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1

Juvenile Correctional Facilities. 1998 Minnesota Student Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on a voluntary survey designed to compare responses of adolescents in corrections with adolescents in public schools in 1998. Findings are highlighted in sections entitled: (1) "Youth, Their Families, and Their Environment"; (2) "Psychological Distress"; (3) "Sexual Activity"; (4) "School Perceptions"; and (5) "Antisocial and…

Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Harrison, Patricia A.; Hedger, Scott A.

2

Community Corrections Facilities for Juvenile Offenders in OhioAn Examination of Treatment Integrity and Recidivism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although prior research suggests that juvenile correctional programs can be effective at reducing recidivism, research has also found that some programs are more effective than others. This suggests that identifying the characteristics of effective correctional programs is an important issue surrounding interventions with juveniles. The current research not only examines the effectiveness of Ohio’s community correctional facilities in reducing recidivism,

Christopher T. Lowenkamp; Matthew D. Makarios; Edward J. Latessa; Richard Lemke; Paula Smith

2010-01-01

3

Quality Teacher Impact on Learning in a Juvenile Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine teacher impact upon student learning at a correctional facility for adolescent boys. Improving teacher quality is directly related to the ability to produce higher levels of learning for K-12 students. Providing confirmation that teachers in correctional facilities can facilitate the learning of all…

Feinstein, Sheryl G., Ed.D.; Sorenson, David

2008-01-01

4

Substance Abuse Treatment in Adult and Juvenile Correctional Facilities: Findings from the Uniform Facility Data Set 1997 Survey of Correctional Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents methodology and findings from the Uniform Facility Data Set (UFDS) 1997 Survey of Correctional Facilities, which surveyed about 7,600 adult and juvenile correctional facilities to identify those that provide on-site substance abuse treatment to their inmates or residents. The survey assesses substance abuse treatment provided…

Marsden, Mary Ellen, Ed.; Straw, Richard S., Ed.

5

Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Youth in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This practice parameter presents recommendations for the mental health assessment and treatment of youths in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. Mental and substance-related disorders are significant public health problems affecting youths in juvenile justice settings. Sufficient time is necessary to conduct a comprehensive diagnostic assessment, in- terview collateral historians, and review pertinent records to identify primary and comorbid conditions. Potential

Christopher Thomas; William Bernet; Oscar G. Bukstein; Valerie Arnold; Joseph Beitchman; R. Scott Benson; Joan Kinlan; Jon McClellan; Jon Shaw; Saundra Stock; Louis Kraus; David Fassler; William Arroyo; Andres J. Pumariega; Diane H. Schetky

2005-01-01

6

Towards a Strength-Based Juvenile Correctional Facility: Sustainability and Effects of an Institutional Transformation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2006, the administration of a state-run, secure juvenile correctional facility initiated an attempt to transform its institutional culture using a strength-based approach to assessment and case planning. This resulted in a rapid improvement in institutional climate. The current study revisits this setting several years later to see if those…

Barton, William H.; Mackin, Juliette R.

2012-01-01

7

Comparison of violence and abuse in juvenile correctional facilities and schools.  

PubMed

Peer violence, peer sexual harassment and abuse, and staff abuse experienced by boys and girls in juvenile correctional facilities are compared with those experienced by peers in schools in the community. Responses of 360 youths in 20 gender-separated correctional facilities in Israel to a questionnaire tapping these forms of mistreatment were compared with those of 7,012 students in a representative sample of Israeli junior high and high schools. Victimization was reported more frequently by those in correctional facilities than by those in schools. However, some of the more prevalent forms of violence and abuse were reported with equal frequency in both settings, and some more frequently in schools. Despite being victimized more frequently, those in the correctional facilities tended to view their victimization as a significantly less serious problem than those in the schools and to rate the staff as doing a better job of dealing with the problem. PMID:18463307

Davidson-Arad, Bilha; Benbenishty, Rami; Golan, Miriam

2009-02-01

8

Cultural analysis of communication behaviors among juveniles in a correctional facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addressed communication behaviors of female juvenile delinquents in a correctional facility. Qualitative methodology was used to study 78 participants ranging in age from 13.1 to 18.9 (years; months), over a five-month period. Data collection consisted of observations, participant observation, interviews, and a review of documents. Additionally, participants were tested on the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals—3. Listening and

Dixie D Sanger; John W Creswell; Jaime Dworak; Lisa Schultz

2000-01-01

9

Critical Factors in Mental Health Programming for Juveniles in Corrections Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juveniles with mental health and other specialized needs are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system, and while juvenile corrections have not historically provided standardized and evidence-based mental health services for its incarcerated youth, the demand is evident. The reality is that juveniles with serious mental illness are committed…

Underwood, Lee A.; Phillips, Annie; von Dresner, Kara; Knight, Pamela D.

2006-01-01

10

Children in Custody: 1982/83 Census of Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Children in Custody (CIC) report provides biennial information, in the form of statistical charts, on public and private residential facilities holding juveniles in custody across the country, and on the juveniles they hold. The reference date for this CIC census was February 1, 1983. Annual data are for the calendar year 1982. The major…

Sickmund, Melissa

11

Mental Disorders among Adolescents in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities: A Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis of 25 Surveys  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article presents a meta-analysis of all existing surveys on the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in adolescents in juvenile detention and correctional facilities in order to assess the prevalence of mental disorders. Findings indicate adolescents in detention are 10 times more likely to suffer from psychosis than the general adolescent…

Fazel, Seena; Doll, Helen; Langstrom, Niklas

2008-01-01

12

Pilot Implementation and Preliminary Evaluation of START:AV Assessments in Secure Juvenile Correctional Facilities  

PubMed Central

The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability: Adolescent Version (START:AV) is a new structured professional judgment guide for assessing short-term risks in adolescents. The scheme may be distinguished from other youth risk assessment and treatment planning instruments by its inclusion of 23 dynamic factors that are each rated for both vulnerability and strength. In addition, START:AV is also unique in that it focuses on multiple adverse outcomes—namely, violence, self-harm, suicide, unauthorized leave, substance abuse, self-neglect, victimization, and general offending—over the short-term (i.e., weeks to months) rather than long-term (i.e., years). This paper describes a pilot implementation and preliminary evaluation of START:AV in three secure juvenile correctional facilities in the southern United States. Specifically, we examined the descriptive characteristics and psychometric properties of START:AV assessments completed by 21 case managers on 291 adolescent offenders (250 boys and 41 girls) at the time of admission. Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility of completing START:AV assessments as part of routine practice. Findings also highlight differences in the characteristics of START:AV assessments for boys and girls and differential associations between the eight START:AV risk domains. Though results are promising, further research is needed to establish the reliability and validity of START:AV assessments completed in the field.

Sellers, Brian G; Viljoen, Jodi L.; Cruise, Keith R.; Nicholls, Tonia L.; Dvoskin, Joel A.

2012-01-01

13

The Correctional Orientation of "Child Savers": Support for Rehabilitation and Custody among Juvenile Correctional Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies have explored levels and sources of support for rehabilitation and custody among correctional workers. However, the vast majority of this type of research has been conducted in adult facilities, and there are few existing studies that use samples of juvenile correctional workers. To help address this gap in the literature, we use a…

Blevins, Kristie R.; Cullen, Francis T.; Sundt, Jody L.

2007-01-01

14

Juveniles within Adult Correctional Settings: Legal Pathways and Developmental Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing number of juvenile offenders are being processed through adult correctional systems in the United States. Changing conceptions of juvenile offenders and expansions to the criteria for juvenile transfer laws have created a number of new challenges for correctional systems, policy makers and researchers. In this article, we detail the legal mechanisms that bring adolescents into the adult system.

Jennifer L. Woolard; Candice Odgers; Lonn Lanza-Kaduce; Hayley Daglis

2005-01-01

15

Influence of Child Maltreatment on Juveniles' Psychological Adjustment within Correctional Institutions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data used in this study were collected between April 1997 and August 1998. The study used a longitudinal sample of 509 juveniles confined to 48 correctional facilities in 20 States. Site visits were made to each of the 48 correctional facilities. During t...

A. R. Grover

2001-01-01

16

Ability of substance abusers to escape detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a juvenile correctional facility.  

PubMed

The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; Butcher et al., 1992) was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once under instructions to fake good (FG). Under SI, substance scales correctly classified about 60% to 85% of adolescents. Under FG, substance- and non-substance-abusing juveniles produced lower scores on substance scales. However, the Lie Scale (L) was able to detect more than 75% of deceptive profiles and about 77% of honest profiles. When scale L and the best substance scale were used in combination, only about 18% of faking substance abusers were not identified as either substance abusers or as underreporting. For feigning substance abusers, only about 10% of substance abusers were detected, with about 72% being categorized as faking and needing further assessment. PMID:15695741

Stein, L A R; Graham, John R

2005-03-01

17

Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility  

PubMed Central

The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once under instructions to fake good (FG). Under SI, substance scales correctly classified about 60% to 85% of adolescents. Under FG, substance- and non-substance-abusing juveniles produced lower scores on substance scales. However, the Lie Scale (L) was able to detect more than 75% of deceptive profiles and about 77% of honest profiles. When scale L and the best substance scale were used in combination, only about 18% of faking substance abusers were not identified as either substance abusers or as underreporting. For feigning substance abusers, only about 10% of substance abusers were detected, with about 72% being categorized as faking and needing further assessment.

Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

2010-01-01

18

Current Juvenile Corrections Professional Development Practices and Future Directions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Personnel in juvenile corrections (JC) work with students who have challenging academic, behavioral, and mental health needs. The complexity of the JC setting requires personnel to be highly skilled in effective practices to meet the demands of their job. Unfortunately, juvenile correctional personnel are neglected as an important link in the…

Gagnon, Joseph C.; Houchins, David E.; Murphy, Kristin M.

2012-01-01

19

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

20

Helping Female Juveniles Improve their On-Task Behavior and Academic Performance Using a Self-Management Procedure in a Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to teach female juvenile offenders with disabilities a self-management procedure to help improve on-task behavior and academic performance during independent practice of math calculation facts. Students were taught to set goals and were provided with incentives for goal attainment. A reversal single-case design…

Caldwell, Stacy; Joseph, Laurice M.

2012-01-01

21

Reading Instruction for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to obtain (a) a national picture of the characteristics of special educators who provide reading or English instruction in juvenile corrections facilities and (b) characteristics of the schools in which they work and the students who they serve. In addition, the study was designed to gather information on teacher use of…

Wilkerson, Kimber L.; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Mason-Williams, Loretta; Lane, Holly B.

2012-01-01

22

Mathematics in Juvenile Corrections: Curricular and Assessment Policies and Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study is a national survey of special education mathematics teachers in juvenile correctional schools (JC). Results are based on 121 (32%) returned surveys from special education mathematics teacher. Results indicated that in 47% of schools, curriculum was not based on district or state curricula. Between 40-50% of teachers reported…

Maccini, Paula; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Mason-Williams, Loretta

2012-01-01

23

Juvenile Correctional Workers' Perceptions of Suicide Risk Factors and Mental Health Issues of Incarcerated Juveniles  

PubMed Central

Correctional staff knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of incarcerated juveniles' mental health needs, including suicide prevention, have not been studied empirically. This study measured juvenile correctional officers' knowledge and attitudes regarding suicide risk factors and mental health and substance abuse issues through administration of the Mental Health Knowledge and Attitude Test (MHKAT) before and after a staff training on suicide prevention. Seventy-six participants completed the pre- and post-training MHKAT. They demonstrated significant improvement in knowledge of and attitudes toward mental health treatment of incarcerated youth as reflected by higher post-training MHKAT scores. Findings suggest that correctional staff are receptive to increasing knowledge of critical mental health issues. Studies of the retention and implementation of this new knowledge by direct care staff over time and the optimal type and frequency of new staff training and continuing education are indicated.

Penn, Joseph V.; Esposito, Christianne; Stein, L. A. R.; Lacher-Katz, Molly; Spirito, Anthony

2009-01-01

24

Effective Instructional Practices in Juvenile Justice Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The majority of youths involved with the juvenile justice system struggle to make academic progress. This article reviews the characteristics of youths in these settings and highlights evidence-based instructional practices that are effective with struggling students, as well as practices that have been documented as successful in secure…

Mathur, Sarup R.; Schoenfeld, Naomi

2010-01-01

25

ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTIONS OF SOUTH CAROLINA'S JUVENILE CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS, INSIGHT INTO THE TURNOVER EPIDEMIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

Employee turnover has long been a problematic issue in the field of corrections. In the past, research has attempted to identify causal factors to address the staff attrition issue, but has failed to complete the void of information regarding staff turnover among the juvenile correctional officers. The current study examines juvenile correctional staff's degree of job satisfaction and their retention

Jeffrey A. Tipton

2002-01-01

26

76 FR 11337 - Presidential Library Facilities; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NARA-07-0005] RIN 3095-AA82 Presidential Library Facilities; Correction AGENCY: National...and design standards for Presidential libraries and information required in NARA's...facility, and equipment as a Presidential library. DATES: This regulation is...

2011-03-02

27

Juvenile Correctional Workers' Perceptions ofSuicide Risk Factors andMental Health Issues ofIncarcerated Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Correctional staff knowledge, attitudes, andperceptions of incarcerated juveniles' mental health needs, including suicide prevention, havenotbeenstudied empirically. Thisstudy measured juvenile correc- tional officers' knowledge andattitudes regarding suicide risk factors and mental health andsubstance abuse issues through administration ofthe Mental Health Knowledge andAttitude Test(MHKAT)before andafter astaff training onsuicide prevention. Seventy-six participants completed thepre-andpost-training MHKAT.Theydemonstrated significant improvement inknowledge ofandattitudes toward mental health treat-

Joseph V. Penn; L. A. R. Stein; BA Anthony Spirito

28

Effective Practices in Juvenile Correctional Education: A Study of the Literature and Research 1980-1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication, a literature review on effective practices in juvenile correctional education, is intended to challenge all who are in a position to influence the future course of the education of juvenile delinquents. It is based on the conviction that education can and must play a greater role in the lives of delinquent and at-risk youth in…

Coffey, Osa D.; Gemignani, Maia G.

29

The impact of the juvenile intervention facility on the adjudication of delinquent youth in Broward County  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable funds have been allocated in the area of juvenile justice in attempts to reduce and prevent the problem of juvenile delinquency. Much of these funds have been funneled to various community-level intervention programs. This dissertation reports the results of a study that examined the effects of one such program, the Juvenile Intervention Facility (JIF) in Broward County, Florida, on

Michele Verdi

2004-01-01

30

Tennessee's Youth in Juvenile Justice Facilities: Mental Health and Substance Abuse Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to assess the prevalence of mental health and substance abuse among youth in one state's juvenile justice facilities, a survey was conducted of 40 Tennessee facilities. A total of 1215 youth were being held on the \\

Louise Barnes; Deborah Bennett; Charlotte Bryson; Sita Diehl; Trish Hayes; Craig Anne; Liz Ledbetter; Pam McCain; Linda O'Neal; Patti Orten; Nancy Reed; Adriane Sheffield; Debrah Stafford; Pat Wade

2005-01-01

31

Facility-Level Characteristics Associated with Serious Suicide Attempts and Deaths from Suicide in Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about how facility-level characteristics affect the risk of suicide and suicide attempts in juvenile justice residential facilities. This leaves facility administrators and mental health providers without evidence-based guidance on how the facility itself affects risks. The current study uses data from two recently developed…

Gallagher, Catherine A.; Dobrin, Adam

2006-01-01

32

Learning behind Bars: Selected Educational Programs from Juvenile, Jail and Prison Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes briefly a number of highly effective educational programs in correctional settings. The programs are divided into three sections: juvenile correctional education, local detention/community correctional education, and prison education. Information provided for each program includes address and telephone number; type of…

Sawyer, Richard; Cosgrove, Susan, Ed.

33

Destructuring, Privatization, and the Promise of Juvenile Diversion: Compromising Community-Based Corrections  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the 1970s, a consensus emerged that juvenile deinstitutionalization and diversion offered great promise for lowering recidivism. However, critics charged that community-based programs had failed to achieve their stated objectives and that diversion actually “widened the net” of social control. The present research examined the impact of “restructuring” by analyzing data on the national growth and distribution of open facilities

Daniel J. Curran

1988-01-01

34

Evaluation of juvenile salmonid bypass facilities and passage at water diversions on the lower Umatilla River. Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Outdated juvenile and adult fish passage facilities were recently reconstructed at the five major irrigation dams on the lower Umatilla River, Oregon to meet National marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design standards. Changes in design at juvenile fish byp...

W. A. Cameron, S. M. Knapp, R. W. Carmichael

1997-01-01

35

Adolescent Psycopathology Scale As A Screener For Incoming Juveniles Within Residential Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study examined the utility of the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale - Short Form (APS-SF) as a screening instrument for assessment of the mental health needs of incoming juveniles within a Department of Juvenile Justice residential facility. The APS-SF was compared to a well-validated, semi-structured diagnostic interview, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Diagnoses (KID-SCID), within a sample of 50

Catherine Hardee Drew

2009-01-01

36

Mental Health Specialists and Services in Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data concerning the number of mental health specialists in each of four groups (psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and correctional counselors) employed in state and Federal correctional facilities are reviewed. Social workers are seen to represent 76% and 57% of all mental health specialists employed in Federal and state facilities, respectively. In addition, a ratio of one mental health specialist to

Nathaniel J. Pallone; Daniel S. LaRosa

1980-01-01

37

Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Correctional Facilities: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is estimated that up to one-fourth of the people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States pass through a correctional facility each year. The majority of persons who enter a correctional facility today will return home in the near future. Most inmates with HIV infection acquire it in the outside community; prison does not seem

Anne Spaulding; Becky Stephenson; Grace Macalino; William Ruby; Jennifer G. Clarke; Timothy P. Flanigan

2002-01-01

38

Improving Literacy Skills of Juvenile Detainees. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Office of Juvenile and Delinquency Prevention funded a model designed to improve the literacy level of youth in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. The model specified training language arts teachers and relevant staff and volunteers in direct instruction methods for rapid improvement of students' comprehension, particularly for…

Hodges, Jane; And Others

39

State Plan: Vocational Education for Youth in Juvenile Justice Commitment Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, a multi-agency plan was developed for the vocational education of youth in juvenile commitment facilities. Part 1 of the plan describes the Plan Narrative, which provides contextual information and describes events leading up to the development of the plan, the rationale for creating the plan, and the characteristics of vocational…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

40

Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care Screening and Youth Level of Services\\/Case Management Inventory were analyzed from 937

Richard F. Dalton; Lisa J. Evans; Keith R. Cruise; Ronald A. Feinstein; Rhonda F. Kendrick

2009-01-01

41

Review of Education Services in Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities. Report No. 98-28.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of a performance review of educational programs for youth in residential commitment facilities are presented including background, methodology, and findings. Most juvenile justice students enter residential programs performing below their grade level in reading and math but improve by at least one grade level during their stay.…

Florida State Legislature, Tallahassee. Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability.

42

Trauma Affect Regulation Psychoeducation Group and Milieu Intervention Outcomes in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports outcomes of Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET), a group and milieu intervention, in three juvenile detention facilities, controlling for site, length of stay, ethnicity, number of arrests, mental health and traumatic stress problems, and cohort effects. Linear multiple regression results showed that every session of TARGET received in the first seven days of

Julian D. Ford; Josephine Hawke

2012-01-01

43

Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

2009-01-01

44

Educational Faculty Perceptions of the Learning Climate in a Juvenile Justice Residential Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The majority of educational faculty from a juvenile justice residential detention facility in rural Northeast Missouri who participated in a learning climate survey of their school seemed to agree that the environment for staff and students was generally physically safe and emotionally supportive; key factors for a positive learning climate. By…

Cox, Carolyn; Visker, Joseph; Hartman, Ashley

2011-01-01

45

Adapting Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports for Secure Juvenile Justice Settings: Improving Facility-Wide Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The popularity and success of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in public schools across the United States has led professionals to advocate for its implementation in secure juvenile settings. Statewide implementation efforts have been mounted in several jurisdictions, and a number of secure facilities are applying it with…

Jolivette, Kristine; Nelson, C. Michael

2010-01-01

46

TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC Features TB in Correctional Facilities is a Public Health Concern Share Compartir Diagnosing and treating TB in ... the community with untreated TB present a serious public health concern. Figure 1 (larger view). TB Control in ...

47

Residential Community Corrections Facilities: Current Practice and Policy Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this project was to analyze a database previously assembled by NIC during the course of a survey of residential community corrections facilities, to supplement the survey with case studies of a limited number of residential community correc...

1992-01-01

48

Compliance with bloodborne pathogen standards at eight correctional facilities.  

PubMed

This study had three objectives: (a) to examine compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogens (BBPs) Standard at eight correctional facilities, (b) to identify potential barriers to compliance, and (c) to discuss steps to address these barriers. Eight facilities of different sizes and locations were visited to examine employer adherence to 15 selected BBP risk reduction activities. Facility compliance was less than 50% for four activities: updating exposure control plans, implementing use of appropriate safer medical devices, soliciting employee input on selection of safer devices, and training medical staff when such devices are implemented. Inconsistent compliance may be due to difficulties in applying the standards in the correctional health care work setting. Any BBP training and health communication activities targeted to correctional health care workers should be tailored to the correctional facility setting. PMID:22209817

Lehman, Everett J; Huy, Janice M; Viet, Susan M; Gomaa, Ahmed

2012-01-01

49

Stress and Satisfaction among Juvenile Correctional Workers: A Test of Competing Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the past three decades, there have been increasing investigations of correctional employees' reactions to their work, especially in terms of job-related stress and satisfaction. The vast majority of this research, however, has been conducted in adult facilities. To help address this limitation in the literature, we use a secondary dataset…

Blevins, Kristie R.; Cullen, Francis T.; Frank, James; Sundt, Jody L.; Holmes, Stephen T.

2006-01-01

50

[Temperament and character-traits as protective factors among adolescents in juvenile residential facilities].  

PubMed

Although adolescents in juvenile residential facilities are at high risk for mental disorders, not all of these adolescents develop psychiatric symptoms. The aim of our study was to define traits protecting these adolescents. A total of 314 adolescents of 20 juvenile residential facilities were examined using standardized assessment instruments (Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI)). Educators of the facilities filled out a sociodemographic questionnaire for each participant. Adolescents were divided into two groups (resilient vs. mental problems) by CBCL-Cut-off-Scores. Analyses were based on these two groups. Resilient youth differed from youth with psychiatric symptoms in temperament- and character-traits (e. g. self-directedness F = 28.4, p < .001, d = 0.64) with small to moderate effect sizes (d = 0.36 to 0.64). Resilient adolescents lived in larger facilities (U = 9080, p = .025). No associations were found between gender and resilience, as well as age at placement in the facility and duration of the stay in the facility and resilience. Significant differences in temperament- and character-traits between resilient adolescents and adolescents with mental problems were identified. Especially character-traits could be a basis for developing strategies for promoting mental health and further resilience factors, as social support. PMID:24693806

Witt, Andreas; Schmid, Marc; Fegert, Jörg M; Plener, Paul L; Goldbeck, Lutz

2014-01-01

51

Newly Identified HIV Infections in Correctional Facilities, United States, 2007  

PubMed Central

We used Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV Counseling and Testing System data from 2007 to determine the percentage and characteristics of persons newly identified as HIV-positive in US correctional facilities. The newly identified HIV positivity was 0.7%, and 30% of detainees newly identified with HIV were categorized as having low-risk heterosexual contact or no acknowledged risk. Correctional facilities should provide detainees with routine opt-out HIV testing, unless the prevalence of previously undiagnosed HIV infection has been documented to be less than 0.1%.

Beltrami, John F.; MacGowan, Robin J.; Borkowf, Craig B.; Margolis, Andrew D.

2012-01-01

52

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs and Imeques C-mem-ini-kem acclimation facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O, kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning summer steelhead, fall chinook and coho salmon. In the spring of 1994, juvenile summer steelhead were acclimated at Bonifer and Minthorn. At Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, juvenile spring chinook were acclimated in the spring and fall. A total of 92 unmarked and 42 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 1, 1993 through May 2, 1994 and held at Minthorn. An estimated 234,432 green eggs were taken from 48 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and early rearing. Fingerlings were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for final rearing and release into the Umatilla River in 1995. Fall chinook and coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 1994. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated juvenile adult survival rates are detailed in this document.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1995-05-01

53

Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis C Virus among Juveniles in Correctional Center in Isfahan, Iran  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Juveniles in custody are affected by blood borne viruses due to high rates of risk behaviors. Therefore, they have a disproportionate burden of infectious diseases, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The purpose of the present study was to determine prevalence and associated characteristics of hepatitis C infection in inmates of a correctional center in Isfahan, Iran. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of HCV infection in 160 youths, who were admitted to correctional center in Isfahan during 2008-2009. Subjects were asked questions regarding behaviors that might put them at high risk for acquiring HCV and blood was drawn for this test. Sera were analyzed for HCV Ab and RIBA test was performed on antibody-positive HCV. We used Chi-square test and logistic regression model to analyze data and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 160 young prisoners (147 boys and 13 girls) were studied. The mean age of the inmates was 16.59 ± 1.24 year. A history of intravenous drug addiction was reported in 3.8% of them. HCV infection was detected in 7 (4.4%) subjects. This study revealed that history of IDU was the main risk factor for HCV (OR, 134.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.29-2481.03). Conclusions: To prevent HCV transmission, proper drug prevention educations should be performed in young age prisoners.

Nokhodian, Zary; Ataei, Behrooz; Kassaian, Nazila; Yaran, Majid; Hassannejad, Razieh; Adibi, Peyman

2012-01-01

54

High School Education in Correctional Facilities. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of "Get tough on crime" and "Three strikes" in the 1980s and 1990s, correctional facilities have become overloaded with prisoners who are often repeat offenders. 51% of those imprisoned have a GED or high school diploma. Out of the remaining 49%, 36% of inmates had not completed the ninth grade and approximately a quarter of them…

Walker, Karen

2006-01-01

55

78 FR 45983 - Acceptability of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities,'' based on receipt and review...CAP), voluntarily submitted by fuel cycle facility licensees, was acceptable....

2013-07-30

56

78 FR 11903 - Acceptability of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities.'' The draft NUREG provides...CAP) submitted by the licensee of a fuel cycle facility is acceptable. DATES:...

2013-02-20

57

Juvenile Delinquency and Special Education Laws: Policy Implementation Issues and Directions for Future Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research literature has repeatedly demonstrated that there is an overrepresentation of juveniles with disabilities who are incarcerated in short-term and long-term correctional facilities. Despite these findings, special education programs in many juvenile correctional facilities have been shown to be lacking many of the necessary services…

Morris, Richard J.; Thompson, Kristin C.

2008-01-01

58

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. This 1993 annual report details scheduled maintenance and other projects carried out during the year.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1994-05-01

59

Isoniazid preventive therapy in correctional facilities: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the main cause of death in correctional facilities in middle- and low-income countries. Due to the closed environment and the concentration of individuals with TB-related risk factors, effective measures are required to control TB in such settings. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) represents an effective and cost-effective measure. Despite international recommendations that IPT be integral to TB control, it is seldom deployed. A systematic review of interventions used to assess IPT initiation and completion in correctional facilities was conducted using published studies from two biomedical databases and relevant keywords. Additional references were reviewed, resulting in 18 eligible studies. Most (72%) studies were conducted in the United States and in jail settings (60%), with the main objective of improving completion rates inside the facility or after release. Studies that provided data about initiation and completion rates showed poor success in correctional facilities. Adverse consequences and treatment interruption ranged from 1% to 55% (median 5%) in reported studies; hepatotoxicity was the most prevalent adverse reaction. Despite its accelerating effect on the development of active TB, information on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status was provided in only half of the studies. Among the four studies where IPT effectiveness was assessed, the results mirror those described in community settings. Future studies require thorough assessments of IPT initiation and completion rates and adverse effects, particularly in low- and middle-income countries and where comorbid viral hepatitis may contribute significantly to outcomes, and in settings where TB and HIV are more endemic. PMID:22410101

Al-Darraji, H A A; Kamarulzaman, A; Altice, F L

2012-07-01

60

41 CFR 102-75.815 - What happens if property conveyed for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...conveyed for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response...Property for Correctional Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response...conveyed for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency management...

2013-07-01

61

41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...property for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response...Property for Correctional Facility, Law Enforcement, Or Emergency Management Response...property for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency management...

2013-07-01

62

The Voices of Youth: Perspectives and Recommendations from Young Adults Involved in Juvenile Corrections. Information Brief. Volume 5, Issue 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief describes two exceptional model programs for adjudicated youth with disabilities: Woodland Hills Residential Facility in Duluth, Minnesota and the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Walter McGinnis High School in Red Wing, Minnesota. The brief shares best practices from research about these programs as well as insight, commentary, and…

Stenhjem, Pam

2006-01-01

63

Operations of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1984-1986 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonifer Springs salmon and steelhead juvenile release and adult collection facility is located in the upper Umatilla River drainage at Meacham Creek mile 2.0. The facility is one of two that are operated on the Umatilla Indian Reservation under contract with Bonneville Power Administration. Construction of the Bonifer facility was completed in the fall of 1983 and operations began in early 1984. The facility consists of a one acre spring-fed pond and a concrete fishway and adult fish holding area at the pond outlet. The facility is used for holding and spawning of adult summer steelhead and for acclimation/release of juvenile fall and spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead. The acclimation capacity is approximately 20,000 lbs. of fish. Minthorn Springs Creek is located about four miles east of Mission, Oregon, on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. It forms from several springs located immediately south of the Umatilla River. The total length of Minthorn Springs Creek is about one mile and the mouth is located at Umatilla River mile 63.7. The fishway and adult holding area of the Minthorn facility are located in Minthorn Springs Creek immediately upstream from the mouth. The juvenile raceways are located in the same general area about 25 feet from the bank of Minthorn Springs Creek. Like the Bonifer Springs project, the Minthorn facility is used for adult fish holding and for temporary rearing or acclimation of juvenile salmon and steelhead to imprint the fish on the particular water source and reduce stress from trucking prior to their downstream migration. The facility was completed in December of 1985 and first used for juvenile acclimation in the Spring of 1986. An existing pond was not available at the Minthorn site so two concrete raceways (120 x 12 feet) were constructed for juvenile holding/rearing. At a water depth of 3 feet and a single-pass water exchange rate of about 800 gpm through each raceway, the facility has a rearing capacity of about 15,000 to 20,000 pounds of fish. This capacity could be exceeded if fish were held only for a brief acclimation period.

James, Gary A.

1987-05-01

64

Community Treatment Programs for Juveniles: A Best-Evidence Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A significant challenge facing the juvenile justice system is the task of transitioning and reintegrating juveniles from youth corrections facilities back into the community. This challenge, in part, is related to determining whether the referred community programs are effective. This article summarizes the literature on the effectiveness of…

Underwood, Lee A.; von Dresner, Kara Sandor; Phillips, Annie L.

2006-01-01

65

Metamorphosis: How Missouri Rehabilitates Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juveniles convicted of serious offenses usually end up in large correctional facilities that focus on punishment--not rehabilitation. The state of Missouri, however, has found a better way to help end the cycle of crime: by creating a network of small facilities that provide therapy and educational opportunities, it has dramatically reduced…

Dubin, Jennifer

2012-01-01

66

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1990. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. Two of the Minthorn and all of the Bonifer pond outlet screens were replaced with vertical bars to alleviate clogging problems. A horizontal bar screen was installed in the water control structure at the largest spring at Bonifer to prevent fish from migrating upstream during acclimation. A pipe was installed under the railroad tracks at Bonifer to make unloading of fish from transport trucks easier and safer. The Minthorn access road was repaired to provide better access for delivery of fish to the facility and for general operations and maintenance.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1991-07-01

67

Gun Acquisition and Possession in Selected Juvenile Samples. Research in Brief. December 1993.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research summarizes the results of a study involving 835 inmates in six major correctional facilities within several states and 758 inner-city students from 10 high schools near the facilities, concerning the number and types of firearms juveniles possess as well as where, how, and why juveniles acquire and carry firearms. Research focused on…

Sheley, Joseph F.; Wright, James D.

68

Operation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1987 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1987.

Lofy, Peter T.

1988-12-01

69

Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1988.

