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1

ASSAULTS IN JUVENILE CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scant research exists exploring the conditions contributing to assaults within juvenile corrections facilities. In fact, very little research exists that addresses violence within prison and detention facilities in general. This lack of research, particularly juvenile corrections research, ignores the fact that incidences of assaults in many juvenile facilities have increased or remained constant in recent years. The study of violence

John P. Vivian; Jennifer N. Grimes; Stella Vasquez

2007-01-01

2

Juvenile Correctional Facilities, 1995. Minnesota Student Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Voluntary survey responses of adolescents in corrections facilities (N=893) are compared to those of adolescents in public schools. Findings are highlighted in the following areas: (1) "Youth, Their Families and Their Environments," which includes sections on population description, family composition and relationships, family alcohol and drug…

Harrison, Patricia A.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Beebe, Timothy J.

3

Immunization Rates in a Canadian Juvenile Corrections Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Canada's judicial system there are more than 31,700 youths admitted to correctional services each year. Given the prevalence of documented medical problems and high-risk behavior in this population, it is important to assess the immunization status of adolescents admitted to juvenile detention facilities. We completed a chart review of all youth admitted to an adolescent custody facility in Kingston,

Leah Bartlett; Marina Kanellos-Sutton; Richard van Wylick

2008-01-01

4

Is Obesity a Problem in a Juvenile Correctional Facility?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study measured changes in body mass index (BMI) of male youths upon admission and 3 months after admission to a long-term juvenile correctional facility and identified potential causes of obesity in this population. Health records for 159 youths admitted during an 18-month period were used to calculate the BMI for each. The annual dietary assessment, standard meal plans, and

Kelly M. Robinson; Debbie Haupt-Hoffman; Barbara Stewart; Faye Schneider; Nancy Hamm; Vicki Garrison

2006-01-01

5

Conditions of Confinement: Juvenile Detention and Corrections Facilities. Research Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The most comprehensive nationwide research ever conducted on the juvenile detention and corrections field was a study by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) assessing conditions of confinement for juveniles and determining the extent to which those conditions conform to recognized national professional standards. The…

Parent, Dale G.; And Others

6

Conditions of Confinement: Juvenile Detention and Corrections Facilities. Research Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The most comprehensive nationwide research ever conducted on the juvenile detention and corrections field was a study by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) assessing conditions of confinement for juveniles and determining the extent to which those conditions conform to recognized national professional standards. The…

Parent, Dale G.; And Others

7

Substance Abuse Treatment in Adult and Juvenile Correctional Facilities: Findings from the Uniform Facility Data Set 1997 Survey of Correctional Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents methodology and findings from the Uniform Facility Data Set (UFDS) 1997 Survey of Correctional Facilities, which surveyed about 7,600 adult and juvenile correctional facilities to identify those that provide on-site substance abuse treatment to their inmates or residents. The survey assesses substance abuse treatment provided…

Marsden, Mary Ellen, Ed.; Straw, Richard S., Ed.

8

Learning to C: Visual Arts Education as Strengths Based Practice in Juvenile Correctional Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Strength-based approaches, originating in juvenile justice as early as the late 1800s, situate the work of juvenile correctional facilities as assisting youth in utilizing their strengths and competencies to understand how they can be applied their lives to affect change and growth. While strengths-based approaches might have originated…

Oesterreich, Heather A.; Flores, Sara McNie

2009-01-01

9

Assessment of Space Needs in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities. Report to Congress.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In its appropriation for the U.S. Department of Justice for Fiscal Year 1998, Congress asked the Office of Justice Programs to assess present and future needs for space in the Nations juvenile detention and correctional facilities. In response to that req...

1998-01-01

10

Critical Factors in Mental Health Programming for Juveniles in Corrections Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juveniles with mental health and other specialized needs are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system, and while juvenile corrections have not historically provided standardized and evidence-based mental health services for its incarcerated youth, the demand is evident. The reality is that juveniles with serious mental illness are committed…

Underwood, Lee A.; Phillips, Annie; von Dresner, Kara; Knight, Pamela D.

2006-01-01

11

Juvenile Corrections in the Philippines  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a discussion of the formal system of juvenile corrections in the Philippines, including laws and official procedures outlined in the juvenile code and brief descriptions of several correctional facilities located in the metropolitan area of Cagayan de Oro City. In addition, there is a discussion of another system of justice that has also been formalized by law

Donald J. Shoemaker

1997-01-01

12

The Status and Praxis of Arts Education and Juvenile Offenders in Correctional Facilities in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article briefly describes the results of a study, funded in 2001 by The National Art Education Foundation, of arts education in juvenile correctional facilities in the United States. It summarizes the results of a national survey, and it presents the Northeastern Training School* and STUDIO 200* as a model for community-based arts…

Williams, Rachel Marie-Crane

2008-01-01

13

Mental Disorders among Adolescents in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities: A Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis of 25 Surveys  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The article presents a meta-analysis of all existing surveys on the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in adolescents in juvenile detention and correctional facilities in order to assess the prevalence of mental disorders. Findings indicate adolescents in detention are 10 times more likely to suffer from psychosis than the general adolescent…

Fazel, Seena; Doll, Helen; Langstrom, Niklas

2008-01-01

14

Report on Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Correctional Facilities. Review Panel on Prison Rape.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In accordance with the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) of 2003, the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) published Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-09 (Jan. 2010). The report, the first of its kind that relied on data f...

2010-01-01

15

Juvenile Corrections in Indiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article argues that the growing trend toward tough penalties in corrections is not the solution to juvenile violence. Rather, policy addressing increased violence should take account of research, which suggests a focus on the home and community. Children are forced to become independent and competitive too soon. Instead, emphasis should be placed on the process, not the product. We

Edward L. Cohn; William G. Hinkle

2000-01-01

16

Boot camps and traditional correctional facilities for juveniles A comparison of the participants, daily activities, and environments ? ? An earlier version of this research was presented at the 1998 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology in Washington, DC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The environments of twenty-seven boot camps and twenty-two traditional facilities were examined in a national study of juvenile correctional facilities. Surveys with administrators and data from institutional files indicated that juveniles in the boot camps had less serious offending histories than did those in traditional facilities. Boot camp environments were more structured and most incorporated military basic training components. There

Angela R Gover; Doris Layton MacKenzie; Gaylene J Styve

2000-01-01

17

TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern  

MedlinePLUS

... in federal or state prisons, local jails, juvenile correction centers, or other facilities. Other correctional facilities include ... Got Mice? Know Hepatitis B Secondhand Smoke TB & Corrections Data & Statistics Diseases & Conditions Emergency Preparedness & Response Environmental ...

18

Prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the Texas juvenile correctional system.  

PubMed

Most studies assessing the burden of psychiatric disorders in juvenile correctional facilities have been based on small or male-only samples or have focused on a single disorder. Using electronic data routinely collected by the Texas juvenile correctional system and its contracted medical provider organization, we estimated the prevalence of selected psychiatric disorders among youths committed to Texas juvenile correctional facilities between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008 (N = 11,603). Ninety-eight percent were diagnosed with at least one of the disorders. Highest estimated prevalence was for conduct disorder (83.2%), followed by any substance use disorder (75.6%), any bipolar disorder (19.4%), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (18.3%), and any depressive disorder (12.6%). The estimated prevalence of psychiatric disorders among these youths was exceptionally high and showed patterns by sex, race/ethnicity, and age that were both consistent and inconsistent with other juvenile justice samples. PMID:22419644

Harzke, Amy Jo; Baillargeon, Jacques; Baillargeon, Gwen; Henry, Judith; Olvera, Rene L; Torrealday, Ohiana; Penn, Joseph V; Parikh, Rajendra

2012-03-14

19

The Correctional Orientation of "Child Savers": Support for Rehabilitation and Custody among Juvenile Correctional Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies have explored levels and sources of support for rehabilitation and custody among correctional workers. However, the vast majority of this type of research has been conducted in adult facilities, and there are few existing studies that use samples of juvenile correctional workers. To help address this gap in the literature, we use a…

Blevins, Kristie R.; Cullen, Francis T.; Sundt, Jody L.

2007-01-01

20

Jail Pedagogy: Liberatory Education inside a California Juvenile Detention Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Approximately 2 million juveniles are arrested each year. Half are sentenced to serve terms of incarceration. Although many scholars have written about teaching in detention facilities, few directly address how prisoners are being taught. This research explores the experiences, teaching philosophy, and practices of correctional educators. To…

Flores, Jerry

2012-01-01

21

Juveniles within Adult Correctional Settings: Legal Pathways and Developmental Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing number of juvenile offenders are being processed through adult correctional systems in the United States. Changing conceptions of juvenile offenders and expansions to the criteria for juvenile transfer laws have created a number of new challenges for correctional systems, policy makers and researchers. In this article, we detail the legal mechanisms that bring adolescents into the adult system.

Jennifer L. Woolard; Candice Odgers; Lonn Lanza-Kaduce; Hayley Daglis

2005-01-01

22

The Comparative Risk of Mistreatment for Juveniles in Detention Facilities and State Prisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little research exists on the prevalence of victimization among young people in juvenile correctional facilities and adult jails and prisons. The limited extant research suggests that youth incarcerated in adult prisons and jails are at greater risk for physical and sexual abuse (Redding, 1999) compared to both adult inmates in the same facilities and youths in juvenile detention centers. Yet

Lacey Levitt

2010-01-01

23

Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility  

PubMed Central

The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once under instructions to fake good (FG). Under SI, substance scales correctly classified about 60% to 85% of adolescents. Under FG, substance- and non-substance-abusing juveniles produced lower scores on substance scales. However, the Lie Scale (L) was able to detect more than 75% of deceptive profiles and about 77% of honest profiles. When scale L and the best substance scale were used in combination, only about 18% of faking substance abusers were not identified as either substance abusers or as underreporting. For feigning substance abusers, only about 10% of substance abusers were detected, with about 72% being categorized as faking and needing further assessment.

Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

2010-01-01

24

Use of the Adolescent SASSI in a Juvenile Correctional Setting  

PubMed Central

The Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory–Adolescent (SASSI-A) is used in evaluation and treatment planning for incarcerated juveniles. Validity of the SASSI-A in a juvenile correctional facility was examined using archival data. Findings generally support the validity of SASSI-A substance use scales. However, there is concern regarding the potential for ethnic bias in this setting. Cut-scores suggest that the SASSI-A may best be used for detecting problematic alcohol consumption using the Face Valid Alcohol Scale ? 3. Future studies should more closely investigate whether the three underlying dimensions of the SASSI-A are useful in treatment planning. Results are presented in light of the relatively new SASSI-A2.

Stein, L. A. R.; Lebeau-Craven, Rebecca; Martin, Rosemarie; Colby, Suzanne M.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Golembeske, Charles; Penn, Joseph V.

2010-01-01

25

Intensive Reading Instruction in Juvenile Correctional Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite 60 years of evidence linking juvenile illiteracy and delinquency, practitioners and policymakers have been painfully slow in the implementation of evidence-based reading interventions for incarcerated juveniles. We will present the Texas Juvenile Justice Tiered Instructional Model, an evidence-based reading program model created…

Williams, Jacob L.; Wexler, Jade; Roberts, Greg; Carpenter, Clint

2011-01-01

26

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.|

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

27

New Dimensions in Staff Development in a Juvenile Correctional System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Recognizing that there must be mutual communication and respect between administrators and employees, the Juvenile Division of the Illinois Department of Corrections has implemented extensive in-service training for all employees. (MK)|

Grenier, Walter J.

1971-01-01

28

Helping Female Juveniles Improve their On-Task Behavior and Academic Performance Using a Self-Management Procedure in a Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to teach female juvenile offenders with disabilities a self-management procedure to help improve on-task behavior and academic performance during independent practice of math calculation facts. Students were taught to set goals and were provided with incentives for goal attainment. A reversal single-case design…

Caldwell, Stacy; Joseph, Laurice M.

2012-01-01

29

Helping Female Juveniles Improve their On-Task Behavior and Academic Performance Using a Self-Management Procedure in a Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to teach female juvenile offenders with disabilities a self-management procedure to help improve on-task behavior and academic performance during independent practice of math calculation facts. Students were taught to set goals and were provided with incentives for goal attainment. A reversal single-case design…

Caldwell, Stacy; Joseph, Laurice M.

2012-01-01

30

Resiliency in Adolescent Males in a Correctional Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this qualitative study was to establish the existing positive factors in the lives of 18 juvenile males living in a low-security correctional facility in order to determine approaches which foster resiliency. Urie Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory, an approach to understanding human development within the context of the…

Feinstein, Sheryl; Baartman, Jyl; Buboltz, Michelle; Sonnichsen, Kim; Solomon, Rebekka

2008-01-01

31

Correctional Supervision of Juvenile Offenders: Where Do We Go from Here?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report on correctional supervision of juvenile offenders begins by identifying two principal factors affecting supervision--facility overcrowding and a declining number of offenders expected because of demographic trends. It notes that overcrowding eventually will be alleviated by the decrease in the number of offenders, and that this…

Greenwood, Peter W.

32

Juvenile Residential Facility Census, 2002: Selected Findings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report offers a comprehensive statistical overview of the problems of juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and the response of the juvenile justice system. In October 2002, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) admi...

M. Sickmund

2006-01-01

33

Youth With Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections: A National Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improving our knowledge of the number of incarcerated youth with disabilities can as- sist educators, other professionals, and policymakers to develop more effective services for youth. This article reports the findings of a national survey conducted to determine the number of youth identified as having disabilities in the juvenile corrections systems in the United States. The data show that, when

MARY MAGEE QUINN; ROBERT B. RUTHERFORD; PETER E. LEONE; DAVID M. OSHER; JEFFREY M. POIRIER

34

Juvenile Correctional Schools: Characteristics and Approaches to Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study focused on school-level approaches to curriculum, as well as school, principal, and student characteristics in juvenile corrections (JC) schools for committed youth. A national random sample of 131 principals from these schools responded to a mail and on-line survey. No statistically significant differences existed between respondent…

Gagnon, Joseph C.; Barber, Brian R.; Van Loan, Christopher; Leone, Peter E.

2009-01-01

35

Juvenile Correctional Schools: Assessment and Accountability Policies and Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study focused on school-level approaches to assessment and accountability policies and practices. A national random sample of 131 (34.22%) principals from juvenile correctional schools for committed youth (JC) responded to a mail and on-line survey. No statistically significant differences existed between respondent and nonrespondent…

Gagnon, Joseph C.; Haydon, Todd; Maccini, Paula

2010-01-01

36

From High School to Juvenile Corrections: The Downward Spiral  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) require pervasive supports that are typically addressed through behavior intervention plans. This article illustrates one student's ("Mark") journey from the general education high school campus, to an alternative discipline campus, and subsequent placement at a juvenile corrections setting. Also,…

Rueter, Jessica A.; Trice, John Nathan

2011-01-01

37

The social archeology of a juvenile facility: Unobtrusive methods in the study of institutional cultures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structure and culture of inmate societies have been studied using a variety of research methods. Neglected among these have been unobtrusive research methods which can provide independent sources of data to test theories or challenge existing research findings. This study uses content analysis of graffiti collected from the walls of an abandoned Massachusetts juvenile correctional facility. Informant interviews and

John M. Klofas; Charles R. Cutshall

1985-01-01

38

American Academy of Pediatrics: Health care for children and adolescents in the juvenile correctional care system.  

PubMed

Over the past decade, there has been a dramatic increase in the population of juvenile offenders in the United States. Juveniles detained or confined in correctional care facilities have been shown to have numerous health problems. Such conditions may have existed before incarceration; may be closely associated with legal problems; may have resulted from parental neglect, mental health disorders, or physical, drug, or sexual abuse; or may develop within the institutional environment. Delinquent youths are often disenfranchised from traditional health care services in the community. For these adolescents, health care provided through correctional services may be their major source of health services. Pediatricians and correctional health care systems have an opportunity and responsibility to help improve the health of this underserved and vulnerable group of adolescents. PMID:11335764

2001-04-01

39

76 FR 11337 - Presidential Library Facilities; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NARA-07-0005] RIN 3095-AA82 Presidential Library Facilities; Correction AGENCY: National...and design standards for Presidential libraries and information required in NARA's...facility, and equipment as a Presidential library. DATES: This regulation is...

2011-03-02

40

Rethinking Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on juvenile arrests, court processing, and admissions to juvenile correctional facilities offer important information to help rethink juvenile justice policy directions of the last decade. Most striking is the progress in reducing the involvement of status offenders within the juvenile justice system between 1974-1979. Less encouraging is that similar progress was not achieved in the case of delinquent offenders.

Barry Krisberg; Ira Schwartz

1983-01-01

41

Effective Instructional Practices in Juvenile Justice Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The majority of youths involved with the juvenile justice system struggle to make academic progress. This article reviews the characteristics of youths in these settings and highlights evidence-based instructional practices that are effective with struggling students, as well as practices that have been documented as successful in secure…

Mathur, Sarup R.; Schoenfeld, Naomi

2010-01-01

42

Assessing the Security Vulnerabilities of Correctional Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Institute of Justice has tasked their Satellite Facility at Sandia National Laboratories and their Southeast Regional Technology Center in Charleston, South Carolina to devise new procedures and tools for helping correctional facilities to assess their security vulnerabilities. Thus, a team is visiting selected correctional facilities and performing vulnerability assessments. A vulnerability assessment helps to identi~ the easiest paths for inmate escape, for introduction of contraband such as drugs or weapons, for unexpected intrusion fi-om outside of the facility, and for the perpetration of violent acts on other inmates and correctional employees, In addition, the vulnerability assessment helps to quantify the security risks for the facility. From these initial assessments will come better procedures for performing vulnerability assessments in general at other correctional facilities, as well as the development of tools to assist with the performance of such vulnerability assessments.

Morrison, G.S.; Spencer, D.S.

1998-10-27

43

ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTIONS OF SOUTH CAROLINA'S JUVENILE CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS, INSIGHT INTO THE TURNOVER EPIDEMIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

Employee turnover has long been a problematic issue in the field of corrections. In the past, research has attempted to identify causal factors to address the staff attrition issue, but has failed to complete the void of information regarding staff turnover among the juvenile correctional officers. The current study examines juvenile correctional staff's degree of job satisfaction and their retention

Jeffrey A. Tipton

2002-01-01

44

The Metamorphosis of Juvenile Correctional Education: Incidental Conception to Intentional Inclusion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile Correctional Education has been evolving in the United States for over 360 years. From inclusion in an indentured servant/foster care type of placement legislated in the Massachusetts Colony in 1642, it has become manifest today as an entitlement regardless of juvenile justice disposition. The education for juveniles was wrapped in the…

Keeley, James H.

2004-01-01

45

Juvenile Counselor Physical Abilities Report. Standards and Training for Corrections Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the physical abilities required for juvenile counselors was conducted as part of the development of evaluation procedures for juvenile counselor candidates in the Standards and Training for Corrections Program in California. Data were gathered through questionnaires and telephone interviews with juvenile counselors and their supervisors…

California State Board of Corrections, Sacramento.

46

Juvenile Corrections and the Exceptional Student. ERIC Digest #E509.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This digest summarizes available information on the educational needs of disabled youth in correctional facilities. The high incidence of disabilities among incarcerated youth is noted and explanations are offered (e.g., they may not be recognized as disabled). The following topics are addressed: entitlement of youths with disabilities in…

Leone, Peter E.; And Others

47

The Association between Suicide Screening Practices and Attempts Requiring Emergency Care in Juvenile Justice Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To provide a national description of suicide screening practices in juvenile residential facilities and to examine their association with whether facilities experience a suicide attempt. Method: Multivariate modeling with data from the 2000 Juvenile Residential Facility Census (n = 3690 facilities). Results: Controlling for facility

Gallagher, Catherine A.; Dobrin, Adam

2005-01-01

48

Report on a National Survey of Correctional Health Facilities: A Needs Assessment of Health Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey comprised of twenty correctional health issues and twelve statements regarding the state of knowledge, training, and resources related to legal and ethical issues was mailed to medical directors at prisons, jails, and juvenile facilities across the country. The responses were tabulated and analyzed based upon a number of independent as well as associated variables. The top issues identified

T. Howard Stone; William J. Winslade

1998-01-01

49

Psychology Internship Training in a Correctional Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interns completing American Psychological Association-accredited internships in correctional facilities were surveyed regarding their perceptions of their internship experience. Several of the internships surveyed included a formal forensic rotation. Results revealed that these internships provided an excellent degree of core training. Findings uniformly suggested that these interns were satisfied with the quality of their training and felt prepared for future employment.

CHRISTINA A. PIETZ; RICHART L. DeMIER; RICHARD D. DIENST; JO B. GREEN; BRIAN SCULLY

1998-01-01

50

Juvenile Counselor Physical Conditioning Course. Standards and Training for Corrections Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual introduces and explains the juvenile counselor physical training course developed as part of the evaluation procedures for juvenile counselor candidates in the Standards and Training for Corrections program in California. The manual is organized in four sections. The first section introduces the physical conditioning module, including…

California State Board of Corrections, Sacramento.

51

Linking Basic and Advanced Motivational Interviewing Training Outcomes for Juvenile Correctional Staff in California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based communication method that can be effective in engaging incarcerated juveniles in substance abuse programming and other treatment services. However, MI can be difficult to learn and often requires several training exposures for skill change. Few studies have examined MI training outcomes over time. This study reports outcomes for 222 juvenile corrections workers trained in

Neal Doran; Melinda Hohman; Igor Koutsenok

2011-01-01

52

Perceptions of Social Climate in a Juvenile Correctional Institution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Utilizes a modified therapeutic community model to investigate the social climate of a juvenile training school. Results indicate few significant differences among staff members' perceptions, although significant differences are present between staff and residents. Findings show that researchers must distinguish between juvenile and adult…

Smith, Benjamin W.; Maume, Michael O.; Reiner, Scott M.

1997-01-01

53

Census of State and Federal Correctional Facilities, 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) conducted a national censusCensus of State and Federal Correctional Facilities (CSFCF) of adult correctional facilities operating under state or federal authority as of December 2005. The census also included private...

J. J. Stephan

2008-01-01

54

Plato and Rawls on Correctional Rehabilitation of Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adopting the perspectives of two innovators in Western thought, Plato and Rawis, this article addresses the issues of juvenile offenders' rehabilitation and consent. These philosophers have been chosen because they accept as an axiom society's obligation to offer offenders the chance to be rehabilitated. Furthermore, they both emphasize the need to develop reason and cognitive structures as a precondition for

Brenda Geiger

1996-01-01

55

Facility-Level Characteristics Associated with Serious Suicide Attempts and Deaths from Suicide in Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Little is known about how facility-level characteristics affect the risk of suicide and suicide attempts in juvenile justice residential facilities. This leaves facility administrators and mental health providers without evidence-based guidance on how the facility itself affects risks. The current study uses data from two recently developed…

Gallagher, Catherine A.; Dobrin, Adam

2006-01-01

56

Juvenile Corrections and Public Health Collaborations: Opportunities for Improved Health Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most juveniles behind bars move in and out of facilities with short lengths of stay. Relatively few have longer sentences\\u000a for more serious crimes; they all return to the community. In 2003, law enforcement agencies reported 2.2 million arrests\\u000a of persons under age 18 (Snyder & Sickmund, 2006). The most serious charges in almost half of all juvenile arrests were

Michelle Staples-Horne; Kaiyti Duffy; Michele T. Rorie

57

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions on the Umatilla River; 1994 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on our progress from October 1993 through September 1994 in evaluating juvenile salmonid bypass facilities and juvenile salmonid passage through ladder facilities, and investigating passage conditions for juvenile fish at diversion dam facilities on the lower Umatilla River in northeastern Oregon. We also report on our progress in evaluating adult salmonid passage at and between dams on the

Suzanne M

1995-01-01

58

Delinquent Self-Concepts in Juvenile Correctional Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many of the leading theories of delinquent behavior incorporate an assumption that low self-esteem is a causal factor in the generation of delinquency. Based upon this assumption, many delinquency prevention programs include techniques for elevating the self-esteem of juveniles. This paper reports an evaluation of such a program through a One-Group Pretest-Posttest design. Significant changes in self-concept (as measured by

Ronald E. Vogel; Stephen E. Brown

1983-01-01

59

Corrections and Juvenile Justice: Current Education Practice for Youth with Learning and Other Disabilities. Monograph Series on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph, one of a series on youth with disabilities and the juvenile justice system, focuses on the educational services provided to youth with behavioral and cognitive disabilities placed in the juvenile justice system. It reports on a review of correctional system monitoring reports, materials from enforcement actions taken against…

Howell, Kenneth W.; Wolford, Bruce I.

60

Learning behind Bars: Selected Educational Programs from Juvenile, Jail and Prison Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes briefly a number of highly effective educational programs in correctional settings. The programs are divided into three sections: juvenile correctional education, local detention/community correctional education, and prison education. Information provided for each program includes address and telephone number; type of…

Sawyer, Richard; Cosgrove, Susan, Ed.

61

Juvenile Justice. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These classroom materials are part of the Project Benchmark series designed to teach secondary students about our legal concepts and systems. This unit focuses on the California juvenile justice system. The materials describe the historical and legal development of the system, juvenile court procedures, correction facilities, and various creative…

Eaneman, Paulette S.

62

Tuberculosis in Texas correctional facilities between 2005--2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been well documented that inmates incarcerated in prisons and correctional facilities exhibit higher incidence and prevalence of mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) disease than the general population. This has public health implications because correctional systems may serve as reservoirs for TB disease that can lead to TB outbreaks in the facilities or can be spread to the general public once

Truc Thanh Pham

2012-01-01

63

A National Survey of Group Psychotherapy Services in Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facilitating group psychotherapy in correctional settings presents dilemmas and concerns that are unmatched in other environments, often leaving clinicians grasping for therapeutic advantages. This article provides information regarding national practices of group psychotherapy services for male inmates in state correctional facilities (n = 79) as reported by correctional mental health providers (n = 162). The general findings of this study

Robert D. Morgan; Carrie L. Winterowd; Sean W. Ferrell

1999-01-01

64

General job stress and job-specific stress in juvenile correctional officers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measures of general job stress (Job Stress Index—JSI; Sandman, 1992) and appraisal of specific job-related stressors (SSOSQ; Anson et al., 1997) were administered to 413 juvenile correctional officers (JCOs) and to eighty-four of their supervisors. JCOs evaluated their work environment as more stressful on the JSI than workers in the normative sample on every job stress dimension except ‘time pressure’.

Stephen M. Auerbach; Ben G. Quick; Phillip O. Pegg

2003-01-01

65

Treatment of Moderately Intellectually Disabled Delinquent Youth in a Dutch Juvenile Justice Facility with Closed and Open Units  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article will focus on a juvenile justice facility in the Netherlands, targeted at moderately intellectually disabled juveniles, who are sentenced because of serious crimes. All of the juveniles have a disruptive disorder (conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder) and 70% have comorbid psychiatric classifications. Treatment amounts…

Lodewijks, Henny P. B.

2011-01-01

66

Treatment of Moderately Intellectually Disabled Delinquent Youth in a Dutch Juvenile Justice Facility with Closed and Open Units  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article will focus on a juvenile justice facility in the Netherlands, targeted at moderately intellectually disabled juveniles, who are sentenced because of serious crimes. All of the juveniles have a disruptive disorder (conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder) and 70% have comorbid psychiatric classifications. Treatment amounts to…

Lodewijks, Henny P. B.

