Sample records for juvenile correctional facilities

  1. Juvenile Correctional Facilities. 1998 Minnesota Student Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Harrison, Patricia A.; Hedger, Scott A.

    This document reports on a voluntary survey designed to compare responses of adolescents in corrections with adolescents in public schools in 1998. Findings are highlighted in sections entitled: (1) "Youth, Their Families, and Their Environment"; (2) "Psychological Distress"; (3) "Sexual Activity"; (4) "School Perceptions"; and (5) "Antisocial and…

  2. Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Youth in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This practice parameter presents recommendations for the mental health assessment and treatment of youths in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. Mental and substance-related disorders are significant public health problems affecting youths in juvenile justice settings. Sufficient time is necessary to conduct a comprehensive diagnostic…

  3. Comparison of Violence and Abuse in Juvenile Correctional Facilities and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson-Arad, Bilha; Benbenishty, Rami; Golan, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Peer violence, peer sexual harassment and abuse, and staff abuse experienced by boys and girls in juvenile correctional facilities are compared with those experienced by peers in schools in the community. Responses of 360 youths in 20 gender-separated correctional facilities in Israel to a questionnaire tapping these forms of mistreatment were…

  4. Reading Practices in the Juvenile Correctional Facility Setting: Incarcerated Adolescents Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Jade; Reed, Deborah K.; Sturges, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This multi-phasic, qualitative study explored the perceptions and provision of research-based reading instruction in the juvenile correctional facility setting. In three settings in two states, we interviewed students (n = 17), teachers (n = 5), and administrators (n = 3); and conducted two focus groups (n = 8), student surveys (n = 49), and seven…

  5. The Status and Praxis of Arts Education and Juvenile Offenders in Correctional Facilities in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Rachel Marie-Crane

    2008-01-01

    This article briefly describes the results of a study, funded in 2001 by The National Art Education Foundation, of arts education in juvenile correctional facilities in the United States. It summarizes the results of a national survey, and it presents the Northeastern Training School* and STUDIO 200* as a model for community-based arts…

  6. Mental Disorders among Adolescents in Juvenile Detention and Correctional Facilities: A Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis of 25 Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazel, Seena; Doll, Helen; Langstrom, Niklas

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a meta-analysis of all existing surveys on the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in adolescents in juvenile detention and correctional facilities in order to assess the prevalence of mental disorders. Findings indicate adolescents in detention are 10 times more likely to suffer from psychosis than the general adolescent…

  7. Suicide Prevention in Juvenile Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Lindsay M.

    2000-01-01

    Youth suicide is recognized as a serious public health problem, but suicide within juvenile facilities has not received comparable attention, and the extent and nature of these deaths remain unknown. This article utilizes an example of a young man in a juvenile justice facility who succeeded in committing suicide to illustrate these points.…

  8. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

  9. Performance Assessment in Juvenile Correction Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl

    2002-01-01

    Performance assessments in geography and math were administered to 20 adolescents in a correctional facility. All students passed both assessments and had positive perceptions. Success was attributed to the use of activities for different learning styles, establishment of small goals, and individualization of assignments. (SK)

  10. Intensive Reading Instruction in Juvenile Correctional Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jacob L.; Wexler, Jade; Roberts, Greg; Carpenter, Clint

    2011-01-01

    Despite 60 years of evidence linking juvenile illiteracy and delinquency, practitioners and policymakers have been painfully slow in the implementation of evidence-based reading interventions for incarcerated juveniles. We will present the Texas Juvenile Justice Tiered Instructional Model, an evidence-based reading program model created…

  11. Reading Instruction for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Kimber L.; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Mason-Williams, Loretta; Lane, Holly B.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to obtain (a) a national picture of the characteristics of special educators who provide reading or English instruction in juvenile corrections facilities and (b) characteristics of the schools in which they work and the students who they serve. In addition, the study was designed to gather information on teacher use of…

  12. Helping Female Juveniles Improve their On-Task Behavior and Academic Performance Using a Self-Management Procedure in a Correctional Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Stacy; Joseph, Laurice M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to teach female juvenile offenders with disabilities a self-management procedure to help improve on-task behavior and academic performance during independent practice of math calculation facts. Students were taught to set goals and were provided with incentives for goal attainment. A reversal single-case design…

  13. Substance Use and HIV Prevention for Youth in Correctional Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouttapa, Michele; Watson, Donnie W.; McCuller, William J.; Reiber, Chris; Tsai, Winnie

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based programs for substance use and HIV prevention (SUHIP) were adapted for high-risk juveniles detained at 24-hour secure correctional facilities. In this pilot study, comparisons were made between adolescents who received the SUHIP intervention and a control group on changes in: (1) knowledge of HIV prevention behaviors, (2) attitudes…

  14. The Association between Suicide Screening Practices and Attempts Requiring Emergency Care in Juvenile Justice Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Catherine A.; Dobrin, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To provide a national description of suicide screening practices in juvenile residential facilities and to examine their association with whether facilities experience a suicide attempt. Method: Multivariate modeling with data from the 2000 Juvenile Residential Facility Census (n = 3690 facilities). Results: Controlling for facility

  15. Juvenile Counselor Physical Abilities Report. Standards and Training for Corrections Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Board of Corrections, Sacramento.

    A study of the physical abilities required for juvenile counselors was conducted as part of the development of evaluation procedures for juvenile counselor candidates in the Standards and Training for Corrections Program in California. Data were gathered through questionnaires and telephone interviews with juvenile counselors and their supervisors…

  16. 76 FR 11337 - Presidential Library Facilities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ...NARA-07-0005] RIN 3095-AA82 Presidential Library Facilities; Correction AGENCY: National...and design standards for Presidential libraries and information required in NARA's...facility, and equipment as a Presidential library. DATES: This regulation is...

  17. Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, D. [Minnesota Department of Corrections, St. Paul, MN (United States); Spencer, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned new construction at other facilities.

  18. Public Library Services to Correctional Facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JANE POOL

    A SURVEY OF recent literature concerning libraries in correctional facilities leads to an important conclusion. It is that, during the 1970s, one of the most significant trends has been the accelerated growth of services to institutions by public library systems and local public libraries. Stout and Turitz label this relationship \\

  19. Juvenile Justice. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaneman, Paulette S.

    These classroom materials are part of the Project Benchmark series designed to teach secondary students about our legal concepts and systems. This unit focuses on the California juvenile justice system. The materials describe the historical and legal development of the system, juvenile court procedures, correction facilities, and various creative…

  20. Lessons Learned: Barriers and Solutions for Conducting Reading Investigations in Juvenile Corrections Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Candace A.; Krezmien, Michael P.; Leone, Peter E.; Houchins, David E.; Baltodano, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Few research studies have investigated the effectiveness of instructional strategies for students in juvenile corrections. The dearth of research on effective instruction for this population may be due in part to difficulties encountered in carrying out methodologically rigorous studies in these settings. This article reports barriers and…

  1. Cognitive and academic functioning of juvenile detainees: implications for correctional populations and public health.

    PubMed

    Lansing, Amy E; Washburn, Jason J; Abram, Karen M; Thomas, Ursula C; Welty, Leah J; Teplin, Linda A

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive functioning affects health. This study assessed cognitive functioning among participants in the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a stratified random sample of 1,829 newly detained juveniles (10 to 18 years old) from Cook County, Illinois. The study examined receptive vocabulary, oral reading, arithmetic computation skills, and general intellectual abilities. The sample exhibited impaired overall intellectual functioning and deficits in all areas. Males performed more poorly than females. More than three quarters of males showed below average overall intellectual functioning, and 9 in 10 had below average receptive vocabulary skills. Hispanic and African American males performed more poorly than non-Hispanic White males. The multiple systems that serve delinquent youth--correctional, health, legal, and rehabilitative--must collaborate to tailor needed services to the cognitive level of youth in the juvenile justice system. PMID:24352405

  2. Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents: Profiles of Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowder, Melissa H.; Cummings, Jack A.; McKinney, Robert

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study of resiliency profiles of male and female juvenile offenders committed to a juvenile correctional facility was conducted. The goal of the present study was to examine juvenile offenders' positive characteristics (e.g., adaptability, optimism, self-efficacy, tolerance of differences). To assess positive characteristics and…

  3. Professional Development: A Capacity-Building Model for Juvenile Correctional Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathur, Sarup R.; Clark, Heather Griller; Schoenfeld, Naomi A.

    2009-01-01

    Youth in correctional facilities experience a broad range of educational, psychological, medical, and social needs. Professional development, a systemic process that improves the likelihood of student success by enhancing educator abilities, is a powerful way to positively affect student outcomes in correctional settings. This article offers a…

  4. TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Features TB in Correctional Facilities is a Public Health Concern Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Diagnosing ... the community with untreated TB present a serious public health concern. Figure 1 (larger view). TB Control in ...

  5. The Ohio Department of Youth Services Juvenile Prison Library System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deidra N. Herring

    2009-01-01

    The article is an introduction to The Ohio Department of Youth Services librarians and the services they provide. Information about each juvenile prison facility is revealed and provides an explanation of guidelines and standards for prison libraries. Sixty-eight questions were asked in four in-person interviews to present a profile of the librarians working within juvenile correctional facility high schools and

  6. Linking basic and advanced motivational interviewing training outcomes for juvenile correctional staff in California.

    PubMed

    Doran, Neal; Hohman, Melinda; Koutsenok, Igor

    2011-09-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based communication method that can be effective in engaging incarcerated juveniles in substance abuse programming and other treatment services. However, MI can be difficult to learn and often requires several training exposures for skill change. Few studies have examined MI training outcomes over time. This study reports outcomes for 222 juvenile corrections workers trained in MI in a three-day introductory and two-day advanced training. MI skills were measured via video-administered pre- and post-tests and with a written questionnaire. Combined results from a linear mixed model found that overall MI skills were positively associated with staff education level, and negatively associated with age and time between trainings. Those who attended their second training within nine months of the first training were more likely to score in the proficiency range. Motivation to use MI, belief in its efficacy with youth, job classification, and sex were not related to skill attainment. PMID:22185036

  7. Turbine Passage of Juvenile and Adult Fish at a Warmwater Hydroelectric Facility in Northeastern Oklahoma: Monitoring Associated with Relicensing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent M. Sorenson; William L. Fisher; Alexander V. Zale

    1998-01-01

    We estimated annual turbine passage rates and susceptibilities of juvenile and adult fish at the Pensacola Dam hydroelectric facility on Grand Lake O' the Cherokees (Grand Lake) in northeastern Oklahoma as part of the relicensing of the facility. Our study was purposefully exploratory in that its primary objective was to determine if turbine passage of valuable fishes was sufficient to

  8. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1994-05-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. This 1993 annual report details scheduled maintenance and other projects carried out during the year.

  9. Walking the Line: Teaching Remedial Writing in a Correctional Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crimmel, Henry Hays, III

    When teaching remedial writing in a correctional facility, a teacher may carry assumptions shaped by formal education that do not always translate to a prison context. These include the idea that the classroom will provide a sphere of intellectual activity, immune from heavy-handed institutional intrusions; that students will want to get to know…

  10. Influenza outbreaks at two correctional facilities -- Maine, March 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    On March 8, 2011, the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) received a laboratory report of a positive influenza specimen from an intensive-care unit patient who was an inmate at a prison (facility A). That same day, the state medical examiner notified Maine CDC of an inmate death suspected to be have been caused by influenza at another, nearby prison (facility B). On March 9, Correctional Medical Services (CMS), which provides health services to both facilities, notified Maine CDC that additional inmates and staff members from both facilities were ill with influenza-like illness (ILI). CMS reported that influenza vaccination coverage among inmates was very low (<10%), and coverage among staff members was unknown but believed to be low. Maine CDC assisted CMS and the Maine Department of Corrections (DOC) in conducting an epidemiologic investigation to gather more information about the two cases, initiate case finding, and implement control measures, which included emphasizing respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette, closing both facilities to new admissions and transfers, and offering vaccination and antiviral drugs to inmates and staff members. This report describes the public health response and highlights the importance of collaboration between public health and corrections officials to identify quickly and mitigate communicable disease outbreaks in these settings, where influenza can spread rapidly in a large and concentrated population. Correctional facilities should strongly consider implementing the following measures during each influenza season: 1) offering influenza vaccination to all inmates and staff members, 2) conducting education on respiratory etiquette, and 3) making documentation regarding the vaccination status of inmates and staff members accessible. PMID:22475851

  11. Juvenile Sexual Offending: Causes, Consequences, and Correction. New and Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Gail, Ed.; Lane, Sandy, Ed.

    A comprehensive resource on juvenile sexual offense, this book provides information on the abused and the abuser, and on the cycle of abuse and appropriate treatment. Part 1 provides an overview of "The Problem of Juvenile Sexual Offending," including: (1) "Sexually Abusive Youth: Defining the Population" (G. Ryan); and (2) "Incidence and…

  12. Streamlining RCRA corrective action at an integrated steel manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, S.C. II [Geneva Steel Co., Vineyard, UT (United States); Mikell, C.D. [CH2M Hill, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The Geneva Steel facility is a 55-year-old integrated steel mill located in Vineyard, Utah. The facility is operating under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit, which specifies Corrective Action (CA) requirements for more than 140 US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-designated Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU). An initial Screening Investigation (SI) was conducted in the Fall of 1995 using a cost-effective onsite close support laboratory focusing on the known Chemicals of Interest (COI) generated by each operational area of the facility. SI results revealed no immediate threats to human health or the environment. The SI results are the basis for development of a phased Verification Investigation (VI) approach as the next step in intrusive facility investigation. An important consideration in development of the VI approach is that many SWMUs are active and integrally associated with facility operations. The phased VI approach involves risk-based SWMU categorization and incorporates risk evaluation considerations and perimeter-in groundwater monitoring into future CA decisions. To explicate the above considerations, a master VI Work Plan was developed detailing preliminary SWMU categorizations, risk assessment criteria, process-specific COIs, general sampling methodologies, and mechanisms for transferring SWMUs between categories or removing them from the permit. The VI Work Plan specifically includes regulatory approved risk-based cleanup levels. The preapproved cleanup levels are based on 10-6 residential risk scenario applied at the facility boundary and 10-4 industrial risk scenario applied within the facility boundary. The perimeter-in groundwater monitoring approach determines if offsite releases are occurring and recognizes that multiple overlapping contamination sources cannot be cost-effectively addressed using traditional SWMU-specific investigations.

  13. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Obi

    2000-01-01

    The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of

  14. Operation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofy, Peter T.

    1988-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1987.

  15. Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofy, Peter T.

    1989-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1988.

  16. Restructuring Juvenile Corrections in California: A Report to the State Legislature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadel-Hayes, Sele; Macallair, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Youth corrections in California is at a crossroads. In response to the near universal recognition of California's failed approach to youth corrections, Governor Schwarzenegger, with support from the California Legislature, has launched one of the largest restructuring initiatives of youth corrections in state history. Reforms currently underway…

  17. HVAC design for minimum-, low-, and medium-security federal correctional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, J.L.; Davenport, B.C. [Newcomb and Boyd Consulting Engineers, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    As the number of inmates convicted of federal crimes has grown, so have the opportunities for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) engineering professionals to resign HVAC systems appropriate for federal correctional facilities. The HVAC design of federal correctional facilities, not unlike any other facilities, must reflect the philosophy of the building owner. Using three actual examples of federal correctional facilities, this study describes various HVAC design features and discusses how these features best meet the owner`s philosophy and concerns. The goal of this paper is to introduce HVAC engineering professionals to federal correctional facilities and to provide some examples for the HVAC design of minimum-, low-, and medium-security federal correctional facilities.

  18. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in Reducing Aggression of Individuals at the Juvenile Correction and Rehabilitation Center

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Atefeh; Nikmanesh, Zahra; Farnam, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the present era, delinquency in children and adolescents is undoubtedly a difficult and upsetting issue attracting the attention of many experts such as psychologists, sociologists, and criminologists. These experts often try to answer why a number of children and adolescents engage in various crimes such as aggressive and anti-social crimes. They also try to find out how these crimes can be prevented. Objectives: The present study investigates the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy training (MBCT) in reducing aggression in a juvenile correction and rehabilitation center of Zahedan province during years 1991 to 1992. Materials and Methods: This experimental study included an experimental and a control group with a pretest, posttest, and follow-up approach. The Buss and Perry aggression questionnaire (1992) was used for data collection. The sample group included 22 (10 experimental and 12 control groups) adolescent males in a juvenile correction and rehabilitation center of Zahedan province who were selected through a census method. Using a matching method based on the pre-test scores of the aggression questionnaire, they were then divided into two equivalent categories and were randomly assigned to the two groups. Mindfulness-based cognitive training took the group training in 8 sessions administered on experimental group. The follow-up test was conducted two weeks after the end of the posttest sessions. The results were analyzed using ANCOVA. Results: The results of ANCOVA showed that mindfulness-based cognitive training could significantly reduce aggression during posttest and follow-up test phases in the experimental group, compared to the control group (P < 0.01). Moreover, the results indicated the effectiveness of this method in significantly reducing anger, physical aggression, and hostility during posttest and follow-up test phases (P < 0.05). However, no significant reduction was observed in the verbal aggression subscale. Conclusions: According to the results of the present study, mindfulness-based cognitive training seems to be effective for reducing aggressive behaviors. PMID:24971290

  19. 28 CFR 115.388 - Data review for corrective action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...for corrective action. 115.388 Section 115.388 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Data Collection and Review § 115.388 Data...

  20. Health care for youth in the juvenile justice system.

    PubMed

    2011-12-01

    Youth in the juvenile correctional system are a high-risk population who, in many cases, have unmet physical, developmental, and mental health needs. Multiple studies have found that some of these health issues occur at higher rates than in the general adolescent population. Although some youth in the juvenile justice system have interfaced with health care providers in their community on a regular basis, others have had inconsistent or nonexistent care. The health needs of these youth are commonly identified when they are admitted to a juvenile custodial facility. Pediatricians and other health care providers play an important role in the care of these youth, and continuity between the community and the correctional facility is crucial. This policy statement provides an overview of the health needs of youth in the juvenile correctional system, including existing resources and standards for care, financing of health care within correctional facilities, and evidence-based interventions. Recommendations are provided for the provision of health care services to youth in the juvenile correctional system as well as specific areas for advocacy efforts. PMID:22123883

  1. Motivational Interviewing Training for Juvenile Correctional Staff in California: One Year Initial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, Melinda; Doran, Neal; Koutsenok, Igor

    2009-01-01

    This study reports initial results of a program designed to train California corrections staff (n = 576) in motivational interviewing (MI), a method of communication that is based on a client-centered, collaborative style. After three days of training, participants made significant gains in terms of knowledge of MI principles and reflective…

  2. Juvenile Confinement in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

  3. Adolescent Fathers Who Are Incarcerated Juvenile Offenders: Explanatory Study of the Co-Occurrence of Two Problem Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Deanne; Bullis, Michael; Yovanoff, Paul

    2004-01-01

    We identify explanatory risk variables associated with the co-occurrence of two problem behaviors: juvenile offending and adolescent fatherhood. Data were gathered from a 5-year prospective, longitudinal study of 531 incarcerated juvenile offenders as they transitioned from youth correction facilities back into the community. Of the total sample,…

  4. Juvenile Salmonid Pit-Tag Studies at Prosser Dam and the Chandler Canal Fish Collection Facility, Yakima River, 1991 and 1992 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehle, Thomas E.; Sandford, Benjamin P.

    1996-01-01

    In 1991 and 1992, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the second and third years of a 3-year study to estimate juvenile salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) timing and survival characteristics related to passage through the Prosser Dam complex, including the Chandler Canal and the Chandler fish collection facility, on the Yakima River. Yearling chinook (O. tshawyacha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch) were collected at the Chandler facility, PIT tagged, and released at various locations in the Yakima River, Chandler Canal, and the Chandler facility. Individual fish were subsequently detected at PIT-tag detection monitors at the Chandler facility and/or McNary Dam on the Columbia River. Survival through various reaches, PIT-tag detection efficiency, and Chandler Canal fish entrainment proportion parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood techniques. The research objectives in 1991 and 1992 were to: (1) assess the effects of passage through the Chandler Canal and the Chandler facility on the survival of juvenile salmonids, (2) determine the entrainment rate of juvenile salmonids into the Chandler Canal as a function of river flow, and (3) determine the efficiency and reliability of the PIT-tag monitoring system at the Chandler facility. The initial 1990 research plan was expanded in 1991 and 1992 to include several more release locations and many more release days.

  5. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofy, Peter T.; Rowan, Gerald D.

    1990-03-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance was completed in 1989. Equipment and pumps received maintenance and repair. An automatic dialing system was incorporated into the alarm system at the Minthorn facility. A security company has replaced the function of the Umatilla Tribal Police which was to contact fisheries personnel in case of an alarm. The configuration of the alarm system was upgraded to activate the alarm faster and provide better access to project personnel with a pager system. A survey was completed in 1988 by Thomas Bumstead of Albrook Hydraulics Lab in Pullman, WA. to determine potential measures to address the change in course of the Umatilla River around Minthorn as a result of the flood of 1986. Options and recommendations were submitted in a report in 1989. Fish Management Consultants Inc. submitted the final reports of evaluations for both the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities. A total of 150 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from December through March and held at Minthorn. Forty-two pairs were spawned (37 pairs from Minthorn and 5 pairs collected and immediately spawned at Threemile Dam). The 241,682 eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and later moved to Oak Springs Hatchery for rearing. An estimated 368 adult hatchery steelhead returned to the Umatilla River in 1988-89 (based on Threemile Dam trap counts and harvest below Threemile Dam) these, and 349 were released upriver. Of seven returned to the Bonifer trap where the smolts were initially released. Acclimation of 79,984 spring chinook salmon and 22,274 steelhead was completed at Bonifer in spring of 1989. At Minthorn, 157,299 coho salmon and 29,852 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Acclimation of 78,825 fall chinook salmon at Minthorn and 80,750 spring chinook salmon completed in the fall. at Bonifer was successfully Control groups were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1989 and 1990. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon, two experiments for spring chinook salmon (spring and fall releases) and one experiment for summer steelhead were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the juvenile salmonid trap located at Westland Diversion. Because the fish in each release were not uniquely fish size and migration timing were used to discern general trends. Data suggested that juvenile salmonids started showing up at the trap 4 days after release until July 14, when sampling was discontinued. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids to test summer steelhead broodstock from the Umatilla River for monitoring purposes and to certify eggs as pathogen-free.

  6. Youth with Mental Health Disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses. Also: Wraparound Milwaukee Program: Suicide Prevention in Juvenile Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juvenile Justice, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue of Juvenile Justice presents three main articles. "Youth with Mental Health Disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses" (J. J. Cocozza and K. Skowyra) discusses tragic mass homicides by juveniles, documented cases of neglect and inadequate services, and federal policy focusing on providing systems of care for at-risk juveniles that have…

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

  8. Juvenile angiofibroma

    MedlinePLUS

    Nasal tumor; Angiofibroma - juvenile; Benign nasal tumor; Juvenile nasal angiofibroma; JNA ... Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. It is usually found in adolescent boys. The tumor contains many ...

  9. 28 CFR 115.377 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...contractors and volunteers. 115.377 Section 115.377 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Discipline § 115.377 Corrective action for...

  10. 28 CFR 115.377 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...contractors and volunteers. 115.377 Section 115.377 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Discipline § 115.377 Corrective action for...

  11. The effect of rapid and sustained decompression on barotrauma in juvenile brook lamprey and Pacific lamprey: implications for passage at hydroelectric facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mueller, Robert P.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.

    2012-10-01

    Fish passing downstream through hydroelectric facilities may pass through hydroturbines where they experience a rapid decrease in barometric pressure as they pass by turbine blades, which can lead to barotraumas including swim bladder rupture, exopthalmia, emboli, and hemorrhaging. In juvenile Chinook salmon, the main mechanism for injury is thought to be expansion of existing gases (particularly those present in the swim bladder) and the rupture of the swim bladder ultimately leading to exopthalmia, emboli and hemorrhaging. In fish that lack a swim bladder, such as lamprey, the rate and severity of barotraumas due to rapid decompression may be reduced however; this has yet to be extensively studied. Another mechanism for barotrauma can be gases coming out of solution and the rate of this occurrence may vary among species. In this study, juvenile brook and Pacific lamprey acclimated to 146.2 kPa (equivalent to a depth of 4.6 m) were subjected to rapid (<1 sec; brook lamprey only) or sustained decompression (17 minutes) to a very low pressure (13.8 kPa) using a protocol previously applied to juvenile Chinook salmon. No mortality or evidence of barotraumas, as indicated by the presence of hemorrhages, emboli or exopthalmia, were observed during rapid or sustained decompression, nor following recovery for up to 120 h following sustained decompression. In contrast, mortality or injury would be expected for 97.5% of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to a similar rapid decompression to these very low pressures. Additionally, juvenile Chinook salmon experiencing sustained decompression died within 7 minutes, accompanied by emboli in the fins and gills and hemorrhaging in the tissues. Thus, juvenile lamprey may not be susceptible to barotraumas associated with hydroturbine passage to the same degree as juvenile salmonids, and management of these species should be tailored to their specific morphological and physiological characteristics.