Lofy, Peter T.

1989-12-01

70

Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in Reducing Aggression of Individuals at the Juvenile Correction and Rehabilitation Center  

PubMed Central

Background: In the present era, delinquency in children and adolescents is undoubtedly a difficult and upsetting issue attracting the attention of many experts such as psychologists, sociologists, and criminologists. These experts often try to answer why a number of children and adolescents engage in various crimes such as aggressive and anti-social crimes. They also try to find out how these crimes can be prevented. Objectives: The present study investigates the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy training (MBCT) in reducing aggression in a juvenile correction and rehabilitation center of Zahedan province during years 1991 to 1992. Materials and Methods: This experimental study included an experimental and a control group with a pretest, posttest, and follow-up approach. The Buss and Perry aggression questionnaire (1992) was used for data collection. The sample group included 22 (10 experimental and 12 control groups) adolescent males in a juvenile correction and rehabilitation center of Zahedan province who were selected through a census method. Using a matching method based on the pre-test scores of the aggression questionnaire, they were then divided into two equivalent categories and were randomly assigned to the two groups. Mindfulness-based cognitive training took the group training in 8 sessions administered on experimental group. The follow-up test was conducted two weeks after the end of the posttest sessions. The results were analyzed using ANCOVA. Results: The results of ANCOVA showed that mindfulness-based cognitive training could significantly reduce aggression during posttest and follow-up test phases in the experimental group, compared to the control group (P < 0.01). Moreover, the results indicated the effectiveness of this method in significantly reducing anger, physical aggression, and hostility during posttest and follow-up test phases (P < 0.05). However, no significant reduction was observed in the verbal aggression subscale. Conclusions: According to the results of the present study, mindfulness-based cognitive training seems to be effective for reducing aggressive behaviors.

Milani, Atefeh; Nikmanesh, Zahra; Farnam, Ali

2013-01-01

71

Meeting the Needs of Handicapped Youth in Correctional Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Delineates the needs of handicapped youngsters in correctional institutions, cites problems in meeting those needs, and suggests ways in which special vocational needs personnel can aid correctional educators. (JOW)

Coffey, Osa D.

1983-01-01

72

Concordance between medical records and interview data in correctional facilities  

PubMed Central

Background Self- administered questionnaires or interviews and medical records are often used as sources of research data; thus it is essential to evaluate their concordance and reliability. The aim of this paper was to assess the concordance between medical and behavioral data obtained from medical records and interview questionnaires in two correctional facilities. Methods Medical record and interview data were compared for 679 inmates from one male and one female maximum security prison between April 2010 and February 2013. Gender non-stratified and gender-stratified analyses were conducted in SPSS to calculate the prevalence and kappa coefficient scores (?) for medical (e.g., HIV, diabetes, hypertension) and behavioral (e.g., smoking, drug use, tattoos) conditions. Sensitivity/specificity between medical records and interview were calculated in the gender non-stratified data. Results In the gender non-stratified analysis, ? score for HIV, hepatitis C, diabetes, asthma, and history of tattoos had strong or good concordance (0.66-0.89). Hypertension, renal/kidney disease, cigarette smoking, antibiotic use in the last 6 months, and cocaine use ever were moderately correlated (0.49-0.57). Both history of any illicit drug use ever (0.36) and marijuana use ever (0.23) had poor concordance. Females had higher ? scores and prevalence rates than males overall. Medical conditions were reported more frequently in medical records and behavioral conditions had higher prevalence in interviews. Sensitivity for medical conditions in the combined facility data ranged from 50.0% to 86.0% and 48.2% to 85.3% for behavioral conditions whereas specificity ranged from 95.9% to 99.5% for medical conditions and 75.9% to 92.8% for behavioral conditions. Conclusion Levels of agreement between medical records and self-reports varied by type of factor. Medical conditions were more frequently reported by chart review and behavioral factors more frequently by self-report. Data source used may need to be chosen carefully depending upon the type of information sought.

2014-01-01

73

The Relationship between Self-Esteem and AD/HD Characteristics in the Serious Juvenile Delinquents in Japan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to clarify the following 2 points: (1) whether self-esteem changes after correctional education, and (2) whether attention deficit/hyperactivity characteristics affect self-esteem. The subjects were 118 juveniles (all males) admitted to "A" juvenile correctional facility. Our findings indicated that during the…

Matsuura, Naomi; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Toichi, Motomi

2009-01-01

74

Pit-Tag Studies with Juvenile Salmonids at the Chandler Canal Fish Collection Facility, Yakima River : Annual Report 1990.  

SciTech Connect

Juvenile salmonid survival studies planned for the Yakima Basin will require the release and recapture of large numbers of marked fish. Before these studies can be implemented, information is needed about potential recovery rates of marked fish at proposed sampling sites. The type of mark employed and the efficiency of the equipment used to capture and examine fish for marks must be evaluated since accurate survival estimates depend on their reliability. Recovery rates are expected to vary with species and life stage as well as environmental factors such as river flow and water temperature. The purpose of this study was to assess the mark-recovery capabilities of the Chandler facility and a mobile juvenile fish trap installed temporarily at West Richland, Washington near the mouth of the Yakima River.

Ruehle, Thomas E.; McCutcheon, Clinton Scott

1994-09-01

75

HIV/AIDS and STDs in Juvenile Facilities. Research in Brief.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV/AIDS, pose serious challenges to administrators of both adult and juvenile justice systems. Although extensive literature exists on HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases among incarcerated adults, l...

R. Widom T. M. Hammett

1996-01-01

76

Implementing a Reentry Framework at a Correctional Facility: Challenges to the Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Implementation research is emerging in the field of corrections, but few studies have examined the complexities associated with implementing change among frontline workers embedded in specific organizational cultures. Using a mixed methods approach, the authors examine the challenges faced by correctional workers in a work release correctional facility during their transformation into a reentry center. Findings reveal that staff report

Danielle S. Rudes; Jennifer Lerch; Faye S. Taxman

2011-01-01

77

Motivational Interviewing Training for Juvenile Correctional Staff in California: One Year Initial Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports initial results of a program designed to train California corrections staff (n = 576) in motivational interviewing (MI), a method of communication that is based on a client-centered, collaborative style. After three days of training, participants made significant gains in terms of knowledge of MI principles and reflective…

Hohman, Melinda; Doran, Neal; Koutsenok, Igor

2009-01-01

78

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1993-08-01

79

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Ener...

1997-01-01

80

A national survey of substance abuse treatment for juvenile offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite consensus about the value of substance abuse treatment for delinquent youth, information about its prevalence and availability is inadequate and inconsistent. This article presents findings about treatment and other correctional service provision from a national survey of directors of 141 juvenile institutional and community corrections (CC) facilities. Educational\\/General Educational Development programming and drug and alcohol education were the most

Douglas W. Young; Richard Dembo; Craig E. Henderson

2007-01-01

81

Characteristics of Prison Sexual Assault Targets in Male Oklahoma Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on male inmate sexual assault has been quite limited in correctional literature. Even fewer of these studies have focused specifically on the characteristics of sexual assault targets. Therefore, data gathered from August 1998 to May 1999 via face-to-face interviews with 174 inmates in three male Oklahoma correctional facilities were drawn on to examine various demographic and organizational characteristics of

Christopher Hensley; Richard Tewksbury; Tammy Castle

2003-01-01

82

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01

83

Juvenile Confinement in Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

Mendel, Richard A.

2012-01-01

84

Correctional facilities as partners in reducing HIV disparities.  

PubMed

The United States now has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The majority of prison and jail inmates come from predominantly nonwhite and medically underserved communities. Although incarceration has adverse effects on both individual and community health, prisons and jails have also been used successfully as venues to provide health services to people with HIV who frequently lack stable health care. We review demographic trends shaping the difficulties in providing care to incarcerated people with HIV and recommend the Centers for AIDS Research Collaboration on HIV in Corrections as a model of interdisciplinary collaboration in addressing those difficulties. PMID:23673887

Rich, Josiah D; DiClemente, Ralph; Levy, Judith; Lyda, Karen; Ruiz, Monica S; Rosen, David L; Dumont, Dora

2013-06-01

85

Correctional Facilities as Partners in Reducing HIV Disparities  

PubMed Central

The U.S. now has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The majority of prison and jail inmates come from predominantly nonwhite and medically underserved communities. Although incarceration has adverse effects on both individual and community health, prisons and jails have also been used successfully as venues to provide health services to people with HIV who frequently lack stable health care. We review demographic trends shaping the difficulties in providing care to incarcerated people with HIV, and recommend the Centers for AIDS Research Collaboration on HIV in Corrections (CFAR-CHIC) as a model of interdisciplinary collaboration in addressing those difficulties.

Rich, Josiah D.; DiClemente, Ralph; Levy, Judith; Lyda, Karen; Ruiz, Monica; Rosen, David L.; Dumont, Dora

2013-01-01

86

Health care for youth in the juvenile justice system.  

PubMed

Youth in the juvenile correctional system are a high-risk population who, in many cases, have unmet physical, developmental, and mental health needs. Multiple studies have found that some of these health issues occur at higher rates than in the general adolescent population. Although some youth in the juvenile justice system have interfaced with health care providers in their community on a regular basis, others have had inconsistent or nonexistent care. The health needs of these youth are commonly identified when they are admitted to a juvenile custodial facility. Pediatricians and other health care providers play an important role in the care of these youth, and continuity between the community and the correctional facility is crucial. This policy statement provides an overview of the health needs of youth in the juvenile correctional system, including existing resources and standards for care, financing of health care within correctional facilities, and evidence-based interventions. Recommendations are provided for the provision of health care services to youth in the juvenile correctional system as well as specific areas for advocacy efforts. PMID:22123883

2011-12-01

87

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document.

C. M. Obi

2000-12-01

88

Tuberculosis transmission in multiple correctional facilities--Kansas, 2002-2003.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) is a substantial health concern in correctional facilities; inmates and employees are at high risk, and TB outbreaks can lead to transmission in surrounding communities. The Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET) recommends that all correctional facilities have a written TB infection-control plan (TBICP). In September 2002, after diagnosis of smear-positive pulmonary TB in a prison inmate, the Kansas TB Control Program, with assistance from CDC, initiated a 6-month contact investigation. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which determined that, while symptomatic for TB, the inmate had resided in three different jails and a state prison, placing hundreds of employees and other inmates at risk for TB infection. The circumstances of this case underscore the need for effective TBICPs to be implemented by trained employees in jails and prisons and for establishment of mechanisms to facilitate information-sharing between correctional facilities and local and state health departments. PMID:15318157

2004-08-20

89

28 CFR 115.377 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...contractors and volunteers. 115.377 Section 115.377 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Discipline § 115.377 Corrective action for...

2013-07-01

90

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site:;\\u000a;\\u000a 25-41-03, EMAD Facility;\\u000a;

Mark Krauss

2010-01-01

91

The Impact of an Intensive Program To Increase the Literacy Skills of Youth Confined to Juvenile Corrections.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A multiple baseline study examined the effectiveness of an intensive literacy program for six African-American adolescents in a juvenile detention center in Maryland. Positive gains were found in oral fluency, grade placement level, and attitudes. (Conains 34 references.) (JOW)

Drakeford, William

2002-01-01

92

The effect of rapid and sustained decompression on barotrauma in juvenile brook lamprey and Pacific lamprey: implications for passage at hydroelectric facilities  

SciTech Connect

Fish passing downstream through hydroelectric facilities may pass through hydroturbines where they experience a rapid decrease in barometric pressure as they pass by turbine blades, which can lead to barotraumas including swim bladder rupture, exopthalmia, emboli, and hemorrhaging. In juvenile Chinook salmon, the main mechanism for injury is thought to be expansion of existing gases (particularly those present in the swim bladder) and the rupture of the swim bladder ultimately leading to exopthalmia, emboli and hemorrhaging. In fish that lack a swim bladder, such as lamprey, the rate and severity of barotraumas due to rapid decompression may be reduced however; this has yet to be extensively studied. Another mechanism for barotrauma can be gases coming out of solution and the rate of this occurrence may vary among species. In this study, juvenile brook and Pacific lamprey acclimated to 146.2 kPa (equivalent to a depth of 4.6 m) were subjected to rapid (<1 sec; brook lamprey only) or sustained decompression (17 minutes) to a very low pressure (13.8 kPa) using a protocol previously applied to juvenile Chinook salmon. No mortality or evidence of barotraumas, as indicated by the presence of hemorrhages, emboli or exopthalmia, were observed during rapid or sustained decompression, nor following recovery for up to 120 h following sustained decompression. In contrast, mortality or injury would be expected for 97.5% of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to a similar rapid decompression to these very low pressures. Additionally, juvenile Chinook salmon experiencing sustained decompression died within 7 minutes, accompanied by emboli in the fins and gills and hemorrhaging in the tissues. Thus, juvenile lamprey may not be susceptible to barotraumas associated with hydroturbine passage to the same degree as juvenile salmonids, and management of these species should be tailored to their specific morphological and physiological characteristics.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mueller, Robert P.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.

2012-10-01

93

Male County Correctional Facility Inmates' Attitudes Towards Male Sexual Assault and Sexual Assault Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male rape is a topic that has been neglected both in society and in research. When male rape is researched it focuses on male to male prison rape while neglecting treatment options for the male rape victims. An anonymous survey was distributed to 85 male inmates in a northeast correctional facility. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed from 51 male

April C Aycock

2010-01-01

94

A Correction Method of Orbit Elements Using Amateur Radio Facilities for Nano-Satellites  

Microsoft Academic Search

A correction method of orbit elements for nano-satellites using simple and low cost facilities is required. In this study, the Doppler shift of the beacon signal from a cubesat was observed using an amateur radio. The history of frequency variation was recorded for different TLEs with different epoch time. The frequency difference translated into seconds (FDTS) was deduced as a

Yasuhisa Oda; Shinichi Nakasuka; Priya Fernando

2008-01-01

95

Optimising sexually transmitted infection screening in correctional facilities: San Francisco, 2003–5  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening in correctional facilities provides access to people at high risk for STIs who might not be screened elsewhere. These screening programmes are becoming more widespread, but with decreasing funding for STI control, maximising screening impact has become increasingly important. We aimed to make recommendations about the impact of age and sex targeted screening in

Pennan M Barry; Charlotte K Kent; Katherine C Scott; Ameera Snell; Joseph Goldenson; Jeffrey D Klausner

2007-01-01

96

Perceptions of German prison officials while visiting American correctional facilities: an example of a fruitful international collaboration.  

PubMed

In June 2007, a group of 15 prison psychologists, social workers, wardens, and correctional administrators from across Germany visited the northeast United States for the purpose of conducting tours of various kinds of correctional facilities. The trip was organized through a collaborative effort from the authors over a period of 2 years. This article describes the correctional facilities visited and observations made by the Germans during their correctional facility tours and will focus on the similarities and differences between the German and American correctional systems. The article clearly reflects how international academic collaborations can provide a variety of benefits for those willing to physically venture beyond boarders. PMID:20656898

Dammer, Harry R; Bindzus, Dieter; Martens, Harald

2011-10-01

97

Prison Health Services: Aborted from the Mainstream. A Critical Review of Health Service Programs for Inmates of Correctional Facilities Throughout the United States.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Over 400,000 prisoners are incarcerated in State and Federal prisons, local jails, and juvenile detention facilities. Disadvantaged socioeconomic classes are disproportionately represented in prison populations; over 40% of all jail inmates are black, ove...

J. Newport

1975-01-01

98

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and

Gerald D

1993-01-01

99

Telepsychiatry in Correctional Facilities: Using Technology to Improve Access and Decrease Costs of Mental Health Care in Underserved Populations  

PubMed Central

Objective: It is unclear if telepsychiatry, a subset of telemedicine, increases access to mental health care for inmates in correctional facilities or decreases costs for clinicians or facility administrators. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how utilization of telepsychiatry affected access to care and costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Methods: A literature review complemented by a semistructured interview with a telepsychiatry practitioner. Five electronic databases, the National Bureau of Justice, and the American Psychiatric Association Web sites were searched for this research, and 49 sources were referenced. The literature review examined implementation of telepsychiatry in correctional facilities in Arizona, California, Georgia, Kansas, Ohio, Texas, and West Virginia to determine the effect of telepsychiatry on inmate access to mental health services and the costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Results: Telepsychiatry provided improved access to mental health services for inmates, and this increase in access is through the continuum of mental health care, which has been instrumental in increasing quality of care for inmates. Use of telepsychiatry saved correctional facilities from $12,000 to more than $1 million. The semistructured interview with the telepsychiatry practitioner supported utilization of telepsychiatry to increase access and lower costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Conclusions: Increasing access to mental health care for this underserved group through telepsychiatry may improve living conditions and safety inside correctional facilities. Providers, facilities, and state and federal governments can expect increased savings with utilization of telepsychiatry.

Deslich, Stacie Anne; Thistlethwaite, Timothy; Coustasse, Alberto

2013-01-01

100

Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective action alternatives to the 'no-action' alternative, as the basis for the Draft Corrective Action Decision for the site. The history and nature of the contamination and previous investigations are summarized in Section 2. Also included in Section 2 is an evaluation of human and environmental targets and potential exposure pathways. Section 3 describes the corrective action goals and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). Section 4 describes four alternatives, Section 5 analyzes the alternatives in detail, and Section 6 compares the alternatives. Section 6 also includes a summary and a recommended corrective action.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-04-20

101

A Correction Method of Orbit Elements Using Amateur Radio Facilities for Nano-Satellites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A correction method of orbit elements for nano-satellites using simple and low cost facilities is required. In this study, the Doppler shift of the beacon signal from a cubesat was observed using an amateur radio. The history of frequency variation was recorded for different TLEs with different epoch time. The frequency difference translated into seconds (FDTS) was deduced as a ratio of the maximum frequency variation in the pass to the 1s-periodic variation. The FDTS has dependency on TLE. For the old TLE, the FDTS was larger than the new one. Because the FDTS is related to satellite's phase variation in the orbit, the TLE's epoch time was corrected using the measurement result. The FDTS with the observation using the corrected TLE was small.

Oda, Yasuhisa; Nakasuka, Shinichi; Fernando, Priya

102

New Approaches to Diversion and Treatment of Juvenile Offenders.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This monograph covers a variety of approaches in the handling of juvenile offenders. Individual papers analyze recent innovations in juvenile community-based corrections in addition to programs and proposals aimed at diverting the juvenile from the crimin...

1973-01-01

103

The Effects of a Self-Management Procedure on the On-Task Behavior, Academic Productivity, and Academic Accuracy of Female Students with Disabilities in a Juvenile Correctional High School Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students served in juvenile correctional school settings often arrive with histories of trauma, aversive educational experiences, low achievement, and other severe risk factors that impeded psychosocial development, educational progress, and occupational outcomes. Schools serving adjudicated youth must address a higher percentage of severe…

Caldwell, Stacy Lynette

2010-01-01

104

The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-05-01

105

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation; 1991 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1991. Major repairs to one Minthorn pump were required and flood damage at Minthorn necessitated the replacement of rock and gravel around the pump house and steelhead brood holding area. Several modifications to the steelhead brood holding pond were also made to help reduce mortality. These changes appeared to be successful as evidenced by the reduced number of mortalities. Total prespawn mortality in 1990-91 was 10.4%. This compares to 20.0 to 39.0% for the previous three years at Minthorn. A total of 202 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from November, 1990 through April, 1991 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 410,356 eggs were taken from 64 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and initial rearing. The fish were then transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for further rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 347 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:l spawning ratio, a total of 601,548 eggs were taken from 159 females. They were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. Acclimation of 100,505 spring chinook salmon and 42,610 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1991. At Minthorn, 152,974 coho and 79,672 fall chinook salmon were acclimated and released. In the fall, 81,144 spring chinook salmon were held at Bonifer for a three-day post-transport recovery period. Control groups of spring and fall chinook salmon and summer steelhead were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1991 and 1992. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon and two experiments for spring chinook salmon were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Because of high spring flows in the Umatilla River however, the trap was not opened until mid-June and few fish were trapped, suggesting most had already migrated downriver. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1992-06-01

106

A High Risk of Hospitalization Following Release From Correctional Facilities in Medicare Beneficiaries  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE Little is known about the risk of individuals who are released from correctional facilities, a time where their may be discontinuity in care. OBJECTIVE To study the risk for hospitalizations among former inmates soon after their release from correctional facilities. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Data from Medicare administrative claims for 110 419 fee-for-service beneficiaries who were released from a correctional facility from 2002 through 2010 and controls matched by age, sex, race, Medicare status, and residential zip code. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hospitalization rates and specifically those for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions 7, 30, and 90 days after release. RESULTS Of 110 419 released inmates, 1559 individuals (1.4%) were hospitalized within 7 days after release; 4285 individuals (3.9%) within 30 days; and 9196 (8.3%) within 90 days. The odds of hospitalization was higher for released inmates compared with those of matched controls (within 7 days: odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% CI, 2.3-2.8]; within 30 days: OR, 2.1 [95% CI, 2.0-2.2]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.7-1.9]). Compared with matched controls, former inmates were more likely to be hospitalized for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (within 7 days: OR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.4-2.1]; within 30 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.8]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.7]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE About 1 in 70 former inmates are hospitalized for an acute condition within 7 days of release, and 1 in 12 by 90 days, a rate much higher than in the general population.

Wang, Emily A.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2014-01-01

107

Implementation of the WICS Wall Interference Correction System at the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) is operational at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) of NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) for semispan and full span tests in the solid wall (slots covered) configuration. The method is based on the wall pressure signature method for computing corrections to the measured parameters. It is an adaptation of the WICS code operational at the 12 ft pressure wind tunnel (12ft PWT) of NASA Ames Research Center (NASA ARC). This paper discusses the details of implementation of WICS at the NTF including tunnel calibration, code modifications for tunnel and support geometry, changes made for the NTF wall orifices layout, details of interfacing with the tunnel data processing system, and post-processing of results. Example results of applying WICS to a semispan test and a full span test are presented. Comparison with classical correction results and an analysis of uncertainty in the corrections are also given. As a special application of the code, the Mach number calibration data from a centerline pipe test was computed by WICS. Finally, future work for expanding the applicability of the code including online implementation is discussed.

Iyer, Venkit; Everhart, Joel L.; Bir, Pamela J.; Ulbrich, Norbert

2000-01-01

108

Implementation of the WICS Wall Interference Correction System at the National Transonic Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) is operational at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) of NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) for semispan and full span tests in the solid wall (slots covered) configuration, The method is based on the wall pressure signature method for computing corrections to the measured parameters. It is an adaptation of the WICS code operational at the 12 ft pressure wind tunnel (12ft PWT) of NASA Ames Research Center (NASA ARC). This paper discusses the details of implementation of WICS at the NTF including, tunnel calibration, code modifications for tunnel and support geometry, changes made for the NTF wall orifices layout, details of interfacing with the tunnel data processing system, and post-processing of results. Example results of applying WICS to a semispan test and a full span test are presented. Comparison with classical correction results and an analysis of uncertainty in the corrections are also given. As a special application of the code, the Mach number calibration data from a centerline pipe test was computed by WICS. Finally, future work for expanding the applicability of the code including online implementation is discussed.

Iyer, Venkit; Martin, Lockheed; Everhart, Joel L.; Bir, Pamela J.; Ulbrich, Norbert

2000-01-01

109

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2007. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2007. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. Two additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2007. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during these additional inspections are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2007 are included in Appendix C.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-03-01

110

Correction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We regret that figure 1 in The freeze-drying of wet and waterlogged materials from archaeological excavations (Watson J 2004 Phys. Educ. 39 171-6) is incorrect. The correct figure is shown here. The graph is adapted from one available at wine1.sb.fsu.edu/chm1045/notes/Forces/Phase/Forces06.htm. The error occurred in production and was not the fault of the author. Corrected figure

2004-07-01

111

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE,

Mark Burmeister

2009-01-01

112

Linear and second order optics corrections for the KEK Accelerator Test Facility final focus beam line  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the linear and second order optics corrections for the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2) final focus beam line are described. The beam optics of the ATF2 beam line is designed based on a local chromaticity correction scheme similar to the ILC final focus system. Beam measurements in 2012 revealed skew sextupole field errors that were much larger than expected from magnetic field measurements. The skew sextupole field error was a critical limitation of the beam size at the ATF2 virtual interaction point (IP). Therefore, four skew sextupole magnets were installed to correct the field error in August 2012. By using the four skew sextupole magnets, the predicted tolerances of the skew sextupole field errors of the ATF2 magnets were increased. Furthermore, analyzing field maps of the sextupole magnets identified the source of the skew sextupole field error. After the field error source was removed, the IP vertical beam size could more easily be focused to less than 65 nm.

Okugi, T.; Araki, S.; Bambade, P.; Kubo, K.; Kurado, S.; Masuzawa, M.; Marin, E.; Naito, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tomas, R.; Urakawa, J.; White, G.; Woodley, M.

2014-02-01

113

Juvenile Offenders' Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic/racial backgrounds) and prospectively predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent…

Mauricio, Anne M.; Little, Michelle; Chassin, Laurie; Knight, George P.; Piquero, Alex R.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino

2009-01-01

114

Evaluation of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon Passage in the McNary Dam Juvenile Fish Bypass Facility, 2000.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2000, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the second year of a study to estimate post-detection bypass survival of juvenile subyearling fall chinook salmon at McNary Dam. The first year of study indicated a delay associated with passage thr...

D. B. Dey G. A. Axel

2001-01-01

115

Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, December 2000)  

SciTech Connect

This document is an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) that has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD) Decontamination Facility. CAU 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. The purpose of this addendum is to provide a rationale for the recommendation of a revised preferred alternative corrective action for CAU 254. This preferred alternative corrective action, Alternative 3, consists of the removal of accessible soil/sediment and all building material above ground level from the CAU 254 Site. This alternative is being recommended because a cost-effective technology is now available to dismantle the contaminated building and ensure complete removal of all CAU 254 CADD-identified contaminants of concern and any associated contamination. This preferred closure method alternative reduces the potential for future exposure pathways. Procedures will be developed, presented in the Corrective Action Plan, and implemented to ensure worker health and safety, protection of human health and the environment, and to meet all unrestricted release requirements in accordance with applicable state and federal regulations.

DOE /NV

2000-12-12

116

Nurse retention in a correctional facility: a study of the relationship between the nurses' perceived barriers and benefits.  

PubMed

Retention of nursing staff is more complex in a correctional facility. After a period of 3 years, only 20% of the staff remained employed at this study facility. Without retention of qualified correctional nurses, there are decreases in access to care, gaps in continuity of care, and less time for mentorship. Trained correctional nurses improve patient and staff safety, provide more education, and are more team-oriented. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and benefits to nursing staff satisfaction with their job and the likelihood that they will continue to work in correctional settings. Practice and patient care will be favorably impacted if correctional nurses are provided with services such as new hire orientation, clinical ladder programs to recruit and retain nursing staff, and teambuilding. PMID:23446873

Chafin, W Sue; Biddle, Wendy L

2013-04-01

117

The effect of a cognitive treatment program for male and female juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

This study assessed the effectiveness of a cognitive intervention treatment program for juvenile offenders, which is called the Juvenile Cognitive Intervention Program. The program was provided to incarcerated delinquents at three juvenile correctional facilities in Wisconsin. The results indicated that using the How I Think (HIT) Questionnaire as a measure of change, significant improvement in reducing cognitive distortions were found across age groups and gender, and included individuals who were unable to successfully complete the program the first time and then completed it successfully. The HIT is a measure of cognitive distortions that are associated with delinquent thinking patterns and behavior. Cognitive change is a major focus of treatment programs in juvenile corrections as there has been substantive research demonstrating a link to reduced delinquent and later criminal behavior. PMID:23123384

McGlynn, Adrea Hahn; Hahn, Philip; Hagan, Michael P

2013-09-01

118

Corrections on energy spectrum and scatterings for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM- II in Technische Universität München (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections.

Liu, Shu-Quan; Bücherl, Thomas; Li, Hang; Zou, Yu-Bin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Guo, Zhi-Yu

2013-11-01

119

A Comparison between Juvenile Delinquents' and Teachers' Opinions on Metalinguistic and Metacognitive Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the opinions of female juvenile delinquents and their teachers from one correctional facility on students' communication behaviors involving metacognitive and metalinguistic skills. The researchers used two parallel surveys that compared the opinions of 31 students and five teachers, on students' behaviors that addressed…

Sanger, Dixie; Spilker, Anna; Scheffler, Marilyn; Zobell, Anneli; Belau, Don

2008-01-01

120

Juvenile Offenders’ Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic\\/racial backgrounds) and prospectively\\u000a predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent in a supervised setting.\\u000a Results indicated that supervised time suppressed age-related growth

Anne M. Mauricio; Michelle Little; Laurie Chassin; George P. Knight; Alex R. Piquero; Sandra H. Losoya; Delfino Vargas-Chanes

2009-01-01

121

Public Health Assessment for Petitioned Public Health Assessment, Connecticut Correctional Institution (a/k/a Somers Correctional Facility), Somers, New Haven County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD980522940.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Osborn Connecticut Correctional Facility (Osborn CCI) is located in Somers, CT. Sand filter beds received tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated wastes from the on-site laundry facility. PCE-contaminated groundwater was detected in 1986 in one of the ...

1997-01-01

122

Correction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alleged mosasaur bite marks on Late Cretaceous ammonites are limpet (patellogastropod) home scars Geology, v. 26, p. 947 950 (October 1998) This article had the following printing errors: p. 947, Abstract, line 11, “sepia” should be “septa” p. 947, 1st paragraph under Introduction, line 2, “creep” should be “deep” p. 948, column 1, 2nd paragraph, line 7, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 1, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 5, “19774” should be “1977)” p. 949, column 1, 4th paragraph, line 7, “in particular” should be “In particular” CORRECTION Mammalian community response to the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: An isotaphonomic study in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Geology, v. 26, p. 1011 1014 (November 1998) An error appeared in the References Cited. The correct reference appears below: Fricke, H. C., Clyde, W. C., O'Neil, J. R., and Gingerich, P. D., 1998, Evidence for rapid climate change in North America during the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: Oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic phosphate from the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming): Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 160, p. 193 208.

1998-12-01

123

Correct dosing of artemether-lumefantrine for management of uncomplicated malaria in rural Tanzania: do facility and patient characteristics matter?  

PubMed Central

Background Use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), such as artemether-lumefantrine (AL), requires a strict dosing schedule that follows the drugs’ pharmacokinetic properties. The quality of malaria case management was assessed in two areas in rural Tanzania, to ascertain patient characteristics and facility-specific factors that influence correct dosing of AL for management of uncomplicated malaria. Methods Exit interviews were conducted with patients attending health facilities for initial illness consultation. Information about health workers’ training and supervision visits was collected. Health facilities were inventoried for capacity and availability of medical products related to care of malaria patients. The outcome was correct dosing of AL based on age and weight. Logistic regression was used to assess health facility factors and patient characteristics associated with correct dosing of AL by age and weight. Results A total of 1,531 patients were interviewed, but 60 pregnant women were excluded from the analysis. Only 503 (34.2%) patients who received AL were assessed for correct dosing. Most patients who received AL (85.3%) were seen in public health facilities, 75.7% in a dispensary and 91.1% in a facility that had AL in stock on the survey day. Overall, 92.1% (463) of AL prescriptions were correct by age or weight; but 85.7% of patients received correct dosing by weight alone and 78.5% received correct dosing by age alone. In multivariate analysis, patients in the middle dosing bands in terms of age or weight, had statistically significant lower odds of correct AL dosing (p?correct AL dosing. Conclusion Although malaria treatment guidelines indicate AL dosing can be prescribed based on age or weight of the patient, findings from this study show that patients within the middle age and weight dosing bands were least likely to receive a correct dose by either measure. Clinicians should be made aware of AL dosing errors for patients aged three to 12 years and advised to use weight-based prescriptions whenever possible.