2011-01-01

67

Developmental Assets: Profile of Youth in a Juvenile Justice Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Possessing high numbers of developmental assets greatly reduces the likelihood of a young person engaging in health-risk behaviors. Since youth in the juvenile justice system seem to exhibit many high-risk behaviors, the purpose of this study was to assess the presence of external, internal, and social context areas of developmental…

Chew, Weslee; Osseck, Jenna; Raygor, Desiree; Eldridge-Houser, Jennifer; Cox, Carol

2010-01-01

68

Developmental Assets: Profile of Youth in a Juvenile Justice Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Possessing high numbers of developmental assets greatly reduces the likelihood of a young person engaging in health-risk behaviors. Since youth in the juvenile justice system seem to exhibit many high-risk behaviors, the purpose of this study was to assess the presence of external, internal, and social context areas of developmental…

Chew, Weslee; Osseck, Jenna; Raygor, Desiree; Eldridge-Houser, Jennifer; Cox, Carol

2010-01-01

69

Economic Benefits of Power Factor Correction at a Nuclear Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The economic benefits of correcting poor power factor at an operating nuclear facility are shown. A project approach for achieving rapid return of investment without disrupting plant availability is described. Examples of technical problems associated wit...

R. M. Boger W. Dalos M. E. Juguilon

1986-01-01

70

Improving Literacy Skills of Juvenile Detainees. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Office of Juvenile and Delinquency Prevention funded a model designed to improve the literacy level of youth in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. The model specified training language arts teachers and relevant staff and volunteers in direct instruction methods for rapid improvement of students' comprehension, particularly for…

Hodges, Jane; And Others

71

Risk Factors for Chlamydia Among Young Women in a Northern California Juvenile Detention Facility: Implications for Community Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives\\/Goal: Chlamydia infections are increasing in California, with rates highest in young women aged 15 to 24. Juvenile detention facilities are important venues for screening high-risk youth who may not otherwise access care. We, therefore, sought to identify risk factors for urogenital chlamydia among young women in a county juvenile detention facility between 2002 and 2005. Study Design: With the

Diana D. Mcdonnell; Vivian Levy; Theresa J. M. Morton

2009-01-01

72

Trauma Affect Regulation Psychoeducation Group and Milieu Intervention Outcomes in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports outcomes of Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET), a group and milieu intervention, in three juvenile detention facilities, controlling for site, length of stay, ethnicity, number of arrests, mental health and traumatic stress problems, and cohort effects. Linear multiple regression results showed that every session of TARGET received in the first seven days of

Julian D. Ford; Josephine Hawke

2012-01-01

73

Adapting Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports for Secure Juvenile Justice Settings: Improving Facility-Wide Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The popularity and success of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in public schools across the United States has led professionals to advocate for its implementation in secure juvenile settings. Statewide implementation efforts have been mounted in several jurisdictions, and a number of secure facilities are applying it with…

Jolivette, Kristine; Nelson, C. Michael

2010-01-01

74

Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

2009-01-01

75

Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

2009-01-01

76

Prevalence of Chlamydial and Gonorrheal Infections Among Females in a Juvenile Detention Facility, Honolulu, Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Limited studies have shown high rates of gonorrheal and chlamydial infections among incarcerated adolescents, however, this population has not been routinely targeted for sexually transmitted disease (STD) screening. This study was done to ascertain the feasibility of screening females for STDs at a juvenile detention facility in Honolulu, Hawaii, and to determine the prevalence of chlamydial and gonorrheal infections in

Alan R. Katz; Maria Veneranda C. Lee; Roy G. Ohye; Paul V. Effler; Elmer C. Johnson; Steven M. Nishi

2004-01-01

77

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1990 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon

Gerald D

1991-01-01

78

Adapting Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports for Secure Juvenile Justice Settings: Improving Facility-Wide Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The popularity and success of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in public schools across the United States has led professionals to advocate for its implementation in secure juvenile settings. Statewide implementation efforts have been mounted in several jurisdictions, and a number of secure facilities are applying it with…

Jolivette, Kristine; Nelson, C. Michael

2010-01-01

79

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesMany adolescents admitted to detention facilities have serious mental and physical health problems. Little is known about policies for the delivery of mental and physical health care in these settings. Our objective was to describe current health care policies in U.S. detention facilities.

KATHLEEN A. PAJER; KELLY KELLEHER; RAVINDRA A. GUPTA; JENNIFER ROLLS; WILLIAM GARDNER

2007-01-01

80

Special Education in Juvenile Residential Facilities: Can Animals Help?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with emotional\\/behavioral disorders (EBD) are arguably one of the highest at-risk groups for dropping out before graduating high school. They are the group of students with disabilities who are most likely to be educated in residential facilities. Residential facilities such as Green Chimneys have incorporated animals into the treatment milieu with success. Animals have been used in various settings

Sally E. Thigpen; Stephanie K. Ellis; Rebecca G. Smith

81

High School Education in Correctional Facilities. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of "Get tough on crime" and "Three strikes" in the 1980s and 1990s, correctional facilities have become overloaded with prisoners who are often repeat offenders. 51% of those imprisoned have a GED or high school diploma. Out of the remaining 49%, 36% of inmates had not completed the ninth grade and approximately a quarter of them…

Walker, Karen

2006-01-01

82

Literacy Education in Correctional Facilities: The “Hope” for Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incarcerated students are more likely than their nonincarcerated peers to have reading problems. Teachers in correctional facilities are faced with many challenges when attempting to help these students. Technology assisted instruction offers teachers hope in assisting these students to better achieve.

Suzanne Engel

2005-01-01

83

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1993 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents progress from October 1992 through September 1993 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls, Maxwell, Westland, and Feed Canal dams on the Umatilla River, and in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River. Also reported is an effort to evaluate delayed mortality and stress responses of juvenile salmonids resulting from trapping and

Suzanne M

1994-01-01

84

Linking basic and advanced motivational interviewing training outcomes for juvenile correctional staff in California.  

PubMed

Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based communication method that can be effective in engaging incarcerated juveniles in substance abuse programming and other treatment services. However, MI can be difficult to learn and often requires several training exposures for skill change. Few studies have examined MI training outcomes over time. This study reports outcomes for 222 juvenile corrections workers trained in MI in a three-day introductory and two-day advanced training. MI skills were measured via video-administered pre- and post-tests and with a written questionnaire. Combined results from a linear mixed model found that overall MI skills were positively associated with staff education level, and negatively associated with age and time between trainings. Those who attended their second training within nine months of the first training were more likely to score in the proficiency range. Motivation to use MI, belief in its efficacy with youth, job classification, and sex were not related to skill attainment. PMID:22185036

Doran, Neal; Hohman, Melinda; Koutsenok, Igor

2011-09-01

85

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1994 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs and Imeques C-mem-ini-kem acclimation facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook

Gerald D

1995-01-01

86

Accommodative Lag and Juvenile-Onset Myopia Progression in Children Wearing Refractive Correction  

PubMed Central

The relationship between accommodative lag and annual myopia progression was investigated using linear models in 592 myopic children wearing a full refractive correction in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. The mean (± SD) age and spherical equivalent refractive error at baseline were 10.4 ± 1.8 years and ?2.13 ± 1.24 D, respectively. The mean annual progression of myopia was ?0.45 ± 0.32 D, and the mean accommodative lag (for a 4-D Badal stimulus) was 1.59 ± 0.63 D. Neither lag at the beginning nor at the end of a yearly progression interval was associated with annual myopia progression (all p ? 0.12). These data suggest that foveal hyperopic retinal blur during near viewing may not drive juvenile-onset myopia progression.

Berntsen, David A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Mutti, Donald O.; Zadnik, Karla

2011-01-01

87

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions on the Umatilla River; 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from October 1993 through September 1994 in evaluating juvenile salmonid bypass facilities and juvenile salmonid passage through ladder facilities, and investigating passage conditions for juvenile fish at diversion dam facilities on the lower Umatilla River in northeastern Oregon. We also report on our progress in evaluating adult salmonid passage at and between dams on the lower Umatilla River and upriver migration using radio telemetry. Two principal studies are also included. Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile salmonid bypass facilities a Feed and Furnish canals, juvenile salmonid passage through fish ladders at Stanfield, Feed Canal, Westland, and Three Mile Falls dams, and the juvenile salmonid trap and haul procedures at Westland Canal. To investigate passage conditions at all passage facilities. Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids past diversions in the lower Umatilla River and their movement in the upper river after transport, using radio telemetry, and to assess factors for successful homing. These studies are part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

Knapp, Suzanne M.

1995-01-01

88

JUVENILES IN ADULT PRISONS: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of juveniles in adult correctional facilities will continue to grow as states turn to the adult criminal justice system as one solution to increasing violent juvenile crime rates. Many questions regarding transfer and its consequences have been and are being researched. One seemingly unexplored area of research focuses on the adult system's response to these young newcomers. This

Frances P. Reddington; Allen D. Sapp

1997-01-01

89

Juveniles in Adult Prisons and Jails: A National Assessment. Monograph.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of youth under 18 confined to adult prisons has more than doubled in the past decade. A nationwide study of juveniles in adult correctional facilities was undertaken to help policymakers form an effective response to this situation. The study determined the extent of juvenile confinement in facilities around the country. It also…

Austin, James; Johnson, Kelly Dedel; Gregoriou, Maria

90

The Ohio Department of Youth Services Juvenile Prison Library System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article is an introduction to The Ohio Department of Youth Services librarians and the services they provide. Information about each juvenile prison facility is revealed and provides an explanation of guidelines and standards for prison libraries. Sixty-eight questions were asked in four in-person interviews to present a profile of the librarians working within juvenile correctional facility high schools and

Deidra N. Herring

2009-01-01

91

Turbine Passage of Juvenile and Adult Fish at a Warmwater Hydroelectric Facility in Northeastern Oklahoma: Monitoring Associated with Relicensing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimated annual turbine passage rates and susceptibilities of juvenile and adult fish at the Pensacola Dam hydroelectric facility on Grand Lake O' the Cherokees (Grand Lake) in northeastern Oklahoma as part of the relicensing of the facility. Our study was purposefully exploratory in that its primary objective was to determine if turbine passage of valuable fishes was sufficient to

Kent M. Sorenson; William L. Fisher; Alexander V. Zale

1998-01-01

92

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1992 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on our progress from October 1991 through September 1992 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls and Westland dams on the Umatilla River. We also report on our progress from October 1991 through June 1992 in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam.

Suzanne M

1993-01-01

93

Obstacles to research in residential juvenile justice facilities: recommendations for researchers.  

PubMed

Federal, state, and local initiatives to improve the treatment and outcomes for young people in the juvenile justice system prompt the need for additional research. Despite the call for empirical data, researchers encounter numerous obstacles when initiating and conducting studies in detention and post-adjudication facilities. These obstacles are often only briefly mentioned in publications, but they can interfere with researchers' desires and abilities to conduct studies in these settings. This paper reviews legal, ethical, and methodological challenges to successfully conducting research in detention and residential post-adjudication placements, including selecting and accessing appropriate facilities, obtaining institutional review board approval, seeking parental permission and youth assent, reporting child abuse and neglect, responding to participants' threats to harm self or others, working effectively with facilities, juvenile justice system-related attrition, and the dissemination of research findings. Recommendations are presented to help investigators anticipate obstacles when designing and executing research protocols to prevent interference and to encourage ethical responses and successful study completion. PMID:22298128

Lane, Christy; Goldstein, Naomi E S; Heilbrun, Kirk; Cruise, Keith R; Pennacchia, Daniel

2012-01-04

94

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. This 1993 annual report details scheduled maintenance and other projects carried out during the year.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1994-05-01

95

Suicide prevention in correctional facilities: reflections and next steps.  

PubMed

Data from a recent national study of inmate suicides indicates that the suicide rate in county jails throughout the United States has steadily decreased. Despite this progress, the author argues that rather than developing and maintaining comprehensive policies and practices, policymakers and correctional administrators appear preoccupied with the notion that suicides can only be prevented when inmates are on suicide precautions. Measures such as closed-circuit television monitoring, suicide-resistant jail cells, safety smocks, and new technology are popular tools to keep certain inmates safe. There is more to suicide prevention than simply observing suicidal inmates and waiting for them to attempt suicide. The author argues that suicides are prevented and suicide rates reduced when correctional facilities provide a comprehensive array of programming that identifies suicidal inmates who are otherwise difficult to identify, ensures their safety on suicide precautions, and provides a continuity of care throughout confinement. PMID:23664363

Hayes, Lindsay M

2013-05-09

96

Technical energy audit of the Rifle Correctional Facility  

SciTech Connect

This energy audit was initiated to pinpoint the reasons for the disproportionate budget share of energy costs at the Rifle Correctional Facility, one of Colorado's newest prisons. Conservation options and retrofits are discussed in detail as are the economics of improvements and rising energy costs. Because of the site's geographic situation, techniques of solar adaptation are discussed, although emphasis is on conservation strategies. Partial wood heating is also considered. Rifle's particular security system may also work to its advantage through the use of inmate labor as a cost-saving measure both during the improvements and as a long-term strategy.

Not Available

1980-01-01

97

Juvenile Sexual Offending: Causes, Consequences, and Correction. New and Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comprehensive resource on juvenile sexual offense, this book provides information on the abused and the abuser, and on the cycle of abuse and appropriate treatment. Part 1 provides an overview of "The Problem of Juvenile Sexual Offending," including: (1) "Sexually Abusive Youth: Defining the Population" (G. Ryan); and (2) "Incidence and…

Ryan, Gail, Ed.; Lane, Sandy, Ed.

98

Gender, Religion, and Correctional Orientations Among a Sample of Juvenile Justice Personnel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent efforts to understand the contexts of criminal and juvenile justice case processing and outcomes have examined the effects of both structural and socio-cultural factors on decision making. In the present research, I treat both gender and religion as theoretical constructs to improve our understanding of the factors that may influence attitudes and possibly decision making. A sample of juvenile

Michael J. Leiber

2000-01-01

99

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1989 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and

Peter T. Lofy; Gerald D. Rowan

1990-01-01

100

Operation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1987 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report

Lofy; Peter T

1988-01-01

101

Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report

Lofy; Peter T

1989-01-01

102

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from October 1991 through September 1992 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls and Westland dams on the Umatilla River. We also report on our progress from October 1991 through June 1992 in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). These are the study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR: (1) Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile fish bypass facility in the West Extension Irrigation District Canal at Three Mile Falls Dam and document juvenile salmonid passage through the juvenile fish bypass facility and east-bank adult fish ladder. To measure velocity and develop trap designs at Westland Dam. (2) Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

Knapp, Suzanne M.

1993-03-01

103

Operations of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1984-1986 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonifer Springs salmon and steelhead juvenile release and adult collection facility is located in the upper Umatilla River drainage at Meacham Creek mile 2.0. The facility is one of two that are operated on the Umatilla Indian Reservation under contract with Bonneville Power Administration. Construction of the Bonifer facility was completed in the fall of 1983 and operations began in early 1984. The facility consists of a one acre spring-fed pond and a concrete fishway and adult fish holding area at the pond outlet. The facility is used for holding and spawning of adult summer steelhead and for acclimation/release of juvenile fall and spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead. The acclimation capacity is approximately 20,000 lbs. of fish. Minthorn Springs Creek is located about four miles east of Mission, Oregon, on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. It forms from several springs located immediately south of the Umatilla River. The total length of Minthorn Springs Creek is about one mile and the mouth is located at Umatilla River mile 63.7. The fishway and adult holding area of the Minthorn facility are located in Minthorn Springs Creek immediately upstream from the mouth. The juvenile raceways are located in the same general area about 25 feet from the bank of Minthorn Springs Creek. Like the Bonifer Springs project, the Minthorn facility is used for adult fish holding and for temporary rearing or acclimation of juvenile salmon and steelhead to imprint the fish on the particular water source and reduce stress from trucking prior to their downstream migration. The facility was completed in December of 1985 and first used for juvenile acclimation in the Spring of 1986. An existing pond was not available at the Minthorn site so two concrete raceways (120 x 12 feet) were constructed for juvenile holding/rearing. At a water depth of 3 feet and a single-pass water exchange rate of about 800 gpm through each raceway, the facility has a rearing capacity of about 15,000 to 20,000 pounds of fish. This capacity could be exceeded if fish were held only for a brief acclimation period.

James, Gary A.

1987-05-01

104

Detecting fake-good MMPI-A profiles in a correctional facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the extent to which the validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; J. N. Butcher et al., 1992) could differentiate between correctional adolescents instructed to fake good and both correctional and noncorrectional adolescents who received standard instructions. The noncorrectional participants (n = 137) were from settings not connected with treatment or correctional facilities. Correctional participants

L. A. R. Stein; John R. Graham

1999-01-01

105

78 FR 11903 - Acceptability of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Fuel Cycle Facilities.'' The draft NUREG provides guidance to the NRC staff on how to determine whether a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) submitted by the licensee of a fuel cycle facility is acceptable. DATES: Comments may be submitted by...

2013-02-20

106

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents progress from October 1992 through September 1993 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls, Maxwell, Westland, and Feed Canal dams on the Umatilla River, and in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River. Also reported is an effort to evaluate delayed mortality and stress responses of juvenile salmonids resulting from trapping and transport at high temperatures. These studies are part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the matilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon and chinook salmon, as well as enhancement of summer steelhead.

Knapp, Suzanne M.

1994-03-01

107

Correcting Community Service: From Work Crews to Community Work in a Juvenile Court  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2001, the Clark County Juvenile Court in Washington State implemented the use of “restorative community service” (RCS) as part of its larger adoption of a restorative justice framework. This paper explores the court’s implementation and use of RCS, including: (1) the types of institutional changes made by the court in its development of RCS, (2) the types and qualities

William R. Wood

2011-01-01

108

Delinquent Self-Concepts in Juvenile Correctional Programs: Implications for Program Design and Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated delinquency prevention programs that include techniques for evaluating the self-esteem of juveniles. Significant changes in self-concept (as measured by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale) and in the cognitive domain (as measured by the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test) were observed at two of five sites evaluated. (Author/HLM)

Vogel, Ronald E.; Brown, Stephen E.

1982-01-01

109

Juvenile Correction Education: A Review of Current Literature. Technical Assistance Bulletin No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bulletin reports the results of a review of research about the educational process used in detention and training schools to identify elements that would assist in adapting law-related education (LRE) materials and strategies to juvenile justice settings. Findings and recommendations are summarized according to the following categories:…

Rider-Hankins, Peg

110

The Mentally Retarded in a Juvenile Correctional Institute Project CAMIO, Volume 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Evaluated were 1,666 juvenile imates committed to the Texas Youth Council. The study was part of Project CAMIO, a Texas effort to determine the incidence of criminal incarceration of the mentally retarded (MR) and to identify laws, procedures, and practices which affect the prosecution and imprisonment of the MR offender. Information was gathered…

Haskins, Jimmy R.; Friel, Charles M.

111

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1990. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. Two of the Minthorn and all of the Bonifer pond outlet screens were replaced with vertical bars to alleviate clogging problems. A horizontal bar screen was installed in the water control structure at the largest spring at Bonifer to prevent fish from migrating upstream during acclimation. A pipe was installed under the railroad tracks at Bonifer to make unloading of fish from transport trucks easier and safer. The Minthorn access road was repaired to provide better access for delivery of fish to the facility and for general operations and maintenance.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1991-07-01

112

Gun Acquisition and Possession in Selected Juvenile Samples. Research in Brief. December 1993.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This research summarizes the results of a study involving 835 inmates in six major correctional facilities within several states and 758 inner-city students from 10 high schools near the facilities, concerning the number and types of firearms juveniles possess as well as where, how, and why juveniles acquire and carry firearms. Research focused…

Sheley, Joseph F.; Wright, James D.

113

Implementing a Reentry Framework at a Correctional Facility: Challenges to the Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Implementation research is emerging in the field of corrections, but few studies have examined the complexities associated with implementing change among frontline workers embedded in specific organizational cultures. Using a mixed methods approach, the authors examine the challenges faced by correctional workers in a work release correctional facility during their transformation into a reentry center. Findings reveal that staff report

Danielle S. Rudes; Jennifer Lerch; Faye S. Taxman

2011-01-01

114

Exploring Scope of Practice Issues for Correctional Facility Nurses in Montana  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research aims were to (a) explore how correctional facility nurses in Montana perceived the balance between the autonomy required in their field and their scope of practice rights, and (b) contrast the correctional nursing specialty from the more traditional nurse setting. Twenty percent of Montana correctional nurses surveyed said there are times where they simply have to work beyond

Amanda L. White; Laura S. Larsson

2012-01-01

115

Operation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1987 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1987.

Lofy, Peter T.

1988-12-01

116

Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1988.

Lofy, Peter T.

1989-12-01

117

Hearings Before the General Subcommittee on Education of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, Ninety-Second Congress, First Session on H.R. 6247; a Bill to Extend the Provisions of the Juvenile Delinquency Prevention and Control Act of 1968 for 5 Years. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., March 26; April 28-29, 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of the Juvenile Delinquency Prevention and Control Act is to provide Federal funds to assist the States and localities in improving their services dealing with the juvenile delinquency problem. This would apply to the juvenile justice and juvenile aid systems including courts, correctional facilities, police agencies, and other…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

118

The Relationship between Self-Esteem and AD/HD Characteristics in the Serious Juvenile Delinquents in Japan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to clarify the following 2 points: (1) whether self-esteem changes after correctional education, and (2) whether attention deficit/hyperactivity characteristics affect self-esteem. The subjects were 118 juveniles (all males) admitted to "A" juvenile correctional facility. Our findings indicated that during the…

Matsuura, Naomi; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Toichi, Motomi

2009-01-01

119

The Relationship between Self-Esteem and AD/HD Characteristics in the Serious Juvenile Delinquents in Japan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to clarify the following 2 points: (1) whether self-esteem changes after correctional education, and (2) whether attention deficit/hyperactivity characteristics affect self-esteem. The subjects were 118 juveniles (all males) admitted to "A" juvenile correctional facility. Our findings indicated that during the…

Matsuura, Naomi; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Toichi, Motomi

2009-01-01

120

Pit-Tag Studies with Juvenile Salmonids at the Chandler Canal Fish Collection Facility, Yakima River : Annual Report 1990.  

SciTech Connect

Juvenile salmonid survival studies planned for the Yakima Basin will require the release and recapture of large numbers of marked fish. Before these studies can be implemented, information is needed about potential recovery rates of marked fish at proposed sampling sites. The type of mark employed and the efficiency of the equipment used to capture and examine fish for marks must be evaluated since accurate survival estimates depend on their reliability. Recovery rates are expected to vary with species and life stage as well as environmental factors such as river flow and water temperature. The purpose of this study was to assess the mark-recovery capabilities of the Chandler facility and a mobile juvenile fish trap installed temporarily at West Richland, Washington near the mouth of the Yakima River.

Ruehle, Thomas E.; McCutcheon, Clinton Scott

1994-09-01

121

Motivational Interviewing Training for Juvenile Correctional Staff in California: One Year Initial Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study reports initial results of a program designed to train California corrections staff (n = 576) in motivational interviewing (MI), a method of communication that is based on a client-centered, collaborative style. After three days of training, participants made significant gains in terms of knowledge of MI principles and reflective…

Hohman, Melinda; Doran, Neal; Koutsenok, Igor

2009-01-01

122

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01

123

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1993-08-01

124

Correctional facilities as partners in reducing HIV disparities.  

PubMed

The United States now has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The majority of prison and jail inmates come from predominantly nonwhite and medically underserved communities. Although incarceration has adverse effects on both individual and community health, prisons and jails have also been used successfully as venues to provide health services to people with HIV who frequently lack stable health care. We review demographic trends shaping the difficulties in providing care to incarcerated people with HIV and recommend the Centers for AIDS Research Collaboration on HIV in Corrections as a model of interdisciplinary collaboration in addressing those difficulties. PMID:23673887

Rich, Josiah D; DiClemente, Ralph; Levy, Judith; Lyda, Karen; Ruiz, Monica S; Rosen, David L; Dumont, Dora

2013-06-01

125

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document.

C. M. Obi

2000-12-01

126

Juvenile Justice and Students with Disabilities: State Infrastructure and Initiatives. inForum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to data collected in 2003 by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), just over 96,000 youth were incarcerated in juvenile correctional facilities throughout the United States (not including those being held in detention). An additional 10,000 youth were in state prisons or adult jails during the same time,…

Muller, Eve

2006-01-01

127

Suicide and Deliberate Self-injurious Behavior in Juvenile Correctional Facilities: A Review  

PubMed Central

Objective: Describe the rates of suicidal ideation, self-injury, and suicide among detained youth as well as risk factors and preventive measures that have been attempted. Method: Literature searches in PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Social Science Citation Index were undertaken to identify published studies written in English. Governmental data was also included from English-speaking nations. Results: The adjusted risk of suicide was 3 to 18 times higher than age-matched controls. The prevalence of lifetime suicidal ideation ranged from 16.9% to 59% while lifetime self-injury ranged from 6.2% to 44%. Affective disorders, borderline personality traits, substance use disorders, impulse control disorders, and anxiety disorders were associated with suicidal thoughts and self-injury. Screening for suicidal ideation upon entry was associated with a decreased rate of suicide. Conclusions: All youth should be screened upon admission. Identified co-morbid disorders should also be treated.

Casiano, Hygiea; Katz, Laurence Y.; Globerman, Daniel; Sareen, Jitender

2013-01-01

128

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

NONE

1997-10-01

129

The Correctional Custody Facility: Rehabilitation of the First-Time Offender in the U.S. Army.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Army's Correctional Custody Facility, a rehabilitation method for first-time offenders that is intended to recreate and strengthen the original resocialization process. The small number of return offenders suggests the facility's success as a rehabilitation concept. (JAC)

Thomas, Robert Evan

1983-01-01

130

Revised interim soil lead guidance for CERCLA sites and RCRA Corrective Action Facilities. Directive  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Superfund Administrative Improvements Initiative, this interim directive establishes a streamlined approach for determining protective levels for lead in soil at CERCLA sites and RCRA facilities that are subject to corrective action under RCRA section 3004(u) or 3008(h). This interim directive replaces all previous directives on soil lead cleanup for CERCLA and RCRA programs.

Not Available

1994-07-14

131

1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South

2000-01-01

132

A Correction Method of Orbit Elements Using Amateur Radio Facilities for Nano-Satellites  

Microsoft Academic Search

A correction method of orbit elements for nano-satellites using simple and low cost facilities is required. In this study, the Doppler shift of the beacon signal from a cubesat was observed using an amateur radio. The history of frequency variation was recorded for different TLEs with different epoch time. The frequency difference translated into seconds (FDTS) was deduced as a

Yasuhisa Oda; Shinichi Nakasuka; Priya Fernando

2008-01-01

133

AIDS in correctional facilities: Current status of legal issues critical to policy development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Administrators of correctional facilities have created specific policies directed toward detecting and controlling health risks created by inmates who are infected with the HIV virus or who have AIDS. This article examines the legal issues that influence the development and implementation of those policies. It discusses the constitutionality of testing and segregation and the reasons currently advanced for each of

Susan Jacobs

1995-01-01

134

Juvenile Confinement in Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

Mendel, Richard A.