  12. Compliance with universal precautions in correctional health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Gershon, R R; Karkashian, C D; Vlahov, D; Kummer, L; Kasting, C; Green-McKenzie, J; Escamilla-Cejudo, J A; Kendig, N; Swetz, A; Martin, L

    1999-03-01

    There were three main objectives of this cross-sectional study of Maryland State correctional health care workers. The first was to evaluate compliance with work practices designed to minimize exposure to blood and body fluids; the second, to identify correlates of compliance with universal precautions (UPs); and the third was to determine the relationship, if any, between compliance and exposures. Of 216 responding health care workers, 34% reported overall compliance across all 15 items on a compliance scale. Rates for specific items were particularly low for use of certain types of personal protective equipment, such as protective eyewear (53.5%), face mask (47.2%) and protective clothing (33.9%). Compliance rates were highest for glove use (93.2%) waste disposal (89.8%), and sharps disposal (80.8%). Compliance rates were generally not associated with demographic factors, except for age; younger workers were more likely to be compliant with safe work practices than were older workers (P < 0.05). Compliance was positively associated with several work-related variables, including perceived safety climate (i.e., management's commitment to infection control and the overall safety program) and job satisfaction, and was found to be inversely associated with security-related work constraints, job/task factors, adverse working conditions, workplace discrimination, and perceived work stress. Bloodborne exposures were not uncommon; 13.8% of all respondents had at least one bloodborne exposure within the previous 6 months, and compliance was inversely related to blood and body fluid exposures. This study identified several potentially modifiable correlates of compliance, including factors unique to the correctional setting. Infection-control interventional strategies specifically tailored to these health care workers may therefore be most effective in reducing the risk of bloodborne exposures. PMID:10091141

  13. The Correctional Custody Facility: Rehabilitation of the First-Time Offender in the U.S. Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert Evan

    1983-01-01

    Describes the Army's Correctional Custody Facility, a rehabilitation method for first-time offenders that is intended to recreate and strengthen the original resocialization process. The small number of return offenders suggests the facility's success as a rehabilitation concept. (JAC)

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

  15. Behind bars: the compelling case for academic health centers partnering with correctional facilities.

    PubMed

    Trestman, Robert L; Ferguson, Warren; Dickert, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs), particularly those that are publicly funded institutions, have as their mission the treatment of disadvantaged populations, the training of the next generation of clinicians, and the development and dissemination of new knowledge to reduce the burden of disease and improve the health of individuals and populations. Incarcerated populations have the most prevalent and acute disease burden and health disparities in the United States, even in comparison with inner-city populations. Yet, only a small proportion of AHCs have reached out to incarcerated populations to fulfill their mission. Those AHCs that have partnered with correctional facilities have overcome concerns about the value and popularity of "training behind bars"; the cost, liability, and pragmatics of caring for a medically complicated population; and the viability of correctional health research and extramural research funding. They have done so to great benefit to patients, students, and faculty. Partnering with correctional facilities to provide health care offers opportunities for AHCs to fulfill their core missions of clinical service, education, and research, while also enhancing their financial stability, to the benefit of all. In this Commentary, the authors discuss, based on their experiences, these concerns, how existing partnerships have overcome them, and the benefits of such relationships to both AHCs and correctional facilities. PMID:25054416

  16. The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-05-01

    Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

  17. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation; 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1992-06-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1991. Major repairs to one Minthorn pump were required and flood damage at Minthorn necessitated the replacement of rock and gravel around the pump house and steelhead brood holding area. Several modifications to the steelhead brood holding pond were also made to help reduce mortality. These changes appeared to be successful as evidenced by the reduced number of mortalities. Total prespawn mortality in 1990-91 was 10.4%. This compares to 20.0 to 39.0% for the previous three years at Minthorn. A total of 202 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from November, 1990 through April, 1991 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 410,356 eggs were taken from 64 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and initial rearing. The fish were then transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for further rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 347 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:l spawning ratio, a total of 601,548 eggs were taken from 159 females. They were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. Acclimation of 100,505 spring chinook salmon and 42,610 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1991. At Minthorn, 152,974 coho and 79,672 fall chinook salmon were acclimated and released. In the fall, 81,144 spring chinook salmon were held at Bonifer for a three-day post-transport recovery period. Control groups of spring and fall chinook salmon and summer steelhead were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Test and control groups were tagged by ODFW for acclimation studies to be performed at the Bonifer and Minthorn facilities in 1991 and 1992. Each group received three separate coded-wire tag codes. One experiment for fall chinook salmon and two experiments for spring chinook salmon were tagged. The progress of outmigration for acclimated releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Because of high spring flows in the Umatilla River however, the trap was not opened until mid-June and few fish were trapped, suggesting most had already migrated downriver. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes.

  18. The Legal Implications of HIPAA Privacy and Public Health Reporting for Correctional Facilities.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Leila; Collmer, Veda; Meza, Nick; Penunuri, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    Inmates in cramped living quarters, a situation common to correctional facilities, are especially vulnerable to disease. Cramped living conditions, coupled with above-average rates of HIV, tuberculosis, and other communicable diseases, increase inmates' risk of problematic health outcomes. Thus, high-quality health care and sustained efforts to prevent disease are especially important to improve inmate health within correctional facilities. Compliance with federal privacy restrictions pursuant to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule and state disease reporting requirements will foster inmate health and assist efforts to prevent the spread of disease. This article examines the interplay between HIPAA rules and state reporting laws to preserve health information privacy and to control the spread of disease. PMID:25953838

  19. The effect of a cognitive treatment program for male and female juvenile offenders.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Adrea Hahn; Hahn, Philip; Hagan, Michael P

    2013-09-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a cognitive intervention treatment program for juvenile offenders, which is called the Juvenile Cognitive Intervention Program. The program was provided to incarcerated delinquents at three juvenile correctional facilities in Wisconsin. The results indicated that using the How I Think (HIT) Questionnaire as a measure of change, significant improvement in reducing cognitive distortions were found across age groups and gender, and included individuals who were unable to successfully complete the program the first time and then completed it successfully. The HIT is a measure of cognitive distortions that are associated with delinquent thinking patterns and behavior. Cognitive change is a major focus of treatment programs in juvenile corrections as there has been substantive research demonstrating a link to reduced delinquent and later criminal behavior. PMID:23123384

  20. A review of the effectiveness of recreation prevention and intervention efforts with at-risk and juvenile delinquent populations 

    E-print Network

    McKay, Stacey Lyn

    1994-01-01

    (for hours!) will be remembered forever; Matt Zuefle - here's to IHOP discussions until 4:00 AM, may the dance never end; and, to Dave Magnuson - your unending assistance in the computer lab made this computer illiterate's life a little easier..., 1979 - 1989 14 Table 2. Method of Processing for Juveniles Taken into Police Custody, 1990 14 Table 3. Characteristics of Juveniles in Public and Private Correctional Facilities, 1989 16 Table 4. Table 5. Table 6. Leisure Boredom and Delinquency...

  1. Juvenile Offenders' Alcohol and Marijuana Trajectories: Risk and Protective Factor Effects in the Context of Time in a Supervised Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauricio, Anne M.; Little, Michelle; Chassin, Laurie; Knight, George P.; Piquero, Alex R.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino

    2009-01-01

    The current study modeled trajectories of substance use from ages 15 to 20 among 1,095 male serious juvenile offenders (M age = 16.54; 42% African-American, 34% Latino, 20% European-American, and 4% other ethnic/racial backgrounds) and prospectively predicted trajectories from risk and protective factors before and after controlling for time spent…

  2. Mapping a Process of Negotiated Identity among Incarcerated Male Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Laura S.; Hyun, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Building on theories of youth identity transitions, this study maps a process of negotiated identity among incarcerated young men. Data are drawn from ethnographic study of three juvenile correctional institutions and longitudinal semistructured interviews with facility residents. Cross-case analysis of 10 cases that finds youth offenders adapted…

  3. A High Risk of Hospitalization Following Release From Correctional Facilities in Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Emily A.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known about the risk of individuals who are released from correctional facilities, a time where their may be discontinuity in care. OBJECTIVE To study the risk for hospitalizations among former inmates soon after their release from correctional facilities. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Data from Medicare administrative claims for 110 419 fee-for-service beneficiaries who were released from a correctional facility from 2002 through 2010 and controls matched by age, sex, race, Medicare status, and residential zip code. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hospitalization rates and specifically those for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions 7, 30, and 90 days after release. RESULTS Of 110 419 released inmates, 1559 individuals (1.4%) were hospitalized within 7 days after release; 4285 individuals (3.9%) within 30 days; and 9196 (8.3%) within 90 days. The odds of hospitalization was higher for released inmates compared with those of matched controls (within 7 days: odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% CI, 2.3-2.8]; within 30 days: OR, 2.1 [95% CI, 2.0-2.2]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.7-1.9]). Compared with matched controls, former inmates were more likely to be hospitalized for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (within 7 days: OR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.4-2.1]; within 30 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.8]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.7]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE About 1 in 70 former inmates are hospitalized for an acute condition within 7 days of release, and 1 in 12 by 90 days, a rate much higher than in the general population. PMID:23877707

  4. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2007. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2007. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. Two additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2007. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during these additional inspections are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2007 are included in Appendix C.

  5. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-01-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE,

  6. A Need For Correction: Reforming New York's Juvenile Justice System. Child Welfare Watch. Vol. 18, Fall 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Andrew; Hemphill, Clara; Hurley, Kendra

    2009-01-01

    In the wake of a U.S. Justice Department investigation that found widespread use of excessive force by staff at upstate psychiatric care facilities for mentally ill children, this new edition of Child Welfare Watch identifies shortcomings in mental health services and explores possible solutions, including the expansion of alternatives to…

  7. A real-time error-free color-correction facility for digital consumers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    It has been well known since the earliest days of color photography that color-balance in general, and facial reproduction (flesh tones) in particular, are of dominant interest to the consumer, and significant research resources have been expended in satisfying this need. The general problem is a difficult one, spanning the factors that govern perception and personal preference, the physics and chemistry of color reproduction, as well as wide field of color measurement specification, and analysis. However, with the advent of digital photography and its widespread acceptance in the consumer market, and with the possibility of a much greater degree of individual control over color reproduction, the field is taking on a new consumer-driven impetus, and the provision of user facilities for preferred color choice now constitutes an intense field of research. In addition, due to the conveniences of digital technology, the collection of large data bases and statistics relating to individual color preferences have now become a relatively straightforward operation. Using a consumer preference approach of this type, we have developed a user-friendly facility whereby unskilled consumers may manipulate the color of their personal digital images according to their preferred choice. By virtue of its ease of operation and the real-time nature of the color-correction transforms, this facility can readily be inserted anywhere a consumer interacts with a digital image, from camera, printer, or scanner, to web or photo-kiosk. Here the underlying scientific principles are explored in detail, and these are related to the practical color-preference outcomes. Examples are given of the application to the correction of images with unsatisfactory color balance, and especially to flesh tones and faces, and the nature of the consumer controls and their corresponding image transformations are explored.

  8. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

  9. Drug Use among Residents of Juvenile Correctional Center in Kerman, Iran, and its Relationship with Personality Dimensions and Self-concept

    PubMed Central

    Gousheh, Amin; Ziaaddini, Hassan; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the status of substance misuse and its psychosocial correlates among residents of juvenile correctional centers, as a high risk group, could potentially illuminate the roadmap to prevention of drug use in this group. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 93 individuals aged 13 to 18 were enrolled. A self-administered questionnaire was completed and dropped in a sealed box. It consisted of 4 parts of Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale, NEO Personality Inventory, drug use questions, and demographic variables. All questionnaires were well adapted in the Persian language. MANOVA was used to compare the subscale scores between the drug users and nonusers. Findings All respondents were male and 40% were illiterate. More than 40% had drug dependent fathers. Use of cigarette, opium, and alcohol in the previous 30 days was reported by 31.9, 52.2, and 15.9% of respondents, respectively. In this population, the score of 3 of the 5 personality factors (i.e., neuroticism, extraversion, and openness) were higher than in the general population (P < 0.001). More than 88% of subjects had negative self-concept. Both the scores of personality and self-concept showed no significant difference based on the status of drug use. Conclusion Prevalence of lifetime and last-month drug use was found to be high. Regarding the profiles of personality and self-concept, more comprehensive evidence-based interventions are needed for improvement of their mental health. PMID:25140214

  10. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Urine Lipoarabinomannan Test for Tuberculosis Screening in a South African Correctional Facility

    PubMed Central

    Hanifa, Yasmeen; Telisinghe, Lilanganee; Fielding, Katherine L.; Malden, Justin L.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Grant, Alison D.; Charalambous, Salome

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) antigen detection assay (Clearview TB-ELISA) to screen for tuberculosis in a South African correctional facility. Methods Between September 2009 and October 2010, male offenders were screened for tuberculosis (symptoms, chest radiograph, two spot sputum specimens for microscopy and culture), and urine tested for LAM. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of LAM were calculated using definite and probable tuberculosis combined as our gold standard. Findings 33/871 (3.8%) participants (26% HIV-positive) had tuberculosis. Amongst HIV-positive vs. HIV-negative offenders the sensitivity and specificity of LAM was 7.1% vs. 0% and 98.5% vs. 99.8% respectively. Conclusion Urine LAM ELISA has inadequate sensitivity for TB screening in this population. PMID:26010840

  11. Determinants of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Inmates at Mangaung Maximum Correctional Facility in Bloemfontein, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Nyasulu, Peter; Mogoere, Serame; Umanah, Teye; Setswe, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Correctional facilities house large number of inmates who are at high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB); however factors associated with TB among inmates at Mangaung Correctional Centre have not been studied. Study Population and Methods. We undertook a case control study and reviewed a total of 1140 medical records of inmates treated for TB between 2009 and 2010. Cases were selected randomly from the medical records of inmates who were treated. Data collected were analysed using STATA version 12.0 and determinants of TB were evaluated using multiple logistic regression analyses. Factors with P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results. Prevalence of TB was 8.8% and 52% of inmates with TB were aged 31–40 years; 58% of the TB cases were HIV positive and 34% of them had CD4 cell count 350 cells/mm3. Factors associated with TB among inmates were HIV coinfection (OR: 4.2; 95% CI: 2.64–7.00); previous history of TB disease (OR: 3.58; 95% CI: 2.25–5.70); and smoking (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.16–3.81). Conclusion. Interventions to improve TB detection such as regular screening of inmates with such factors need to be reinforced to control transmission of TB among inmates and the community. PMID:25866677

  12. Posttraumatic Stress as a Mediator of the Relationship between Trauma and Mental Health Problems among Juvenile Delinquents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerig, Patricia K.; Ward, Rose Marie; Vanderzee, Karin L.; Moeddel, Melissa Arnzen

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the interrelationships among trauma exposure, PTSD, and mental health problems in a sample of 289 adolescents (199 male, 90 female) detained in a juvenile correctional facility. Mean differences were found in that females scored higher than males on measures of interpersonal trauma exposure and symptoms of both simple and…

  13. Voluntary STD testing and treatment program at a metropolitan correctional facility: evaluation of test acceptability and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher K; Earley, Mary; Shaikh, Raees; Fickenscher, Jillian; Ott, Jessica; Person, Austin; Islam, K M Monirul; Simonsen, Kari; Sandkovsky, Uriel; Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Foxall, Mark; Margalit, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have addressed challenges of diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) within correctional facilities. Initiatives that screen all inmates can be cost-prohibitive, while symptom-based screening undoubtedly fails to recognize significant numbers of asymptomatically infected persons. This study discusses a voluntary STD screening and treatment program developed at the Douglas County (Nebraska) Department of Corrections where student volunteers interviewed, screened, and educated 456 inmates. Inmate urine samples and interview responses about risk behaviors and motivators for participation in the screening program were analyzed. The results support the ongoing project method to screen and treat inmates in the community correctional facility. Risk factor analysis suggests that targeted testing and treatment efforts may have a role in providing cost-effective care for STD among the incarcerated population. PMID:24352406

  14. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-41-03. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for CAS 25-41-03. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of corrective actions will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The CAS will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-41-03. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a contaminant of concern to environmental media. • If no PSMs are present at the CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If a PSM is present at the CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed and disposed of as waste, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  15. Functional requirements for the man-vehicle systems research facility. [identifying and correcting human errors during flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.; Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.; Jex, H. R.; Mcruer, D. T.; Schulman, T. M.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center proposed a man-vehicle systems research facility to support flight simulation studies which are needed for identifying and correcting the sources of human error associated with current and future air carrier operations. The organization of research facility is reviewed and functional requirements and related priorities for the facility are recommended based on a review of potentially critical operational scenarios. Requirements are included for the experimenter's simulation control and data acquisition functions, as well as for the visual field, motion, sound, computation, crew station, and intercommunications subsystems. The related issues of functional fidelity and level of simulation are addressed, and specific criteria for quantitative assessment of various aspects of fidelity are offered. Recommendations for facility integration, checkout, and staffing are included.

  16. 76 FR 55256 - Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt Bond Purposes; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...1545-BD04 Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt Bond Purposes...2011, on the definition of solid waste disposal facilities for purposes of the rules...tax-exempt bonds to finance solid waste disposal facilities and to taxpayers that...

  17. 76 FR 55255 - Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt Bond Purposes; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...1545-BD04 Definition of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities for Tax-Exempt Bond Purposes...2011, on the definition of solid waste disposal facilities for purposes of the rules...tax-exempt bonds to finance solid waste disposal facilities and to taxpayers that...

  18. Juvenile Prostitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1986-01-01

    Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

  19. Spatial correction factors for YALINA Booster facility loaded with medium and low enriched fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Inst. for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, 99 Academician A.K.Krasin Str, Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

    2012-07-01

    The Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used in analyses of subcritical assemblies to correct the experimental reactivity as function of the detector position. Besides the detector position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the energy weighting function of the detector, the detector size, the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons, and the reactivity of the subcritical assembly. This work focuses on the dependency of the correction factor on the detector material and it investigates the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly loaded with medium (36%) and low (10%) enriched fuels. (authors)

  20. Promoting Better Interaction between Juvenile Court, Schools, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Lili Frank; Nelson, Renelle

    2004-01-01

    The PACER Center is advocating for greater involvement of parents whose children have become involved in the juvenile justice system. Coalition for Juvenile Justice reported in January 2004 that of the 300,000 to 600,000 juveniles who cycle through detention facilities after arrest awaiting legal action, more than half are under 16 years of age…

  1. Juvenile polyposis.

    PubMed

    Desai, D C; Neale, K F; Talbot, I C; Hodgson, S V; Phillips, R K

    1995-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis is an uncommon condition characterized by the development of multiple juvenile polyps, predominantly in the colon but also in the rest of the gastrointestinal tract. The condition usually presents in childhood; only 15 per cent of patients present as adults. The rarer and often fatal form, namely, juvenile polyposis of infancy, is typified by diarrhoea, protein-losing enteropathy, bleeding and rectal prolapse. The more common form of juvenile polyposis (affecting the colon, stomach and small bowel) occurs in the first or second decade with rectal bleeding and anaemia. A family history of the condition is found in 20-50 per cent of patients with apparently an autosomal dominant trait. The gene for juvenile polyposis has not yet been identified. Epithelial dysplasia is common and the cumulative risk of colorectal cancer is > 50 per cent. Various extracolonic abnormalities may also occur. Most patients are treated surgically for colonic polyps, although endoscopic polypectomy is also an option. The rest of the gastrointestinal tract should be screened as should asymptomatic first-degree relatives. PMID:7881943

  2. A robust in-situ warp-correction algorithm for VISAR streak camera data at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaria, George R.; Warrick, Abbie L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Kalantar, Daniel H.

    2015-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam pulsed laser system for high energy density physics experiments. Sophisticated diagnostics have been designed around key performance metrics to achieve ignition. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is the primary diagnostic for measuring the timing of shocks induced into an ignition capsule. The VISAR system utilizes three streak cameras; these streak cameras are inherently nonlinear and require warp corrections to remove these nonlinear effects. A detailed calibration procedure has been developed with National Security Technologies (NSTec) and applied to the camera correction analysis in production. However, the camera nonlinearities drift over time affecting the performance of this method. An in-situ fiber array is used to inject a comb of pulses to generate a calibration correction in order to meet the timing accuracy requirements of VISAR. We develop a robust algorithm for the analysis of the comb calibration images to generate the warp correction that is then applied to the data images. Our algorithm utilizes the method of thin-plate splines (TPS) to model the complex nonlinear distortions in the streak camera data. In this paper, we focus on the theory and implementation of the TPS warp-correction algorithm for the use in a production environment.

  3. Correction: Facile synthesis of mesoporous spinel NiCo2O4 nanostructures as highly efficient electrocatalysts for urea electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Rui; Qi, Li; Jia, Mingjun; Wang, Hongyu

    2015-06-01

    Correction for 'Facile synthesis of mesoporous spinel NiCo2O4 nanostructures as highly efficient electrocatalysts for urea electro-oxidation' by Rui Ding et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 1369-1376. PMID:25955973

  4. Correction: Facile synthesis of phosphine free ultra-small PbSe nanocrystals and their light harvesting studies in ETA solar cells.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Javeed; Banski, Mateusz; Malik, Mohammad Azad; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Podhorodecki, Artur; Misiewicz, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Correction for 'Facile synthesis of phosphine free ultra-small PbSe nanocrystals and their light harvesting studies in ETA solar cells' by Javeed Akhtar, et al., Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 16424-16430. PMID:26101182

  5. 3Q/4Q98 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring and Correction-Action Report, Volumes I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-15

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1998.

  6. Institutional games played by confined juveniles.

    PubMed

    Bartollas, C; Sieverdes, C M

    1983-01-01

    This study examined the games played by 561 juvenile offenders confined in six coeducational correctional facilities in one state. The types of games these residents used against staff and peers within the confines of the institution varied considerably. The study documented nineteen games used by males and females, twelve to deal with staff and seven to deal with peers. The games were defined as therapeutic games, material games, psychological games, and physical games. Peer-oriented games included attention-seeking activities and a variety of dominance games. Additionally, these games were described and tabulated according to the sex and race of the residents. The conclusion was that game-playing behavior was no less frequent in coeducational institutions than it was in single-sex institutions. PMID:6650271

  7. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-11-18

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  8. The Burden of Infectious Disease Among Inmates of and Releasees From US Correctional Facilities, 1997

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodore M. Hammett; Mary Patricia Harmon; William Rhodes

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study developed national estimates of the burden of selected infec- tious diseases among correctional inmates and releasees during 1997. Methods. Data from surveys, surveillance, and other reports were synthesized to de- velop these estimates. Results. During 1997, 20% to 26% of all people living with HIV in the United States, 29% to 43% of all those infected with

  9. Manual of Standards for Juvenile Training Schools and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Accreditation for Corrections, Rockville, MD.

    This manual of standards for juvenile training schools and services contains 487 American Correctional Association standards for the accreditation of juvenile training schools (youth development centers, villages, correction centers, treatment centers, service centers, homes for boys and girls, camps, and ranches). Standards presented are…

  10. Program use of effective drug abuse treatment practices for juvenile offenders.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Craig E; Young, Douglas W; Jainchill, Nancy; Hawke, Josephine; Farkas, Sarah; Davis, R Meghan

    2007-04-01

    This study examined the extent to which organizational context predicted use of consensus-based elements of effective substance abuse treatment practices with juvenile offenders. Participants were either directors of substance abuse treatment programs located in residential facilities (institutional sample) or directors of community-based treatment agencies providing services to adolescents in their home communities (community sample). The two settings differed significantly in the number and types of effective practices they were using. Community programs were more likely to have staff qualified to deliver substance abuse treatment, involve families in treatment, and assess their treatment outcomes. In contrast, institutional programs were more likely to provide comprehensive services. Resources dedicated to training, internal support for new programming, and network connectedness with non-criminal-justice facilities were associated with greater use of effective practices. These findings highlight the importance of establishing corrections-community partnerships designed to promote continuity of care for juvenile offenders. PMID:17383552

  11. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    G. N. Doyle

    2002-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

  12. Fighting Juvenile Gun Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, David; Grant, Heath; Rowe, Wendy; Jacobs, Nancy

    This bulletin describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's efforts to fight juvenile gun violence. The Office awarded four community demonstration grants to implement "Partnerships To Reduce Juvenile Gun Violence." Partnership goals include increasing the effectiveness of existing strategies by enhancing and coordinating…

  13. Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles

  14. The Importance of Getting Started Right: Further Examination of the Facility-to-Community Transition of Formerly Incarcerated Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullis, Michael; Yovanoff, Paul; Havel, Emily

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the facility-to-community transition of 531 incarcerated youth following their release from Oregon's juvenile correctional system, for a period of 12 months. Data on the sample were gathered through phone interviews, while they were still in custody and then every 6 months after their parole. The interviewees were asked to…

  15. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25 R-MAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-02-24

    This addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25, Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 3110, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--891-VOL I-Rev. 1, dated July 2003, provides details of demolition, waste disposal, and use restriction (UR) modification for Corrective Action Unit 113, Area 25 R-MAD Facility. Demolition was completed on July 15, 2010, when the last of the building debris was disposed. Final field activities were concluded on August 30, 2010, after all equipment was demobilized and UR signs were posted. This work was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  16. Juvenile Justice & Youth Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, James C.

    Youth violence and the juvenile justice system in the United States are explored. Part 1 takes stock of the situation. The first chapter discusses the origins and evaluation of the juvenile justice system, and the second considers the contributions of the Federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act to the existing juvenile justice…

  17. Rapidly progressive myelomonocytic leukemia (juvenile CML).

    PubMed

    Bacon, D R; Mosijczuk, A D; Humberd, Q A

    1986-01-01

    A rare type of rapidly fatal childhood leukemia, generally called juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia, is characterized by absence of the Philadelphia chromosome and a predominantly monocytic proliferation, among other features. Unlike Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia, this disease is neither chronic nor principally a disorder of granulocytic cell lines. A case is presented, with several clinical and laboratory parameters useful in establishing the correct diagnosis, and a change in terminology to "rapidly progressive juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia" is proposed. PMID:3473455

  18. M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1999, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-12-03

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the first and second quarters 1999.

  19. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a “Non-Impacted Class” which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into “survey units” and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three “Class 1,” four “Class 2,” and one “Class 3” survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the building’s interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically “clean,” or free of contamination.