2013-01-01

124

Misdiagnosing the Problem: Mental Health Profiles of Incarcerated Juveniles  

PubMed Central

Aggression, antisocial and delinquent behavior frequently result in the incarceration of a large number of young people, but these problems pale in comparison to the mental health challenges faced by many of these youth. Recent studies show a high prevalence of mental disorders among adolescents within the justice system. These findings have led researchers, clinicians and policy-makers to re-evaluate the assessment and treatment options that are available for youth within correctional facilities. This article provides a concise review of the most recent research related to mental health disorders among incarcerated juveniles within Canada and the United States. Rates of some of the most common mental health disorders among juveniles, including depression, anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity and substance use are summarized. Throughout the review, issues related to co-morbidity and gender differences are highlighted. The implications of mental health disorders for juvenile justice policy and practice are discussed.

Odgers, Candice L.; Burnette, Mandi L.; Chauhan, Preeti; Moretti, Marlene M.; Reppucci, N. Dickon

2005-01-01

125

Effectiveness of Optimism Skills Group Training: Examination of the Attributional Styles of Boys at the Kerman Juvenile Correction and Rehabilitation Center  

PubMed Central

Background The way that people explain events may influence aspects of their development and health. A number of studies have reported that there is a positive relationship between pessimism and the risk of poor heath, infectious disease, and early mortality. Objectives This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of an optimism skills group training (OSGT) on the attribution styles of delinquent boys. Patients and Methods A quasi-experimental method with a two-group design was used, with random assignment and pre- and post-tests. The subjects were selected from adolescent boys, aged 13 to 18 years, in the Kerman Juvenile Correction and Rehabilitation Center (KJCRC). The participants were allocated to two matched groups based on their pre-test scores. They were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. The sample comprised 61 boys. Optimism Skills Group Training (OSGT) was conducted with the experimental group during 10 sessions. Then the subjects were administered the post-test, with a follow-up test a month later. Statistical analysis was conducted using the t-test and repeated-measures analysis of variance. The research instrument was the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ). Results The results showed that the OSGT changed the attributional styles of delinquent boys from pessimistic to optimistic. Also, the follow up study showed that the effect on the delinquent boys’ attributional style was still present after one month. Conclusions Even though the OSGT is an effective technique for inculcating an optimistic attribution style in delinquent boys, this important method needs to be continually implemented in their education.

Nikmanesh, Zahra; Kazemi, Yahya; Raghibi, Mahvash; Rabani Bavejdan, Marjan

2012-01-01

126

Tracking Inmates and Locating Staff with Active Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID): Early Lessons Learned in One U.S. Correctional Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is the result of National Institute of Justice's (NIJ's) interest in helping inform the correctional field about the potential implications of the use of active radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in correctional facilities. The f...

E. Wells L. J. Hickman L. M. Davis M. Eisman

2010-01-01

127

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site:;\\u000a;\\u000a 25-41-03, EMAD Facility;\\u000a 25-99-20,

Mark Burmeister

2009-01-01

128

Juvenile Offenders' Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility  

PubMed Central

The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic/racial backgrounds) and prospectively predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent in a supervised setting. Results indicated that supervised time suppressed age-related growth in substance use. Trajectories of offenders with no supervised time and low levels of supervised time increased in substance use across age, whereas offenders with high levels of supervised time showed no growth. Almost all risk and protective factors had effects on initial substance use but only adolescent history of substance use, impulse control, and psychosocial maturity had an effect on change in substance use over time. Findings highlight the importance of formal sanctions and interventions superimposed on normal developmental processes in understanding trajectories of substance use among serious juvenile offenders.

Little, Michelle; Chassin, Laurie; Knight, George P.; Piquero, Alex R.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino

2009-01-01

129

Voluntary STD testing and treatment program at a metropolitan correctional facility: evaluation of test acceptability and associated risk factors.  

PubMed

Few studies have addressed challenges of diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) within correctional facilities. Initiatives that screen all inmates can be cost-prohibitive, while symptom-based screening undoubtedly fails to recognize significant numbers of asymptomatically infected persons. This study discusses a voluntary STD screening and treatment program developed at the Douglas County (Nebraska) Department of Corrections where student volunteers interviewed, screened, and educated 456 inmates. Inmate urine samples and interview responses about risk behaviors and motivators for participation in the screening program were analyzed. The results support the ongoing project method to screen and treat inmates in the community correctional facility. Risk factor analysis suggests that targeted testing and treatment efforts may have a role in providing cost-effective care for STD among the incarcerated population. PMID:24352406

Brown, Christopher K; Earley, Mary; Shaikh, Raees; Fickenscher, Jillian; Ott, Jessica; Person, Austin; Islam, K M Monirul; Simonsen, Kari; Sandkovsky, Uriel; Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Foxall, Mark; Margalit, Ruth

2014-01-01

130

Validity of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2) scales in juvenile justice settings.  

PubMed

High prevalence rates of psychological problems among juvenile offenders underscore the need for effective mental health screening tools in the juvenile justice system. In this study, we evaluated the validity of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2) developed by Grisso and Barnum (2001) to identify mental health needs of adolescents in various juvenile justice settings. The sample was 1,192 adolescents (1,082 boys and 110 girls) admitted into Virginia juvenile correction facilities between the dates of July 2004 and June 2006. Analyses revealed higher MAYSI-2 scale scores for girls than for boys and MAYSI-2 scale intercorrelations were similar to those reported in the MAYSI-2 manuals (Grisso & Barnum, 2003, 2006). We also evaluated the concurrent validity of MAYSI-2 scales by examining scale score correlations with related and unrelated extratest variables. Results showed strong convergent validity for several MAYSI-2 scales. PMID:20552508

Archer, Robert P; Simonds-Bisbee, Elise C; Spiegel, David R; Handel, Richard W; Elkins, David E

2010-07-01

131

Special Education and Juvenile Justice: An Overview and Analysis of Prevention and Intervention Policy and Program Developments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a serious overpopulation of special needs youth in Ohio's juvenile justice system. This study raises policy questions relating to gaining a deeper understanding of the reasons why there is an overpopulation of children with disabilities in youth correctional facilities and what can be done to reduce the need for future incarcerations.…

Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, 2006

2006-01-01

132

Posttraumatic Stress as a Mediator of the Relationship between Trauma and Mental Health Problems among Juvenile Delinquents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the interrelationships among trauma exposure, PTSD, and mental health problems in a sample of 289 adolescents (199 male, 90 female) detained in a juvenile correctional facility. Mean differences were found in that females scored higher than males on measures of interpersonal trauma exposure and symptoms of both simple and…

Kerig, Patricia K.; Ward, Rose Marie; Vanderzee, Karin L.; Moeddel, Melissa Arnzen

2009-01-01

133

Special Education in Wisconsin's Juvenile Detention System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study looks at incarcerated youth in the public juvenile detention facilities of Wisconsin. State percentages of youth in Wisconsin public schools with Emotional, Learning, Cognitive, and/or Low Incidence Disabilities are compared to percentages reported from the state and county operated juvenile detention facilities. The study investigates…

Zenz, Tamara; Langelett, George

2004-01-01

134

Noise measurements in a free-jet, flight simulation facility - Shear layer refraction and facility-to-flight corrections  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The conversion of free-jet facility into equivalent flyover results is discussed. The essential problem is to 'calibrate out' the acoustic influence of the outer free-jet shear layer on the measurement, since this is absent in the flight case. Results are presented which illustrate the differences between current simplified models (vortex-sheet and geometric acoustics), and a more complete model based on the Lilley equation. Finally, the use of geometric acoustics for facility-to-flight data conversion is discussed.

Morfey, C. L.; Tester, B. J.

1976-01-01

135

Spatial correction factors for YALINA Booster facility loaded with medium and low enriched fuels  

SciTech Connect

The Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used in analyses of subcritical assemblies to correct the experimental reactivity as function of the detector position. Besides the detector position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the energy weighting function of the detector, the detector size, the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons, and the reactivity of the subcritical assembly. This work focuses on the dependency of the correction factor on the detector material and it investigates the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly loaded with medium (36%) and low (10%) enriched fuels. (authors)

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Inst. for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, 99 Academician A.K.Krasin Str, Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

2012-07-01

136

Correction of inherent scan non-planarity in the Boeing Infrared Sensor (BIRS) calibration facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unless corrected, non-planarity and rate non-uniformity occur in the scanned BIRS beam as a result of scan mirror geometry and magnification variation with field angle. These scan distortions will be discussed together with a method for determination of scan mirror control algorithms for their correction.

Chase, Robert P.

1991-12-01

137

Juvenile Prostitution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

Csapo, Marg

1986-01-01

138

Retinoschisis (Juvenile)  

MedlinePLUS

... peripheral (side) vision due to degeneration of the retina. What are the symptoms? Juvenile retinoschisis, also known ... retinoschisis is caused by the splitting of the retina into two layers. This retinal splitting most notably ...

139

78 FR 47154 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Swap Execution Facilities; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Consumer Protection Act. DATES: The effective date of this correction is August 5, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amir Zaidi, Special Counsel, Division of Market Oversight, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Three Lafayette Center,...

2013-08-05

140

Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination...

G. C. Evans

1994-01-01

141

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01

142

AIDS in Correctional Facilities: Issues and Options. Issues and Practices in Criminal Justice. Third Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, written for officials involved in making and implementing decisions regarding the correctional response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), provides the most current figures and trend data on the incidence of AIDS among incarcerated offenders. The stated purpose of this document is to be informational rather than…

Hammett, Theodore M.

143

Norovirus-like virus outbreak at a correctional facility in Haliburton Kawartha Pine Ridge District Health Unit, March to April 2008.  

PubMed

In March 2008, an enteric outbreak was reported from a correctional facility in Central East Ontario to the Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit. The clinical and epidemiological data were compatible with the presence of norovirus in this enteric outbreak. This report summarizes the outbreak investigation conducted and the various public health measures undertaken through a coordinated response by the facility health care and correctional staff and local and provincial health authorities to contain the infection within the facility. Correctional facilities present unique challenges to the implementation of infection control measures, and the investigators eventually recommended that the facility be closed to transfers and new admissions until the outbreak was brought under control. PMID:24078622

Sunil, Vidya; Holt, Anne Marie; Dixon, Ruth; Dingman, Diane; Noseworthy, Avis Lynn

2013-10-01

144

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-11-18

145

Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would

1994-01-01

146

Simulation of beam size multiknobs correction at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 at KEK  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ATF2 project is the final focus system prototype for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects, with a purpose of reaching a 37 nm vertical beam size at the interaction point (IP). During the initial commissioning, we started with larger-than-nominal ?-functions at the IP in order to reduce the effects from higher-order optical aberrations and thereby simplifying the optical corrections needed. We report on the simulation studies at two different IP locations developed based on waist scan, dispersion, coupling and ? function multiknobs correction in the large ? optics of ATF2, in the presence of two kinds of magnet inaccuracies (quadrupole gradient and roll errors) to generate all possible linear optic distortions at the IP. A vertical beam size which is very close to the nominal beam size is obtained based on the simulation study.

Bai, Sha; Bolzon, B.; Bambade, P.; Gao, Jie

2011-04-01

147

Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C among entrants to Maryland correctional facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in correctional institutions has been established, data are sparse regarding\\u000a the comorbidities of hepatitis B virus (HBV), HCV, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), all of which may complicate the\\u000a management of HCV. This study sought to estimate the prevalence and correlates associated with HCV prevalence among entrants\\u000a into the Maryland Division of

Liza Solomon; Colin Flynn; Kelly Muck; John Vertefeuille

2004-01-01

148

Juvenile salmonid pit-tag studies at Prosser Dam and the Chandler Canal Fish Collection Facility, Yakima River, 1991 and 1992. Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1991 and 1992, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the second and third years of a 3-year study to estimate juvenile salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) timing and survival characteristics related to passage through the Prosser Dam complex, includ...

B. P. Sandford T. E. Ruehle

1996-01-01

149

Patient-, health worker-, and health facility-level determinants of correct malaria case management at publicly funded health facilities in Malawi: results from a nationally representative health facility survey  

PubMed Central

Background Prompt and effective case management is needed to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality. However, malaria diagnosis and treatment is a multistep process that remains problematic in many settings, resulting in missed opportunities for effective treatment as well as overtreatment of patients without malaria. Methods Prior to the widespread roll-out of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in late 2011, a national, cross-sectional, complex-sample, health facility survey was conducted in Malawi to assess patient-, health worker-, and health facility-level factors associated with malaria case management quality using multivariate Poisson regression models. Results Among the 2,019 patients surveyed, 34% had confirmed malaria defined as presence of fever and parasitaemia on a reference blood smear. Sixty-seven per cent of patients with confirmed malaria were correctly prescribed the first-line anti-malarial, with most cases of incorrect treatment due to missed diagnosis; 31% of patients without confirmed malaria were overtreated with an anti-malarial. More than one-quarter of patients were not assessed for fever or history of fever by health workers. The most important determinants of correct malaria case management were patient-level clinical symptoms, such as spontaneous complaint of fever to health workers, which increased both correct treatment and overtreatment by 72 and 210%, respectively (p?correct malaria treatment (p?=?0.001). Lower-level cadres of health workers were more likely to prescribe anti-malarials for patients, increasing the likelihood of both correct treatment and overtreatment, but no other health worker or health facility-level factors were significantly associated with case management quality. Conclusions Introduction of RDTs holds potential to improve malaria case management in Malawi, but health workers must systematically assess all patients for fever, and then test and treat accordingly, otherwise, malaria control programmes might miss an opportunity to dramatically improve malaria case management, despite better diagnostic tools.

2014-01-01

150

Juvenile Arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... in children with juvenile arthritis. The impact of chronic and recurrent pain on children. Ways to limit the impact of pain on ... arthritis (JIA). A term for various types of chronic arthritis in children. ... can cause swelling, pain, damage to the joints, and, in some cases, ...

151

Manual of Standards for Juvenile Training Schools and Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual of standards for juvenile training schools and services contains 487 American Correctional Association standards for the accreditation of juvenile training schools (youth development centers, villages, correction centers, treatment centers, service centers, homes for boys and girls, camps, and ranches). Standards presented are…

Commission on Accreditation for Corrections, Rockville, MD.

152

Juvenile Arthritis: Disease Types  

MedlinePLUS

... and Juvenile Chronic Arthritis ) Juvenile Spondyloarthropathies Lupus in Children Scleroderma Non-inflammatory Disorders / Chronic Pain Syndromes Fibromyalgia About the Foundation Annual Report Careers ...

153

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25 R-MAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25, Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 3110, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--891-VOL I-Rev. 1, dated July 2003, provides details of demolition, waste disposal, and use restriction (UR) modification for Corrective Action Unit 113, Area 25 R-MAD Facility. Demolition was completed on July 15, 2010, when the last of the building debris was disposed. Final field activities were concluded on August 30, 2010, after all equipment was demobilized and UR signs were posted. This work was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-02-24

154

The Center of Juvenile and Criminal Justice  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With offices in such gritty locales as Oakland and the nation's capital, it follows that The Center of Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) is well-positioned to offer well-thought out policy research and technical assistance in the field of juvenile and criminal justice. Founded in 1985, the CJCJ works in a number of arenas, such as sentencing reform and community-based alternatives to juvenile detention. A good place to start for first-time visitors is the publications area, which contains links to recent works created by staff members on juvenile justice, adult corrections, and sentencing. One highlight of the site is the juvenile justice area. Here visitors can learn about the CJCJ's work in the state of California with alternative sentencing options and also view video clips from their conference on youth reform.

155

Distinguishing Juvenile Homicide From Violent Juvenile Offending  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile homicide is a social problem that has remained a central focus within juvenile justice research in recent years. The term juvenile murderer describes a legal category, but it is purported to have significant scientific meaning. Research has attempted to conceptualize adolescent murderers as a clinical category that can be reliably distinguished from their nonhomicidal counterparts. This study examined 33

Frank DiCataldo; Meghan Everett

2008-01-01

156

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (includes ROTC No. 1, date 01/25/1999)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 254 was used between 1963 through 1973 for the decontamination of test-car hardware and tooling used in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program. The CAS is composed of a fenced area measuring approximately 119 feet by 158 feet that includes Building 3126, an associated aboveground storage tank, a potential underground storage area, two concrete decontamination pads, a generator, two sumps, and a storage yard. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to resolve the problem statement identified during the Data Quality Objectives process that decontamination activities at this CAU site may have resulted in the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) onto building surfaces, down building drains to associated leachfields, and to soils associated with two concrete decontamination pads located outside the building. Therefore, the scope of the corrective action field investigation will involve soil sampling at biased and random locations in the yard using a direct-push method, scanning and static radiological surveys, and laboratory analyses of all soil/building samples. Historical information provided by former NTS employees indicates that solvents and degreasers may have been used in the decontamination processes; therefore, potential COCs include volatile/semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, asbestos, gamma-emitting radionuclides, plutonium, uranium, and strontium-90. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

1999-07-29

157

Juvenile Justice & Youth Violence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth violence and the juvenile justice system in the United States are explored. Part 1 takes stock of the situation. The first chapter discusses the origins and evaluation of the juvenile justice system, and the second considers the contributions of the Federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act to the existing juvenile justice…

Howell, James C.

158

Housekeeping Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 288: Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly/Treatability Test Facility Chemicals Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order was entered into by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense to identify sites of potential historical contamination and implement corrective actions based on public health and environmental considerations. The facilities subject to this agreement include the Nevada Test Site (NTS), parts of the Tonopah Test Range, parts to the Nellis Air Force Range, the Central Nevada Test Area, and the Project Shoal Area. Corrective Action Sites (CASs) are areas potentially requiring corrective actions and may include solid waste management units, individual disposal, or release sites. Based on geography, technical similarity, agency responsibility, or other appropriate reasons, CASs are grouped together into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for the purposes of determining corrective actions. This report contains the Closure Verification Forms for cleanup activities that were performed at 11 CASs within CAU 288 on the NTS. The Housekeeping Closure Verification Form for each CAS provides the location, directions to the site, general description, and photographs of the site before and after cleanup activities. Housekeeping activities at these sites included removal of debris, crates containing contaminated materials, chemicals, and other material. Based on these activities, no further action is required at these CASs.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-04-24

159

Social Work and Juvenile Probation: Historical Tensions and Contemporary Convergences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work's weak presence in the field of corrections is peculiar, given that those involved in the criminal and juvenile justice systems are undeniably among the vulnerable and oppressed populations that the profession has traditionally served. The field of juvenile probation shares roots with the profession of social work but lacks a strong…

Peters, Clark M.

2011-01-01

160

American Correctional Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Correctional Association is the oldest, and largest international correctional association in the world. ACA serves all disciplines within the corrections profession and is dedicated to excellence in every aspect of the field. The topics covered on this site are wide-ranging, from professional development and certification, to standards and accreditation, network and consulting, research and publications, conferences and exhibits and technology and testing. ACA is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the American Corrections system. A key feature of the website, is that it provides information about professional development programs and workshops as well as professional certification for an adult and juvenile correctional staff.

2006-11-12

161

Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; Butcher et al., 1992) was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once…

Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

2005-01-01

162

Juvenile dermatomyositis.  

PubMed

Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a systemic, inflammatory, idiopathic disease, mainly affecting the skin and the muscles, starting before the age of 16, with an incidence around one case per 1 million children. Some patients display typical features of JDM without skin involvement, or even without muscle involvement; however, both tissues are affected over time in most cases. Diagnosis criteria were established by Bohan and Peter 35 years ago, based on the presence of typical skin rash and proximal muscle involvement. Other conditions have to be ruled out before making a diagnosis of JDM, such as other connective tissue diseases, polymyositis, infectious/postinfectious myositis, genetic diseases, or metabolic or drug-induced myopathies. Unlike adult-onset dermatomyositis, JDM is exceptionally associated with a malignant disease. JDM may also affect several organs, including the lungs and the digestive tract. In a subset of patients, glucose intolerance, lipodystrophia and/or calcinosis develop. Delay in treatment initiation or inadequate treatment may favor diffuse, debilitating calcinosis. JDM patients have to be referred to reference pediatric centers to properly assess disease activity and disease-related damage (including low bone density in most cases), and to define the best treatment. Long-lasting corticosteroid therapy remains the gold standard, together with physiotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing the effect of several immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory drugs, which may help to control the disease and possibly demonstrate a corticosteroid-sparing effect. Most patients respond to treatment; relapses are frequent but a complete disease remission is achieved in most cases before adulthood. PMID:23622367

Quartier, Pierre; Gherardi, Romain K

2013-01-01

163

Juvenile Alien Borderlands Conference.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The findings and recommendations of a conference convened by the Texas Department of Community Affairs in October, 1975 to address the problem of juvenile aliens are presented in this report. The juvenile alien problem is viewed as encompassing both legal...

C. Fuller I. Cuellar J. Milstead N. Dailey S. Castleberry

1975-01-01

164

Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Handbook.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Handbook is designed to teach communities how to develop an effective juvenile firesetter intervention program. The six chapters of this Handbook can be viewed as the six building blocks essential to construct a succe...

J. Gaynor

2000-01-01

165

Juvenile Delinquency: An Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile Delinquency is a term which is often inaccurately used. This article clarifies definitions, looks at prevalence, and explores the relationship between juvenile delinquency and mental health. Throughout, differences between males and females are explored. (Contains 1 table.)

Smith, Carolyn A.

2008-01-01

166

Prevalence of selected sexually and blood-borne infections in Injecting drug abuser inmates of bandar abbas and roodan correction facilities, Iran, 2002.  

PubMed

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and other blood borne viral infections like hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are major health issues especially in young and growing population of developing countries. All around the globe correctional facilities are known as potential source of spreading such disease. During summer 2002, HIV, HCV antibodies, hepatitis B surface (HBs) antigen and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test were checked in venous blood samples of 252 injecting drug abuser prisoners from correctional facilities in southern Iran. Overall HIV, HCV and HBV infection rate was 15.1% (38/249), 64.8% (163/249), and 4.7% (12/249), respectively. HCV infection rate of HIV positive cases was 94% (35/38). All RPR results were negative. Duration of previous drug abuse and imprisonment were correlated with HIV and HCV infection (p value = 0.0003 and 0.015 & p value =0.02 and 0.02). Considering the higher prevalence of HIV and HCV infection in correctional facilities compared to general population of Iran, warrants immediate multidisciplinary approaches targeted at controlling further spread of these infections primarily among prisoners and secondarily preventing them to act as carrier to general population. PMID:20428635

Davoodian, Parivash; Dadvand, Habib; Mahoori, Khatereh; Amoozandeh, Alireza; Salavati, Alborz

2009-10-01

167

Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

Snyder, Howard N.

168

Interrogation of juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little information has been available on the frequency of police interrogation and rights waiver in juvenile cases. Research in developmental psychology suggests that the cognitive and emotional characteristics of juveniles, coupled with the circumstances inherent in police interrogations might render very infrequent the assertion of the right to silence by juveniles. Furthermore, both legal and social science commentators have suggested

J. Thomas Grisso; Carolyn Pomicter

1977-01-01

169

Concepts Shaping Juvenile Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rob White's paper explores ways in which community building can be integrated into the practices of juvenile justice work. He provides a model of what can be called "restorative social justice", one that builds upon the juvenile conferencing model by attempting to fuse social justice concerns with progressive juvenile justice practices.

White, Rob

2008-01-01

170

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

Pat Matthews

2007-09-01

171

Juvenile sex offenders: similar to, or different from, other incarcerated delinquent offenders?  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to compare incarcerated juvenile sex offenders to incarcerated youth who committed confrontational but nonsex offenses, and to those youth who committed only nonconfrontational, nonsex offenses. Furthermore, comparisons were made between two subtypes of sex offenders: those youth convicted for rape or sodomy vs those convicted for child molestation. Eighty-three male juvenile delinquents served as participants. Teachers within the correctional facility completed an instrument which allowed the examination of the two areas of interest: externalizing problems and internalizing problems. The results indicated that sex offenders generally, and particularly those who had committed only sex offenses, were perceived as having fewer externalizing and internalizing problems. No differences emerged between the two subtypes of sex offenders. Implications, as well as limitations, of the findings are discussed. PMID:1520239

Kempton, T; Forehand, R

1992-09-01

172

Juvenile Suicide in Confinement--Findings from the First National Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings from the first national survey on juvenile suicide in confinement are provided, and include the extent and distribution of juvenile suicides, as well as descriptive data on demographic characteristics of each victim, incident, and juvenile facility which sustained the suicide. Among the significant findings were that suicides were evenly…

Hayes, Lindsay M.

2009-01-01

173

Procedures for neutron scattering corrections in a calibration facility with a non-symmetric set-up.  

PubMed

When calibrating neutron monitors, it is important to correct for scattering effects. In general, the correction factors depend on the type of source and monitor used, and on the configuration of the calibration room. These correction factors have been determined for the specific non-symmetric configuration of the calibration room used at SCK.CEN by means of the different analytical techniques recommended by the ISO. These results are compared with each other and also with the outcome of numerical calculations performed using the Tripoli-3 and MCNP 4B code. PMID:11548327

Vanhavere, F; Coeck, M; Vermeersch, F

2001-01-01

174

Recombinant factor VIIa to correct coagulopathy in patients with traumatic brain injury presenting to outlying facilities before transfer to the regional trauma center.  

PubMed

Timely correction of coagulopathy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) improves mortality. Recombinant, activated factor VII (VIIa) has been identified as an effective method to correct coagulopathy in patients with TBI. We performed a retrospective study (January 1, 2008-December 31, 2009) of all patients with TBI and coagulopathy (international normalized ratio (INR) > 1.5) transferred to our Level I trauma center. Twenty-three patients with coagulopathy and TBI were transferred to our trauma center, 100 per cent sustained a fall, and 100 per cent were taking warfarin at the time of injury. Ten patients received VIIa to correct coagulopathy before transfer, whereas 13 did not. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes in patients who received VIIa with those who did not. When comparing the VIIa group with the no-VIIa group there was no difference in age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale score, injury severity score, transfer time, or INR at outlying facility. Both groups received one unit of plasma before arrival at our trauma center; patients in the VIIa group received a single 1.2 mg dose of VIIa at the outlying facility. Upon arrival to our trauma center the VIIa group had a lower INR (1.0 vs 3.0, P = 0.02) and lower mortality (0% vs 39%, P = 0.03). In coagulopathic patients with TBI presenting to outlying institutions with limited resources to quickly provide plasma, VIIa efficiently corrects coagulopathy before transfer to definitive care at the regional trauma center. More rapid correction of coagulopathy with VIIa in this patient population may improve mortality. PMID:22273315

Brown, Carlos V R; Sowery, Lauren; Curry, Eardie; Valadka, Alex B; Glover, Cynthia S; Grabarkewitz, Kim; Green, Terry; Hail, Steve; Admire, John

2012-01-01

175

Creative Art Therapy for Incarcerated Male Juveniles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document begins by briefly outlining the problems of juveniles incarcerated in correctional institutions, including the problems of overcrowding and recidivism. It asserts that creative art therapy is designed to provide a therapeutic atmosphere for understanding and change and documents the use of creative art therapy techniques with…

Treanor, Virginia; Newlon, Betty J.

176

Juvenile Crime in Rural Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increases in juvenile crime over a ten-year period caused the Idaho legislature to overhaul the juvenile justice system. A state Department of Juvenile Justice and a balance system for juveniles were created, providing an impressive range of services. The Fifth Judicial District has two detention centers that house juvenile probation officers, a courtroom, a judge's chamber, a clerk's office, a

Linda E. Wright

1997-01-01

177

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post-closure-posting requirements for the mounded/capped basement structure, as well as for the entire CAU, are addressed in Section 4.2.10. The site contains radiologically impacted surfaces and hazardous materials. Based on review of the historical information for CAU 116 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 116 using the SAFER process. CAUs that may be closed using the SAFER process have conceptual corrective actions that are clearly identified. Consequently, corrective action alternatives can be chosen prior to completing a corrective action investigation, given anticipated investigation results. The SAFER process combines elements of the data quality objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to plan and conduct closure activities. The DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the SAFER process. The purpose of the investigation phase is to verify the adequacy of existing information used to determine the chosen corrective action. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty during the planning and decision-making phases of the project. The SAFER process allows for technical decisions to be made based on information gathered during site visits, interviews, meetings, research, and a consensus of opinion by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) team members. Any uncertainties are addressed by documented assumptions that are verified by sampling and analysis, data evaluation, onsite observations, and contingency plans, as necessary. Closure activities may proceed simultaneously with site characterization as sufficient data are gathered to confirm or disprove the assumptions made during selection of the corrective action. If, at any time during the closure process, new information is discovered that indicates that closure activities should be revised, closure activities will be reevaluated as appropriate. Based on a detailed review of historical documentation, there is sufficient process know

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-12-01

178

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

NA

2006-03-01

179

National Juvenile Defender Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Formerly affiliated with the National Bar Association, the National Juvenile Defender Center separated from the ABA in 2005 becoming an independent organization. The NJDC is a support center for public defenders, caseworkers and other groups working with juveniles or juvenile crime issues. Included on the site are publications related to juvenile justice cases and standards. The site also publishes training curriculum on basic skills and strategies for working with juveniles and delinquency proceedings, as well as information on adolescent development and strategies for communication with teens. The NJDC primarily presents itself as a legal resource for public defenders, but it is also a great resource for those in the criminal justice field and anyone working with juvenile or at-risk populations.

2007-03-18

180

Forensic Evaluation of Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Grisso, T. (1998). Forensic evaluation of juveniles. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press. ISBN 156887037X, 9781568870373\\u000aPublisher summary: In recent years, juvenile courts and juvenile attorneys have come to rely heavily on mental health professionals for evaluations of youths in delinquency cases. Evaluation questions include the youth's competence to stand trial, competence to waive Miranda rights prior to giving a

Thomas Grisso

1998-01-01

181

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2005-2006 Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), formerly named the Board of Corrections, the administrator of funding. California counties receiving state funds for Juvenile Justice…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2007-01-01

182

Adolescent neglect, juvenile delinquency and the risk of recidivism.  

PubMed

Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental rejection and family relationships are instrumental in explaining juvenile conduct problems. This study sought to determine whether neglect is associated with recidivism for moderate and high risk juvenile offenders in Washington State. Statewide risk assessments and administrative records for child welfare, juvenile justice, and adult corrections were analyzed. The sample was diverse (24 % female, 13 % African American, 8 % Hispanic, 5 % Native American) and included all moderate and high risk juvenile offenders screened by juvenile probation between 2004 and 2007 (n = 19,833). Official records from child protection were used to identify juvenile offenders with a history of child neglect and to identify juvenile offenders with an ongoing case of neglect. Event history models were developed to estimate the risk of subsequent offending. Adolescents with an ongoing case neglect were significantly more likely to continue offending as compared with youth with no official history of neglect. These findings remain even after controlling for a wide range of family, peer, academic, mental health, and substance abuse covariates. Interrupting trajectories of offending is a primary focus of juvenile justice. The findings of the current study indicate that ongoing dependency issues play a critical role in explaining the outcomes achieved for adolescents in juvenile justice settings. The implications for improved collaboration between child welfare and juvenile justice are discussed. PMID:23334336

Ryan, Joseph P; Williams, Abigail B; Courtney, Mark E

2013-03-01

183

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The following is an addendum to the 'Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Nevada Test Site, Nevada', DOE/NV/11718--306, dated April 1999. This addendum includes Use Restriction Information forms and survey maps for CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), that were inadvertently left out of the Closure Report when it was published as a final document.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-06-01

184

Juvenile Rights. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These classroom materials are part of the Project Benchmark series designed to teach secondary students about our legal concepts and systems. This unit focuses on juvenile rights and responsibilities under the law. The materials outline juvenile rights and responsibilities in the areas of parental control, education, free expression, search and…

Eaneman, Paulette S.; And Others

185

Juvenile Delinquency Intervention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three meta-analyses by C. J. Garrett (1984, 1985), P. Kaufman (1985), and W. S. Davidson and others (1984) of juvenile delinquency interventions are summarized. This systematic literature review indicates that interventions to reduce juvenile delinquency may have small, but meaningful, impacts. Promising avenues for future research are suggested.…

Lipsey, Mark W.

1988-01-01

186

Distinguishing juvenile homicide from violent juvenile offending.  