2012-01-01

135

The relationship between self-esteem and AD\\/HD characteristics in the serious juvenile delinquents in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to clarify the following 2 points: (1) whether self-esteem changes after correctional education, and (2) whether attention deficit\\/hyperactivity characteristics affect self-esteem. The subjects were 118 juveniles (all males) admitted to “A” juvenile correctional facility. Our findings indicated that during the correctional education period, changes in self-esteem were limited. The AD\\/HD-YSR attention deficit score was

Naomi Matsuura; Toshiaki Hashimoto; Motomi Toichi

2009-01-01

136

Scoring the Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank-High School Form in Facility Placed Male Juvenile Delinquents: Maladjustment or Artifact of Placement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although the Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank (ISB):High School Form has been used to distinguish between normal and abnormal adolescents, it has been hypothesized that in facility placed juvenile delinquents' highly conflictual responses (i.e., those that index maladjustment) reflect removal from home and agency placement rather than long-term…

Noonan, John R.; Von, Judith M.

137

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Three-Mile Falls Dam; Umatilla River, Oregon, 1989 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on our progress from October 1989 through September 1990 on evaluating juvenile fish bypass and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Study objectives addressed by ODFW

Nigro; Anthony A

1990-01-01

138

Adolescent Fathers Who Are Incarcerated Juvenile Offenders: Explanatory Study of the Co-Occurrence of Two Problem Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We identify explanatory risk variables associated with the co-occurrence of two problem behaviors: juvenile offending and adolescent fatherhood. Data were gathered from a 5-year prospective, longitudinal study of 531 incarcerated juvenile offenders as they transitioned from youth correction facilities back into the community. Of the total sample,…

Unruh, Deanne; Bullis, Michael; Yovanoff, Paul

2004-01-01

139

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1989. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. An automatic dialing system was incorporated into the alarm system at the Minthorn facility. A security company has replaced the function of the Umatilla Tribal Police which was to contact fisheries personnel in case of an alarm. The configuration of the alarm system was upgraded to activate the alarm faster and provide better access to project personnel with a pager system. A survey was completed in 1988 by Thomas Bumstead of Albrook Hydraulics Lab in Pullman, WA. to determine potential measures to address the change in course of the Umatilla River around Minthorn as a result of the flood of 1986. Options and recommendations were submitted in a report in 1989. Fish Management Consultants Inc. submitted the final reports of evaluations for both the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities. A total of 150 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from December through March and held at Minthorn. Forty-two pairs were spawned (37 pairs from Minthorn and 5 pairs collected and immediately spawned at Threemile Dam). The 241,682 eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and later moved to Oak Springs Hatchery for rearing. An estimated 368 adult hatchery steelhead returned to the Umatilla River in 1988-89 (based on Threemile Dam trap counts and harvest below Threemile Dam) these, and 349 were released upriver. Of seven returned to the Bonifer trap where the smolts were initially released. Acclimation of 79,984 spring chinook salmon and 22,274 steelhead was completed at Bonifer in spring of 1989. At Minthorn, 157,299 coho salmon and 29,852 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Acclimation of 78,825 fall chinook salmon at Minthorn and 80,750 spring chinook salmon completed in the fall. at Bonifer was successfully Control groups were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1989 and 1990. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon, two experiments for spring chinook salmon (spring and fall releases) and one experiment for summer steelhead were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the juvenile salmonid trap located at Westland Diversion. Because the fish in each release were not uniquely fish size and migration timing were used to discern general trends. Data suggested that juvenile salmonids started showing up at the trap 4 days after release until July 14, when sampling was discontinued. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids to test summer steelhead broodstock from the Umatilla River for monitoring purposes and to certify eggs as pathogen-free.

Lofy, Peter T.; Rowan, Gerald D.

1990-03-01

140

Telepsychiatry in Correctional Facilities: Using Technology to Improve Access and Decrease Costs of Mental Health Care in Underserved Populations  

PubMed Central

Objective: It is unclear if telepsychiatry, a subset of telemedicine, increases access to mental health care for inmates in correctional facilities or decreases costs for clinicians or facility administrators. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how utilization of telepsychiatry affected access to care and costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Methods: A literature review complemented by a semistructured interview with a telepsychiatry practitioner. Five electronic databases, the National Bureau of Justice, and the American Psychiatric Association Web sites were searched for this research, and 49 sources were referenced. The literature review examined implementation of telepsychiatry in correctional facilities in Arizona, California, Georgia, Kansas, Ohio, Texas, and West Virginia to determine the effect of telepsychiatry on inmate access to mental health services and the costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Results: Telepsychiatry provided improved access to mental health services for inmates, and this increase in access is through the continuum of mental health care, which has been instrumental in increasing quality of care for inmates. Use of telepsychiatry saved correctional facilities from $12,000 to more than $1 million. The semistructured interview with the telepsychiatry practitioner supported utilization of telepsychiatry to increase access and lower costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Conclusions: Increasing access to mental health care for this underserved group through telepsychiatry may improve living conditions and safety inside correctional facilities. Providers, facilities, and state and federal governments can expect increased savings with utilization of telepsychiatry.

Deslich, Stacie Anne; Thistlethwaite, Timothy; Coustasse, Alberto

2013-01-01

141

Juveniles in Adult Prisons and Jails. A National Assessment. Monograph.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report begins to answer important questions about this vulnerable population: What is the extent of juvenile confinement in federal, state, and local facilities. What types of facilities are used to house juvenile offenders. What happens to juveniles...

J. Austin K. Dedel M. Gregoriou

2000-01-01

142

Engineering Self-Service Correctional Facility Biometric Computer-Based Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faced with rising costs and rampant overcrowding, correctional facilities are turning to computer-based systems for help. More than 2.3 million people currently live in US prisons or jails-25 percent of the world's total inmate population-a comparatively much higher rate than in other Western countries. Denmark only incarcerates 66 of every 100,000 citizens, compared to 760 in the US. This situation

Patricia O'Hagan

2010-01-01

143

Social Support and Sense of Program Belonging Discriminate between Youth-Staff Relationship Types in Juvenile Correction Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the association between personal and social characteristics of incarcerated juvenile offenders and youth-staff relationship types. Employing the three relationship categories identified in a typology by Marsh and Evans (2009), multinomial logistic regression indicated that youth reporting higher levels of social support and…

Marsh, Shawn C.; Evans, William P.; Williams, Michael J.

2010-01-01

144

A Correction Method of Orbit Elements Using Amateur Radio Facilities for Nano-Satellites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A correction method of orbit elements for nano-satellites using simple and low cost facilities is required. In this study, the Doppler shift of the beacon signal from a cubesat was observed using an amateur radio. The history of frequency variation was recorded for different TLEs with different epoch time. The frequency difference translated into seconds (FDTS) was deduced as a ratio of the maximum frequency variation in the pass to the 1s-periodic variation. The FDTS has dependency on TLE. For the old TLE, the FDTS was larger than the new one. Because the FDTS is related to satellite's phase variation in the orbit, the TLE's epoch time was corrected using the measurement result. The FDTS with the observation using the corrected TLE was small.

Oda, Yasuhisa; Nakasuka, Shinichi; Fernando, Priya

145

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and

Gerald D

1993-01-01

146

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1993 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and

Gerald D

1994-01-01

147

Phenotypic and molecular characterization of Acinetobacter clinical isolates obtained from inmates of California correctional facilities.  

PubMed

Acinetobacter spp. increasingly have been wreaking havoc in hospitals and communities worldwide. Although much has been reported regarding Acinetobacter isolates responsible for nosocomial infections, little is known about these organisms in correctional facilities. In this study, we performed species identification, examined the antibiotic resistance profiles, and determined the mechanisms of resistance and clonal relationships of 123 Acinetobacter isolates obtained from inmates of 20 California correctional facilities (CCFs). We found that 57.7% of the isolates belong to A. baumannii, followed by isolates of Acinetobacter genomic species 3 (gen. sp. 3; 23.6%) and of Acinetobacter gen. sp. 13TU (10.6%). Multidrug-resistant (MDR) CCF isolates were found in only six CCFs. Additionally, DNA sequences of gyrA and parC genes were consistent with fluoroquinolone (FQ) susceptibility phenotypes. Furthermore, the presence of class 1 integrons was detected in 15 CCF isolates, all of which are MDR. Integron-associated gene cassettes encode several aminoglycoside modification enzymes, which correlate with most of the aminoglycoside-resistant phenotypes. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the presence of Phe-Arg-?-naphthylamide dihydrochloride and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine indicated the involvement of efflux pumps in the FQ resistance of only a few CCF isolates. Finally, genetic profiling showed that there was no evidence of A. baumannii outbreaks in CCFs. Instead, our analyses revealed only limited clonal dissemination of mostly non-MDR A. baumannii strains in a few facilities. This study represents the first report to characterize phenotypic and molecular features of Acinetobacter isolates in correctional facilities, which provides a baseline for monitoring the antimicrobial resistance changes and dissemination patterns of these organisms in such specialized institutions. PMID:21450955

Golanbar, Galarah D; Lam, Christopher K; Chu, Yi-Ming; Cueva, Carla; Tan, Stephanie W; Silva, Isba; Xu, H Howard

2011-03-30

148

Social Support and Sense of Program Belonging Discriminate Between Youth-Staff Relationship Types in Juvenile Correction Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the association between personal and social characteristics of incarcerated juvenile offenders and youth-staff\\u000a relationship types. Employing the three relationship categories identified in a typology by Marsh and Evans (2009), multinomial logistic regression indicated that youth reporting higher levels of social support and sense of program belonging\\u000a were least likely to belong to the relationship category associated with

Shawn C. Marsh; William P. Evans; Michael J. Williams

2010-01-01

149

Initial experience with a juvenile sheep model for evaluation of the pediatric intracorporeal ventricular assist devices [corrected].  

PubMed

There is a scarcity of source material available in animal models appropriate to test pediatric-size blood pump design for assisting the left ventricle. A juvenile ovine animal model was developed to evaluate two pediatric ventricular assist devices (VADs). The child-size Jarvik 2000 and CircuLite VADs were tested with this model. The 33 in vivo experiments were retrospectively studied to evaluate the reliability of the animal model. Dorset hybrid juvenile sheep (20~36 kg) were used to evaluate the small pediatric VADs. Under general anesthesia, a left lateral thoracotomy was performed through the fifth intercostal space. The devices were implanted between the left ventricle apex and the descending aorta without cardiopulmonary bypass. Heparin was infused continuously for anticoagulation therapy. Support duration averaged 26.7 ± 19.6 days. Completion of 75.7% (25/33) experiments was done as intended. The animals were docile and did not require sitters beyond the immediate operative period. Complication includes leg injury, graft infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, intravenous line disconnection, weight loss, renal failure, red urine, (one for each) and pulmonary failure in two. Activated clotting time was adjusted via continuous intravenous heparin to 150-200 seconds. Reliable hemodynamics and biocompatibility data were collected for evaluate pediatric intracorporeal VADs in the animal model. The juvenile sheep model is reliable, reproducible, and translatable for testing pediatric VADs. These experiments provided vital information for improvement of the devices and for clinical application in the future. PMID:23254234

Wei, Xufeng; Li, Tieluo; Sanchez, Pablo G; Sanchez, Pablo; Watkins, Amelia; Li, Shuying; DeFilippi, Christopher; Wu, Zhongjun J; Griffith, Bartley P

150

Our Nation's Schools--A Report Card: "A" in School Violence and Vandalism. Preliminary Report of the Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency, Based on Investigations, 1971-1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Since 1971 the Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency has held 55 days of hearings and received testimony from 419 witnesses on topics including the extent and causes of drug abuse, runaway youth, school dropouts, and the confinement of juveniles in detention and correctional facilities. A questionnaire designed to obtain…

Bayh, Birch

151

Development of Entry-Level Vision and Hearing Guidelines for Corrections Officers, Juvenile Counselors, and Probation Officers. Standards and Training for Corrections Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In response to a mandate from the California State Legislature, the California Board of Corrections conducted a three-phase research study in preparation for the revision and standardization of the current state standards for hiring and training corrections personnel. This document presents the vision and hearing guidelines for the occupations of…

California State Board of Corrections, Sacramento.

152

Exploring the Relationship Between Social Support and Job Burnout Among Correctional Staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between social support and burnout among correctional staff at a private midwestern correctional facility for juveniles tried as adults. Research on correctional staff burnout often calls for social support to help combat the problem; however, there has been no published research on whether different types of social support influence the different dimensions of job burnout.

Eric G. Lambert; Irshad Altheimer; Nancy L. Hogan

2010-01-01

153

Operations of the Bonifer Springs Juvenile Release/Adult Collection Facility, 1984-1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The progress of the project objectives are given in this report. The project objectives are: (1) enhancement of the natural spawning summer steelhead run in the Umatilla River Drainage; (2) establishment of a hatchery produced summer steelhead run in the Umatilla River; (3) protect the Confederated Tribes right to fish as reserved by the Treat of 1855 with the US Government; (4) enhance Indian and non-Indian fishing opportunities within the Umatilla River System; (5) demonstration of low-tech, low-cost acclimation facilities in conjunction with off-site hatchery production for rehabilitation of anadromous salmonid populations; and (6) partial mitigation for the impact of federal hydroelectric projects on the Umatilla River fisheries.

James, Gary A.

1986-02-01

154

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2007. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2007. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. Two additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2007. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during these additional inspections are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2007 are included in Appendix C.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-03-01

155

A National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment for Juvenile Offenders  

PubMed Central

Despite consensus about the value of substance abuse treatment for delinquent youth, information about its prevalence and availability is inadequate and inconsistent. This paper presents findings about treatment and other correctional service provision from a national survey of directors of 141 juvenile institutional and community corrections facilities. Educational/GED programming and drug and alcohol education were the most prevalent types of correctional and substance abuse services. Other common services included physical health services and mental health assessment, provided to about 60% of youth across facilities, and mental health counseling, life and communication skills, and anger management, provided to about half the youth. Substance abuse treatment, as with most other services, were more prevalent in large, state-funded residential facilities (where 66% provided treatment), than local detention centers (20%) and community corrections facilities (56%). More detailed data showed that the number of youth attending treatment in all types of facilities on any given day was very low.

Young, Douglas W.; Dembo, Richard; Henderson, Craig E.

2008-01-01

156

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE,

Mark Burmeister

2009-01-01

157

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Three-Mile Falls Dam; Umatilla River, Oregon, 1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from October 1989 through September 1990 on evaluating juvenile fish bypass and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR are: (1) ODFW (Report A): Operate and evaluate the juvenile fish bypass system in the West Extension Irrigation District canal at Three Mile Falls Dam; and (2) CTUIR (Report 8): Examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin that includes restorations of coho salmon Oncorhynchus Wsutch and chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha and enhancement of summer steelhead 0. mytiss.

Nigro, Anthony A.

1990-09-01

158

The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-05-01

159

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation; 1991 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1991. Major repairs to one Minthorn pump were required and flood damage at Minthorn necessitated the replacement of rock and gravel around the pump house and steelhead brood holding area. Several modifications to the steelhead brood holding pond were also made to help reduce mortality. These changes appeared to be successful as evidenced by the reduced number of mortalities. Total prespawn mortality in 1990-91 was 10.4%. This compares to 20.0 to 39.0% for the previous three years at Minthorn. A total of 202 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from November, 1990 through April, 1991 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 410,356 eggs were taken from 64 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and initial rearing. The fish were then transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for further rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 347 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:l spawning ratio, a total of 601,548 eggs were taken from 159 females. They were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. Acclimation of 100,505 spring chinook salmon and 42,610 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1991. At Minthorn, 152,974 coho and 79,672 fall chinook salmon were acclimated and released. In the fall, 81,144 spring chinook salmon were held at Bonifer for a three-day post-transport recovery period. Control groups of spring and fall chinook salmon and summer steelhead were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1991 and 1992. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon and two experiments for spring chinook salmon were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Because of high spring flows in the Umatilla River however, the trap was not opened until mid-June and few fish were trapped, suggesting most had already migrated downriver. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1992-06-01

160

Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, December 2000)  

SciTech Connect

This document is an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) that has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD) Decontamination Facility. CAU 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. The purpose of this addendum is to provide a rationale for the recommendation of a revised preferred alternative corrective action for CAU 254. This preferred alternative corrective action, Alternative 3, consists of the removal of accessible soil/sediment and all building material above ground level from the CAU 254 Site. This alternative is being recommended because a cost-effective technology is now available to dismantle the contaminated building and ensure complete removal of all CAU 254 CADD-identified contaminants of concern and any associated contamination. This preferred closure method alternative reduces the potential for future exposure pathways. Procedures will be developed, presented in the Corrective Action Plan, and implemented to ensure worker health and safety, protection of human health and the environment, and to meet all unrestricted release requirements in accordance with applicable state and federal regulations.

DOE /NV

2000-12-12

161

Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

Evans, G.C.

1994-06-01

162

A Need For Correction: Reforming New York's Juvenile Justice System. Child Welfare Watch. Vol. 18, Fall 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In the wake of a U.S. Justice Department investigation that found widespread use of excessive force by staff at upstate psychiatric care facilities for mentally ill children, this new edition of Child Welfare Watch identifies shortcomings in mental health services and explores possible solutions, including the expansion of alternatives to…

White, Andrew; Hemphill, Clara; Hurley, Kendra

2009-01-01

163

Medical devices; medical device, user facility, distributor, and manufacturer reporting, certification, and registration; correction--FDA. Tentative final rule; correction.  

PubMed

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is correcting a tentative final rule that appeared in the Federal Register of November 26, 1991 (56 FR 60024). The tentative final rule was published with some editorial errors. In the preamble under the "Paperwork Reduction Act" heading, the last two lines in the table "Estimated Annual Burden for Reporting" should have been in the table "Annual Burden for Recordkeeping". As a result, the total figures in both tables were incorrect. This document corrects the errors in these two tables. PMID:10117356

1992-02-25

164

Outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O111 infections associated with a correctional facility dairy - Colorado, 2010.  

PubMed

On April 20, 2010, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) was notified by correctional authorities regarding three inmates with bloody diarrhea at a minimum-security correctional facility. The facility, which houses approximately 500 inmates, is a designated work center where inmates are employed or receive vocational training. Approximately 70 inmates work at an onsite dairy, which provides milk to all state-run correctional facilities in Colorado. CDPHE immediately began an investigation and was later assisted by the High Plains Intermountain Center for Agricultural Health and Safety at Colorado State University and by CDC. This report describes the results of the investigation, which determined that the illnesses were caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O111 (STEC O111) infections. During April-July, 10 inmates at the facility received a diagnosis of laboratory-confirmed STEC O111 infection, and a retrospective prevalence study of 100 inmates found that, during March-April, 14 other inmates had experienced diarrheal illness suspected of being STEC O111 infection. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) testing indicated that STEC O111 isolates from inmates matched STEC O111 isolates from cattle at the onsite dairy. An environmental investigation determined that inmates employed at the dairy might have acquired STEC O111 infection on the job or transported contaminated clothing or other items into the main correctional facility and kitchen, thereby exposing other inmates. To prevent similar outbreaks in correctional facilities, authorities should consult with public health officials to design and implement effective infection control measures. PMID:22398842

2012-03-01

165

76 FR 55255 - Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt Bond Purposes; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RIN 1545-BD04 Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt...19, 2011, on the definition of solid waste disposal facilities for purposes...issue tax-exempt bonds to finance solid waste disposal facilities and to...

2011-09-07

166

76 FR 55256 - Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt Bond Purposes; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RIN 1545-BD04 Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt...19, 2011, on the definition of solid waste disposal facilities for purposes...issue tax-exempt bonds to finance solid waste disposal facilities and to...

2011-09-07

167

M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

NONE

1995-05-01

168

Corrections.  

PubMed

In the report "Distribution and detection of positrons from an orbiting nuclear reactor" by E. W. Hones and P. R. Higbie (28 Apr., p. 448), the following corrections should be noted. The first sentence of the caption for figure 1 should have read, "Location of SMM (dots) and Cosmos 1176 (triangles) at the times of 21 of the most intense 511-keV gamma events recorded by SMM during the 29 April to 2 September 1980 operating period." The first sentence of the caption for figure 3 should have read, "Estimated differential energy spectrum positrons escaping from Cosmos 1176 per joule of fission energy." On page 450, the second sentence of the first full paragraph should have referred to event 5, not event 59. PMID:17820653

1989-06-16

169

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report. Second quarter 1995, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site during second quarter 1995. Topics include: changes in sampling, analysis, and reporting; water levels; remedial action of groundwater; and hydrology of the affected aquifer zones.

NONE

1995-08-01

170

Accuracy of Psychologists' Short-Term Predictions of Future Criminal Behavior Among Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study analyzed the accuracy of predictions of criminality as a measure of future violent behavior by two psychologists at a juvenile correctional facility. The purpose of the study was to look at how effectively predictions of future dangerousness could be made under certain conditions. While other studies have looked at how accurately predictions of violence could be made for

Michael P. Hagan; Sandra L. King

1997-01-01

171

Mapping a Process of Negotiated Identity among Incarcerated Male Juvenile Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on theories of youth identity transitions, this study maps a process of negotiated identity among incarcerated young men. Data are drawn from ethnographic study of three juvenile correctional institutions and longitudinal semistructured interviews with facility residents. Cross-case analysis of 10 cases that finds youth offenders adapted…

Abrams, Laura S.; Hyun, Anna

2009-01-01

172

Juvenile Offenders’ Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic\\/racial backgrounds) and prospectively\\u000a predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent in a supervised setting.\\u000a Results indicated that supervised time suppressed age-related growth

Anne M. Mauricio; Michelle Little; Laurie Chassin; George P. Knight; Alex R. Piquero; Sandra H. Losoya; Delfino Vargas-Chanes

2009-01-01

173

Policies and Practices in the Delivery of HIV Services in Correctional Agencies and Facilities: Results From a Multisite Survey.  

PubMed

HIV risk is disproportionately high among incarcerated individuals. Corrections agencies have been slow to implement evidence-based guidelines and interventions for HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. The emerging field of implementation science focuses on organizational interventions to facilitate adoption and implementation of evidence-based practices. A survey of correctional agency partners from the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) revealed that HIV policies and practices in prevention, detection, and medical care varied widely, with some corrections agencies and facilities closely matching national guidelines and/or implementing evidence-based interventions. Others, principally attributed to limited resources, had numerous gaps in delivery of best HIV service practices. A brief overview is provided of a new CJ-DATS cooperative research protocol, informed by the survey findings, to test an organization-level intervention to reduce HIV service delivery gaps in corrections. PMID:24078624

Belenko, Steven; Hiller, Matthew; Visher, Christy; Copenhaver, Michael; O'Connell, Daniel; Burdon, William; Pankow, Jennifer; Clarke, Jennifer; Oser, Carrie

2013-10-01

174

RCRA Facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 100-DR-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provides for corrective action at solid waste management units located at permitted RCRA facilities, regardless of when waste was received at a unit. The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) focuses on waste site cleanups whenever there is a release or substantial threat of a release to the environment of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. High priority sites are placed on a National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with CERCLA. CERCLA requires that federal facilities that qualify be placed on the NPL. The 100 Area of the Hanford Site is one of four Hanford aggregate areas currently proposed for the NPL. This work plan was prepared in accordance with Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) (EPA 1988a). However, in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the EPA and State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) have determined that the 100-DR-1 operable unit will be addressed under RCRA corrective action authority. The EPA and Ecology have determined that the EPA guidance for conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study under CERCLA may be used at the Hanford Site in the performance of a RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study. Therefore, although RCRA terminology has been used where appropriate, the content and format of this work plan conform to EPA guidance for CERCLA activities.

Not Available

1989-10-01

175

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-09-29

176

Misdiagnosing the Problem: Mental Health Profiles of Incarcerated Juveniles  

PubMed Central

Aggression, antisocial and delinquent behavior frequently result in the incarceration of a large number of young people, but these problems pale in comparison to the mental health challenges faced by many of these youth. Recent studies show a high prevalence of mental disorders among adolescents within the justice system. These findings have led researchers, clinicians and policy-makers to re-evaluate the assessment and treatment options that are available for youth within correctional facilities. This article provides a concise review of the most recent research related to mental health disorders among incarcerated juveniles within Canada and the United States. Rates of some of the most common mental health disorders among juveniles, including depression, anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity and substance use are summarized. Throughout the review, issues related to co-morbidity and gender differences are highlighted. The implications of mental health disorders for juvenile justice policy and practice are discussed.

Odgers, Candice L.; Burnette, Mandi L.; Chauhan, Preeti; Moretti, Marlene M.; Reppucci, N. Dickon

2005-01-01

177

Juvenile Offenders' Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility  

PubMed Central

The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic/racial backgrounds) and prospectively predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent in a supervised setting. Results indicated that supervised time suppressed age-related growth in substance use. Trajectories of offenders with no supervised time and low levels of supervised time increased in substance use across age, whereas offenders with high levels of supervised time showed no growth. Almost all risk and protective factors had effects on initial substance use but only adolescent history of substance use, impulse control, and psychosocial maturity had an effect on change in substance use over time. Findings highlight the importance of formal sanctions and interventions superimposed on normal developmental processes in understanding trajectories of substance use among serious juvenile offenders.

Little, Michelle; Chassin, Laurie; Knight, George P.; Piquero, Alex R.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino

2009-01-01

178

Corrective Measures Study Modeling Results for the Southwest Plume - Burial Ground Complex/Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater modeling scenarios were performed to support the Corrective Measures Study and Interim Action Plan for the southwest plume of the Burial Ground Complex/Mixed Waste Management Facility. The modeling scenarios were designed to provide data for an economic analysis of alternatives, and subsequently evaluate the effectiveness of the selected remedial technologies for tritium reduction to Fourmile Branch. Modeling scenarios assessed include no action, vertical barriers, pump, treat, and reinject; and vertical recirculation wells.

Harris, M.K.

1999-01-29

179

Outbreaks of infection caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Canadian correctional facility  

PubMed Central

Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been identified in prison settings in the United States. The present study investigated two clusters of skin and soft tissue infection caused by community-acquired (CA) MRSA in a correctional facility in southern Ontario. Methods Outbreak investigations were conducted by the responsible public health authority. Strain relatedness was assessed through comparison of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antibiograms. Results Two distinct outbreaks of CAMRSA-associated disease occurred in 2002 and 2004. Most patients presented with abscesses in the lower extremities. All isolates had identical DNA banding patterns on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One-half of the affected inmates resided in a cellblock with one other affected inmate. No other risk factors were identified. Conclusions One of the first outbreaks of CAMRSA infections in a correctional facility in Canada is documented. Taken in conjunction with outbreaks elsewhere, this suggests that residence in correctional facilities may be a risk factor for CAMRSA infection.

