and flow was manipulated\\u000a over a range of discharge (1.0–4.2 m3 s?1) during a series of ‘experiments’ simulating hydropeaking in both summer

D. A. Scruton; C. Pennell; L. M. N. Ollerhead; K. Alfredsen; M. Stickler; A. Harby; M. Robertson; K. D. Clarke; L. J. LeDrew

2008-01-01

378

The Correctional-Rehabilitation Process in Retrospect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nine male and four female ex-inmates of a co-correctional federal facility, repeat offenders who had been successfully functioning in the community for a postrelease period of 2 years or more, agreed to be interviewed on videotape. Of interest to the researchers were: (1) their views on how being placed in the minimum-security, co-correctional environment after serving time in more security-oriented

Jerome Mabli; John K. Faherty

1982-01-01

379

Characteristics of Crimes against Juveniles. Crimes against Children Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Bulletin reviews data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's 1997 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data file that pertain to juvenile victims, revealing that while juveniles made up 26% of the population of the 12 states participating in NIBRS in 1997, they accounted for only 12% of the reported crime victims. At the same…

Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

380

Assessing the Parents of Juvenile Offenders: A Preliminary Validation Study of the Juvenile Offender Parent Questionnaire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study is a preliminary investigation into the development of a parent self-report instrument, the Juvenile Offender Parent Questionnaire (JOPQ). A large pool of items was rationally derived from a model of parent competency and then administered to 243 parents of children who were making appearances in juvenile court. Exploratory…

Rose, Clark C.; Glaser, Brian A.; Calhoun, Georgia B.; Bates, Jeffrey M.

2004-01-01

381

Navigating the Juvenile Justice System: A Handbook for Juveniles and Their Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The juvenile justice system is complicated and can seem overwhelming. This handbook is designed to give some basic information to youths as well as parents, grandparents, foster parents, guardians, and other family members or friends of children who have been or may be in trouble with the law. This handbook is written to defendants in juvenile

2002

382

An Empirical Evaluation of Juvenile Awareness Programs in the United States: Can Juveniles Be "Scared Straight"?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile awareness programs like Scared Straight became popular crime prevention strategies during the 1970s. Juvenile offenders and at-risk youth who participate in these programs are taken to prisons where inmates use confrontational methods to recount stories about violence, sex, and abuse perpetrated by fellow inmates while living a life…

Klenowski, Paul M.; Bell, Keith J.; Dodson, Kimberly D.

2010-01-01

383

An Empirical Evaluation of Juvenile Awareness Programs in the United States: Can Juveniles be “Scared Straight”?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile awareness programs like Scared Straight became popular crime prevention strategies during the 1970s. Juvenile offenders and at-risk youth who participate in these programs are taken to prisons where inmates use confrontational methods to recount stories about violence, sex, and abuse perpetrated by fellow inmates while living a life behind bars. These “get tough” policies have wide public and political

Paul M. Klenowski; Keith J. Bell; Kimberly D. Dodson

2010-01-01

384

Boots Corrections Syllabus Page 1 Corrections  

E-print Network

and prisons, alternatives to incarceration (e.g., probation and parole), capital punishment, and the public of punishment and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on correctional law, policies, practices, issues) explain the history of corrections and the rationales for punishment 2) discuss the contemporary issues

O'Toole, Alice J.

385

Histological variations in juvenile polyp phenotype correlate with genetic defect underlying juvenile polyposis  

PubMed Central

Background Juvenile polyps are distinct hamartomatous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract that may occur in the heritable juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) or sporadically. Histologically, juvenile polyps are characterised by a marked increase of the stromal cell compartment but, an epithelial phenotype has also been reported. JPS has an increased risk of colorectal cancer but sporadic juvenile polyps do not. In 50–60% of JPS patients a germline mutation of the TGF-?/BMP pathway genes SMAD4 or BMPR1A is found. This study compares the histological phenotype of juvenile polyps with a SMAD4 or BMPR1A germline mutation and sporadic juvenile polyps. Methods H&E slides of 65 JPS polyps and 25 sporadic juvenile polyps were reviewed for histological features and dysplasia. Systematic random crypt and stroma counts were obtained by count stereology and a crypt-stroma ratio was determined. All polyps were subsequently categorised as type A (crypt-stroma ratio <1.00) or type B (crypt-stroma ratio ?1.00), the latter referring to the epithelial phenotype. Cell cycle activity was assessed using immunohistochemistry of the proliferation marker Ki67, and mutation analysis was conducted for KRAS and APC to determine the involvement of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Results Juvenile polyps with a SMAD4 germline mutation were predominantly type B, whereas, type A was more common among juvenile polyps with a BMPR1A germline mutation, but this distinction could not be ascribed to differences in cell cycle activity. Dysplasia was equally common in JPS polyps with either a SMAD4 or BMPR1A germline mutation, where the involvement of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence does not seem to play a distinct role. Conclusion juvenile polyps in the setting of JPS exhibit distinct phenotypes correlating with the underlying genetic defect. PMID:21412070

van Hattem, W. Arnout; Langeveld, Danielle; de Leng, Wendy W. J.; Morsink, Folkert H.; van Diest, Paul J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.

2011-01-01

386

New York Correction History Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the New York Correction History Society is "to pursue, preserve and promote the history of correction services in New York." The Society helps fulfill their mission via this site which has an ample offering of institutional history, inmate art, philosophical musings, and perspectives of the role of such facilities in the history of the Empire State. The homepage is a bit busy, visually speaking, and there isn't a formal index of subjects covered within, but a bit of careful investigation will yield some rich material. Visitors will note that one of the finds here is a virtual tour of Rikers Island from 1948, and it is nestled right next to a historical essay on the jail system in Westchester County. Further down near the bottom of the homepage, visitors can learn about a 1987 coloring book titled "Getting to Know Your New York City Department of Correction". There's much more to see here, and the site does a nice job of covering the various aspects of the correctional experience.

387

HIV\\/AIDS and Other Infectious Diseases Among Correctional Inmates: Transmission, Burden, and an Appropriate Response  

Microsoft Academic Search

Correctional inmates en- gage in drug-related and sexual risk behaviors, and the transmission of HIV, hepatitis, and sexually transmitted dis- eases occurs in correctional facilities. However, there is un- certainty about the extent of transmission, and hyperbolic descriptions of its extent may further stigmatize inmates and elicit punitive responses. Whether infection was acquired within or outside correctional facilities, the prevalence

Theodore M. Hammett

388

Glucocorticoids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

Glucocorticoid (GC) drugs are a potent and rapidly effective therapeutic option for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). These medications are mainly used for the management of the extra-articular features of systemic-onset disease. A course of low-dose prednisone may be considered for achieving a rapid disease control in patients with severe polyarthritis refractory to other therapies or while awaiting the full therapeutic effect of a recently initiated disease-modifying antirheumatic drug or biologic agent. Short-term systemic GC administration may also be indicated for chronic iridocyclitis unresponsive to topical therapy. The general objective of GC therapy is to limit the maximum dose and exposure to the highest doses to what is needed to achieve disease control, and then to gradually taper the dose until the minimum level sufficient to maintain disease quiescence over time is reached. High-dose intravenous 'pulse' methylprednisolone administration is sometimes chosen to treat the most severe or acute disease manifestations of systemic JIA, particularly macrophage activation syndrome. Intra-articular GC injection is a safe and rapidly effective treatment for synovitis in children with chronic arthritis. Triamcinolone hexacetonide is the optimal GC preparation for pediatric patients. Local injection therapy is used most frequently to treat oligoarthritis, but the strategy of performing multiple injections to induce disease remission, while simultaneously initiating therapy with second-line or biologic agents, has also been proposed for children with polyarticular JIA. Administration of GCs is associated with potentially deleterious adverse effects, some of which can be irreversible. This highlights the need of a judicious use of these medications and careful monitoring of their toxicity. The recently published recommendations for the management of JIA provide useful guidance to the clinicians for the administration of GCs in children with chronic arthritis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25227183

Schiappapietra, Benedetta; Varnier, Giulia; Rosina, Silvia; Consolaro, Alessandro; Martini, Alberto; Ravelli, Angelo

2015-01-01

389

Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage  

SciTech Connect

A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-02-01

390

Wall interference assessment and corrections  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel wall interference assessment and correction (WIAC) concepts, applications, and typical results are discussed in terms of several nonlinear transonic codes and one panel method code developed for and being implemented at NASA-Langley. Contrasts between 2-D and 3-D transonic testing factors which affect WIAC procedures are illustrated using airfoil data from the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and Pathfinder 1 data from the National Transonic Facility. Initial results from the 3-D WIAC codes are encouraging; research on and implementation of WIAC concepts continue.