PubMed

Juvenile homicide is a social problem that has remained a central focus within juvenile justice research in recent years. The term juvenile murderer describes a legal category, but it is purported to have significant scientific meaning. Research has attempted to conceptualize adolescent murderers as a clinical category that can be reliably distinguished from their nonhomicidal counterparts. This study examined 33 adolescents adjudicated delinquent or awaiting trial for murder and 38 adolescents who committed violent, nonhomicidal offenses to determine whether the two groups differed significantly on family history, early development, delinquency history, mental health, and weapon possession variables. The nonhomicide group proved more problematic on many of these measures. Two key factors did distinguish the homicide group: These adolescents endorsed the greater availability of guns and substance abuse at the time of their commitment offenses. The significance of this finding is discussed, and the implications for risk management and policy are reviewed. PMID:17671097

DiCataldo, Frank; Everett, Meghan

2008-04-01

187

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereinafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereinafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction of Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30

188

Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect

This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

MCCARTHY, M.M.

1999-08-01

189

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30

190

Reducing Recidivism in Juvenile Offenders: Project About Face's Educational Impact.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project About Face is a joint effort of the Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, Youth Services, Inc., the Naval Air Station at Millington, Correctional Counseling, Inc., and the Bureau of Educational Research Services at Memphis State University. The project's goal is to implement a correctional education and training program that reduces…

Petry, John R.; And Others

191

Special Issues in Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the original juvenile court founded in Cook County, Illinois, to current juvenile court systems across the United States, the philosophy of juvenile justice has reflected society’s predominant views on youth and adolescence. The first juvenile courts developed during the industrial revolution when social reformers were concerned about the dangers children faced in the workplace. In the early 1900s, compulsory

Keith R. Cruise

2006-01-01

192

The Attack on Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

As juvenile crime increased during the last two decades, the juvenile justice system came under unprecedented scrutiny and criticism for its perceived inability to respond to this increase and to provide interventions that might thwart juvenile crime. As this offending became more lethal, with juvenile homicide rates increasing by more than 200 percent in some jurisdictions, the abolishment of the

Russell K. Van Vleet

1999-01-01

193

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This CR provides documentation and justification for the closure of CAU 118 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative and closure activities conducted in accordance with the CAU 118 SAFER Plan: Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The SAFER Plan provides information relating to site history as well as the scope and planning of the investigation. This CR also provides the analytical and radiological survey data to confirm that the remediation goals were met as specified in the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approved the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (Murphy, 2006), which recommends closure in place with use restrictions (URs).

Mark Burmeister

2007-09-01

194

Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a histologically denign, clinically aggressive neoplasm arising primarily in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. Diagnosis and treatment often present difficulty. The potential for these tumors to involve the p...

J. F. Nelson J. L. Hicks

1973-01-01

195

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is the most common type of childhood and adolescent chronic arthritis and a major cause\\u000a of short- and long-term disability among the pediatric age group with chronic pediatric diseases (Cassidy & Petty, 2005) The\\u000a term juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is used here because the criteria for this diagnosis (Cassidy et al., 1986) were the inclusion\\u000a criteria for

Michael A. Rapoff; Carol B. Lindsley

196

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004. Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the California Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Board of Corrections (BOC) as the administrator of funding. A 2001 Senate Bill extended the funding and changed the program's name to the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2005-01-01

197

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004 Report Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document summarizes a report focusing on California counties receiving funds from Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) programs. This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among at-risk and young offenders. The Board of Corrections

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2005-01-01

198

Entrance Into Juvenile Male Prostitution.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Forty-six juvenile male prostitutes and 50 juvenile male non-prostitute delinquents were studied to provide information on: the process of entrance into prostitution; early sexual experience; exposure to prostitution; and associated criminal and drug invo...

J. James

1982-01-01

199

Neighborhood Deterioration and Juvenile Crime.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Residents of deteriorating neighborhoods generally identify juvenile offenders as the cause of greatest fear. This project attempted to provide recommendations for solutions to juvenile delinquency and its debilitating effect on neighborhoods by: (1) seek...

J. A. Kromkowski

1976-01-01

200

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24

201

Neuropsychology of Juvenile Adjudicative Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the application of neuropsychology to adult adjudicative competence has been examined previously (cf. Denney & Wynkoop, 2000; Wynkoop & Denney, 1999), there is nothing yet written on the application of neuropsychology to juvenile adjudicative competence. This article is a primer on juvenile adjudicative competence from a neuropsychological perspective, briefly describing some of the issues relevant to juvenile adjudicative competence,

Timothy F. Wynkoop

2004-01-01

202

Psychosocial concepts in juvenile law  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to clarify the types of information about juveniles and their families that are relevant for three types of juvenile court decisions: (a) the pretrial detention of juveniles; (b) their transfer for trial in criminal courts: and (c) disposition decisions after delinquency adjudication. Predominant legal standards for these decisions are described, information relevance for the decisions is

Thomas Grisso; Alan Tomkins; Pamela Caseyw

1988-01-01

203

Controlling the Front Gates: Effective Admissions Policies and Practices. Pathways to Juvenile Detention Reform 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report identifies policies and practices essential to overcoming problems with admissions to juvenile detention facilities, using information from the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI). Chapter 1, "Why Objective Admissions Policies and Practices Are Critical to Detention Reform," describes factors contributing to uncontrolled…

Orlando, Frank

204

Life as a Library Media Specialist within a Juvenile Detention School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Norfolk Detention School is an alternative school for juveniles under the age of 18 who are awaiting adjudication by the court and those who are awaiting transfer to another facility. This article describes the author's experience as a library media specialist in this juvenile detention school. She describes how she has promoted and encouraged…

Parker, Meredith

2008-01-01

205

Juvenile psoriatic arthritis.  

PubMed

Among 664 juvenile chronic arthritis patients cared for in the Outpatient Clinic of the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy 11 were found with juvenile psoriatic arthritis, and their data regarding skin, joint, ophthalmological, laboratory and radiological manifestations were analysed. These patients were categorised according to the four subgroups suggested by Truckenbrodt et al. Considering that the occurrence of the disease is rare, the small number of patients investigated in this study can provide additional data to the study of Truckenbrodt. The higher number of patients with JPA thus studied can give more information for a multicentric evaluation. PMID:1790632

Koó, E; Balogh, Z; Gömör, B

1991-09-01

206

What Is Juvenile Arthritis?  

MedlinePLUS

... booklet. To order the Juvenile Arthritis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information above. To view the complete text or to order online, visit ... updates and for any questions about any medications you are taking, please ...

207

Treating the Juvenile Offender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This authoritative, highly readable reference and text is grounded in the latest knowledge on how antisocial and criminal behavior develops in youth and how it can effectively be treated. Contributors describe proven ways to reduce juvenile delinquency by targeting specific risk factors and strengthening young people's personal, family, and…

Hoge, Robert D., Ed.; Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Boxer, Paul, Ed.

2008-01-01

208

Adolescent Neglect, Juvenile Delinquency and the Risk of Recidivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental…

Ryan, Joseph P.; Williams, Abigail B.; Courtney, Mark E.

2013-01-01

209

Juvenile Offender Recidivism: An Examination of Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between…

Calley, Nancy G.

2012-01-01

210

Juvenile Offender Recidivism: An Examination of Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between recidivism and nine specific variables: offense type, age at initial involvement in

Nancy G. Calley

2012-01-01

211

Juvenile trabecular ossifying fibroma  

PubMed Central

Juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF) is an uncommon fibro-osseous lesion with highly aggressive clinical behavior, higher incidence in young adults, and a strong tendency to recur. Two categories, trabecular JOF (TrJOF) and psammomatoid JOF (PsJOF), based on histologic criteria and a distinct predilection for specific age groups have been identified. Juvenile trabecular ossifying fibroma of peripheral variety is an uncommon clinical entity with aggressive local behavior and high recurrence rate. This article reports a case of aggressive JTOF in the anterior mandibular region in a 13-year-old boy with history of recurrence. Complete surgical resection of the growth was done along with involved periodontal ligament and periosteum to minimize the possibility of recurrence. The case was followed up for more than 3 months without recurrence.

Pandit, Nymphea; Saini, Nitin; Kler, Shikha; Jindal, Shaifi

2014-01-01

212

Cost-Effectiveness of Residential Community Corrections: An Analytical Prototype.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a technique for determining whether residential community corrections is a cost-effective alternative to two traditional methods of dealing with adult and juvenile offenders: probation and institutionalization. ...

1977-01-01

213

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17

214

Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, and 2068-U, all previously located at the Buildings 9720-15/ 9754-1 site (Facility Identification (number sign)0-010117), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Te...

D. E. Bohrman E. M. Ingram

1992-01-01

215

Legal Questions about Juveniles’ Capacities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Grisso, T. (2009). Legal questions about juveniles’ capacities. Module 4 in series: Toward developmentally appropriate practice: A juvenile court training curriculum. Washington, D.C.: National Juvenile Defender Center and MacArthur Foundation Models for Change Project.\\u000aOverview: Module 4 is designed to assist participants in: 1. Understanding legal questions in delinquency cases that require information about youth’s capacities; 2. Knowing about

Thomas Grisso

2009-01-01

216

Mild form of treacher collins syndrome imitating juvenile otosclerosis.  

PubMed

Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an inherited developmental disorder. More than 40% of individuals with TCS have conductive hearing loss attributed to external and middle ear anomalies. Mild cases of TCS often pass undiagnosed at birth or early childhood. The disease may be manifested as conductive hearing loss in teenagers and may resemble juvenile otosclerosis. Patients could suffer from slight facial variabilities including retrognathia (as in our case) and others, which point out to a possible middle ear anomaly. Surgical corrections of middle ear anomalies including TCS generally lead to poorer outcomes comparing with juvenile otosclerosis, which should be discussed with parents during preoperative counselling. PMID:22953143

Zeleník, Karol; Komínek, Pavel

2012-01-01

217

Mild Form of Treacher Collins Syndrome Imitating Juvenile Otosclerosis  

PubMed Central

Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an inherited developmental disorder. More than 40% of individuals with TCS have conductive hearing loss attributed to external and middle ear anomalies. Mild cases of TCS often pass undiagnosed at birth or early childhood. The disease may be manifested as conductive hearing loss in teenagers and may resemble juvenile otosclerosis. Patients could suffer from slight facial variabilities including retrognathia (as in our case) and others, which point out to a possible middle ear anomaly. Surgical corrections of middle ear anomalies including TCS generally lead to poorer outcomes comparing with juvenile otosclerosis, which should be discussed with parents during preoperative counselling.

Zelenik, Karol; Kominek, Pavel

2012-01-01

218

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Glossary definitions Reviewed July 2013 What is juvenile primary lateral sclerosis? Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis is a ...

219

Psychological Definitions of Concepts in Juvenile Law.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the research was to determine the characteristics of juveniles and their families that can be conceptualized as legally relevant for making several discriminatory decisions about juveniles in the juvenile justice system. The areas studied w...

T. Grisso

1984-01-01

220

Juvenile Firesetting: A Research Overview. Juvenile Justice Bulletin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2002, the National Association of State Fire Marshals (NASFM) began developing applied research initiatives to help professionals curtail juvenile firesetting. The project included a review of the research literature, a conference of researchers and professionals involved in preventing juvenile firesetting, and a final report, upon which this…

Putnam, Charles T.; Kirkpatrick, John T.

2005-01-01

221

Juvenile Mentoring Program: A Progress Review. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The greatest support offered by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention for youth mentoring has been through the Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP), which provides one-to-one mentoring for youth at risk of delinquency, gang involvement, educational failure, or dropping out of school. Information on JUMP has been collected through…

Novotney, Laurence C.; Mertinko, Elizabeth; Lange, James; Baker, Tara Kelley

222

77 FR 75299 - Standards To Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Sexual Abuse and Assault in Confinement Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...prohibits facility staff from conducting body cavity searches of juveniles, requiring instead that all body cavity searches of juveniles be referred to...would ban cross-gender strip or body cavity searches except in exigent...

2012-12-19

223

Using Online Annotations to Support Error Correction and Corrective Feedback  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Giving feedback on second language (L2) writing is a challenging task. This research proposed an interactive environment for error correction and corrective feedback. First, we developed an online corrective feedback and error analysis system called "Online Annotator for EFL Writing". The system consisted of five facilities: Document Maker,…

Yeh, Shiou-Wen; Lo, Jia-Jiunn

2009-01-01

224

Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The central question examined in this address is, “Do children's crimes make them adults?” I begin by focusing on the concept and history of adolescence in our society, I then examine the development and philosophy of the juvenile justice system. Adolescent development and juvenile justice are brought together around the concepts of maturity, judgment, and competence, followed by a brief

N. Dickon Reppucci

1999-01-01

225

Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although justice system policy and practice cannot, and should not, be dictated solely by studies of adolescent development, the ways in which we respond to juvenile offending should be informed by the lessons of developmental science. This review begins with a brief overview of the history, rationale, and workings of the American juvenile justice system. Following this, I summarize findings

Laurence Steinberg

2009-01-01

226

Juvenile Crime. Opposing Viewpoints Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Books in the Opposing Viewpoints Series present debates about current issues that can be used to teach critical reading and thinking skills. The variety of opinions expressed in this collection of articles and book excerpts explores many aspects of juvenile crime. It is a commonly held view that the number of crimes committed by juveniles is…

Sadler, A. E., Ed.

227

Tagging Juvenile Pacific Lamprey with Passive Integrated Transponders: Methodology, Short-Term Mortality, and Influence on Swimming Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to determine the feasibility (i.e., efficiency and nonintrusiveness) of tagging juvenile Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and to determine any associated impacts on survivorship and swimming ability. Juvenile Pacific lampreys were obtained from the John Day Dam fish collection facility and tests were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in

Robert P. Mueller; Russell A. Moursund; Matthew D. Bleich

2006-01-01

228

Aggressive juvenile mandibular fibromatosis.  

PubMed

Aggressive juvenile fibromatosis of the jawbones is a rare tumor presenting as infiltrative mass with unpredictable evolution. We report herein a 17-year-old student with a 6-month history of radiologically proven resorption of a part of the mandible, lingual displacement of tooth 34 and malocclusion. Alveolar ridge resorption and three dark-brown foci in the bone were seen after the tooth was extracted. Histological study showed the tumor tissue to have a bundle-like structure; immunohistochemically it was positive for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, beta-catenin, Ki-67 (5%), and negative for desmin and cytokeratin 34bE12. The golden standard in the diagnostics of desmoid fibromatoses is the nuclear or membrane expression of beta-catenin, which is found in 90% of the cases. Differential diagnosis include mandibular fibroma, well-differentiated fibrosarcoma, fibrosing histiocytoma, and infiltration from adjacent soft-tissue tumor. Aggressive juvenile fibromatosis should be managed by radical excision. Local recurrences are not rare, but metastases do not develop. In rare cases this type of fibromatosis has been known to regress spontaneously. Aggressive fibromatosis is a diagnostic challenge, since it remains in the grey zone between benign and malignant lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:24712289

Ivanov, Georgi P; Atanasov, Dimitar T; Anavi, Beniamin L

2013-01-01

229

State Correctional Education Programs. State Policy Update.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Secure state correctional facilities currently house more than 1.8 million adults, and nearly 4.4 million adults fall under state-administered community corrections. A state's approach to corrections and the communication between the state correctional components can have a large impact on the state's correctional education program. Decentralized…

Tolbert, Michelle

230

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996; as amended March 2010). CAU 562 consists of 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) loc...

2011-01-01

231

Premotor functional connectivity predicts impulsivity in juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

Teenagers are often impulsive. In some cases this is a phase of normal development; in other cases impulsivity contributes to criminal behavior. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined resting-state functional connectivity among brain systems and behavioral measures of impulsivity in 107 juveniles incarcerated in a high-security facility. In less-impulsive juveniles and normal controls, motor planning regions were correlated with brain networks associated with spatial attention and executive control. In more-impulsive juveniles, these same regions correlated with the default-mode network, a constellation of brain areas associated with spontaneous, unconstrained, self-referential cognition. The strength of these brain-behavior relationships was sufficient to predict impulsivity scores at the individual level. Our data suggest that increased functional connectivity of motor-planning regions with networks subserving unconstrained, self-referential cognition, rather than those subserving executive control, heightens the predisposition to impulsive behavior in juvenile offenders. To further explore the relationship between impulsivity and neural development, we studied functional connectivity in the same motor-planning regions in 95 typically developing individuals across a wide age span. The change in functional connectivity with age mirrored that of impulsivity: younger subjects tended to exhibit functional connectivity similar to the more-impulsive incarcerated juveniles, whereas older subjects exhibited a less-impulsive pattern. This observation suggests that impulsivity in the offender population is a consequence of a delay in typical development, rather than a distinct abnormality. PMID:21709236

Shannon, Benjamin J; Raichle, Marcus E; Snyder, Abraham Z; Fair, Damien A; Mills, Kathryn L; Zhang, Dongyang; Bache, Kevin; Calhoun, Vince D; Nigg, Joel T; Nagel, Bonnie J; Stevens, Alexander A; Kiehl, Kent A

2011-07-01

232

A Typology of Juvenile Offenders Based on the Judgments of Juvenile Court Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to determine whether a cluster analysis of juvenile offender cases, based on the judgments of juvenile court professionals, would produce a typology similar to Quay's. The data consisted of juvenile court professionals' descriptions of 1,423 juvenile cases on 93 variables. A cluster analytic method and statistical stopping rules created three well-separated clusters of juvenile offenders, differing on

FRANK DICATALDO; THOMAS GRISSO

1995-01-01

233

Juvenile Court Clinical Services: A National Description  

Microsoft Academic Search

There have been few studies of the manner in which juvenile courts obtain clinical evaluations and consultation by juvenile court clinicians in order to identify and respond to youths with mental health problems. This study involved a telephone survey of professionals associated with juvenile court clinic (JCC) services in 87 of the largest juvenile court jurisdictions nationwide, providing data on

Thomas Grisso; Judith Quinlan

2005-01-01

234

Reforming Our Expectations about Juvenile Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Typing the term "juvenile justice reform" into a Google[TM] search will result in 60 pages of entries. But what is meant by juvenile justice reform? What does it look like? How will one know when it is achieved? This article defines juvenile justice reform, discusses the principles of effective reform, and describes the practice of juvenile

Rodriguez, Pamela F.; Baille, Daphne M.

2010-01-01

235

Parents' Attitudes toward Juveniles' Rights in Interrogation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed the attitudes of parents regarding nurturance and self-determination rights for juveniles. Nurturance rights for juveniles were strongly endorsed. Most parents did not believe that juvenile suspects should be allowed to withhold information from police. Results question parents' abilities to provide meaningful protections for juveniles in…

Grisso, Thomas; Ring, Melissa

1979-01-01

236

A Wall Correction Program Based on Classical Methods for the National Transonic Facility (Solid Wall or Slotted Wall) and the 14x22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel at NASA LaRC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Fortran subroutine CMWALL is described, which is an implementation of the collective information from classical methods-based wall corrections. These methods use established closed-form expressions which were developed based on simple linear potential-based methods. This is a simple and rapid tool to calculate corrections due to wall interference in the National Transonic Facility (Solid Wall or Slotted Wall) or the 14x22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel at NASA LaRC. It is designed to be easily implemented in the existing tunnel data reduction programs, either as real-time or post-point. It is however important to realize that the method is based on the simplifying assumptions of linearity, small model and attached flow. The computed results are thus to be viewed as first-cut estimates, to be refined further using more complex methods based on measured wall pressures (known as wall signature methods).

Hemsch, Michael J. (Technical Monitor); Iyer, Venkit

2004-01-01

237

Special Education and the Juvenile Justice System. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This bulletin is intended to inform judges, attorneys, advocates, probation officers, institutional staff, and other youth-serving professionals about the impact of special education issue on juvenile justice matters. It summarizes the provisions of the I...

S. Burrell L. Warboys

2000-01-01

238

Learning to Change: Does Life Skills Training Lead to Reduced Incident Reports among Inmates in a Medium/Minimum Correctional Facility?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There have been numerous research on the effect of education on behavior as it relates to recidivism. However, the base of knowledge is lacking in research discussing the effect of education on the behavior of inmates in an Omaha correctional institution. This study hypothesized that inmates engaging in life skills training would demonstrate a…

Hunte, Rose S.

2010-01-01

239

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

2014-01-01

240

Parents' Attitudes Toward Juveniles' Rights in Interrogation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does requiring the presence of parents at pretrial interrogations of juveniles ensure adequate protection of juveniles' rights to silence and to retain legal counsel? The study assessed the attitudes of parents regarding nurturance and self-determination rights for juveniles—including rights which are relevant to interrogation—for juveniles of two age groups and of both delinquent and nondelinquent status. Nurturance rights for juveniles

Thomas Grisso; Melissa Ring

1979-01-01

241

Juvenile Crime Victims in the Justice System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The literature on juvenile justice is largely concerned with offenders: topics such as juvenile courts, the rights of juvenile\\u000a offenders, the adjudication of juveniles as adults, and the effectiveness of delinquency prevention programs. But juveniles\\u000a have contact with the justice system in another role—in the role of victims—and this is not an intersection that has been\\u000a addressed nearly so intensively

David Finkelhor; Mallie J. Paschall; Patricia Y. Hashima

242

Serial Juvenile Sex Offenders and Their Offenses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In light of the dearth of literature specifically on serial juvenile sex offenders, this chapter considers the findings of\\u000a research with juvenile sex offenders and juvenile repeat sex offenders with respect to what this might tell us about juvenile\\u000a serial sex offending and its investigation. The chapter reports on different types of juvenile sex offenders: those that offend\\u000a against younger

Jessica Woodhams; Clive Hollin; Ray Bull

243

Juvenile homosexual homicide.  

PubMed

Limited information exists on juvenile homosexual homicide (JHH), that is, youths who perpetrate sexual homicides against same-sex victims. Only a handful of cases from the United States and internationally have been described in the literature. This study, the first of its kind, examines the epidemiology, victimology, victim-offender relationship, and weapon-use patterns in JHH offenders using a large U.S. database on homicide spanning three decades. The data for this study were derived from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplementary Homicide Reports (SHRs) for the years 1976 through 2005. A total of 93 cases of JHH were identified. On average, three of these crimes occurred annually in the U.S., and there was a marked decline in its incidence over the study period. Ninety-five percent were male offender-male victim cases and 5% were female offender-female victim cases. JHH offenders were over-represented amongst all juvenile sexual murderers, similar to their adult counterparts. The majority of these boys were aged 16 or 17 and killed adult victims. They were significantly more likely to kill adult victims than other age groups, to be friends or acquaintances of the victims, and to use contact/edged weapons or firearms. Most offenders killed same-race victims, although Black offenders were significantly more likely than White offenders to kill interracially. A case report is provided to illustrate JHH. Further research is needed to promote our understanding of the pathogenesis, etiology, and associated risk factors for this aberrant form of murder by children. PMID:22447462

Myers, Wade C; Chan, Heng Choon Oliver

2012-01-01

244

Addendum to the corrective action plan for Underground Storage Tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1: Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID {number_sign}0-010117  

SciTech Connect

This document represents an addendum to the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U located at Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The site of the four underground storage tanks is commonly referred to as the Rust Garage Facility. The original CAP was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review in May 1992. During the time period after submission of the original CAP for the Rust Garage Facility, Y-12 Plant Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program personnel continued to evaluate improvements that would optimize resources and expedite the activities schedule presented in the original CAP. Based on these determinations, several revisions to the original corrective action process options for remediation of contaminated soils are proposed. The revised approach will involve excavation of the soils from the impacted areas, on-site thermal desorption of soil contaminants, and final disposition of the treated soils by backfilling into the subject site excavations. Based on evaluation of the corrective actions with regard to groundwater, remediation of groundwater under the Y-12 Plant CERCLA Program is proposed for the facility.

Not Available

1994-01-01

245

Screening and Assessing Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders among Youth in the Juvenile Justice System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On any given day, over 100,000 youth are held in custody in juvenile justice facilities across the country, either awaiting trial in detention centers or having been placed in residential facilities after being convicted of delinquencies. A growing body of research suggests that most of these youth meet criteria for at least one mental disorder,…

Grisso, Thomas; Underwood, Lee

246

Program plan for correction of US instrument degradation or failure in the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) in the Federal Republic of Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents, as of September, 1986, the investigation of the failure or degradation of some of the advanced two-phase flow instruments supplied by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to the German Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). These instruments include Tie-Plate Drag Bodies (DBs), Breakthrough Detectors (BTDs), Loop Drag Disc (DD) paddles, Fluid Distribution Grid (FDG) sensors, and

G. S. Rhee; Y. S. Chen; L. M. Shotkin

1987-01-01

247

Adolescent development and juvenile justice.  

PubMed

Although justice system policy and practice cannot, and should not, be dictated solely by studies of adolescent development, the ways in which we respond to juvenile offending should be informed by the lessons of developmental science. This review begins with a brief overview of the history, rationale, and workings of the American juvenile justice system. Following this, I summarize findings from studies of brain, cognitive, and psychosocial development in adolescence that have implications for the treatment of juveniles in the justice system. The utility of developmental science in this context is illustrated by the application of these research findings to three fundamental issues in contemporary justice policy: the criminal culpability of adolescents, adolescents' competence to stand trial, and the impact of punitive sanctions on adolescents' development and behavior. Taken together, the lessons of developmental science offer strong support for the maintenance of a separate juvenile justice system in which adolescents are judged, tried, and sanctioned in developmentally appropriate ways. PMID:19327037

Steinberg, Laurence

2009-01-01

248

Juvenile Angiofibroma: Evolution of Management  

PubMed Central

Juvenile angiofibroma is a rare benign lesion originating from the pterygopalatine fossa with distinctive epidemiologic features and growth patterns. The typical patient is an adolescent male with a clinical history of recurrent epistaxis and nasal obstruction. Although the use of nonsurgical therapies is described in the literature, surgery is currently considered the ideal treatment for juvenile angiofibroma. Refinement in preoperative embolization has provided significant reduction of complications and intraoperative bleeding with minimal risk of residual disease. During the last decade, an endoscopic technique has been extensively adopted as a valid alternative to external approaches in the management of small-intermediate size juvenile angiofibromas. Herein, we review the evolution in the management of juvenile angiofibroma with particular reference to recent advances in diagnosis and treatment.

Nicolai, Piero; Schreiber, Alberto; Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea

2012-01-01

249

A Giant Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma  

PubMed Central

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) are locally growing highly vascular tumours. They are treated primarily by surgical excision ranging from open approach to endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old male with a giant nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibroma obliterating the pterygopalatine fossa bilaterally, invasing the sphenoid bone and extending to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically with endoscopic approach and discharged as cured without any complication.

Yuce, Salim; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Dogan, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; Salk, Ismail; Muderris, Suphi

2012-01-01

250

Swimming Behaviour of Juvenile Pacific Lamprey, Lampetra tridentata  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synopsis  We collected actively migrating juvenile Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata [Richardson, J. 1836. Fauna Boreali-Americana; or the zoology of the northern parts of British America: containing descriptions\\u000a of the objects of natural history collected on the late northern land expeditions, under the command of Sir John Franklin.\\u000a R.N., Fauna Boreali-Americana, 327 pp.] from hydroelectric bypass facilities in the Columbia River and

Dennis D. Dauble; Russell A. Moursund; Matthew D. Bleich

2006-01-01

251

Pregnancy resolution decisions in juvenile detention.  

PubMed

A group of detained pregnant adolescents and expectant teenage fathers served as participants in a qualitative research project designed to describe how adolescents residing in a large metropolitan area juvenile detention facility make health- and pregnancy-related decisions. During the course of the study and clinical work with this population, it was found that although troubled and troublesome, these teenagers do not present as bleak and depressing a picture as might appear on the surface. Three primary themes emerged from the study findings: responsibility, reputation, and respect. These themes were bound to the important relationships in the teenagers' lives. The participants also presented some surprising strengths and resolutions for the future that psychiatric and liaison nurses working in the setting can use in program planning and clinical interventions. PMID:2260892

Anderson, N L

1990-10-01

252

PSYCHOSOCIAL PROFILE OF JUVENILE DIABETES  

PubMed Central

A study of the complex relationships between the patient characteristics, family and environmental influences, physician's behaviour and the demands of the disease with its management in Juvenile Diabetics was taken up at a general hospital. 90 subjects were selected for the study and grouped into three. Group A consisted of 30 Juvenile Diabetics, Group B of 30 Adult Diabetics and Group C of 30 Normal healthy adolescents. The impact of the illness was measured on the Diabetes Impact Measurement Scale (DIMS), the behavioural deviations and the parental attitudes towards child rearing on the Fallstrom's Questionnaire (FQ) and the family environment on the Family Climate Scale (FCS). Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using DSM-IV criteria. Group A & B were compared on the DIMS and Group A & C on FQ & FCS. Adult diabetics had a greater impact of diabetes. Juvenile diabetics had significantly higher frequency of behavioural deviations as compared to controls. Also there was a higher number of responses on questions indicating an overprotecting attitude amongst parents of juvenile diabetics. There was an increased incidence of psychiatric morbidity in juvenile diabetics as compared to normal adolescents irrespective of the family environment. The results are discussed in relation to current literature.

Dass, Jyoti; Dhavale, H.S.; Rathi, Anup

1999-01-01

253

[Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemias].  

PubMed

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemias (JMML) are rare but severe myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasms of infancy. They represent about 10 new cases per year in France and preferentially affect males. JMML are all stem cell diseases the common denominator of which is RAS pathway dysregulation, due to mutations in RAS (NRAS, KRAS) or RAS regulatory components (PTPN11, NF1 or CBL). This leads to an hypersensivity of myeloid progenitors to GM-CSF (granulo-macrophagic colony stimulating factor) which induces in turn excessive monocytic and macrophagic proliferation in blood and bone marrow. All organs can be infiltrated by this monocytic proliferation leading to multisystemic failure. Blast crisis with transformation into acute myeloid leukemia occurs in one third of patients. A salient feature of JMML is their frequent association with predisposition syndromes such as Noonan syndrome, neurofibromatosis and CBL syndrome, which are developmental diseases associated with a constitutional RAS pathway deregulation, now grouped under the name RASopathies. Clinical heterogeneity makes JMML diagnosis difficult. Splenomagaly is the most constant sign. Palor, adenopathy, respiratory or cutaneous symptoms can also be present. Blood smear shows monocytosis (>1×10(9)/L) presence of myeloid progenitors and abnormal basophils. The demonstration of an endogeneous in vitro growth of myeloid progenitors although not very specific can help JMML diagnosis. Nowadays, genetic typing has to be included in the workup of JMML diagnosis and allows to evidence a mutation in more than 90% of cases. JMML have a poor prognosis. The only curative treatment is bone marrow transplantation but approximately 35% of patients relapse. JMML clinical course is highly heterogeneous and unpredictable. Some rare patients have an indolent evolution or even spontaneous remission. Age over two years, thrombopenia below 33×10(9)/L and high foetal hemoglobin (HbF) level for age are poor prognosis criteria but hardly predict individual outcome. Several research directions are currently being explored to improve prognosis prediction and provide more effective targeted treatments. PMID:24691193

Lachenaud, Julie; Strullu, Marion; Baruchel, André; Cavé, Hélène

2014-03-01

254

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile polyposis syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... and symptoms of the disorder. Juvenile polyposis of infancy is characterized by polyps that occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract during infancy. Juvenile polyposis of infancy is the most severe ...

255

Ill thrift and juvenile llama immunodeficiency syndrome.  

PubMed

The problem of "ill thrift" or "failure to thrive" in juvenile llamas is widespread and relatively common in the continental United States. Juvenile llama immunodeficiency syndrome (JLIDS) is one of several causes of the problem and is the most common cause of ill thrift in juvenile llamas evaluated at Colorado State University's Veterinary Teaching Hospital. This article will review current knowledge of JLIDS and will briefly discuss other causes of ill thrift in juvenile llamas. PMID:7953965

Hutchison, J M; Garry, F

1994-07-01

256

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has recently placed an item of interest online. This item, from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention (OJJDP), is the 1999 national report on Juvenile Offenders and Victims, "the most comprehensive source of information about juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and about the response of the juvenile justice system to these problems." The report is offered in seven chapters in .pdf format.

Sickmund, Melissa.; Snyder, Howard N.

257

Factors Affecting Attitudes Toward Juvenile Sex Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment amenability were negative. No differences in attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders were found between those who had

Kimberly J. Sahlstrom; Elizabeth L. Jeglic

2008-01-01

258

Counseling Juvenile Offenders in Institutional Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews several aspects of counseling services for institutionalized juvenile offenders. The six articles include studies on the functional analysis of behavior in detention, vocational and social rehabilitation, the impact of a juvenile awareness program on personality traits, and the effectiveness of a juvenile transition center. (JAC)

Chaneles, Sol, Ed.