  20. Juvenile Suicide in Confinement--Findings from the First National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Lindsay M.

    2009-01-01

    Findings from the first national survey on juvenile suicide in confinement are provided, and include the extent and distribution of juvenile suicides, as well as descriptive data on demographic characteristics of each victim, incident, and juvenile facility which sustained the suicide. Among the significant findings were that suicides were evenly…

  1. Juvenile Delinquency: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile Delinquency is a term which is often inaccurately used. This article clarifies definitions, looks at prevalence, and explores the relationship between juvenile delinquency and mental health. Throughout, differences between males and females are explored. (Contains 1 table.)

  2. Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

  3. Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in 1999, 33…

  4. Juvenile Court Statistics, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Jacqueline; Vereb, Thomas S.

    This report presents information on juvenile court processing of youth in the U.S. during 1974. It is based on data gathered under the National Juvenile Court Statistical Reporting System. Findings can be summarized as follows: (1) 1,252,700 juvenile delinquency cases, excluding traffic offenses, were handled by courts in the U.S. in 1974; (2) the…

  5. Juvenile Court Statistics 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; And Others

    This report is the 59th in the "Juvenile Court Statistics" series, a series begun in 1929 which serves as the primary source of information on the activities of juvenile courts. It describes the number and characteristics of delinquency and status offense cases disposed during 1985 by courts with juvenile jurisdiction and addresses some important…

  6. Juveniles in court.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Matthew F; Scott, Charles L

    2010-01-01

    Nineteenth-century American reformers were concerned about the influence of immaturity and development in juvenile offenses. They responded to their delinquent youths through the creation of juvenile courts. This early American juvenile justice system sought to treat children as different from adults and to rehabilitate wayward youths through the state's assumption of a parental role. Although these rehabilitative goals were never fully realized, the field of American child psychiatry was spawned from these efforts on behalf of delinquent youths. Early child psychiatrists began by caring for juvenile offenders. The function of a child psychiatrist with juvenile delinquents expanded beyond strictly rehabilitation, however, as juvenile courts evolved to resemble criminal adult courts-due to landmark Supreme Court decisions and also juvenile legislation between 1966 and 1975. In response to dramatically increased juvenile violence and delinquency rates in the 1980s, juvenile justice became more retributional, and society was forced to confront issues such as capital punishment for juveniles, their transfer to adult courts, and their competency to stand trial. In the modern juvenile court, child psychiatrists are often asked to participate in the consideration of such issues because of their expertise in development. In that context we review the role of psychiatrists in assisting juvenile courts. PMID:21080770

  7. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

  8. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk AA; Langeveld, Danielle; van Hattem, W Arnout; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan A

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34. Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes. Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum, juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis. In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found. Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway. It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-called “landscaper mechanism” where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma. Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment, follow-up and screening of at risk individuals. Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome. In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome. PMID:22171123

  9. Juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk Aa; Langeveld, Danielle; van Hattem, W Arnout; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan A

    2011-11-28

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34. Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes. Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum, juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis. In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found. Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway. It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-called "landscaper mechanism" where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma. Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment, follow-up and screening of at risk individuals. Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome. In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome. PMID:22171123

  10. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Pat Matthews

    2007-09-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

  11. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2005-2006 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

    2007-01-01

    In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), formerly named the Board of Corrections, the administrator of funding. California counties receiving state funds for Juvenile Justice…

  12. [Juvenile polyposis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vasov?ák, P; Foretová, L; Puchmajerová, A; K?epelová, A

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of juvenile polyps and predisposition to cancer of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Characteristic feature of juvenile polyps are irregular cystic glands filled with mucus not observed in other colorectal cancer syndromes. Germline mutations in the SMAD4 and BMPR1A genes are found in 40% of the JP individuals. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and higher frequency of gastric polyposis are associated mostly with SMAD4 mutations. PMID:22920200

  13. Adolescent neglect, juvenile delinquency and the risk of recidivism.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph P; Williams, Abigail B; Courtney, Mark E

    2013-03-01

    Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental rejection and family relationships are instrumental in explaining juvenile conduct problems. This study sought to determine whether neglect is associated with recidivism for moderate and high risk juvenile offenders in Washington State. Statewide risk assessments and administrative records for child welfare, juvenile justice, and adult corrections were analyzed. The sample was diverse (24 % female, 13 % African American, 8 % Hispanic, 5 % Native American) and included all moderate and high risk juvenile offenders screened by juvenile probation between 2004 and 2007 (n = 19,833). Official records from child protection were used to identify juvenile offenders with a history of child neglect and to identify juvenile offenders with an ongoing case of neglect. Event history models were developed to estimate the risk of subsequent offending. Adolescents with an ongoing case neglect were significantly more likely to continue offending as compared with youth with no official history of neglect. These findings remain even after controlling for a wide range of family, peer, academic, mental health, and substance abuse covariates. Interrupting trajectories of offending is a primary focus of juvenile justice. The findings of the current study indicate that ongoing dependency issues play a critical role in explaining the outcomes achieved for adolescents in juvenile justice settings. The implications for improved collaboration between child welfare and juvenile justice are discussed. PMID:23334336

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.750 - Who is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for correctional facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01...facility, law enforcement, or emergency management response purposes? 102-75.750...750 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  15. Partial correction of the CNS lysosomal storage defect in a mouse model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis by neonatal CNS administration of an adeno-associated virus serotype rh.10 vector expressing the human CLN3 gene.

    PubMed

    Sondhi, Dolan; Scott, Emma C; Chen, Alvin; Hackett, Neil R; Wong, Andrew M S; Kubiak, Agnieszka; Nelvagal, Hemanth R; Pearse, Yewande; Cotman, Susan L; Cooper, Jonathan D; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-03-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or CLN3 disease) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting from mutations in the CLN3 gene that encodes a lysosomal membrane protein. The disease primarily affects the brain with widespread intralysosomal accumulation of autofluorescent material and fibrillary gliosis, as well as the loss of specific neuronal populations. As an experimental treatment for the CNS manifestations of JNCL, we have developed a serotype rh.10 adeno-associated virus vector expressing the human CLN3 cDNA (AAVrh.10hCLN3). We hypothesized that administration of AAVrh.10hCLN3 to the Cln3(?ex7/8) knock-in mouse model of JNCL would reverse the lysosomal storage defect, as well as have a therapeutic effect on gliosis and neuron loss. Newborn Cln3(?ex7/8) mice were administered 3 × 10(10) genome copies of AAVrh.10hCLN3 to the brain, with control groups including untreated Cln3(?ex7/8) mice and wild-type littermate mice. After 18 months, CLN3 transgene expression was detected in various locations throughout the brain, particularly in the hippocampus and deep anterior cortical regions. Changes in the CNS neuronal lysosomal accumulation of storage material were assessed by immunodetection of subunit C of ATP synthase, luxol fast blue staining, and periodic acid-Schiff staining. For all parameters, Cln3(?ex7/8) mice exhibited abnormal lysosomal accumulation, but AAVrh.10hCLN3 administration resulted in significant reductions in storage material burden. There was also a significant decrease in gliosis in AAVrh.10hCLN3-treated Cln3(?ex7/8) mice, and a trend toward improved neuron counts, compared with their untreated counterparts. These data demonstrate that AAVrh.10 delivery of a wild-type cDNA to the CNS is not harmful and instead provides a partial correction of the neurological lysosomal storage defect of a disease caused by a lysosomal membrane protein, indicating that this may be an effective therapeutic strategy for JNCL and other diseases in this category. PMID:24372003

  16. Immunization Coverage Among Juvenile Justice Detainees.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, Gregory L; Glanz, Jason M; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Anoshiravani, Arash

    2015-07-01

    This study sought to (1) quantify the baseline immunization coverage of adolescents entering the juvenile justice system and (2) assess the effect of detention-based care on immunization coverage in youth. A cross-sectional retrospective chart review was performed of 279 adolescents detained at a large juvenile detention facility. Only 3% of adolescents had received all study immunizations prior to detention. Before detention, immunization coverage was significantly lower than that for the general adolescent population for all vaccines except the first doses of hepatitis A and varicella-zoster virus vaccines. Subsequent to detention, most individual immunization coverage levels increased and were significantly higher than in the general adolescent population. The routine administration of immunizations in the juvenile justice setting can help detained youth achieve levels of immunization coverage similar to their nondetained peers. PMID:26084948

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-12-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post-closure-posting requirements for the mounded/capped basement structure, as well as for the entire CAU, are addressed in Section 4.2.10. The site contains radiologically impacted surfaces and hazardous materials. Based on review of the historical information for CAU 116 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 116 using the SAFER process. CAUs that may be closed using the SAFER process have conceptual corrective actions that are clearly identified. Consequently, corrective action alternatives can be chosen prior to completing a corrective action investigation, given anticipated investigation results. The SAFER process combines elements of the data quality objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to plan and conduct closure activities. The DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the SAFER process. The purpose of the investigation phase is to verify the adequacy of existing information used to determine the chosen corrective action. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty during the planning and decision-making phases of the project. The SAFER process allows for technical decisions to be made based on information gathered during site visits, interviews, meetings, research, and a consensus of opinion by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) team members. Any uncertainties are addressed by documented assumptions that are verified by sampling and analysis, data evaluation, onsite observations, and contingency plans, as necessary. Closure activities may proceed simultaneously with site characterization as sufficient data are gathered to confirm or disprove the assumptions made during selection of the corrective action. If, at any time during the closure process, new information is discovered that indicates that closure activities should be revised, closure activities will be reevaluated as appropriate. Based on a detailed review of historical documentation, there is sufficient process know

  18. Distinguishing juvenile homicide from violent juvenile offending.

    PubMed

    DiCataldo, Frank; Everett, Meghan

    2008-04-01

    Juvenile homicide is a social problem that has remained a central focus within juvenile justice research in recent years. The term juvenile murderer describes a legal category, but it is purported to have significant scientific meaning. Research has attempted to conceptualize adolescent murderers as a clinical category that can be reliably distinguished from their nonhomicidal counterparts. This study examined 33 adolescents adjudicated delinquent or awaiting trial for murder and 38 adolescents who committed violent, nonhomicidal offenses to determine whether the two groups differed significantly on family history, early development, delinquency history, mental health, and weapon possession variables. The nonhomicide group proved more problematic on many of these measures. Two key factors did distinguish the homicide group: These adolescents endorsed the greater availability of guns and substance abuse at the time of their commitment offenses. The significance of this finding is discussed, and the implications for risk management and policy are reviewed. PMID:17671097

  19. Juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whittle, D O; Lee, M G; Hanchard, B

    2010-06-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is rare and is present when there are multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, usually the colon. The importance of this condition is the association with the development of colorectal and upper gastrointestinal cancer at a young age. We report the case of a 21-year old male with a two-year history of intermittent rectal bleeding and anal protrusion. Colonoscopy revealed multiple pedunculated cherry red polyps mainly in the left colon. Histology confirmed juvenile polyps. Juvenile polyposis syndrome should be considered in young patients with colonic symptoms, especially rectal bleeding. It is important to distinguish between patients with JPS and patients with an isolated harmatomatous juvenile polyp. PMID:21291112

  20. No Place for Kids: The Case for Reducing Juvenile Incarceration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    States confine juvenile offenders in many types of facilities, including group homes, residential treatment centers, boot camps, wilderness programs, or country-run youth facilities (some of them locked, others secured only through staff supervision). But the largest share of committed youth--about 40 percent of the total--are held in locked…

  1. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Correction Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-23

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the F-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  2. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-23

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  3. Experimental demonstration of a global dispersion-free steering correction at the new linac test facility at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latina, A.; Pfingstner, J.; Schulte, D.; Adli, E.; Decker, F. J.; Lipkowitz, N.

    2014-04-01

    The performance of future linear colliders will depend critically on beam-based alignment and feedback systems. In ILC and CLIC it is planned to perform dispersion-free steering in the main linacs. To this end the beams are accelerated with different gradients to evaluate the dispersion. The steering is performed by minimizing the average offset of the different beams in the beam position monitors and, at the same time, the difference between the beam trajectories. The experimental verification of the dispersion-free steering algorithm is essential to prove its effectiveness and to prepare the commissioning of such machines. The algorithm should take an orbit measurement at every cycle (train to train), estimate the correction from this information, and, from the system response matrices, apply the correction. We have successfully tested dispersion-free steering at FACET, including an adaptive system-identification algorithm, where the system response matrix is measured dynamically and automatically.

  4. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereinafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereinafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction of Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

  5. Development of a large ion beam figuring facility for correction of optics up to 1.7 m diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, M.; Cornelli, S.; Canestrari, R.; Garegnani, D.

    2009-08-01

    In the INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAF-OAB) a new Ion Beam Figuring Facility, that adds to the previous one, is under advanced construction. The present facility is able to figure optics up to 50 cm in diameter meanwhile the new one is larger and will be able to figure optics up to 1.7 meter. It will employ a Kaufman Ion Source having three degrees of freedom (x-y-z) with step motors and encoders. The source will have two different grid sizes so to be able to figure the optics wit a broad or small removal function depending from the application. The control system will be computer controlled and designed to be autonomous and self-monitoring during the figuring by using a proprietary process control software. This software will use a time matrix map indicating the dwell times required for each pixel of the optical surface. The software and the mathematical tools used to compute the Time Matrix solution has been developed in INAF-OAB as well.

  6. Colorectal neoplasia in juvenile polyposis or juvenile polyps.

    PubMed Central

    Giardiello, F M; Hamilton, S R; Kern, S E; Offerhaus, G J; Green, P A; Celano, P; Krush, A J; Booker, S V

    1991-01-01

    Juvenile (retention) polyps are usually solitary lesions in the colorectum but may be multiple in juvenile polyposis. The association between juvenile polyps and colorectal neoplasia is controversial. We present three patients with juvenile polyposis who had colorectal adenomas or adenomatous epithelium in juvenile polyps at ages 3, 4, and 7 years. In a retrospective study of 57 additional patients with one or more juvenile polyps, 10 patients (18%) had colorectal neoplasia including three with adenocarcinoma, two with tubular adenoma, and six with adenomatous epithelium in a juvenile polyp (one had both adenomatous epithelium and an adenocarcinoma). Nine of these 10 patients had juvenile polyposis defined by the presence of at least three juvenile polyps; and eight of the nine had a family history of juvenile polyps. Colorectal neoplasia occurred at young age (mean (SEM) 37 (5) years). Our findings suggest that patients with juvenile polyps who have three or more juvenile polyps or a family history of juvenile polyps should undergo surveillance for colorectal neoplasia. Images Figure 1 PMID:1656892

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Burmeister

    2007-09-01

    This CR provides documentation and justification for the closure of CAU 118 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative and closure activities conducted in accordance with the CAU 118 SAFER Plan: Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The SAFER Plan provides information relating to site history as well as the scope and planning of the investigation. This CR also provides the analytical and radiological survey data to confirm that the remediation goals were met as specified in the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approved the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (Murphy, 2006), which recommends closure in place with use restrictions (URs).

  8. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

  9. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004. Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

    2005-01-01

    In 2000, the California Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Board of Corrections (BOC) as the administrator of funding. A 2001 Senate Bill extended the funding and changed the program's name to the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

  10. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2003-2004 Report Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

    2005-01-01

    This document summarizes a report focusing on California counties receiving funds from Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) programs. This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among at-risk and young offenders. The Board of Corrections

  11. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

  12. MMPI-A: prediction of program disruption for incarcerated female juvenile delinquents

    E-print Network

    Stefanov, Michael Lee

    1999-01-01

    for female juvenile delinquents incarcerated in a state facility in Texas. Treating MMPI-A scales as continuous and dichotomous (i.e., [] 65 T) variables, regression analyses were conducted to examine whether specific critical incidents (i.e., assault...

  13. Juvenile Bighead Carp

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    These juvenile bighead carps are used to find potential physical, biological or chemical controls as part of an integrated pest management approach for natural resource managers. Asian carp are invasive species that could pose substantial environmental risks and economic impacts if they become esta...

  14. Juvenile Silver Carp

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    These juvenile silver carps are used to find potential physical, biological or chemical controls as part of an integrated pest management approach for natural resource managers. Asian carp are invasive species that could pose substantial environmental risks and economic impacts if they become estab...

  15. Juvenile Battens Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayton, Romayne

    1987-01-01

    Ten children diagnosed with juvenile Battens disease were tested over a three-year period in general intelligence, memory, listening and speech, motor skills, and general learning. Results showed that the patients followed a predetermined pattern but that the time span for development of memory, communication, and behavior problems varied greatly.…

  16. 28 CFR 115.318 - Upgrades to facilities and technologies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...facilities and technologies. 115.318 Section 115.318 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Prevention Planning § 115.318 Upgrades to...

  17. Juvenile Offender Recidivism: An Examination of Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calley, Nancy G.

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between…

  18. The Ohio Department of Youth Services Juvenile Prison Library System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Deidra N.

    2009-01-01

    The article is an introduction to The Ohio Department of Youth Services librarians and the services they provide. Information about each juvenile prison facility is revealed and provides an explanation of guidelines and standards for prison libraries. Sixty-eight questions were asked in four in-person interviews to present a profile of the…

  19. Institutional Treatment for Juvenile Delinquents: 2000 Offenders after Three Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Karin; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A common belief is that residential treatment of juvenile delinquents reinforces rather than inhibits their patterns of delinquent behavior. Findings of this study clearly indicate that, at least in Israel, incarceration in a residential treatment facility did not increase the level of delinquency among the inmates in the period following…

  20. Adolescent Neglect, Juvenile Delinquency and the Risk of Recidivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph P.; Williams, Abigail B.; Courtney, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Victims of child abuse and neglect are at an increased risk of involvement with the juvenile justice and adult correctional systems. Yet, little is known about the continuation and trajectories of offending beyond initial contact with law enforcement. Neglect likely plays a critical role in continued offending as parental monitoring, parental…

  1. Scared Straight and Other Juvenile Awareness Programs for Preventing Juvenile Delinquency: A Systematic Review of the Randomized Experimental Evidence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANTHONY PETROSINO; CAROLYN TURPIN-PETROSINO; JOHN BUEHLER

    2003-01-01

    Scared Straight and other programs involve organized visits to prison facilities by juvenile delinquents or at-risk kids to deter them from delinquency. Despite several research studies and reviews questioning their effectiveness, they remain in use and have now been tried in at least six nations. The authors report here on the results of a systematic review of randomized experimental tests

  2. Urban Youth in Correctional Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochoa, Theresa A.; Eckes, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Research indicates that a disproportionate number of minority students are assigned to special education programs in urban school districts. Oftentimes, these programs are inadequate and they deny minority students with special needs a free appropriate public education. These concerns are not only applicable to urban public schools; research also…

  3. Juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cichy, Wojciech; Klincewicz, Beata; Plawski, Andrzej

    2014-06-29

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant predisposition to the occurrence of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis of JPS is based on the occurrence of numerous colon and rectum polyps or any number of polyps with family history and, in the case of juvenile polyps, their occurrence also outside the large intestine. The JPS is caused by mutations in SMAD4 and BMPR1A. Products of the SMAD4 gene are involved in signal transduction in the transforming growth factor ? pathway and BMPR1A protein is a receptor belonging to the family of transmembrane serine/threonine kinases. Both proteins are responsible for processes determining appropriate development of colonic mucosa. The JPS belongs to the group of hamartomatous polyposes. The hamartomatous polyposis syndromes constitute a group of diseases in which manifestations differ slightly and only molecular diagnostics gives the possibility of verifying the clinical diagnosis. PMID:25097590

  4. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cichy, Wojciech; Klincewicz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant predisposition to the occurrence of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis of JPS is based on the occurrence of numerous colon and rectum polyps or any number of polyps with family history and, in the case of juvenile polyps, their occurrence also outside the large intestine. The JPS is caused by mutations in SMAD4 and BMPR1A. Products of the SMAD4 gene are involved in signal transduction in the transforming growth factor ? pathway and BMPR1A protein is a receptor belonging to the family of transmembrane serine/threonine kinases. Both proteins are responsible for processes determining appropriate development of colonic mucosa. The JPS belongs to the group of hamartomatous polyposes. The hamartomatous polyposis syndromes constitute a group of diseases in which manifestations differ slightly and only molecular diagnostics gives the possibility of verifying the clinical diagnosis. PMID:25097590

  5. Juvenile trabecular ossifying fibroma

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Nymphea; Saini, Nitin; Kler, Shikha; Jindal, Shaifi

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF) is an uncommon fibro-osseous lesion with highly aggressive clinical behavior, higher incidence in young adults, and a strong tendency to recur. Two categories, trabecular JOF (TrJOF) and psammomatoid JOF (PsJOF), based on histologic criteria and a distinct predilection for specific age groups have been identified. Juvenile trabecular ossifying fibroma of peripheral variety is an uncommon clinical entity with aggressive local behavior and high recurrence rate. This article reports a case of aggressive JTOF in the anterior mandibular region in a 13-year-old boy with history of recurrence. Complete surgical resection of the growth was done along with involved periodontal ligament and periosteum to minimize the possibility of recurrence. The case was followed up for more than 3 months without recurrence. PMID:24872635

  6. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Juvenile polyposis syndrome On this page: Description Genetic changes ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed October 2013 What is juvenile polyposis syndrome? Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a disorder ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile Batten disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Juvenile Batten disease On this page: Description Genetic changes ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed September 2013 What is juvenile Batten disease? Juvenile Batten disease is an inherited ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis On this page: Description Genetic ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed July 2013 What is juvenile primary lateral sclerosis? Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis is ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile Paget disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Juvenile Paget disease On this page: Description Genetic changes ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed February 2010 What is juvenile Paget disease? Juvenile Paget disease is a disorder ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile primary osteoporosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research studies PubMed Recent literature Conditions > Juvenile primary osteoporosis On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed January 2013 What is juvenile primary osteoporosis? Juvenile primary osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized ...

  12. PIT-Tag Detection System for Large-Diameter Juvenile Fish Bypass Pipes at Columbia River Basin Hydroelectric Dams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Axel; E. F. Prentice; B. P. Sandford

    2005-01-01

    We developed a prototype detection system with increased reading range for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The system eliminates the need to route juvenile salmonids to sampling and collection facilities for detection and allows fisheries management greater flexibility in safely bypassing juvenile salmonids at dams. This technology can be applied to PIT-tag studies elsewhere, especially those directed at recovery of

  13. Pathways and Predictors of Juvenile Justice Involvement for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Youths: A Focus on Gender

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Pasko; David T. Mayeda

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growth of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) youths in court and correctional involvement, studies of their delinquency and juvenile justice involvement are quite limited, and the literature becomes almost nonexistent when examining gender differences. Using case file analysis of 150 Native Hawaiian\\/part-Hawaiian and Pacific Islander juvenile offenders, this article addresses this dearth of research by showing

  14. Juvenile Justice Bulletin: Aftercare Services. Juvenile Justice Practices Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gies, Steve V.

    This bulletin examines aftercare services that provide youth with comprehensive health, education, family, and vocational services upon their release from the juvenile justice system. Aftercare can be defined as reintegrative services that prepare out-of-home placed juveniles for reentry into the community by reestablishing the necessary…

  15. Offenders in Juvenile Court, 1994. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    Juvenile courts in the United States processed more than 1.5 million delinquency cases in 1994, representing a 5% increase over the 1993 caseload and a 41% increase over the number of cases handled in 1985. These figures are taken from "Juvenile Court Statistics, 1994," the latest in a series of annual reports on cases handled by courts with…

  16. Psychopathology in Female Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Angela; Howie, Pauline; Starling, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Background: The aim was to document the spectrum of present and lifetime psychological disorders in female juvenile offenders, and to examine the relations between mental health status and socio-demographic, family and trauma variables. Method: One hundred juvenile offenders were matched with a comparison group of 100 females on age and…

  17. Juvenile Justice in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankovic, Joanne, Ed.; And Others

    Producing a much-needed organized body of literature about rural juvenile justice, 14 papers (largely from the 1979 National Symposium on Rural Justice) are organized to identify current issues, identify forces causing changes in current systems, review programs responding to rural juvenile justice problems, and provide planning models to aid…

  18. Corrective Action Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The glossary of technical terms was prepared to facilitate the use of the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) issued by OSWER on November 14, 1986. The CAP presents model scopes of work for all phases of a corrective action program, including the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI), Corrective Measures Study (CMS), Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI), and interim measures. The Corrective Action Glossary includes brief definitions of the technical terms used in the CAP and explains how they are used. In addition, expected ranges (where applicable) are provided. Parameters or terms not discussed in the CAP, but commonly associated with site investigations or remediations are also included.