Newman, P. A.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Garriz, J. A.

1989-01-01

391

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)  

MedlinePLUS

... and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)/2 Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) CMML is a clonal disorder, which means ... progresses to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) JMML is an uncommon blood cancer. It ...

392

Psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma of the jaws.  

PubMed

Juvenile ossifying fibroma is an uncommon, benign, bone-forming neoplasm with aggressive local growth that is distinguished from other fibro-osseous lesions primarily by its age of onset, clinical presentation and aggressive behavior. Although a benign entity, juvenile ossifying fibroma is known to be locally aggressive and has a high tendency to recur. Two distinctive microscopic patterns have been described: A trabecular variant and a psammomatoid variant. This latter variant is predominantly a craniofacial lesion and occurs rarely in the jaws. We present herein two cases of psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma involving the jaws. The first case was a mandibular lesion in a 31-year-old female whereas the second case presented with maxillary involvement in a 46-year-old female. In addition, the pathology of the lesion was analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:22144839

Malathi, N; Radhika, T; Thamizhchelvan, H; Ravindran, C; Ramkumar, S; Giri, Gvv; Gopal, Deepika

2011-09-01

393

Characteristics of homicidal and violent juveniles.  

PubMed

Homicidal youth have received considerable attention in the mass media and social science literature in recent years. Due to several methodological obstacles, relatively little is known about the premorbid and offense characteristics of this population. The current investigation compared 30 juvenile males charged with murder with a group of 62 juvenile males charged with other violent felony offenses. Comparisons were made across 33 demographic, historical, clinical, offense, and forensic characteristics. Both groups were similar in their demographic characterishics and family backgrounds. Juvenile homicide defendants, however, were less likely than the comparison group to have a current Axis I psychiatric diagnosis. Homicide defendants were also more likely to have acted alone and to have committed their alleged crime in a domestic setting. Implications of the results are discussed as are suggestions for future research. PMID:11506449

Shumaker, D M; McKee, G R

2001-08-01

394

Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.  

PubMed

There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s. PMID:2122167

Frazier, H C

1990-01-01

395

A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation.  

PubMed

In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS. PMID:22163918

Weiland, Mark A; Deng, Z Daniel; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J; Thronas, Aaron I; Eppard, M Brad

2011-01-01

396

A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 1. Engineering Design and Instrumentation  

PubMed Central

In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS. PMID:22163918

Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, M. Brad

2011-01-01

397

THE SELF-REPORT OF OFFENDING AMONG SERIOUS JUVENILE OFFENDERS  

PubMed Central

This article evaluates the measurement equivalence of a self-report of offending measure among female and male juveniles, as well as Hispanic, African American, and White male juveniles. The findings indicate (a) considerable functional equivalence across gender and ethnically/racially diverse groups of juvenile offenders, and (b) scalar equivalence across Hispanic and White male juvenile offenders, but (c) that researchers should be careful making either mean difference or association comparisons across genders or African American/White boys. PMID:20119516

Knight, George P.; Little, Michelle; Losoya, Sandra H.; Mulvey, Edward P.

2009-01-01

398

A program of the National Institute of Justice National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center--  

E-print Network

Statistics, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and Office for Victims of Crime. #12;GuideA program of the National Institute of Justice National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology that include 99-IJ-R-034 awarded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U

Ellingson, Steven W.

399

Juvenile justice. A role for health professionals.  

PubMed

The United States is the only nation in the world that continues to execute its youth. The use of the death penalty against those who committed crimes as children is an act contrary to American standards of decency and fairness, as well as international law. The adolescent brain has not fully developed before the age of 18 years of age. Thus children do not have the same emotional and mental capacity as adults. Although juveniles should be held accountable for their crimes, the United States must not impose this most extreme punishment. The medical profession must take a stand to stop the execution of juvenile offenders in the United States. PMID:12545519

Brookman, Monica

2003-01-01

400

Diet alters species recognition in juvenile toads.  

PubMed

Whether environmental effects during juvenile development can alter the ontogeny of adult mating behaviour remains largely unexplored. We evaluated the effect of diet on the early expression of conspecific recognition in spadefoot toads, Spea bombifrons. We found that juvenile toads display phonotaxis behaviour six weeks post-metamorphosis. However, preference for conspecifics versus heterospecifics emerged later and was diet dependent. Thus, the environment can affect the early development of species recognition in a way that might alter adult behaviour. Evaluating such effects is important for understanding variation in hybridization between species and the nature of species boundaries. PMID:24088562

Pfennig, Karin S; Moncalvo, Verónica G Rodriguez; Burmeister, Sabrina S

2013-10-23

401

Diet alters species recognition in juvenile toads  

PubMed Central

Whether environmental effects during juvenile development can alter the ontogeny of adult mating behaviour remains largely unexplored. We evaluated the effect of diet on the early expression of conspecific recognition in spadefoot toads, Spea bombifrons. We found that juvenile toads display phonotaxis behaviour six weeks post-metamorphosis. However, preference for conspecifics versus heterospecifics emerged later and was diet dependent. Thus, the environment can affect the early development of species recognition in a way that might alter adult behaviour. Evaluating such effects is important for understanding variation in hybridization between species and the nature of species boundaries. PMID:24088562

Pfennig, Karin S.; Rodriguez Moncalvo, Verónica G.; Burmeister, Sabrina S.

2013-01-01

402

Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis: a case report.  

PubMed

Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis is a rare, hereditary disease with distinct clinical and histopathological features. Clinically, it presents with gingival hypertrophy, pappulonodular skin lesions and joint contractures. Bone involvement is usually an uncommon finding. We report a case of a 2-year-old patient, daughter of consanguineous parents, who presented since the age of 2 months with impairment of mental development, multiple joint contractures, motion limitation and nodules on the scalp. The calvarian lesions were surgically removed, and histopathological examination concluded to juvenile hyaline fibromatosis. PMID:25291871

Mestiri, S; Labaied, N; Mama, N; Ayadi, A; Ladib, M; Sriha, B; Krifa, H; Mokni, M

2014-06-01

403

Research in Correctional Rehabilitation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty-three leaders in corrections and rehabilitation participated in the seminar planned to provide an indication of the status of research in correctional rehabilitation. Papers include: (1) "Program Trends in Correctional Rehabilitation" by John P. Conrad, (2) "Federal Offenders Rahabilitation Program" by Percy B. Bell and Merlyn Mathews, (3)…

Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

404

It's Your Move: Juveniles in Adult Jails and Lockups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet discusses the confinement of juveniles in adult jails, and offers suggestions for local citizens who want to remedy the problem. The first section presents background information on juveniles in adult jails, and discusses the following issues: the physically and psychologically damaging effects on juveniles of incarceration in adult…

Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

405

Juvenile transfer and recidivism: a propensity score matching approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been research conducted which focused on the topic of juvenile transfer to adult court. However, less research has been done focusing on the effectiveness of juvenile transfer in reducing recidivism for transferred offenders. Of the research that has been done, most may not have adequately addressed selection bias. The current study investigates the impact of juvenile transfer on