1982-01-01

259

Juvenile Offenders' Perceptions of the Counseling Relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study was to explore juvenile offenders' perceptions of the counseling relationship. Eight juvenile offenders who were on probation under the jurisdiction of a juvenile court participated in the study. Using a phenomenological methodology, two interviews with each participant were conducted in order to obtain participants' full descriptions of the phenomenon of the counseling relationship. The main

John Ryals

2003-01-01

260

A giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.  

PubMed

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are locally growing and highly vascular tumors. They are primarily treated through surgical excision ranging from an open approach to an endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old man with a giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma that bilaterally obliterated the pterygopalatine fossa, invaded the sphenoid bone, and extended to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically using the endoscopic approach and declared cured and discharged without any complications. PMID:23714961

Yüce, Salim; Uysal, Ismail Önder; Do?an, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; Salk, Ismail; Müderris, Suphi

2013-05-01

261

Mobilizing Communities To Prevent Juvenile Crime. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through Title V Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Programs (Community Prevention Grants), the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) allocated $20 million in fiscal year 1997 to states to complement law enforcement and justice system efforts by helping local communities foster strong families and nurture…

Bownes, Donna; Ingersoll, Sarah

262

Prevention of Serious and Violent Juvenile Offending. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin explores the proximal risk factors for juvenile offending, reviews the early developmental precursors to violent offending, and summarizes approaches to prevention. It also discusses components of intervention programs, limitations of single-focus prevention, examples of multi systemic interventions, and limitations of prevention…

Wasserman, Gail A.; Miller, Laurie S.; Cothern, Lynn

263

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). Corrective A...

2006-01-01

264

Peptides with juvenile hormone activity.  

PubMed

Peptide derivatives of juvenile hormone analogs which show substantial hormonal activity for certain insects were prepared. The most active compound, L-isoleucyl-L-alanyl-p-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, was up to twice as active as juvabione. Like juvabione, the peptide analog showed selective action on pyrrhocorid bugs. PMID:5452900

Zaoral, M; Sláma, K

1970-10-01

265

Peptides with Juvenile Hormone Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peptide derivatives of juvenile hormone analogs which show substantial hormonal activity for certain insects were prepared. The most active compound, L-isoleucyl-L-alanyl-p-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, was up to twice as active as juvabione. Like juvabione, the peptide analog showed selective action on pyrrhocorid bugs.

M. Zaoral; K. Slama

1970-01-01

266

Juveniles and the Death Penalty.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The appropriateness of the death penalty for juveniles is the subject of intense debate despite Supreme Court decisions upholding its use. Although nearly half the States allow those who commit capital crimes as 16- and 17-year-olds to be sentenced to dea...

J. J. Wilson

2000-01-01

267

Juvenile Justice and Substance Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laurie Chassin focuses on the elevated prevalence of substance use disorders among young offenders in the juvenile justice system and on efforts by the justice system to provide treatment for these disorders. She emphasizes the importance of diagnosing and treating these disorders, which are linked both with continued offending and with a broad…

Chassin, Laurie

2008-01-01

268

Juvenile Delinquency Probation Caseload, 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Courts with juvenile jurisdiction handled 1.7 million delinquency cases in 2007. Probation supervision was the most severe disposition in 34% (561,600) of all delinquency cases. The number of cases placed on probation grew 34% between 1985 and 2007. Durin...

S. Livsey

2010-01-01

269

Juvenile offenders and mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author reviews the significance of the presence of mental illnesses to the juvenile justice system. He acknowledges the absence of a satisfactory system for classifying mental disorders among children and adolescents and sketches what so far is known about certain childhood disorders which appear to have a special significance for delinquent behaviour. He reviews studies on the overlap between

Thomas Grisso

1999-01-01

270

Juvenile Parricide: A Predictable Offense?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The act of juvenile parricide is a rare crime, but one that is highly publicized and generates much public outrage. Due to it being an offense that has a very low base rate, predicting its occurrence is extremely difficult, if not impossible. The purpose of this study was to assess the predictive utility of both the Structured Assessment of Violence

Thomas M. Evans; Meghan McGovern-Kondik; Franco Peric

2005-01-01

271

Juvenile Criminals: Who Are They?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many adolescents who were born in the late 1970s and 1980s in Russia became juvenile criminals due to the change in the social structure, the proclamation of the values of the comfortable way of life, the institution of property ownership and so forth. Many young people have to help relatives who are in need, and this as well often causes them to…

Antonov, A. I.; Lebed, O. L.

2005-01-01

272

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act. RAND Quarterly Report, October 2008. TR-621-LACPD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In July 2008, RAND Corporation staff conducted Correctional Program Checklist (CPC) assessments of five home-based programs (Asian Youth Center, Communities in Schools, Inter-Agency Drug Abuse Recovery Programs, Soledad Enrichment Action, and Stars Behavioral Health Group) as part of its ongoing evaluation of Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

2008-01-01

273

Juveniles' Competence to Stand Trial: A Comparison of Adolescents' and Adults' Capacities as Trial Defendants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abilities associated with adjudicative competence were assessed among 927 adolescents in juvenile detention facilities and community settings. Adolescents' abilities were compared to those of 466 young adults in jails and in the community. Participants at 4 locations across the United States completed a standardized measure of abilities relevant for competence to stand trial (the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool—Criminal Adjudication) as

Thomas Grisso; Laurence Steinberg; Jennifer Woolard; Elizabeth Cauffman; Elizabeth Scott; Sandra Graham; Fran Lexcen; N. Dickon Reppucci; Robert Schwartz

2003-01-01

274

Silence in the Court and Testimony Behind Bars Juvenile Defendants and the French Judicial System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article addresses salient questions in literature and anthropology centring on the politics of writing, readership and representation in a context marked by highly charged public debates on the nature, causes and perpetrators of youth violence. It critically examines and juxtaposes two sets of texts, one set produced by incarcerated youths in a writing workshop at a juvenile detention facility

Andrew Sobanet; Susan Terrio

2005-01-01

275

Academic Potential Among African American Adolescents in Juvenile Detention Centers: Implications for Reentry to School  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study explores Black adolescent detainees' academic potential and motivation to return to school, to inform best practices and policies for juvenile reentry to educational settings. Adolescent detainees (N = 1,576) who were recruited from 1 male and 1 female youth detention facility, responded to surveys that assessed postdetention educational plans, as well as social and emotional characteristics, and criminal history. Multivariate

Ivory A. Toldson; Kamilah M. Woodson; Ronald Braithwaite; Rhonda C. Holliday; Mario De La Rosa

2010-01-01

276

Juveniles' competence to stand trial: a comparison of adolescents' and adults' capacities as trial defendants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abilities associated with adjudicative competence were assessed among 927 adolescents in juvenile detention facilities and community settings. Adolescents' abilities were compared to those of 466 young adults in jails and in the community. Participants at 4 locations across the United States completed a standardized measure of abilities relevant for competence to stand trial (the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool--Criminal Adjudication) as

Thomas Grisso; Laurence Steinberg; Jennifer Woolard; Elizabeth Cauffman; Elizabeth Scott; Sandra Graham; Frances J. Lexcen; N. Dickon Reppucci; Robert Schwartz

2003-01-01

277

Post-Construction Evaluation of the Juvenile Bypass System at John Day Dam, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The John Day Dam juvenile salmonid sampling facility and bypass system reconstruction was completed and ready for operation in April 1998, at the beginning of the spring outmigration. This bypass system is similar to others on the Snake and Columbia River...

D. A. Brege J. W. Ferguson R. F. Absolon

2000-01-01

278

Classification of Severe Male Juvenile Offenders Using the MACI Clinical and Personality Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classifications for severe juvenile offenders and ones that include mental health needs are lacking. Thus, in this study, adolescent male offenders (N = 652) committed to a residential facility were clustered on personality and clinical scales of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (Millon, 1993) into 5 groups (including 4 found in other…

Taylor, Jeanette; Kemper, Therese Skubic; Loney, Bryan R.; Kistner, Janet A.

2006-01-01

279

Development of external and neutrally buoyant acoustic transmitters for juvenile salmon turbine passage evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fish can sustain injury or mortality when they pass through hydroelectric facilities. To develop a method to monitor the passage and survival of juvenile salmonids without bias through turbines within the Federal Columbia River Power System, we developed and fabricated two designs of neutrally buoyant transmitters: Type A (sutured to the dorsal musculature of the fish anterior to the dorsal

Z. Daniel Deng; Jayson J. Martinez; Alison H. Colotelo; Tylor K. Abel; Andrea P. LeBarge; Richard S. Brown; Brett D. Pflugrath; Robert P. Mueller; Thomas J. Carlson; Adam G. Seaburg; Robert L. Johnson; Martin L. Ahmann

280

Differences in the Dispositional Empathy of Juvenile Sex Offenders, Non-Sex-Offending Delinquent Juveniles, and Nondelinquent Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Differences in dispositional empathy between juvenile sex offenders, non-sex-offending delinquent juveniles, and nondelinquent juveniles were explored controlling for age and race. Participants were 81 males ranging in age from 13 to 18 from a southwestern state. Their scores on Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) were analyzed using a one-way randomized block multivariate analysis of variance. Postomnibus analyses included mean vector

RALPH E. LINDSEY; ALFRED F. CARLOZZI; GREGORY T. EELLS

2001-01-01

281

Juvenile Delinquency: Symptom or Syndrome?  

PubMed Central

Dr. Stephenson discusses juvenile delinquency as a symptom of a variety of underlying problems, a syndrome or a disease entity. She describes research carried out in Vancouver in which multiple factors were found to be concerned, with three major types of delinquents identified. Delinquency is seen to be a symptom of relatively healthy adolescent development, of social disturbance or emotional disturbance. The research was supported by National Health Grant 609-7-194.

Stephenson, P. Susan

1972-01-01

282

Nephrotic syndrome and juvenile dermatomyositis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by proximal muscle weakness, skin lesions, gastro\\u000a intestinal, pulmonary, cardiac and small nerve damage. Renal involvement has been rarely reported in JDM. This is the report\\u000a of a 7-year-old boy presented with nephrotic syndrome (NS) and subsequent renal failure. Clinical manifestations of JDM appeared\\u000a gradually. Renal manifestations could be considered as

Azar Nickavar; Mitra Mehr azma

283

The Effect of Job Involvement on Correctional Staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

The driving force of corrections is the staff of correctional facilities. It is important to understand how the work environment shapes the attitudes of correctional staff; yet, the effect of job involvement on correctional employees has received little, if any, attention. Most of the research to date has focused on job stress and job satisfaction among correctional staff. Only recently

Eric G. Lambert

284

Swimming behaviour of juvenile Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata  

SciTech Connect

Actively migrating juvenile Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata Richardson, 1836) were collected from hydroelectric bypass facilities in the Columbia River and transferred to the laboratory to study their diel movement patterns and swimming ability. Volitional movement of lamprey was restricted mainly to night, with 94% of all swimming activity occurring during the 12-hr dark period. Burst speed of juvenile lamprey ranged from 56 to 94 cm/s with a mean of 71 ±5 cm/s or an average speed of 5.2 body lengths (BL)/s. Sustained swim speed for 5-min test intervals ranged from 0 to 46 cm/s with a median of 23 cm/s. Critical swimming speed was 36.0±10.0 cm/s and 2.4±0.6 BL/s. There was no significant relationship between fish length and critical swimming speed. Overall swimming performance of juvenile Pacific lamprey is low compared to that of most anadromous teleosts. Their poor swimming ability provides a challenge during the freshwater migration interval to the Pacific Ocean.

Dauble, Dennis D.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

2006-02-01

285

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites

2000-01-01

286

Runaway Juvenile Crime? The Context of Juvenile Arrests in America. Research in Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Violent and Repeat Juvenile Offender Act of 1997 (S-10) was to be debated in the Senate in spring 1998. This bill would blur the distinction between juvenile and adult criminal systems, making it easier to imprison children as young as 14. Supporters of S-10 were citing statistics to indicate that juvenile crime was on the rise. In fact, the…

Ziedenberg, Jason; Schiraldi, Vincent

287

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME, TASK FORCE REPORT, REPORT ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CONSULTANTS PAPERS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF THE JUVENILE COURT SYSTEM AND THE PREVENTION OF DELINQUENCY. THE COMMISSION'S RECOMMENDATIONS ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY INCLUDE THE AREAS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, HOUSING AND RECREATION, FAMILIES, INVOLVING YOUTHS IN COMMUNITY LIFE, SCHOOLS, AND EMPLOYMENT. THE APPENDIXES, WHICH CONSTITUTE THE…

President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.

288

National Implications in Juvenile Justice: The Influence of Juvenile Mentoring Programs on At Risk Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1972 the federal government created the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act that procured funding for various governmental programs to combat the sudden increase in juvenile crime. A provision of this Act set out the creation of mentoring programs to help decrease the juvenile crime rate and dropout rates in secondary schools. This…

Belshaw, Scott H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

2007-01-01

289

Juvenile offenders: competence to stand trial.  

PubMed

This article details the legal background and assists the reader in the preparation and practical conduct of evaluations regarding juvenile adjudicative competency. The material is presented to be useful as a guide to direct questions of competency and covers aspects of evaluation that include: legal standard for competency to stand trial, developmental immaturity, current practice in juvenile competency to stand trial, forensic evaluation of juvenile competency to stand trial, organizing the evaluation, collateral sources of information, psychiatric evaluation of juvenile adjudicative competency, assessment of mental disorder and intellectual disability, assessment of developmental status, assessment of functional abilities for adjudicative competence, and reaching the forensic opinion. PMID:23107566

Soulier, Matthew

2012-12-01

290

Jitter Correction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Jitter_Correct.m is a MATLAB function that automatically measures and corrects inter-frame jitter in an image sequence to a user-specified precision. In addition, the algorithm dynamically adjusts the image sample size to increase the accuracy of the measurement. The Jitter_Correct.m function takes an image sequence with unknown frame-to-frame jitter and computes the translations of each frame (column and row, in pixels) relative to a chosen reference frame with sub-pixel accuracy. The translations are measured using a Cross Correlation Fourier transformation method in which the relative phase of the two transformed images is fit to a plane. The measured translations are then used to correct the inter-frame jitter of the image sequence. The function also dynamically expands the image sample size over which the cross-correlation is measured to increase the accuracy of the measurement. This increases the robustness of the measurement to variable magnitudes of inter-frame jitter

Waegell, Mordecai J.; Palacios, David M.

2011-01-01

291

Child Welfare, the Private Sector, and Community-Based Corrections  

Microsoft Academic Search

After more than a decade of carrying out a community-based juvenile correctional policy, it is useful to stand back and gain perspective on how this policy has been implemented. From national data the following facts about implementation are readily apparent: Implementation is strongly associated with private sector dominance; alternatives are linked to the child welfare system, as well as the

Paul Lerman

1984-01-01

292

Time to Reframe Politics and Practices in Correctional Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this chapter, Stefan LoBuglio discusses the politics and practices of educational programs for adults in correctional facilities. To begin, LoBuglio provides an overview of the field of corrections, including various types of facilities and correctional programs, as well as demographic and educational data on the U.S. incarcerated population…

LoBuglio, Stefan

2001-01-01

293

Seven Juvenile Delinquents--Case Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven case studies are presented to further research on juvenile problems and to clarify existing juvenile problems. These seven were all inmates of the same institution at the same time, and were selected case studies--neither the best nor the worst. They were all interviewed inside the penal institution. The first oart asked each about the…

Williams, Michael C., Sr.; Starkey, John D.

294

Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

2004-01-01

295

Juvenile Obesity, Physical Activity, and Lifestyle Changes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because many obese children become obese adults, the recent rapid increase in juvenile obesity poses a major public health challenge. Enhanced physical activity is a cornerstone in a multidisciplinary approach to preventing and treating juvenile obesity. Giving exercise recommendations focused for obese youth is critical. Cutting down on sedentary…

Bar-Or, Oded

2000-01-01

296

Human Services Study. Report on Juvenile Justice.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Juvenile justice is considered as one component of the countywide human services planning program of the Johnson County Regional Planning Commission in Iowa. The report on juvenile justice is one in a series of eight reports describing the program. The ov...

1977-01-01

297

Juvenile Offender Comprehensive Reentry Substance Abuse Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature provides ample evidence of the relationship of substance abuse to crime. Research over the last 20 years has established a strong correlation between substance abuse and juvenile delinquency (held, 1998). Currently, there are more than 350,000 juveniles on probation and in continuing care programs in the U.S. who have substance…

Watson, Donnie W.

2004-01-01

298

Moral Development of Solo Juvenile Sex Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral…

Van Vugt, Eveline; Stams, Geert Jan; Dekovic, Maja; Brugman, Daan; Rutten, Esther; Hendriks, Jan

2008-01-01

299

Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Juvenile Sex Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment…

Sahlstrom, Kimberly J.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

2008-01-01

300

School Security and Rights of Juveniles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After introductory sections on the incidence of crime among juveniles and in the schools, the author concentrates on the rights of students in the schools and in the courts. He traces the historical development of juvenile courts from their original intentions up to the Supreme Court decisions that have granted substantial civil liberties to…

Smith, Charles Z.

301

Juvenile hormone regulation of Drosophila aging  

PubMed Central

Background Juvenile hormone (JH) has been demonstrated to control adult lifespan in a number of non-model insects where surgical removal of the corpora allata eliminates the hormone’s source. In contrast, little is known about how juvenile hormone affects adult Drosophila melanogaster. Previous work suggests that insulin signaling may modulate Drosophila aging in part through its impact on juvenile hormone titer, but no data yet address whether reduction of juvenile hormone is sufficient to control Drosophila life span. Here we adapt a genetic approach to knock out the corpora allata in adult Drosophila melanogaster and characterize adult life history phenotypes produced by reduction of juvenile hormone. With this system we test potential explanations for how juvenile hormone modulates aging. Results A tissue specific driver inducing an inhibitor of a protein phosphatase was used to ablate the corpora allata while permitting normal development of adult flies. Corpora allata knockout adults had greatly reduced fecundity, inhibited oogenesis, impaired adult fat body development and extended lifespan. Treating these adults with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene restored all traits toward wildtype. Knockout females remained relatively long-lived even when crossed into a genotype that blocked all egg production. Dietary restriction further extended the lifespan of knockout females. In an analysis of expression profiles of knockout females in fertile and sterile backgrounds, about 100 genes changed in response to loss of juvenile hormone independent of reproductive state. Conclusions Reduced juvenile hormone alone is sufficient to extend the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. Reduced juvenile hormone limits reproduction by inhibiting the production of yolked eggs, and this may arise because juvenile hormone is required for the post-eclosion development of the vitellogenin-producing adult fat body. Our data do not support a mechanism for juvenile hormone control of longevity simply based on reducing the physiological costs of egg production. Nor does the longevity benefit appear to function through mechanisms by which dietary restriction extends longevity. We identify transcripts that change in response to juvenile hormone independent of reproductive state and suggest these represent somatically expressed genes that could modulate how juvenile hormone controls persistence and longevity.

2013-01-01

302

The color of juvenile justice: Racial disparities in dispositional decisions.  

PubMed

Existing research on dispositional decisions typically models the outcome as merely placed or not placed. However, this does not accurately reflect the wide variation in residential options available to juvenile court actors. In this research, we combine data from ProDES, which tracks adjudicated youth in Philadelphia, with data from the Program Design Inventory, which describes over 100 intervention programs, to further examine the factors that influence court actors' decision making in selecting an appropriate program for a juvenile offender. We find that even after controlling for legal and needs-based factors, race continues to exert a significant influence, with decision makers being significantly more likely to commit minority youth to facilities using physical regimen as their primary modality and reserving smaller, therapeutic facilities for their white counterparts. Using focal concerns theory as an explanatory lens, we suggest that court actors in this jurisdiction employ a racialized perceptual shorthand of youthful offenders that attributes both higher levels of blame and lower evaluations of reformability to minority youth. PMID:24468439

Fader, Jamie J; Kurlychek, Megan C; Morgan, Kirstin A

2014-03-01

303

Juvenile delinquency and adolescent fatherhood.  

PubMed

This study examined ecological risk factors associated with teen paternity in a sample of 2,931 male adolescents coming to the attention of juvenile courts across five midwestern counties. In contrast to previous studies documenting significantly higher rates of teen paternity among African American youth, we found that the European American court-involved youth in our sample were as likely to be teen fathers as their African American counterparts. However, an in-depth examination of the social ecologies of these court-involved youth revealed significant racial differences (regardless of the paternity status), with African American males reporting more prior offenses, delinquent peer associations, traumatic pasts, risky sexual behaviors, and educational risks as compared to European American youth, who reported greater involvement in substance use. Furthermore, logistic regression analyses revealed that after controlling for age and racial background, youth who reported greater exposure to trauma and prior offenses had significantly greater odds of having fathered a child. Surprisingly, youth who were teen fathers reported lower rates of behavioral problems as compared to their nonfathering peers. Given the cross-sectional nature of our data, interpretation of this result is limited. Overall, our findings underscore the need for developing a comprehensive understanding of the ecological risk and protective factors present in the lives of teen fathers coming in contact with the juvenile justice system, as an essential first step in designing effective and relevant intervention programs and services for this at-risk population. PMID:20508087

Khurana, Atika; Gavazzi, Stephen M

2011-08-01

304

Genetic heterogeneity in juvenile NCL  

SciTech Connect

The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of related lysosomal storage diseases classified according to the age of onset, clinical syndrome, and pathology. The clinical syndromes include myoclonus, visual failure, progressive dementia, ataxia and generalized tonic clonic seizures in varying combinations depending on the age of onset and pathology. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive in most cases, except for several families with the adult form (Kufs` disease) which have autosomal dominant inheritance. Linkage for the infantile (Halatia-Santavuori) form (CLN1), characterized ultrastructurally by lysosomal granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD), has been demonstrated with markers on chromosome lp, while the gene for the typical juvenile (Spielmeyer-Vogt) form (CLN3), characterized by fingerprint-profile inclusions, has been linked to chromosome 16p. The gene locations of the late infantile (Jansky-Bielschowsky) and adult (Kufs` disease) forms are unknown, although it has recently been shown that the late infantile form does not link to chromosome 16p. We describe three siblings, including a pair of monozygotic twins, with juvenile onset NCL with GROD in whom linkage to the CLN3 region of chromsome 16p has been excluded. This would suggest that there is genetic heterogeneity not only among the different clinical syndromes, but also among identical clinical syndromes with different ultrastructural characteristics. Preliminary studies of linkage to chromosome 1p employing the microsatellite marker HY-TM1 have been uninformative. Further studies with other chromosome 1 markers are underway.

Hart, Y.M.; Andermann, E.; Mitchison, H.M. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

1994-09-01

305

Management of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.  

PubMed

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common form of epilepsy and a fairly lifelong disorder that may significantly lower a patient's expectations and potential for a full life. Luckily, it is also a highly treatable disorder, and up to 85% of patients with JME will enjoy satisfactory seizure control. Among anticonvulsants, valproate still stands out as the most efficacious drug, but may be poorly tolerated by some, and is considered unsafe for the fetuses of pregnant women. Alternatives have emerged in recent years, especially levetiracetam, but also topiramate, zonisamide or lamotrigine. In some cases, combination therapy may be useful or even required. One should not forget the potential aggravation induced not only by some commonly used anticonvulsants, especially carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, but also, in some patients, by lamotrigine. In special settings, older drugs like benzodiazepines and barbiturates may be useful. But the management of JME should also include intervention in lifestyle, with strict avoidance of sleep deprivation and the management of copathologies, including the cognitive and psychiatric problems that are often encountered. With adequate management, there will only remain a small proportion of patients with uncontrolled epilepsy and all of its related problems. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a condition in which the clinician has a fair chance of significantly helping the patient with medication and counseling. PMID:23756489

Crespel, Arielle; Gelisse, Philippe; Reed, Ronald C; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Jerney, Judith; Schmitz, Bettina; Genton, Pierre

2013-07-01

306

Family transitions and juvenile delinquency.  

PubMed

There is a large body of research that shows children from non-intact homes show higher rates of juvenile delinquency than children from intact homes, partially due to weaker parental control and supervision in non-intact homes. What has not been adequately addressed in the research is the influence of changes in family structure among individual adolescents over time on delinquent offending. Using the first and third waves of the National Youth Study, we assess the effect of family structure changes on changes in delinquent offending between waves through the intermediate process of changes in family time and parental attachment. Although prior research has documented adolescents in broken homes are more delinquent than youth in intact homes, the process of family dissolution is not associated with concurrent increases in offending. In contrast, family formation through marriage or cohabitation is associated with simultaneous increases in offending. Changes in family time and parental attachment account for a portion of the family formation effect on delinquency, and prior parental attachment and juvenile offending significantly condition the effect of family formation on offending. PMID:20879178

Schroeder, Ryan D; Osgood, Aurea K; Oghia, Michael J

2010-01-01

307

An Evaluation for System-Provided Library Services to State Correctional Centers in Illinois.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This comprehensive evaluation report is based on site visits to 13 adult and 8 juvenile correctional centers and interviews with library staff, prison staff, and residents in 1982. An introduction presents a historical overview of library services to Illinois correctional institutions, a literature review, and a discussion of the methodology of…

Rubin, Rhea Joyce; And Others

308

Reviving Juvenile Justice in a Get-Tough Era  

Microsoft Academic Search

State and local jurisdictions throughout the United States enacted a wide array of new juvenile justice policies in recent years. Many of these policies were intended to make the juvenile justice system tougher, but others improved prevention, increased reha- bilitation, and enhanced the restorative features of the juvenile justice system. This article describes the most prominent new ideas in juvenile

JEFFREY A. BUTTS; DANIEL P. MEARS

2001-01-01

309

Juveniles' Waiver of Rights: Legal and Psychological Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Grisso, T. (1981). Juveniles' waiver of rights: Legal and psychological competence. New York: Plenum. (Volume 3 of Perspectives in law & psychology)\\u000aSummary: This volume explores the competence of juveniles to waive rights to silence and legal counsel. It is based on a review of issues in juvenile law and procedure concerning the interrogation of juveniles and the validity

Thomas Grisso

1981-01-01

310

Challenging the Myths: 1999 National Report Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin, extracted from "Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report," examines juvenile crime statistics, demonstrating that the predictions in the early 1990s of the emergence of juvenile superpredators (juveniles for whom violence is a way of life) is not supported by current data. Research indicates that levels of predatory…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

311

24 CFR 570.910 - Corrective and remedial actions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT...HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS ...corrective actions, including the correction or removal of the causes...

2013-04-01

312

Chemical Evolution of the Juvenile Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Models of average Galactic chemical abundances are in good general agreement with observations for [Fe/H] > -1.5, but there are gross discrepancies at lower metallicities. Only massive stars contribute to the chemical evolution of the `juvenile universe' corresponding to [Fe/H] <~ -1.5. If Type II supernovae (SNe II) are the only relevant sources, then the abundances in the interstellar medium of the juvenile epoch are simply the sum of different SN II contributions. Both low-mass (~8-11 Msolar) and normal (~12-25 Msolar) SNe II produce neutron stars, which have intense neutrino-driven winds in their nascent stages. These winds produce elements such as Sr, Y and Zr through charged-particle reactions (CPR). Such elements are often called the `light r-process elements', but are considered here as products of CPR and not the r process. The observed absence of production of the low-A elements (Na through Zn including Fe) when the true r-process elements (Ba and above) are produced requires that only low-mass SNe II be the site if the r process occurs in SNe II. Normal SNe II produce the CPR elements in addition to the low-A elements. This results in a two-component model that is quantitatively successful in explaining the abundances of all elements relative to hydrogen for -3 <~ [Fe/H] <~ -1.5. This model explicitly predicts that [Sr/Fe] >= -0.32. Recent observations show that there are stars with [Sr/Fe] <~ -2 and [Fe/H] < -3. This proves that the two-component model is not correct and that a third component is necessary to explain the observations. The production of CPR elements associated with the formation of neutron stars requires that the third component must be massive stars ending as black holes. It is concluded that stars of ~25-50 Msolar (possibly up to ~100 Msolar) are the appropriate candidates. These produce hypernovae (HNe) that have very high Fe yields and are observed today. Stars of ~140-260 Msolar are completely disrupted upon explosion. However, they produce an abundance pattern greatly deficient in elements of odd atomic numbers, which is not observed, and therefore they are not considered as a source here. Using a Salpeter initial mass function, it is shown that HNe are a source of Fe that far outweighs normal SNe II, with the former and the latter contributing ~24% and ~9% of the solar Fe abundance, respectively. It follows that the usual assignment of AS08058_IE1.gif of the solar Fe abundance to normal SNe II is not correct. This leads to a simple three-component model including low-mass and normal SNe II and HNe, which gives a good description of essentially all the data for stars with [Fe/H] <~ -1.5. We conclude that HNe are more important than normal SNe II in the chemical evolution of the low-A elements from Na through Zn (including Fe), in sharp distinction to earlier models.

Wasserburg, G. J.; Qian, Y.-Z.

2009-09-01

313

Law & psychiatry: punishing juveniles who kill.  

PubMed

Punishment of juvenile murderers forces policy makers to weigh the developmental immaturity of adolescents against the heinousness of their crimes. The U.S. Supreme Court has progressively limited the severity of punishments that can be imposed on juveniles, holding that their impulsivity, susceptibility to peer pressure, and more fluid character render them less culpable for their actions. Having eliminated the death penalty as a punishment, the Court recently struck down mandatory life sentences without prospect of parole. The decision is interesting for its emphasis on rehabilitation, opening the door to further restrictions on punitive sentences for juveniles-and perhaps for adults too. PMID:23032673

Appelbaum, Paul S

2012-10-01

314

[Juvenile papillomatosis of the breast].  

PubMed

The PJ, introduced by Rosen in the 1980, is a benign and localized mammary lesion in female under 30 years old. The most important clinical and histological features are: Diagnosis in juvenile age. A mass clinically localized. A nodule with histologic features of cyst, benign hyperplasia of ductal epithelium and galactophorus ducts dilatation (Swiss cheese disease). There is a correlation between patients with PJ and breast cancer there is an increment of breast cancer in familirs of patients with PJ. There is an increment of the risk to develop a K in situ in patients with PJ and apocrine metaplasia and/or adenomatosis and/or atypical mastoplasia. We describe the diffuse PJ in a girl of 23 years old from the 1996 to 2002. PMID:12870277

Noccioli, P; Grossi, S; D'Aulerio, A; Tavoletta, S; Imbriglio, G; Cianchetti, E

2003-01-01

315

Pathways and Predictors of Juvenile Justice Involvement for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Youths: A Focus on Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the growth of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) youths in court and correctional involvement, studies of their delinquency and juvenile justice involvement are quite limited, and the literature becomes almost nonexistent when examining gender differences. Using case file analysis of 150 Native Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian and…

Pasko, Lisa; Mayeda, David T.

2011-01-01

316

An overview of institutions for juvenile offenders in the Netherlands and their place within the Dutch system of justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: This paper provides the reader with a concise overview of juvenile correctional institutions in The Netherlands. These institutions are operated by either state? or private?sector entities as detention centers (providing temporary custody) or remedial centers (when extended treatment is needed). The Netherlands is in the midst of significant changes in its population makeup which have had a corresponding effect

Mike Carlie

1997-01-01

317

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to

K. B. Campbell

2002-01-01

318

Conceptualizing juvenile prostitution as child maltreatment: findings from the National Juvenile Prostitution Study.  