Main, Cheryl L; Jayaratne, Padman; Haley, Allan; Rutherford, Candy; Smaill, Fiona; Fisman, David N

2005-01-01

180

Punishing My ParentsJuveniles' Perspectives on Parental Responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interviews of 147 juveniles in postadjudication residential facilities revealed that the juveniles generally did not believe their parents were responsible for the illegal activities of the juvenile. A vast majority of juveniles said that their parents were not responsible at all and also said that if they had known that their parents would also be punished for their crimes, they

Eve M. Brank

2008-01-01

181

Special Education and Juvenile Justice: An Overview and Analysis of Prevention and Intervention Policy and Program Developments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There is a serious overpopulation of special needs youth in Ohio's juvenile justice system. This study raises policy questions relating to gaining a deeper understanding of the reasons why there is an overpopulation of children with disabilities in youth correctional facilities and what can be done to reduce the need for future incarcerations.…

Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, 2006

2006-01-01

182

Standards for Building Materials, Equipment and Systems Used in Detention and Correctional Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Because of equipment and system performance problems which have occurred in jails and prisons, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC), U.S. Department of Justice, initiated a study at the Center for Building Technology, National Bureau of Standards (...

R. D. Dikkers B. C. Reeder

1987-01-01

183

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation; 1991 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and

Gerald D

1992-01-01

184

3Q/4Q98 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring and Correction-Action Report, Volumes I, II, and III.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1998.

J. Chase

1999-01-01

185

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01

186

Clarification to the 1994 Revised Interim Soil Lead Guidance for CERCLA Sites and RCRA Corrective Action Facilities: Directive  

SciTech Connect

This directive clarifies the existing 1994 Revised Interim Soil Lead Guidance for CERCLA Sites and RCRA Corrective Action Facilities, OSWER Directive 9355.4-12. Specifically, this directive clarifies OSWER`s policy on (1) using EPA`s Science Advisory Board (SAB) reviewed Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic Model (IEUBK) and blood lead studies, (2) determining the geographic area to use in evaluating human exposure to lead contamination (exposure units), (3) addressing multimedia lead contamination and (4) determining appropriate response actions at lead sites. The purpose for clarifying the existing 1994 directive is to promote national consistency in decision-making at CERCLA and RCRA lead sites across the country.

NONE

1998-08-27

187

Norovirus-like virus outbreak at a correctional facility in haliburton kawartha pine ridge district health unit, march to april 2008.  

PubMed

In March 2008, an enteric outbreak was reported from a correctional facility in Central East Ontario to the Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit. The clinical and epidemiological data were compatible with the presence of norovirus in this enteric outbreak. This report summarizes the outbreak investigation conducted and the various public health measures undertaken through a coordinated response by the facility health care and correctional staff and local and provincial health authorities to contain the infection within the facility. Correctional facilities present unique challenges to the implementation of infection control measures, and the investigators eventually recommended that the facility be closed to transfers and new admissions until the outbreak was brought under control. PMID:24078622

Sunil, Vidya; Holt, Anne Marie; Dixon, Ruth; Dingman, Diane; Noseworthy, Avis Lynn

2013-10-01

188

AIDS in Correctional Facilities: Issues and Options. Issues and Practices in Criminal Justice. Third Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document, written for officials involved in making and implementing decisions regarding the correctional response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), provides the most current figures and trend data on the incidence of AIDS among incarcerated offenders. The stated purpose of this document is to be informational rather than…

Hammett, Theodore M.

189

The Burden of Infectious Disease Among Inmates of and Releasees From US Correctional Facilities, 1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. This study developed national estimates of the burden of selected infec- tious diseases among correctional inmates and releasees during 1997. Methods. Data from surveys, surveillance, and other reports were synthesized to de- velop these estimates. Results. During 1997, 20% to 26% of all people living with HIV in the United States, 29% to 43% of all those infected with

Theodore M. Hammett; Mary Patricia Harmon; William Rhodes

2002-01-01

190

Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would

1994-01-01

191

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-11-18

192

Determinants of Length of Stay at Woodside Juvenile Detention Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study used both quantitative and qualitative data to examine determinants of length of stay at Woodside Juvenile Detention Center, Vermont's only locked juvenile detention facility. We analyzed Woodside data for the 358 admissions that occurred betwe...

M. L. Bellas W. H. Clements

2004-01-01

193

Development of corrective measures and site stabilization technologies for shallow land burial facilities at semiarid sites  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the corrective measures task performed for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program has been to develop and test methods that can be used to correct any actual or anticipated problems with new and existing shallow land burial (SLB) sites in a semiarid environment. These field tests have not only evaluated remedial actions, but have also investigated phenomena suspected of being a possible problem at semiarid SLB sites. The approach we have taken in developing remedial action and site closure technologies for low-level waste sites is to recognize that physical and biological processes affecting site integrity are interdependent, and therefore, cannot be treated as separate problems. The field experiments performed for this task were to identify, evaluate, and model erosion control technologies, field test second generation biointrusion barriers, determine by field experiments the extent of upward radionuclide migration due to moisture cycling, and measure the effects of subsidence on remedial action of other system components. Progress made in each of these research areas is described.

Nyhan, J.W.; Abeele, W.V.

1986-01-01

194

Juvenile post-adjudication dispositions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six socio-demographic and graphic and diagnostic and evaluation center (D&E) variables which influence juvenile post-adjudication\\u000a disposition into one of two treatment modalities, group home or institution, are examined. Data employed in this study were\\u000a gathered from completed case history records for 133 randomly sampled male juveniles processed over a six-month period by\\u000a a department of youth services (DYS) facility in

Gregory S. Kowalski; John P. Rickicki

1982-01-01

195

Juvenile Fibromyalgia  

MedlinePLUS

... juvenile fibromyalgia patients per year. Not all these children require treatment for their symptoms; some naturally get better over time. Q. Do girls tend to outnumber boys? A. Yes. Just as fibromyalgia is ...

196

Juvenile Prostitution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

Csapo, Marg

1986-01-01

197

Necrotizing community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia: an emerging problem in correctional facilities.  

PubMed

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections have been common in prisons for more than a decade. However, CA-MRSA as a cause of pneumonia has been reported infrequently. This infection can present with flu-like symptoms and rapidly progress, possibly leading to death in a matter of days. Two cases of MRSA community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) associated with influenza-like illness in correctional officers employed in two separate prisons within the California prison system are presented. Both individuals were previously healthy, but one died of this disease. MRSA is an uncommon, but now recognized, cause of CAP. These cases are notable for their unique presentation and occurrence in non-health care, occupational settings. Prompt diagnosis and intervention by occupational health nurses and physicians are critical to improving outcomes, especially in high-risk settings such as prisons. These worksites need an effective occupational health program to manage MRSA, with adequate training for both employees and inmates. PMID:21366203

Kohli, Nita; Kochie, Mary; Harber, Philip

2011-03-01

198

Juvenile Court DispositionsFactors in the Decision-making Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the decision-making process of juvenile court judges and, more specifically, the factors associated with judicial decisions. Data were gathered over a three-year period on 1,210 adjudicated delinquents and included social background and delinquency history information, as well as scores on a stand ard personality inventory. The correctional facilities to which boys were assigned represent a rough continuum

Frank R. Scarpitti; Richard M. Stephenson

1971-01-01

199

Information About the National Commission on Correctional Health Care and Its Position Statements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC) is a not-for-profit, 501(c)(3) organi- zation committed to improving the quality of care in our nation's jails, prisons, and juvenile detention and confinement facilities. The NCCHC is supported by national organizations listed below representing the fields of health, law, and corrections. In the early 1970s the American Medical Association (AMA) studied the

Charles A. Meyer; Jere G. Sutton; Jonathan B. Weisbuch

200

Prosecuting Juveniles in Adult Court: The Practitioner's Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fear of juvenile crime has reversed the long-accepted practice of treating young offenders in special juvenile courts. Thousands of children annually are now being transferred “automatically,” without judicial review, from juvenile court jurisdiction to adult criminal court and into adult corrections. These transfers place children into a court setting in which they are at a disadvantage at every stage of

Patricia Allard; Malcolm C. Young

2002-01-01

201

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25 R-MAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25, Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 3110, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--891-VOL I-Rev. 1, dated July 2003, provides details of demolition, waste disposal, and use restriction (UR) modification for Corrective Action Unit 113, Area 25 R-MAD Facility. Demolition was completed on July 15, 2010, when the last of the building debris was disposed. Final field activities were concluded on August 30, 2010, after all equipment was demobilized and UR signs were posted. This work was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-02-24

202

Juvenile Gangs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is concerned with the issue of youth gangs. A brief introduction provides examples of gang violence and notes that juvenile gangs are not just a problem in large metropolitan areas, but are being established in communities nationwide. Following this introduction is a series of questions and answers about gangs. Questions focus on what…

William Gladden Foundation, York, PA.

203

Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a “Non-Impacted Class” which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into “survey units” and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three “Class 1,” four “Class 2,” and one “Class 3” survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the building’s interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically “clean,” or free of contamination.

Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

2010-09-30

204

Correctional Boot Camps: A Tough Intermediate Sanction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Foreword; Preface; Historical perspective; State Correctional Programs; Boot Camps in County Jails; Juvenile Boot Camps; Different Program Models; Program Design and Planning and Conclusion.

D. L. MacKenzie H. E. Hebert

1996-01-01

205

Manual of Standards for Juvenile Training Schools and Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This manual of standards for juvenile training schools and services contains 487 American Correctional Association standards for the accreditation of juvenile training schools (youth development centers, villages, correction centers, treatment centers, service centers, homes for boys and girls, camps, and ranches). Standards presented are…

Commission on Accreditation for Corrections, Rockville, MD.

206

Policies and Practices in the Delivery of HIV Services in Correctional Agencies and Facilities: Results from a Multi-Site Survey  

PubMed Central

HIV risk is disproportionately high among incarcerated individuals. Corrections agencies have been slow to implement evidence-based guidelines and interventions for HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. The emerging field of implementation science focuses on organizational interventions to facilitate adoption and implementation of evidence-based practices. A survey of among CJ-DATS correctional agency partners revealed that HIV policies and practices in prevention, detection and medical care varied widely, with some corrections agencies and facilities closely matching national guidelines and/or implementing evidence-based interventions. Others, principally attributed to limited resources, had numerous gaps in delivery of best HIV service practices. A brief overview is provided of a new CJ-DATS cooperative research protocol, informed by the survey findings, to test an organization-level intervention to reduce HIV service delivery gaps in corrections.

Belenko, Steven; Hiller, Matthew; Visher, Christy; Copenhaver, Michael; O'Connell, Daniel; Burdon, William; Pankow, Jennifer; Clarke, Jennifer; Oser, Carrie

2013-01-01

207

Responding to juvenile crime: lessons learned.  

PubMed

Although the dispositional options for delinquent youths have diversified over the past 20 years, the debate about the most effective treatment of young offenders continues. This article reviews the existing evaluations of various juvenile corrections alternatives. In contrast to the conclusions of scholars in the late 1970s that "nothing worked" in juvenile corrections, Mark Lipsey's 1992 meta-analysis of more than 400 evaluations of juvenile programs reported an average 10% improvement in recidivism rates for all the programs evaluated. Lipsey's meta-analysis found a significant advantage in community-based programs run by private providers compared with large custodial institutions, such as traditional state training schools. The most effective privately run community programs have high levels of intensity and duration, multiple modes of intervention, and a great deal of structure. Nonresidential, dawn-to-dusk educational programs that work with both juveniles and their families are good examples of this type of programming. Boot camps for juvenile offenders have proliferated because of their political popularity. A recent evaluation of eight of these programs showed that four had no effect on recidivism, one resulted in higher recidivism rates, and three showed improvements in some recidivism measures. Probation and diversion, the most common of all juvenile court dispositions, are not effective options for youths with multiple risk factors. Juvenile courts need an array of dispositional options, the ability to monitor program effectiveness, and the flexibility to find the appropriate placement for each juvenile offender. PMID:9117368

Greenwood, P W

1996-01-01

208

Housekeeping Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 288: Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly/Treatability Test Facility Chemicals Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order was entered into by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense to identify sites of potential historical contamination and implement corrective actions based on public health and environmental considerations. The facilities subject to this agreement include the Nevada Test Site (NTS), parts of the Tonopah Test Range, parts to the Nellis Air Force Range, the Central Nevada Test Area, and the Project Shoal Area. Corrective Action Sites (CASs) are areas potentially requiring corrective actions and may include solid waste management units, individual disposal, or release sites. Based on geography, technical similarity, agency responsibility, or other appropriate reasons, CASs are grouped together into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for the purposes of determining corrective actions. This report contains the Closure Verification Forms for cleanup activities that were performed at 11 CASs within CAU 288 on the NTS. The Housekeeping Closure Verification Form for each CAS provides the location, directions to the site, general description, and photographs of the site before and after cleanup activities. Housekeeping activities at these sites included removal of debris, crates containing contaminated materials, chemicals, and other material. Based on these activities, no further action is required at these CASs.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-04-24

209

Heterogeneity in drug abuse among juvenile offenders: is mixture regression more informative than standard regression?  

PubMed

Research on juvenile offenders has largely treated this population as a homogeneous group. However, recent findings suggest that this at-risk population may be considerably more heterogeneous than previously believed. This study compared mixture regression analyses with standard regression techniques in an effort to explain how known factors such as distress, trauma, and personality are associated with drug abuse among juvenile offenders. Researchers recruited 728 juvenile offenders from Missouri juvenile correctional facilities for participation in this study. Researchers investigated past-year substance use in relation to the following variables: demographic characteristics (gender, ethnicity, age, familial use of public assistance), antisocial behavior, and mental illness symptoms (psychopathic traits, psychiatric distress, and prior trauma). Results indicated that standard and mixed regression approaches identified significant variables related to past-year substance use among this population; however, the mixture regression methods provided greater specificity in results. Mixture regression analytic methods may help policy makers and practitioners better understand and intervene with the substance-related subgroups of juvenile offenders. PMID:23027831

Montgomery, Katherine L; Vaughn, Michael G; Thompson, Sanna J; Howard, Matthew O

2012-10-01

210

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-03-01

211

HIV\\/AIDS among Inmates of and Releasees from US Correctional Facilities, 2006: Declining Share of Epidemic but Persistent Public Health Opportunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because certain groups at high risk for HIV\\/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus\\/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) come together in correctional facilities, seroprevalence was high early in the epidemic. The share of the HIV\\/AIDS epidemic borne by inmates of and persons released from jails and prisons in the United States (US) in 1997 was estimated in a previous paper. While the number of inmates

Anne C. Spaulding; Ryan M. Seals; Matthew J. Page; Amanda K. Brzozowski; William Rhodes; Theodore M. Hammett; Anastasia P. Litvintseva

2009-01-01

212

Distinguishing Juvenile Homicide From Violent Juvenile Offending  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile homicide is a social problem that has remained a central focus within juvenile justice research in recent years. The term juvenile murderer describes a legal category, but it is purported to have significant scientific meaning. Research has attempted to conceptualize adolescent murderers as a clinical category that can be reliably distinguished from their nonhomicidal counterparts. This study examined 33

Frank DiCataldo; Meghan Everett

2008-01-01

213

Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles

Snyder, Howard N.

214

The ‘big house’ in a small town: The economic and social impacts of a correctional facility on its host community  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a result of the dramatic increase in the prison population, correctional institutions have become the fastest growing public space in the United States (Zukin, 1995). Criminal justice practitioners and scholars continue to debate the utility of sentencing policies that have produced the demand for new prisons. Perhaps, though, the most unexpected result is the extent to which new correctional

Jeanie Thies

2001-01-01

215

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility • 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 114. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. • If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

Mark Burmeister

2009-08-01

216

Exocrine pancreatic function in juvenile diabetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 11 juvenile diabetics and 13 control subjects, the secretin-pancreozymin test was performed. Doudenal-volume losses were corrected by use of radioactive vitamin B12 as marker substance. As compared to normal subjects, juvenile diabetics had significantly decreased pancreatic outputs of amylase, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and to a lesser degree, of bicarbonate. Clinical evidence of disease of the exocrine pancreas was missing. There

F. Tympner; S. Domschke; L. Demling

1975-01-01

217

American Correctional Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Correctional Association is the oldest, and largest international correctional association in the world. ACA serves all disciplines within the corrections profession and is dedicated to excellence in every aspect of the field. The topics covered on this site are wide-ranging, from professional development and certification, to standards and accreditation, network and consulting, research and publications, conferences and exhibits and technology and testing. ACA is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the American Corrections system. A key feature of the website, is that it provides information about professional development programs and workshops as well as professional certification for an adult and juvenile correctional staff.

2006-11-12

218

41 CFR 102-75.815 - What happens if property conveyed for correctional facility, law enforcement, or emergency...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes is found to be in...815 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

2013-01-01

219

Development of a large ion beam figuring facility for correction of optics up to 1.7 m diameter  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAF-OAB) a new Ion Beam Figuring Facility, that adds to the previous one, is under advanced construction. The present facility is able to figure optics up to 50 cm in diameter meanwhile the new one is larger and will be able to figure optics up to 1.7 meter. It will employ a Kaufman Ion

M. Ghigo; S. Cornelli; R. Canestrari; D. Garegnani

2009-01-01

220

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30

221

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

David Strand

2006-09-01

222

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

NA

2006-03-01

223

Reducing violence in serious juvenile offenders using intensive treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on the reduction in violent offending in a population of serious and violent juvenile offenders following an intensive institutional treatment program. The treatment group (N=101) is compared to a similar group that was assessed but not treated (N=147). All youth were sent to the program from a juvenile corrections institution where they had received the customary rehabilitation

Michael F. Caldwell; Gregory J. Van Rybroek

2005-01-01

224

Social Work and Juvenile Probation: Historical Tensions and Contemporary Convergences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social work's weak presence in the field of corrections is peculiar, given that those involved in the criminal and juvenile justice systems are undeniably among the vulnerable and oppressed populations that the profession has traditionally served. The field of juvenile probation shares roots with the profession of social work but lacks a strong…

Peters, Clark M.

2011-01-01

225

Predicting Attrition to Prevent Service Gaps in Serving Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to: (a) investigate differences in demographic variables, previous delinquent\\/criminal behavior variables, family system variables, juvenile court system variables, and subsequent delinquent behavior variables between youth who received services and those who did not among court-involved juvenile delinquent youth; and (b) create a predictive model that would correctly identify youth at the greatest risk

Michelle Mohr Carney; Frederick P. Buttell

2003-01-01

226

Isolation of English Juvenile Offenders by Classification: An American Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major concern of American juvenile corrections is isolating corrigible youths from corruption by hardened criminals. The English system provides a model both informative in its variety, and pertinent in its shared common law background. A major principle of English procedure is insofar as possible to remove juveniles from the court system. Devices to achieve this with various age groups

FRANCIS EDWARD DEVINE

1977-01-01

227

Social Work and Juvenile Probation: Historical Tensions and Contemporary Convergences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work's weak presence in the field of corrections is peculiar, given that those involved in the criminal and juvenile justice systems are undeniably among the vulnerable and oppressed populations that the profession has traditionally served. The field of juvenile probation shares roots with the profession of social work but lacks a strong…

Peters, Clark M.

2011-01-01

228

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Correction Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the F-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23

229

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23

230

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act. Fiscal Year 2009-2010 Report. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards…

Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

2012-01-01

231

Attributions toward Violence of Male Juvenile Delinquents: A Concurrent Mixed-Methodological Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the causal attributions juvenile delinquents make for other's behavior and the salient pieces of information they use to arrive at these attributions. Participants were 82 male juvenile offenders selected through an a priori power analysis, drawn randomly from the population of juveniles incarcerated at a correctional

Daley, Christine E.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

232

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The following is an addendum to the 'Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Nevada Test Site, Nevada', DOE/NV/11718--306, dated April 1999. This addendum includes Use Restriction Information forms and survey maps for CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), that were inadvertently left out of the Closure Report when it was published as a final document.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-06-01

233

Juvenile Huntington's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Up Shop Login Contact Us For Physicians Twitter Facebook facebook twitter search form search: New to HD New ... Remembrance Living With HD HD Care Juvenile HD facebook twitter Juvenile Huntington's Disease Fewer than ten percent ...

234

Juvenile Suicide in Confinement--Findings from the First National Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Findings from the first national survey on juvenile suicide in confinement are provided, and include the extent and distribution of juvenile suicides, as well as descriptive data on demographic characteristics of each victim, incident, and juvenile facility which sustained the suicide. Among the significant findings were that suicides were evenly…

Hayes, Lindsay M.

2009-01-01

235

Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

Snyder, Howard N.

236

Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

Snyder, Howard N.

237

Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in 1999, 33…

Snyder, Howard N.

238

Juvenile Zebra fish  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The juvenile stage is the third stage in the zebra fish life cycle. In the juvenile stage, the zebra fish is continuing to grow in size. At this stage, the juvenile fish can feed on its own and does not need a yolk sac.

Katie Hale (CSUF;Biological Sciences)

2007-06-08

239

Zebra fish juvenile  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The juvenile stage is the third stage in the zebra fish life cycle. In the juvenile stage, the zebra fish is continuing to grow in size. At this stage, the juvenile fish can feed on its own and does not need a yolk sac.

Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)

2007-01-08

240

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereinafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereinafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction of Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30

241

Development of a large ion beam figuring facility for correction of optics up to 1.7 m diameter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAF-OAB) a new Ion Beam Figuring Facility, that adds to the previous one, is under advanced construction. The present facility is able to figure optics up to 50 cm in diameter meanwhile the new one is larger and will be able to figure optics up to 1.7 meter. It will employ a Kaufman Ion Source having three degrees of freedom (x-y-z) with step motors and encoders. The source will have two different grid sizes so to be able to figure the optics wit a broad or small removal function depending from the application. The control system will be computer controlled and designed to be autonomous and self-monitoring during the figuring by using a proprietary process control software. This software will use a time matrix map indicating the dwell times required for each pixel of the optical surface. The software and the mathematical tools used to compute the Time Matrix solution has been developed in INAF-OAB as well.

Ghigo, M.; Cornelli, S.; Canestrari, R.; Garegnani, D.

2009-08-01

242

Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect

This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

MCCARTHY, M.M.

1999-08-01

243

Juvenile polyposis syndrome  

PubMed Central

Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34. Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes. Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum, juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis. In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found. Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway. It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-called “landscaper mechanism” where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma. Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment, follow-up and screening of at risk individuals. Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome. In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome.

Brosens, Lodewijk AA; Langeveld, Danielle; van Hattem, W Arnout; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan A

2011-01-01

244

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30

245

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2006. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2006. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. One additional inspection was performed after a precipitation event that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2006. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during this inspection, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklist and field notes completed during this additional inspection is included in Appendix A of this report. Precipitation records for 2006 are included in Appendix C of this report.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-03-01

246

Sexuality Education Groups in Juvenile Detention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a coeducational sex education program for 15 adolescents in a juvenile detention facility. Subjects completed Hudson's Index of Self-Esteem and a knowledge/attitude test. Results indicated improved knowledge and attitudes about sexuality, contraception and venereal disease, as well as improved self-esteem. (JAC)

Farrow, James A.; Schroeder, Elaine

1984-01-01

247

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This CR provides documentation and justification for the closure of CAU 118 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative and closure activities conducted in accordance with the CAU 118 SAFER Plan: Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The SAFER Plan provides information relating to site history as well as the scope and planning of the investigation. This CR also provides the analytical and radiological survey data to confirm that the remediation goals were met as specified in the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approved the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (Murphy, 2006), which recommends closure in place with use restrictions (URs).

Mark Burmeister

2007-09-01

248

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2005-2006 Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), formerly named the Board of Corrections, the administrator of funding. California counties receiving state funds for Juvenile Justice…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2007-01-01

249

National Juvenile Defender Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Formerly affiliated with the National Bar Association, the National Juvenile Defender Center separated from the ABA in 2005 becoming an independent organization. The NJDC is a support center for public defenders, caseworkers and other groups working with juveniles or juvenile crime issues. Included on the site are publications related to juvenile justice cases and standards. The site also publishes training curriculum on basic skills and strategies for working with juveniles and delinquency proceedings, as well as information on adolescent development and strategies for communication with teens. The NJDC primarily presents itself as a legal resource for public defenders, but it is also a great resource for those in the criminal justice field and anyone working with juvenile or at-risk populations.

2007-03-18

250

Forensic Evaluation of Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Grisso, T. (1998). Forensic evaluation of juveniles. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press. ISBN 156887037X, 9781568870373\\u000aPublisher summary: In recent years, juvenile courts and juvenile attorneys have come to rely heavily on mental health professionals for evaluations of youths in delinquency cases. Evaluation questions include the youth's competence to stand trial, competence to waive Miranda rights prior to giving a

Thomas Grisso

1998-01-01

251

Electronic Monitoring For Juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

One aspect of a nine-month comprehensive research project of the Allen County Superior Court Juvenile Electronic Monitoring program Pilot Project is reported here. The author discusses characteristics of the juveniles and the impact this program had on participating youth and the parent(s) or guardian(s) involved in this pilot project. The findings indicate that a well-designed electronic monitoring program for juveniles

Michael T. Charles

1989-01-01

252

Screening for sexually transmitted diseases in short-term correctional institutions: summary of evidence reviewed for the 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines.  

PubMed

Young persons entering US jails and youth detention facilities have high rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention added STD screening guidelines specific to correctional settings to the 2010 STD Treatment Guidelines. This article summarizes published evidence from 1990 to 2009 used to develop the recommendations. The literature supports routine screening of adolescents and young women (aged ?35 years, or on the basis of local institutional prevalence data) for chlamydia and gonorrhea because of high prevalence and the subsequent risk of adverse reproductive outcomes. Chlamydia positivity among young women (aged <20 years) in juvenile detention facilities and adult facilities is more than 14%. Men in correctional settings are also at high risk for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Among boys in juvenile detention facilities, chlamydia positivity is estimated at 6.6%; among young men in adult facilities, positivity is 16.6%. Screening men (to reduce sequelae among women) should be considered based on local epidemiology and resource availability. Syphilis screening is not strongly supported in published literature because of low prevalence and is not routinely recommended; however, some screening may be warranted based on local prevalence. Although there is a great diversity in the organization of correctional facilities, implementation of screening recommendations is possible owing to improvements in test technology (urine specimens) and through integration of a standard screening protocol. Based on the high burden of disease and substantial opportunities to reach a high-risk population, correctional facilities are important venues to target efforts to control STDs. PMID:23945422

Spaulding, Anne C; Miller, Jamie; Trigg, Bruce G; Braverman, Paula; Lincoln, Thomas; Reams, Patricia N; Staples-Horne, Michelle; Sumbry, Anitra; Rice, Dana; Satterwhite, Catherine Lindsey

2013-09-01

253

Juvenile Rights. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These classroom materials are part of the Project Benchmark series designed to teach secondary students about our legal concepts and systems. This unit focuses on juvenile rights and responsibilities under the law. The materials outline juvenile rights and responsibilities in the areas of parental control, education, free expression, search and…

Eaneman, Paulette S.; And Others

254

Renewing Juvenile Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) was commissioned by Sierra Health Foundation to critically examine California's juvenile justice system and consider the potential role of foundations in promoting systemic reform. The information gathered by CJCJ researchers for this report suggests that foundations can perform a key leadership…

Macallair, Daniel; Males, Mike; Enty, Dinky Manek; Vinakor, Natasha

2011-01-01

255

Juvenile Rights. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These classroom materials are part of the Project Benchmark series designed to teach secondary students about our legal concepts and systems. This unit focuses on juvenile rights and responsibilities under the law. The materials outline juvenile rights and responsibilities in the areas of parental control, education, free expression, search and…

Eaneman, Paulette S.; And Others

256

Reducing Recidivism in Juvenile Offenders: Project About Face's Educational Impact.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project About Face is a joint effort of the Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, Youth Services, Inc., the Naval Air Station at Millington, Correctional Counseling, Inc., and the Bureau of Educational Research Services at Memphis State University. The project's goal is to implement a correctional education and training program that reduces…

Petry, John R.; And Others

257

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24

258

Coordinated California Corrections: Institutions. Correctional System Study. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This series of comprehensive task force reports on jails, prisons, and juvenile institutions presents overviews of corrective institutions in California, models, survey findings about the current systems, and a wide range of general and specific recommendations. Various tables and charts illustrate the data, which were collected by a review of…

California State Human Relations Agency, Sacramento. Board of Corrections.