Kareem L. Jordan

2012-01-01

406

Juvenile transfer and recidivism: a propensity score matching approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been research conducted which focused on the topic of juvenile transfer to adult court. However, less research has been done focusing on the effectiveness of juvenile transfer in reducing recidivism for transferred offenders. Of the research that has been done, most may not have adequately addressed selection bias. The current study investigates the impact of juvenile transfer on

Kareem L. Jordan

2011-01-01

407

Informing Juvenile Justice Policy: Directions for Behavioral Science Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent policy initiatives threaten to reduce the rehabilitative mission of the juvenile court or eliminate the court entirely. This article lays out a framework for an empirical assessment of these developments. It first evaluates the available and potential empirical support for three hypotheses about juveniles that might justify maintaining a separate, rehabilitation-oriented juvenile justice system: the hypotheses that, compared to

Jennifer L. Woolard; Mark R. Fondacaro; Christopher Slobogin

2001-01-01

408

Juvenile Sexual Offenders: We are the Sons of our Fathers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This briefing reports on how juvenile sexual offenders perceived and experienced their fathers in their developmental years. In-depth interviews were conducted with nine sentenced juvenile sexual offenders at a prison in Durban. The purpose of the interviews was to explore possible family influences on the behaviour of the juveniles and their attachment experiences. The findings indicated that for the majority

Sibonsile Mathe

2007-01-01

409

The Impact of Schools on Juvenile Substance Initiation and Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use data from the two rounds of the NLSY97 and the corresponding QED data to examine the effectiveness of school endowments and curricula in targeting juvenile use of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana. Our results support the notion that schools matter in reducing juvenile involvement in substance use. Higher discretionary dollars per pupil are linked to reduced rates of juvenile

Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes; Traci Mach; John D. Clapp

2004-01-01

410

Short Communication Stature of Juvenile Trees in Response to  

E-print Network

the plants that experienced die-back in burnt plots. Relative growth rate of juvenile trees was significantly suggest that anthropogenic fires stunt the growth of juvenile trees. Keywords: tropical deciduous forests of fire on juvenile tree composition and stat- ure. We compare the relative growth rate and size

Howe, Henry F.

411

Original article Relationship between haemolymphatic levels of juvenile  

E-print Network

of juvenile hormone and basal oocyte growth during the first gonadotrophic cycle. The stimulating effectOriginal article Relationship between haemolymphatic levels of juvenile hormone and the duration. As ovarian activity is essentially under the control of juvenile hormone (JH), haemolymphatic hormone levels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

Age and growth of larval and juvenile Atlantic croake~  

E-print Network

773 Age and growth of larval and juvenile Atlantic croake~ Micropogonias undulatus, from the Middle used to detennine age and growth of605 larval and juvenile Atlantic croaker, Micropogonias undulatus-based estimates of growth for larval and juvenileAtlantic croaker for the MiddleAtlantic Bight

413

Age Determination in Larval and Juvenile Sheepshead, Archosargus  

E-print Network

and juvenile fishes. Veri- fication of daily growth rings in individual fish species has generally been-us, is poorly known. In this study. daily growth rings in the otoliths of larval and juvenile sheepshead wereAge Determination in Larval and Juvenile Sheepshead, Archosargus probatocephalus Pannella (1971

414

Kids Who Commit Adult Crimes: Serious Criminality by Juvenile Offenders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The increasingly serious nature of juvenile criminal behavior has led to greater efforts to understand the roots, causes, and correlates of juvenile violence and chronic delinquency, as well as develop more effective means of identifying at-risk youth and treating serious and violent juvenile offenders. This book examines the realities and…

Flowers, R. Barri

415

Restorative justice: an alternative approach to juvenile crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines “restorative justice,” a new approach to the problem of juvenile crime, from an economic point of view. Advocates assert that the personal, social, and economic harms inflicted by many juvenile crimes are more adequately repaired through mediated face-to-face conferences between victims and offenders than through the conventional disposition of juvenile cases. Parallels between this conception and key

Catherine L. Lawson; JoAnne Katz

2004-01-01

416

American Youth Violence: Implications for National Juvenile Justice Policy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that the perception of increasing youth violence is based on fiction rather than fact. Provides the facts involved in the juvenile justice policy focusing on the differences between juvenile and adult violence, youth violence trends, population trends, and three legal policy issues toward adolescent violence. Offers juvenile crime…

Zimring, Franklin E.

2000-01-01

417

Contagion and Repeat Offending among Urban Juvenile Delinquents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research investigates the role of repeat offending and spatial contagion in juvenile delinquency recidivism using a database of 7166 male juvenile offenders sent to community-based programs by the Family Court of Philadelphia. Results indicate evidence of repeat offending among juvenile delinquents, particularly for drug offenders. The…

Mennis, Jeremy; Harris, Philip

2011-01-01

418

The Impact of Juvenile Curfew Laws* Patrick Kline  

E-print Network

crimes committed by juveniles below the statutory curfew age. Curfews do not appear to be effectiveThe Impact of Juvenile Curfew Laws* Patrick Kline UC Berkeley / NBER pkline@econ.berkeley.edu First's youth curfews became a popular strategy for combating juvenile delinquency. A survey by Ruefle

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

419

Best Practices in Juvenile Accountability: Overview. JAIBG Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin examines the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grants (JAIBG) program, which asserts that juvenile offenders should be held accountable for their crimes as a matter of basic justice and to prevent and deter delinquency. It reviews the developmental perspective shaping…

Beyer, Marty

420

Juvenile Crime and Responses to Delinquency in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the juvenile crime trend and responses to juvenile delinquency in Hong Kong since the 1970s. It explores how changing conceptions of the causes of juvenile crime have influenced delinquency control policies. Although Hong Kong has a relatively low crime rate, the heavy emphasis on the use of custodial programs over community-based programs is obvious. Whereas the scope

Dennis S. W. Wong

2000-01-01

421

The Effectiveness of Juvenile Curfews at Crime Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile curfew laws have become a pervasive and popular strategy for controlling juvenile crime. Public opinion is solidly behind the use of curfews, and the primary basis for this support is the notion that curfews make streets safer. This article provides preliminary results from a systematic review of empirical research on juvenile curfews, concluding that the evidence does not support

Kenneth Adams

2003-01-01

422

National Comparisons of Present Day Juvenile Boot Camps  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research documents the present status of all juvenile bot camps throughout the United States, through the process of interviewing. This thesis begins with a brief background of juvenile boot camps to orient the reader with the subject of the research. Following the background, the author will discuss the structure and goals of juvenile boot campus, offer a literature review

Michelle A. Roberts

2006-01-01

423

Juvenile Recidivism: A Comparison of Three Prediction Instruments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared three models to predict recidivism in juvenile offenders. Discriminant analyses performed on data from 91 juvenile parolees (42 nonrecidivists, 49 recidivists) revealed that Orange County Risk Assessment Instrument and Arizona Juvenile Risk Assessment Form were able to predict recidivism 18-22 percent better than chance. Contra Costa Risk…

Ashford, Jose B.; LeCroy, Craig Winston

1990-01-01

424

Programa Shortstop: A Culturally Focused Juvenile Intervention for Hispanic Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Culturally sensitive juvenile delinquency and substance abuse interventions are relatively limited and unavailable to many first-time Hispanic juvenile offenders. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a culturally focused juvenile and substance abuse intervention program for first time Hispanic youth offenders. The intent of…

Cervantes, Richard C.; Ruan, Karen; Duenas, Norma

2004-01-01

425

Contagion and repeat offending among urban juvenile delinquents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research investigates the role of repeat offending and spatial contagion in juvenile delinquency recidivism using a database of 7166 male juvenile offenders sent to community-based programs by the Family Court of Philadelphia. Results indicate evidence of repeat offending among juvenile delinquents, particularly for drug offenders. The likelihood of recidivism is influenced by ethnicity, parental criminality, and various measures of