  19. Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Teotia, M; Teotia, S P; Singh, R K

    1979-09-01

    We describe four children with idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis. All patients were initially seen between the ages of 10 and 13 years and spontaneously recovered following puberty. We review 27 similar cases reported in the literature. Theories on the cause of idiopathic osteoporosis in children are critically discussed. It may be that milder forms remain undiagnosed because of the self-limited course and the pain being confused with a variety of rheumatic disorders. It would be worth observing these cases to determine if they are otherwise prone to development of osteoporosis during pregnancy or in later life. PMID:314235

  20. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vijai D.; Gangopadhyaya, A. N.; Sharma, S. P.; Gopal, S. C.; Gupta, D. K.; Kumar, Vijayendra

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Report of a series of 12 cases of juvenile polyposis coli. Methods: The study period was from 1995 to 2005. All the patients were treated by total colectomy with rectal mucosectomy and endorectal ileoanal pullthrough with or without ileal pouch formation. Covering ileostomy was avoided in all the cases. Time taken for the surgery, postoperative complications and continence were documented. Results: The mean operating time was 4.2 h (range: 4–5 h). The mean duration of hospital stay was 16.3 days (range: 15–18 days). The most common postoperative complication was pouchitis and perianal excoriation. Initially, all the patients were passing stools at an interval of 2 h, and after 3 weeks, the frequency has reduced to 6–8 stools per day. In the follow-up after 3 months, the frequency was 3–5 per day with minimal soiling. Conclusions: Single-stage total colectomy with rectal mucosectomy and endorectal ileoanal pull-through without covering ileostomy and pouch formation is a safe and definitive treatment for juvenile polyposis coli if the patient selection is appropriate. PMID:20011494

  1. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2007-2008 Report. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

    2010-01-01

    In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile-justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA) (formerly named the Board of Corrections) the administrator of funding. A 2001 California Senate bill extended the funding and changed the…

  2. Recidivism of juvenile homicide offenders.

    PubMed

    Vries, Anne M; Liem, Marieke

    2011-01-01

    Serious offenses against persons perpetrated by juveniles raise fundamental questions about the background, causes, and prevention of future crime. The current study addresses the potential of future crime of all juvenile homicide offenders (JHOs) in the Netherlands in the period 1992-2007. In contrast to former research on recidivism of JHOs, which has been merely descriptive, the present study integrates theoretical perspectives as to why some of these juveniles turn back to crime, while others do not. To this end, relationships are investigated between recidivism behavior and risk factors. Results indicate that male JHOs, and JHOs who maintain relationships with delinquents, run a greater risk of reoffending. PMID:21484856

  3. 28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

  4. 28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

  5. 28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

  6. 28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...supervises the implementation of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (18...

  7. Group Work with Juvenile Delinquents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews group work literature on juvenile delinquents. Presents overview of interventions, including positive peer culture, cognitive-behavioral treatment, psychoeducational treatment, treatment of learned behavior, action-oriented treatment, milieu therapy, parental involvement, assertiveness training, and music therapy. Discusses outcome…

  8. State Correctional Education Programs. State Policy Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolbert, Michelle

    Secure state correctional facilities currently house more than 1.8 million adults, and nearly 4.4 million adults fall under state-administered community corrections. A state's approach to corrections and the communication between the state correctional components can have a large impact on the state's correctional education program. Decentralized…

  9. Culvert Testing Program for Juvenile Salmonid Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Richmond, Marshall C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schafer, Jim (Washington State Department of Transportation)

    2002-01-01

    In partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has undertaken a phased program conducted by an interdisciplinary team of experts to address the hydraulic and behavioral issues associated with juvenile salmonid fish passage through culvert systems. Juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) is the initial test subject. This program addresses the testing and assessment of culvert designs, along with associated measurements of hydraulic conditions and fish behavior, occurring in full-scale physical models of culvert systems deployed in an experimental test bed. The proposed approach includes the use of three kinds of models. First, a conceptual model of fish passage is developed to guide the design of hydraulic and behavioral testing and to interpret the results. Second, mathematical models of culvert hydraulics provide information to design the full-scale test facility and to guide design of the hydraulic a nd behavioral testing program. Third, full-scale physical models of culverts in a test bed are used to evaluate fish passage quantitatively. Using the knowledge and data from previous studies, this program will encompass the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a full-scale, controlled culvert test bed. Experiments in the testing apparatus will measure the hydraulic conditions (mean velocity, turbulence, and water depth) associated with various culvert designs under various slopes and flow regimes and then relate these measures to repeatable, quantitative measures of fish passage success. After construction in late spring, 2001, preliminary trials will be conducted in summer 2001.

  10. Addendum to the corrective action plan for Underground Storage Tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1: Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID {number_sign}0-010117

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document represents an addendum to the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U located at Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The site of the four underground storage tanks is commonly referred to as the Rust Garage Facility. The original CAP was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review in May 1992. During the time period after submission of the original CAP for the Rust Garage Facility, Y-12 Plant Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program personnel continued to evaluate improvements that would optimize resources and expedite the activities schedule presented in the original CAP. Based on these determinations, several revisions to the original corrective action process options for remediation of contaminated soils are proposed. The revised approach will involve excavation of the soils from the impacted areas, on-site thermal desorption of soil contaminants, and final disposition of the treated soils by backfilling into the subject site excavations. Based on evaluation of the corrective actions with regard to groundwater, remediation of groundwater under the Y-12 Plant CERCLA Program is proposed for the facility.

  11. A Wall Correction Program Based on Classical Methods for the National Transonic Facility (Solid Wall or Slotted Wall) and the 14x22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel at NASA LaRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J. (Technical Monitor); Iyer, Venkit

    2004-01-01

    A Fortran subroutine CMWALL is described, which is an implementation of the collective information from classical methods-based wall corrections. These methods use established closed-form expressions which were developed based on simple linear potential-based methods. This is a simple and rapid tool to calculate corrections due to wall interference in the National Transonic Facility (Solid Wall or Slotted Wall) or the 14x22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel at NASA LaRC. It is designed to be easily implemented in the existing tunnel data reduction programs, either as real-time or post-point. It is however important to realize that the method is based on the simplifying assumptions of linearity, small model and attached flow. The computed results are thus to be viewed as first-cut estimates, to be refined further using more complex methods based on measured wall pressures (known as wall signature methods).

  12. Update in juvenile myositis

    PubMed Central

    Nistala, Kiran; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This update on childhood idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) reviews recent progress in the field of translational science and clinical research over the past 12–18 months. Recent findings Several new studies, including results from the international genome-wide association study, point to abnormalities of the adaptive immune system in childhood IIMs. Circulating T-follicular helper cells promote plasma cell differentiation and have been found in high levels in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), which may account the frequency of autoantibodies seen in this disease. One of the latest to be identified in JDM targets the protein NXP-2 and is associated with an increased risk of calcinosis in young patients. The first randomized controlled clinical trial in refractory adult and childhood IIMs was reported this year. B-cell depletion with the anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, failed to achieve its primary end point, but patients with JDM did show good improvement in disease activity. A new international definition of disease remission in JDM has been agreed, which will aid disease assessment in future therapeutic trials. Summary The challenges of studying a rare disease such as JDM have been overcome by several collaborative studies and have led to significant progress in understanding the cause, treatment and prognosis of childhood IIMs. PMID:24061078

  13. Political Correctness--Correct?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boase, Paul H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the phenomenon of political correctness, its roots and objectives, and its successes and failures in coping with the conflicts and clashes of multicultural campuses. Argues that speech codes indicate failure in academia's primary mission to civilize and educate through talk, discussion, thought,166 and persuasion. (SR)

  14. Wavefront correction for static and dynamic aberrations to within 1 second of the system shot in the NIF Beamlet demonstration facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Hartley; M. Kartz; W. Behrendt

    1996-01-01

    The laser wavefront of the NIF Beamlet demonstration system is corrected for static aberrations with a wavefront control system. The system operates closed loop with a probe beam prior to a shot and has a loop bandwidth of about 3 Hz. However, until recently the wavefront control system was disabled several minutes prior to the shot to allow time to

  15. Forensic aspects of juvenile violence.

    PubMed

    Haller, L H

    2000-10-01

    The juvenile justice system was created because it was recognized that youthful offenders needed to be managed differently from adults. They were to receive habilitation services instead of punishment. It is now more than a century since the creation of the first juvenile court. After 67 years, the US Supreme Court, in Kent v United States stated that the model was not working because juveniles in the criminal justice system received no treatment and they had no rights. Because the issue that had been appealed was the lack of rights (not lack of treatment), the Court mandated that juveniles, like adults, be given certain rights. The following year, in In re Gault, the Court expanded these rights. Subsequent Supreme Court cases have dealt with these kinds of issues--that is, whether juvenile offenders are entitled to the same rights as adults and subject to the same penalties. The Supreme Court has never heard a "right to treatment" case, which is the other part of the juvenile court system. Cases have been brought in lower courts (e.g., Nelson v. Heyne, 1972) alleging inadequate treatment services, but no national impact has resulted. Thus, in general, children in the juvenile court system do not have an enforceable right to treatment and can obtain only what services are available in their jurisdictions. The services often are woefully inadequate. Sentencing a youth to probation, with the requirement that he or she participate in counseling or mental health treatment, is meaningless if services are not available. Community-based, model programs that provide effective treatment do exist. They are, as yet, the rare exception rather than the norm and, therefore, are not available to most youthful offenders. Incarcerated juveniles, obviously, cannot avail themselves of community programs. Litigation to give these youth the same rights as adults in penal institutions is not the answer because incarcerated adults don't have a right to treatment, only a right to be free from "deliberate indifference" to their medical needs. It is hoped that a way will be found to provide effective services for the juvenile delinquent population. Federal laws have been enacted to mandate special services for educationally handicapped children. Those statutes, and litigation based on them, have led to some improvements for that group of children. Perhaps the same can be accomplished for the youthful offender population. Mandatory early intervention will serve them far better than mandatory waiver to adult court or incarceration in adult prison. PMID:11005010

  16. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Safe Concussions: What to Know Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Juvenile ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  17. Mental Illness Afflicts Many Juveniles in Jail

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 153704.html Mental Illness Afflicts Many Juveniles in Jail Problems more common among girls than boys, study ... the general population, a new study finds. Juvenile inmates also have longer hospital stays, which suggests they ...

  18. Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sickmund, Melissa.

    The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has recently placed an item of interest online. This item, from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention (OJJDP), is the 1999 national report on Juvenile Offenders and Victims, "the most comprehensive source of information about juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and about the response of the juvenile justice system to these problems." The report is offered in seven chapters in .pdf format.

  19. [Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemias].

    PubMed

    Lachenaud, Julie; Strullu, Marion; Baruchel, André; Cavé, Hélène

    2014-03-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemias (JMML) are rare but severe myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasms of infancy. They represent about 10 new cases per year in France and preferentially affect males. JMML are all stem cell diseases the common denominator of which is RAS pathway dysregulation, due to mutations in RAS (NRAS, KRAS) or RAS regulatory components (PTPN11, NF1 or CBL). This leads to an hypersensivity of myeloid progenitors to GM-CSF (granulo-macrophagic colony stimulating factor) which induces in turn excessive monocytic and macrophagic proliferation in blood and bone marrow. All organs can be infiltrated by this monocytic proliferation leading to multisystemic failure. Blast crisis with transformation into acute myeloid leukemia occurs in one third of patients. A salient feature of JMML is their frequent association with predisposition syndromes such as Noonan syndrome, neurofibromatosis and CBL syndrome, which are developmental diseases associated with a constitutional RAS pathway deregulation, now grouped under the name RASopathies. Clinical heterogeneity makes JMML diagnosis difficult. Splenomagaly is the most constant sign. Palor, adenopathy, respiratory or cutaneous symptoms can also be present. Blood smear shows monocytosis (>1×10(9)/L) presence of myeloid progenitors and abnormal basophils. The demonstration of an endogeneous in vitro growth of myeloid progenitors although not very specific can help JMML diagnosis. Nowadays, genetic typing has to be included in the workup of JMML diagnosis and allows to evidence a mutation in more than 90% of cases. JMML have a poor prognosis. The only curative treatment is bone marrow transplantation but approximately 35% of patients relapse. JMML clinical course is highly heterogeneous and unpredictable. Some rare patients have an indolent evolution or even spontaneous remission. Age over two years, thrombopenia below 33×10(9)/L and high foetal hemoglobin (HbF) level for age are poor prognosis criteria but hardly predict individual outcome. Several research directions are currently being explored to improve prognosis prediction and provide more effective targeted treatments. PMID:24691193

  20. Guidelines for Juvenile Information Sharing. OJJDP Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mankey, Jennifer; Baca, Patricia; Rondenell, Stephanie; Webb, Marilyn; McHugh, Denise

    2006-01-01

    The juvenile information sharing (JIS) guidelines were prepared by the Center for Network Development (CND) for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The guidelines suggest a course of action for key agency and organization stakeholders involved in a state or local effort to implement and sustain juvenile information…

  1. Genetic alterations and epithelial dysplasia in juvenile polyposis syndrome and sporadic juvenile polyps.

    PubMed

    Wu, T T; Rezai, B; Rashid, A; Luce, M C; Cayouette, M C; Kim, C; Sani, N; Mishra, L; Moskaluk, C A; Yardley, J H; Hamilton, S R

    1997-03-01

    Juvenile polyps are regarded as hamartomatous polyps and occur in sporadic and familial syndromic settings. There is increased risk of gastrointestinal neoplasia in patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome, but the molecular mechanisms are not known. We therefore studied 78 colorectal juvenile polyposis from 12 patients with juvenile polyps syndrome and 34 sporadic juvenile polyps for epithelial dysplasia and genetic changes associated with colorectal neoplasia. Dysplasia occurred in 31% of syndromic juvenile polyps but not in sporadic juvenile polyps (P < 0.0001). Topographic control of proliferation and expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAFI/CIP1) seen in native colorectal epithelium was lost in 79% of dysplastic juvenile polyps and in 8% of nondysplastic juvenile polyps (P < 0.000001). Somatic mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene were demonstrated in 50% of dysplastic juvenile polyps (3 of 6) but not in any of 16 juvenile polyps without dysplasia (P = 0.01). Both sporadic and syndromic juvenile polyps had K-ras mutations (14%) and there was no relationship to dysplasia. p53 gene product overexpression identified by immunohistochemical staining occurred rarely in dysplastic juvenile polyps (2 of 24, 8%). Our results indicate that the multiple genetic alterations involved in usual colorectal neoplasia also play a role in neoplastic transformation of juvenile polyps, predominantly in juvenile polyposis syndrome. PMID:9060832

  2. Genetic alterations and epithelial dysplasia in juvenile polyposis syndrome and sporadic juvenile polyps.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T. T.; Rezai, B.; Rashid, A.; Luce, M. C.; Cayouette, M. C.; Kim, C.; Sani, N.; Mishra, L.; Moskaluk, C. A.; Yardley, J. H.; Hamilton, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Juvenile polyps are regarded as hamartomatous polyps and occur in sporadic and familial syndromic settings. There is increased risk of gastrointestinal neoplasia in patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome, but the molecular mechanisms are not known. We therefore studied 78 colorectal juvenile polyposis from 12 patients with juvenile polyps syndrome and 34 sporadic juvenile polyps for epithelial dysplasia and genetic changes associated with colorectal neoplasia. Dysplasia occurred in 31% of syndromic juvenile polyps but not in sporadic juvenile polyps (P < 0.0001). Topographic control of proliferation and expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAFI/CIP1) seen in native colorectal epithelium was lost in 79% of dysplastic juvenile polyps and in 8% of nondysplastic juvenile polyps (P < 0.000001). Somatic mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene were demonstrated in 50% of dysplastic juvenile polyps (3 of 6) but not in any of 16 juvenile polyps without dysplasia (P = 0.01). Both sporadic and syndromic juvenile polyps had K-ras mutations (14%) and there was no relationship to dysplasia. p53 gene product overexpression identified by immunohistochemical staining occurred rarely in dysplastic juvenile polyps (2 of 24, 8%). Our results indicate that the multiple genetic alterations involved in usual colorectal neoplasia also play a role in neoplastic transformation of juvenile polyps, predominantly in juvenile polyposis syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9060832

  3. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Phone 50 Fax 50 Facilities must contact their accreditation body to update or correct their address or ... on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of Radiology (ACR), and ...

  4. Prevention of Serious and Violent Juvenile Offending. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Gail A.; Miller, Laurie S.; Cothern, Lynn

    This bulletin explores the proximal risk factors for juvenile offending, reviews the early developmental precursors to violent offending, and summarizes approaches to prevention. It also discusses components of intervention programs, limitations of single-focus prevention, examples of multi systemic interventions, and limitations of prevention…

  5. Special Education and the Juvenile Justice System. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Sue; Warboys, Loren

    This bulletin summarizes provisions of federal law as they pertain to special education and juvenile justice. It discusses provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 1997 including: the definition of disability; free appropriate public education; identification, referral, and evaluation; the individualized education program…

  6. Roger A. Mann Award. Juvenile hallux valgus: etiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, M J

    1995-11-01

    In an 11-year retrospective study of 45 patients (60 feet) with juvenile hallux valgus, a multiprocedural approach was used to surgically correct the deformity. A Chevron osteotomy or McBride procedure was used for mild deformities, a distal soft tissue procedure with proximal first metatarsal osteotomy was used for moderate and severe deformities with MTP subluxation, and a double osteotomy (extra-articular correction) was used for moderate and severe deformities with an increased distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA). The average hallux valgus correction was 17.2 degrees and the average correction of the 1-2 intermetatarsal angle was 5.3 degrees. Good and excellent results were obtained in 92% of cases using a multiprocedural approach. Eighty-eight percent of patients were female and 40% of deformities occurred at age 10 or younger. Early onset was characterized by increased deformity and an increased DMAA. Maternal transmission was noted in 72% of patients. An increased distal metatarsal articular angle was noted in 48% of cases. With subluxation of the first MTP joint, the average DMAA was 7.9 degrees. With a congruent joint, the average DMAA was 15.3 degrees. In patients where hallux valgus occurred at age 10 or younger, the DMAA was increased. First metatarsal length was compared with second metatarsal length. While the incidence of a long first metatarsal was similar to that in the normal population (30%), the DMAA was 15.8 degrees for a long first metatarsal and 6.0 degrees for a short first metatarsal. An increased DMAA may be the defining characteristic of juvenile hallux valgus. The success of surgical correction of a juvenile hallux valgus deformity is intimately associated with the magnitude of the DMAA. Moderate and severe pes planus occurred in 17% of cases, which was no different than the incidence in the normal population. No recurrences occurred in the presence of pes planus. Pes planus was not thought to have an affect on occurrence or recurrence of deformity. Moderate and severe metatarsus adductus was noted in 22% of cases, a rate much higher than that in the normal population. The presence of metatarsus adductus did not affect the preoperative hallux valgus angle or the average surgical correction of the hallux valgus angle. Constricting footwear was noted by only 24% of patients as playing a role in the development of juvenile hallux valgus. There were six recurrences of the deformities and eight complications (six cases of postoperative hallux varus, one case of wire breakage, and one case of undercorrection). PMID:8589807

  7. Juvenile Justice and Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chassin, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Laurie Chassin focuses on the elevated prevalence of substance use disorders among young offenders in the juvenile justice system and on efforts by the justice system to provide treatment for these disorders. She emphasizes the importance of diagnosing and treating these disorders, which are linked both with continued offending and with a broad…

  8. A Century of Juvenile Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Philip W.; Welsh, Wayne N.; Butler, Frank

    The millennium marks the beginning of a second century for the formal system of juvenile justice in the United States. From its inception, the central focus of the system has been delinquency, an amorphous construct that includes not only "criminal" behavior but also an array of youthful actions that offend prevailing social norms. Thus, the…

  9. [Sex-linked juvenile retinoschisis].

    PubMed

    François, P; Turut, P; Soltysik, C; Hache, J C

    1976-02-01

    About 13 observations of sexe linked juvenile retinoschisis, the authors describe the ophthalmoscopic, fluorographic and functional aspects of the disease whose caracteristics are:--its sexe linked recessive heredity; --its clinical characterestics associating: a microcystic macular degeneration, peripheral retinal lesions, vitreous body alterations, --an electroretinogram of the negative type. PMID:132916

  10. Sexual risk behavior, knowledge, and condom use among adolescents in Juvenile detention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane M. Morrison; Sharon A. Baker; Mary R. Gillmore

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on sexual behavior, knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases (including AIDS) and condoms, and condom use among African-American and white incarcerated adolescents in Seattle, Washington. One hundred nineteen adolescents in a juvenile detention facility completed questionnaires that assessed their lifetime and recent sexual behaviors, an objective test of disease and condom knowledge, attitudes and norms regarding condom use

  11. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act. RAND Quarterly Report, October 2008. TR-621-LACPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

    2008-01-01

    In July 2008, RAND Corporation staff conducted Correctional Program Checklist (CPC) assessments of five home-based programs (Asian Youth Center, Communities in Schools, Inter-Agency Drug Abuse Recovery Programs, Soledad Enrichment Action, and Stars Behavioral Health Group) as part of its ongoing evaluation of Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

  12. Swimming behaviour of juvenile Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

    2006-02-01

    Actively migrating juvenile Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata Richardson, 1836) were collected from hydroelectric bypass facilities in the Columbia River and transferred to the laboratory to study their diel movement patterns and swimming ability. Volitional movement of lamprey was restricted mainly to night, with 94% of all swimming activity occurring during the 12-hr dark period. Burst speed of juvenile lamprey ranged from 56 to 94 cm/s with a mean of 71 ±5 cm/s or an average speed of 5.2 body lengths (BL)/s. Sustained swim speed for 5-min test intervals ranged from 0 to 46 cm/s with a median of 23 cm/s. Critical swimming speed was 36.0±10.0 cm/s and 2.4±0.6 BL/s. There was no significant relationship between fish length and critical swimming speed. Overall swimming performance of juvenile Pacific lamprey is low compared to that of most anadromous teleosts. Their poor swimming ability provides a challenge during the freshwater migration interval to the Pacific Ocean.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked juvenile retinoschisis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > X-linked juvenile retinoschisis On this page: Description Genetic ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed March 2015 What is X-linked juvenile retinoschisis? X-linked juvenile retinoschisis is ...

  14. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH CRIME, TASK FORCE REPORT, REPORT ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CONSULTANTS PAPERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, Washington, DC.

    THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A DETAILED DISCUSSION OF THE JUVENILE COURT SYSTEM AND THE PREVENTION OF DELINQUENCY. THE COMMISSION'S RECOMMENDATIONS ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY INCLUDE THE AREAS OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, HOUSING AND RECREATION, FAMILIES, INVOLVING YOUTHS IN COMMUNITY LIFE, SCHOOLS, AND EMPLOYMENT. THE APPENDIXES, WHICH CONSTITUTE THE…

  15. Black Juveniles in the Juvenile Justice System: A Cause for Alarm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFlore, Larry

    This report examines the representation of black youth in the juvenile justice system, describes changes in juvenile justice philosophy, and discusses policy implications. Black youth are overrepresented at all stages of the juvenile justice system compared to white youth. Positivist theories explain this overrepresentation as the result of…

  16. National Implications in Juvenile Justice: The Influence of Juvenile Mentoring Programs on At Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belshaw, Scott H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    In 1972 the federal government created the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act that procured funding for various governmental programs to combat the sudden increase in juvenile crime. A provision of this Act set out the creation of mentoring programs to help decrease the juvenile crime rate and dropout rates in secondary schools. This…

  17. Juvenile polyposis of the colon: sonographic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chaubal, Nitin; Shah, Mohit; Dighe, Manjiri; Ketkar, Dinesh; Joshi, Anand

    2002-11-01

    Juvenile polyposis is an uncommon condition characterized by development of multiple juvenile polyps, predominantly in the colon but also in the rest of the gastrointestinal tract. The condition usually appears in childhood. The rarer and often fatal form, occurring in infancy, is typified by diarrhea, protein-losing enteropathy, bleeding, and rectal prolapse. The more common form of juvenile polyposis (affecting the colon, stomach, and small bowel) occurs in the first or second decade with rectal bleeding and anemia. We report a case of juvenile polyposis detected on sonography, which had been treated as severe anemia for 1 year. PMID:12418773

  18. Analyzing turbine bypass systems at hydro facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1992-01-01

    In the 1960s, biologists for several federal and state resource agencies investigated turbine mortality at US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects along the Columbia River. Their findings suggested that turbine bypass systems would provide improved passage conditions for juvenile salmon. In response to these findings, the Corps installed bypass systems at many of its facilities. However, evaluations of salmon

  19. Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Juvenile Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahlstrom, Kimberly J.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment…

  20. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  1. [Juvenile polyposis coli associated with hereditary spherocytosis].

    PubMed

    Agnifili, A; Carducci, G; Gola, P; Mancini, E; Marino, M; Verzaro, R; Ibi, I

    1998-10-01

    The first case of colorectal juvenile polyposis associated with hereditary spherocytosis is reported. Symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of juvenile polyposis are described along with the associated syndromes reported in the literature. The scientific and clinical consequences of this association are discussed. PMID:9882972

  2. Psychiatric Disorder in a Juvenile Assessment Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McReynolds, Larkin S.; Wasserman, Gail A.; DeComo, Robert E.; John, Reni; Keating, Joseph M.; Nolen, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile assessment centers (JACs) were developed to address service fragmentation and promote the sharing of information among agencies providing services to youth involved with the juvenile justice system. To date, there are no reports that describe the diagnostic profiles of the youth served by such centers. The authors hypothesize that the…

  3. Juvenile Delinquency: Research, Theory, and Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Bernice Milburn

    While this booklet on juvenile delinquency does not attempt a full review of the literature, it has been designed to further an understanding and appreciation of the social-psychological problems of deviant behavior. The booklet briefly covers the publicity which juvenile delinquency has been given in recent years, as well as the difficulties…

  4. Moral Development of Solo Juvenile Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vugt, Eveline; Stams, Geert Jan; Dekovic, Maja; Brugman, Daan; Rutten, Esther; Hendriks, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral…

  5. Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

    This report offers the Congress, state legislators, and other state and local policymakers, professors and teachers, juvenile justice professionals, and concerned citizens solid answers to the most frequently asked questions about the nature of juvenile crime and victimization and about the justice system's response. Citing FBI and other data…

  6. Juveniles and the Law. Teaching Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Gayle

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan that teaches students to analyze the goals and effectiveness of the juvenile justice system. Instructional materials include handouts describing three criminal situations involving teenagers and copies of an article on the juvenile justice system. Activities include small group discussions followed by a class discussion.…

  7. VERBAL LEARNING, MODELING, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    IRWIN G. SARASON

    1968-01-01

    DEALS WITH EXPOSURE TO OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES AS A POSSIBLE THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUE WITH JUVENILE DELINQUENTS. INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MODELING AND THE BEHAVIOR OF JUVENILE DELINQUENTS GREW OUT OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF PERSONALITY. AVAILABLE EVIDENCE SUGGESTS THAT OBSERVATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE POTENTIALLY POWERFUL BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION INFLUENCES. THESE INFLUENCES ARE MOST NOTICEABLE IN THE AREAS OF PERSONAL ATTITUDES AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR.