PubMed

Two studies were conducted to identify the incidence (Study 1) and characteristics (Study 2) of juvenile prostitution cases known to law enforcement agencies in the United States. Study 1 revealed a national estimate of 1,450 arrests or detentions (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1,287-1,614) in cases involving juvenile prostitution during a 1-year period. In Study 2, exploratory data were collected from a subsample of 138 cases from police records in 2005. The cases are broadly categorized into three main types: (a) third-party exploiters, (b) solo prostitution, and (c) conventional child sexual abuse (CSA) with payment. Cases were classified into three initial categories based on police orientation toward the juvenile: (a) juveniles as victims (53%), (b) juveniles as delinquents (31%), and (c) juvenile as both victims and delinquents (16%). When examining the status of the juveniles by case type, the authors found that all the juveniles in CSA with payment cases were treated as victims, 66% in third-party exploiters cases, and 11% in solo cases. Findings indicate law enforcement responses to juvenile prostitution are influential in determining whether such youth are viewed as victims of commercial sexual exploitation or as delinquents. PMID:19926628

Mitchell, Kimberly J; Finkelhor, David; Wolak, Janis

2010-02-01

319

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site's Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 342. The scope of this document consists of the following: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit.

DOE /NV

1999-05-26

320

Corrections, the Public Safety, and Offenders' Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the institutional mission and characteristics of local, state, and federal corrections facilities. Reviews the rights of prisoners and considers the interlocking components of a successful rehabilitation effort. Reports on future correctional issues such as in-house substance abuse programs and the aging of the prison population. (MJP)

Quinlan, J. Michael

1997-01-01

321

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile Batten disease  

MedlinePLUS

... not show signs and symptoms of the condition. Where can I find information about diagnosis or management ... genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook. Where can I find additional information about juvenile Batten ...

322

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... about 12 times that of the general population. Where can I find information about diagnosis or management ... genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook. Where can I find additional information about juvenile idiopathic ...

323

Habitat Suitability Index Models: Juvenile Spot.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop an estuarine habitat model for juvenile spot (Leiostomus xanthurus). The model is scaled to produce an index of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) and 1 (optimally suitabl...

R. R. Stickney M. L. Cuenco

1982-01-01

324

Youth Gangs: An Overview. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proliferation of youth gangs since 1980 has fueled the public's fear and magnified possible misconceptions about youth gangs. To address the mounting concern about youth gangs, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has init...

1998-01-01

325

Changes to OJJDP's Juvenile Accountability Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A recently enacted federal law restructures the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Preventions (OJJDPs) funding activity, introducing a number of significant changes that take effect in fiscal year 2004 (beginning October 1, 2003). Among these cha...

C. Andrews L. Marble

2003-01-01

326

Juvenile Mentoring Program: A Progress Review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many valuable lessons have been learned since the implementation of OJJDPs Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP) in 1996. This Bulletin lists the parameters under which the current 164 JUMP projects operate and describes the scope and methodology of JUMPs ong...

E. Mertinko J. Lange L. C. Novotney T. K. Baker

2000-01-01

327

Evaluation of Juveniles' Competence to Stand Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Kruh, I., & Grisso, T. (2008). Evaluation of juveniles’ competence to stand trial. In series: Best Practices in Forensic Mental Health Assessment. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195323076, 9780195323078.\\u000aSummary: Forensic mental health assessment has grown into a specialization informed by research and professional guidelines. This volume addresses best approaches to practice for evaluations in the juvenile\\/family area.

Ivan Kruh; Thomas Grisso

2008-01-01

328

Moral development of solo juvenile sex offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13–19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral judgement was assessed with the Sociomoral Reflection Measure –

Eveline Van Vugt; Geert Jan Stams; Maja Dekovic; Daan Brugman; Esther Rutten; Jan Hendriks

2008-01-01

329

Juvenile Probation Officers’ Mental Health Decision Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed case records for 583 juvenile delinquency intakes in four county juvenile probation offices; 14.4% were receiving\\u000a mental health or substance use services at case opening, and 24.9% were newly identified during probation contact. Youths\\u000a were significantly more likely to be newly identified if they were repeat offenders, if their probation officer knew more\\u000a about mental health and if

Gail A. Wasserman; Larkin S. McReynolds; Andria L. Whited; Joseph M. Keating; Hana Musabegovic; Yanling Huo

2008-01-01

330

Juvenile Stature Estimation: A Chilean Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Limited analysis has been conducted for estimating stature derived from the long bone lengths of juvenile skeletons. Juvenile\\u000a stature estimation can be particularly useful in the forensic setting, which may have applications for use as a proxy for\\u000a nutritional health. Stature equations developed by Ruff (Am J Phys Anthropol 133:698–716, 2007) and Smith (J Forensic Sci\\u000a 52:538–546, 2007) derived from

Rebecca Sutphin; Ann H. Ross

331

Post-Construction Evaluation of the New Juvenile Bypass System and Guidance Screen Modifications at John Day Dam, 1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Modifications to the John Day Dam juvenile salmonid sampling facility and bypass system were completed and the system was ready for operation in April 1998, at the beginning of the spring outmigration. This bypass system is similar to others on the Snake ...

B. P. Sandford D. B. Dey R. F. Absolon

2000-01-01

332

Report and Recommendations of the Governor's Task Force on the Mental Health of Juvenile Offenders. Final Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Governor's Task Force on the Mental Health of Juvenile Offenders in the state of Pennsylvania conducted a statewide survey of facilities for the care, treatment, and rehabilitation of adolescents between 12 and 18 years of age. The Task Force surveyed mental hospitals, community-based services, private psychiatric treatment centers, youth…

Pennsylvania State Dept. of Public Welfare, Harrisburg.

333

A synopsis of ‘hydropeaking’ studies on the response of juvenile Atlantic salmon to experimental flow alteration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In insular Newfoundland, Canada, studies were conducted from 1999 to 2003 on the effects of ‘simulated’ hydropeaking power\\u000a generation on juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). In 1999, Atlantic salmon parr were released into an experimental reach below a hydroelectric facility and flow was manipulated\\u000a over a range of discharge (1.0–4.2 m3 s?1) during a series of ‘experiments’ simulating hydropeaking in both summer

D. A. Scruton; C. Pennell; L. M. N. Ollerhead; K. Alfredsen; M. Stickler; A. Harby; M. Robertson; K. D. Clarke; L. J. LeDrew

2008-01-01

334

Juveniles' perceptions of a protective-permissive dichotomy in the juvenile justice system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The juvenile justice system has come under increasing criticism for its traditionally paternalistic and protective posture. The literature surveyed reviews some of the major occurrences, such as the Gault decision, which have led to a new direction in legislation. It is demonstrated that while juveniles are being awarded more due process rights, they are also being held more accountable for

Robert Paul Saltstone

1983-01-01

335

Assessing the Mental Health Status of Youth in Juvenile Justice Settings. Juvenile Justice Bulletin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Bulletin reports the results of a study that used the Voice DISC, a computerized, self-administered version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC), to screen for psychiatric disorders in youth newly admitted to juvenile assessment centers. The Voice DISC offers the following advantages for use in the juvenile justice system:…

Wasserman, Gail A.; Ko, Susan J.; McReynolds, Larkin S.

2004-01-01

336

Characteristics of Crimes against Juveniles. Crimes against Children Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Bulletin reviews data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's 1997 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data file that pertain to juvenile victims, revealing that while juveniles made up 26% of the population of the 12 states participating in NIBRS in 1997, they accounted for only 12% of the reported crime victims. At the same…

Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

337

Specificity of the Juvenile Hormone Binding Protein: The Geometrical Isomers of Juvenile Hormone I  

Microsoft Academic Search

The binding of the geometrical isomers (>= 99% pure) of juvenile hormone I to the hemolymph juvenile hormone binding protein of Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) was analyzed. A technique is described for isomer separation by micropreparative high-resolution liquid chromatography. Analysis of competition was performed by using a ``batch adsorption'' hydroxylapatite binding assay. Competition studies indicate that the naturally occurring isomer,

Walter Goodman; David A. Schooley; Lawrence I. Gilbert

1978-01-01

338

An Empirical Evaluation of Juvenile Awareness Programs in the United States: Can Juveniles Be "Scared Straight"?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile awareness programs like Scared Straight became popular crime prevention strategies during the 1970s. Juvenile offenders and at-risk youth who participate in these programs are taken to prisons where inmates use confrontational methods to recount stories about violence, sex, and abuse perpetrated by fellow inmates while living a life…

Klenowski, Paul M.; Bell, Keith J.; Dodson, Kimberly D.

2010-01-01

339

Juvenile fibromyalgia: Guidance for management.  

PubMed

Juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) is a disease in which patients complain of acute and chronic severe pain, an overt primary cause for which cannot be found or surmised. Although patients with JFM mainly complain of systemic pain or allodynia in the medical interview and physical examination, the concept of the disease is the total sum of painful illness, chronic fatigue, hypothermia and many other autonomic symptoms and signs. Many issues are interacting including individual traits (personality, temperament, sensitivity, memory of pain; age: early adolescence), individual states (self-esteem, anxiety, developmental level), and external stressors (parent especially mother, school environment). JFM is diagnosed on the combination of disease history, physical examination to determine the 18 tender points and allodynia, pain from gently touching their hair, and negative results of blood tests (inflammatory markers, thyroid function, myogenic enzymes). The goals of treatment are the following: restoration of function and relief of pain. Psychological support is advocated. Although the exact number of patients with JFM is still to be elucidated, it seems to be growing because pediatric rheumatologists in Japan encounter children with a wide variety of musculoskeletal pains. This guideline describes how to diagnose JFM in children and how to treat them appropriately. PMID:23758613

Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Miyamae, Takako

2013-08-01

340

Wall Correction Program Based on Classical Methods for the National Transonic Facility (Solid Wall or Slotted Wall) and the 14x22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel at NASA LaRC.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A Fortran subroutine CMWALL is described, which is an implementation of the collective information from classical methods-based wall corrections. These methods use established closed-form expressions which were developed based on simple linear potential-b...

M. J. Hemsch V. Iyer

2004-01-01

341

Summary of 50-State Preliminary Survey on Basic Literacy Training, Testing, and School District Organization in State Correctional Systems. Coordination Bulletin No. 21.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As an initial effort to assess reading in correctional institutions, a questionnaire was sent to some 70 state directors of corrections, both adult and juvenile, by the National Clearinghouse for Offender Literacy Programs which is sponsored by the American Bar Association, the American Correctional Association, and the National Association of…

American Bar Association, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse for Offender Literacy Programs.

342

Convention and Conference Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rigorous statistical analysis indicates that large group bookings are a dominant source for errors in convention and conference facilities. This study demonstrates that the accuracy of the quantitative forecast can benefit from human judgment when an explicit structured process is applied to the judgmental adjustments. It develops and fits a correcting model that simulates managers' predictions. The results suggest

Zvi Schwartz

1997-01-01

343

Lacosamide treatment of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.  

PubMed

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is the most common form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy with onset at puberty or late teenage years. About 80-90% of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy respond to appropriate antiepileptic treatment and achieve seizure freedom, and about 15% of patients become intractable. Valproic acid, levetiracetam, lamotrigine, topiramate and zonisamide are used as first line or adjunctive therapy of this disorder. Lacosamide is approved for adjunctive treatment of partial onset epilepsies. The role of lacosamide in treatment of idiopathic generalized epilepsy including juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is unknown. We present three patients with classic clinical and electrographic features of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy that were maintained on lacosamide (one on monotherapy and two as adjuvant therapy). There were no special pharmacodynamic actions causing exacerbation or worsening of myoclonic jerks or generalized seizures in these three patients. In conclusion, although, the data from our three patients' suggest that lacosamide may be effective in the treatment of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, larger studies are needed to explore efficacy and role of lacosamide in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:22281192

Afra, Pegah; Adamolekun, Bola

2012-04-01

344

Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage  

SciTech Connect

A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-02-01

345

Valgus Knee Deformities in Children with Juvenile Chronic Polyarthritis Treated by Epiphysial Stapling  

PubMed Central

Stapling of the epiphysis to the diaphysis on the medial aspect of the lower end of the femur and the upper end of the tibia has been shown to correct valgus deformities of the knees in 3 children with juvenile chronic polyarthritis, whose growth had been considerably retarded during prolonged corticosteroid therapy. Satisfactory correction was obtained in all 3 without loss of function. We stress the need for supervision in the immediate post-operative period, as well as later, since over-rapid correction of the deformity may occur during the growth spurt after stopping corticosteroid therapy, requiring removal of the staples after a few months. To obtain similar correction in those whose growth rate is slower, the staples should be left in situ for longer. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6

Ansell, B. M.; Arden, G. P.; McLennan, I.

1970-01-01

346

Taft Prison Facility: Cost Scenarios.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On July 21, 1997, the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) announced that Wackenhut Corrections would be awarded the contract to manage a new Federal facility. Located in Taft, California, the new facility had been designed and built by the Federal government ...

J. Nelson

1999-01-01

347

Juvenile parkinsonism: a heterogeneous entity.  

PubMed

We studied the clinical features, laboratory investigation, management and natural history of a cohort of patients with Juvenile Parkinsonism (JP), seen at a tertiary referral centre. JP was defined as Parkinsonism with onset at age 20 years or less. Six patients (five male, one female) entered the study. The mean age at onset of Parkinsonism was 12.5 years (range 7-19) and the mean follow-up time was 49.3 months (range 40-57). Bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability were observed in all patients and five subjects had tremor. Dystonia was present in four subjects. Other clinical features were dementia (five subjects), supranuclear ophthalmoparesis (five subjects), seizures (three subjects), multifocal myoclonus (one subject), decreased deep reflexes (one subject), pyramidal signs (one subject). Family history of Parkinson's disease (PD) was positive in one subject. Work-up for Wilson's disease was negative in all patients. Neuroimaging studies showed cortical atrophy in two subjects and mild brainstem atrophy in two others. Sea-blue histiocytes were found in one subject. L-dopa improved the Parkinsonism in all subjects but four rapidly developed fluctuations and dyskinesias, requiring, in one, stereotaxic surgery. After a mean disease duration of 6.5 years, five subjects require assistance for performance of all daily activities. JP is a heterogeneous clinical entity. In the majority of patients, no underlying cause is identified. The unusual clinical features suggest most subjects have a CNS degenerative disease distinct from PD. There is, however, evidence suggesting that PD may rarely cause JP. Gangliosidosis is another cause of L-dopa-responsive JP. Regardless of the cause, in the present study JP displays an aggressive and rapidly progressive course in most patients. PMID:11054129

Cardoso, F; Camargos, S

2000-09-01

348

Second Comprehensive Study of Missing Children. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Missing Children's Assistance Act (Title IV of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended) requires the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) to periodically conduct studies of the scope of the prob...

L. Hanson

2000-01-01

349

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. 0.57 Section... ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Criminal Division § 0.57 Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The...

2013-07-01

350

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the

David A. Strand

2004-01-01

351

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-01-01

352

Psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma of the jaws  

PubMed Central

Juvenile ossifying fibroma is an uncommon, benign, bone-forming neoplasm with aggressive local growth that is distinguished from other fibro-osseous lesions primarily by its age of onset, clinical presentation and aggressive behavior. Although a benign entity, juvenile ossifying fibroma is known to be locally aggressive and has a high tendency to recur. Two distinctive microscopic patterns have been described: A trabecular variant and a psammomatoid variant. This latter variant is predominantly a craniofacial lesion and occurs rarely in the jaws. We present herein two cases of psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma involving the jaws. The first case was a mandibular lesion in a 31-year-old female whereas the second case presented with maxillary involvement in a 46-year-old female. In addition, the pathology of the lesion was analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy.

Malathi, N; Radhika, T; Thamizhchelvan, H; Ravindran, C; Ramkumar, S; Giri, GVV; Gopal, Deepika

2011-01-01

353

Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.  

PubMed

There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s. PMID:2122167

Frazier, H C

1990-01-01

354

Perceptions of Juvenile Offenders Who Were Abused as Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Should a history of child abuse be taken into consideration when a juvenile offender is punished? Although some research shows that child abuse is used as a mitigating factor for juvenile offenders (i.e., elicits less punitive sentences), surveys of juvenile court officials reveal that it is considered an aggravating factor. Specifically, in controlled mock jury studies in which child abuse

Margaret C. Stevenson

2009-01-01

355

THE COMPREHENSIBILITY AND CONTENT OF JUVENILE MIRANDA WARNINGS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Annually, more than 1.5 million juvenile offenders are arrested and routinely Mirandized with little consideration regarding the comprehensibility of these warnings. The current investigation examined 122 juvenile Miranda warnings from across the United States regarding their length, reading level, and content. Even more variable than general Miranda warnings, juvenile warnings ranged remarkably from 52 to 526 words; inclusion of Miranda

Richard Rogers; Lisa L. Hazelwood; Kenneth W. Sewell; Daniel W. Shuman; Hayley L. Blackwood

2008-01-01

356

Offense related characteristics and psychosexual development of juvenile sex offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:: This article reports on offense related characteristics and the psychosexual development in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders as measured by the Global Assessment Instrument for Juvenile Sex Offenders (GAIJSO). The predictive validity of these characteristics for persistent (sexual) offensive behavior in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders was investigated. METHODS:: One hundred seventy four sex offenders (mean age 14.9 SD

Lisette't A Hart-Kerkhoffs; Theo AH Doreleijers; Lucres MC Jansen; Anton PH van Wijk; Ruud AR Bullens

2009-01-01

357

Advocating a Functional Approach to Determining Adjudicative Competency in Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Supreme Court required extending to juvenile delinquency proceedings those due process rights guaranteed in criminal proceedings. Most states have recognized the legal concept of adjudicative competence for participation in juvenile cases, although the Supreme Court has never established a standard for adjudicative competence in juvenile proceedings. Consequently, competency requirements for participation in delinquency cases vary considerably across states.

Naomi E. Goldstein; Marchelle R. Thomson; Douglas Osman; Lois Oberlander

2002-01-01

358

Immersion Marking of Juvenile Midas Cichlids with Oxytetracycline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory experiments were conducted on the use of oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC) for marking juvenile Midas cichlids Amphilophus citrinellus. Juveniles were immersed in tris-buffered OTC solutions of 200, 400, or 600 mg\\/L for 4, 8, or 16 h. Marked juveniles were detected by the presence of a fluorescent mark on spines and rays when viewed under an ultraviolet light. Immersion in

Jennifer M. Barker; Kenneth R. McKaye

2004-01-01

359

Detecting Mental Disorder in Juvenile Detainees: Who Receives Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. We determined whether or not juvenile detainees with major men- tal disorders received treatment, and the variables that predicted who received services. Methods. Our sample was 1829 randomly selected juvenile detainees taking part in the Northwestern Juvenile Project. To determine need for mental health ser- vices, independent interviewers administered the Diagnostic Interview Sched- ule for Children and rated functional

Linda A. Teplin; Karen M. Abram; Gary M. McClelland; Jason J. Washburn; Ann K. Pikus

2005-01-01

360

Programa Shortstop: A Culturally Focused Juvenile Intervention for Hispanic Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Culturally sensitive juvenile delinquency and substance abuse interventions are relatively limited and unavailable to many first-time Hispanic juvenile offenders. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a culturally focused juvenile and substance abuse intervention program for first time Hispanic youth offenders. The intent of…

Cervantes, Richard C.; Ruan, Karen; Duenas, Norma

2004-01-01

361

Race, Legal Representation, and Juvenile Justice: Issues and Concerns  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to examine the influence of type of counsel across race on juvenile court outcomes. Using data from a sample of juvenile court referrals from two midwestern juvenile courts, this study examined the interaction of race and type of counsel on disposition outcome. The results indicated that youth without an attorney…

Guevara, Lori; Spohn, Cassia; Herz, Denise

2004-01-01

362

Habitat Suitability Index Models: Juvenile Spot  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop estuarine habitat models for juvenile spot (Leiostomus xanthurus). The models are scaled to produce an index of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1 (optimally suitable habitat) for estuarine areas of the continental United States. Habitat suitability indexes (HSI's) are designed for use with the habitat evaluation procedures developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Guideline for juvenile spot model applications and techniques for estimating model variables are described.

Stickney, Robert R.; Cuenco, Michael L.

1982-01-01

363

Juvenile justice. A role for health professionals.  

PubMed

The United States is the only nation in the world that continues to execute its youth. The use of the death penalty against those who committed crimes as children is an act contrary to American standards of decency and fairness, as well as international law. The adolescent brain has not fully developed before the age of 18 years of age. Thus children do not have the same emotional and mental capacity as adults. Although juveniles should be held accountable for their crimes, the United States must not impose this most extreme punishment. The medical profession must take a stand to stop the execution of juvenile offenders in the United States. PMID:12545519

Brookman, Monica

2003-01-01

364

Intracardiac juvenile xanthogranuloma with presentation in adulthood.  

PubMed

Juvenile xanthogranuloma is the most frequent type of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It most commonly presents in infancy and early childhood; manifesting as cutaneous lesions on the head, neck, and trunk that suddenly appear and usually undergo spontaneous regression. Extracutaneous involvement, although rare, may occur along with the cutaneous form or in isolation. It most frequently involves the eye, deep subcutaneous tissues, lung, and liver. Involvement of the heart is exceptionally rare, with only seven reports found in the English literature, all affecting infants. We present the first report of an intracardiac juvenile xanthogranuloma in an adult. PMID:24012116

Lehrke, Heidi D; Johnson, Christopher K; Zapolanski, Alex; Kasatki, Alex; Grau, Juan B; Maleszewski, Joseph J

2014-01-01

365

Incidence and prevalence of juvenile arthritis in an urban population of southern Germany: a prospective study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To ascertain the incidence and prevalence of juvenile arthritis in a German urban population.?METHODS—All 766 paediatricians, orthopaedists, and rheumatologists working in practices or outpatient clinics in 12 south German towns were asked to report all patients who consulted them for juvenile arthritis during the year 1995. Patients with continuing symptoms were followed up for 9-12 months to obtain a final diagnosis. Extended measures of quality control were taken to control for known biases.?RESULTS—Of 457 reported cases, 294 were diagnosed with para-/postinfectious arthritis (PPA), 78 with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), and 18 with other forms of arthritis. Half of the PPA cases were classified as transient synovitis of the hip (SH). For JCA the reported annual incidence was 6.6 and the prevalence 14.8 per 100 000 subjects under 16 years of age. For PPA the reported incidence was 76 and the prevalence 4.4 per 100 000 subjects under 16. The incidence of rheumatic fever was clearly below 1 per 100 000 people under 16. A correction model was used to control for known biases and to adjust the estimates accordingly.?CONCLUSIONS—The results of this first prospective study on the incidence and prevalence of juvenile arthritis in Germany are consistent with a retrospective study performed in the Berlin area. Based on these results it was estimated that the annual frequency of juvenile arthritis in Germany is as follows: 750-900 incident JCA cases, 21 000 incident SH cases, and 21 000 incidence cases of other forms of PPA a year. The number of incidence cases of rheumatic fever is expected to be markedly lower than 150 a year. The total prevalence is expected to be 3600-4350 JCA cases, 2250-3000 SH cases, and the same number of other forms of PPA.??

von Koskull, S.; Truckenbrodt, H; Holle, R; Hormann, A

2001-01-01

366

Criminal Profiles of Violent Juvenile Sex and Violent Juvenile Non-Sex Offenders: An Explorative Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few studies have longitudinally investigated the criminal profiles of violent juvenile sex and violent juvenile non-sex offenders. To make up for this lack, this study used police records of juveniles to determine the nature of the criminal profiles of violent sex offenders (n = 226) and violent non-sex offenders (n = 4,130). All offenders…

van Wijk, Anton Ph.; Mali, Bas R. F.; Bullens, Ruud A. R.; Vermeiren, Robert R.

2007-01-01

367

Assessing the Mental Health Status of Youth in Juvenile Justice Settings. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Serious mental health and substance use disorders can interfere with the rehabilitation of youth who come into contact with the juvenile justice system and increase their risk for recidivism. Too often, the needs of these youth have gone unrecognized and ...

G. A. Wasserman S. J. Ko L. S. McReynolds

2004-01-01

368

Larval, pre-juvenile and juvenile development of Diapterus peruvianus (Perciformes: Gerreidae).  

PubMed

The development of Diapterus peruvianus (Sauvage 1879) is based on 60 larvae collected in superficial tows made in Bahía Concepción, and on 16 pre-juvenile and juvenile organisms collected in Bahía de La Paz, B. C. S., México, using a standard plankton net and a rectangular epibenthonic net, respectively. Larvae of D. peruvianus show three large blotches on the dorsum of the gut that can fuse together and give the appearance of one large continuous blotch. There are two to three pre-anal pigments and 16 post-anal pigments in the ventral midline; cephalic pigments are present from the postflexion stage, as well as a serrated preoperculum. The pre-juvenile and juvenile organisms are distinguished by their body depth, the anal-fin formula, the serrated pre-operculum and the base pigments in the dorsal and anal fins. PMID:15162741

Jiménez Rosenberg, Sylvia Patricia; González Navarro, Enrique; Saldierna Martínez, Ricardo Javier

2003-06-01

369

RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

Not Available

1993-05-01

370

The use of a juvenile hormone binding protein for the quantitative assay of juvenile hormone  

Microsoft Academic Search

The suitability of the haemolymph juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP) of Locusta migratoria for use in a competition assay for juvenile hormone (JH) III has been investigated, and a simple quantitative assay procedure using this protein has been developed. JHBP partially purified from haemolymph of precocene treated adult locusts gives rapid and stable binding of [3H]10R-JH III, and can be

A. V. Glinka; R. P. Braun; J. P. Edwards; G. R. Wyatt

1995-01-01

371

Activity of juvenile hormone and juvenile hormone analogues on the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of juvenile hormone-III (JH-III) and the juvenile hormone analogues (JHA) methoprene and fenoxycarb on the growth and macromolecular biosynthesis in Trypanosoma cruzi were studied in vitro. It was observed that JH-III and JHA blocked growth and 3H-thymidine incorporation without killing the cells within certain concentrations (?1 × 10?4M), but they caused cellular death at concentrations over 1 ×

A. M. Stoka

1996-01-01

372

Application of Megan's Law to Juveniles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the history of registration and notification statutes for sex offenders and concerns and legal challenges they have faced, noting psychology's limited knowledge about normal versus abnormal sexual development and research suggesting that recidivism rates for sexual offenses may be lower for juveniles than adults who have received…

Trivits, Lisa C.; Reppucci, N. Dickon

2002-01-01

373

Psychiatric Disorders in Youth in Juvenile Detention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Given the growth of juvenile detainee populations, epidemiologic data on their psychiatric dis- orders are increasingly important. Yet, there are few em- pirical studies. Until we have better epidemiologic data, we cannot know how best to use the system's scarce men- tal health resources. Methods: Using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children version 2.3, interviewers assessed a randomly selected,

Linda A. Teplin; Karen M. Abram; Gary M. McClelland; Mina K. Dulcan; Amy A. Mericle

2002-01-01

374

FRAME TRAWL FOR SAMPLING PELAGIC JUVENILE FISH  

Microsoft Academic Search

The frame trawl is a microrichton net designed to sample pelagic larval and juvenile fish that avoid plankton nets and pass through the mesh of large midwater trawls. The mouth of the frmic trawl is a rigid, square frame with an area of 5 in2. The bridle attaches at two points and leavcs the mouth relatively unobstructed and vertical at

RICHARD D METHOT

1986-01-01

375

Predicting Juvenile Recidivism: New Method, Old Problems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared three statistical procedures to determine their ability to predict delinquents' return to juvenile prison after first release. Logit analysis, predictive attribute analysis, and a Burgess procedure were tested. No significant differences were found between statistical procedures in prediction. (Author/NB)

Benda, Brent B.

1987-01-01

376

Juveniles' Competence to Stand Trial as Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary During the 1990s, nationwide legal reforms lowered the age at which youths could be tried in adult criminal court and expanded the range of young offenders subject to adult adjudication and punishment. The present study asked whether, to what extent, and at what ages juveniles may be more at risk than adults for incompetence as legal defendants in criminal

Laurence Steinberg; Thomas Grisso; Jennifer Woolard; Elizabeth Cauffman; Elizabeth Scott; Sandra Graham; Fran Lexcen; N. Dickon Reppucci; Robert Schwartz

2003-01-01

377

RAS Pathway Mutations in Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare blood cell malignancy occurring in very young children. Yet, just as has been proven in other rare diseases, the study of JMML has provided us great insights into aberrant and dysregulated signal transduction through the Ras pathway, with the ultimate development of malignancy. Further, JMML investigations have also revealed to us much about

Peter D. Emanuel

2008-01-01

378

Gambling Behavior of Juvenile Offenders in Louisiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper was to determine the (1) frequency of and (2) types of prearrest gambling (3) prevalence of pathological gambling and (4) the associations of after school activities and gambling related symptoms among juvenile offenders in Louisiana, compared to a contemporaneous school sample. A gambling survey was administered to 343 (jail) and 1293 (prison) offenders, ages 10–19

James R. Westphal; Lera J. Johnson

2006-01-01

379

The Juvenile Justice System. Chapter 6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers presented at a 1996 conference on children's mental health focuses on the juvenile justice system. Papers have the following titles and authors: (1) "Delinquency and Mental Illness: The Intersection of Problems and Systems" (Carolyn S. Breda); (2) "Assessing the Mental Health of Adolescents in the Mental Health and…

1996

380

Juvenile Delinquency. Selected Studies in Social Problems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Excerpts from eight books present material on juvenile delinquency. Included are selections from the following: "Wayward Youth" by August Aichhorn, "The Gang" by Frederic M. Thrasher, "The Jack-Roller" by Clifford R. Shaw, "Street Corner Society" by William Foote Whyte, "Children Who Hate" by Fritz Redl and David Wineman, "The Addict in the…

Korn, Richard R., Ed.

381

Perceived Competence of Juvenile Delinquents and Nondelinquents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirty male juvenile delinquents and 90 male high achievers, low achievers, and students with behavior problems were compared using an adapted version of Harter's Perceived Competence Scale for Children. The Australian students (aged 12-15) were compared on 4 different domains of perceived competence--cognitive competence, social competence,…

Cole, Peter G.; And Others

1989-01-01

382

Juvenile Drug Courts and Teen Substance Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile justice officials across the United States are embracing a new method of dealing with adolescent substance abuse. Importing a popular innovation from adult courts, state and local governments have started hundreds of specialized drug courts to provide judicial supervision and coordinate substance abuse treatment for drug-involved…

Butts, Jeffrey A., Ed.; Roman, John, Ed.

2004-01-01

383

Social Skills Training With Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated the influence of social skills training of cognitive and behavioral characteristics of juvenile offenders. Structured social skills training, an unstructured discussion group, and a control group were compared. Subjects were 30 adolescent male offenders who had been previously arrested for a variety of offenses. The design was a 3 x 2 factorial design with a repeated

Sharon J. Long; Mark Sherer

1985-01-01

384

Low-Salinity Resistance of Juvenile Cobias  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile cobias Rachycentron canadum were exposed to decreasing salinity (?1‰ per day) in a series of five experiments to assess their low-salinity resistance. All fish survived for 24 h at a salinity of 2‰, but 73% died within 24 h of a reduction to 1‰ salinity. Plasma osmolality decreased significantly with decreasing salinity. Fish held for 7 d at 2,

K. Burkey; S. P. Young; T. I. J. Smith; J. R. Tomasso

2007-01-01

385

Juvenile Firesetter and School Arson Prevention Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide background information and assistance to educators developing arson prevention programs in the schools, this report reviews existing programs and recent research on juvenile firesetting. Following an introduction, information is divided into four sections. Section 1 emphasizes curiosity and emotional disturbances as underlying…

Karchmer, Clifford L.

386

Psychological Evaluation at Juvenile Court Disposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Do psychologists' evaluations of juvenile offenders prior to dispositional placement have a measurable effect on judges' decision making? Is the nature of any such influence best explained by the quality of the written report, the relationship between the psychologist and the judge, or a combination of these and other factors? The current study attempted to address these issues by investigating

Thomas Hecker; Laurence Steinberg

2002-01-01

387

Attachment Theory Applied to Juvenile Sex Offending.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attachment theory is applied to identify systemic patterns encouraging juveniles to commit sexual offenses. The role of the helping system in perpetuating offenses is reviewed. The priority of family integrity and the role of professionals in breaking cycles of abuse and repairing earlier destructive emotional attachments are discussed. (EMK)

Goodrow, Kenneth K.; Lim, Mee-Gaik

1998-01-01

388

TPX correction coil studies  

SciTech Connect

Error correction coils are planned for the TPX (Tokamak Plasma Experiment) in order to avoid error field induced locked modes and disruption. The FT (Fix Tokamak) code is used to evaluate the ability of these correction coils to remove islands caused by symmetry breaking magnetic field errors. The proposed correction coils are capable of correcting a variety of error fields.