Jeremy Mennis; Philip Harris

2011-01-01

426

Victimization of Incarcerated Children and Juveniles in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The empirical study reported here analyses the practical relevance of United Nations standards and norms in the area of juvenile justice. It concentrates on South Africa and focuses on the implementation of the Rules for the Protection of Juveniles Deprived of their Liberty and Article 37 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. A total of 804 children\\/juveniles

Heidrun Kiessl; Michael Würger

2002-01-01

427

Modeling juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain  

E-print Network

Modeling juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain E. Ashley Steel Peter Guttorp NRCSET juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain E. Ashley Steel and Peter Guttorp National Research.S.A SUMMARY We describe movement patterns of hatchery-raised, juvenile, spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus

Washington at Seattle, University of

428

The World of Juvenile Justice According to the Numbers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended to be an instructive, yet sobering, introduction to the complex and disturbing nature of the juvenile justice system, this article details the "numbers," including selected percentages, ratios, and dollar amounts, that are relevant to developing a better understanding of the juvenile justice system. General statistics about juvenile and…

Rozalski, Michael; Deignan, Marilyn; Engel, Suzanne

2008-01-01

429

Juvenile Courts after 100 Years: Past and Present Orientations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile institutions were developed in the nineteenth century. In the United States, they prompted an extension of the parens patriae doctrine, which provided a basis for the creation of the juvenile court a century ago. The protective orientation of the court was intended both for juvenile delinquents and children in danger. Important changes have occurred since the 1960s. Procedural guarantees

Jean Trépanier

1999-01-01

430

Modelling Juvenile Wood Barry Gardiner and Elspeth Macdonald  

E-print Network

Lean #12;01/12/20083 Modelling Juvenile Wood MOE versus Cambial Age in Sitka Spruce Courtesy Paul McModelling Juvenile Wood Barry Gardiner and Elspeth Macdonald Conifer Breeding and Timber Quality Steering Group #12;01/12/20082 Modelling Juvenile Wood Microfibril Angle with Ring Number Courtesy Paul Mc

431

Perceptions of Juvenile Offenders Who Were Abused as Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Should a history of child abuse be taken into consideration when a juvenile offender is punished? Although some research shows that child abuse is used as a mitigating factor for juvenile offenders (i.e., elicits less punitive sentences), surveys of juvenile court officials reveal that it is considered an aggravating factor. Specifically, in controlled mock jury studies in which child abuse

Margaret C. Stevenson

2009-01-01

432

45 CFR Appendix B to Part 1356 - NYTD Youth Outcome Survey  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...allegedly committing a crime?OR This means...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...connection with a crime (misdemeanor or...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...allegedly committing a crime?_Yes _No...

2010-10-01

433

45 CFR Appendix B to Part 1356 - NYTD Youth Outcome Survey  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...allegedly committing a crime?OR This means...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...connection with a crime (misdemeanor or...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...allegedly committing a crime? _Yes...

2013-10-01

434

45 CFR Appendix B to Part 1356 - NYTD Youth Outcome Survey  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...allegedly committing a crime?OR This means...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...connection with a crime (misdemeanor or...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...allegedly committing a crime?_Yes _No...

2011-10-01

435

45 CFR Appendix B to Part 1356 - NYTD Youth Outcome Survey  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...allegedly committing a crime?OR This means...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...connection with a crime (misdemeanor or...correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention...allegedly committing a crime? _Yes...

2012-10-01

436

Equal nonbreeding period survival in adults and juveniles of a long-distant migrant bird  

PubMed Central

In migrant birds, survival estimates for the different life-history stages between fledging and first breeding are scarce. First-year survival is shown to be strongly reduced compared with annual survival of adult birds. However, it remains unclear whether the main bottleneck in juvenile long-distant migrants occurs in the postfledging period within the breeding ranges or en route. Quantifying survival rates during different life-history stages and during different periods of the migration cycle is crucial to understand forces driving the evolution of optimal life histories in migrant birds. Here, we estimate survival rates of adult and juvenile barn swallows (Hirundo rusticaL.) in the breeding and nonbreeding areas using a population model integrating survival estimates in the breeding ranges based on a large radio-telemetry data set and published estimates of demographic parameters from large-scale population-monitoring projects across Switzerland. Input parameters included the country-wide population trend, annual productivity estimates of the double-brooded species, and year-to-year survival corrected for breeding dispersal. Juvenile survival in the 3-week postfledging period was low (S = 0.32; SE = 0.05), whereas in the rest of the annual cycle survival estimates of adults and juveniles were similarly high (S > 0.957). Thus, the postfledging period was the main survival bottleneck, revealing the striking result that nonbreeding period mortality (including migration) is not higher for juveniles than for adult birds. Therefore, focusing future research on sources of variation in postfledging mortality can provide new insights into determinants of population dynamics and life-history evolution of migrant birds. PMID:24683458

Gruebler, Martin U; Korner-Nievergelt, Franzi; Naef-Daenzer, Beat

2014-01-01

437

Equal nonbreeding period survival in adults and juveniles of a long-distant migrant bird.  

PubMed

In migrant birds, survival estimates for the different life-history stages between fledging and first breeding are scarce. First-year survival is shown to be strongly reduced compared with annual survival of adult birds. However, it remains unclear whether the main bottleneck in juvenile long-distant migrants occurs in the postfledging period within the breeding ranges or en route. Quantifying survival rates during different life-history stages and during different periods of the migration cycle is crucial to understand forces driving the evolution of optimal life histories in migrant birds. Here, we estimate survival rates of adult and juvenile barn swallows (Hirundo rusticaL.) in the breeding and nonbreeding areas using a population model integrating survival estimates in the breeding ranges based on a large radio-telemetry data set and published estimates of demographic parameters from large-scale population-monitoring projects across Switzerland. Input parameters included the country-wide population trend, annual productivity estimates of the double-brooded species, and year-to-year survival corrected for breeding dispersal. Juvenile survival in the 3-week postfledging period was low (S = 0.32; SE = 0.05), whereas in the rest of the annual cycle survival estimates of adults and juveniles were similarly high (S > 0.957). Thus, the postfledging period was the main survival bottleneck, revealing the striking result that nonbreeding period mortality (including migration) is not higher for juveniles than for adult birds. Therefore, focusing future research on sources of variation in postfledging mortality can provide new insights into determinants of population dynamics and life-history evolution of migrant birds. PMID:24683458

Grüebler, Martin U; Korner-Nievergelt, Fränzi; Naef-Daenzer, Beat

2014-03-01

438

Mechanisms of deaths in captive juvenile New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri).  

PubMed

Juvenile seals are sometimes encountered in waters around South Australia with injuries and/or diseases that require veterinary treatment. Two cases are reported where apparently stable animals died soon after being rescued due to quite disparate conditions. In Case 1 a juvenile male New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) was found unexpectedly dead in its enclosure. A necropsy examination revealed an emaciated juvenile male with no injuries. The intestine was filled throughout its length with melena stool that was due to heavy infestation of the stomach with roundworms with adjacent gastritis. Death was due to shock from upper gastrointestinal blood loss secondary to parasitosis. In Case 2 a second juvenile male New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) also died unexpectedly in its enclosure. It had been listless with loud respirations since capture. At necropsy there was no blood around the head, neck or mouth, and no acute external injuries were identified. An area of induration was, however, present over the snout with fragmentation of underlying bones. The maxilla was freely mobile and CT scanning revealed multiple comminuted fractures of the adjacent facial skeleton. Examination of the defleshed skull showed fragmentation of the facial skeleton with roughening of bones in keeping with osteomyelitis. Death was attributed to sepsis from osteomyelitis of a comminuted midfacial fracture. These cases demonstrate two unusual and occult conditions that may be present in recently retrieved juvenile fur seals. Failure to establish the correct diagnosis rapidly may result in death soon after capture. The usefulness of imaging techniques such as CT scanning in delineating underlying injuries prior to necropsy is clearly demonstrated. PMID:20499212

Byard, Roger W; Machado, Aaron; Braun, Kerry; Solomon, Lucian B; Boardman, Wayne

2010-09-01

439

Bioassays of compounds with potential juvenoid activity on Drosophila melanogaster: Juvenile hormone III, bisepoxide juvenile hormone III  

E-print Network

hormone III, bisepoxide juvenile hormone III and methyl farnesoates Lawrence G. Harshman a , Ki-Duck Song are relatively low in this insect (Sliter et al., 1987; Bownes and Rembold, 1987). Low levels of juvenile hormone) described atypical effects of topical administration of juvenile hormone to third instar (last instar) D

Hammock, Bruce D.