  8. Skills training as treatment for juvenile delinquents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas R. Collingwood; Robert W. Genthner

    1980-01-01

    Viewing skills deficits as parameters of juvenile offender dysfunctioning, and considering skills training as a treatment modality represent relatively new strategies for rehabilitation. Data from a police diversion project (the Dallas Police Department's Youth Services Program) are presented, indicating that levels of certain physical, emotional, and intellectual skills are related to rearrest recidivism for juvenile offenders. The results of providing

  9. Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2006 National Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    This report presents comprehensive information on juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and on the juvenile justice system. This report brings together the latest available statistics from a variety of sources and includes numerous tables, graphs, and maps, accompanied by analyses in clear, nontechnical language. The report offers Congress,…

  10. Juvenile Offender Comprehensive Reentry Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Donnie W.

    2004-01-01

    The literature provides ample evidence of the relationship of substance abuse to crime. Research over the last 20 years has established a strong correlation between substance abuse and juvenile delinquency (held, 1998). Currently, there are more than 350,000 juveniles on probation and in continuing care programs in the U.S. who have substance…

  11. Juvenile toxicity testing protocols for chemicals.

    PubMed

    Piersma, Aldert H; Tonk, Elisa C M; Makris, Susan L; Crofton, Kevin M; Dietert, Rodney R; van Loveren, Henk

    2012-11-01

    There is increased awareness of the specific position of children when it comes to hazards of xenobiotic exposures. Children are not small adults, since their exposure patterns, compound kinetics and metabolism, and sensitivity of their developing organs may differ extensively from adults. Current international hazard assessment test guidelines do not specifically address juvenile exposures and effects. In conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the European Teratology Society, a satellite meeting was organized to specifically address juvenile toxicity testing issues for chemicals. The workshop focused on developmental neurotoxicity and developmental immune toxicity testing in juvenile animals. A clear case was made for the importance of juvenile toxicity testing, showing that in animal studies developmental neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity parameters express specifically high sensitivities after exposure during the juvenile period. Additional data will be generated in the coming years, and OECD initiatives will need to further the issue at the global regulatory level. PMID:22564981

  12. SMAD genes in juvenile polyposis.

    PubMed

    Roth, S; Sistonen, P; Salovaara, R; Hemminki, A; Loukola, A; Johansson, M; Avizienyte, E; Cleary, K A; Lynch, P; Amos, C I; Kristo, P; Mecklin, J P; Kellokumpu, I; Järvinen, H; Aaltonen, L A

    1999-09-01

    Juvenile polyposis (JP) is a dominantly inherited condition characterized by the development of multiple hamartomatous tumors, juvenile polyps, in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of SMAD4 in JP. DNA from four unrelated JP kindreds and three sporadic JP cases was available for mutation screening. Two truncating defects (one in a familial and one in a sporadic case) and one missense change (in a familial case) that was absent in 55 control samples were detected. To study the possibility that germline mutations in other genes encoding different components of the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be present in these JP patients, mutation analyses of the SMAD2, SMAD3, and SMAD7 genes were also performed. No mutations of these genes were detected in any of the patients. Our results confirm that SMAD4 is a gene predisposing to JP and suggest the existence of further JP loci other than the SMAD2, SMAD3, or SMAD7 genes. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 26:54-61, 1999. PMID:10441006

  13. Juvenile Gaucher disease simulating osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Ortega, J.A.; Heisel, M.A.

    1981-10-01

    A case in which several imaging procedures suggested juvenile Gaucher disease in a child who presented with symptomatology of osteomyelitis is discussed. The 20-month girl was given a Technetium-99m radionuclide skeletal examination which revealed intense uptake of tracer agents along the shaft of the right femur. It was also found that the liver and spleen were dramatically Ga-67 avid. The bone pain symptomatology suggested an osteomyelitis of the femur, but skeletal scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled bone tracer demonstrated photopenic areas involving the femur, suggesting that the bone pain may have been due to marrow packed with Gaucher cells. This overexpansion of the marrow may lead to microfractures with remodeling seen radiographically as periosteal new bone and scintigraphically as increased periosteal deposition of tracer agent. The radiogallium study was useful to exclude an underlying osteomyelitis in the involved femurs. Although juvenile Gaucher disease is unusual, it should be considered in any child who presents with the constellation of hepatosplenomegaly and bone pain simulating osteomyelitis.

  14. The illicit acquisition of firearms by youth and juveniles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony A. Braga; David M. Kennedy

    2001-01-01

    Youth and juvenile gun violence has been linked to the availability of firearms. Scholars have suggested that, in order to reduce youth and juvenile gun violence, the illicit gun markets serving youth and juveniles must be disrupted. The question of whether illegal firearms markets serving youth and juveniles can be disrupted has been vigorously debated in the academic literature on

  15. Profile of Incarcerated Juveniles: Comparison of Male and Female Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Dell, Rex; Davis, Candice; Guerrieri, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Effective methods of identifying potential juvenile offenders are critical when developing prevention programs within both state and national juvenile justice systems. The characteristics of juvenile offenders in a large juvenile justice system are examined in this study. Participants live in a Midwestern city with a high rate of crime as…

  16. Challenging the Myths: 1999 National Report Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa

    This bulletin, extracted from "Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report," examines juvenile crime statistics, demonstrating that the predictions in the early 1990s of the emergence of juvenile superpredators (juveniles for whom violence is a way of life) is not supported by current data. Research indicates that levels of predatory…

  17. Law & psychiatry: punishing juveniles who kill.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2012-10-01

    Punishment of juvenile murderers forces policy makers to weigh the developmental immaturity of adolescents against the heinousness of their crimes. The U.S. Supreme Court has progressively limited the severity of punishments that can be imposed on juveniles, holding that their impulsivity, susceptibility to peer pressure, and more fluid character render them less culpable for their actions. Having eliminated the death penalty as a punishment, the Court recently struck down mandatory life sentences without prospect of parole. The decision is interesting for its emphasis on rehabilitation, opening the door to further restrictions on punitive sentences for juveniles-and perhaps for adults too. PMID:23032673

  18. 75 FR 16177 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  19. 75 FR 53958 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  20. 76 FR 61672 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  1. 77 FR 70994 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  2. 78 FR 58288 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  3. 77 FR 3453 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  4. 78 FR 17184 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  5. 75 FR 70216 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  6. 76 FR 39075 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  7. 78 FR 65297 - Meeting of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...COORDINATING COUNCIL ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION [OJP...Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention AGENCY: Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention....

  8. The Influence of a Juvenile’s Abuse History on Support for Sex Offender Registration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether and how a juvenile’s history of experiencing sexual abuse affects public perceptions of juvenile sex offenders in a series of 5 studies. When asked about juvenile sex offenders in an abstract manner (Studies 1 and 2), the more participants (community members and undergraduates) believed that a history of being sexually abused as a child causes later sexually abusive behavior, the less likely they were to support sex offender registration for juveniles. Yet when participants considered specific sexual offenses, a juvenile’s history of sexual abuse was not considered to be a mitigating factor. This was true when participants considered a severe sexual offense (forced rape; Study 3 and Study 4) and a case involving less severe sexual offenses (i.e., statutory rape), when a juvenile’s history of sexual abuse backfired and was used as an aggravating factor, increasing support for registering the offender (Study 3 and Study 5). Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

  9. Conceptualizing juvenile prostitution as child maltreatment: findings from the National Juvenile Prostitution Study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kimberly J; Finkelhor, David; Wolak, Janis

    2010-02-01

    Two studies were conducted to identify the incidence (Study 1) and characteristics (Study 2) of juvenile prostitution cases known to law enforcement agencies in the United States. Study 1 revealed a national estimate of 1,450 arrests or detentions (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1,287-1,614) in cases involving juvenile prostitution during a 1-year period. In Study 2, exploratory data were collected from a subsample of 138 cases from police records in 2005. The cases are broadly categorized into three main types: (a) third-party exploiters, (b) solo prostitution, and (c) conventional child sexual abuse (CSA) with payment. Cases were classified into three initial categories based on police orientation toward the juvenile: (a) juveniles as victims (53%), (b) juveniles as delinquents (31%), and (c) juvenile as both victims and delinquents (16%). When examining the status of the juveniles by case type, the authors found that all the juveniles in CSA with payment cases were treated as victims, 66% in third-party exploiters cases, and 11% in solo cases. Findings indicate law enforcement responses to juvenile prostitution are influential in determining whether such youth are viewed as victims of commercial sexual exploitation or as delinquents. PMID:19926628

  10. Juvenile polyposis occurring in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Matsumoto, T; Iida, M; Hoshika, K; Shimizu, M; Hisamoto, N; Kihara, T

    1999-01-01

    Various extraintestinal manifestations may occur in juvenile polyposis, but hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia has rarely been reported in this type of polyposis. The authors treated a 14-year-old girl with rectal bleeding and anemia who had multiple polyps of the colorectum. Large polyps were removed and histologically diagnosed as juvenile polyps. She was later diagnosed as having telangiectasia of the skin, and arteriovenous malformations in the lung and in the liver, all of which were compatible with the diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. At age 32, she had multiple ulcers in the ileum and in the colon. The coexistence of juvenile polyposis and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may be a clue for the understanding of the histopathogenesis of juvenile polyposis. PMID:9892274

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... also characterized by overgrowth of the gums (gingival hypertrophy) and joint deformities (contractures) that can impair movement. ... recessive ; basement membranes ; capillaries ; cell ; gene ; gingival ; gums ; hypertrophy ; inherited ; joint ; juvenile ; prevalence ; protein ; recessive ; syndrome You ...

  12. Juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the epididymis.

    PubMed

    Gravas, Stavros; Georgiadis, Thomas; Vassiliadis, Fedon; Kehayas, Platon

    2007-01-01

    We report the first case of a juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the epididymis in a young man. Clinical and histological findings are presented and the clinical significance of the case is discussed. PMID:17406141

  13. What Can Be Done about Juvenile Homicide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorrells, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Using information available regarding juvenile homicide, it is suggested that high-risk communities need to be identified and the particular problems in each community detailed so that agencies can pool their efforts in addressing the most serious problems. (Author)

  14. Screening Incarcerated Juveniles Using the MAYSI-2.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy L; Grande, Todd L; Hallman, Janelle; Underwood, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of mental health disorders among incarcerated juveniles is a matter of national and global concern. Juvenile justice personnel need accurate screening measures that identify youth requiring immediate mental health services. The purpose of this study was threefold: (a) to examine the utility of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument, Version 2 (MAYSI-2) in identifying juveniles with mental health concerns in a large sample of juveniles (N = 4,009), (b) to provide data regarding rates of identified mental health needs in incarcerated youth, and (c) to provide descriptive comparisons to other studies using the MAYSI-2. Mean scores of subscales were compared with the MAYSI-2 normative samples and other recent studies. Results indicated that this population has a high occurrence of mental health symptoms and there is high variability in the severity of the symptoms. In addition, a multivariate analysis of variance test found significant differences in mental health problems across ethnic groups. PMID:25431437

  15. A review of juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chow, Elizabeth; Macrae, Finlay

    2005-11-01

    Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome is an uncommon hamartomatous disorder with significant gastrointestinal malignant potential. Mutations in SMAD4 and BMPR1A, implicated in the Transforming Growth Factor beta pathway, have recently been characterized, and hold significance in the management of patients and at risk family members. This article reviews our knowledge to date of the genetics and clinicopathological features of the Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome, and discusses the current expert recommendations for genetic testing, disease screening and management. PMID:16246179

  16. Juvenile Hormone Activity of Isomers of Farnesol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. T. Yamamoto; M. Jacobson

    1962-01-01

    SINCE the juvenile hormone of insects was first extracted from the abdomens of male cecropia moths1, its presence or the presence of juvenile hormone-like activity has been demonstrated in other insects2, in invertebrates3, in bacteria, yeast, and higher plants4, in certain organs of mammals5, and in the fæces of the beetle Tenebrio molitor6. Recently, the active constituents of the fæces

  17. The specificity of juvenile hormone esterase revisited

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Grieneisen; Amy Mok; Travis D. Kieckbusch; David A. Schooley

    1997-01-01

    Juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) catalyses the transesterification of juvenile hormones (JH) in the presence of appropriate alcohols to yield ethyl, propyl or butyl JH esters. Using baculovirus-expressed, recombinant Heliothis virescens JHE or hemolymph from several species, we have produced 200–300 ?g of JH III ethyl, n-propyl and n-butyl esters from 1.0 mg JH III incubated in 30% (vv) ethanol, 10%

  18. Movements and activity of juvenile Brown Treesnakes (Boiga irregularis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lardner, Bjorn; Savidge, Julie A.; Reed, Robert N.; Rodda, Gordon H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial ecology and foraging strategy of invasive animals is essential for success in control or eradication. We studied movements and activity in juvenile Brown Treesnakes on Guam, as this population segment has proven particularly difficult to control. Distance between daytime refugia (from telemetry of 18 juveniles, 423-800 mm snout-vent length) ranged from 0-118 m (n ?=? 86), with a grand mean of 43 m. There were tendencies for shorter snake movements on nights directly following a full moon and on dry nights, but variation among snakes was of a larger magnitude and would greatly reduce chances to detect moon or rain effects unless corrected for. Snake activity was estimated from audio recordings of signals from “tipping” radio transmitters, analyzed for pulse period and amplitude. Activity was highest in the hours immediately after sunset, and gradually declined throughout the night before dropping abruptly in conjunction with sunrise. Snake activity was higher on rainy nights, and tended to be highest during waning moons and when the moon was below the horizon. We conclude that small Brown Treesnakes forage actively and appear to move far enough to regularly encounter the traps and bait used on Guam for control purposes, suggesting that alternative explanations are required for their low capture rates with these control tools.

  19. Legal Advocacy and Juvenile Justice: Negotiations with Public Officials over Juvenile Justice Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    The Youth Law Center is a public interest law office whose primary activity has been the Juvenile Justice Legal Advocacy Project. The center has developed a specific procedure for investigating and negotiating juveniles justice problems which involves resolution through negotiation without resorting to litigation. Effective advocacy requires…

  20. Characteristics of Crimes against Juveniles. Crimes against Children Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard

    This Bulletin reviews data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's 1997 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data file that pertain to juvenile victims, revealing that while juveniles made up 26% of the population of the 12 states participating in NIBRS in 1997, they accounted for only 12% of the reported crime victims. At the same…

  1. Juveniles' perceptions of a protective-permissive dichotomy in the juvenile justice system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Paul Saltstone

    1983-01-01

    The juvenile justice system has come under increasing criticism for its traditionally paternalistic and protective posture. The literature surveyed reviews some of the major occurrences, such as the Gault decision, which have led to a new direction in legislation. It is demonstrated that while juveniles are being awarded more due process rights, they are also being held more accountable for

  2. Tracking Juvenile Recidivists: Three Options for Creating Statewide, Longitudinal Records of Juvenile Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooney, Teresa L.

    This document describes three options for a statewide statistical system for tracking recidivism of juvenile delinquents placed outside their homes in treatment programs. The information is intended for use by the state in allocating resources. The options described involve potential use of juvenile court records, placement data, and/or…

  3. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 1. Engineering Design and Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, M. Brad

    2011-01-01

    In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS. PMID:22163918

  4. Histological variations in juvenile polyp phenotype correlate with genetic defect underlying juvenile polyposis

    PubMed Central

    van Hattem, W. Arnout; Langeveld, Danielle; de Leng, Wendy W. J.; Morsink, Folkert H.; van Diest, Paul J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Juvenile polyps are distinct hamartomatous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract that may occur in the heritable juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) or sporadically. Histologically, juvenile polyps are characterised by a marked increase of the stromal cell compartment but, an epithelial phenotype has also been reported. JPS has an increased risk of colorectal cancer but sporadic juvenile polyps do not. In 50–60% of JPS patients a germline mutation of the TGF-?/BMP pathway genes SMAD4 or BMPR1A is found. This study compares the histological phenotype of juvenile polyps with a SMAD4 or BMPR1A germline mutation and sporadic juvenile polyps. Methods H&E slides of 65 JPS polyps and 25 sporadic juvenile polyps were reviewed for histological features and dysplasia. Systematic random crypt and stroma counts were obtained by count stereology and a crypt-stroma ratio was determined. All polyps were subsequently categorised as type A (crypt-stroma ratio <1.00) or type B (crypt-stroma ratio ?1.00), the latter referring to the epithelial phenotype. Cell cycle activity was assessed using immunohistochemistry of the proliferation marker Ki67, and mutation analysis was conducted for KRAS and APC to determine the involvement of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Results Juvenile polyps with a SMAD4 germline mutation were predominantly type B, whereas, type A was more common among juvenile polyps with a BMPR1A germline mutation, but this distinction could not be ascribed to differences in cell cycle activity. Dysplasia was equally common in JPS polyps with either a SMAD4 or BMPR1A germline mutation, where the involvement of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence does not seem to play a distinct role. Conclusion juvenile polyps in the setting of JPS exhibit distinct phenotypes correlating with the underlying genetic defect. PMID:21412070

  5. Neurophysiology of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Anna; Rubboli, Guido; Gigli, Gian Luigi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis; Gelisse, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    Juvenile myclonic epilepsy (JME) can be firmly diagnosed by a careful interview of the patient focusing on the seizures and by the EEG with the help, if necessary, of long-term video-EEG monitoring using sleep and/or sleep deprivation. Background activity is normal. The interictal EEG shows diffuse or generalized spike-wave (SW) and polyspike-wave (PSW) discharges. In some patients, non-specific changes or misleading features such as focal changes are found. Changes are mostly seen at sleep onset and at awakening. Provoked awakenings are more likely to activate interictal paroxysmal abnormalities than spontaneous awakenings. The presence of a photoparoxysmal response with or without myoclonic jerks (MJ) is common (30% of the cases). Myoclonic jerks are associated with a discharge of fast, irregular, generalized PSWs that predominate anteriorly. Myoclonic jerks appear to be associated with rhythmic EEG (spike) potentials at around 20Hz. These frequencies are in the range of movement-related fast sensorimotor cortex physiological rhythms. The application of jerk-locked averaging technique has provided findings consistent with a cortical origin of MJ. Paired TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) studies showed a defective intracortical inhibition, due to impaired GABA-A mediated mechanisms. In this review, we present the EEG characteristics of JME with particular emphasis on the pathophysiology of MJ and on the role of sleep deprivation on interictal and ictal changes. PMID:23756477

  6. Academic Achievement Among Juvenile Detainees.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, Elena L; Macomber, Donna; Hart, Lesley; Naples, Adam; Chapman, John; Geib, Catherine F; Chart, Hilary; Tan, Mei; Wolhendler, Baruch; Wagner, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The literature has long pointed to heightened frequencies of learning disabilities (LD) within the population of law offenders; however, a systematic appraisal of these observations, careful estimation of these frequencies, and investigation of their correlates and causes have been lacking. Here we present data collected from all youth (1,337 unique admissions, mean age 14.81, 20.3% females) placed in detention in Connecticut (January 1, 2010-July 1, 2011). All youth completed a computerized educational screener designed to test a range of performance in reading (word and text levels) and mathematics. A subsample (n = 410) received the Wide Range Achievement Test, in addition to the educational screener. Quantitative (scale-based) and qualitative (grade-equivalence-based) indicators were then analyzed for both assessments. Results established the range of LD in this sample from 13% to 40%, averaging 24.9%. This work provides a systematic exploration of the type and severity of word and text reading and mathematics skill deficiencies among juvenile detainees and builds the foundation for subsequent efforts that may link these deficiencies to both more formal, structured, and variable definitions and classifications of LD, and to other types of disabilities (e.g., intellectual disability) and developmental disorders (e.g., ADHD) that need to be conducted in future research. PMID:24064502

  7. Costs of RCRA corrective action: Interim report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Tonn; M. Russell; Hwang Ho-Ling; R. Goeltz; J. Warren

    1991-01-01

    This report estimates the cost of the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for all non-federal facilities in the United States. RCRA is the federal law which regulates the treatment, storage, disposal, and recovery of hazardous waste. The 1984 amendment to RCRA, known as the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments, stipulates that facilities that treat,

  8. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  9. Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Three size classes of juvenile surf smelt collected in a beach seine by USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA. ...

  10. Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Juvenile sand lance collected in a beach seine by USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA.  Like surf smelt, sand lance are an important forage fish in Puget Sound.  ...

  11. Colorectal juvenile polyposis in an adult with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Elhjouji, A; Aitali, A; Rouibaa, F; Rharrassi, I; Zentar, A; Sair, K

    2011-02-01

    Juvenile polyposis is a rare disorder. We report an unusual case of juvenile polyposis in a 22-yr-old woman with ulcerative colitis, apparently one of the first cases reported in the literature. PMID:21296636

  12. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

  13. Characteristics of homicidal and violent juveniles.

    PubMed

    Shumaker, D M; McKee, G R

    2001-08-01

    Homicidal youth have received considerable attention in the mass media and social science literature in recent years. Due to several methodological obstacles, relatively little is known about the premorbid and offense characteristics of this population. The current investigation compared 30 juvenile males charged with murder with a group of 62 juvenile males charged with other violent felony offenses. Comparisons were made across 33 demographic, historical, clinical, offense, and forensic characteristics. Both groups were similar in their demographic characterishics and family backgrounds. Juvenile homicide defendants, however, were less likely than the comparison group to have a current Axis I psychiatric diagnosis. Homicide defendants were also more likely to have acted alone and to have committed their alleged crime in a domestic setting. Implications of the results are discussed as are suggestions for future research. PMID:11506449

  14. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s. PMID:2122167

  15. Non familial juvenile polyposis presenting as chronic intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Panchagnula, R; Kini, U

    2000-10-01

    Juvenile polyps are the commonest colonic polyps seen in children and present most often with rectal bleed. Intussusception is an extremely rare presentation in juvenile polyposis (JP) syndrome. This case highlights the rare association of ileo-colic intussusception with non-familial Juvenile Polyposis. PMID:11200904

  16. Kids Who Commit Adult Crimes: Serious Criminality by Juvenile Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, R. Barri

    The increasingly serious nature of juvenile criminal behavior has led to greater efforts to understand the roots, causes, and correlates of juvenile violence and chronic delinquency, as well as develop more effective means of identifying at-risk youth and treating serious and violent juvenile offenders. This book examines the realities and…

  17. Modeling juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Modeling juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain E. Ashley Steel Peter Guttorp NRCSET juvenile salmon migration using a simple Markov chain E. Ashley Steel and Peter Guttorp National Research.S.A SUMMARY We describe movement patterns of hatchery-raised, juvenile, spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus

  18. Differentiating Two Types of Juvenile Sex Offenders: Generalists versus Specialists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda L. Wolf

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore various risk factors which may potentially be used to predict and distinguish two subtypes of juvenile sexual offenders (JSOs): (1) juvenile sexual offenders with a history of antisocial behavior (JSO- generalists) and (2) juvenile sexual offenders without a history of antisocial behavior (JSO-specialists). The overall goal of this study was to

  19. Perceptions of Juvenile Offenders Who Were Abused as Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret C. Stevenson

    2009-01-01

    Should a history of child abuse be taken into consideration when a juvenile offender is punished? Although some research shows that child abuse is used as a mitigating factor for juvenile offenders (i.e., elicits less punitive sentences), surveys of juvenile court officials reveal that it is considered an aggravating factor. Specifically, in controlled mock jury studies in which child abuse

  20. Kids and Guns. 1999 National Report Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    This report provides information about the use of guns by children and adolescents, with related information on juvenile homicides and suicides. The annual number of juveniles killed with a firearm increased substantially between 1987 and 1993 as occurrences of other types of homicide remained constant. Since 1980, one in four murders of juveniles

  1. Rapid assay for insect juvenile hormone esterase activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. D. Hammock; T. C. Sparks

    1977-01-01

    A rapid new assay is proposed for analyzing insect juvenile hormone esterase activity. The assay is based on >99% of radiolabeled juvenile hormone being extracted into an isooctane phase while >99% of the juvenile hormone acid remains in the basic aqueous-methanol phase. The assay is more rapid and less expensive than conventional chromatographic assays while yielding almost identical values of

  2. It's Your Move: Juveniles in Adult Jails and Lockups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    This booklet discusses the confinement of juveniles in adult jails, and offers suggestions for local citizens who want to remedy the problem. The first section presents background information on juveniles in adult jails, and discusses the following issues: the physically and psychologically damaging effects on juveniles of incarceration in adult…

  3. American Youth Violence: Implications for National Juvenile Justice Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimring, Franklin E.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that the perception of increasing youth violence is based on fiction rather than fact. Provides the facts involved in the juvenile justice policy focusing on the differences between juvenile and adult violence, youth violence trends, population trends, and three legal policy issues toward adolescent violence. Offers juvenile crime…

  4. Race, Legal Representation, and Juvenile Justice: Issues and Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guevara, Lori; Spohn, Cassia; Herz, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of type of counsel across race on juvenile court outcomes. Using data from a sample of juvenile court referrals from two midwestern juvenile courts, this study examined the interaction of race and type of counsel on disposition outcome. The results indicated that youth without an attorney…

  5. Diet alters species recognition in juvenile toads

    PubMed Central

    Pfennig, Karin S.; Rodriguez Moncalvo, Verónica G.; Burmeister, Sabrina S.