Hanson, J.D.

1994-11-03

389

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam is used for holding and spawning adult fall chinook and coho salmon. Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and summer steelhead. The main goal of acclimation is to reduce stress from trucking prior to release and improve imprinting of juvenile salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. Juveniles are transported to the acclimation facilities primarily from Umatilla and Bonneville Hatcheries. This report details activities associated with operation and maintenance of the Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques, Thornhollow and Three Mile Dam facilities in 1996.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1997-06-01

390

Rx for Pedagogical Correctness: Professional Correctness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the difficulties caused by educators holding to a view of teaching that assumes that there is one "pedagogically correct" way of running a classroom. Provides three examples of harmful pedagogical correctness ("untracked" classes, cooperative learning, and testing and test-wiseness). Argues that such dogmatic views of education limit…

Lasley, Thomas J.

1993-01-01

391

Meteorological Sensor Calibration Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The meteorological sensor calibration facility is designed to test and assess radiosonde measurement quality through actual flights in the atmosphere. United States radiosonde temperature measurements are deficient in that they require correction for errors introduced by long- and short-wave radiation. The effect of not applying corrections results in a large bias between day time and night time measurements. This day/night bias has serious implications for users of radiosonde data, of which NASA is one. The derivation of corrections for the U.S. radiosonde is quite important. Determination of corrections depends on solving the heat transfer equation of the thermistor using laboratory measurements of the emissivity and absorptivity of the thermistor coating. The U.S. radiosonde observations from the World Meteorological Organization International Radiosonde Intercomparison were used as the data base to test whether the day/night height bias can be removed. Twenty-five noon time and 26 night time observations were used. Corrected temperatures were used to calculate new geopotentials. Day/night bias in the geopotentials decreased significantly when corrections were introduced. Some testing of thermal lag attendant with the standard carbon hygristor took place. Two radiosondes with small bead thermistors imbedded in the hygristor were flown. Detailed analysis was not accomplished; however, cursory examination of the data showed that the hygristor is at a higher temperature than the external thermistor indicates.

Schmidlin, F. J.

1988-01-01

392

Competitive exclusion in a discrete juvenile–adult model with continuous and seasonal reproduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

We develop a general discrete juvenile–adult population model that describes two competing species. We consider species in which the juveniles only compete with other juveniles, and the adults only compete with other adults, i.e. juveniles and adults of either species do not compete. This is typical of amphibians where juveniles (tadpoles) live in water and adults (frogs) live on land.

Azmy S. Ackleh; Ross A. Chiquet

2011-01-01

393

Influence of Waterway Development on Migrational Characteristics of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Willamette River, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the effects of Portland Harbor development in the lower Willamette River on the migration and behavior of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.), the habitat occupied by juvenile salmonids, and predation on juvenile salmonids by northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis. Juvenile salmonids were abundant in the lower Willamette River during spring; radio-tagged juvenile steelhead O. mykiss and yearling chinook salmon O.

David L. Ward; Anthony A. Nigro; Ruth A. Farr; Christopher J. Knutsen

1994-01-01

394

Wall interference assessment and corrections  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel wall interference assessment and correction (WIAC) concepts, applications, and typical results are discussed in terms of several nonlinear transonic codes and one panel method code developed for and being implemented at NASA-Langley. Contrasts between 2-D and 3-D transonic testing factors which affect WIAC procedures are illustrated using airfoil data from the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and Pathfinder 1 data from the National Transonic Facility. Initial results from the 3-D WIAC codes are encouraging; research on and implementation of WIAC concepts continue.

Newman, P. A.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Garriz, J. A.

1989-01-01

395

A Soldier of Service: An Interview with Playwright and Teaching Artist Dominique Cieri. Teaching At-Risk, Juvenile Justice, and the Holocaust  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inner-city public school classrooms, group homes, juvenile detention centers and facilities will be with Americans forever. Their populations can deflate, challenge, or improve any artist's skills and expertise. The author thinks of teaching artists who work these strenuous communities as soldiers of service, dedicated individuals who fight with…

Cobb, Catlin

2010-01-01

396

A Practice/Research Collaborative: An Innovative Approach to Identifying and Responding to Psychosocial Functioning Problems and Recidivism Risk among Juvenile Arrestees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effectively identifying and responding to the psychosocial problems and recidivism risk of arrested youths remain critical needs in the field. Centralized intake facilities, such as juvenile assessment centers (JACs), can play a key role in this process. As part of a U.S. National Demonstration Project, the Miami-Dade JAC, serving a…

Dembo, Richard; Walters, Wansley; Meyers, Kathleen

2005-01-01

397

Vasculitis and calcinosis in juvenile dermatomyositis.  

PubMed

Dermatomyositis of childhood onset is characterized by vasculitic lesions and often complicated by calcinosis. We describe 32 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis. All suffered from vasculitic skin changes like facial erythema often with edema, Gottron's sign, telangiectasias, erythematous eruptions, different rashes and necrotic ulcerations. Vasculitis appeared also in inner organs as gastrointestinal ulceration, neurologic and cardiac manifestation. 4 children complained of Raynaud's phenomenon. Calcinosis of soft tissues developed in 21 patients within 0.5 to 10 years after onset. In 6 of them we saw regression of calcium deposits after a progressive phase of 1 to 5 years. Functional outcome in juvenile dermatomyositis depends mainly on the degree of calcinosis together with shortening of diseased muscles. PMID:1845413

Truckenbrodt, H; Häfner, R

1991-01-01

398

A juvenile case of conjunctival atypical nevus  

PubMed Central

Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2973228795724608 Melanocytic nevi are the most common tumors of the conjunctiva, accounting for 28% of all neoplastic lesions. These tumors, despite their benign behavior, share some atypical histological features with nevi found in other anatomic sites like the genital and acral regions, globally designated as nevi with site-related atypia. Moreover, in children and adolescents, rapidly growing conjunctival nevi show sometimes worrisome histological patterns in association with a prominent inflammatory infiltrate that may lead to diagnostic problems. In this paper we describe a juvenile compound nevus characterized by marked melanocytic atypia and severe inflammation, which can be considered a rare case of juvenile conjunctival atypical nevus. The final diagnosis relied on morphological and immunohistochemical characterization of the large epithelioid melanocytic cells, and on the results of FISH analysis.

2013-01-01

399

Juvenile rainbow trout production in New York tributaries of Lake Ontario: implications for Atlantic salmon restoration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three Pacific salmonid species Onchorynchus spp. have replaced the extirpated Atlantic salmon Salmo salar as the main migratory salmonid in the Lake Ontario drainage. One of those species, the nonnative rainbow trout O. mykiss, has become widely distributed within the historical Atlantic salmon habitat, occupying an ecological niche similar to that of juvenile Atlantic salmon. Consequently, both a tributary's carrying capacity for Atlantic salmon and competition from established nonnative species are important when considering the feasibility of Atlantic salmon restoration. Estimation of juvenile rainbow trout production will help evaluate the capacity of tributaries to produce salmonids that occupy similar niches. Geostatistical methods were applied to standardized and efficiency-corrected electrofishing data from three of New York's best salmonid-producing streams to precisely estimate juvenile rainbow trout populations. Results indicated that each study stream could produce 20,000-40,000 age-0 and 4,000-10,000 age-1 and older rainbow trout per year. Statistical interpolation indicated areas of significantly different production potential and points of significant changes in productivity. Closer examination of the niche similarity and competitive potential of these two species is needed to properly interpret these estimates with regard to Atlantic salmon restoration.

McKenna, James E., Jr.; Johnson, James H.

2005-01-01

400

Do infections trigger juvenile idiopathic arthritis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a disease that was prominent with increased inflammation response in immune system,\\u000a appeared mostly with peripheral arthritis and endogenous and exogenous antigens play a role in the pathogenesis of disease.\\u000a Two major reasons were thinking to be considerably important. First of them is immunological predisposition and the second\\u000a one is environmental factors. Infections are considered

Mustafa Aslan; Ozgur Kasapcopur; Hatice Yasar; Erdal Polat; Suat Saribas; Huseyin Cakan; Ahmet Dirican; Müzeyyen Mamal Torun; Nil Ar?soy; Bekir Kocazeybek

2011-01-01

401

Adjudicative Competency in a Juvenile Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Differences in adjudicative competency among juveniles who were either awaiting adjudication (n= 70) or members of an age-matched control group (n= 40) were assessed, and their scores were compared with those of an adult sample. Competency was assessed using the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool–Criminal Adjudication, which contains three scales: Understanding, Reasoning, and Appreciation. Participants in the comparison group did not

Darla M. R. Burnett; Charles D. Noblin; Vicki Prosser

2004-01-01

402

Risk of colorectal cancer in juvenile polyposis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Juvenile polyposis (JP) is an autosomal-dominant syndrome characterised by the development of hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyps and is associated with colorectal cancer. However, the relative and absolute risk of colorectal malignancy in these patients is not known.Methods: The incidence rates of colorectal cancer in patients with JP were compared with that of the general population through person-year analysis with adjustment

Lodewijk A A Brosens; Arnout van Hattem; Linda M Hylind; Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue; Katharine E Romans; Jennifer Axilbund; Marcia Cruz-Correa; Anne C Tersmette; G Johan A Offerhaus; Francis M Giardiello

2007-01-01

403

Chemical Evolution of the Juvenile Universe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models of average Galactic chemical abundances are in good general agreement with observations for [Fe\\/H] > -1.5, but there are gross discrepancies at lower metallicities. Only massive stars contribute to the chemical evolution of the `juvenile universe' corresponding to [Fe\\/H] <~ -1.5. If Type II supernovae (SNe II) are the only relevant sources, then the abundances in the interstellar medium

G. J. Wasserburg; Y.-Z. Qian

2009-01-01

404

Treatment advances in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an autoinflammatory condition that is distinct from other forms of childhood arthritis. Recently, biologic agents that specifically inhibit the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 have demonstrated remarkable clinical effectiveness and confirmed the importance of these cytokines in the disease process. Future studies are likely to optimize the care of children with systemic arthritis and further elucidate the disease pathogenesis.

2014-01-01

405

Kienbock's disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

PubMed Central

Kienbock's disease or osteonecrosis of the lunate is an uncommon cause of wrist pain. . Though there have been several reports of cases in patients with various rheumatologic diseases, the precise etiology has currently not been established. We report a case of Kienbock's disease that occurred in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report with an association between these two conditions.

Desy, Nicholas M.; Bernstein, Mitchell; Harvey, Edward J.; Hazel, Hazel

2011-01-01

406

ESO adaptive optics facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ESO has initiated in June 2004 a concept of Adaptive Optics Facility. One unit 8m telescope of the VLT is upgraded with a 1.1 m convex Deformable Secondary Mirror and an optimized instrument park. The AO modules GALACSI and GRAAL will provide GLAO and LTAO corrections forHawk-I and MUSE. A natural guide star mode is provided for commissioning and maintenance at the telescope. The facility is completed by a Laser Guide Star Facility launching 4 LGS from the telescope centerpiece used for the GLAO and LTAO wavefront sensing. A sophisticated test bench called ASSIST is being designed to allow an extensive testing and characterization phase of the DSM and its AO modules in Europe. Most sub-projects have entered the final design phase and the DSM has entered Manufacturing phase. First light is planned in the course of 2012 and the commissioning phases should be completed by 2013.

Arsenault, R.; Madec, P.-Y.; Hubin, N.; Paufique, J.; Stroebele, S.; Soenke, C.; Donaldson, R.; Fedrigo, E.; Oberti, S.; Tordo, S.; Downing, M.; Kiekebusch, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Duchateau, M.; Jost, A.; Hackenberg, W.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Delabre, B.; Stuik, R.; Biasi, R.; Gallieni, D.; Lazzarini, P.; Lelouarn, M.; Glindeman, A.

2008-07-01

407

Prosimian juvenile mortality in zoos and primate centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

I review literature on juvenile mortality of captive prosimians in order to evaluate the available information on captive\\u000a breeding. Juvenile mortality includes abortion, premature mortality, stillbirth, and death of the unweaned young. Prosimian\\u000a juvenile mortality ranges between 25 and 45% in captive populations. It is generally lower in the Lemuroidea, particularly\\u000a the Cheirogaleidae, than in the Lorisoidea. Mortality is particularly

I. W. J. Debyser

1995-01-01

408

The Impact of Families on Juvenile Substance Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the effect of family composition on juvenile substance use and drug sales using data from the National\\u000a Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The results underscore the importance of having a father figure in the household in deterring\\u000a juvenile smoking, marijuana use, and drug sale. However, the extent to which father figures affect juvenile substance use\\u000a and drug

Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes; Traci Mach

2002-01-01

409

Genetic Identification of F1 and Post-F1 Serrasalmid Juvenile Hybrids in Brazilian Aquaculture  

PubMed Central

Juvenile fish trade monitoring is an important task on Brazilian fish farms. However, the identification of juvenile fish through morphological analysis is not feasible, particularly between interspecific hybrids and pure species individuals, making the monitoring of these individuals difficult. Hybrids can be erroneously identified as pure species in breeding facilities, which might reduce production on farms and negatively affect native populations due to escapes or stocking practices. In the present study, we used a multi-approach analysis (molecular and cytogenetic markers) to identify juveniles of three serrasalmid species (Colossoma macropomum, Piaractus mesopotamicus and Piaractus brachypomus) and their hybrids in different stocks purchased from three seed producers in Brazil. The main findings of this study were the detection of intergenus backcrossing between the hybrid ? patinga (P. mesopotamicus×P. brachypomus)×? C. macropomum and the occurrence of one hybrid triploid individual. This atypical specimen might result from automixis, a mechanism that produces unreduced gametes in some organisms. Moreover, molecular identification indicated that hybrid individuals are traded as pure species or other types of interspecific hybrids, particularly post-F1 individuals. These results show that serrasalmid fish genomes exhibit high genetic heterogeneity, and multi-approach methods and regulators could improve the surveillance of the production and trade of fish species and their hybrids, thereby facilitating the sustainable development of fish farming.

Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Senhorini, Jose Augusto; Foresti, Fausto; Martinez, Paulino; Porto-Foresti, Fabio

2014-01-01

410

Research in Correctional Rehabilitation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty-three leaders in corrections and rehabilitation participated in the seminar planned to provide an indication of the status of research in correctional rehabilitation. Papers include: (1) "Program Trends in Correctional Rehabilitation" by John P. Conrad, (2) "Federal Offenders Rahabilitation Program" by Percy B. Bell and Merlyn Mathews, (3)…

Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

411

The Influence of Building Codes on Recreation Facility Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Implications of building codes upon design and construction of recreation facilities are investigated (national building codes, recreation facility standards, and misperceptions of design requirements). Recreation professionals can influence architectural designers to correct past deficiencies, but they must understand architectural and…

Morrison, Thomas A.

1989-01-01

412

Affiliative behavior requires juvenile, but not adult neurogenesis.  

PubMed

The capacity to interact with conspecifics is essential for stable social networks, reproduction, and survival in mammals. In rodents, social exploration and play behavior increase during the juvenile period, suggesting that this timeframe represents an important window for socialization. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms necessary to support this developmental process have not been elucidated. Neurogenesis during the juvenile period, like that in adults, is mainly confined to the subgranular and subventricular zones. Nevertheless, the levels of neurogenesis are significantly higher during the juvenile period, suggesting unique functions not shared with adult neurogenesis. Here we use a transgenic mouse approach that allows for ablation of neurogenesis during different developmental phases. We find that ablating neurogenesis during either juvenile or adult phases altered anxiety and memory in adult female mice, demonstrating an age-independent function of new neurons for certain behaviors. Blocking neurogenesis during the juvenile period resulted in a profound impairment in the ability of these mice to interact with other adult females or to retrieve pups, without causing gross olfactory deficits. Interestingly, ablating neurogenesis in adult females had no effect on these social behaviors. This work defines a novel role for juvenile neurogenesis in establishing brain circuits necessary for socialization, and demonstrates that juvenile and adult neurogenesis make different contributions to social competency in adult female mice. Additional work is needed to determine whether ablation of juvenile neurogenesis in the subgranular zone and/or the subventricular zone is responsible for the social abnormalities seen after global elimination of juvenile neurogenesis. PMID:21976519

Wei, Lan; Meaney, Michael J; Duman, Ronald S; Kaffman, Arie

2011-10-01

413

78 FR 66383 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...form/collection: Juvenile Justice Reform and...collection: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, United...Iowa; and Delaware Juvenile Justice Service Providers...has had the intended effect of improving...

2013-11-05

414

78 FR 42109 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...form/collection: Juvenile Justice Reform and...collection: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, United...Iowa; and Delaware Juvenile Justice Service Providers...has had the intended effect of improving...

2013-07-15

415

Juvenile hormone activity in Dysdercus cingulatus Fabr by juvenile hormone esterase inhibitor, OTFP.  

PubMed

Application of juvenile hormone esterase inhibitor 3-octylthio-1,1,1- trifluropropan-2-one (OTFP) to 5th instar nymphs and virgin females of D. cingulatus revealed the profound role played by juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) in metamorphosis and reproduction. The ability of OTFP to cause delay and the formation of malformed nymphs, suggests that inhibition of JHE in vivo maintains a higher than normal hemolymph JH titer. It is obvious that OTFP does inhibit in vivo JHE activity in late instar nymphs. Further, the application of JHE inhibitor, OTFP to virgin females demonstrates that substituted trifluropropanones can indirectly stimulate egg development by inhibiting JHE activity in virgin females. PMID:17948739

Elayidam, U Gayathri; Muraleedharan, D

2007-10-01

416

OPTIMIZING WATER TREATMENT PLANT PERFORMANCE WITH THE COMPOSITE CORRECTION PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

This Technology Transfer Summary Report summarizes the results of an ongoing project to evaluate the utility of the Composite Correction Program (CCP) approach to improving the performance of drinking water treatment facilities. The CCP approach, which has already proven successf...

417

Evaluation of the Army Correction Program. Volume I. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study examines the Army Correction Program to assess management, cost effectiveness and achievement of objectives. It recommends revision in organization and procedures to improve management and cost effectiveness of the systems and facilities. The St...

R. Bhattacharyya A. L. Willey W. C. Parker J. T. Luftig

1977-01-01

418

40 CFR 264.101 - Corrective action for solid waste management units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Corrective action for solid waste management units. 264.101 Section...FACILITIES Releases From Solid Waste Management Units § 264.101 Corrective action for solid waste management units. (a) The...

2010-07-01

419

40 CFR 264.101 - Corrective action for solid waste management units.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Corrective action for solid waste management units. 264.101 Section...FACILITIES Releases From Solid Waste Management Units § 264.101 Corrective action for solid waste management units. (a) The...

2009-07-01

420

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, received sanitary effluent from four buildings within the Test Cell ''C'' Facility from the mid-1960s through approximately 1996. The Test Cell ''C'' Facility was used to develop nuclear propulsion technology by conducting nuclear test reactor studies. Based on the site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, herbicides, gamma emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, isotopic uranium, and strontium-90. A detailed conceptual site model is presented in Section 3.0 and Appendix A of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The conceptual model serves as the basis for the sampling strategy. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

USDOE /NV

1999-05-01

421

Kinematics and critical swimming speed of juvenile scalloped hammerhead sharks  

PubMed

Kinematics and critical swimming speed (Ucrit) of juvenile scalloped hammerhead sharks Sphyrna lewini were measured in a Brett-type flume (635 l). Kinematic parameters were also measured in sharks swimming in a large pond for comparison with those of sharks swimming in the flume. Sharks in the flume exhibited a mean Ucrit of 65±11 cm s-1 (± s.d.) or 1.17±0.21 body lengths per second (L s-1), which are similar to values for other species of sharks. In both the flume and pond, tailbeat frequency (TBF) and stride length (LS) increased linearly with increases in relative swimming speed (Urel=body lengths traveled per second). In the flume, tailbeat amplitude (TBA) decreased with increasing speed whereas TBA did not change with speed in the pond. Differences in TBF and LS between sharks swimming in the flume and the pond decreased with increases in Urel. Sharks swimming at slow speeds (e.g. 0.55 L s-1) in the pond had LS 19 % longer and TBF 21 % lower than sharks in the flume at the same Urel. This implies that sharks in the flume expended more energy while swimming at comparable velocities. Comparative measurements of swimming kinematics from sharks in the pond can be used to correct for effects of the flume on shark swimming kinematics and energetics. PMID:9320537

Lowe

1996-01-01

422

Macular hole in juvenile X-linked retinoschisis  

PubMed Central

An 18 year-old male with no antecedent of trauma, systemic syndrome or myopia was referred for surgical treatment of a full thickness macular hole in the left eye. A more careful inspection revealed discrete foveal cystic changes in the fellow eye and subtle peripheral depigmented retinal pigment epithelial changes in both eyes. A spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scan confirmed, in addition to the full thickness macular hole in the left eye, microcystic spaces in the nuclear layers of both retinae. The diagnosis of X-linked retinoschisis was confirmed with a full field electroretinogram displaying the typical negative ERG. Macular holes are uncommon in the young and those complicating X-linked retinoschisis are rare. This report highlights the importance of investigating the presence of a macular hole in a young patient and illustrates the clinical and SD-OCT clues beyond the foveal center which led to the correct diagnosis of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

Al-Swaina, Nayef; Nowilaty, Sawsan R.

2013-01-01

423

Manners of Speaking: Linguistic Capital and the Rhetoric of Correctness in Late-Nineteenth-Century America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of arguments appeared in the late-nineteenth-century United States about "correctness" in language, arguments for and against enforcing a standard of correctness and arguments about what should count as correct in language. Insofar as knowledge about and facility with "correct" linguistic usage could affect one's standing in the social…

Herring, William Rodney, Jr.

2009-01-01

424

Hanford surplus facilities programs facilities listings and descriptions. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

On the Hanford Site, many surplus facilities exist (including buildings, stacks, tanks, cribs, burial grounds, and septic systems) that are scheduled to be decommissioned. Many of these facilities contain large inventories of radionuclides, which present potential radiological hazards on and off the Hanford Site. Some structures with limited structural deterioration present potential radiological and industrial safety hazards to personnel. Because of the condition of these facilities, a systematic surveillance and maintenance program is performed to identify and correct potential hazards to personnel and the environment until eventual decommissioning operations are completed.

Kiser, S.K.; Witt, T.L.

1994-01-01

425

An overview of correctional psychiatry.  

PubMed

Supermax facilities may be an unfortunate and unpleasant necessity in modern corrections. Because of the serious dangers posed by prison gangs, they are unlikely to disappear completely from the correctional landscape any time soon. But such units should be carefully reserved for those inmates who pose the most serious danger to the prison environment. Further, the constitutional duty to provide medical and mental health care does not end at the supermax door. There is a great deal of common ground between the opponents of such environments and those who view them as a necessity. No one should want these expensive beds to be used for people who could be more therapeutically and safely managed in mental health treatment environments. No one should want people with serious mental illnesses to be punished for their symptoms. Finally, no one wants these units to make people more, instead of less, dangerous. It is in everyone's interests to learn as much as possible about the potential of these units for good and for harm. Corrections is a profession, and professions base their practices on data. If we are to avoid the most egregious and harmful effects of supermax confinement, we need to understand them far better than we currently do. Though there is a role for advocacy from those supporting or opposed to such environments, there is also a need for objective, scientifically rigorous study of these units and the people who live there. PMID:16904510

Metzner, Jeffrey; Dvoskin, Joel

2006-09-01

426

Juvenile Justice in Australia 2009-10. Juvenile Justice Series. Number 8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Australia, the state and territory governments are responsible for dealing with young people who are involved in crime. One major aspect of the juvenile justice system is the supervision of children and young people who have committed or are alleged to have committed an offence. This report presents information on the young people under…

Aalders, Rachel; Morgan, Kirsten

2011-01-01

427

Curfew: An Answer to Juvenile Delinquency and Victimization? Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many jurisdictions have implemented curfews in reaction to increased juvenile delinquency and other social trends. This bulletin explores developments in curfew ordinances, legal issues related to curfews, how community based jurisdictions have responded to these issues, and the elements of sound curfew programs as illustrated in seven…

LeBoeuf, Donni

428

Effects of Juvenile Steelhead on Juvenile Chinook Salmon Behavior and Physiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments were designed to determine whether and how steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss affect chinook salmon O. tshawytscha when the two species are confined together. In a behavioral experiment, we observed groups of juvenile chinook salmon and steelhead together and groups of chinook salmon alone to determine whether the steelhead were aggressive and their presence changed the behavior of chinook salmon. We

D. A. Kelsey; C. B. Schreck; J. L. Congleton; L. E. Davis

2002-01-01

429

The Juvenile Counseling and Assessment Model and Program: A Conceptualization and Intervention for Juvenile Delinquency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a model of conceptualization and intervention for juvenile delinquency. Model includes the characteristics of the adolescent, ecological context in which the adolescent lives, and the interaction among these variables. Describes a specific integrated service, training, and research project based on the model. The project utilizes a…

Calhoun, Georgia B.; Glaser, Brian A.; Bartolomucci, Christi L.

2001-01-01

430

Community-Based Juvenile Reentry Services: The Effects of Service Dosage on Juvenile and Adult Recidivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study the authors examined the influence of length of participation in a community-based reentry program on the odds of reconviction in the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems. A structured telephone survey of reentry program alumni was conducted with 75 transition-age (18-25 year-old) young men. Binary logistic regression analysis…

Abrams, Laura S.; Terry, Diane; Franke, Todd M.

2011-01-01

431

The real face of juvenile polyposis syndrome  

PubMed Central

Colorectal cancers are mostly sporadic; some cases of familial clustering and autosomal dominant conditions are also known to occur. Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by the mutation of the SMAD4 or the BMPR1A genes. JPS is characterized by hamartomatous polyps developing in the upper and lower intestine. Contradicting previous studies, many of these polyps can go through malignant transformation. This paper reports the case of a male patient who was continuously treated for juvenile polyposis. During the eighteen years of treatment, more than hundred polyps were endoscopically removed from his gastrointestinal tract. The patient’s care was interrupted for eight years due to insufficient compliance. He was subsequently referred to our Department of Gastroenterology in severe clinical condition caused by metastatic colorectal cancer. He died after a short palliative therapy at the age of 31. His first-degree accessible relatives were further examined for juvenile polyposis syndrome. Several gastrointestinal polyps of different histological origin were observed in the deceased patient’s brother, who subsequently had to undergo a left lateral hemicolectomy. Genetic analyses revealed mutations of the BMPR1A gene in the clinically affected brother, the brother’s daughter, and in the deceased proband’s daughter. Indebt genetic analyses helped customize and deliver care to a very specific group of individuals. We were able to identify potential family members on whom preventive care and treatment could be focused and simultaneously prevented unnecessary clinical and invasive procedures on those who were healthy. Furthermore, these analyses helped prevent future unnecessary trauma or distress on the analyzed family.

Tam, Beatrix; Salamon, Agnes; Bajtai, Attila; Nemeth, Annamaria; Kiss, Janos; Simon, Laszlo

2012-01-01

432

Psychiatric Disorders in Youth in Juvenile Detention  

PubMed Central

Background Given the growth of juvenile detainee populations, epidemiologic data on their psychiatric disorders are increasingly important. Yet, there are few empirical studies. Until we have better epidemiologic data, we cannot know how best to use the system’s scarce mental health resources. Methods Using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC 2.3), interviewers assessed a randomly selected, stratified sample of 1829 African American, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic youth (1172 males, 657 females, ages 10–18) arrested and detained in Cook County, Illinois (which includes Chicago and surrounding suburbs). We present six-month prevalence estimates by demographic subgroups (gender, race/ethnicity, and age) for the following disorders: affective disorders (major depressive episode, dysthymia, manic episode), anxiety (panic, separation anxiety, overanxious, generalized anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorders), psychosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), disruptive behavior disorders (oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder) and substance use disorders (alcohol and drug). Results Nearly two thirds of males and nearly three quarters of females met diagnostic criteria for one or more psychiatric disorders. Excluding conduct disorder (common among detained youth), nearly 60% of males and over two thirds of females met diagnostic criteria and had diagnosis-specific impairment for one or more psychiatric disorders. One half of males and almost one half of females had a substance use disorder, and over 40% of males and females met criteria for disruptive behavior disorders. Affective disorders were also prevalent, especially among females; 20% of females met criteria for a major depressive episode. Rates of many disorders were higher among females, non-Hispanic whites, and older adolescents. Conclusion These results suggest substantial psychiatric morbidity among juvenile detainees. Youth with psychiatric disorders pose a challenge for the juvenile justice system and, after their release, for the larger mental health system.

Teplin, Linda A.; Abram, Karen M.; McClelland, Gary M.; Dulcan, Mina K.; Mericle, Amy A.

2010-01-01

433

The real face of juvenile polyposis syndrome.  

PubMed

Colorectal cancers are mostly sporadic; some cases of familial clustering and autosomal dominant conditions are also known to occur. Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by the mutation of the SMAD4 or the BMPR1A genes. JPS is characterized by hamartomatous polyps developing in the upper and lower intestine. Contradicting previous studies, many of these polyps can go through malignant transformation.This paper reports the case of a male patient who was continuously treated for juvenile polyposis. During the eighteen years of treatment, more than hundred polyps were endoscopically removed from his gastrointestinal tract. The patient's care was interrupted for eight years due to insufficient compliance. He was subsequently referred to our Department of Gastroenterology in severe clinical condition caused by metastatic colorectal cancer. He died after a short palliative therapy at the age of 31. His first-degree accessible relatives were further examined for juvenile polyposis syndrome. Several gastrointestinal polyps of different histological origin were observed in the deceased patient's brother, who subsequently had to undergo a left lateral hemicolectomy. Genetic analyses revealed mutations of the BMPR1A gene in the clinically affected brother, the brother's daughter, and in the deceased proband's daughter.Indebt genetic analyses helped customize and deliver care to a very specific group of individuals. We were able to identify potential family members on whom preventive care and treatment could be focused and simultaneously prevented unnecessary clinical and invasive procedures on those who were healthy. Furthermore, these analyses helped prevent future unnecessary trauma or distress on the analyzed family. PMID:23205314

Tam, Beatrix; Salamon, Agnes; Bajtai, Attila; Németh, Annamária; Kiss, János; Simon, László; Molnár, Tamás

2012-12-01

434

RCRA FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

435

Evidence for gonococcal transmission within a correctional system.  

PubMed Central

In a study to examine sexually transmissible disease occurring within a large correctional system where sexual activity is prohibited, 27 male inmates acquired culture-proven gonorrhea from in-jail sexual activity during a three-month period. These results provide evidence to encourage inmate education about the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and to support condom distribution programs in correctional facilities.

van Hoeven, K H; Rooney, W C; Joseph, S C

1990-01-01

436

Legislating for Correctional Line Officer Education and Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph was prepared for the Correctional Officers Educational Program, a joint project of the AACJC and the ABA Commission on Correctional Facilities and Services, which works toward the expansion of associate degree programs for line personnel through junior and community colleges. The monograph: (1) considers the role of the legislature…

Perlman, Harvey S.

437

MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA)\\u000a in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric\\u000a patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1–17 years; mean age 9.4 years)

Edward Y. Lee; Robert P. Sundel; Susan Kim; David Zurakowski; Paul K. Kleinman

2008-01-01

438

Anakinra for Myocarditis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

PubMed Central

A 20-year-old pregnant woman with a history of juvenile idiopathic arthritis presented with flu-like symptoms, systemic inflammation with myocarditis, and severe cardiomyopathy. Six weeks earlier, her chronic-arthritis therapy had been changed from anakinra, an interleukin-1? receptor antagonist, to etanercept. When she resumed taking anakinra, her condition improved dramatically, including a complete recovery of ventricular function. Myocarditis is a well-recognized complication of systemic vasculitides. This unusual case emphasizes the important pathophysiologic role of interleukin receptors in the successful treatment of myocarditis. We suggest that clinical cardiologists be aware of the therapeutic usefulness of biological agents such as anakinra in patients with rheumatic conditions.

Movva, Rajesh; Brown, Suzanne B.; Morris, D. Lynn; Figueredo, Vincent M.