259

Coordinated California Corrections: Institutions. Correctional System Study. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series of comprehensive task force reports on jails, prisons, and juvenile institutions presents overviews of corrective institutions in California, models, survey findings about the current systems, and a wide range of general and specific recommendations. Various tables and charts illustrate the data, which were collected by a review of the…

California State Human Relations Agency, Sacramento. Board of Corrections.

260

Library Services to Correctional Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chronicles trends in prison libraries during last decade--improved standards, more attention to educational and vocational services, continued interest in reentry materials and services and networking, and emphasis on jail library services. Goals of prison librarianship predicated upon availability of professional librarians are explored, and 23…

Pool, Jane

1985-01-01

261

Juvenile crime and the transformation of juvenile justice: Is there a juvenile crime wave?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current get-tough juvenile policy reforms are based on an assumption that juvenile crime has been increasing for some time. Official and victimization data on juvenile crime are examined to see whether such a trend can be documented. The data show many conflicting trends, but the article argues that the most consistent interpretation is that juvenile crime, with the exception of

Thomas J. Bernard

1999-01-01

262

Juvenile Spondyloarthritis Treatment Recommendations  

PubMed Central

No specific recommendations for the treatment of juvenile spondyloarthritis have been established. Important differences exist in how spondyloarthritis begins and progresses in children and adults, supporting the need for pediatric-specific recommendations. Recently published recommendations for the treatment of juvenile arthritis consider children with sacroiliitis in a separate group, and allow for more accelerated institution of a TNF inhibitor depending on disease activity and prognostic factors that derive primarily from studies of other forms of juvenile arthritis. There is a need to develop measures of disease activity and prognosis specific for juvenile spondyloarthritis that reflect spinal disease, as well as other major clinical features such as enthesitis, before significant progress can be made in this area.

Tse, Shirley; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Colbert, Robert A.

2012-01-01

263

Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterized by levodopa-responsive parkinsonism with onset before age 40 years and a slowly progressive course. Families with this condition have been described predominantly in Japanese population, occasionally under different names including an autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism with diurnal fluctuation (AR-EPDF) or a familial form of juvenile parkinsonism. Recently, the causative

Masaaki Saito; Mieko Maruyama; Ken Ikeuchi; Hiroshi Kondo; Atsushi Ishikawa; Tatsuhiko Yuasa; Shoji Tsuji

2000-01-01

264

Male Versus Female Substance Abuse Patterns Among Incarcerated Juvenile Offenders: Comparing Strain and Social Learning Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study explores gender differences in substance use among a juvenile correctional population. Hypotheses derived from general strain theory and differential association\\/social learning theory are evaluated in order to examine the relative importance of family transitions, family dysfunctions, victimization, and peer substance use. The data include information on approximately 5,000 incarcerated juveniles (89 percent males, 11 percent females). Comparisons

Joan L. Neff; Dennis E. Waite

2007-01-01

265

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004 Report Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document summarizes a report focusing on California counties receiving funds from Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) programs. This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among at-risk and young offenders. The Board of Corrections

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2005-01-01

266

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004. Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 2000, the California Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Board of Corrections (BOC) as the administrator of funding. A 2001 Senate Bill extended the funding and changed the program's name to the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

2005-01-01

267

Juvenile Offenders and Victims, National Report Series. Juveniles in Court.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Courts with juvenile jurisdiction handle some 1.8 million delinquency cases each year. This Bulletin, part of OJJDP's National Report Series, summarizes the latest national statistics on juveniles in court. Drawing on court data and research findings from...

M. Sickmund

2003-01-01

268

Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, and 2068-U, all previously located at the Buildings 9720-15/ 9754-1 site (Facility Identification (number sign)0-010117), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Te...

D. E. Bohrman E. M. Ingram

1992-01-01

269

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17

270

The relationship between self-esteem and AD/HD characteristics in the serious juvenile delinquents in Japan.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to clarify the following 2 points: (1) whether self-esteem changes after correctional education, and (2) whether attention deficit/hyperactivity characteristics affect self-esteem. The subjects were 118 juveniles (all males) admitted to "A" juvenile correctional facility. Our findings indicated that during the correctional education period, changes in self-esteem were limited. The AD/HD-YSR attention deficit score was negatively correlated with the self-esteem score on admission but was not associated with the self-esteem score at the time of parole. Next, the subjects were classified according to the self-esteem score. Consequently, the attention deficit score was significantly associated with self-esteem in all groups. Our results were suggested that total AD/HD-YSR score in the high self-esteem group was lower than that in the other groups. Our cross-sectional surveys have shown an association between the AD/HD-YSR score and self-esteem, suggesting the influences of developmental problems on self-esteem. Research implications were discussed. PMID:19200690

Matsuura, Naomi; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Toichi, Motomi

2009-02-05

271

Developing, Monitoring, and Enforcing Juvenile Justice Legislation: A Case Study of Pennsylvania.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This case study documents reform policies and practices for handling juveniles, and the development of complete monitoring of child welfare and juvenile facilities. Due to the work of citizen and child advocacy groups, ways have been developed in Pennsylvania to determine whether state and federal laws regarding institutionalized children are…

Baird, Joseph H.

272

UNSAFE SEX AND DRUG USE IN JUVENILE DETAINEES IN THE NORTHERN THAILAND  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine whether drug use was associated with participation in unprotected intercourse and to explore the factors that influenced drug use and sexual behaviors among juvenile detainees in Thailand. The study used qualitative and quantitative approaches to identify factors that affected sex and drug-use behaviors of 96 juvenile detainees in detention facility in Northern

Oraphin Krissanakriangkrai; Supaphitt Mikanmak

2008-01-01

273

Monovision slows juvenile myopia progression unilaterally  

PubMed Central

Aim: To evaluate the acceptability, effectivity, and side effects of a monovision spectacle correction designed to reduce accommodation and myopia progression in schoolchildren. Methods: Dominant eyes of 11 year old children with myopia (?1.00 to ?3.00 D mean spherical equivalent) were corrected for distance; fellow eyes were uncorrected or corrected to keep the refractive imbalance ?2.00 D. Myopia progression was followed with cycloplegic autorefraction and A-scan ultrasonography measures of vitreous chamber depth (VCD) for up to 30 months. Dynamic retinoscopy was used to assess accommodation while reading. Results: All children accommodated to read with the distance corrected (dominant) eye. Thus, the near corrected eye experienced myopic defocus at all levels of accommodation. Myopia progression in the near corrected eyes was significantly slower than in the distance corrected eyes (inter-eye difference?=?0.36 D/year (95% CI: 0.54 to 0.19, p?=?0.0015, n?=?13); difference in VCD elongation?=?0.13 mm/year (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.08, p?=?0.0003, n?=?13)). After refitting with conventional spectacles, the resultant anisometropia returned to baseline levels after 9–18 months. Conclusions: Monovision is not effective in reducing accommodation in juvenile myopia. However, myopia progression was significantly reduced in the near corrected eye, suggesting that sustained myopic defocus slows axial elongation of the human eye.

Phillips, J R

2005-01-01

274

Psychosocial concepts in juvenile law  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to clarify the types of information about juveniles and their families that are relevant for three types of juvenile court decisions: (a) the pretrial detention of juveniles; (b) their transfer for trial in criminal courts: and (c) disposition decisions after delinquency adjudication. Predominant legal standards for these decisions are described, information relevance for the decisions is

Thomas Grisso; Alan Tomkins; Pamela Caseyw

1988-01-01

275

Juvenile Aponeurotic Fibroma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Twenty-five new cases of juvenile aponeurotic fibroma are reported. Nineteen were located in the hands or wrists, 2 in the sole of the foot, and one each in the forearm, the thigh, the popliteal fossa, and the capsule of the knee joint. All the patients w...

F. M. Enzinger P. W. Allen

1970-01-01

276

Treating the Juvenile Offender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This authoritative, highly readable reference and text is grounded in the latest knowledge on how antisocial and criminal behavior develops in youth and how it can effectively be treated. Contributors describe proven ways to reduce juvenile delinquency by targeting specific risk factors and strengthening young people's personal, family, and…

Hoge, Robert D., Ed.; Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Boxer, Paul, Ed.

2008-01-01

277

Juvenile Huntington disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of 195 cases of juvenile Huntington disease gathered from case descriptions, the sex, age at onset, duration of disease, clinical type, sex of the affected parent, as well as sex, mean age at onset and at death of adult cases in the same pedigrees were noted when available, and the data were investigated for evidence of relationships between different features.

J. G. van Dijk; E. A. Velde; R. A. C. Roos; G. W. Bruyn

1986-01-01

278

Improvement of an Esocid Bioenergetics Model for Juvenile Fish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Feeding rate and water temperature are known to influence the accuracy of fish bioenergetics models. In an effort to improve the accuracy of a juvenile esocid bioenergetics model, we used a regression-based approach to develop a corrective equation that accounted for the prediction error associated with variable feeding rates and water temperatures. The regression model explained 58% of the variability

Casey W. Schoenebeck; Steven R. Chipps; Michael L. Brown

2008-01-01

279

Adolescent Neglect, Juvenile Delinquency and the Risk of Recidivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental…

Ryan, Joseph P.; Williams, Abigail B.; Courtney, Mark E.

2013-01-01

280

Adolescent Neglect, Juvenile Delinquency and the Risk of Recidivism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental…

Ryan, Joseph P.; Williams, Abigail B.; Courtney, Mark E.

2013-01-01

281

Injury and Mortality of Juvenile Salmon Entrained in a Submerged Jet Entering Still Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of more eco-friendly hydroelectric facilities requires better understanding of the biological response of juvenile fish when they migrate through the turbines and other downstream passage facilities. Juvenile fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were exposed to turbulent shear flows in a laboratory by using a fast-fish-to-slow-water mechanism in which test fish were carried by the fast-moving water of a submerged

Zhiqun Deng; Robert P. Mueller; Marshall C. Richmond; Gary E. Johnson

2010-01-01

282

Reintegrative Police Surveillance of Juvenile Offenders: Forging an Urban Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews patterns of police behavior vis-à-vis juvenile offenders and proposes a model called reintegrative surveillance, which is an integration of community-based corrections and community policing. Neither community-based corrections nor community policing is designed to handle serious, repeat offenders who are returning to high-crime neighborhoods. Police need to reexamine their roles to ensure that (a) policies of maintaining order

Susan Guarino-Ghezzi

1994-01-01

283

Adult Versus Juvenile Sanctions: Voices of Incarcerated Youths  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports findings from face-to-face interviews with youthful offenders in Florida, about half of whom had been transferred to the adult system and half of whom were retained in the juvenile system. The focus is on the youths’global assessments of the impact of their correctional experiences relevant to subsequent offending. The overall impact of each recalled correctional disposition was

Lonn Lanza-Kaduce; Charles E. Frazier; Donna M. Bishop

2002-01-01

284

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at...

1998-01-01

285

Juvenile Offender Recidivism: An Examination of Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between…

Calley, Nancy G.

2012-01-01

286

The Ohio Department of Youth Services Juvenile Prison Library System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The article is an introduction to The Ohio Department of Youth Services librarians and the services they provide. Information about each juvenile prison facility is revealed and provides an explanation of guidelines and standards for prison libraries. Sixty-eight questions were asked in four in-person interviews to present a profile of the…

Herring, Deidra N.

2009-01-01

287

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile polyposis syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... of the following: (1) more than five juvenile polyps of the colon or rectum, (2) juvenile polyps in other parts ... tract. In juvenile polyposis coli, affected people develop polyps only in their colon. People with generalized juvenile polyposis and juvenile polyposis ...

288

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) describes a heterogeneous group of several disease subtypes characterized by\\u000a arthritis beginning before the age of 16 years and where symptoms persist for more than 6 weeks. All subtypes of JIA are of\\u000a unknown cause. Although the pathogenesis for each subtype is likely to be different, JIA is generally regarded to be an autoimmune

Günther E. Dannecker; Martin N. Arbogast; Carol B. Lindsley; H. Schacherl; H. J. Girschick; C. Huemer; A. Heiligenhaus; U. Neudorf

289

Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile amytrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS) is a type of motor neuron disease presenting before 25 years of age. It is characterized\\u000a by a combination of upper and lower motor signs. It may be familial or sporadic. We are reporting a sporadic case of JALS\\u000a with onset of symptoms at 4 years of age. Diagnostic criteria and a brief review of

Anju Aggarwal; Shashiraj

2006-01-01

290

Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.  

PubMed

Juvenile amytrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS) is a type of motor neuron disease presenting before 25 years of age. It is characterized by a combination of upper and lower motor signs. It may be familial or sporadic. We are reporting a sporadic case of JALS with onset of symptoms at 4 years of age. Diagnostic criteria and a brief review of literature are presented. PMID:16567917

Aggarwal, Anju; Shashiraj

2006-03-01

291

Juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) is a common musculoskeletal pain syndrome of unknown etiology characterized\\u000a by widespread persistent pain, sleep disturbance, fatigue, and the presence of multiple discrete tender points on physical\\u000a examination. Other associated symptoms include chronic anxiety or tension, chronic headaches, subjective soft tissue swelling,\\u000a and pain modulated by physical activity, weather, and anxiety or stress. Research and

Kelly K. Anthony; Laura E. Schanberg

2001-01-01

292

3Q\\/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II  

Microsoft Academic Search

Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section

2000-01-01

293

Pathways and Predictors of Juvenile Justice Involvement for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Youths: A Focus on Gender  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the growth of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) youths in court and correctional involvement, studies of their delinquency and juvenile justice involvement are quite limited, and the literature becomes almost nonexistent when examining gender differences. Using case file analysis of 150 Native Hawaiian\\/part-Hawaiian and Pacific Islander juvenile offenders, this article addresses this dearth of research by showing

Lisa Pasko; David T. Mayeda

2011-01-01

294

Wavefront correction for static and dynamic aberrations to within 1 second of the system shot in the NIF Beamlet demonstration facility  

SciTech Connect

The laser wavefront of the NIF Beamlet demonstration system is corrected for static aberrations with a wavefront control system. The system operates closed loop with a probe beam prior to a shot and has a loop bandwidth of about 3 Hz. However, until recently the wavefront control system was disabled several minutes prior to the shot to allow time to manually reconfigure its attenuators and probe beam insertion mechanism to shot mode. Thermally-induced dynamic variations in gas density in the Beamlet main beam line produce significant wavefront error. After about 5-8 seconds, the wavefront error has increased to a new, higher level due to turbulence- induced aberrations no longer being corrected- This implies that there is a turbulence-induced aberration noise bandwidth of less than one Hertz, and that the wavefront controller could correct for the majority of turbulence-induced aberration (about one- third wave) by automating its reconfiguration to occur within one second of the shot, This modification was recently implemented on Beamlet; we call this modification the t{sub 0}-1 system.

Hartley, R.; Kartz, M.; Behrendt, W.

1996-10-01

295

3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

Chase, J.

2000-05-12

296

Race as a Factor in Juvenile Arrests. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bulletin examines the effect of race on police decisions to take juvenile offenders into custody. Analysis of 1997 and 1998 data on 17 states from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System indicates that there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that police are more likely to arrest nonwhite juvenile

Pope, Carl E.; Snyder, Howard E.

297

Juvenile Firesetting: A Research Overview. Juvenile Justice Bulletin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 2002, the National Association of State Fire Marshals (NASFM) began developing applied research initiatives to help professionals curtail juvenile firesetting. The project included a review of the research literature, a conference of researchers and professionals involved in preventing juvenile firesetting, and a final report, upon which this…

Putnam, Charles T.; Kirkpatrick, John T.

2005-01-01

298

Submandibular juvenile fibromatosis.  

PubMed

This brief clinical study presents a case of a 2-year-old girl with a submandibular mass that caused erosion of the inferior border of the mandible. An incisional biopsy finding revealed juvenile fibromatosis, that is, a group of fibrous proliferations that have biologic behavior and histopathologic pattern intermediate between those of benign fibrous lesions and fibrosarcoma. These lesions should be treated through wide surgical excision, and patients should be kept under regular follow-up because of their high recurrence rate. PMID:23851885

Bede, Salwan Yousif Hanna; Ismael, Waleed Khaleel; Abdullah, Bashar Hamid

2013-07-01

299

[Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy].  

PubMed

Since juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (EMJ) and/or Janz syndrome is a primary syndrome which persists throughout life, there should be permanent behavioural hygiene and treatment to keep it under control. Suspension of treatment is nearly always followed by recurrence. Although some researchers report relapses of 75% on suspension of treatment, Janz (1995), cited by Dreifuss points out that this rises to 91% in patients who suspend treatment after two years with no crises. This is, to date, the highest documented level of relapses in epilepsy (5,6,12). PMID:8974749

Medina, C; Obando, M T

1996-11-01

300

Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although justice system policy and practice cannot, and should not, be dictated solely by studies of adolescent development, the ways in which we respond to juvenile offending should be informed by the lessons of developmental science. This review begins with a brief overview of the history, rationale, and workings of the American juvenile justice system. Following this, I summarize findings

Laurence Steinberg

2009-01-01

301

Iatrogenic effect of juvenile justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The present study uses data from a community sample of 779 low-SES boys to investigate whether intervention by the juvenile justice system is determined, at least in part, by particular indi- vidual, familial and social conditions, and whether intervention by the juvenile courts during adoles- cence increases involvement in adult crime. Method: The study considers self-reported crime in childhood

Uberto Gatti; Richard E. Tremblay; Frank Vitaro

2009-01-01

302

Drug Abuse among Juvenile Detainees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although recent surveys of youths in the general pop ulation indicate that drug use has declined, drug use among juvenile detainees remains at a high level. These youths, who are often experiencing multiple problems, are a seriously underserved popula tion group in our society A review of the literature, and results from an ongoing longitudinal study of juvenile detainees in

Richard Dembo; Linda Williams; James Schmeidler

1992-01-01

303

Juvenile Crime. Opposing Viewpoints Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Books in the Opposing Viewpoints Series present debates about current issues that can be used to teach critical reading and thinking skills. The variety of opinions expressed in this collection of articles and book excerpts explores many aspects of juvenile crime. It is a commonly held view that the number of crimes committed by juveniles is…

Sadler, A. E., Ed.

304

Offenders in Juvenile Court, 1993.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Bulletin profiles the estimated 1.5 million cases processed by these courts in 1993. The report's 1993 estimates of juvenile court cases are derived from data from more than 1,800 juvenile courts that have jurisdiction over 67 percent of the U.S. juv...

J. A. Butts

1996-01-01

305

Guidelines for Juvenile Information Sharing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

State and local jurisdictions across the United States are working to improve information sharing among key agencies responsible for community safety and the health and well being of at-risk youth and juvenile offenders. These juvenile justice and other y...

D. McHugh J. Mankey M. Webb P. Baca S. Rondenell

2006-01-01

306

Psychopathology in female juvenile offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The aim was to document the spectrum of present and lifetime psychological disorders in female juvenile offenders, and to examine the relations between mental health status and socio- demographic, family and trauma variables. Method: One hundred juvenile offenders were matched with a comparison group of 100 females on age and socioeconomic status (SES). Psychological profiles and trauma histories of

Angela Dixon; Pauline Howie; Jean Starling

2004-01-01

307

Should Juvenile Delinquency Be Abolished?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The legal concept of juvenile delinquency as administered for the last 150 years began to die with the Gault decision. Delinquency jurisdiction should be removed from juvenile courts and be allowed to revert to criminal courts, where interests which are highly valued in our society can be protected more fully. (Author)

McCarthy, Francis Barry

1977-01-01

308

Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2007-2008 Report. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile-justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA) (formerly named the Board of Corrections) the administrator of funding. A 2001 California Senate bill extended the funding and changed the…

Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

2010-01-01

309

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Correction Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the 'Federal Facility Ag...

2004-01-01

310

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the 'Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (FFACO) (...

T. Echelard

2006-01-01

311

Premotor functional connectivity predicts impulsivity in juvenile offenders  

PubMed Central

Teenagers are often impulsive. In some cases this is a phase of normal development; in other cases impulsivity contributes to criminal behavior. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined resting-state functional connectivity among brain systems and behavioral measures of impulsivity in 107 juveniles incarcerated in a high-security facility. In less-impulsive juveniles and normal controls, motor planning regions were correlated with brain networks associated with spatial attention and executive control. In more-impulsive juveniles, these same regions correlated with the default-mode network, a constellation of brain areas associated with spontaneous, unconstrained, self-referential cognition. The strength of these brain–behavior relationships was sufficient to predict impulsivity scores at the individual level. Our data suggest that increased functional connectivity of motor-planning regions with networks subserving unconstrained, self-referential cognition, rather than those subserving executive control, heightens the predisposition to impulsive behavior in juvenile offenders. To further explore the relationship between impulsivity and neural development, we studied functional connectivity in the same motor-planning regions in 95 typically developing individuals across a wide age span. The change in functional connectivity with age mirrored that of impulsivity: younger subjects tended to exhibit functional connectivity similar to the more-impulsive incarcerated juveniles, whereas older subjects exhibited a less-impulsive pattern. This observation suggests that impulsivity in the offender population is a consequence of a delay in typical development, rather than a distinct abnormality.

Shannon, Benjamin J.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Fair, Damien A.; Mills, Kathryn L.; Zhang, Dongyang; Bache, Kevin; Calhoun, Vince D.; Nigg, Joel T.; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Stevens, Alexander A.; Kiehl, Kent A.

2011-01-01

312

Criminal and behavioral aspects of juvenile sexual homicide.  

PubMed

This preliminary research provides a descriptive, systematic study of juvenile sexual homicide. Fourteen incarcerated juveniles, identified through a department of corrections computer search, were assessed using a structured diagnostic interview, an author-designed clinical interview, and a review of correctional files and other available records. Five of the offenders' victims survived the homicidal attack, but their cases were nevertheless included in this study as the offenders' intent was clearly to kill their victim, and the victim's survival was merely by chance. All victims were female and all offenders were male. Their crimes typically occurred in the afternoon, and involved a low-risk victim of the same race who lived in the offender's neighborhood. The sexual component of the crime consisted of vaginal rape in over one-half of the cases. Weapons, typically a knife or bludgeon, were used in all but one case. Thirteen of these youths had a prior history of violence, and twelve had previous arrests. Chaotic, abusive backgrounds and poor adjustment in school were typical for these boys. A conduct disorder diagnosis was present in twelve of the youths, and violent sexual fantasies were experienced by one-half of the sample. The findings in this study suggest that juvenile sexual murderers comprise less than 1% of juvenile murderers, and are likely to be an emotionally and behaviorally disturbed population with serious familial, academic, and environmental vulnerabilities. PMID:9544541

Myers, W C; Burgess, A W; Nelson, J A

1998-03-01

313

Screening and Assessing Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders among Youth in the Juvenile Justice System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On any given day, over 100,000 youth are held in custody in juvenile justice facilities across the country, either awaiting trial in detention centers or having been placed in residential facilities after being convicted of delinquencies. A growing body of research suggests that most of these youth meet criteria for at least one mental disorder,…

Grisso, Thomas; Underwood, Lee

314

28 CFR 2.64 - Youth Corrections Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Youth Corrections Act. 2.64...AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS...Prisoners and Parolees § 2.64 Youth Corrections Act. (a...will effectively reduce the risk to the public welfare...

2010-07-01

315

The Watershed of Juvenile Justice Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an overview of current policy debates surrounding reform in the juvenile justice system. New data on trends in juvenile crime and the justice system are also presented. These data reveal that while juvenile arrests have declined, the juvenile justice system has become more formal and restrictive and more oriented toward punishment. The authors also present their views

Barry Krisberg; Ira M. Schwartz; Paul Litsky; James Austin

1986-01-01

316

Miranda Rights: Implications for Juveniles with Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Juvenile delinquency in the United States has been a persistent concern for decades. Consequently, because more juveniles have been referred to juvenile court and the arrest rate of preteen offenders has increased to almost three times that of older youth, the persistent and often controversial issue of the capacity of juvenile offenders to waive…

Katsiyannis, Antonis; Barrett, David E.; Losinski, Mickey L.

2011-01-01

317

Value of juvenile animal studies.  

PubMed

The Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee of the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute has undertaken a project to address the impact of juvenile animal studies on pediatric drug development. A workshop, sponsored and organized by the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity Technical Committee, was held on May 5-6, 2010, in Washington, DC, to discuss the outcome of a global survey and the value of juvenile animal studies in the development of drugs intended for use in pediatric patients. During this workshop, summary data from the 2009-2010 survey were presented, and breakout sessions were used to discuss specific case studies to try to assess the impact of juvenile animal studies performed to support specific pediatric drug development. The objectives of the Workshop on The Value of Juvenile Animal Studies were to (1) provide a forum for scientists representing industry, academia, and regulatory agencies to discuss the impact of juvenile animal studies on pediatric drug development, (2) evaluate summary data from the survey to understand how the juvenile study data are being used and their impact in labeling and risk assessment, (3) discuss selected case studies from the survey to highlight key findings, and (4) identify the areas of improvement for the designs of juvenile animal studies. The take home message that resonated from the workshop discussions was that well-designed juvenile animal studies have demonstrated value in support of certain pediatric drug development programs. However, it was also clear that a juvenile animal study is not always warranted. PMID:22623020

Leconte, Isabelle; Bailey, Graham; Davis-Bruno, Karen; Hew, Kok Wah; Kim, James; Silva Lima, Beatriz; Liminga, Ulla; Moffit, Jeffrey; De Schaepdrijver, Luc; Schmitt, Georg; Tassinari, Melissa; Thompson, Kary; Hurtt, Mark

2011-08-01

318

Recidivism of juvenile homicide offenders.  

PubMed

Serious offenses against persons perpetrated by juveniles raise fundamental questions about the background, causes, and prevention of future crime. The current study addresses the potential of future crime of all juvenile homicide offenders (JHOs) in the Netherlands in the period 1992-2007. In contrast to former research on recidivism of JHOs, which has been merely descriptive, the present study integrates theoretical perspectives as to why some of these juveniles turn back to crime, while others do not. To this end, relationships are investigated between recidivism behavior and risk factors. Results indicate that male JHOs, and JHOs who maintain relationships with delinquents, run a greater risk of reoffending. PMID:21484856

Vries, Anne M; Liem, Marieke

2011-04-12

319

Innovative Approaches to Juvenile Indigent Defense. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Bulletin describes ABA/OJJDP collaboration to further the goal of legal representation for juvenile deliquents and features informative examples of promising approaches to ensuring quality legal services for youth.