    2013-01-01

    Whether environmental effects during juvenile development can alter the ontogeny of adult mating behaviour remains largely unexplored. We evaluated the effect of diet on the early expression of conspecific recognition in spadefoot toads, Spea bombifrons. We found that juvenile toads display phonotaxis behaviour six weeks post-metamorphosis. However, preference for conspecifics versus heterospecifics emerged later and was diet dependent. Thus, the environment can affect the early development of species recognition in a way that might alter adult behaviour. Evaluating such effects is important for understanding variation in hybridization between species and the nature of species boundaries. PMID:24088562

  6. [Rearing behavior of parents of schizophrenic juveniles].

    PubMed

    Henschel, H

    1975-08-01

    The educational behavior of parents of schizophrenic juveniles with both favorable and unfavorable prognoses is discussed. The study reported by the author is based upon a three-factor concept of education, which comprises conflictive, laudatory, and fundamental situations. Consequently, parents of schizophrenic juveniles with either favorable or unfavorable prognoses will show different reactions in conflictive, laudatory, fundamental, and abnormal situations. (Statistical evidence of the results was obtained through the use of quality levels.) The results and their possible interpretations are discussed, and recommendations for behavioral or familial therapy, respectively, are given. PMID:1228810

  7. Movies and juvenile delinquency: an overview.

    PubMed

    Snyder, S

    1991-01-01

    Film viewing may affect the juvenile delinquent through the processes known as social learning and instigation. Identification with the movie and its characters by the delinquent viewer is common, and studies have consistently demonstrated that films can affect delinquents, although in some cases the effects are small. Numerous examples of how films may serve as either the initiator or the final common pathway of delinquent acts are presented. However, prosocial aspects of films dealing with delinquency may exert a positive influence on the juvenile delinquent. Treatment implications of these observations are discussed from social learning and other perspectives. PMID:2048467

  8. Sexually-related expectancies for alcohol use and marijuana use among juvenile detainees.

    PubMed

    Kingree, J B; Thompson, Martie

    2007-09-01

    This study is focused on sexually-related expectancies for substance use among juvenile detainees. Over a 6 month period, 272 juveniles recruited from a short-term detention facility completed measures assessing sexually-related expectancies in relation to alcohol use and marijuana use as well as measures assessing their actual use of these substances. Repeated measures analyses of sexual risk expectancy measures indicated that the sample as a whole, and older respondents in particular, expected more sexual risk in relation to using alcohol than in relation to using marijuana. Repeated measures analyses of sexual enhancement expectancy measures indicated that African-American and younger respondents expected more sexual enhancement from using marijuana than from using alcohol. Logistic regression analyses indicated that expectancies for sexual enhancement from alcohol use, and expectancies for sexual enhancement from marijuana use, were respectively associated with the use of these substances in a recent sexual incident. Limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:17250971

  9. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: Part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-05-26

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District started development of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS), a nonproprietary technology, in 2001 to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 federal dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters, and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in 2 or 3-dimensions as the fish passed at the facility for determining route of passage. The additional route of passage information, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities and through the FCRPS.

  10. Criminal Profiles of Violent Juvenile Sex and Violent Juvenile Non-Sex Offenders: An Explorative Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wijk, Anton Ph.; Mali, Bas R. F.; Bullens, Ruud A. R.; Vermeiren, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Few studies have longitudinally investigated the criminal profiles of violent juvenile sex and violent juvenile non-sex offenders. To make up for this lack, this study used police records of juveniles to determine the nature of the criminal profiles of violent sex offenders (n = 226) and violent non-sex offenders (n = 4,130). All offenders…

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Strand

    2004-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the

  12. Social familiarity and shoal formation in juvenile fishes.

    PubMed

    Lee-Jenkins, S S Y; Godin, J-G J

    2010-02-01

    The potential influence of social familiarity in shoal-choice decisions was investigated in two sympatric species of north temperate fishes, juvenile banded killifish Fundulus diaphanus and juvenile bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus. Groups of socially familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics were formed in the laboratory using wild-caught fishes. Juvenile F. diaphanus demonstrated a strong preference for familiar conspecific shoalmates, whereas juvenile L. macrochirus exhibited no preference for either unfamiliar or familiar conspecific shoalmates. The differential influence of familiarity on shoalmate choice in juveniles of these two species could be due to their different ecologies, local population densities and life histories. PMID:20666898

  13. A Correction.

    PubMed

    Darrow, K K

    1946-01-18

    Please correct a detail on page 17 of your issue of 4 January. You describe and quote from certain resolutions passed by the Metropolitan Section of the American Physical Society on 9 November; and in the course of your description, you unluckily speak of the position of the "Society" rather than that of the Section. Now, the fact is that fewer than five per cent of the members of the Society were present at that meeting, of which no one had been notified in advance except the members living in and near New York and a few others. The resolutions cannot therefore be taken as an expression of the' Society, even though many-myself included-think that a majority of the Society agree with them. PMID:17732768

  14. Cemento-ossyfying fibroma juvenile of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    CECCHETTI, F.; LUCIANI, F.; BRAMANTI, E.; BARTULI, F.N.; OTTRIA, L.; ARCURI, C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives Fibro-osseous neoplasm remains somewhat controversial, and differing concept have been advanced regarding their nature and the proper terminology for them. Cemento-ossyfying fibroma juvenile (JOF) is a rare type of fibro-osseous tumor as also been included under the “umbrella” of cemento-ossyfying fibroma. The JOF is most often seen in patients who are between 5 and 15 years of age. With this work we emphasize the importance of a correct diagnostic approach. Material and methods. The case describes a form of cemento-ossyfying fibroma hight active and aggressive like JOF. The patient thirteen older showed from 2004 to 2008 three times the palatal lesion, it was performed with a incisional biopsy and excisional biopsy. The tumor were fixed in 10% buffered formalin embedded in paraffin cut into thick sections and stained with ematoxylineosin. Results The incisional biopsy was inadequate to formulate a correct diagnosis. The histological exams have showed for three times different aspects. Conclusion Some authors in the past have suggested different classification. The COFs show different clinical, histological and radiographical patterns. PMID:23285378

  15. Juvenile polyposis in a tropical country

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, U.; Thapa, B; Vaiphei, K; Rao, K; Mitra, S; Singh, K.

    1998-01-01

    The clinical profile, malignant potential, and management of 17 children with juvenile polyposis (more than five juvenile polyps) were evaluated clinically and endoscopically. Colonoscopy and polypectomy were done three weekly until colonic clearance was achieved, and thereafter two yearly. All polyps were subjected to histological examination. Mean age was 7.7 years, with a male preponderance (3:1). Presentation was with rectal bleeding (94%), pallor (65%), stunted growth (53%), and oedema (47%), and the mean (SD) duration of symptoms was 33 (27) months. None had a positive family history or any congenital anomaly. Two children had six polyps up to the transverse colon; the rest had numerous polyps all over the colon. All children had juvenile polyps on histology and 10 (59%) had adenomatous changes (dysplasia). Total colectomy was done in six for intractable symptoms. Colon clearance was achieved in eight after an average 3.4 polypectomy sessions, and three were still on the polypectomy programme. In conclusion, juvenile polyposis is commonly associated with low grade dysplasia. Serial colonoscopic polypectomy is effective but colectomy is required for intractable symptoms and when clearance of the colon is not possible.?? PMID:9613360

  16. Juvenile polyposis in a tropical country.

    PubMed

    Poddar, U; Thapa, B R; Vaiphei, K; Rao, K L; Mitra, S K; Singh, K

    1998-03-01

    The clinical profile, malignant potential, and management of 17 children with juvenile polyposis (more than five juvenile polyps) were evaluated clinically and endoscopically. Colonoscopy and polypectomy were done three weekly until colonic clearance was achieved, and thereafter two yearly. All polyps were subjected to histological examination. Mean age was 7.7 years, with a male preponderance (3:1). Presentation was with rectal bleeding (94%), pallor (65%), stunted growth (53%), and oedema (47%), and the mean (SD) duration of symptoms was 33 (27) months. None had a positive family history or any congenital anomaly. Two children had six polyps up to the transverse colon; the rest had numerous polyps all over the colon. All children had juvenile polyps on histology and 10 (59%) had adenomatous changes (dysplasia). Total colectomy was done in six for intractable symptoms. Colon clearance was achieved in eight after an average 3.4 polypectomy sessions, and three were still on the polypectomy programme. In conclusion, juvenile polyposis is commonly associated with low grade dysplasia. Serial colonoscopic polypectomy is effective but colectomy is required for intractable symptoms and when clearance of the colon is not possible. PMID:9613360

  17. Legal Lexicon, Social Labeling, and Juvenile Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ronald A.

    1977-01-01

    The only viable approach to the elaboration of an effective juvenile justice system is through the accuratization of social labeling, the corresponding elaboration of a behaviorally discrete legal lexicon, and the provision of appropriate social services based upon precise, valid, and time-limited social labels. (Author)

  18. Legal Lexicon, Social Labeling, and Juvenile Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ronald A.

    One of 52 theoretical papers on school crime and its relation to poverty, this chapter maintains that social labeling is a pervasive and necessary social phenomenon. However, inaccurate social labeling plagues contemporary juvenile justice systems. Relevant examples include legal adjudication categories such as status offender, persons in need of…

  19. School of Biological Sciences Juvenile wood

    E-print Network

    within the living tree crown · researchers now make the distinction between `juvenile wood' and `crown · traditionally thought to form within the living tree crown · researchers now make the distinction between, Cameron et al. 2005) The theory is that trees have evolved to have more flexible wood in the canopy

  20. Movies and Juvenile Delinquency: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Scott

    1991-01-01

    Notes that film viewing may affect juvenile delinquent through social learning and instigation; identification with movie and movie characters by delinquents is common. Presents examples of how films may serve as initiator or final common pathway of delinquent acts. Adds that prosocial aspects of films dealing with delinquency may exert positive…

  1. Treating women with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J Craig; Stephen J Hunt

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy has special implications for women, especially during their childbearing years, and particularly when pregnancy is contemplated. Being aware of the relevant issues is therefore essential. For anyone with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and other idiopathic generalised epilepsies, valproate is generally regarded as the gold standard treatment against which other antiepileptic drugs are compared. However, information from pregnancy registers consistently show

  2. OPTIMUM TEMPERATURE FOR GROWTH OF JUVENILE BLUEGILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Juvenile bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus (initial weight, 1.8-8.0 g), were individually marked and fed to excess during a 30-day constant temperature test; day length was 16 h. Fish were tested at temperature intervals of 2 degrees from 20 to 36C. The highest specific growth rate ...

  3. Successful euthanasia of a juvenile fin whale.

    PubMed

    Daoust, P Y; Ortenburger, A I

    2001-02-01

    A stranded juvenile fin whale was successfully euthanized with an intravenous injection of sedative and cardioplegic drugs. Veterinarians may face a number of serious difficulties if called to perform this task, and advance preparation is required for successful euthanasia of these animals. PMID:11272456

  4. Intervening with Convicted Serious Juvenile Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Dale

    Juveniles who commit such serious offenses as nonnegligent homicide, rape, assault, and robbery constitute an increasing concern for the criminal justice system. Persons who commit these offenses force a balancing of conflicting demands for offender rehabilitation and community protection. This report, the result of a comprehensive effort…

  5. 76 FR 54978 - Special Immigrant Juvenile Petitions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ...or custody must be in effect when the Form I-360...order is no longer in effect at the time of adjudication...will no longer be in effect because the juvenile...child; and unlawful corporal punishment or injury. Cal....

  6. Variables associated with recidivism among juvenile delinquents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor J. Ganzer; Irwin G. Sarason

    1973-01-01

    Isolated variables which would discriminate between recidivists and nonrecidivists in a sample of formerly institutionalized juvenile delinquents. Institution case files were selected and compared for 100 male and 100 female 11-18 yr. old Ss, 1\\/2 of them recidivists. 34 family background and personality variables were compared, of which 7 significantly discriminated between recidivists and nonrecidivists, 10 between males and females,

  7. Juvenile Delinquency and Victimization: A Theoretical Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Carlos A.; Finkelhor, David; Turner, Heather A.; Ormrod, Richard K.

    2007-01-01

    It is a widely voiced notion that juvenile delinquency and victimization co-occur extensively in the youth population, in particular because delinquent youth engage in risky activities. But theory from the bullying and traumatic stress literatures suggests that there may be additional pathways by which delinquency and victimization are connected.…

  8. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  9. Spinal stenosis subsequent to juvenile lumbar osteochondrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaj Tallroth; Dietrich Schlenzka

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes eight patients with spinal stenosis associated with marked osteochondrous changes in the vertebral bodies due to juvenile lumbar osteochondrosis (Scheuermann's disease). In no case was the midsagittal or interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal indicative of bony stenosis. On the other hand, in the myelograms the sagittal diameter of the dural sac was in all cases significantly

  10. Attachment Theory Applied to Juvenile Sex Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrow, Kenneth K.; Lim, Mee-Gaik

    1998-01-01

    Attachment theory is applied to identify systemic patterns encouraging juveniles to commit sexual offenses. The role of the helping system in perpetuating offenses is reviewed. The priority of family integrity and the role of professionals in breaking cycles of abuse and repairing earlier destructive emotional attachments are discussed. (EMK)

  11. Profile of incarcerated juveniles: comparison of male and female offenders.

    PubMed

    Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Dell, Rex; Davis, Candice; Guerrieri, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Effective methods of identifying potential juvenile offenders are critical when developing prevention programs within both state and national juvenile justice systems. The characteristics of juvenile offenders in a large juvenile justice system are examined in this study. Participants live in a Midwestern city with a high rate of crime as indicated by federal standards. Both male and female subjects were currently incarcerated (N = 363). The article highlights a basic psychological and behavioral profile of these juveniles in an effort to determine characteristics that might identify future juvenile offenders. The authors believe that if future offenders can be identified, both school systems and community agencies may be better able to intervene in the cycle of juvenile crime and violence. PMID:19086673

  12. A Practice/Research Collaborative: An Innovative Approach to Identifying and Responding to Psychosocial Functioning Problems and Recidivism Risk among Juvenile Arrestees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Walters, Wansley; Meyers, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Effectively identifying and responding to the psychosocial problems and recidivism risk of arrested youths remain critical needs in the field. Centralized intake facilities, such as juvenile assessment centers (JACs), can play a key role in this process. As part of a U.S. National Demonstration Project, the Miami-Dade JAC, serving a…

  13. A group-based approach to examining the association among risky sexual behavior, drug use, and criminal involvement in a sample of newly arrested juvenile offenders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristina K Childs

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the interrelationships between risky sexual practices, substance use, and arrest history. The sample consists of 948 newly arrested juvenile offenders processed at a centralized intake facility in 2006. A series of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling techniques are used to 1) determine if risky sexual behavior, marijuana and cocaine use, and arrest history form

  14. Home Economists in Correctional Education: A New Area to Explore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, Myrna P.

    1980-01-01

    Individuals in prisons and correctional facilities have needs for constructive living that home economists can meet. This article explores the nature of correctional education, social education, vanguard programs, status of education in correctional institutions, the Florida International University Project, and the most prevalent needs of…

  15. Addressing methodological issues in correctional health research: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maruca, Annette T; Shelton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This case study describes the experiences of a novice correctional nurse researcher's application of the recommended strategies from the correctional literature to improve the conduct of research in a correctional institution. An innovative booster intervention was implemented and evaluated as a pilot study in a state correctional institution. Correctional nurse researchers encounter many challenges when conducting research in a correctional facility. This case study shares challenges that persisted and concludes by recommending ways to strengthen and improve on learned strategies proposed by experienced correctional nurse researchers. PMID:25996434

  16. CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 528: POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS CONTAMINATION NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination is listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 528 was created to address polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination identified during the CAU 262 corrective action investigation. CAU 528 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): CAS 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination.

  17. Predicting recidivism in juvenile delinquents: the role of mental health diagnoses and the qualification of conclusions by race

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle Wierson; Rex Forehand

    1995-01-01

    Seventy-five male youths were evaluated while incarcerated in a juvenile facility in the state of Georgia. Twenty-one to 32 months following discharge, criminal files were examined for records of reincarceration. The recidivism rate was approximately one-third of the initial sample. Crime-related and mental health variables were entered into discriminant function analyses to determine models for predicting recidivism. For the total

  18. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-01-01

    The Areas 25, 26 and 27 Septic Systems are in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271. This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for CAU 271. CAU 271 is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Krause

    2010-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) presents information supporting the selection of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) leading to the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1999-01-01

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists

  2. Increased Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Van Hattem, W. Arnout; Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Marks, Susan Y.; Milne, Anya N. A.; Van Eeden, Susanne; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Ristimäki, Ari; Giardiello, Francis M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastrointestinal juvenile polyps may occur in juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) or sporadically. JPS is an autosomal-dominant condition caused by a germline defect in SMAD4 or BMPR1A in 50% to 60% of cases, and is characterized by multiple juvenile polyps, predominantly in the colorectum. JPS has an increased risk of gastrointestinal malignancy but sporadic juvenile polyps do not. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is increased in gastrointestinal tumorigenesis and familial adenomatous polyposis. Inhibition of COX-2 leads to regression of colorectal adenomas in familial adenomatous polyposis patients and inhibits gastrointestinal tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of COX-2 in juvenile polyps, we compared the expression of COX-2 in juvenile polyps from a well-defined group of juvenile polyposis patients and sporadic juvenile polyps. Methods COX-2 expression was assessed in 24 genetically well-defined JPS patients and 26 patients with sporadic juvenile polyps using tissue microarray analysis. Two additional markers, Hu-antigen R, a stabilizer of messenger RNA, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein ?, a transcription factor, both associated with increased COX-2 expression, also were investigated. Results Increased COX-2 expression in JPS patients was noted compared with patients with sporadic juvenile polyps (P < .001). Also, JPS patients with a BMPR1A germline defect had higher COX-2 expression than did JPS patients in whom no germline mutation was detected. High COX-2 levels correlated with increased cytoplasmic Hu-antigen R expression in JPS polyps (P = .022), but not in sporadic juvenile polyps. Conclusions Juvenile polyposis and sporadic juvenile polyps show distinctive expression profiles of COX-2 that may have clinical implications. PMID:19124115

  3. Effectiveness of hydrotreatment in reducing the toxicity of a coal liquefaction product to juvenile channel catfish

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.; Kenna, M.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrotreatment in reducing the acute toxicity of a representative coal liquefaction product. Acute bioassays with juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were used to compare the toxicities of raw (nonupgraded) H-Coal oil, four samples of the same H-Coal oil subjected to different degrees of upgrading by hydrotreatment, and a petroleum crude oil. Channel catfish were chosen because they have considerable commercial and sport fisheries value and are likely to be abundant in large rivers where commercial coal liquefaction facilities will be located.

  4. Health issues faced by adolescents incarcerated in the juvenile justice system.

    PubMed

    Griel Iii, Lester C; Loeb, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Incarcerated adolescents have a high level of health problems when compared to those not incarcerated. These higher rates are in part due to inadequate coping skills. The purpose of this paper is to conduct a literature review of articles that focus on the health issues of incarcerated adolescents. This review provides an overview of the issue, strategies that nurses working in juvenile facilities can employ to increase their impact on the health of adolescent offenders, and research needs for the future. Thirty articles published around the world between the years 1995 and 2007 are reviewed and described. PMID:19702743

  5. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  6. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia: a case series.

    PubMed

    Azma, R Z; Zarina, A L; Hamidah, A; Jamal, R; Sharifah, N A; Ainoon, O; Hamidah, N H

    2009-12-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML), previously known as juvenile chronic myeloid leukaemia (JCML) is a rare, myelodysplastic - myeloproliferative disease typically presenting in early childhood. This disorder is difficult to distinguish from other myeloproliferative syndrome such as chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) because of the similarities in their clinical and bone marrow findings. However, because of its unique biological characteristics such as absolute monocytosis with dysplasia, absence of Philadelphia chromosome or BCR-ABL fusion protein, hypergammaglobulinaemia and raised fetal haemoglobin level, this disorder does not satisfy the criteria for inclusion in the CML or chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) group, as seen in adult patients. We describe a series of three patients with JMML, who had almost similar clinical and laboratory findings, and discuss the difficulty in the classification and treatment of the disease. PMID:20514855

  7. Juvenile polyposis complicated with protein losing gastropathy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kentaro; Saito, Mayuko; Itoh, Miki; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Yamaoka, Satoshi; Goto, Akira; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Yamaguchi, Koji; Endo, Takao

    2009-01-01

    A male patient with chronic bloody stool was diagnosed as juvenile polyposis at the age of 28. He had thirty to forty colonic polyps and some were removed endoscopically, while gastric polyps were too numerous to intervene. As the polyposis advanced gradually, the patient developed intractable anemia and serious hypoproteinemia. Albumin scintigram revealed protein losing gastropathy due to progressive gastric polyposis. Total gastrectomy was carried out at the age of 34 and the patient has achieved remarkable and sustainable improvement. PMID:19252357

  8. Familial juvenile polyposis with adenomatous-carcinomatous change.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A K; Sharma, S S; Mathur, P

    1995-01-01

    A family tree of 118 members with five members found to have juvenile polyposis-adenomatous change and four juvenile polyposis-adenomatous-carcinomatous change is presented. All the patients developed bleeding per rectum between 10 and 17 years of age. Four members died of colonic malignancy between 30 and 55 years of age. Colonoscopy in five living members revealed typical juvenile polyps throughout the whole length of the colon and atypical large lobulated polyps containing adenomatous change in juvenile polyps in the rectosigmoid area. An autosomal dominant mode of transmission was evident on analysis of the pedigree. Gastric hyperplastic polyps were present in three of the five living members. Familial juvenile polyposis may have the potential to progress into adenoma-carcinoma sequence and is not always a benign disorder. Colonoscopic surveillance should be done to detect adenomatous change if any member of the juvenile polyposis family develops colonic malignancy. PMID:7787156

  9. [Polyps (single or multiple) and juvenile polyposis].

    PubMed

    Agnifili, A; Schietroma, M; Mattucci, S; Carloni, A; Caterino, G; Rossi, M; Pistoia, M A; Carlei, F

    2001-10-01

    The authors underline the important aspects of juvenile familial polyposis (JFP), a disease transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. A case of JFP characterized by the presence of hundreds of polyps in the colo-rectal intestinal tract, is analyzed. The single juvenile polyp, multiple polyps (=/>5 polyps) and the sporadic form are examined. These are mucous hamartomas which can undergo neoplastic transformation (in carcinoma in 68% of untreated cases), a behaviour similar to that of adenomatous polyps. They differ from the later due to the following features: epidemiology (earlier appearance age), anatomopathology (stroma), clinical observation (self-recovery in some cases) and genetics (10q23.3-18q21, genetic mutations in a locus different those of adenomatous polyps). It is also necessary to determine its extension by means of colonoscopy, ileoscopy, gastroscopy and small bowel barium enema. Patients' screening through construction of the genealogical family tree is fundamental. Isolation of possible degenerative aspects of the polyps through biopsy is also fundamental. Single or multiple polyps are treated endoscopically, the juvenile polyposis is treated surgically (colectomy, total colectomy). A rigorous follow-up of the patients and their family members is recommended. PMID:11568727

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles and Debris) Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2005-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 511, Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris). The CAU is comprised of nine corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit

  11. The Impact of Families on Juvenile Substance Use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes; Traci Mach

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of family composition on juvenile substance use and drug sales using data from the National\\u000a Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The results underscore the importance of having a father figure in the household in deterring\\u000a juvenile smoking, marijuana use, and drug sale. However, the extent to which father figures affect juvenile substance use\\u000a and drug

  12. Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tank 2331-U at the Building 9201-1 Site, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. E. Bohrman; E. M. Ingram

    1992-01-01

    This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tank 2331-U, previously located at Building 9201-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 2331-U, was removed on December 14, 1988. Based on the determination that groundwater at the Building 9201-1 Site is classified as a nondrinking water source, the applicable TDEC Closure Action Levels for remediation of petroleum

  13. 78 FR 9070 - Meeting (Webinar) of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ...AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

  14. 78 FR 56940 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...305-1270, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...CJ-15, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

  15. 77 FR 70473 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Agency Information Collection Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ...1121-0218] Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Agency...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...305-1270, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

  16. 28 CFR 0.94 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 0.94... § 0.94 Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Office...seq., relating to juvenile delinquency, the improvement...

  17. 28 CFR 0.94 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 0.94... § 0.94 Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Office...seq., relating to juvenile delinquency, the improvement...

  18. 78 FR 43920 - Meeting (Webinar) of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

  19. 75 FR 17956 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Agency Information Collection Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ...1121-0219] Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Agency...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...353-9258, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

  20. 77 FR 61641 - Meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

  1. 78 FR 42109 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...616-3649, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...collection: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

  2. 75 FR 70293 - Meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

  3. 78 FR 66383 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ...Programs Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OMB Number...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...616-3649, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

  4. 28 CFR 0.94 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 0.94... § 0.94 Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Office...seq., relating to juvenile delinquency, the improvement...

  5. 75 FR 22163 - Meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ...AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office...SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP...C-E) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of...

  6. 78 FR 40189 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Juvenile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ...OF JUSTICE Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OMB Number...Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will be...305-1270, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention,...

  7. 28 CFR 0.94 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 0.94... § 0.94 Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Office...seq., relating to juvenile delinquency, the improvement...

  8. 28 CFR 0.94 - Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 0.94... § 0.94 Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Office...seq., relating to juvenile delinquency, the improvement...

  9. Nuclear Facilities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christopher Griffith

    In order to produce nuclear weapons, each country must have facilities to produce and refine the nuclear materials, conduct research on weapon design, and store the completed weapons. The interactives in this collection allow you to explore the nuclear facilities of the nuclear powers (both declared and undeclared).