2013-01-01

439

Temperament of Juvenile Delinquents with History of Substance Abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The etiological factors and interrelations of juvenile delinquents, with psy- chiatric morbidity and substance abuse have been continuously debated. Cloninger's Tridimensional Theory of Temperament has been reported to predict patterns of substance abuse and comorbidity. In the current study, we aimed to examine the usability of the theory in predicting juvenile delinquen- cy and substance abuse. Methods: Sixty consecutive

Hsueh-Ling Chang; Sue-Huei Chen; Chien Huang

440

Reviving Juvenile Justice in a Get-Tough Era.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes prominent new developments in juvenile justice, focusing on the origins of juvenile justice; the get-tough movement, which emphasizes punishment (transfer to criminal court); and promising ideas in rehabilitation, prevention, and early intervention. Suggests that a new generation of innovative programs might revive the spirit of U.S.…

Butts, Jeffrey A.; Mears, Daniel P.

2001-01-01

441

The behavior of heterotypic resting schools of juvenile grunts (Pomadasyidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resting schools of juvenile grunts (less than 12 cm length), composed primarily of Haemulon flavolineatum and H. plumieri, were studied from 1972 to 1976 on a series of patch reefs surrounded by seagrass beds on the northeast coast of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. Juvenile grunts form large inactive multispecies schools in reef areas by day. Repeated censuses over several

J. C. Ogden; P. R. Ehrlich

1977-01-01

442

Evaluation of Juvenile Competency to Proceed: Applying the Dusky Standard  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the general lack of legal guidance in defining the minimum standard for juvenile competency to proceed, such evaluations are frequently requested. Research suggests that younger adolescents are found incompetent at higher rates than adults and may have unique deficits due to their developmental immaturity. Evaluators must consider these potential deficits when applying the Dusky standard to juvenile evaluations, and

Christina L. Riggs Romaine; Kathleen Kemp; David DeMatteo

2010-01-01

443

Evaluating Juveniles' Adjudicative Competence: A Guide for Clinical Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Grisso, T. (2005). Evaluating juveniles’ adjudicative competence: A guide for clinical practice. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press. ISBN 1568870957.\\u000aDeveloped by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice.

Thomas Grisso

2005-01-01

444

Extinguishing All Hope: Life-without-Parole for Juveniles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sentencing juveniles to life-without-parole (JLWOP) is a practice fraught with ethical dilemmas. Through in-depth interviews with 11 men living sentences of JLWOP, their narratives of their backgrounds and experiences as juveniles were studied. Common themes were identified, and 3 general categories of cases emerged from the narratives. Ethical…

Butler, Frank

2010-01-01

445

Juvenile Crime and Criminal Justice: Resolving Border Disputes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rising juvenile crime rates during the 1970s and 1980s spurred state legislatures across the country to exclude or transfer a significant share of offenders under the age of eighteen to the jurisdiction of the criminal court, essentially redrawing the boundary between the juvenile and adult justice systems. Jeffrey Fagan examines the legal architecture of the new boundary-drawing regime and how

Jeffrey Fagan

2008-01-01

446

Juvenile Crime and Criminal Justice: Resolving Border Disputes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rising juvenile crime rates during the 1970s and 1980s spurred state legislatures across the country to exclude or transfer a significant share of offenders under the age of eighteen to the jurisdiction of the criminal court, essentially redrawing the boundary between the juvenile and adult justice systems. Jeffrey Fagan examines the legal…

Fagan, Jeffrey

2008-01-01

447

Delinquency Cases in Juvenile Court, 2002. OJJDP Fact Sheet #02  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet presents statistics on delinquency cases processed by juvenile courts in 2002. The number of delinquency cases handled by juvenile courts decreased 11 percent between 1997 and 2002. During this time, the number of person offense cases decreased 2 percent, property offense cases decreased 27 percent, drug law violation cases…

Stahl, Anne L.

2006-01-01

448

The Hospitalized Juvenile Offender: A Behavioral/Educational Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research points to two major deficits in the juvenile offender: behavioral (minimal social adaptive skills) and educational (learning disabilities). A private hospitalization treatment program for adolescents is described which combines a behavioral and educational approach to the juvenile offender. A case study illustrates how a…

Burnett, Darrell J.; Curtis, Susann K.

449

Evolution of brain size and juvenile periods in primates  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper assesses selective pressures that shaped primate life histories, with particular attention to the evolution of longer juvenile periods and increased brain sizes. We evaluate the effects of social complexity (as indexed by group size) and foraging complexity (as indexed by percent fruit and seeds in the diet) on the length of the juvenile period, brain size, and brain

Robert Walker; Oskar Burger; John Wagner; Christopher R. Von Rueden

2006-01-01

450

Reclaiming lost opportunities: Applying public health models in juvenile justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper frames juvenile justice as a public health concern and articulates a public health approach to intervention with incarcerated youth. The authors review the founding principles of juvenile justice and examine current practices through the lens of public health concepts. Although the knowledge base is incomplete, existing literature suggests dismal outcomes including high recidivism and low productivity; it also

Diane M. Myers; Anne F. Farrell

2008-01-01

451

Family and Community Perceptions of Quality in Juvenile Justice Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conceptualization and empirical assessment of service quality in juvenile justice remains limited. There are few reports on programmatic attempts to assess satisfaction in juvenile justice programs or attempts to include what constitutes quality of service from multiple customer perspectives. This article describes a potential model, the Gap…

Selber, Katherine; Streeter, Calvin

2004-01-01

452

Treatment of Juveniles Who Sexually Offend: An Overview  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile sexual offending is increasingly being recognized as a serious crime among youth. The prevalence of sexual offending and sexual reoffending suggests that many juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) may repeat their offending behaviors if not treated. However, clinical trials evaluating specific interventions are virtually nonexistent. Instead, the…

Efta-Breitbach, Jill; Freeman, Kurt A.

2004-01-01

453

The Death Penalty for Juveniles: An Assessment of Public Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States is one of the few nations that permits the execution of offenders for murders committed while under the age of 18. The juvenile death penalty has received considerable media and public attention both nationally and internationally. Yet despite the extensive literature on public attitudes toward the death penalty, little research exists on public attitudes toward the juvenile

Sandra Evans Skovron; Joseph E. Scott; Francis T. Cullen

1989-01-01

454

Predictors of Sexual Aggression among Male Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to conduct a longitudinal examination of predictors of sexual aggression among male juvenile offenders. Four hundred and four adolescent males between the ages of 14 and 17 years were recruited from juvenile probation offices to take part in a prospective study of substance use and sexual risk. At baseline,…

Yeater, Elizabeth A.; Lenberg, Kathryn L.; Bryan, Angela D.

2012-01-01

455

Rural Juvenile Delinquency: Problems & Needs in East Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile delinquency problems and ways to improve youth services were explored in a survey conducted in 1975 in 15 East Tennessee counties surrounding Knoxville. The 51 persons interviewed were associated with law enforcement, judicial, and counseling services; respondents believed that juvenile delinquency was on the increase in rural areas and…

Bolton, William Dan; Brown, David W.

456

The Retention and Attrition of Juvenile Justice Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The intent of this study was to examine factors associated with the attrition and retention of juvenile justice teachers. Prior to this study, no data were available on the specific attrition and retention factors of this population. An extensive survey was administered to all of Georgia's juvenile justice teachers. Completed surveys were received…

Houchins, David E.; Shippen, Margaret E.; Cattret, Jack

2004-01-01

457

Female juvenile delinquents' pragmatic awareness of conversational interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standardized testing has shown that juvenile delinquents have a high incidence of communication problems; however, discourse analyses have failed to confirm pragmatic deficits. This study's purpose was to explore, using qualitative procedures, the pragmatic awareness of female juvenile delinquents concerning conversational interactions. The 45 participants engaged in small-group conversations about communication during multiple class periods. On-line field notes served as

Dixie D Sanger; Karen Hux; Mitzi Ritzman

1999-01-01

458

Intraspecific mimicry and status signals in juvenile African penguins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of resting groups of African penguins Spheniscus demersus on land showed that adults were more aggressive towards juveniles than towards adults. Head coloration was important in triggering this aggression. Adults probably discriminate against juveniles to exclude inexperienced birds from co-operative feeding groups and thus maximize their own energetic returns. There was a disproportionately low frequency of penguin groups at

P. G. Ryan; R. P. Wilson; J. Cooper

1987-01-01

459

Environmental and Endogenous Factors Influencing Emigration in Juvenile Anadromous Alewives  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed migration of juvenile anadromous alewives Alosa pseudoharengus at Bride Lake, a coastal lake in Connecticut, during summer 2006 and found that migration on 24-h and seasonal time scales was influenced by conditions of the environment and characteristics of the individual fish. To identify environmental cues of juvenile migration, we continuously video-recorded fish at the lake outflow and employed

Benjamin I. Gahagan; Katie E. Gherard; Eric T. Schultz

2010-01-01

460

ASYMMETRIC COMPETITION, HABITAT SELECTION, AND NICHE OVERLAP IN JUVENILE SALMONIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship among asymmetric competition, habitat selection, and niche overlap is poorly understood. I conducted a response surface design experiment in artificial stream channels using juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) to explore the density- and scale-dependent relationship among asymmetric competition, habitat selection, and niche overlap. In these sympatric populations, juvenile coho are larger, occupy mutually

Kyle A. Young

2004-01-01

461

Society's retributive response to juvenile violence: A developmental perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines theoretical and empirical challenges to a national trend toward increasingly punitive determinate sentences in juvenile court, and “automatic transfer” of juveniles to criminal court, for homicides and other serious violent offenses. Theory and research in developmental psychology, criminology, and child clinical psychology and psychiatry are examined, with special attention to (a) decision-making by adolescents; (b) characteristics of adolescents who

Thomas Grisso I

1996-01-01

462

Unfolding and Refolding of Juvenile Hormone Binding Protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates insect development. JH present in the hemolymph is bound to a specific glycoprotein, juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP), which serves as a carrier to deploy the hormone to target tissues. In this report structural changes of JHBP from Galleria mellonella induced by guanidine hydrochloride have been investigated by a combination of size-exclusion chromatography, protein activity measurements,

Piotr Dobryszycki; Robert Ko?odziejczyk; Daniel Krowarsch; Jacek Gapi?ski; Andrzej O?yhar; Marian Kochman

2004-01-01

463

The Content Validity of Juvenile Psychopathy: An Empirical Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the content validity of a juvenile psychopathy measure, the Childhood Psychopathy Scale (CPS; D. R. Lynam, 1997), based on a downward translation of an adult instrument, the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 1991). The CPS was compared with two other indices of juvenile psychopathy: (a) an index derived…

Lynam, Donald R.; Derefinko, Karen J.; Caspi, Avshalom; Loeber, Rolf; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda

2007-01-01

464

Trauma and Juvenile Delinquency: Theory, Research, and Interventions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book addresses the connection between childhood trauma and juvenile delinquency. It includes theoretical models of this relationship and examinations of its most important aspects, explorations of trauma-related assessment issues, and practical therapeutic interventions for use with juvenile delinquents. Chapters include: (1) "The Role of…

Greenwald, Ricky, Ed.

465

Juvenile Probation Initiatives in California and Their Effects. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past ten years, probation departments across the state of California have undertaken five major initiatives aimed at juvenile offenders and at-risk youths. Although these initiatives were concomitant with reductions in juvenile arrests and other positive outcomes, we cannot definitively attribute such observed statewide trends to these…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry

2005-01-01

466

Natal homing in juvenile loggerhead turtles ( Caretta caretta )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile loggerhead turtles ( Caretta caretta ) from West Atlantic nesting beaches occupy oceanic (pelagic) habitats in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, whereas larger juvenile turtles occupy shallow (neritic) habitats along the continental coastline of North America. Hence the switch from oceanic to neritic stage can involve a trans-oceanic migration. Several researchers have suggested that at the end of the

BRIAN W. B OWEN; ANNA L. B ASS; SHAIO-MEI CHOW; MEREDITH BOSTROM; KAREN A. BJORNDAL; ALAN B. B OLTEN; TOSHINORI OKUYAMA; BENJAMIN M. B OLKER; SHERYAN EPPERLY; ERIN LACASELLA; DONNA SHAVER; MARK DODD; SALLY R. H OPKINS; JOHN A. M USICK; MARK SWINGLE; KAREN RANKIN-BARANSKY; WENDY TEAS; WAYNE N. W ITZELL; PETER H. D UTTON

467

Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice, Annual Report 2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice (FACJJ) is an advisory body established by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act of 1974, as amended (Section 223), and supported by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ),Office of Jus...

2005-01-01

468

Juvenile Delinquency in the Federal Republic of Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile delinquency has gained recognition worldwide as one of the most prominent criminological problem areas as well as a pressing crime political issue. The current state of this field in Germany is characterized by a tremendous increase after World War II, similar to other west European countries, but slightly leveling down since the Eighties. However, the great bulk of juvenile

GÜNTHER KAISER

1992-01-01

469

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to

David A. Strand

2005-01-01

470

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1 and 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the

David A. Strand

2004-01-01

471

Juvenile crime and criminal justice: resolving border disputes.  

PubMed

Rising juvenile crime rates during the 1970s and 1980s spurred state legislatures across the country to exclude or transfer a significant share of offenders under the age of eighteen to the jurisdiction of the criminal court, essentially redrawing the boundary between the juvenile and adult justice systems. Jeffrey Fagan examines the legal architecture of the new boundary-drawing regime and how effective it has been in reducing crime. The juvenile court, Fagan emphasizes, has always had the power to transfer juveniles to the criminal court. Transfer decisions were made individually by judges who weighed the competing interests of public safety and the possibility of rehabilitating young offenders. This authority has now been usurped by legislators and prosecutors. The recent changes in state law have moved large numbers of juveniles into the adult system. As many as 25 percent of all juvenile offenders younger than eighteen, says Fagan, are now prosecuted in adult court. Many live in states where the age boundary between juvenile and criminal court has been lowered to sixteen or seventeen. The key policy question is: do these new transfer laws reduce crime? In examining the research evidence, Fagan finds that rates of juvenile offending are not lower in states where it is relatively more common to try adolescents as adults. Likewise, juveniles who have been tried as adults are no less likely to re-offend than their counterparts who have been tried as juveniles. Treating juveniles as adult criminals, Fagan concludes, is not effective as a means of crime control. Fagan argues that the proliferation of transfer regimes over the past several decades calls into question the very rationale for a juvenile court. Transferring adolescent offenders to the criminal court exposes them to harsh and sometimes toxic forms of punishment that have the perverse effect of increasing criminal activity. The accumulating evidence on transfer, the recent decrease in serious juvenile crime, and new gains in the science of adolescent development, concludes Fagan, may be persuading legislators, policymakers, and practitioners that eighteen may yet again be the appropriate age for juvenile court jurisdiction. PMID:21337999

Fagan, Jeffrey

2008-01-01

472

The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Adaptive Optics Facility is a project to convert one VLT-UT into a specialized Adaptive Telescope. The present secondary mirror (M2) will be replaced by a new M2-Unit hosting a 1170 actuators deformable mirror. The 3 focal stations will be equipped with instruments adapted to the new capability of this UT. Two instruments are in development for the 2 Nasmyth foci: Hawk-I with its AO module GRAAL allowing a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics correction and MUSE with GALACSI for GLAO correction and Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics correction. A future instrument still needs to be defined for the Cassegrain focus. Several guide stars are required for the type of adaptive corrections needed and a four Laser Guide Star facility (4LGSF) is being developed in the scope of the AO Facility. Convex mirrors like the VLT M2 represent a major challenge for testing and a substantial effort is dedicated to this. ASSIST, is a test bench that will allow testing of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and both instruments with simulated turbulence. This article describes the Adaptive Optics facility systems composing associated with it.

Ströbele, S.; Arsenault, R.; Bacon, R.; Biasi, R.; Bonaccini-Calia, D.; Downing, M.; Conzelmann, R. D.; Delabre, B.; Donaldson, R.; Duchateau, M.; Esposito, S.; Fedrigo, E.; Gallieni, D.; Hackenberg, W. K. P.; Hubin, N.; Kasper, M.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Le Louarn, M.; McDermid, R.; Oberti, S.; Paufique, J.; Riccardi, A.; Stuik, R.; Vernet, E.

2006-07-01

473

National Institute of Corrections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Institute of Corrections hosts a wealth of information for anyone in criminal corrections, by "providing federal, state, and local corrections agencies with training, technical assistance, information services, and policy/program development assistance." Their left-hand navigation menu makes it easy to find your way through their site. The Training Services & Resources link allows users to find opportunities for learning, whether one is interested in classroom-based learning, or non-traditional studies via the Internet or other avenues. The Research Center hosts site-developed resources as well as links to other websites relevant to corrections.

2006-11-13

474

What we do not know about juvenile sexual reoffense risk.  

PubMed

States have increasingly subject juvenile sexual offenders to sex offender registration and commitment under sexual predator laws in recent years. These statutes assume that sexual offenders present a sustained risk to recommit sexually violent crimes over an extended time period. Implicit in this assumption is that criminal sexual behavior is a product of some form of stable trait or condition that continues to push the juvenile toward sexually violent behaviors as they get older. This article examines these assumptions in light of the available research on the stability of sexually offending behavior in juveniles. The difficulties attendant to applying adult offender risk assessment models to juvenile sexual offenders are addressed. The available evidence indicates that the development and persistence of sexually criminal behavior is poorly understood, making the prediction of sustained sexual offending in juveniles that is required by some sexual predator statutes a particularly difficult task. PMID:12408242

Caldwell, Michael F

2002-11-01

475

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevad...

2000-01-01

476

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 151 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-03-01

477

Juvenile hormone esterases of Lepidoptera II. Isoelectric points and binding affinities of hemolymph juvenile hormone esterase and binding protein activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) and juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP) activities from the last larval instar of 14 species of Lepidoptera (Pieris rapae, Colias eurytheme, Danaus plexippus, Junonia coenia, Hemileuca nevadensis, Pectinophora gossypiella, Spodoptera exigua, Trichoplusia ni, Heliothis virescens, Orygia vetusta, Ephestia elutella, Galleria mellonella, Manduca sexta andEstigmene acrea) were analyzed by analytical isoelectric focusing (IEF). While the multiplicity

Keith D. Wing; Maria Rudnicka; Grace Jones; Davy Jones; Bruce D. Hammock

1984-01-01

478

Juvenile Delinquency and Teenage Pregnancy: A Comparison of Ecological Risk Profiles among Midwestern White and Black Female Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined ecological risk factors associated with teen pregnancy with a sample of 1,190 court-involved female juvenile offenders between 11 and 18 years of age. Data were obtained from five Midwestern juvenile county courts using a recently developed youth risk assessment instrument called the global risk assessment device (GRAD). In…

Khurana, Atika; Cooksey, Elizabeth C.; Gavazzi, Stephen M.

2011-01-01

479

Juvenile kyphosis: histological and histochemical studies.  

PubMed

Histological and histochemical studies of the spine of a sixteen-year-old boy with juvenile kyphosis who was killed in an automobile accident showed abnormal cartilage in extensive areas of the vertebral and growth plates of the involved vertebrae. In these areas the cartilage matrix was loose, strongly positive when stained with alcian blue and weakly positive to periodic acid-Schiff, and it contained numerous chondrocytes. Some chondrocytes were irregularly shaped and others were in clusters. Vertebral bone growth was stunted under the areas of abnormal vertebral and growth plates. The ossification in the ring apophyses was irregular in areas of abnormal cartilage plate, but necrotic bone was not seen. Schmorl nodes had formed where areas of abnormal cartilage plate adjoining the nucleus pulposus had collapsed, allowing the disc material to herniate into the vertebral body. Clinical Relevance: The defective vertebral-bone formation in juvenile kyphosis appears to result from abnormal vertebral and growth-plate cartilage. The kyphosis and presumably also the cartilage abnormality can be improved during the florid stage of the disease by decreasing the postural load on the anterior part of the vertebrae with the use of a proper brace. PMID:7462274

Ippolito, E; Ponseti, I V

1981-02-01

480

[Lung is also involved in juvenile dermatomyositis].  

PubMed

Juvenile dermatomyositis is the leading cause of chronic idiopathic inflammatory myopathy of auto-immune origin in children. Lung involvement in inflammatory myopathies is well described in adults, involving mostly interstitial lung disease, aspiration pneumonia and alveolar hypoventilation. We propose to describe its specificities in children. Pulmonary involvement may be asymptomatic and therefore must be systematically screened for. In case of clinical or functional respiratory abnormality, a chest computed tomographic (CT) scan is necessary. In children, a decrease of respiratory muscle strength seems common and should be systematically and specifically searched for by non-invasive and reproducible tests (sniff test). Interstitial lung disease usually associates restrictive functional defect, impairment of carbon monoxide diffusion and interstitial lung disease on CT scan. As in adults, the first-line treatment of juvenile dermatomyositis is based on corticosteroids. Corticosteroid resistant forms require corticosteroid bolus or adjuvant immunosuppressive drugs (methotrexate or cyclosporine). There is no consensus in pediatrics for the treatment of diffuse interstitial lung disease. Complications of treatment, including prolonged steroid therapy, are frequent and therefore a careful assessment of the treatments risk-benefit ratio is necessary, especially in growing children. PMID:24856457

Pouessel, G; Thumerelle, C; Nève, V; Santangelo, T; Flammarion, S; Pruvot, I; Tillie-Leblond, I; Deschildre, A

2014-07-01

481

RHIC chromatic correction system  

SciTech Connect

The chromaticity correction system, including the nonlinear correction, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is presented. Expected multipoles in the superconducting magnets have shown that the octupole and decapole might be large enough to reduce the momentum aperture and introduce undesirable nonlinear chromatic behavior of the machine. Simulations of these conditions have been performed with the accelerator physics tracking code TEAPOT. The chromatic dependence curves were obtained by the least square fitting. A correction to the first and the second order terms were applied by using two sextupole and two octupole circuits. The decapole correction system has been applied to correct for the third order dependence on momentum. The long term tracking studies at injection did not include the decapole correction. The studies showed that the octupole correction system significantly improves the dynamical aperture at the injection. The decapole system would not be necessary at commissioning of the machine but the correction magnets will be available. At the top energy, as to be expected, the low beta quadrupoles are the dominant source of the nonlinear momentum dependence.

Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.; Tepikian, S.; Peggs, S.; Dell, F.; Satogata, T.

1993-12-31

482

Correction coil cable  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present invention relates generally to the field of the manufacture of electrical coil windings, and more particularly to a unique cable assembly for use in winding coils having small wires and a large number of winding turns. The predominant current usage of the correction coil cable of the present invention is as the winding wire for correction coils in

Sou-Tien

1991-01-01

483

Multipole correction in synchrotrons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Novel methods of correcting dynamic nonlinearities resulting from the multipole content of a synchrotron are discussed. In simplest form, correction elements are placed at the center (C) of the accelerator half-cells as well as near the focusing (F) and defocusing (D) quadrupoles. In a first approximation, the corrector strengths follow Simpson's rule. The F, C, and D correctors permit direct

David Neuffer

1989-01-01

484

Facility Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

Graves, Ben E.

1984-01-01

485

FACILITY DATABASE  

Cancer.gov

January 2008 LASP FACILTY Database Form 5.000 Issue Reporting Form This form is used to report data and/or program related issues regarding the FACILITY database, Supplemental, or the LASP Online Access System. Before submitting this form,

486

Health Facilities  

MedlinePLUS

Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

487

School Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the building designs of eight school athletic and recreational facilities, including the educational contexts and design goals. Includes information on architects and designers, construction cost, size, and occupancy date. Also provides photographs. (EV)

Athletic Business, 2002

2002-01-01

488

Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)\\/Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The corrective actions proposed in this document are in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and

Wickline

2006-01-01

489

Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata Sheet  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)\\/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552, Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The corrective actions proposed in this document are in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE),

Laura Pastor

2005-01-01

490

Recycling of magmatic clasts during explosive eruptions: estimating the true juvenile content of phreatomagmatic volcanic deposits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The juvenile content of phreatomagmatic deposits contains both ‘first-cycle’ juvenile clasts derived from magma at the instant of eruption, and recycled juvenile clasts, which were fragmented and first ejected by earlier explosions during the eruption, but fell back or collapsed into the vent. Recycled juvenile clasts are similar to accessory and accidental lithics in that they contribute no heat to

B. F. Houghton; R. T. Smith

1993-01-01

491

Principles of competitive exclusion for discrete populations with reproducing juveniles and adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

We invent notions of dominance and weak dominance for discrete multi-species systems with competing juveniles and adults. In this model, both the juveniles and adults are allowed to reproduce. We prove that, a dominant species drives the dominated species to extinction. In discrete juvenile-adult systems that do not allow juveniles to reproduce, it is known that weak dominance is equivalent

John E. Franke; Abdul-Aziz Yakubu

1997-01-01

492

Detecting Juvenile Wood in Southern Pine Lumber by Measuring Phase Shift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identification of juvenile wood in green lumber following sawing would allow for segregation of juvenile wood from mature wood and application of special drying procedures to reduce warp. A dielectric means to detect juvenile wood by analysis of the real and imaginary signal components was applied via adjacent electrodes. Juvenile wood was successfully differentiated from normal wood by comparison of the imaginary signal component.

Cooper, Jerome; Steele, Philip; Mitchell, Brian

2005-04-01

493

ESTIMATING SURVIVAL RATES OF UNCATCHABLE ANIMALS: THE MYTH OF HIGH JUVENILE MORTALITY IN REPTILES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Survival rates of juvenile reptiles are critical population parameters but are difficult to obtain through mark-recapture programs because these small, secretive animals are rarely caught. This scarcity has encouraged speculation that survival rates of juveniles are very low, and we test this prediction by estimating juvenile survival rates indirectly. A simple mathematical model calculates the annual juvenile survival rate needed

David A. Pike; Lígia Pizzatto; Brian A. Pike; Richard Shine

2008-01-01

494

Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report. Hepatitis Testing and Treatment in State Prisons. Correction Reprint, October 2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the 2000 Census of State and Federal Adult Correctional Facilities, 1,209 of the 1,584 State public and private adult correctional facilities reported that they tested inmates for hepatitis C between July 1,1999, and June 30, 2000. These facilities hou...

A. J. Beck L. M. Maruschak

2004-01-01

495

Few juvenile auditory perceptual skills correlate with adult performance.  

PubMed

Measures of human mental development suggest that behavioral skills displayed during early life can predict an individual's subsequent cognitive performance. Support for this draws from longitudinal studies that reveal compelling within-subject correlations during childhood. If this idea applies across the life span, then correlations in performance should persist into adulthood. Here, we address this prediction in juvenile and adult gerbils by evaluating within-subject measures of auditory learning and perception. Animals were trained and tested as juveniles on either an amplitude modulation (AM) or a frequency modulation (FM) detection task. Measures of learning and perception obtained from juveniles were then compared to similar measures obtained when each subject was tested in adulthood on either the same task or the untrained task. For animals trained and tested on the AM detection task as juveniles and adults, there was no correlation between juvenile and adult learning metrics, or perceptual sensitivity. For animals trained and tested on FM detection as juveniles, we observed a significant relationship to their adult performance. Juveniles that performed the best on FM detection were the poorest at AM detection, and the best at FM detection, when tested as adults. Thus, across-age correlations for sensory and cognitive measures, obtained during development and in adulthood, depend heavily on the specific type of developmental experience and the outcome measure. PMID:24512063

Sarro, Emma C; Sanes, Dan H

2014-02-01

496

Global orbit corrections  

SciTech Connect

There are various reasons for preferring local (e.g., three bump) orbit correction methods to global corrections. One is the difficulty of solving the mN equations for the required mN correcting bumps, where N is the number of superperiods and m is the number of bumps per superperiod. The latter is not a valid reason for avoiding global corrections, since, we can take advantage of the superperiod symmetry to reduce the mN simultaneous equations to N separate problems, each involving only m simultaneous equations. Previously, I have shown how to solve the general problem when the machine contains unknown magnet errors of known probability distribution; we made measurements of known precision of the orbit displacements at a set of points, and we wish to apply correcting bumps to minimize the weighted rms orbit deviations. In this report, we will consider two simpler problems, using similar methods. We consider the case when we make M beam position measurements per superperiod, and we wish to apply an equal number M of orbit correcting bumps to reduce the measured position errors to zero. We also consider the problem when the number of correcting bumps is less than the number of measurements, and we wish to minimize the weighted rms position errors. We will see that the latter problem involves solving equations of a different form, but involving the same matrices as the former problem.

Symon, K.

1987-11-01

497

Offense related characteristics and psychosexual development of juvenile sex offenders  

PubMed Central

Objective: This article reports on offense related characteristics and the psychosexual development in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders as measured by the Global Assessment Instrument for Juvenile Sex Offenders (GAIJSO). The predictive validity of these characteristics for persistent (sexual) offensive behavior in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders was investigated. Methods: One hundred seventy four sex offenders (mean age 14.9 SD 1.4) referred by the police to the Dutch Child Protection Board were examined. Offense related characteristics were assessed by means of the GAIJSO and the BARO (a global assessment tool for juvenile delinquents), and criminal careers of the subjects were ascertained from official judicial records. Results: Serious need for comprehensive diagnostics were found on the domains sexual offense and psychosexual development in juvenile sex offenders, especially in the group of child molesters. These youngsters displayed more internalizing and (psychosexual) developmental problems and their sexual offense was more alarming as compared to the other juvenile sex offender subgroups. Although one third of the juveniles had already committed one or more sex offenses prior to the index offense, at follow up (mean follow up period: 36 months SD 18 months) almost no sexual recidivism was found (0.6% of the entire sample). However, a substantial proportion of the entire sample of juvenile sex offenders showed non-sexual (55.6%) and violent recidivism (32.1%). Several predictors for a history of multiple sex offending and non-sexual recidivism were identified. Conclusion: This study revealed numerous problems in juvenile sex offenders. Assessment using the GAIJSO is helpful in order to identify indicators for extensive diagnostic assessment. In order to investigate the predictive validity for sexual reoffending a longer follow up period is necessary.

Hart-Kerkhoffs, Lisette 't A; Doreleijers, Theo AH; Jansen, Lucres MC; van Wijk, Anton PH; Bullens, Ruud AR

2009-01-01

498

Identification of juvenile-hormone-binding proteins on blotted electropherograms using tritiated juvenile hormones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary An electroblotting method has been developed to identify juvenile-hormone-binding proteins (JHBPs) of insects. JHBPs were separated by means of one- or two-dimensional native PAGE and then transferred onto ion-exchange membranes. Following incubation in buffer containing3H-JH, the hormone-binding proteins could be detected by autoradiography or3H-scanning of the blots. InG. mellonella andL. migratoria hemolymph, respectively, two and five electrophoretically different JHBP

J. R. Wi?niewski

1989-01-01

499

Trapping and Transportation of Adult and Juvenile Salmon in the Lower Umatilla River in Northeast Oregon: Umatilla River Basin Trap and Haul Program, October 1994-September 1995.  

SciTech Connect

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were collected at Threemile Dam from August 26, 1994 to June 27, 1995. A total of 1,531 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 688 adult, 236 jack, and 368 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawvtscha); 984 adult and 62 jack coho (O. kisutch) ; and 388 adult and 108 jack spring chinook (O. tshawvtscha) were collected. All fish were trapped at the east bank facility. Of the fish collected, 971 summer steelhead; 581 adult and 27 jack fall chinook; 500 adult and 22 jack coho; and 363 adult and 61 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were also 373 summer steelhead; 12 adult, 186 jack and 317 subjack fall chinook; 379 adult and 32 jack coho; and 15 adult and one jack spring chinook released at Threemile Dam. In addition, 154 summer steelhead were hauled to Bonifer and Minthorn for brood. The Westland Canal facility, located near the town of Echo, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The facility operated for a total of 179 days between December 2, 1994 and July 19, 1995. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 137 days and were trapped 42 days. Three steelhead kelts and an estimated 1,560 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from the Westland Canal trap to the Umatilla River boat ramp at rivermile 0.5. Approximately 98% of the fish transported this year were salmonids. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass began operating March 25, 1995 and was closed on June 16, 1995. The juvenile trap was operated by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife research personnel from April 1, 1995 through the summer to monitor juvenile outmigration.

Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

1995-09-01

500