1998-01-01

320

Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against Minors. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is committed to improving the justice systems response to crimes against children. OJJDP recognizes that children are at increased risk for crime victimization. Not only are children the vi...

D. Finkelher M. Chaffin R. Ormrod

2009-01-01

321

Prostitution of Juveniles: Patterns from NIBRS. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is committed to improving the justice systems response to crimes against children. OJJDP recognizes that children are at increased risk for crime victimization. Not only are children the vi...

D. Finkelhor R. Ormrod

2004-01-01

322

[Surgical treatment of idiopathic scoliosis and juvenile kyphosis].  

PubMed

Indication for operative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis and juvenile kyphosis is mainly cosmetic. There is also a higher incidence of pain in scoliosis patients, and reduced pulmonary function in severe deformity, especially in severe deformities present at the age of 5 years (early onset). Scoliotic curves of less than 30 degrees will not progress in adults, whereas curves of 50-75 degrees will further progress a mean of 25 degrees during 40 years. Progression in adults with juvenile kyphosis is not well documented. Operative treatment aims to stop progression, to control spinal growth, or to perform correction and fusion by spinal instrumentation and bone grafts. These goals can be achieved either by an anterior, a posterior, or a combined approach. Correction principles are compression, distraction, derotation and translation. The forces applied by correction are transferred by fixation devices (pedicle screws, anterior screws, hooks, sublaminar wires) to the spine. The higher correction forces are, the higher is the correction achieved, but also the risk of fracture and torn out implants. Mobilisation reduces rigidity and allows to achieve a better correction with equal forces. The best mobilisation techniques are disc excision, facet joint removal, and techniques to mobilise the thorax. PMID:11963466

Krismer, M; Behensky, H; Frischhut, B; Wimmer, C; Ogon, M

2002-01-01

323

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

Juvenile idiopathic arthrithis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood.JIA is a chronic disease that is associated with periods of disease flares and periods of disease inactivity.Early, aggressive treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, or methotrexate, has significantly improved the outcome of most children who have JIA. Biologics have been shown to be both safe and effective for the treatment of more aggressive forms of arthritis and for uveitis. Long-term safety data of biologics is still uncertain. In the near future, it is hoped that genetic testing will allow earlier diagnosis of JIA as well as help predict the disease course of children who have JIA. Genetic analysis also may allow physicians to target therapies more effectively. It is hoped that development of more specific therapies will decrease overall immunosuppression and other associated toxicities. PMID:22753788

Espinosa, Maria; Gottlieb, Beth S

2012-07-01

324

Juvenile Sex Offender Treatment at State-Operated Correctional Institutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's criminal justice system faces enormous challenges across a broad spectrum of issues. Sex offenses are one such issue posing unique problems to criminal justice practitioners. Research on adult sex offenders indicates offense patterns begin early in life, usually around preor postadolescence. This underscores the importance ofjuvenile sex offender rehabilitative intervention to curb individuals' offense histories before they escalate in

Allen D. Sapp; Michael S. Vaughn

1990-01-01

325

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 34...

1999-01-01

326

Juvenile Spondyloarthritis (JSpA)  

MedlinePLUS

... for a group of childhood rheumatic diseases, which cause arthritis before the age of 16 and may span ... undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic ... JSpA typically causes pain and inflammation in the joints in the ...

327

Naproxen in juvenile chronic polyarthritis.  

PubMed Central

Naproxen at 10 mg per kg body weight was compared with aspirin at 80 mg per kg body weight in children suffering from juvenile chronic polyarthritis. It was found to be as effective as aspirin, with certainly no more and possibly fewer gastrointestinal side effects. A long-term tolerance study up to 12 months confirmed that naproxed was a satisfactory nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the management of various types of juvenile chronic arthritis.

Moran, H; Hanna, D B; Ansell, B M; Hall, M; Engler, C

1979-01-01

328

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area Corrective Action Unit 407 in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved Corrective Action Alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy,

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2000-01-01

329

Evaluation for System-Provided Library Services to State Correctional Centers in Illinois.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This comprehensive evaluation report is based on site visits to 13 adult and 8 juvenile correctional centers and interviews with library staff, prison staff, and residents in 1982. An introduction presents a historical overview of library services to Illi...

R. J. Rubin

1983-01-01

330

HLA types in American black juvenile diabetics strong associations with Dw3 and Dw4.  

PubMed

The distributions of HLA-A, -B, -C and -D antigens in 38 black American insulin-dependent juvenile diabetics were studied. Antigens A1, A2, B8 and Cw3 were slightly increased, but the corrected probability values were not statistically significant. As determined by mixed lymphocyte culture, the frequency of Dw3 was 89% in the juvenile diabetics and that of Dw4 was 42% in comparison with 14 and 8%, respectively, in the controls. The relative risks for juvenile diabetes were 52 for Dw3 (p = 10(-8) and 9 for Dw4 (p = 10(-6). Dw2 was significantly decreased in the diabetics (p equals 0.008). All of these deviations in A, B, C and D locus specificities have been previously reported by others in white juvenile diabetics. Because there are white genes in the American black gene pool and juvenile diabetes is rare in blacks in western Africa, many cases of juvenile diabetes in American blacks could be the result of genes ultimately derived from the white genes. This hypothesis is supported by the similar HLA associations in juvenile diabetes in the black and white ethnic groups. PMID:6453266

MacDonald, M J; Traisman, H S; Levitsky, L L; Duquesnoy, R J; Mullins, P; Hackbarth, S A

1981-06-01

331

Sexuality education groups in juvenile detention.  

PubMed

Several major studies have described the magnitude and character of adolescent sexual activity and sexual knowledge related to contraception and sexually transmitted diseases (Diepold & Young, 1979; Hass, 1979; Sorenson, 1973; Zelnick & Kantner, 1980). Few systematic studies have been conducted, however, which analyze the attitudes toward sexuality and contraception of delinquent adolescents who are generally school dropouts and who may engage in socially unacceptable behaviors such as running away, drug abuse, and prostitution. Delinquent youths, especially delinquent girls, have been characterized as being more sexually active and less sexually knowledgeable than their nondelinquent peers (Gibbon, 1981; Mannarino & Marsh, 1978). Despite the assumed high-risk nature of this delinquent population, few juvenile detention facilities have offered systematically evaluated coeducational sex education programs. One barrier to implementation of such programs in juvenile detention centers is the lack of a treatment or program orientation of most staff, and/or staff denial of adolescent sexuality in general, an attitude which suppresses the development of healthier sexual values and often promotes pathologic sexual interaction within institutions (Shore & Gochros, 1981). A recent survey of adolescent sexuality (Diepold, 1979) points out that teenagers' feelings about their "sexual selves" impacts greatly upon their general self-image. Low self-esteem is more frequently found among delinquents than nondelinquents (Jones & Swain, 1977; Lund & Salury, 1980), and treatment for delinquent girls often focuses on increasing self-esteem and developing assertiveness skills based on feelings of self-worth (DeLange, Lanahan, & Barton, 1981; NiCarthy, 1981). Two studies carried out with juvenile detainees from a large urban center confirmed that sexual activity among delinquent adolescents is significantly greater than that of the general adolescent population, and that the delinquents have little or no knowledge of birth control methods or venereal disease (Deisher, 1980; Schroeder, 1981). Further, these adolescents appear to endorse constricted and conventional values related to sexual activity, abortion, and relationship issues and frequently have a background of sexual abuse and prostitution. These findings form the basis of the current study which attempts to develop an effective coeducational sex education program for this population within a detention facility. This program is specifically designed for a sexually active adolescent group aged 14 to 17. PMID:6516931

Farrow, J A; Schroeder, E

1984-01-01

332

Juveniles tried as adults: the age of the juvenile matters.  

PubMed

Serious juvenile crimes require evaluation of a child as a criminal defendant in adult court. In such cases, it is crucial to understand jurors' attitudes, biases, and ability to follow legal instructions and maintain fairness. 308 undergraduate psychology students served as mock jurors, were randomly separated into four groups, and each group read the same realistic summary of a trial with the defendant's age presented as 13, 15, 17, or 21 years. Participants were asked to render guilty or not guilty verdicts and, if guilty, to suggest sentences. Chi-squared analysis indicated 13- and 15-year-old defendants were convicted less often than 17- and 21-year-old defendants, showing that jurors distinguished between juvenile defendants of different ages, but not minors and adults as defined by law. Additional analysis showed that age did not affect sentencing recommendations. Decision processes jurors use for juveniles tried as adults are discussed. PMID:22049670

Semple, Jaclyn K; Woody, William Douglas

2011-08-01

333

Does Completion of Juvenile Drug Court Deter Adult Criminality?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile drug courts have been developed with the explicit mission of reducing juvenile substance use and related delinquency, and adult crime. Research has shown that juvenile drug courts continue to be popular and effective alternatives to other juvenile court initiatives in terms of decreasing juvenile recidivism. This study is the first to focus on the link between juvenile drug court

W. Craig Carter; R. Donald Barker

2011-01-01

334

The Effect of Job Involvement on Correctional Staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

The driving force of corrections is the staff of correctional facilities. It is important to understand how the work environment shapes the attitudes of correctional staff; yet, the effect of job involvement on correctional employees has received little, if any, attention. Most of the research to date has focused on job stress and job satisfaction among correctional staff. Only recently

Eric G. Lambert

335

Effective Family Strengthening Interventions. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is dedicated to reversing trends of increased delinquency and violence among adolescents. These trends have alarmed the public during the past decade and challenged the juvenile justice sys...

K. L. Kumpfer R. Alvarado

1998-01-01

336

OJJDP Research: Making a Difference for Juveniles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) was established by the President and Congress through the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act of 1974, Public Law 93-415, as amended. Located within the Office of Justice...

1999-01-01

337

Collecting informed consent with juvenile justice populations: issues and implications for research.  

PubMed

Researchers must provide participants with opportunities to make informed decisions about whether to participate in research studies. Investigators conducting research with youth in the juvenile justice system face unique ethical, legal, and practical challenges to obtaining informed consent. Juvenile justice researchers must navigate multiple legal and ethical standards for collecting informed consent, take into account youths' dual vulnerabilities as children and prisoners, and overcome practical limitations to obtaining parental/guardian permission. Given the challenges and complexity of obtaining standard informed consent of youth in juvenile justice facilities, this paper provides suggestions for overcoming obstacles to recruiting these youth for research participation. It offers guidance for fostering the enrollment of juvenile justice youth in research studies using procedures that comply with ethical and legal standards for research with this dually vulnerable population. PMID:23629742

Wolbransky, Melinda; Goldstein, Naomi E S; Giallella, Christy; Heilbrun, Kirk

2013-04-29

338

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has recently placed an item of interest online. This item, from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention (OJJDP), is the 1999 national report on Juvenile Offenders and Victims, "the most comprehensive source of information about juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and about the response of the juvenile justice system to these problems." The report is offered in seven chapters in .pdf format.

Sickmund, Melissa.; Snyder, Howard N.

339

Juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the testis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the testis is a rare type of intermediate stromal cell tumor. Only 11 cases of juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the testis have been reported to the national tumor registry as of December 2001. We report an additional case of primary juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the testis. The benign lesion was managed successfully with

Randy Fagin; Ema Berbescu; Steve Landis; Kenneth Strumpf; Umeshchandra Patil

2003-01-01

340

In Defense of Juvenile Court. Debate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the early history of the juvenile court system and ties it to the reforms of the U.S. Progressive Era. Examines the arguments of those who call for the abolition of juvenile courts. Concludes that much of the criticism is misplaced and that efforts should be made to make juvenile courts work rather than abolish them. (CFR)

Kopecky, Frank

1994-01-01

341

The Juvenile Court and Delinquency Cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Growing public concern about the rise in violent juvenile crime is borne out by increases in the juvenile court's caseload, which rose 23% between 1989 and 1993. The number of cases involving person offenses increased by 52%. Despite the rise in per- son offenses, the majority of delinquency cases in juvenile court involve property offenses, and less than 10% of

Howard N. Snyder

1996-01-01

342

Families, Juvenile Justice and Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The theme issue of this bulletin is a discussion of youth with emotional disturbances who are in the juvenile justice system and how to meet their needs. Articles include: (1) "Responding to the Mental Health Needs of Youth in the Juvenile Justice System" (Susan Rotenberg); (2) "Prevalence of Mental Disorders among Youth in the Juvenile Justice…

McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

1997-01-01

343

Gender differences in stalking behaviour among juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is emerging recognition that stalking is a problem behaviour among juveniles. As gender differences in the nature of stalking have been observed to exist in adult stalkers, it is important to ascertain whether gender differences are also apparent in juvenile perpetrators. This study compared the characteristics and motivations of stalking behaviour in an Australian sample of juvenile perpetrators (n = 299),

Rosemary Purcell; Michele Pathé; Paul Mullen

2010-01-01

344

Families, Juvenile Justice and Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The theme issue of this bulletin is a discussion of youth with emotional disturbances who are in the juvenile justice system and how to meet their needs. Articles include: (1) "Responding to the Mental Health Needs of Youth in the Juvenile Justice System" (Susan Rotenberg); (2) "Prevalence of Mental Disorders among Youth in the Juvenile Justice…

McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

1997-01-01

345

The Juvenile Court: Changes and Challenges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Explores the changes in the juvenile court system, in particular, the juvenile waiver and sentencing laws, as it transformed from a social welfare agency into a type of criminal court system for young offenders. Addresses whether states should create an integrated juvenile and criminal justice system. (CMK)|

Feld, Barry C.

2000-01-01

346

On the Prevention of Juvenile Crime  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Crimes committed by juveniles are among the most urgent social problems. Juvenile crime is as prevalent as crime itself is, and it has not been solved completely in any society and cannot be solved through law enforcement measures alone. In this article, the authors discuss the dynamics and structure of juvenile crime in Russia and present data…

Lelekov, V. A.; Kosheleva, E. V.

2008-01-01

347

Special Education and the Juvenile Justice System. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin summarizes provisions of federal law as they pertain to special education and juvenile justice. It discusses provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 1997 including: the definition of disability; free appropriate public education; identification, referral, and evaluation; the individualized education program…

Burrell, Sue; Warboys, Loren

348

Juvenile hypothyroidism among two populations exposed to radioiodine.  

PubMed Central

We found an epidemic of juvenile hypothyroidism among a population of self-defined "downwinders" living near the Hanford nuclear facility located in southeast Washington State. The episode followed massive releases of 131I. Self-reported data on 60 cases of juvenile hypothyroidism (<20 years of age) among a group of 801 Hanford downwinders are presented, as well as data concerning the thyroid status of approximately 160,000 children exposed to radioiodine before 10 years of age as a result of the 26 April 1986 Chernobyl explosion in the former Soviet Union. These children were residents of five regions near Chernobyl. They were examined by standardized screening protocols over a period of 5 years from 1991 to 1996. They are a well-defined group of 10 samples. Fifty-six cases of hypothyroidism were found among boys and 92 among girls. Body burdens of 137Cs have been correlated with hypothyroidism prevalence rates. On the other hand, the group of juvenile (<20 years of age) Hanford downwinders is not a representative sample. Most of the 77 cases of juvenile hypothyroidism in the Hanford group were diagnosed from 1945 to 1970. However, the ratio of reported cases to the county population under 20 years of age is roughly correlated with officially estimated mean levels of cumulative thyroid 131I uptake in these counties, providing evidence that juvenile hypothyroidism was associated with radioiodine exposures. Because even subtle hypothyroidism may be of clinical significance in childhood and can be treated, it may be useful to screen for the condition in populations exposed to radioiodine fallout. Although radiation exposure is associated with hypothyroidism, its excess among fallout-exposed children has not been previously quantified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

Goldsmith, J R; Grossman, C M; Morton, W E; Nussbaum, R H; Kordysh, E A; Quastel, M R; Sobel, R B; Nussbaum, F D

1999-01-01

349

Juvenile offender recidivism: an examination of risk factors.  

PubMed

One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between recidivism and nine specific variables: offense type, age at initial involvement in juvenile justice, child welfare system involvement, termination of parental rights, parental criminal history, family support, program completion status, length of treatment stay, and discharge placement. Offender type was the only factor found to have a significant impact on recidivism with general and substance-involved offenders more likely to recidivate than sex offenders. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:22574843

Calley, Nancy G

2012-01-01

350

Time to Reframe Politics and Practices in Correctional Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this chapter, Stefan LoBuglio discusses the politics and practices of educational programs for adults in correctional facilities. To begin, LoBuglio provides an overview of the field of corrections, including various types of facilities and correctional programs, as well as demographic and educational data on the U.S. incarcerated population…

LoBuglio, Stefan

2001-01-01

351

What is Justice for Juveniles?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Provides background information and related learning activities for three areas of inquiry involving youth and violence: (1) "Evolution of the Juvenile Justice System"; (2) "The Literature of Crime and Poverty"; (3) "Youth Crime and Public Policy." Includes a list of six recommended Web sites. (MJP)|

Rothwell, Jennifer Truran

1997-01-01

352

Rethinking the Juvenile Justice System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crime is the product of the confluence of individuals low on self-control and appropriate opportunities. The likelihood of crime varies continuously with age, but the meaning of criminal acts does not depend on the age of the offender. Distinctions based on age are thus arbitrary, and probably cause more trouble than they are worth. Special treatment of juveniles is based

Travis Hirschi; Michael Gottfredson

1993-01-01

353

Juvenile Criminals: Who Are They?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many adolescents who were born in the late 1970s and 1980s in Russia became juvenile criminals due to the change in the social structure, the proclamation of the values of the comfortable way of life, the institution of property ownership and so forth. Many young people have to help relatives who are in need, and this as well often causes them to…

Antonov, A. I.; Lebed, O. L.

2005-01-01

354

Juvenile Parricide: A Predictable Offense?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The act of juvenile parricide is a rare crime, but one that is highly publicized and generates much public outrage. Due to it being an offense that has a very low base rate, predicting its occurrence is extremely difficult, if not impossible. The purpose of this study was to assess the predictive utility of both the Structured Assessment of Violence

Thomas M. Evans; Meghan McGovern-Kondik; Franco Peric

2005-01-01

355

Juveniles and the Death Penalty.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The appropriateness of the death penalty for juveniles is the subject of intense debate despite Supreme Court decisions upholding its use. Although nearly half the States allow those who commit capital crimes as 16- and 17-year-olds to be sentenced to dea...

J. J. Wilson

2000-01-01

356

Juvenile Criminals: Who Are They?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many adolescents who were born in the late 1970s and 1980s in Russia became juvenile criminals due to the change in the social structure, the proclamation of the values of the comfortable way of life, the institution of property ownership and so forth. Many young people have to help relatives who are in need, and this as well often causes them to…

Antonov, A. I.; Lebed, O. L.

2005-01-01

357

Juvenile offenders and mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author reviews the significance of the presence of mental illnesses to the juvenile justice system. He acknowledges the absence of a satisfactory system for classifying mental disorders among children and adolescents and sketches what so far is known about certain childhood disorders which appear to have a special significance for delinquent behaviour. He reviews studies on the overlap between

Thomas Grisso

1999-01-01

358

Juvenile Firesetting: A Research Overview.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The consequences of juvenile firesetting can be tragic and costly. In a typical year, fires set by children and youth claim the lives of approximately 300 people and destroy more than $300 million worth of property. Children are the predominant victims of...

C. T. Putnam J. T. Kirkpatrick

2006-01-01

359

Juvenile Diabetes and Rehabilitation Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Severe complications of diabetes are more likely to occur with the juvenile diabetic and problems of psychosocial adjustment are recurring and difficult. Implications for the rehabilitation counselor are discussed in terms of employment considerations, the effects of complications, genetic counseling, and cooperation with other professionals.…

Stone, J. Blair; Gregg, Charles H.

1981-01-01

360

ADJUSTMENT PROBLEMS OF JUVENILE DIABETES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparative and correlational study was made of 50 juvenile diabetics and 50 individually matched controls. Evaluation included psychiatric interview, psy- chological testing, interviews in home with parents, and medical rating of diabetic control. For clinical ratings, the diabetics showed significantly more pathology on psychiatric classification, dependence-independence balance, self- percept, manifest and latent anxiety, sexual identification, constriction, hostility, and oral

CHARLES R. SWIFT; FRANCES SEIDMAN

1964-01-01

361

Effectiveness of Culturally Specific Community Treatment for African American Juvenile Felons  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to seemingly high recidivism rates among male African American juvenile felons in Cincinnati, a community program was created specifically for these youths. The Community Corrections Partnership (CCP) Program focuses on the cultural regrounding of African American boys to improve their self-esteem and help them to develop a sense of community. The program has received national attention, yet its

John Wooldredge; Jennifer Hartman; Edward Latessa; Stephen Holmes

1994-01-01

362

Corrections. Focal Point: Research, Policy, and Practice in Children's Mental Health. Volume 20, Number 2, Summer 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This issue of "Focal Point" describes the need for, and provides examples of, new strategies for meeting the mental health needs of children and adolescents involved with the juvenile justice system. Articles in this issue discuss the particular need for correction in the way that the juvenile justice system interacts with youth who have mental…

Walker, Janet S., Ed.

2006-01-01

363

Academic Potential Among African American Adolescents in Juvenile Detention Centers: Implications for Reentry to School  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study explores Black adolescent detainees' academic potential and motivation to return to school, to inform best practices and policies for juvenile reentry to educational settings. Adolescent detainees (N = 1,576) who were recruited from 1 male and 1 female youth detention facility, responded to surveys that assessed postdetention educational plans, as well as social and emotional characteristics, and criminal history. Multivariate

Ivory A. Toldson; Kamilah M. Woodson; Ronald Braithwaite; Rhonda C. Holliday; Mario De La Rosa

2010-01-01

364

Classification of Severe Male Juvenile Offenders Using the MACI Clinical and Personality Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classifications for severe juvenile offenders and ones that include mental health needs are lacking. Thus, in this study, adolescent male offenders (N = 652) committed to a residential facility were clustered on personality and clinical scales of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (Millon, 1993) into 5 groups (including 4 found in other…

Taylor, Jeanette; Kemper, Therese Skubic; Loney, Bryan R.; Kistner, Janet A.

2006-01-01

365

Academic Potential among African American Adolescents in Juvenile Detention Centers: Implications for Reentry to School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study explores Black adolescent detainees' academic potential and motivation to return to school, to inform best practices and policies for juvenile reentry to educational settings. Adolescent detainees (N = 1,576) who were recruited from 1 male and 1 female youth detention facility, responded to surveys that assessed postdetention educational…

Toldson, Ivory A.; Woodson, Kamilah M.; Braithwaite, Ronald; Holliday, Rhonda C.; De La Rosa, Mario

2010-01-01

366

Juveniles' Competence to Stand Trial: A Comparison of Adolescents' and Adults' Capacities as Trial Defendants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abilities associated with adjudicative competence were assessed among 927 adolescents in juvenile detention facilities and community settings. Adolescents' abilities were compared to those of 466 young adults in jails and in the community. Participants at 4 locations across the United States completed a standardized measure of abilities relevant for competence to stand trial (the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool—Criminal Adjudication) as

Thomas Grisso; Laurence Steinberg; Jennifer Woolard; Elizabeth Cauffman; Elizabeth Scott; Sandra Graham; Fran Lexcen; N. Dickon Reppucci; Robert Schwartz

2003-01-01

367

Juveniles' competence to stand trial: a comparison of adolescents' and adults' capacities as trial defendants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abilities associated with adjudicative competence were assessed among 927 adolescents in juvenile detention facilities and community settings. Adolescents' abilities were compared to those of 466 young adults in jails and in the community. Participants at 4 locations across the United States completed a standardized measure of abilities relevant for competence to stand trial (the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool--Criminal Adjudication) as

Thomas Grisso; Laurence Steinberg; Jennifer Woolard; Elizabeth Cauffman; Elizabeth Scott; Sandra Graham; Frances J. Lexcen; N. Dickon Reppucci; Robert Schwartz

2003-01-01

368

Issues in Education for the Youthful Offender in Correctional Institutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The introduction to the survey of educational programs for juvenile offenders in correctional institutions briefly outlines the educational problems and priorities in the prison setting. Chapter one discusses the history of such programs over the last 150 years, especially considering the use and biases of intelligence tests during the last 50…

Dell'Apa, Frank

369

Issues in Education for the Youthful Offender in Correctional Institutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The introduction to the survey of educational programs for juvenile offenders in correctional institutions briefly outlines the educational problems and priorities in the prison setting. Chapter one discusses the history of such programs over the last 150 years, especially considering the use and biases of intelligence tests during the last 50…

Dell'Apa, Frank

370

Juvenile justice decision making in a rural hispanic community  

Microsoft Academic Search

The processing of juveniles through the juvenile justice system of a jurisdiction encompassing two rural counties in New Mexico where the numerical majority of the population is Hispanic\\/Mexican American was examined. The official records of 591 juveniles referred to the Juvenile Probation and Parole Office were analyzed and interviews with all Juvenile Probation and Parole Officers (JPPOs) assigned to this

Lisa J. Bond-Maupin; James R. Maupin

1998-01-01

371

Putting race into context: Race, juvenile justice processing, and urbanization  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we examine differential sentencing patterns among black, Hispanic, and white juveniles and the context in which those decisions are made. Using a bivariate probit model, we show that juveniles living in urban counties are more likely to be referred to juvenile court, and that juveniles living in a single-mother household are more likely than juveniles living with

Christina DeJong; Kenneth C. Jackson

1998-01-01

372

No Time To Play: Youthful Offenders in Adult Correctional Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of juveniles tried as adults increased by 71 percent from 1985 through 1994. A comprehensive look at the growing population of youthful offenders housed in adult facilities and guidance in managing this special needs population is provided. Section 1, "History and Current Realities," includes a brief review of the history of the…

Glick, Barry; Sturgeon, William

373

CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 423: BUILDING 03-60 UNDERGROUND DISCHARGE POINT, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, REVISION 0, JUNE 1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (Corrective Action Unit 423) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action ...

1998-01-01

374

Corrective action under RCRA. [Resource Recovery and Conservation Act  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the cost and benefits of the proposed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Rule establishing regulatory requirements for corrective action at hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities receiving RCRA permits. The topics of the article include corrective action history, corrective action philosophy, promoting flexibility, and better remediation.

Kotlinski

2009-01-01

375

Swimming behaviour of juvenile Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata  

SciTech Connect

Actively migrating juvenile Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata Richardson, 1836) were collected from hydroelectric bypass facilities in the Columbia River and transferred to the laboratory to study their diel movement patterns and swimming ability. Volitional movement of lamprey was restricted mainly to night, with 94% of all swimming activity occurring during the 12-hr dark period. Burst speed of juvenile lamprey ranged from 56 to 94 cm/s with a mean of 71 ±5 cm/s or an average speed of 5.2 body lengths (BL)/s. Sustained swim speed for 5-min test intervals ranged from 0 to 46 cm/s with a median of 23 cm/s. Critical swimming speed was 36.0±10.0 cm/s and 2.4±0.6 BL/s. There was no significant relationship between fish length and critical swimming speed. Overall swimming performance of juvenile Pacific lamprey is low compared to that of most anadromous teleosts. Their poor swimming ability provides a challenge during the freshwater migration interval to the Pacific Ocean.