440

Refining and Resolving the Blur of Gault for Juvenile Capital Offenders in Texas: A World without the Juvenile Death Penalty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Texas's approach to juvenile capital offenders has been profoundly lacking any balance of the interests of accountability and rehabilitation. Texas has employed adult transfer for juvenile capital offenders with potential life imprisonment and possible parole in 40 years and determinate sentencing to adjudicate capital offenders in juvenile court, yielding a maximum sentence of 40 years in prison. Legislative initiatives in

David Mikhail

2006-01-01

441

Improvement of rearing conditions for juvenile lobsters ( Homarus gammarus) by co-culturing with juvenile isopods ( Idotea emarginata)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Growth conditions of the juvenile lobsters, Homarus gammarus, were optimized in view of a restocking project of the lobster population at Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) aimed to produce more than ten thousand juvenile lobsters per year. Growth and survival rates of juvenile lobsters depend on diet, temperature and water quality. In the present study, diet at optimum temperature was

Isabel Schmalenbach; Friedrich Buchholz; Heinz-Dieter Franke; Reinhard Saborowski

2009-01-01

442

OPTIMIZING WATER TREATMENT PLANT PERFORMANCE WITH THE COMPOSITE CORRECTION PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

This Technology Transfer Summary Report summarizes the results of an ongoing project to evaluate the utility of the Composite Correction Program (CCP) approach to improving the performance of drinking water treatment facilities. The CCP approach, which has already proven successf...

443

Profiling Serious Juvenile Offenders in Juvenile Institutions: Change in Risk Factors in Their Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large sample of 74% of all serious juvenile offenders in the Netherlands (n = 1,147) was studied with the aim to define which risk factors play a role in the this high-risk group. The Juvenile Forensic Profile with good psychometric qualities was developed to measure seventy risk factors in seven domains: ‘history of criminal behavior,’ ‘family and environment,’ ‘offense-related

Eva Mulder; Eddy Brand; Rudd Bullens; Hjalmar van Marle

2010-01-01

444

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, received sanitary effluent from four buildings within the Test Cell ''C'' Facility from the mid-1960s through approximately 1996. The Test Cell ''C'' Facility was used to develop nuclear propulsion technology by conducting nuclear test reactor studies. Based on the site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, herbicides, gamma emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, isotopic uranium, and strontium-90. A detailed conceptual site model is presented in Section 3.0 and Appendix A of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The conceptual model serves as the basis for the sampling strategy. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

USDOE /NV

1999-05-01

445

Attachment Theory Applied to Juvenile Sex Offending.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attachment theory is applied to identify systemic patterns encouraging juveniles to commit sexual offenses. The role of the helping system in perpetuating offenses is reviewed. The priority of family integrity and the role of professionals in breaking cycles of abuse and repairing earlier destructive emotional attachments are discussed. (EMK)

Goodrow, Kenneth K.; Lim, Mee-Gaik

1998-01-01

446

THE TREATMENT OF JUVENILE HOMICIDE OFFENDERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes psychodynamic treatment of juvenile homicide offenders whose lethal violence is the result of severe developmental deficits. The three major tasks of treatment are to reduce fear, to develop and strengthen ego functions, and to understand and accept the social, emotional, and legal consequences of the homicide. The role of regression in treatment is discussed, as are the

Maureen Neihart

1999-01-01

447

Incestuous victimization by Juvenile Sex offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most research and clinical data dealing with child sexual abuse have focused on adult offenders (usually a parent or relative) and their child victims. More recently, however, the data are beginning to show that a sizeable number of these sexual encounters are being committed by juvenile offenders. Thus, parents and members of the helping professions are beginning to see that

Lois H. Pierce; Robert L. Pierce

1987-01-01

448

Behavioral science and the juvenile death penalty.  

PubMed

Behavioral science data included in an amicus brief has been introduced into a recent Supreme Court decision (Thompson v. Oklahoma) involving the juvenile death penalty. However, a close examination of the data fails to provide support for either the pro- or antijuvenile death penalty position. PMID:2676026

Leong, G B; Eth, S

1989-01-01

449

Multiple Substance Use Disorders in Juvenile Detainees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To estimate the 6-month prevalence of multiple substance use disorders (SUDs) among juvenile detainees by demographic subgroups (sex, race/ethnicity, age). Method: Participants were a randomly selected sample of 1,829 African American, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic detainees (1,172 males, 657 females, aged 10 to 18). Patterns and…

McClelland, Gary M.; Elkington, Katherine S.; Teplin, Linda A.; Abram, Karen M.

2004-01-01

450

OPTIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR GROWTH OF JUVENILE BLUEGILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Juvenile bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus (initial weight, 1.8-8.0 g), were individually marked and fed to excess during a 30-day constant temperature test; day length was 16 h. Fish were tested at temperature intervals of 2 degrees from 20 to 36C. The highest specific growth rate ...

451

Rehabilitation of the Personality of Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Russian youth has in recent years been increasingly involved in crime, narcotics addiction, and alcoholism, possibly due to a failure of socialization in childhood. Researchers are seeking the origins of this phenomenon and searching for ways to combat it through rehabilitation of juvenile offenders. The essential nature of social and pedagogical…

Zaitsev, G. K.; Zaitsev, A. G.; Dmitriev, M. G.; Apal'kova, I. Iu.

2009-01-01

452

The diversity of juvenile sarcoidosis symptoms.  

PubMed

We report a case of juvenile sarcoidosis, emphasizing the variety of clinical manifestations. The child had uveitis, which is among the most common manifestations of the disease. However, fever of unknown origin, glomerulonephritis and lymphadenopathy were also noticed, underscoring the diversity of the clinical spectrum of the disease. PMID:22980565

Vougiouka, O; Moustaki, M; Nicolaidou, P; Fretzayas, A

2012-01-01

453

Identifying and classifying juvenile stalking behavior.  