  10. Life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to juvenile polyposis.

    PubMed

    Pashankar, D; Murphy, J J; Ostry, A; Schreiber, R A

    2000-02-01

    A 14-yr-old, previously healthy boy presented with massive lower GI hemorrhage. After the routine endoscopic and radiological evaluation, laparotomy and intraoperative colonoscopy revealed multiple polyps in the colon. A hemicolectomy was performed because of the severity of hemorrhage. A diagnosis of juvenile polyposis was made based upon histological findings and the family history. This is an extremely unusual presentation of juvenile polyposis and has been reported only once before. The clinical features, diagnosis, and therapeutic options for juvenile polyposis are discussed. Juvenile polyposis, although a rare condition in the pediatric population, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of life-threatening GI hemorrhage. PMID:10685766

  11. [Juvenile polyposis in 2 patients of the same family].

    PubMed

    Alcaín, G; Guillén, P; Soria, M J; Rendón, P; Alonso, E; Garcia, C

    1995-10-01

    Two cases of juvenile familiar polyposis (one 40-year-old male and his 14-year-old daughter) are presented. The girl presented intermittent rectal bleeding since the age of 10 with growth retardation and chronic anemia. The child was treated by colectomy with more than 100 juvenile polyps without adenomatous alterations being observed in the surgical specimen. Juvenile gastric polyps were also endoscopically observed. The father underwent sigmoidectomy for a adenomatous polyp of this localization. Later review of the surgical specimen demonstrated a juvenile polyp with zones of adenomatous alterations. The diagnostic difficulties of this rare entity and the therapeutic options available are discussed. PMID:7584781

  12. The Juvenile Suicide Assessment: an instrument for the assessment and management of suicide risk with incarcerated juveniles.

    PubMed

    Galloucis, Matthew; Francek, Heather

    2002-01-01

    This article presents and describes the Juvenile Suicide Assessment (JSA). The JSA is a suicide risk assessment instrument that can be used by mental health professionals who work with youth involved in the juvenile justice system. The rationale and clinical significance of each of the suicide risk and protective factors comprising the JSA are discussed. The authors discuss important considerations for assessing suicide risk among incarcerated juveniles and identify how the JSA may have clinical-utility for accomplishing this task. PMID:12387191

  13. Juveniles' Miranda comprehension: Understanding, appreciation, and totality of circumstances factors.

    PubMed

    Zelle, Heather; Romaine, Christina L Riggs; Goldstein, Naomi E S

    2015-06-01

    This study examined juvenile justice-involved youths' understanding and appreciation of the Miranda warnings' rights to silence and legal counsel using the Miranda Rights Comprehension Instruments (Goldstein, Zelle, & Grisso, 2012). It also examined the relationships between totality of circumstances factors and understanding and appreciation of rights. Data were collected from 183 youths (140 boys) in pre- and postadjudication facilities in 2 states. Overall, youths demonstrated greater difficulty on measures of appreciation than understanding, with particular deficits in their abilities to comprehend the abstract concept of the right to silence. Results varied slightly by instrument, highlighting the importance of a multimodal assessment of these complex abilities. Examination of totality of circumstances factors identified relationships between some factors (e.g., age, verbal IQ, academic achievement) and Miranda comprehension, but revealed that other factors (e.g., gender, number of previous arrests) were not significantly related to Miranda understanding or appreciation. The findings support a nuanced conceptualization of Miranda rights comprehension that acknowledges the complexity of understanding and appreciating the warnings. Empirical analyses also support the continued use of some totality of circumstances factors and abandonment of others. Findings underscore the necessity of multimodal assessment and interpretation when conducting capacity to waive Miranda rights evaluations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25495714

  14. Mammary presentation of adult-type "juvenile" xanthogranuloma.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sandra J; Scamman, Will; Gopalan, Anuradha; Rosen, Paul Peter

    2005-06-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a benign histiocytic disorder of infants and childhood. Approximately 15% of cases occur in adults. Adult JXG characteristically affect patients in their 20s and 30s; however, about 5% of patients are older than 60 years. Adult JXGs rarely regress spontaneously, and reports of concomitant extracutaneous lesions are rare. Herein, we report an exceptional case of adult xanthogranuloma in a 74-year-old woman who presented with ipsilateral breast masses and also found to have prior cutaneous lesions. This is the first reported case of cutaneous and extracutaneous adult JXG where the latter manifested in the breast as a spindle cell xanthogranuloma. Histologically, the lesion was composed predominantly of spindle cells with associated multinucleated giant cells and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate. Spindle cells were immunoreactive for various histiocytic markers and negative for cytokeratins, S-100, CD34, factor XIIIa, and CD1a. In the breast, the morphologic features of JXG evoked several entities in the differential diagnosis, including spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma, inflammatory pseudotumor, fibromatosis, myofibroblastoma, and phyllodes tumor. With the aid of immunohistochemical stains and appropriate clinical history, the correct diagnosis of extracutaneous adult JXG manifesting as a spindle cell xanthogranuloma can be made. PMID:15897751

  15. Juvenile Justice in Australia 2009-10. Juvenile Justice Series. Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aalders, Rachel; Morgan, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, the state and territory governments are responsible for dealing with young people who are involved in crime. One major aspect of the juvenile justice system is the supervision of children and young people who have committed or are alleged to have committed an offence. This report presents information on the young people under…

  16. JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY BRIEF SERIES Mental Health Issues in California's Juvenile Justice System

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    SWEC,UCBerkeleySchoolofSocialWelfare ·CurtisHill,Sheriff,SanBenitoCounty ·Hon.KurtKumli,Judge, Santa Clara County, Superior Court ·BarryKrisberg,PresidentPowers,Chief Probation Officer, Stanislaus County; Past-President,ChiefProbation OfficersofCalifornia ·David reports and media accounts documenting the failures of the juvenile justice system, underscores the urgent

  17. Factors in Juvenile Court Dispositions: Case Study of a Rural Juvenile Court

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Lee Kirk

    2011-01-01

    The primary question of importance in this current study is what factors affect judges' dispositional rulings in a small rural Central Kentucky county. In order to evaluate these factors, this study involved a two stage process. The quantitative data were gathered from 120 Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) files dating back to 1999 that were processed through the study site

  18. Predictors of Support for Juvenile Sex Offender Registration: Educated Individuals Recognize the Flaws of Juvenile Registration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Margaret C.; Smith, Amy C.; Sekely, Ady; Farnum, Katlyn S.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated demographic predictors of support for juvenile sex offender registration policies, including education level, gender, political orientation, and age. Participants were 168 individuals recruited from public places in a Midwest community (45% women; M age = 42). In line with hypotheses, as education level increased, support for…

  19. Increasing School Safety through Juvenile Accountability Programs. Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grants (JAIBG) Program Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Scott H.

    This bulletin explores promotion of school safety by increasing students' accountability for their behavior. It provides information to facilitate the development of constructive, well-conceived, accountability-based programs that work with juvenile offenders. These programs also address the issues of violence, disorder, and fear. The bulletin…

  20. The Juvenile Counseling and Assessment Model and Program: A Conceptualization and Intervention for Juvenile Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Georgia B.; Glaser, Brian A.; Bartolomucci, Christi L.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a model of conceptualization and intervention for juvenile delinquency. Model includes the characteristics of the adolescent, ecological context in which the adolescent lives, and the interaction among these variables. Describes a specific integrated service, training, and research project based on the model. The project utilizes a…

  1. Health Facilities

    MedlinePLUS

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  2. FACILITY DATABASE

    Cancer.gov

    LASP Administrative Use Only Data Entry Start Date _______________ July 2007 LASP FACILTY Database Form 1.000 FACILITY DATABASE Principal Investigator – Data Entry Requirements This form is used to identify the level of data that each investigator

  3. Research Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Donald E. Bohringer, Argonne engineering specialist employed NASA information in two projects associated with the laboratory's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility. The NASA technology Bohringer employed involved improved vibration protection for a gamma ray detector in one project, and in the other a new leak detection technology. IPNS and other Argonne facilities have many vacuum and pressure vessels and early detection of leaks is highly important. Bohringer learned of both items in Tech Briefs.

  4. The Challenges in Providing Needed Transition Programming to Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, John S.; Bohac, Paul D.; Wade, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    The transition to and from juvenile justice settings is a complex and challenging process. Effectively preparing juvenile justice personnel to address the transition needs of incarcerated students is an essential aspect of reducing the negative effects of the school-to-prison pipeline. This article examines program and professional development…

  5. [Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare cause of gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Tørring, Pernille Mathiesen; Qvist, Niels; Bernstein, Inge; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2013-11-18

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an autosomal dominant polyposis syndrome. It is characterized by predisposition to multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with an increased risk of colorectal and ventricular cancer. Patients and at risk family members should be offered surveillance. This article discusses clinical features and surveillance based on the current literature. PMID:25353092

  6. [Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare cause of gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Tørring, Pernille Mathiesen; Qvist, Niels; Bernstein, Inge; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2014-10-27

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an autosomal dominant polyposis syndrome. It is characterized by predisposition to multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with an increased risk of colorectal and ventricular cancer. Patients and at risk family members should be offered surveillance. This article discusses clinical features and surveillance based on the current literature. PMID:25354001

  7. Psychological Characteristics of Juvenile Alcohol and Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Jon F.; Gudjonsson, Gisli H.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates whether personality tests can differentiate between alcohol and drug users among juvenile offenders. Subjects were 108 Icelandic juvenile offenders who had been given conditional discharge, who received the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) and Gough Socialisation Scale (GSS). Drug and alcohol users scored significantly lower…

  8. Psychological Characteristics of Juvenile Alcohol and Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Jon F.; Gudjonsson, Gisili H.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates whether personality tests could differentiate between alcohol and drug users among juvenile offenders. Subjects were 108 juvenile offenders given conditional discharge. Results indicate that frequent drug and/or alcohol abusers scored lower on the Gough Socialization Scale and higher on the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire lie scale.…

  9. Juvenile Probation Department Experiences Compared by Adult Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Waln K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined surveys, court records, and anecdotal information of former adjudicated delinquents (n=273) to determine effects of juvenile justice intervention on outcome; specifically, whether delinquent labeling initiated a self-fulfilling prophecy. Found no significant relationship between juvenile probation experience rating and adult recidivism.…

  10. Juvenile Crime and Criminal Justice: Resolving Border Disputes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Rising juvenile crime rates during the 1970s and 1980s spurred state legislatures across the country to exclude or transfer a significant share of offenders under the age of eighteen to the jurisdiction of the criminal court, essentially redrawing the boundary between the juvenile and adult justice systems. Jeffrey Fagan examines the legal…

  11. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: A clinical and sleep EEG study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Dhanuka; B. K. Jain; Singh Daljit; D. Maheshwari

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is characterized by myoclonic jerks on awakening, generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS) and is associated with absence seizures in more than one third of cases. Fifteen patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy were studied with regard to their clinical profile, EEG data and sleep EEG findings. There was a delay in the diagnosis of JME (mean of 3.5

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Determining the transition from juvenile to mature wood

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    ORIGINAL PAPER Determining the transition from juvenile to mature wood microfibril angle 2012 Abstract & Context The transition of microfibril angle (MFA) values from juvenile to mature wood much of a log is higher quality mature wood based on MFA. & Methods MFA was measured from pith to bark

  13. Integrating Research, Policy, and Practice in Juvenile Justice Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomberg, Thomas G.; Waldo, Gordon P.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview and a context leading to Florida's efforts to implement an evaluation-driven research and associated quality assurance system for its juvenile justice education policies and practices. The Juvenile Justice Educational Enhancement Program described began implementing Florida's evaluation research and quality assurance system in…

  14. 8 CFR 1236.3 - Detention and release of juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    Juveniles for whom bond has been posted, for whom parole has been authorized, or who have been ordered released on recognizance, shall be released pursuant to the following guidelines: (1) Juveniles shall be released, in order of preference, to: (i) A parent; (ii) Legal guardian;...

  15. 28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    28 ? Judicial Administration ? 1 ? 2010-07-01 ? 2010-07-01 ? false ? Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. ? 0.57 ? Section 0.57 ? Judicial Administration ? DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ? ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ? Criminal Division ? § 0.57 ? Criminal prosecutions against juveniles....

  16. 8 CFR 236.3 - Detention and release of juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    Juveniles for whom bond has been posted, for whom parole has been authorized, or who have been ordered released on recognizance, shall be released pursuant to the following guidelines: (1) Juveniles shall be released, in order of preference, to: (i) A parent; (ii) Legal guardian;...

  17. The moral reasoning of juvenile delinquents: A meta-analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Ron Nelson; Deborah J. Smith; John Dodd

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesized immaturity of juvenile delinquents' moral reasoning, the results of 15 studies of the moral reasoning of juvenile delinquents were integrated quantitatively using meta-analysis. Hedges and Olkin (1985) methods were used to (a) compute effect sizes, (b) test the homogeneity of the obtained effect sizes, and (c) test the statistical significance of the pooled mean effect size.

  18. The YouthARTS Development Project. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Heather J.; Coolbaugh, Kathleen

    The arts enrich the culture and individual lives immeasurably, but what impact do arts-based programs have in preventing juvenile delinquency? To address this question, the YouthARTS Development Project, with the technical assistance of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), brought together Federal agencies, national…

  19. Correlates of Male and Female Juvenile Offender Abuse Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Schmeidler, James; Childs, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of developing and evaluating a classification of 315 arrested youth processed at the Hillsborough County Juvenile Assessment Center from September 1, 1994 to January 31, 1998. Youth were characterized as physically or sexually abused if they reported abuse or if they had been referred to juvenile court for abuse.…

  20. Criminal Justice Information Policy. Privacy and Juvenile Justice Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belair, Robert R.

    Elected officials, justice professionals, courts and other institutions of our society are contributing to a reevaluation of juvenile justice information policy. The tenet that juveniles who commit crimes are not culpable is being challenged as the public's safety and economic well being is increasingly threatened by children engaged in criminal…

  1. Calcification characteristics of porcine stentless valves in juvenile sheep1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Herijgers; Shigeyuki Ozakia; Eric Verbeken; Alfons Van Lommelb; Rozalia Racz; Miroslaw Zietkiewicz; Bartlomiej Perek; Willem Flamenga

    Objective: To compare calcification characteristics of two porcine stentless valves (Toronto SPV and Freestyle) with different designs, fixation and antimineralization techniques using a juvenile sheep model of valve implantation inside the circulation. Methods: The stentless valves (n = 2 ? 6) were implanted in juvenile sheep in the pulmonary artery as an interposition, while the circulation was maintained with a

  2. The Miami-Dade Juvenile Assessment Center National Demonstration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Wansley; Dembo, Richard; Beaulaurier, Richard; Cocozza, Joseph; De La Rosa, Mario; Poythress, Norman; Skowyra, Kathy; Veysey, Bonita M.

    2005-01-01

    The Miami-Dade Juvenile Assessment Center National Demonstration Project (NDP) is serving as a national model for the transformation of front end services in the juvenile justice system in a unique sociocultural setting.We discuss the background and vision of the NDP, its implementation and accomplishments in six major program areas: (1)…

  3. Juvenile Fire-Setting: A Review of Treatment Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katarina Fritzon; Mairead Dolan; Rebekah Doley; Troy E. McEwan

    2011-01-01

    The current paper provides a review of the literature on juvenile fire-setting, focusing on psychological contributions to the assessment and treatment of this population. The paper discusses research on the actions associated with deliberately lit fires by juveniles, as well as the psychological characteristics of the perpetrators. International perspectives on intervention are reviewed, and in conclusion the paper highlights the

  4. State Responses to Serious and Violent Juvenile Crime. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbet, Patricia; And Others

    State legislators across the country have responded with new efforts to change the authority and practice of the juvenile and criminal justice systems. Since 1992, 48 of the 51 state legislatures (including the District of Columbia) have made substantive changes to their juvenile justice laws. This report presents the first comprehensive analysis…

  5. Female juvenile delinquents' pragmatic awareness of conversational interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dixie D Sanger; Karen Hux; Mitzi Ritzman

    1999-01-01

    Standardized testing has shown that juvenile delinquents have a high incidence of communication problems; however, discourse analyses have failed to confirm pragmatic deficits. This study's purpose was to explore, using qualitative procedures, the pragmatic awareness of female juvenile delinquents concerning conversational interactions. The 45 participants engaged in small-group conversations about communication during multiple class periods. On-line field notes served as

  6. Escape\\/Aggression Incidence in Sexually Abused Juvenile Delinquents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W. Reich; Sara E. Gutierres

    1979-01-01

    The psychological impact of sexual abuse on children is not a well-understood phenomenon. It has been suggested, however, that such an experience renders the child more aggressive and antisocial. Juvenile delinquency crime data represent a strong test of that assumption. This study reports a continuation of prior research testing a theoretical model which predicts that juveniles subjected to abuse will

  7. Delinquency Cases in Juvenile Court, 2002. OJJDP Fact Sheet #02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl, Anne L.

    2006-01-01

    This fact sheet presents statistics on delinquency cases processed by juvenile courts in 2002. The number of delinquency cases handled by juvenile courts decreased 11 percent between 1997 and 2002. During this time, the number of person offense cases decreased 2 percent, property offense cases decreased 27 percent, drug law violation cases…

  8. The Moral Judgment of Juvenile Delinquents: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stams, Geert Jan; Brugman, Daniel; Dekovic, Maja; van Rosmalen, Lenny; van der Laan, Peter; Gibbs, John C.

    2006-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 50 studies was conducted to investigate whether juvenile delinquents use lower levels of moral judgment than their nondelinquent age-mates and, if so, what factors may influence or moderate the developmental delay. The results show a lower stage of moral judgment for juvenile delinquents (d = 0.76). Effect sizes were large for…

  9. Extinguishing All Hope: Life-without-Parole for Juveniles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Sentencing juveniles to life-without-parole (JLWOP) is a practice fraught with ethical dilemmas. Through in-depth interviews with 11 men living sentences of JLWOP, their narratives of their backgrounds and experiences as juveniles were studied. Common themes were identified, and 3 general categories of cases emerged from the narratives. Ethical…

  10. Predator-prey Interactions with Delays Due to Juvenile Maturation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth L. Cooke; Richard H. Elderkin; Wenzhang Huang

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on predator-prey models with juvenile\\/mature class structure for each of the predator and prey populations in turn, further classified by whether juvenile or mature individuals are active with respect to the predation process. These models include quite general prey recruitment at every stage of analysis, with mass action predation, linear predator mortality as well as delays in

  11. The real face of juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tam, Beatrix; Salamon, Agnes; Bajtai, Attila; Németh, Annamária; Kiss, János; Simon, László; Molnár, Tamás

    2012-12-01

    Colorectal cancers are mostly sporadic; some cases of familial clustering and autosomal dominant conditions are also known to occur. Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by the mutation of the SMAD4 or the BMPR1A genes. JPS is characterized by hamartomatous polyps developing in the upper and lower intestine. Contradicting previous studies, many of these polyps can go through malignant transformation.This paper reports the case of a male patient who was continuously treated for juvenile polyposis. During the eighteen years of treatment, more than hundred polyps were endoscopically removed from his gastrointestinal tract. The patient's care was interrupted for eight years due to insufficient compliance. He was subsequently referred to our Department of Gastroenterology in severe clinical condition caused by metastatic colorectal cancer. He died after a short palliative therapy at the age of 31. His first-degree accessible relatives were further examined for juvenile polyposis syndrome. Several gastrointestinal polyps of different histological origin were observed in the deceased patient's brother, who subsequently had to undergo a left lateral hemicolectomy. Genetic analyses revealed mutations of the BMPR1A gene in the clinically affected brother, the brother's daughter, and in the deceased proband's daughter.Indebt genetic analyses helped customize and deliver care to a very specific group of individuals. We were able to identify potential family members on whom preventive care and treatment could be focused and simultaneously prevented unnecessary clinical and invasive procedures on those who were healthy. Furthermore, these analyses helped prevent future unnecessary trauma or distress on the analyzed family. PMID:23205314

  12. The real face of juvenile polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Beatrix; Salamon, Ágnes; Bajtai, Attila; Németh, Annamária; Kiss, János; Simon, László

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancers are mostly sporadic; some cases of familial clustering and autosomal dominant conditions are also known to occur. Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by the mutation of the SMAD4 or the BMPR1A genes. JPS is characterized by hamartomatous polyps developing in the upper and lower intestine. Contradicting previous studies, many of these polyps can go through malignant transformation. This paper reports the case of a male patient who was continuously treated for juvenile polyposis. During the eighteen years of treatment, more than hundred polyps were endoscopically removed from his gastrointestinal tract. The patient’s care was interrupted for eight years due to insufficient compliance. He was subsequently referred to our Department of Gastroenterology in severe clinical condition caused by metastatic colorectal cancer. He died after a short palliative therapy at the age of 31. His first-degree accessible relatives were further examined for juvenile polyposis syndrome. Several gastrointestinal polyps of different histological origin were observed in the deceased patient’s brother, who subsequently had to undergo a left lateral hemicolectomy. Genetic analyses revealed mutations of the BMPR1A gene in the clinically affected brother, the brother’s daughter, and in the deceased proband’s daughter. Indebt genetic analyses helped customize and deliver care to a very specific group of individuals. We were able to identify potential family members on whom preventive care and treatment could be focused and simultaneously prevented unnecessary clinical and invasive procedures on those who were healthy. Furthermore, these analyses helped prevent future unnecessary trauma or distress on the analyzed family. PMID:23205314

  13. Causes of uveitis in children without juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Engelhard, Stephanie B; Bajwa, Asima; Reddy, Ashvini K

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report the demographics, disease characteristics, treatments, and visual outcomes of pediatric uveitis patients without juvenile idiopathic arthritis managed in a tertiary medical center. Methods A retrospective, observational study was performed in pediatric uveitis patients without juvenile idiopathic arthritis and aged 0–18 years, who were seen at the University of Virginia from 1984 to 2014. Results Thirty-nine pediatric uveitis patients (57 eyes) were identified. The patient population was 51.28% female, 51.28% Caucasian, and 33.33% African American. The mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.11 years. The mean number of visits to the clinic was 10.41. Of 57 eyes, 31 (54.39%) had anterior uveitis, 12 (21.05%) had intermediate uveitis, nine (15.79%) had posterior uveitis, and five (8.77%) had panuveitis. The leading diagnoses were traumatic uveitis (25.64%), undifferentiated anterior uveitis (17.95%), undifferentiated intermediate uveitis (15.38%), HLA-B27-associated anterior uveitis (7.69%), and herpetic anterior uveitis (7.69%). Systemic associations included sarcoidosis, ulcerative colitis, and psoriatic arthritis (n=3). The most common treatment modalities included local steroids (66.67%), systemic steroids (23.08%), and antimetabolites (20.51%). Ocular hypertension was found in five (12.82%) patients. Ocular surgery was performed in six (15.38%) patients. Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at baseline across all anatomical locations was 0.458 logMAR, and was 0.411 logMAR at final follow-up. Mean BCVA improved during follow-up in all but the anterior uveitis group. The mean baseline intraocular pressure was 14.27 mmHg, and was 14.22 mmHg at final follow-up. Conclusion Uveitis in childhood is a vision-threatening group of inflammatory disorders arising from numerous etiologies that vary geographically and historically. Because of the high burden of disease, the difficulty of making precise etiologic diagnoses, and the complicated management, it is imperative that affected children be referred to and closely monitored by uveitis specialists to prevent devastating ocular damage. This study found that BCVA and intraocular pressure did not vary significantly during follow-up, suggesting that close management by an ophthalmologist may prevent adverse visual outcomes, and highlighted the high prevalence of traumatic uveitis in children, which tends to have good visual outcomes.

  14. 77 FR 37421 - Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2012 Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ...HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2012 Correction AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS...medical care provided by Indian Health Service facilities for Calendar Year 2012 for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries of...

  15. The juvenile court and dependency cases.

    PubMed

    Barth, R P

    1996-01-01

    Most child abuse and neglect reports do not reach the juvenile court. However, those that do constitute a significant and demanding portion of the court's workload. These cases are often the most serious and require intense efforts at preserving the family and a temporary or permanent change in custody for the child. The children involved are increasingly very young and have histories of repeated contact with the child welfare system. The limited available data about the effectiveness of the court and child welfare system's response to these cases are reviewed in this article and show that improvement is needed in protecting children and ensuring safe and stable placements for them. PMID:9117356

  16. Juvenile trabecular ossifying fibroma: an update.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Pieter J

    2012-12-01

    Fibro-osseous lesions are characterized by the presence of bone marrow that has changed into fibrous tissue and that contains mineralized material of varying appearances. Because of overlapping clinical, radiological, and histopathological features, their classification has evoked much discussion. The current classification recognizes fibrous dysplasia, ossifying fibroma, and osseous dysplasia. Juvenile trabecular ossifying fibroma is a rare variant of ossifying fibroma that is clinically characterized by rapid growth that may suggest malignancy. A series of 15 cases is reported with emphasis on a hitherto unnoticed histological feature that may be helpful in recognizing this lesion. PMID:23052375

  17. [Medical treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kröger, Liisa; Vähäsalo, Paula; Tynjälä, Pirjo; Aalto, Kristiina; Säilä, Hanna; Malin, Merja; Putto-Laurila, Anne; Lahdenne, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    Although etiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is currently not known, better understanding of immunologic pathways of inflammation and the development of new therapies with biologic agents have remarkably improved the treatment of JIA. However, approximately 30% of the patients with JIA do not seem to response adequately to conventional anti-rheumatic drugs but the arthritis runs a continuously active course and may lead to the evolution of erosions. Such patients benefit from biologic agents, of which the longest clinical experience comes from anti-TNF therapies. Molecules targeting IL-1, IL-6 and B- and T-lymphocytes are also used in the treatment of severe JIA. PMID:22486063

  18. Manners of Speaking: Linguistic Capital and the Rhetoric of Correctness in Late-Nineteenth-Century America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, William Rodney, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A number of arguments appeared in the late-nineteenth-century United States about "correctness" in language, arguments for and against enforcing a standard of correctness and arguments about what should count as correct in language. Insofar as knowledge about and facility with "correct" linguistic usage could affect one's standing in the social…

  19. Estimating survival rates from banding of adult and juvenile birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1974-01-01

    The restrictive assumptions required by most available methods for estimating survival probabilities render them unsuitable for analyzing real banding data. A model is proposed which allows survival rates and recovery rates to vary with the calendar year, and also allows juveniles to have rates different from adults. In addition to survival rates and recovery rates, the differential vulnerability factors of juveniles relative to adults are estimated. Minimum values of the variances of the estimators are also given. The new procedure is applied to sets of duck and goose data in which reasonably large numbers of adult and juvenile birds were banded. The results are shown to be generally comparable to those procured by other methods, but, in addition, insight into the extent of annual variation is gained. Combining data from adults and juveniles also increases the effective sample size, since the juveniles are assumed to enter the adult age class after surviving their initial year.