Dauble, Dennis D.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

2006-02-01

376

Use of Otoliths to Separate Juvenile Steelhead Trout from Juvenile Rainbow Trout.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Otolith nuclei were investigated as a means of separating juvenile steelhead trout, Salmo gairdneri, from juvenile rainbow trout, S. gairdneri, in the lower Deschutes River, Oreg. An intensive recreational fishery necessitated development of a technique f...

J. T. Rybock H. F. Horton J. L. Fessler

1974-01-01

377

"Children of the city": juvenile justice, property, and place in England and Scotland, 1945-60.  

PubMed

This article uses cases studies of Dundee and Manchester to explain juvenile property-offending in terms of young people's use of objects and spaces in the period 1945-60. A composite picture is assembled of objects stolen, which reflects growth of the specifically "teenage" consumer market as well as continued significance of young people's contribution to family economies. Concerns about youth, property, and space were reported in newspapers in terms of vandalism and hooliganism. "Play" and "nuisance" were overlapping and contested categories; re-education of young people in the correct use of place, space, and property was a key aim of the postwar juvenile justice system. PMID:21328805

Jackson, Louise A; Bartie, Angela

2011-01-01

378

Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 contaminated waste dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate correction action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143 under the Federal Facility Agreeme...

USDOE Nevada Operations Office

1999-01-01

379

Corrective Action Decision Documents/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190, Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by t...

2008-01-01

380

[In]Subordination: Inmate Photography and Narrative Elicitation in a Youth Incarceration Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing urgency and social responsibility regarding the lives and experiences of incarcerated juveniles; the author utilizes a visual ethnographic methodology using participant photography in a prison facility in Louisiana to simultaneously invert the surveillance structure and add “layers of significance” (Pink, 2007) to the narrative process. The results, from the photographs and interviews with six incarcerated juvenile

Jonathan Arendt

2011-01-01

381

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME, TASK FORCE REPORT, REPORT ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CONSULTANTS PAPERS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF THE JUVENILE COURT SYSTEM AND THE PREVENTION OF DELINQUENCY. THE COMMISSION'S RECOMMENDATIONS ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY INCLUDE THE AREAS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, HOUSING AND RECREATION, FAMILIES, INVOLVING YOUTHS IN COMMUNITY LIFE, SCHOOLS, AND EMPLOYMENT. THE APPENDIXES, WHICH CONSTITUTE THE…

President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.

382

Aaron Kupchip, Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Judging Juveniles, Aaron Kupchik addresses some of the contextual and sociolegal issues that arise from the growing number of adolescents prosecuted in criminal rather than juvenile court. Testing the assumption held by policy makers and academics that juveniles processed in criminal court are subjected to an entirely different model of justice, Kupchik utilizes a rigorous, mixed-methods research design to

Jennifer N. Grimes

2007-01-01

383

Juvenile Practice Is Not Child's Play: A Handbook for Attorneys Who Represent Juveniles in Texas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook is an attempt to summarize the most important aspects of juvenile law for a new practitioner, and to offer some additional ideas and strategies to any juvenile defense attorney. The goal is to help improve representation of juveniles across the state of Texas. References to useful books, cases, and statutes are included. The handbook…

2002

384

A Juvenile Justice System for the 21st Century. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bulletin describes the objectives and elements of an effective juvenile justice system and suggests legislative and administrative strategies for its implementation. An effective juvenile justice system must meet the three objectives of holding the juvenile offender accountable, enabling the offender to become a capable and productive…

Bilchik, Shay

385

Runaway Juvenile Crime? The Context of Juvenile Arrests in America. Research in Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Violent and Repeat Juvenile Offender Act of 1997 (S-10) was to be debated in the Senate in spring 1998. This bill would blur the distinction between juvenile and adult criminal systems, making it easier to imprison children as young as 14. Supporters of S-10 were citing statistics to indicate that juvenile crime was on the rise. In fact, the…

Ziedenberg, Jason; Schiraldi, Vincent

386

The JDAI Story: Building a Better Juvenile Detention System. Pathways to Juvenile Detention Reform. Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This monograph describes the work of five Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) sites designed to streamline and rationalize local juvenile detention systems and to reduce overcrowding in juvenile detention centers, thus improving conditions and saving jurisdictions money in overtime and additional staff and millions of dollars to…

Stanfield, Rochelle

387

A Handbook for Juveniles and Parents on Maine's Juvenile Justice System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide explains Maine's juvenile justice system so that juveniles and/or their parents can know what to expect or what to do in a situation involving juveniles, public officials and the law. Although it is geographically specific, it could serve as a model to other states. The booklet can serve as a checklist to make sure law enforcement…

Mehnert, Irene

388

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME, TASK FORCE REPORT, REPORT ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CONSULTANTS PAPERS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF THE JUVENILE COURT SYSTEM AND THE PREVENTION OF DELINQUENCY. THE COMMISSION'S RECOMMENDATIONS ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY INCLUDE THE AREAS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, HOUSING AND RECREATION, FAMILIES, INVOLVING YOUTHS IN COMMUNITY LIFE, SCHOOLS, AND EMPLOYMENT. THE APPENDIXES, WHICH CONSTITUTE THE…

President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.

389

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site's Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 342. The scope of this document consists of the following: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit.

DOE /NV

1999-05-26

390

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE] [Subpart K...prosecutions against juveniles.] 28 JUDICIAL...THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Criminal Division...prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant...implementation of the Juvenile Justice and...

2009-07-01

391

Alternatives to the Secure Detention and Confinement of Juvenile Offenders.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is presenting a Juvenile Justice Practices Series to provide the field with updated research, promising practices, and tools for a variety of juvenile justice areas. These Bulletins are imp...

J. Austin K. D. Johnson R. Weitzer

2005-01-01

392

Female Offenders in the Juvenile Justice System. Statistics Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Table of Contents: Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Arrests of Female Juvenile Offenders; Female Offenders in the Juvenile Court; Female Juvenile Offenders in Custody; Conclusion; Related Reading; Methods; Tables, Figures, and Data Tables; Figures...

E. Poe-Yamagata J. A. Butts

1996-01-01

393

The impact of incarceration on juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

Increasingly, research points to the negative effects of incarcerating youth offenders, particularly in adult facilities. Literature published since 2000 suggests that incarceration fails to meet the developmental and criminogenic needs of youth offenders and is limited in its ability to provide appropriate rehabilitation. Incarceration often results in negative behavioral and mental health consequences, including ongoing engagement in offending behaviors and contact with the justice system. Although incarceration of youth offenders is often viewed as a necessary means of public protection, research indicates that it is not an effective option in terms of either cost or outcome. The severe behavioral problems of juvenile offenders are a result of complex and interactive individual and environmental factors, which elicit and maintain offending behavior. Therefore, the focus of effective treatment must be on addressing such criminogenic needs and the multiple "systems" in which the young person comes from. Recent research demonstrates that in order to achieve the best outcomes for youth offenders and the general public, community-based, empirically supported intervention practices must be adopted as an alternative to incarceration wherever possible. PMID:23454219

Lambie, Ian; Randell, Isabel

2013-01-28

394

Juvenile justice and substance use.  

PubMed

Laurie Chassin focuses on the elevated prevalence of substance use disorders among young offenders in the juvenile justice system and on efforts by the justice system to provide treatment for these disorders. She emphasizes the importance of diagnosing and treating these disorders, which are linked both with continued offending and with a broad range of negative effects, such as smoking, risky sexual behavior, violence, and poor educational, occupational, and psychological outcomes. The high rates of substance use problems among young offenders, says Chassin, suggest a large need for treatment. Although young offenders are usually screened for substance use disorders, Chassin notes the need to improve screening methods and to ensure that screening takes place early enough to allow youths to be diverted out of the justice system into community-based programs when appropriate. Cautioning that no single treatment approach has been proven most effective, Chassin describes current standards of "best practices" in treating substance use disorders, examines the extent to which they are implemented in the juvenile justice system, and describes some promising models of care. She highlights several treatment challenges, including the need for better methods of engaging adolescents and their families in treatment and the need to better address environmental risk factors, such as family substance use and deviant peer networks, and co-occurring conditions, such as learning disabilities and other mental health disorders. Chassin advocates policies that encourage wider use of empirically validated therapies and of documented best practices for treating substance use disorders. High relapse rates among youths successfully treated for substance use disorders also point to a greater need for aftercare services and for managing these disorders as chronic illnesses characterized by relapse and remission. A shortage of aftercare services and a lack of service coordination in the juvenile justice system, says Chassin, suggest the need to develop treatment models that integrate and coordinate multiple services for adolescent offenders, particularly community-based approaches, both during and after their justice system involvement. PMID:21338002

Chassin, Laurie

2008-01-01

395

Microsurgery in Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma  

PubMed Central

Thirty-four consecutive juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, mainly stage II or III, were removed using a transnasomaxillary approach with good tumor control and without complications or sequelae. A pedicled nasomaxillary osteomucocutaneous flap is lifted through a lateronasal skin incision, and reflected laterally to open the nasal fossa and the maxillary sinus. This approach is an improvement on the conventional approach of lateral rhinotomy, which entails nasomaxillary skeletal loss. The approach ensures early and direct exposure of the root of the tumor and its vascular peduncle and also allows removal of tumors with intracranial extradural extensions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 7

Bagatella, Francesco; Mazzoni, Antonio

1995-01-01

396

Bioassay Testing of Simulated Effluent from the Defense Waste Processing Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Static acute bioassay tests were used to investigate the effect of the proposed effluent from the Defense Waste Processing Facility on juvenile bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, and the lower food chain microorganisms present in Four Mile Creek. The ...

C. B. Fliermans

1984-01-01

397

A Critique of Diversionary Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasingly zealous support today for diversion of youth from the juvenile justice system is a consequence of several widely held notions: (1) Traditional strategies for dealing with juvenile offenders have not worked; ( 2) informal diversion is used both widely and effectively now; and (3) the most humane treatment of troubled youth is based upon the parens patriae philosophy

Bruce Bullington; James Sprowls; Daniel Katkin; Mark Phillips

1978-01-01

398

Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Juvenile Sex Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment…

Sahlstrom, Kimberly J.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

2008-01-01

399

Juvenile Hormone: Effects on a Higher Dipteran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Injection of dl-juvenile hormone or C17 methyl ester into Sarcophaga bullata larvae prevents puparium formation or arrests development at about the 3rd day of pupal-adult development. Topical application to the abdomens of young pupae results in the secretion of a second pupal cuticle. This is the first reported morphogenetic effect of juvenile hormone on a fly.

Lawrence I. Gilbert

1968-01-01

400

Counseling Juvenile Offenders: A Program Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews the results of the effectiveness of counseling services provided by the Juvenile Counseling and Assessment Program of the Juvenile Court of Clarke County, Georgia. Individual and group counseling services were provided for 55 adjudicated delinquent youths for four to six months. The recidivism rates of the youths who had received…

Kadish, Tara E.; Glaser, Brian A.; Risler, Edwin A.; Calhoun, Georgia B.

1999-01-01

401

Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

2004-01-01

402

Changes in Juvenile Justice in China.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses rising juvenile and youth crime in China, highlighting the essence of Chinese Marxist criminological thought and changing conceptions of delinquency from the postrevolutionary period to the present; examining official responses to delinquency and the recent development of juvenile justice; and suggesting that current delinquency control…

Wong, Dennis S. W.

2001-01-01

403

Familial cheiroarthropathy without juvenile onset diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cheiroarthropathy is a recently recognised complication of juvenile onset diabetes mellitus. It comprises inability to extend fully the fingers, contracted tendons, and waxy thickening of the skin overlying the fingers and to a lesser extent the hands. We report two families in which one parent and a number of siblings had the typical features of cheiroarthropathy without juvenile onset diabetes

D. L. Scott; J. P. Delamere; L. P. Mackintosh; S. Jobson

1982-01-01

404

Seven Juvenile Delinquents--Case Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Seven case studies are presented to further research on juvenile problems and to clarify existing juvenile problems. These seven were all inmates of the same institution at the same time, and were selected case studies--neither the best nor the worst. They were all interviewed inside the penal institution. The first oart asked each about the…

Williams, Michael C., Sr.; Starkey, John D.

405

Juvenile hormone: effects on a higher dipteran.  

PubMed

Injection of dl-juvenile hormone or C(17) methyl ester into Sarcophaga bullata larvae prevents puparium formation or arrests development at about the 3rd day of pupal-adult development. Topical application to the abdomens of young pupae results in the secretion of a second pupal cuticle. This is the first reported morphogenetic effect of juvenile hormone on a fly. PMID:5659127

Srivastava, U S; Gilbert, L I

1968-07-01

406

Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

2004-01-01

407

Autosomal dominant juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a form of chronic motor neuron disease characterized by combined upper and lower motor neuron symptoms and signs with onset prior to age 25 years. We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in 49 affected family members and neuropathological findings from two autopsies of a Maryland kindred with autosomal dominant juvenile ALS linked

Bruce A. Rabin; John W. Griffin; Barbara J. Crain; Mena Scavina; Philip F. Chance; David R. Cornblath

1999-01-01

408

Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

Fishman, H. Charles

2006-01-01

409

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report offers the Congress, state legislators, and other state and local policymakers, professors and teachers, juvenile justice professionals, and concerned citizens solid answers to the most frequently asked questions about the nature of juvenile crime and victimization and about the justice system's response. Citing FBI and other data…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

410

Juvenile Justice System: At the Crossroads.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the current state of juvenile criminal justice programs and the historical and legal precedents that created it. The current system rests on concepts of confidentiality, due process, and alternatives to jail. Many states are considering modifying aspects of these because of the increase in juvenile crime. (MJP)

Simms, Stuart O.

1997-01-01

411

Juvenile Delinquency: Research, Theory, and Comment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|While this booklet on juvenile delinquency does not attempt a full review of the literature, it has been designed to further an understanding and appreciation of the social-psychological problems of deviant behavior. The booklet briefly covers the publicity which juvenile delinquency has been given in recent years, as well as the difficulties…

Moore, Bernice Milburn

412

Juvenile Delinquency: Research, Theory, and Comment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While this booklet on juvenile delinquency does not attempt a full review of the literature, it has been designed to further an understanding and appreciation of the social-psychological problems of deviant behavior. The booklet briefly covers the publicity which juvenile delinquency has been given in recent years, as well as the difficulties…

Moore, Bernice Milburn

413

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2006 National Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents comprehensive information on juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and on the juvenile justice system. This report brings together the latest available statistics from a variety of sources and includes numerous tables, graphs, and maps, accompanied by analyses in clear, nontechnical language. The report offers Congress,…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

2006-01-01

414

Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

Fishman, H. Charles

2006-01-01

415

Juvenile Offender Comprehensive Reentry Substance Abuse Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The literature provides ample evidence of the relationship of substance abuse to crime. Research over the last 20 years has established a strong correlation between substance abuse and juvenile delinquency (held, 1998). Currently, there are more than 350,000 juveniles on probation and in continuing care programs in the U.S. who have substance…

Watson, Donnie W.

2004-01-01

416

How Juveniles Get to Criminal Court.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

All States allow juveniles to be tried as adults in criminal court under certain circumstances. A juvenile's case can be transferred to criminal court for trial in one of three ways--judicial waiver, prosecutorial discretion, or statutory exclusion from j...

1994-01-01

417

Research Note: Juveniles on Electronic Monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study of the electronic monitoring program pilot project operated by the Fort Wayne, Indiana Family Relation's Division of the Superior Court was undertaken during the months of October 1987 through June 1988. The findings indicate juveniles can successfully complete a six month placement on electronic monitoring. The program helped juveniles avoid committing criminal acts and associating with delinquent prone

Michael T. Charles

1989-01-01

418

Juvenile Obesity, Physical Activity, and Lifestyle Changes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Because many obese children become obese adults, the recent rapid increase in juvenile obesity poses a major public health challenge. Enhanced physical activity is a cornerstone in a multidisciplinary approach to preventing and treating juvenile obesity. Giving exercise recommendations focused for obese youth is critical. Cutting down on…

Bar-Or, Oded

2000-01-01

419

Serious Juvenile Crime: A Redirected Federal Effort.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, an examination of the administration of the federal Juvenile Justice Act from 1974 to the present, outlines the findings and recommendations of the National Advisory Committee for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Following a statement of the proposed new direction in delinquency prevention, which focuses on the serious,…

National Advisory Committee for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Washington, DC.

420

The High Cost of Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Essay will discuss the high cost of incarcerating substantial numbers of minority juveniles and will advocate alternatives to detention. The author discusses how minority youth are disproportionately affected at multiple stages of the criminal justice process: arrests, detentions, adjudication, and disposition. The Essay further discusses the increased use of the prison system for juveniles. The Essay concludes with several

Diane Ridley Gatewood

1993-01-01

421

Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

Jednacz, Ewa; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia

2012-01-01

422

Atherosclerosis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  

PubMed

Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance. PMID:22933832

Jednacz, Ewa; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia

2012-08-13

423

Taft Prison Facility: Cost Scenarios.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On July 21, 1997, the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) announced that Wackenhut Corrections would be awarded the contract to manage a new Federal facility. Located in Taft, California, the new facility had been designed and built by the Federal government ...

J. Nelson

1999-01-01

424

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

DOE /NV

1998-12-08

425

Social and Legal Policy Dimensions of Violent Juvenile Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of what to do about violent delinquents has existed since the juvenile court was established in 1899. Doubts about the efficacy of rehabilitation, together with persistently high rates of violent juvenile crime, placed violent juvenile offenders at the center of an ideological debate between proponents of traditional juvenile justice policies and those who would restrict or eliminate the

JEFFREY FAGAN

1990-01-01

426

The Automatic Waiver of Juveniles and Substantive Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Legislative waiver bypasses juvenile court and juvenile justice officials by initially transferring jurisdiction over juveniles arrested for serious offenses to criminal court. Supporters of legislative waiver argue that the exclusion of offense categories from juvenile court jurisdiction best meets the punishment-oriented objectives of waiver. However, a logistic regression analysis of case processing decisions in a state with automatic transfer provisions

Simon I. Singer

1993-01-01

427

Juvenile Offenders With Mental Health Needs: Reducing Recidivism Using Wraparound  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rate of youth with mental health needs is disproportionately high in juvenile justice. Wraparound planning involves families and providers in coordinating juvenile justice, mental health, and other services and supports. This study compares data from two groups of juvenile offenders with mental health problems: 106 youth in a juvenile justice wraparound program called Connections and a historical comparison group

Michael D. Pullmann; Jodi Kerbs; Nancy Koroloff; Ernie Veach-White; Rita Gaylor; Dede Sieler

2006-01-01

428

Neither Seen Nor Heard: Media in America's Juvenile Courts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relative dearth of coverage of juvenile justice issues in American journalism suggests the need for discussion of standards governing media access to juvenile courts. This article provides a brief history of the nation's juvenile court system and presents the existing legal and policy justifications for regular media presence in juvenile courts. The article argues that it is possible to

Emily Metzgar

2007-01-01

429

Challenging the Myths: 1999 National Report Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bulletin, extracted from "Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report," examines juvenile crime statistics, demonstrating that the predictions in the early 1990s of the emergence of juvenile superpredators (juveniles for whom violence is a way of life) is not supported by current data. Research indicates that levels of predatory…

Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

430

Hispanics and juvenile court dispositions: a county?level study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on the treatment of, and factors that affect, Hispanics in the juvenile justice system has been sparse and limited to the Southwest U.S. In this study we examine these issues in terms of juvenile court dispositional severity by comparing Hispanic juveniles to Whites in a Western county. Our findings show that Hispanic juveniles receive harsher dispositions than Whites. The

N. Prabha Unnithan

2009-01-01

431

An Analysis of Juvenile Court Laws in Mississippi.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Statutory laws, case laws, and model laws have been provided in this report as a basis for comparing Mississippi's juvenile laws with other juvenile laws. Since legislation concerning juvenile courts is vast, complete legislation is only provided for the State of Mississippi and two model juvenile court acts. Discussion, however, is provided…

Carter, Walter S., III

432

Reviving Juvenile Justice in a Get-Tough Era  

Microsoft Academic Search

State and local jurisdictions throughout the United States enacted a wide array of new juvenile justice policies in recent years. Many of these policies were intended to make the juvenile justice system tougher, but others improved prevention, increased reha- bilitation, and enhanced the restorative features of the juvenile justice system. This article describes the most prominent new ideas in juvenile

JEFFREY A. BUTTS; DANIEL P. MEARS

2001-01-01

433

Pathways and Predictors of Juvenile Justice Involvement for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Youths: A Focus on Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite the growth of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) youths in court and correctional involvement, studies of their delinquency and juvenile justice involvement are quite limited, and the literature becomes almost nonexistent when examining gender differences. Using case file analysis of 150 Native Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian and…

Pasko, Lisa; Mayeda, David T.

2011-01-01

434

Habitat associations of juvenile versus adult butterflyfishes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many coral reef fishes exhibit distinct ontogenetic shifts in habitat use while some species settle directly in adult habitats, but there is not any general explanation to account for these differences in settlement strategies among coral reef fishes. This study compared distribution patterns and habitat associations of juvenile (young of the year) butterflyfishes to those of adult conspecifics. Three species, Chaetodon auriga, Chaetodon melannotus, and Chaetodon vagabundus, all of which have limited reliance on coral for food, exhibited marked differences in habitat association of juvenile versus adult individuals. Juveniles of these species were consistently found in shallow-water habitats, whereas adult conspecifics were widely distributed throughout a range of habitats. Juveniles of seven other species ( Chaetodon aureofasciatus, Chaetodon baronessa, Chaetodon citrinellus, Chaetodon lunulatus, Chaetodon plebeius, Chaetodon rainfordi, and Chaetodon trifascialis), all of which feed predominantly on live corals, settled directly into habitat occupied by adult conspecifics. Butterflyfishes with strong reliance on corals appear to be constrained to settle in habitats that provide access to essential prey resources, precluding their use of distinct juvenile habitats. More generalist butterflyfishes, however, appear to utilize distinct juvenile habitats and exhibit marked differences in the distribution of juveniles versus adults.

Pratchett, M. S.; Berumen, M. L.; Marnane, M. J.; Eagle, J. V.; Pratchett, D. J.

2008-09-01

435

Attitudes regarding life sentences for juvenile offenders.  

PubMed

Twice in recent years, the U.S. Supreme Court has considered the constitutionality of life sentences without the possibility of parole (LWOP) for juvenile offenders. Given the public nature of this issue, there is scant information on beliefs about imposing LWOP on juveniles. Attitudes on related issues suggest two possibilities. On the one hand, because public opinion regarding juvenile offenders has become somewhat less punitive recently, LWOP may be viewed as excessively harsh punishment. On the other hand, portrayal of some juvenile offenders as superpredators suggests that LWOP may still have public support. We used survey methodology and the unique "ninth justice paradigm" to examine how an offender's age influences beliefs about the appropriateness of LWOP, and the relationship between those beliefs and punishment-related ideologies. Results showed that, except in the case of murder, the majority of respondents disfavored imposing LWOP on juveniles, though a subset approved broad use of LWOP even for young offenders. In fact, after removing from consideration those who oppose LWOP under any circumstances, youthfulness of the offender has little impact on the beliefs about the types of crimes in which LWOP should be imposed (Study 1) or the mean sentence lengths imposed on juvenile offenders (Study 2). Respondents' punishment goals influenced their attitudes, as did beliefs about the likelihood of rehabilitation and reform. Harsh judgments of juveniles who commit serious crimes may result from dispositional attributions of youthful offenders as irredeemable. PMID:23646918

Greene, Edie; Evelo, Andrew J

2013-05-06

436

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release Site Nevada Test Site, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Pesticide Release Site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 340. The CAU is located in Areas 23 and 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and includes three Corrective Action Sites (CAS)....

S. Parsons

1999-01-01

437

Law & psychiatry: punishing juveniles who kill.  

PubMed

Punishment of juvenile murderers forces policy makers to weigh the developmental immaturity of adolescents against the heinousness of their crimes. The U.S. Supreme Court has progressively limited the severity of punishments that can be imposed on juveniles, holding that their impulsivity, susceptibility to peer pressure, and more fluid character render them less culpable for their actions. Having eliminated the death penalty as a punishment, the Court recently struck down mandatory life sentences without prospect of parole. The decision is interesting for its emphasis on rehabilitation, opening the door to further restrictions on punitive sentences for juveniles-and perhaps for adults too. PMID:23032673

Appelbaum, Paul S

2012-10-01

438

Sociologic perspectives on juvenile violence.  

PubMed

In sum, there are four sets of social factors that help us understand why juvenile violence appears when, and where, it does, and why some communities and entire societies are persistently wracked by youth violence whereas others are largely spared its worst expressions. When it comes to the first three factors in particular--deprivation, disorganization, and brutalization--the evidence for these links is as strong as anything in social science, and that evidence is supported by a variety of sources and a variety of methods of investigation. Such investigation includes the knowledge we gain through social intervention. Some of the most effective violence prevention programs are successful precisely because they confront and deflect the social forces that otherwise often lead to violence. Consider, for example, the home-visiting programs that work with poor parents in disorganized communities to lower the risks of child abuse; and some of the more "holistic" or "multisystemic" efforts to work with violent juvenile offenders. The best of these programs work by tackling the problems of social isolation and lack of supports in the community, as well as immediate issues of economic survival for vulnerable families and children. More generally, we know that the availability of steady and rewarding work in the future, of the kind that can reliably sustain a family, is one of the most important factors allowing some youths to "desist" from violence as they mature. These conclusions give us much to be encouraged about, and much to be alarmed about. On the one hand, understanding that youth violence often is rooted in a set of adverse social conditions that are identifiable, and potentially modifiable, is a fundamentally optimistic message. It reminds us that the level of juvenile violence we suffer in America today is neither fated nor inevitable. Other societies that are in many respects much like us suffer far less of it; so could we, and we increasingly understand some of the ways in which we could make that happen. We know that some programs designed to increase opportunities and supports for high-risk youth and families do work, and we know that there are broader social and economic policies--policies that are not abstract visions, but have actually been put into place in societies much like our own--that can significantly diminish the pressures toward violence that are bred by poverty and social insecurity among the young. But knowing what to do is one thing, and actually doing it is another. In this there is much reason for concern. The 7-year economic boom that began in the early 1990s has had salutary effects on youth violence, mainly by providing improved economic opportunities for low-income youth and, accordingly, diminishing the appeal of illegal activities. Despite that extraordinary burst of sustained prosperity, however, too many of America's youth remain impoverished, sometimes desperately so: the boom has had only limited effect on our disturbingly high rates of family poverty, which continue to tower above those of comparable industrial societies. And if the boom should come to an end, and we enter again into a period of rising joblessness for youth and young adults, then much, or all, of the recent gains could be quickly lost. The positive economic trends that have helped take the edge off serious juvenile violence in the past few years, in short, are both partial and fragile. Worse, some of our recent social and economic policies, at both state and federal levels, are working in the opposite direction. Some variants of welfare reform, for example, have tossed many vulnerable families off of public assistance without offering solid economic opportunities in its place. Many more families face this future as federal time limits on public welfare increasingly come into play. Given what we know about the links between deprivation and youth violence, this is not a development we can celebrate. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:11005004

Currie, E

2000-10-01

439

Autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in juvenile dermatomyositis are associated with calcinosis  

PubMed Central

Objective The identification of novel autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) may have etiologic and clinical implications. The aim of this study was to describe autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in children recruited to the Juvenile DM National Registry and Repository for UK and Ireland. Methods Clinical data and sera were collected from children with juvenile myositis. Sera that recognized a 140-kd protein by immunoprecipitation were identified. The identity of the p140 autoantigen was investigated by immunoprecipitation/immunodepletion, using commercial monoclonal antibodies to NXP-2, reference anti-p140, and anti-p155/140, the other autoantibody recently described in juvenile DM. DNA samples from 100 Caucasian children with myositis were genotyped for HLA class II haplotype associations and compared with those from 864 randomly selected UK Caucasian control subjects. Results Sera from 37 (23%) of 162 patients with juvenile myositis were positive for anti-p140 autoantibodies, which were detected exclusively in patients with juvenile DM and not in patients with juvenile DM–overlap syndrome or control subjects. No anti-p140 antibody–positive patients were positive for other recognized autoantibodies. Immunodepletion suggested that the identity of p140 was consistent with NXP-2 (the previously identified MJ autoantigen). In children with anti-p140 antibodies, the association with calcinosis was significant compared with the rest of the cohort (corrected P < 0.005, odds ratio 7.0, 95% confidence interval 3.0–16.1). The clinical features of patients with anti-p140 autoantibodies were different from those of children with anti-p155/140 autoantibodies. The presence of HLA–DRB1*08 was a possible risk factor for anti-p140 autoantibody positivity. Conclusion This study has established that anti-p140 autoantibodies represent a major autoantibody subset in juvenile DM. This specificity may identify a further immunogenetic and clinical phenotype within the juvenile myositis spectrum that includes an association with calcinosis.