PubMed

Despite the growing research in the area of stalking, the focus has been on adults who engage in this behavior. Unfortunately, almost no studies investigate the prevalence of this behavior in adolescents. Two cases are presented demonstrating not only that stalking occurs during the period of adolescence, but also that there is a significant difference in the motivation underlying this behavior that can be classified similarly to that of adult stalkers. Further, a suggested classification based on these two cases as well as our experience with other juveniles who have exhibited stalking behaviors is proposed. The first case involves a narcissistic youth who also possesses psychopathic traits, while the second involves a lonely, severely socially awkward teen. Juvenile stalking is a societal problem that has not yet garnered the attention it deserves, and all systems that deal with juvenile delinquency (juvenile court, law enforcement, and mental health personnel) as well as the school system must be educated to the prevalence and severity of this yet-to-be-recognized problem. PMID:20969566

Evans, Thomas M; Reid Meloy, J

2011-01-01

454

Does School Quality Affect Juvenile Crime?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay investigates whether students who attend higher-quality schools commit fewer crimes. If so, improving school quality might be worth considering as an approach to reducing juvenile crime. The author finds some evidence that higher-quality schools are associated with lower probabilities of committing some types of crime. (Contains 1…

Pandjiris, Amy

2003-01-01

455

Factors Involved in Juveniles' Decisions About Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

Delinquency is viewed as a purposeful behavior that is the result of a rational decision in which the pros and cons are weighed and the act that promises the greatest potential gain is performed. As a first step in evaluating this view, an experiment was run using 45 male juvenile offenders as subjects and the Subjective Expected Utility (SEU) model

Edward Cimler; Lee Roy Beach

1981-01-01

456

The Juvenile Justice System. Chapter 6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers presented at a 1996 conference on children's mental health focuses on the juvenile justice system. Papers have the following titles and authors: (1) "Delinquency and Mental Illness: The Intersection of Problems and Systems" (Carolyn S. Breda); (2) "Assessing the Mental Health of Adolescents in the Mental Health and…

1996

457

Gender Bias in Juvenile Court Dispositions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much attention has been focused upon the extent to which extra-legal factors influence decisions made in the justice systems (both adult and juvenile) in this country. While major attention has been given to race, the growing rate of female involvement in criminal (and particularly delinquent) activity requires attention to gender as a potential influence on decision making. Available research is

Carl E. Pope; William H. Feyerherm

1983-01-01

458

Juveniles' Competence to Stand Trial as Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary During the 1990s, nationwide legal reforms lowered the age at which youths could be tried in adult criminal court and expanded the range of young offenders subject to adult adjudication and punishment. The present study asked whether, to what extent, and at what ages juveniles may be more at risk than adults for incompetence as legal defendants in criminal

Laurence Steinberg; Thomas Grisso; Jennifer Woolard; Elizabeth Cauffman; Elizabeth Scott; Sandra Graham; Fran Lexcen; N. Dickon Reppucci; Robert Schwartz

2003-01-01

459

Illinois Juvenile Justice: An Emerging Dual System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trial courts have inherent powers, including the authority to punish for contempt. Historically, contempt charges were limited to adults who understood the consequences of deliberately disregarding a court order or challenging the court's authority. Illinois juvenile court judges now use contempt power to force nondelinquent status offenders to comply with routine court directives, a practice having no legal or historical

Randall R. Beger

1994-01-01

460

Offenders Incarcerated for Crimes Against Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is committed to improving the justice system's response to crimes against children. OJJDP recognizes that children are at increased risk for crime victimization. Not only are children the vic- tims of many of the same crimes that victimize adults, they are subject to other crimes, like child abuse and neglect, that

David Finkelhor; Richard Ormrod

461

Youth for Justice. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth for Justice uses the power of active learning to teach youth practical information about the law while addressing the risks associated with being young in the United States today. This unique initiative is a law-related education (LRE) program supported by the United States Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency…

Nessel, Paula A.

462

Survival models of recidivism among juvenile delinquents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among juveniles, the probability of recidivism has a curvilinear relationship to age. Rates of reoffending do not simply increase or decrease with age, but rather, they increase as a function of age up to a certain point of peak activity and decrease with increasing age thereafter. Because of this, the forms of recidivism functions between cohorts of widely varying ages

Paul J. Gruenewald; Barbara R. West

1989-01-01

463

Juvenile sex offenders: Epidemiology, recidivism and treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

One out of every five sexual assaults in the United States involves an offender under the age of eighteen. Media interest in these crimes has waxed and waned in proportion to the number and heinousness of the sex crimes for any given time period. This paper reviews three primary components of juvenile sex offending: (1) epidemiology and risk characteristics; (2)

Stewart S. Newman; Christine E. Negendank; Ernest Poortinga; Elissa P. Benedek

2009-01-01

464

Application of Megan's Law to Juveniles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the history of registration and notification statutes for sex offenders and concerns and legal challenges they have faced, noting psychology's limited knowledge about normal versus abnormal sexual development and research suggesting that recidivism rates for sexual offenses may be lower for juveniles than adults who have received…

Trivits, Lisa C.; Reppucci, N. Dickon

2002-01-01

465

Television and Nutrition in Juvenile Detention Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: We sought to improve the ability of incarcerated juveniles to critically evaluate media food messages through an educational program that focused on nutrition. Methods: Surveys were administered to two groups of inmates of both sexes (seven to 16 years). The program consisted of forty-one 50 minute sessions (three times per week for 15 weeks) focusing on media and nutrition.

Ed Wallace

2005-01-01

466

EXPERIMENTAL Differential Gene Expression between Juvenile  

E-print Network

Genes Play a Role in the Regeneration of Membranous Bone Derrick C. Wan, M.D. Oliver O. Aalami, M markers (Runx2/Cbfa1, Itm2a, and FGFR-1), and the growth factor Ptn were among other genes with greater expression in juvenile dura mater. Markers of osteoclasts (Acp5, MMP9, Ctsk) and the multiple candidate gene

Derynck, Rik

467

Juvenile delinquency and adult aggression against women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present research assessed whether males who exhibited delinquent acts in their youth would be likely to demonstrate aggression against women as adults. Attitudinal information was also collected to see whether attitudes supporting aggression would mediate the relation between juvenile delinquency and adult aggression against women. Male undergraduates (N = 185) responded to a 68-item, comprehensive measure of delinquency that

Michelle Kalra

1996-01-01

468

Love Deprivation and Violent Juvenile Delinquency  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the effects of love deprivation on violent delinquency among juvenile probationers. In the elaboration of this relationship we introduce variables of interest to sociologists (class, race, substance abuse) and variables of interest to psychologists (IQ and family size and intactness). Love deprivation emerged as the most useful predictor of violent delinquency, followed by race, class, and substance

Anthony Walsh; Thomas A. Petee

1987-01-01

469

Gambling Behavior of Juvenile Offenders in Louisiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper was to determine the (1) frequency of and (2) types of prearrest gambling (3) prevalence of pathological gambling and (4) the associations of after school activities and gambling related symptoms among juvenile offenders in Louisiana, compared to a contemporaneous school sample. A gambling survey was administered to 343 (jail) and 1293 (prison) offenders, ages 10–19

James R. Westphal; Lera J. Johnson

2006-01-01

470

The Visual Anatomy of the Juvenile Delinquent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project offering comprehensive vision therapy evaluations and visual-perception testing to juvenile delinquents revealed a high percentage of undiagnosed and previously untreated visual perceptual problems. Treatment has resulted in marked reduction in recidivism and increases in reading skills. (CL)

Kaseno, Stanley L.

1985-01-01

471

Prior adjustment of violent juvenile offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares 202 juvenile offenders on a series of preoffense adjustment variables grouped into five categories: Family Dysfunction, School Adjustment, Prior Violence, Criminal Activity, and Substance Abuse. Emphasis is placed on the importance of distinguishing subgroups of violent youth based on the type of assault (interpersonal conflict or crime-related) and the youth's relationship to the victim (parent or other

Dewey G. Cornell

1990-01-01

472

Profile of incarcerated juveniles: comparison of male and female offenders.  

PubMed

Effective methods of identifying potential juvenile offenders are critical when developing prevention programs within both state and national juvenile justice systems. The characteristics of juvenile offenders in a large juvenile justice system are examined in this study. Participants live in a Midwestern city with a high rate of crime as indicated by federal standards. Both male and female subjects were currently incarcerated (N = 363). The article highlights a basic psychological and behavioral profile of these juveniles in an effort to determine characteristics that might identify future juvenile offenders. The authors believe that if future offenders can be identified, both school systems and community agencies may be better able to intervene in the cycle of juvenile crime and violence. PMID:19086673

Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Dell, Rex; Davis, Candice; Guerrieri, Karen

2008-01-01

473

Structure of Intellect and Learning Style of Incarcerated Youth Assessment: A Means to Providing a Continuum of Educational Service in Juvenile Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors analyzed data on the information processing abilities of incarcerated youth (n = 1480) within a correctional center. The goal was to develop a learning style profile of the juvenile offenders. Based on the current sample, they concluded that the bulk of the students were figural learners in terms of the preferred modality for receiving…

Sheridan, Matthew J.; Steele-Dadzie, Timothy E.

2005-01-01

474

Education and Correctional Populations. Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents data from the Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities, 1991 and 1997; Survey of Inmates in Local Jails, 1989 and 1996 ; Survey of Adults on Probation, 1995; National Adult Literacy Survey; and Current Population Survey. Correctional populations were less educated than the general public. Numbers of…

Harlow, Caroline Wolf

475

ENHANCING THE COMPETENCY OF THE CORRECTIONAL NURSING WORKFORCE  

E-print Network

and safety focus Nursing Orientation What is a Correctional Nurse? Nursing orientation in assigned facilityENHANCING THE COMPETENCY OF THE CORRECTIONAL NURSING WORKFORCE THROUGH A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH School of Nursing Deborah Shelton, PhD, RN, NE-BC, CCHP, FAAN E. Jane Martin Professor Associate Dean

Oliver, Douglas L.

476

40 CFR 264.552 - Corrective Action Management Units (CAMU).  

...facility as a corrective action management unit under the requirements...section. Corrective action management unit means an area within...tanks are excavated during the course of cleanup; or (B) The...to prohibit the wastes from management in a CAMU. (iii)...

2014-07-01

477

Promoting Justice in the Delivery of Services to Juvenile Delinquents: The Ecosystemic Natural Wrap-Around Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Caught between their child and doing the “right thing,” families of chronic juvenile delinquents often experience a series of injustices in the name of justice. Attempts by the “system” to correct the delinquency problem often result in the imposition of values and beliefs that negate the family's values, experiences and meanings of their child's behavior. The Ecosystemic Natural Wrap-around (E.N.W.)

William F. Northey; Vicky Primer; Lisa Christensen

1997-01-01

478

The relevance of the effective school correlates, to alternative education settings, for student in a correctional system, as identified by the teachers and adminstrators in selected charter schools, in Harris County, Texas  

E-print Network

The State of Texas accepted the Effective School Research model and its correlates as a way of determining whether the state’s schools are effective. This included all juvenile justice alternative educational facilities. The purpose of the study...

Cortez-Rucker, Vance

2009-05-15

479

Transition State Analogs as Ligands for Affinity Purification of Juvenile Hormone Yehia A. I. Abdel-Aal; Bruce D. Hammock  

E-print Network

Transition State Analogs as Ligands for Affinity Purification of Juvenile Hormone Esterase Yehia A for Affinity Purification of Juvenile Hormone Esterase Insect juvenile hormones are metabolized in numerous

Hammock, Bruce D.

480

Hanford surplus facilities programs facilities listings and descriptions. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

On the Hanford Site, many surplus facilities exist (including buildings, stacks, tanks, cribs, burial grounds, and septic systems) that are scheduled to be decommissioned. Many of these facilities contain large inventories of radionuclides, which present potential radiological hazards on and off the Hanford Site. Some structures with limited structural deterioration present potential radiological and industrial safety hazards to personnel. Because of the condition of these facilities, a systematic surveillance and maintenance program is performed to identify and correct potential hazards to personnel and the environment until eventual decommissioning operations are completed.

Kiser, S.K.; Witt, T.L.

1994-01-01

481

A juvenile case of conjunctival atypical nevus  

PubMed Central

Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2973228795724608 Melanocytic nevi are the most common tumors of the conjunctiva, accounting for 28% of all neoplastic lesions. These tumors, despite their benign behavior, share some atypical histological features with nevi found in other anatomic sites like the genital and acral regions, globally designated as nevi with site-related atypia. Moreover, in children and adolescents, rapidly growing conjunctival nevi show sometimes worrisome histological patterns in association with a prominent inflammatory infiltrate that may lead to diagnostic problems. In this paper we describe a juvenile compound nevus characterized by marked melanocytic atypia and severe inflammation, which can be considered a rare case of juvenile conjunctival atypical nevus. The final diagnosis relied on morphological and immunohistochemical characterization of the large epithelioid melanocytic cells, and on the results of FISH analysis. PMID:23607499

2013-01-01

482

Influence of Waterway Development on Migrational Characteristics of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Willamette River, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the effects of Portland Harbor development in the lower Willamette River on the migration and behavior of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.), the habitat occupied by juvenile salmonids, and predation on juvenile salmonids by northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis. Juvenile salmonids were abundant in the lower Willamette River during spring; radio-tagged juvenile steelhead O. mykiss and yearling chinook salmon O.

David L. Ward; Anthony A. Nigro; Ruth A. Farr; Christopher J. Knutsen

1994-01-01

483

Cortical thickness abnormality in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies on gray matter concentration changes in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) are inconsistent.\\u000a To investigate cortical abnormality in JME differently, we measured the cortical thickness in 19 JME patients and 18 normal\\u000a controls. Results showed that the cortical thicknesses of superior\\/middle\\/medial frontal gyri, and superior\\/middle\\/ inferior\\u000a temporal gyri were decreased in JME patients. Moreover, cortical thicknesses of

Woo Suk Tae; Sun Hyung Kim; Eun Yun Joo; Sun Jung Han; I. Y. Kim; S. I. Kim; J.-M. Lee; S. B. Hong

2008-01-01

484

Chitotriosidase activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an inflammatory joint disease of unknown etiology. The pathogenesis is driven by T\\u000a and B cells. The role of macrophages remains unclear. Chitotriosidase belongs to the chitinase protein family and is secreted\\u000a by activated macrophages. The chitinases are able to catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin or chitin-like substrates such as 4-methylumbelliferyl\\u000a chitotrioside. Chitotriosidase activity was

Jürgen K. H. Brunner; Sabine Scholl-Bürgi; David Hössinger; Petra Wondrak; Martina Prelog; Lothar-Bernd Zimmerhackl

2008-01-01

485

Predictors of Juvenile Court Actions and Recidivism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variables related to court decision making and recidivism over a two-year follow-up were studied in a group of 475 first-time referrals to a juvenile court. Recidivism was associated with extralegal factors more consistently than were court actions except on the age variable. Court actions were more strongly related to legally relevant factors and, like the referral offense variable, failed to

Kevin I. Minor; David J. Hartmann; Sue Terry

1997-01-01

486

Juvenile xanthogranuloma: a rare benign histiocytic disorder  

PubMed Central

Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically affects children. The clinical presentation of this disease is characterized by single or, rarely, multiple yellow and brown skin nodules, most often found on the face and neck. Internal organ involvement has been sporadically observed in JXG and is associated with an increased risk of serious complications. We report two cases with a small and large nodular form of JXG. PMID:25097495

Kozicka, Dorota; Purzycka-Bohdan, Dorota; Biernat, Wojciech; Stawczyk, Marta; Nowicki, Roman

2014-01-01

487

Self-Reported Juvenile Delinquency in Kuwait  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is based on a self-reported juvenile delinquency study conducted among high school students in Kuwait, a rapidly developing Arab speaking Muslim Persian-Gulf country. A group-interview-questionnaire was administered to a sample of 483 male students in grades 10 and 11 enrolled in four high schools located in the four Governerates. Specifically we measured the interrelationship between delinquency and selected

K. S. MURTY; ABDULLAH M. AL-LANQAWI; JULIAN B. ROEBUCK

1990-01-01

488

Juvenile xanthogranuloma: diverse presentations of noncutaneous disease.  