Gunawardena, H; Wedderburn, L R; Chinoy, H; Betteridge, Z E; North, J; Ollier, W E R; Cooper, R G; Oddis, C V; Ramanan, A V; Davidson, J E; McHugh, N J

2009-01-01

440

Social reward among juvenile mice  

PubMed Central

Mammalian social relationships, such as mother–offspring attachments and pair bonds, can directly affect reproductive output. However, conspecifics approach one another in a comparatively broad range of contexts, so conceivably there are motivations for social congregation other than those underlying reproduction, parental care or territoriality. Here, we show that reward mediated by social contact is a fundamental aspect of juvenile mouse sociality. Employing a novel social conditioned place preference (SCPP) procedure, we demonstrate that social proximity is rewarding for juvenile mice from three inbred strains (A/J, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), while mice from a fourth strain (BALB/cJ) are much less responsive to social contact. Importantly, this strain-dependent difference was not related to phenotypic variability in exploratory behavior or contextual learning nor influenced by the genetic background associated with maternal care or social conditioning. Furthermore, the SCPP phenotype was expressed early in development (postnatal day 25) and did not require a specific sex composition within the conditioning group. Finally, SCPP responses resulted from an interaction between two specifiable processes: one component of the interaction facilitated approach toward environments that were associated with social salience, whereas a second component mediated avoidance of environmental cues that predicted social isolation. We have thus identified a genetically prescribed process that can attribute value onto conditions predicting a general form of social contact. To our knowledge, this is the first definitive evidence to show that genetic variation can influence a form of social valuation not directly related to a reproductive behavior.

Panksepp, J B; Lahvis, G P

2007-01-01

441

Juvenile dermatomyositis: recognition and treatment.  

PubMed

Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a multisystem disease characterized by acute and chronic lymphocytic inflammation of the skeletal muscle and skin. The disease is marked early in its course by the presence of a vasculopathy or vasculitis, and later by the development of calcinosis. Research has focused on the epidemiology, etiology, and pathogenesis of the disease with, until more recently, limited therapeutic interventions. This article highlights treatment regimens, both traditional and more recent interventions. Traditional treatment for JDM includes high dose corticosteroid treatment with additional agents used in resistant disease or children with unwarranted adverse effects. Traditional therapy begins with daily oral corticosteroids, with intravenous corticosteroids utilized in severe disease; however, recent data suggests that short-term use of intravenous corticosteroids will allow a short-term improvement in strength, with no long-term change in outcome. More recent investigations suggest that early intervention with additional immunomodulatory agents will allow for a faster recovery, with less medication and disease sequelae. Use of methotrexate as an agent early in the disease course is becoming common place. Methotrexate, in conjunction with oral corticosteroids, allows a rapid improvement in symptoms, and allows for a more rapid reduction in corticosteroid dose. Methotrexate is considered as a steroid sparing agent, whether oral or intravenous corticosteroids are used. Additional immunomodulatory agents include the use of cyclosporine with or without methotrexate. Intravenous immunoglobulin has been reported to have benefit in resistant disease. There are exciting new agents which have great potential in treating JDM. Many of these agents are termed biologics and are being tested in adult myositis and juvenile arthritis. These include tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibitors, such as a chimeric monoclonal antibody to TNF-alpha, and a recombinant soluble human TNF receptor (p75)-Fc fusion protein. Many other new biological agents are also being tested in myositis. PMID:11994036

Reed, Ann M; Lopez, Maricarmen

2002-01-01

442

Social reward among juvenile mice.  

PubMed

Mammalian social relationships, such as mother-offspring attachments and pair bonds, can directly affect reproductive output. However, conspecifics approach one another in a comparatively broad range of contexts, so conceivably there are motivations for social congregation other than those underlying reproduction, parental care or territoriality. Here, we show that reward mediated by social contact is a fundamental aspect of juvenile mouse sociality. Employing a novel social conditioned place preference (SCPP) procedure, we demonstrate that social proximity is rewarding for juvenile mice from three inbred strains (A/J, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), while mice from a fourth strain (BALB/cJ) are much less responsive to social contact. Importantly, this strain-dependent difference was not related to phenotypic variability in exploratory behavior or contextual learning nor influenced by the genetic background associated with maternal care or social conditioning. Furthermore, the SCPP phenotype was expressed early in development (postnatal day 25) and did not require a specific sex composition within the conditioning group. Finally, SCPP responses resulted from an interaction between two specifiable processes: one component of the interaction facilitated approach toward environments that were associated with social salience, whereas a second component mediated avoidance of environmental cues that predicted social isolation. We have thus identified a genetically prescribed process that can attribute value onto conditions predicting a general form of social contact. To our knowledge, this is the first definitive evidence to show that genetic variation can influence a form of social valuation not directly related to a reproductive behavior. PMID:17212648

Panksepp, J B; Lahvis, G P

2006-12-21

443

Mittelfristige ergebnisse von dorsalen aufrichtungsoperationen juveniler kyphosen mit dem Harrington-instrumentarium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors present the results of 20 corrective procedures for juvenile cyphosis using Harrington, compressive rods and Hibbs spondylodesis. 16 procedures date back more than one year (average 3 years, 4 months). 10 cases of pure dorsal cyphosis are compared to 10 cases of dorso-lumbar cyphosis. The pre-operative Cobb-angles for cyphosis averaged 52°, postoperatively an average of 24° was measured.

Peter Griss; Hanns Frhr. Andrian-Werburg

1978-01-01

444

Conceptualizing juvenile prostitution as child maltreatment: findings from the National Juvenile Prostitution Study.  

PubMed

Two studies were conducted to identify the incidence (Study 1) and characteristics (Study 2) of juvenile prostitution cases known to law enforcement agencies in the United States. Study 1 revealed a national estimate of 1,450 arrests or detentions (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1,287-1,614) in cases involving juvenile prostitution during a 1-year period. In Study 2, exploratory data were collected from a subsample of 138 cases from police records in 2005. The cases are broadly categorized into three main types: (a) third-party exploiters, (b) solo prostitution, and (c) conventional child sexual abuse (CSA) with payment. Cases were classified into three initial categories based on police orientation toward the juvenile: (a) juveniles as victims (53%), (b) juveniles as delinquents (31%), and (c) juvenile as both victims and delinquents (16%). When examining the status of the juveniles by case type, the authors found that all the juveniles in CSA with payment cases were treated as victims, 66% in third-party exploiters cases, and 11% in solo cases. Findings indicate law enforcement responses to juvenile prostitution are influential in determining whether such youth are viewed as victims of commercial sexual exploitation or as delinquents. PMID:19926628

Mitchell, Kimberly J; Finkelhor, David; Wolak, Janis

2009-11-18

445

75 FR 70216 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2010-11-17

446

76 FR 39075 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2011-07-05

447

78 FR 58288 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2013-09-23

448

78 FR 38014 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2013-06-25

449

78 FR 17184 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2013-03-20

450

77 FR 24687 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2012-04-25

451

76 FR 61672 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2011-10-05

452

77 FR 70994 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2012-11-28

453

77 FR 3453 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION...the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency...

2012-01-24

454

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) presents information supporting the selection of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) leading to the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the

Mark Krause

2010-01-01

455

A Federal Perspective on Juvenile Justice Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides an exposition of the changed federal perspective on juvenile justice reform. The major programmatic elements of OJJDP's new reform emphasis are presented, and the ideological rationale for those activities is explained.

Alfred S. Regnery

1986-01-01

456

Brief Strategic Family Therapy. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is dedicated to preventing and reversing trends of increased delinquency and violence among adolescents. These trends have alarmed the public during the past decade and challenged the juven...

M. S. Robbins J. Szapocznik

2000-01-01

457

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile Paget disease  

MedlinePLUS

... bones to be abnormally large, misshapen, and easily broken (fractured). The signs of juvenile Paget disease appear ... a normal process in which old bone is broken down and new bone is created to replace ...

458

Juvenile Restitution: A Dynamic and Challenging Alternative.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This booklet provides a brief history of restitution and then describes Wisconsin's juvenile restitution program, a pilot project in 10 court jurisdictions funded by the Federal Law Enforcement Assistance Administration in 1979. Wisconsin was a ready reci...

D. L. Tank M. C. McEniry

1979-01-01

459

Juvenile participation in conversations with probation officers.  

PubMed

Juvenile probation work comprises a mixture of repressive and empowering strategies, since probation officers need to control young offenders' conduct and at the same time help the offender to take responsibility and live life within the margins of society. This ambiguous nature of juvenile probation work may confuse the communication between probation officers and juveniles. Interviews with offenders of Moroccan origin and their probation officers in the Netherlands show that both parties are unhappy with the mutual communication. According to the youngsters, a restrictive policy is inevitable but might be more effective if this would go together with an empowering approach. Interactional analysis of the conversations shows that the lack of juvenile participation is caused by professional conversational dominance, as seen in topic control, poor role clarification, and a cross-examining style of the conversations. PMID:21429957

van Nijnatten, Carolus; Stevens, Gonneke

2011-03-23

460

Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile primary osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... caused by a shortage of calcium and other minerals in bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone ... protein is involved in the regulation of bone mineral density. LRP5 gene mutations that cause juvenile primary ...

461

Evaluation of an HIV and STD Prevention Program for Adolescents in Juvenile Rehabilitation Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate a sexual and STD\\/AIDS prevention program tailored for adolescents with social adaptation difficulties in juvenile rehabilitation facilities. The impact of the intervention on the psychosocial determinants of condom use were assessed, using a pretest post-test quasi-experimental design. A total of 296 adolescents participated in the program (experimental group) while 240 adolescents did

Gaston Godin; Francine Michaud; Michel Alary; Johanne Otis; Benoît Mâsse; Christian Fortin; Marie-Pierre Gagnon; Hélène Gagnon

2003-01-01

462

SpineCor treatment for Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis: SOSORT award 2010 winner  

PubMed Central

Introduction Juvenile idiopathic scoliosis is a condition used to describe patients who are least 4 years of age but younger than 10 when the deformity is first identified. In these patients, the condition is usually progressive and those that are diagnosed at five years or younger have a high chance of progression to a large curve, with additional pulmonary and cardiac complications. The main form of conservative treatment for juvenile scoliosis is the use of a bracing system. This prospective interventional study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Dynamic SpineCor orthosis for juvenile idiopathic scoliosis as well as to evaluate the stability of the spine after the weaning point. Material and Methods For this study, 150 juvenile patients were treated by the SpineCor orthosis between 1993 and 2009. Of these, 67 patients had a definite outcome and 83 are still actively being treated. To determine the effectiveness of the brace the OUTCOME criteria recommended by the SRS was used. Results The results from our study showed that of the 67 patients with a definite outcome, 32.9% corrected their Cobb angle by at least 5° and 10.5% had a stabilization of their Cobb angle. Within the patients with a definite outcome, 37.3% of patients where recommended for surgery before authorized end of treatment. For this group of patients, surgery was postponed. Looking at the stability of the curves 2 years after the end of the treatment, we found 12.5% of the patients continued their correction without the brace being used and 71.4% remained stable. Discussion From our study we can clearly see that the effectiveness of the SpineCor orthosis in obtaining and maintaining the neuromuscular integration of the corrective movement can be achieved effectively for juvenile patients. Over 75% of all patients that finished the treatment had remained stable with a few continuing to correct their Cobb angle after the use of the SpineCor orthosis was discontinued. Conclusion Our conclusion from this study is that the SpineCor orthosis is a very effective method of treatment of juvenile idiopathic scoliosis. The results obtained also indicate that treatment outcomes are better with early bracing. Most encouraging perhaps is the fact that the positive outcome appears to be maintained in the long term, and that surgery can be avoided or at least postponed.

2010-01-01

463

Corrective Jaw Surgery  

MedlinePLUS

... course of treatment that is best for you. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities Correcting an Open Bite: ... and their supporting soft and hard tissues Surgical Correction of Maxillofacial Skeletal Deformities Cleft and Craniofacial Surgery ...

464

A model of aftercare for female juveniles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the early 1980s, California's prison system has witnessed a boom. Of this growth, females represent the fastest growing population in both the adult and juvenile systems, often with youth feeding into the adult system. Although girls are the fastest-growing population in the juvenile justice system, there is a blatant lack of gender-specific programs to match this growth. Researchers have

Vivian Y. Lee

2005-01-01

465

Prognostic factors in juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prognostic factors in juvenile arthritis are related to many variables that must be evaluated according to the different subtypes.\\u000a The International League of Associations of Rheumatologists (ILAR) recently proposed six different categories referred to\\u000a as the Durban criteria, under the eponym of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of this classification was to define\\u000a homogeneous groups according to their clinical

Anne-Marie Prieur; Gaëlle Chèdeville

2001-01-01

466

Juvenile angiofibroma of the maxillary sinus.  

PubMed

Juvenile angiofibromas are benign fibro-vascular tumours of the nasopharynx that develop in prepubertal and adolescent males. Typical symptoms are longstanding unilateral nasal obstruction occasionally followed by epistaxes and frequent severe intraoperative haemorrhage of the discovered mass. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy histologically diagnosed with a juvenile angiofibroma in spite of the atypical localisation of the polyploid mass of the left maxillary sinus. PMID:23397786

Malvi?, Goran; Manestar, Dubravko; Krstulja, Mira; Corak, Davor; Candrli?, Barbara; Kujundzi?, Milodar; Velepic, Marko; Starcevi?, Radan

2012-11-01

467

Surgical Outcomes in Juvenile Retinal Detachment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively clinical features and surgical outcomes of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in juvenile patients.Methods: Between 1991 and 1996, 28 patients younger than 15 years of age with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (32 eyes) underwent the first surgical procedure, scleral buckling and\\/or pars plana vitrectomy, at our hospital.Results: The major types of juvenile detachment, in order of frequency, were idiopathic,

Naoko Akabane; Shuichi Yamamoto; Itsuro Tsukahara; Masahiro Ishida; Yoshinori Mitamura; Teiko Yamamoto; Shinobu Takeuchi

2001-01-01

468

RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

Not Available

1993-05-01

469

28 CFR 31.303 - Substantive requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...from incarcerated adults in any particular jail, lockup, detention or correctional facility...separating juveniles from adult criminals in jails or correctional facilities. A State... (e) Removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups. Pursuant to section...

2010-07-01

470

28 CFR 91.2 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...management and operation of adult and juvenile correctional facilities...security classification system, appropriate...correctional facilities for adults or juveniles that can free conventional...offenders; and (3) The prison time served is...

2009-07-01

471

28 CFR 91.2 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...management and operation of adult and juvenile correctional facilities...security classification system, appropriate...correctional facilities for adults or juveniles that can free conventional...offenders; and (3) The prison time served is...

2010-07-01

472

Rendezvous facilities  

SciTech Connect

The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

1988-11-01

473

Female Juvenile Delinquency: Misunderstood by the Juvenile Justice System, Neglected by Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of juvenile delinquency has focused primarily on conduct disorder and aggression in males, while relatively little attention has been paid to females who commit delinquent acts. This article offers a critical review of the existing theories of and research on female delinquency and the juvenile justice system's response to female delinquency. The inadequacies and persistence of historical theories

Stephanie Hoyt; David G. Scherer

1998-01-01

474

Violent Victimization as a Risk Factor for Violent Offending among Juveniles. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bulletin analyzes the relationships between violent victimization and violent offending across a 2-year period, using data for 5,003 juveniles age 11-17 years who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The bulletin looks at victimization and offending experiences in subgroups of juveniles classified by age,…

Shaffer, Jennifer N.; Ruback, R. Barry

475

An Empirical Evaluation of Juvenile Awareness Programs in the United States: Can Juveniles Be "Scared Straight"?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Juvenile awareness programs like Scared Straight became popular crime prevention strategies during the 1970s. Juvenile offenders and at-risk youth who participate in these programs are taken to prisons where inmates use confrontational methods to recount stories about violence, sex, and abuse perpetrated by fellow inmates while living a life…

Klenowski, Paul M.; Bell, Keith J.; Dodson, Kimberly D.

2010-01-01

476

Reducing Racial Disparities in Juvenile Detention. Pathways to Juvenile Detention Reform 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 1992, the Annie E. Casey Foundation launched a multiyear, multisite project known as the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI). This report focuses on reducing racial disparities in juvenile detention. The number of youth held in secure detention nationwide increased by 72% from 1985 to 1995. During this period, the number of white…

Hoytt, Eleanor Hinton; Schiraldi, Vincent; Smith, Brenda V.; Ziedenberg, Jason

477

Tracking Juvenile Recidivists: Three Options for Creating Statewide, Longitudinal Records of Juvenile Offenders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document describes three options for a statewide statistical system for tracking recidivism of juvenile delinquents placed outside their homes in treatment programs. The information is intended for use by the state in allocating resources. The options described involve potential use of juvenile court records, placement data, and/or…

Rooney, Teresa L.

478

Characteristics of Crimes against Juveniles. Crimes against Children Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Bulletin reviews data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's 1997 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data file that pertain to juvenile victims, revealing that while juveniles made up 26% of the population of the 12 states participating in NIBRS in 1997, they accounted for only 12% of the reported crime victims. At the same…

Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

479

Assessing the Parents of Juvenile Offenders: A Preliminary Validation Study of the Juvenile Offender Parent Questionnaire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study is a preliminary investigation into the development of a parent self-report instrument, the Juvenile Offender Parent Questionnaire (JOPQ). A large pool of items was rationally derived from a model of parent competency and then administered to 243 parents of children who were making appearances in juvenile court. Exploratory…

Rose, Clark C.; Glaser, Brian A.; Calhoun, Georgia B.; Bates, Jeffrey M.

2004-01-01

480

Reducing Racial Disparities in Juvenile Detention. Pathways to Juvenile Detention Reform 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1992, the Annie E. Casey Foundation launched a multiyear, multisite project known as the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI). This report focuses on reducing racial disparities in juvenile detention. The number of youth held in secure detention nationwide increased by 72% from 1985 to 1995. During this period, the number of white…

Hoytt, Eleanor Hinton; Schiraldi, Vincent; Smith, Brenda V.; Ziedenberg, Jason

481

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of Review To describe recent evidence from the literature pertaining to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) associated uveitis. Recent Findings Uveitis is most common in extended oligoarticular JIA. A significant number of patients already have ocular complications at time of diagnosis of uveitis. Risk factors for complications include either abnormally high or low intraocular pressure, posterior synechiae, male gender, temporal proximity to diagnosis of arthritis and topical corticosteroid use. Use of immunosuppressive agents significantly reduces ocular complications. Aggressive peri-operative control of intraocular inflammation is necessary for successful cataract surgery with lens implantation. Controlled clinical trials are under way to assess the efficacy of biologic agents in JIA-associated uveitis. Long term safety, however, is still unknown. Summary JIA-associated uveitis carries significant ocular morbidity that lasts well into adulthood. Treatment with immunosuppressive agents can reduce the risk of ocular complications. Biologics hold promise in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis but require long-term data to assess their safety.

Qian, Ying; Acharya, Nisha R.

2011-01-01

482

Clinical assessment in juvenile dermatomyositis.  

PubMed

Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that affects primarily the skin and muscles. Although the prognosis of JDM has improved considerably in the last three decades, a number of patients may develop irreversible damage due to the disease activity or its treatment. This damage may cause permanent disability and affect the quality of life of patients and their families. In the clinical management of patients with JDM, there is, therefore, the need of monitoring the level of disease activity, the accrual of organ damage, and the impact of the illness on patients' daily living. A reliable assessment of these different aspects of disease requires the availability of well-designed and standardized clinical tools. In the recent years, there has been increasing collaborative effort to devise new assessment measures and these measures have been included into disease activity and damage core sets of outcome variables that have been developed through international consensus. In addition, preliminary definitions of clinical improvement for patients with JDM and other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies have been created. In this review, the latest advances in the development of standardized instruments for the clinical assessment of JDM patients are illustrated and the recent international efforts that have led to the development of core sets of outcome measures and to preliminary definitions of improvement for JDM clinical trials are summarized. PMID:16769653

Ravelli, Angelo; Ruperto, Nicolino; Trail, Lucia; Felici, Enrico; Sala, Elena; Martini, Alberto

2006-05-01

483

[Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].  

PubMed

Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA. PMID:22732914

Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

2012-07-01

484

Juvenile fibromyalgia: Guidance for management.  

PubMed

Juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) is a disease in which patients complain of acute and chronic severe pain, an overt primary cause for which cannot be found or surmised. Although patients with JFM mainly complain of systemic pain or allodynia in the medical interview and physical examination, the concept of the disease is the total sum of painful illness, chronic fatigue, hypothermia and many other autonomic symptoms and signs. Many issues are interacting including individual traits (personality, temperament, sensitivity, memory of pain; age: early adolescence), individual states (self-esteem, anxiety, developmental level), and external stressors (parent especially mother, school environment). JFM is diagnosed on the combination of disease history, physical examination to determine the 18 tender points and allodynia, pain from gently touching their hair, and negative results of blood tests (inflammatory markers, thyroid function, myogenic enzymes). The goals of treatment are the following: restoration of function and relief of pain. Psychological support is advocated. Although the exact number of patients with JFM is still to be elucidated, it seems to be growing because pediatric rheumatologists in Japan encounter children with a wide variety of musculoskeletal pains. This guideline describes how to diagnose JFM in children and how to treat them appropriately. PMID:23758613

Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Miyamae, Takako

2013-08-01

485

CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR THE AREA 3 LANDFILL COMPLEX, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, CAU 424, REVISION 0, MARCH 1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for the Area 3 Landfill Complex (Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Corrective Action Unit 424 is located...

1998-01-01

486

BELIEF IN CORRECTNESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In developing information technology, you want assurance that systems are secure and reliable. Correctness is an attribute that one strives for in order to achieve those goals, but you cannot have assurance or security without correctness. We discuss methods used to achieve correctness, focusing on weaknesses and approaches that management might take to increase belief in correctness. Formal methods, simulation,

Marshall D. Abrams; Marvin V. Zelkowitz

487

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65

2002-01-01

488

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 -

Robert Boehlecke

2004-01-01

489

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 -

Boehlecke

2004-01-01

490

Gender Issues in Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The federal JJDP legislation has had a differential impact on the pattern of admission of females and males to detention facilities and training schools, and also on the rate of admission relative to the total available youth population. These findings suggest a differential societal response, and also variable incidence of delinquency among females and males. Data from a self-report survey

Rosemary C. Sarri

1983-01-01

491

Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage  

SciTech Connect

A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-02-01

492

A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 1. Engineering Design and Instrumentation  

PubMed Central

In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS.

Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, M. Brad

2011-01-01

493

77 FR 72199 - Technical Corrections; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Region I office, correcting authority citations and typographical and spelling errors...that is cited in one of the authority citations in the final rule. DATES: The correction...authority that is cited in the authority citation for part 171 of Title 10 of the...

2012-12-05

494

New York Correction History Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the New York Correction History Society is "to pursue, preserve and promote the history of correction services in New York." The Society helps fulfill their mission via this site which has an ample offering of institutional history, inmate art, philosophical musings, and perspectives of the role of such facilities in the history of the Empire State. The homepage is a bit busy, visually speaking, and there isn't a formal index of subjects covered within, but a bit of careful investigation will yield some rich material. Visitors will note that one of the finds here is a virtual tour of Rikers Island from 1948, and it is nestled right next to a historical essay on the jail system in Westchester County. Further down near the bottom of the homepage, visitors can learn about a 1987 coloring book titled "Getting to Know Your New York City Department of Correction". There's much more to see here, and the site does a nice job of covering the various aspects of the correctional experience.

495

Is juvenile obsessive-compulsive disorder a developmental subtype of the disorder?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juvenile obsessivecompulsive disorder (OCD) has been hypothesized to be different from adult-onset OCD suggesting that juvenile OCD may be a developmental subtype of the disorder. There is some evidence that juvenile OCD may be phenotypically different from juvenile-onset adult OCD. This study examines the phenotypic characteristics of juvenile OCD (current age = 18 years, n = 39), juvenile-onset adult OCD

T. S. Jaisoorya; Y. C. Janardhan Reddy; S. Srinath

2003-01-01

496

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam is used for holding and spawning adult fall chinook and coho salmon. Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and summer steelhead. The main goal of acclimation is to reduce stress from trucking prior to release and improve imprinting of juvenile salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. Juveniles are transported to the acclimation facilities primarily from Umatilla and Bonneville Hatcheries. This report details activities associated with operation and maintenance of the Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques, Thornhollow and Three Mile Dam facilities in 1996.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1997-06-01

497

Juvenile Suicide in Confinement: A National Survey, February 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Although youth suicide in the community has been identified as a major public health problem, juvenile suicide in confinement has received scant attention. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) awarded a contract to National Ce...

2009-01-01

498

28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. 0.57 Section... ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Criminal Division § 0.57 Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The...

2013-07-01

499

Juvenile and Resident Salmonid Movement and Passage through Culverts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An outcome of the Washington State Department of Transportation's Juvenile Fish Passage Workshop on September 24, 1997, was agreement that a literature review was necessary to determine the state of knowledge about juvenile salmonid movement and passage t...

T. H. Kahler T. P. Quinn

1998-01-01

500

Desktop Guide to Good Juvenile Detention Practice. Research Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Table of Contents: Volunteer Network; In Memoriam; Foreword; Introduction; Part I PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS: Historical Perspective; Juvenile Detention and the Law; Defining Juvenile Detention; Adolescent Development and Delinquency; Rights and Responsibili...

D. W. Roush

1996-01-01