PubMed

Juvenile xanthogranulomas (JXGs) are benign cutaneous lesions of childhood that often spontaneously involute. They rarely present as a noncutaneous tumors. However, JXG tumors have been described in numerous noncutaneous anatomic sites, presenting with a variety of symptoms. The severity of symptoms and accurate preoperative diagnosis of JXG should determine operative and nonoperative treatment options of these uncommon, benign, and self-limiting tumors. We report 3 cases of symptomatic, noncutaneous JXG from disparate anatomic sites all treated with aggressive surgical resection. PMID:24065046

Murphy, Joseph T; Soeken, Tim; Megison, Steve; Perez, Eduardo

2014-11-01

489

The Effects of Visitation on Incarcerated Juvenile Offenders: How Contact with the Outside Impacts Adjustment on the Inside  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigates how visitation from parents impacts youths’ mental health in the first two months of incarceration\\u000a in a secure juvenile facility. A diverse sample of 276 male, newly incarcerated serious adolescent offenders (14–17 years)\\u000a was interviewed over a 60-day period. Results indicate that youth who receive visits from parents report more rapid declines\\u000a in depressive symptoms over time

Kathryn C. Monahan; Asha Goldweber; Elizabeth Cauffman

2011-01-01

490

Validity of the juvenile sex offender assessment protocol revised (J-SOAP-II) with a multiethnic sample of juvenile sex offenders released from juvenile justice commission placements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Juvenile Sex Offender Assessment Protocol Revised (J SOAP II) is currently the most widely used and researched risk assessment instrument specifically designed to aid in the evaluation of the risk of sexual recidivism for known juveniles sex offenders (JSO). However, the instrument has been the subject of only a handful of empirical studies and support for its predictive validity

Ricardo Martinez

2011-01-01

491

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0 with ROTC No. 1 and ROTC No. 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-01-01

492

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

the suite under a negative pressure to the surrounding space which is designed to prevent cross, and the correct way to leave the facility. 2.0 Scope: This procedure applies to all CMLAF staff, maintenance of Responsible Care & Use of Laboratory Animal Certification Program. 3. Attendance at Right-To-Know training. 4

Krovi, Venkat

493

Effectiveness of hydrotreatment in reducing the toxicity of a coal liquefaction product to juvenile channel catfish  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrotreatment in reducing the acute toxicity of a representative coal liquefaction product. Acute bioassays with juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were used to compare the toxicities of raw (nonupgraded) H-Coal oil, four samples of the same H-Coal oil subjected to different degrees of upgrading by hydrotreatment, and a petroleum crude oil. Channel catfish were chosen because they have considerable commercial and sport fisheries value and are likely to be abundant in large rivers where commercial coal liquefaction facilities will be located.

Cada, G.F.; Kenna, M.

1985-05-01

494

Genetic identification of F1 and post-F1 serrasalmid juvenile hybrids in Brazilian aquaculture.  

PubMed

Juvenile fish trade monitoring is an important task on Brazilian fish farms. However, the identification of juvenile fish through morphological analysis is not feasible, particularly between interspecific hybrids and pure species individuals, making the monitoring of these individuals difficult. Hybrids can be erroneously identified as pure species in breeding facilities, which might reduce production on farms and negatively affect native populations due to escapes or stocking practices. In the present study, we used a multi-approach analysis (molecular and cytogenetic markers) to identify juveniles of three serrasalmid species (Colossoma macropomum, Piaractus mesopotamicus and Piaractus brachypomus) and their hybrids in different stocks purchased from three seed producers in Brazil. The main findings of this study were the detection of intergenus backcrossing between the hybrid ? patinga (P. mesopotamicus×P. brachypomus)×? C. macropomum and the occurrence of one hybrid triploid individual. This atypical specimen might result from automixis, a mechanism that produces unreduced gametes in some organisms. Moreover, molecular identification indicated that hybrid individuals are traded as pure species or other types of interspecific hybrids, particularly post-F1 individuals. These results show that serrasalmid fish genomes exhibit high genetic heterogeneity, and multi-approach methods and regulators could improve the surveillance of the production and trade of fish species and their hybrids, thereby facilitating the sustainable development of fish farming. PMID:24594674

Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Senhorini, José Augusto; Foresti, Fausto; Martínez, Paulino; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

2014-01-01

495

Genetic Identification of F1 and Post-F1 Serrasalmid Juvenile Hybrids in Brazilian Aquaculture  

PubMed Central

Juvenile fish trade monitoring is an important task on Brazilian fish farms. However, the identification of juvenile fish through morphological analysis is not feasible, particularly between interspecific hybrids and pure species individuals, making the monitoring of these individuals difficult. Hybrids can be erroneously identified as pure species in breeding facilities, which might reduce production on farms and negatively affect native populations due to escapes or stocking practices. In the present study, we used a multi-approach analysis (molecular and cytogenetic markers) to identify juveniles of three serrasalmid species (Colossoma macropomum, Piaractus mesopotamicus and Piaractus brachypomus) and their hybrids in different stocks purchased from three seed producers in Brazil. The main findings of this study were the detection of intergenus backcrossing between the hybrid ? patinga (P. mesopotamicus×P. brachypomus)×? C. macropomum and the occurrence of one hybrid triploid individual. This atypical specimen might result from automixis, a mechanism that produces unreduced gametes in some organisms. Moreover, molecular identification indicated that hybrid individuals are traded as pure species or other types of interspecific hybrids, particularly post-F1 individuals. These results show that serrasalmid fish genomes exhibit high genetic heterogeneity, and multi-approach methods and regulators could improve the surveillance of the production and trade of fish species and their hybrids, thereby facilitating the sustainable development of fish farming. PMID:24594674

Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Senhorini, Jose Augusto; Foresti, Fausto; Martinez, Paulino; Porto-Foresti, Fabio

2014-01-01

496

Probabilistic quantum error correction  

E-print Network

There are well known necessary and sufficient conditions for a quantum code to correct a set of errors. We study weaker conditions under which a quantum code may correct errors with probabilities that may be less than one. We work with stabilizer codes and as an application study how the nine qubit code, the seven qubit code, and the five qubit code perform when there are errors on more than one qubit. As a second application, we discuss the concept of syndrome quality and use it to suggest a way that quantum error correction can be practically improved.

Jesse Fern; John Terilla

2002-09-06

497

Laser correcting mirror  

DOEpatents

An improved laser correction mirror (10) for correcting aberrations in a laser beam wavefront having a rectangular mirror body (12) with a plurality of legs (14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28) arranged into opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) along the long sides (30, 32) of the mirror body (12). Vector force pairs (49, 50, 52, 54) are applied by adjustment mechanisms (42, 44, 46, 48) between members of the opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) for bending a reflective surface 13 of the mirror body 12 into a shape defining a function which can be used to correct for comatic aberrations.

Sawicki, Richard H. (Danville, CA)

1994-01-01

498

Nuclear Facilities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In order to produce nuclear weapons, each country must have facilities to produce and refine the nuclear materials, conduct research on weapon design, and store the completed weapons. The interactives in this collection allow you to explore the nuclear facilities of the nuclear powers (both declared and undeclared).

Griffith, Christopher

499

State Responses to Serious and Violent Juvenile Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report was prepared by the National Center for Juvenile Justice, the research division of the National Council ofJuvenile and Family Court Judges, and was supported by cooperative agreement number 95--JN--FX--K003 with theOffice of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.Points of view or opinions expressed in this document are those of the

Patricia Torbet; Richard Gable; Hunter Hurst Iv; Imogene Montgomery; Linda Szymanski; Douglas Thomas

1996-01-01

500

Juvenile toads avoid chemical cues from snake predators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical senses mediate several anuran behaviours, including predator avoidance by larval frogs. Predation by garter snakes is an important influence on the survival of post-metamorphic, juvenile toads (Bufosp.). Studies have shown that visual, rather than chemical, cues are important for predator avoidance in post-metamorphic juvenile bufonids. This study investigated the ability of post-metamorphic, juvenile great plains toads,B.cognatusand southwestern toads,B.microscaphusto detect

MATTHEW A. FLOWERS; BRENT M. GRAVES

1997-01-01