  20. Familial juvenile polyposis coli with APC gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Roh, S A; Yu, C S; Lee, H I; Gong, G

    1997-10-01

    Familial juvenile polyposis has been known to have malignant potential, but their genetic relation to familial adenomatous polyposis has not been proven yet. Two young brothers with intermittent rectal bleeding revealed multiple juvenile polyposis. Their father had a history of rectal cancer with multiple colonic polyps. Four frequent exons of APC gene mutation were tested from these patients' white blood cells by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The 21-yr-old brother had a missense mutation (GAA-->GGA) at codon 1309, whereas the 18-yr-old brother showed a missense mutation (ATA-->GTA) at codon 1304 in exon 15 of APC gene. Three of four first-degree relatives were affected with familial juvenile polyposis, familial juvenile polyposis with adenomatous change, and rectal cancer with multiple polyps. The APC gene mutation of familial juvenile polyposis in this case suggests a genetic relationship with familial adenomatous polyposis. PMID:9382065

  1. Wall interference assessment and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Garriz, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Wind tunnel wall interference assessment and correction (WIAC) concepts, applications, and typical results are discussed in terms of several nonlinear transonic codes and one panel method code developed for and being implemented at NASA-Langley. Contrasts between 2-D and 3-D transonic testing factors which affect WIAC procedures are illustrated using airfoil data from the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and Pathfinder 1 data from the National Transonic Facility. Initial results from the 3-D WIAC codes are encouraging; research on and implementation of WIAC concepts continue.

  2. Who's in, who's out, and who's back: follow-up data on 59 juveniles incarcerated in adult prison for murder or attempted murder in the early 1980s.

    PubMed

    Heide, K M; Spencer, E; Thompson, A; Solomon, E P

    2001-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, when juvenile arrests for violent crime increased dramatically, interest has focused on juvenile offenders who commit violent acts. Legislatures across the United States have enacted a variety of measures to "get tough" with juveniles in response to escalating crime rates and the perceptions that longer sentences were needed. This manuscript provides follow-up data on 59 juveniles who were committed to the adult Department of Corrections in Florida during the period January 1982 through January 1984 for one or more counts of murder, attempted murder, or, in a few cases, manslaughter. Although many of these adolescents received lengthy prison sentences, more than two-thirds had been released from prison prior to November 1999. This article presents data on amount of time served and recidivism over the 15 to 17 year period. Results indicated that 60 percent of sample subjects released from prison were returned to prison, and most of those who failed did so within the first three years of release. Findings from the present study, when examined in the context of previous comparative follow-up studies of delinquent youths, suggest that the dialogue on how to handle violent youths must be continued if juvenile homicide offenders are going to be released to society at some point in the future. PMID:11241683

  3. Experimental evaluation of co-culture of juvenile sea cucumbers, Holothuria scabra (Jaeger), with juvenile blue shrimp, Litopenaeus stylirostris (Stimpson)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven W Purcell; Jacques Patrois; Nicolas Fraisse

    2006-01-01

    The co-culture of juvenile sea cucumber Holothuria scabra (Jaeger), or 'sandfish', with juvenile blue shrimp Litopenaeus. stylirostris (Stimpson) was tested by growing groups in co-culture and monoculture for 3 weeks in tanks with enriched sand substratum. Feed was supplied on trays, accessible only to shrimp. Survival of shrimp and sandfish was high in all treatments (73^ 100%). Growth of shrimp

  4. Juvenile Delinquency and Teenage Pregnancy: A Comparison of Ecological Risk Profiles among Midwestern White and Black Female Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khurana, Atika; Cooksey, Elizabeth C.; Gavazzi, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined ecological risk factors associated with teen pregnancy with a sample of 1,190 court-involved female juvenile offenders between 11 and 18 years of age. Data were obtained from five Midwestern juvenile county courts using a recently developed youth risk assessment instrument called the global risk assessment device (GRAD). In…

  5. A randomized clinical trial of multisystemic therapy with juvenile sexual offenders: effects on youth social ecology and criminal activity.

    PubMed

    Borduin, Charles M; Schaeffer, Cindy M; Heiblum, Naamith

    2009-02-01

    A randomized clinical trial evaluated the efficacy of multisystemic therapy (MST) versus usual community services (UCS) for 48 juvenile sexual offenders at high risk of committing additional serious crimes. Results from multiagent assessment batteries conducted before and after treatment showed that MST was more effective than UCS in improving key family, peer, and academic correlates of juvenile sexual offending and in ameliorating adjustment problems in individual family members. Moreover, results from an 8.9-year follow-up of rearrest and incarceration data (obtained when participants were on average 22.9 years of age) showed that MST participants had lower recidivism rates than did UCS participants for sexual (8% vs. 46%, respectively) and nonsexual (29% vs. 58%, respectively) crimes. In addition, MST participants had 70% fewer arrests for all crimes and spent 80% fewer days confined in detention facilities than did their counterparts who received UCS. The clinical and policy implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19170451

  6. [A case of juvenile polyposis limited to the stomach accompanied by double gastric cancers and Ménétrier's disease].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Toshifumi; Wachi, Eiko; Yamashita, Naoyuki

    2010-10-01

    A 48-year-old woman who had innumerable polyps in her stomach for 4 years visited our hospital to receive further examinations. Her younger brother had undergone gastrectomy because of cancer with gastric polyposis. Gastrography and gastroscopy showed numerous reddish polyps finger-like in form with much mucin in the antrum. On the other hand, polyposis in the corpus and fornix was nodular which formed giant folds. There was no polyps in other organs, therefore, we diagnosed juvenile polyposis limited to the stomach accompanied with Ménétrier disease. Double carcinoma were proved histologically after total gastrectomy. 55.8% of juvenile poplyposis limited to the stomach are accompanied with neoplasms, however, the rate of preoperatively correctly diagnosed neoplasms was 55%, so total gastrectomy was recommended. PMID:20938115

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1 and 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Strand

    2004-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision No. 1 (9\\/2001)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    This corrective action investigation plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 262 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): Underground Storage Tank (25-02-06), Septic Systems A

  9. Recycling of magmatic clasts during explosive eruptions: estimating the true juvenile content of phreatomagmatic volcanic deposits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. F. Houghton; R. T. Smith

    1993-01-01

    The juvenile content of phreatomagmatic deposits contains both ‘first-cycle’ juvenile clasts derived from magma at the instant of eruption, and recycled juvenile clasts, which were fragmented and first ejected by earlier explosions during the eruption, but fell back or collapsed into the vent. Recycled juvenile clasts are similar to accessory and accidental lithics in that they contribute no heat to

  10. Putting kids to death: Specifying public support for juvenile capital punishment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melissa M. Moon; John Paul Wright; Francis T. Cullen; Jennifer A. Pealer

    2000-01-01

    Using a statewide sample of 539 Tennessee residents, we explored the extent to which the public supports the death penalty for juveniles. The analysis revealed that a majority of respondents favored juvenile capital punishment, often for young offenders. The respondents, however, were less supportive of juvenile than of adult execution. Most important, as an alternative to juvenile capital punishment, nearly

  11. 77 FR 72199 - Technical Corrections; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...Region I office, correcting authority citations and typographical and spelling errors...that is cited in one of the authority citations in the final rule. DATES: The correction...authority that is cited in the authority citation for part 171 of Title 10 of the...

  12. Boots Corrections Syllabus Page 1 Corrections

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    and prisons, alternatives to incarceration (e.g., probation and parole), capital punishment, and the public of punishment and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on correctional law, policies, practices, issues) explain the history of corrections and the rationales for punishment 2) discuss the contemporary issues

  13. Education and Correctional Populations. Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Caroline Wolf

    This report presents data from the Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities, 1991 and 1997; Survey of Inmates in Local Jails, 1989 and 1996 ; Survey of Adults on Probation, 1995; National Adult Literacy Survey; and Current Population Survey. Correctional populations were less educated than the general public. Numbers of…

  14. Opportunity: How Twenty Boys Serving Time in a Detention Facility Learned to Rebuild Their Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cernero, Deanna E.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a trial program involving 20 boys in a juvenile detention facility. Academic skills in math, English, and architecture, and vocational skills in carpentry and electrical contracting, were taught. Students also received art therapy. Test scores improved for these students, as did communication, social skills, self-confidence, and pride.…

  15. Establishing a School-Based Mentoring Program for Youth Who Are Transitioning from a Secure Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Katherine S.; Houchins, David E.; Nomvete, Patsy Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Youth with disabilities face many obstacles when transitioning from a juvenile detention facility back to school. A school-based mentoring program provides formerly incarcerated youth with support and encouragement from a caring, responsible adult. Youth with positive role models such as a mentor are more likely to successfully transition back to…

  16. Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Enter Search terms Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products ... Search Mammography Facilities Help | Download File | More About MQSA Enter the First 3 Digits of your Zip Code ...

  17. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-03-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 151 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

  18. The case of juvenile polygraphy as a clinical ethics dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Polygraph interrogations are used by half of all surveyed juvenile sex offender (JSO) treatment programs in the United States. This is a distinctive and controversial practice that is rarely if ever used with other juvenile delinquent populations, and that is rarely used or is banned from JSO treatment programs in other countries. Clinical polygraphy is an ethically sensitive issue because it involves mental health therapists in involuntary coercive interrogations of minors. This article reviews core mental health professional ethics principles for juveniles. JSO polygraphy is used as an illustrative issue for applying human rights principles to a practice in light of its benefits, risks, and available alternatives. PMID:20944059

  19. Landmark learning by juvenile salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum).

    PubMed

    Heuring, Whitney L; Mathis, Alicia

    2014-10-01

    Learning to use a landmark as a beacon to locate resources is one of the simplest forms of spatial learning. We tested whether landmark learning occurs in a semifossorial salamander that migrates annually to breeding ponds as adults. Juvenile spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) were tested in square containers with a plastic feeding dish in each corner, and a piece of earthworm was placed in one randomly-chosen dish. For landmark-trained salamanders, a rock was placed beside the dish containing the prey. For control salamanders, the rock was placed beside a randomly selected feeding dish. Each salamander was trained once every 2 days for 30 days. Significantly more landmark-trained salamanders than control salamanders entered the landmark area first, and landmark-trained individuals had faster latencies to enter the landmark area and longer stay-times. These results suggest that spotted salamanders are able to locate resources by associating their positions with landmarks. PMID:25444775

  20. Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and education.

    PubMed

    von Tetzchner, Stephen; Fosse, Per; Elmerskog, Bengt

    2013-11-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) is characterized by severe visual impairment with onset around age 4-8 years, and a developmental course that includes blindness, epilepsy, speech problems, dementia, motor coordination problems, and emotional reactions. There is presently no cure and the disease leads to premature death. There have been few studies of non-medical intervention for individuals with JNCL, probably because of the negative prognosis. The present chapter discusses the education of children and adolescents with JNCL on the basis of current knowledge about the variation in perceptual, cognitive and language abilities through the course of the disease, and the possibilities that exist for supporting coping and learning within and outside the classroom. Adapted and special needs education may contribute significantly to improved learning conditions, better maintenance of skills and less frustration for individuals with JNCL. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses or Batten Disease. PMID:23470553

  1. Juvenile polyposis in an Ethiopian family.

    PubMed

    Chali, Debela; Schneider, Jakob; Melaku, Girma; Mekasha, Amha; Geremew, Meaza

    2006-07-01

    An 8-year-old boy from Arsi, central Ethiopia, seen at Tikur Anbessa Hospital, a tertiary and teaching hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, with a history of protruding mass per anum during straining at defecation and micturition and rectal bleeding of 12 months, diagnosed to have juvenile polyposis is presented The condition was complicated by severe anemia and hypoproteinemia. Following abdominal surgery (subtotal colectomy, ileoproctostomy and proctoscopic diathermy of rectal polyps) and supportive measures, the bleeding stopped and his general condition improved His father and two of his three siblings were also proved to have colonic polyposis, earlier. Clinical presentation, investigations, intra-operative and histologic findings, and prognosis are discussed with background literature review. PMID:17447398

  2. Pediatric juvenile polyposis syndromes: an update.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sherry C; Erdman, Steven H

    2009-06-01

    Colon polyps are a common finding in pediatrics and can present with rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, or polyp prolapse from the rectum. Histologically classified as hamartomas, these isolated pediatric polyps lack epithelial dysplasia and have no cancer risk. However, when polyps are present in greater numbers, or are associated with a family history of polyps or colon or other cancers, a polyposis or hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome should be considered. Using a case-based format, this article reviews the clinical features and provides updates on the three most common hamartomatous polyp syndromes of childhood: juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. Each syndrome has distinctive intestinal and extra-intestinal findings that, when present, can guide genetic counseling and testing. Lifelong cancer surveillance is crucial to disease prevention and the long-term health of these patients and their families. PMID:19463221

  3. Computer-Tailored Intervention for Juvenile Offenders

    PubMed Central

    LEVESQUE, DEBORAH A.; JOHNSON, JANET L.; WELCH, CAROL A.; PROCHASKA, JANICE M.; FERNANDEZ, ANNE C.

    2012-01-01

    Studies assessing the efficacy of juvenile justice interventions show small effects on recidivism and other outcomes. This paper describes the development of a prototype of a multimedia computer-tailored intervention (“Rise Above Your Situation”or RAYS) that relies on an evidence-based model of behavior change, the Transtheoretical Model, and expert system technology to deliver assessments, feedback, printed reports, and counselor reports with intervention ideas. In a feasibility test involving 60 system-involved youths and their counselors, evaluations of the program were favorable: 91.7% of youths agreed that the program could help them make positive changes, and 86.7% agreed that the program could give their counselor helpful information about them. PMID:23264754

  4. Juvenile hormone regulates butterfly larval pattern switches.

    PubMed

    Futahashi, Ryo; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2008-02-22

    Insect color patterns can be very diverse. This variation is also seen among many larval instar stages, which can take on vastly different phenotypes. Young caterpillars of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, are mimics of bird droppings, whereas the fifth larval instar is camouflaged among the leaves of host plants (cryptic pattern). We find that juvenile hormone (JH) titers decrease during the fourth larval instar. Furthermore, treatment with JH analog at the beginning of the fourth instar stage resulted in reproducing the mimetic pattern instead of the usual cryptic one and likewise altered gene expression patterns to that associated with the mimetic pattern. These findings suggest that JH regulates the progressive larval pattern switch of this insect. PMID:18292334

  5. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (<9 months of age) have resistance to Bovine Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature. PMID:25715822

  6. Juvenile hormone esterase: biochemistry and structure

    PubMed Central

    Kamita, Shizuo G.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Normal insect development requires a precisely timed, precipitous drop in hemolymph juvenile hormone (JH) titer. This drop occurs through a coordinated halt in JH biosynthesis and increase in JH metabolism. In many species, JH esterase (JHE) is critical for metabolism of the resonance-stabilized methyl ester of JH. JHE metabolizes JH with a high kcat/KM ratio that results primarily from an exceptionally low KM. Here we review the biochemistry and structure of authentic and recombinant JHEs from six insect orders, and present updated diagnostic criteria that help to distinguish JHEs from other carboxylesterases. The use of a JHE-encoding gene to improve the insecticidal efficacy of biopesticides is also discussed. PMID:23543805

  7. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma staging: An overview.

    PubMed

    Alshaikh, Nada Ali; Eleftheriadou, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Staging of tumors is very important in treatment and surgical decision making, as well as in predicting disease recurrence and prognosis. This review focuses on the different available classifications of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) and their impact on the evaluation, management, and prognosis of JNA. The literature was reviewed, and publications on JNA staging were examined. Our MEDLINE search of the entire English-language literature found no review article on the current available staging systems for JNA. In this article, we review the common JNA classification systems that have been published, and we discuss some of their advantages and disadvantages. The most commonly used staging systems for JNA are the Radkowski and the Andrews-Fisch staging systems. However, some newer staging systems that are based on advances in technology and surgical approaches-the Onerci, INCan, and UPMC systems-have shown promising utility, and they will probably gain popularity in the future. PMID:26053985

  8. Use of methotrexate in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, A; Whitworth, P; Baildam, E

    2003-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has transformed the outlook for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Most of the evidence from uncontrolled clinical trials suggests that MTX is an effective agent for treating active JIA. Data from controlled clinical trials suggests that MTX has statistically significant effects on patient centred disability measures in JIA patients with active arthritis. Although we would like a much larger study directed evidence base for our use of the drug, the studies that have been done are sound and have been followed by a change in clinical expectations and advice that speak of qualitative evidence from clinical practice, confirming the scientifically acquired data. Randomised controlled multicentre trials using sufficient numbers of patients, including functional assessment and quality of life measures, are needed to confirm the long term efficacy and safety of MTX in JIA. PMID:12598376

  9. Health care for youth involved with the correctional system.

    PubMed

    Perry, Raymond C W; Morris, Robert E

    2014-09-01

    Adolescents with involvement in the correctional system have significant health risks and needs. Professional guidelines and policies related to health services in correctional settings can help health care providers who work in youth detention facilities and those who see youth for follow-up care after incarceration. Several challenges exist to providing care in detention facilities, but overcoming these barriers to optimally serve youth is critical. When youth are released to their homes, community providers must understand the extent of care offered in detention facilities, the unique considerations for youth on probation, and the aspects of follow-up care that should be addressed. PMID:25124213

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites; Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wickline

    2006-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01,

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant Evenson

    2008-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 563, Septic Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). The corrective action sites (CASs) for CAU 563 are located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and are comprised of the following four sites:;\\u000a;

  12. Therapeutic effects of stem cells and substrate reduction in juvenile Sandhoff mice.

    PubMed

    Arthur, J R; Lee, J P; Snyder, E Y; Seyfried, T N

    2012-06-01

    Sandhoff Disease (SD) involves the CNS accumulation of ganglioside GM2 and asialo-GM2 (GA2) due to inherited defects in the ?-subunit gene of ?-hexosaminidase A and B (Hexb gene). Substrate reduction therapy, utilizing imino sugar N-butyldeoxygalactonojirimycin (NB-DGJ), reduces ganglioside biosynthesis and levels of stored GM2 in SD mice. Intracranial transplantation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) can provide enzymatic cross correction, to help reduce ganglioside storage and extend life. Here we tested the effect of NSCs and NB-DGJ, alone and together, on brain ?-hexosaminidase activity, GM2, and GA2 content in juvenile SD mice. The SD mice received either cerebral NSC transplantation at post-natal day 0 (p-0), intraperitoneal injection of NB-DGJ (500 mg/kg/day) from p-9 to p-15, or received dual treatments. The brains were analyzed at p-15. ?-galactosidase staining confirmed engraftment of lacZ-expressing NSCs in the cerebral cortex. Compared to untreated and sham-treated SD controls, NSC treatment alone provided a slight increase in Hex activity and significantly decreased GA2 content. However, NSCs had no effect on GM2 content when analyzed at p-15. NB-DGJ alone had no effect on Hex activity, but significantly reduced GM2 and GA2 content. Hex activity was slightly elevated in the NSC + drug-treated mice. GM2 and GA2 content in the dual treated mice were similar to that of the NB-DGJ treated mice. These data indicate that NB-DGJ alone was more effective in targeting storage in juvenile SD mice than were NSCs alone. No additive or synergistic effect between NSC and drug was found in these juvenile SD mice. PMID:22367451

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0 with ROTC No. 1 and ROTC No. 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2004-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant Evenson

    2008-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, located in Areas 2, 3, 4, 12, and 15 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 234 is comprised of the following

  15. Probiotic Feeding Experiments with Juvenile Channel Catfish and Nile Tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probiotic microbial feed supplements are gaining wide acceptance in livestock production, and may be applicable to aquaculture production systems. We have conducted a series of experiments using commercial probiotics added to diets of juvenile channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), and...

  16. Mineral balance in juvenile horses in race training 

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Tonya Leigh

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to further elucidate the requirements for Ca, P and Mg during exercise induced skeletal modeling and remodeling in juvenile racehorses. Nineteen long yearlings were fed rations containing differing amounts of Ca, P and Mg...

  17. 28 CFR 115.114 - Juveniles and youthful detainees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...youthful detainees. 115.114 Section 115.114 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Prevention Planning § 115.114 Juveniles and youthful...

  18. Tail Kinematics of Juvenile Common Snapping Turtles during Aquatic Walking

    E-print Network

    Blob, Richard W.

    juvenile Common Snapping Turtles (Chelydra serpentina) during aquatic walking. Common Snapping Turtles hold Macrochelys temminicki and three Common Snapping Turtle species in the genus Chelydra; Phillips et al., 1996

  19. American juvenile justice system: history in the making.

    PubMed

    Meng, Aaron; Segal, Roland; Boden, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The original theory behind separating juvenile offenders from adult offenders was to provide care and direction for youngsters instead of isolation and punishment. This idea took hold in the 19th century and became mainstream by the early 20th century. In the 1950s and 1960s, public concern grew because of a perceived lack of effectiveness and lack of rights. The Supreme Court made a series of rulings solidifying juvenile rights including the right to receive notice of charges, the right to have an attorney and the right to have charges proven beyond a reasonable doubt. In the 1980s, the public view was that the juvenile court system was too lenient and that juvenile crimes were on the rise. In the 1990s, many states passed punitive laws, including mandatory sentencing and blanket transfers to adult courts for certain crimes. As a result, the pendulum is now swinging back toward the middle from rehabilitation toward punishment. PMID:23843574

  20. Suspected viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) in a juvenile blackbar triggerfish,

    E-print Network

    Grutter, Alexandra "Lexa"

    Suspected viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) in a juvenile blackbar triggerfish, Rhinecanthus Suspected viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) was detected in blood films from an immature blackbar erythrocytes affected by the VEN-like condition, but accompanying erythroblasts appeared free from infection

  1. Transportation methods for restocking of juvenile sea cucumber, Holothuria scabra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven W. Purcell; Bernard F. Blockmans; Natacha N. S. Agudo

    2006-01-01

    The sandfish, Holothuria scabra, is a heavily exploited sea cucumber species. Minimising stress in the transportation of hatchery-produced sandfish juveniles to release sites is critical for successful restocking. Replicate groups (n=4) of 20 hatchery-produced juveniles (1–5 g) were held in plastic bags with oxygen under 6 transport durations (0, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h), two media (water or

  2. Survival and growth of cultured juvenile sea cucumbers, Holothuria scabra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen C. Battaglene; J. Evizel Seymour; Christain Ramofafia

    1999-01-01

    Factors influencing survival and growth of cultured sandfish, Holothuria scabra, were evaluated in a series of experiments in land-based nursery tanks. There was a critical period in the culture of newly-settled juveniles(<5mm) during which high mortality occurred. After 1 month, survival averaged 34.4% (± 1.2 s.e., n=4) if juveniles were reared on plates, but was lower and more variable if

  3. Movements of juvenile Bonelli's Eagles Aquila fasciata during dispersal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javier Balbontín; Miguel Ferrer

    2009-01-01

    Capsule Juvenile non?breeding males and females explored surrounding areas, returned to breeding areas, and settled in temporary settlement areas.Aims To describe movement patterns of juvenile Bonelli's Eagles during the transient phase of dispersal.Methods Radiotelemetry data from 16 individuals were studied.Results Six main temporary settlement areas were located. No sex differences were found in the time to first departure from natal

  4. Juvenile Sex Offenders: A Group on its Own?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anton van Wijk; Joan van Horn; Ruud Bullens; Catrien Bijleveld; Theo Doreleijers

    2005-01-01

    There is some debate about whether sex offenders are similar to non-sex offenders. It is known that sex and non-sex offenders are heterogeneous groups. Comparative studies must take this heterogeneity into account. Based on an aggregated database, a study was conducted among adjudicated juvenile (sex) offenders. The sample consisted of juvenile male sex and non-sex offenders who had been subjected

  5. Platyrrhine juvenile mortality in captivity and in the wild

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. W. J. Debyser

    1995-01-01

    I reviewed literature on juvenile mortality in the Platyrrhini in order to evaluate reproductive success in captive breeding.\\u000a Juvenile mortality includes abortion, premature mortality, stillbirth and death of the unweaned young. The highest losses\\u000a occur in the Callitrichidae (31% through 3 months of age; 86% through 6 months of age) and in Lagothrixspp. (around 50% through 1 month of age)

  6. [Unusual presentation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Moreno Prieto, M; Carbonero Celis, M J; Cuadrado Caballero, M C

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is very rare. This is the case of an 18 month old female patient whose first sign of disease was torticollis due to an underlying atlanto-axial subluxation. Three months later, bilateral knee arthritis developed and she was diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Throughout the disease a persistent elevation of liver enzymes was noted, combined with positive antinuclear antibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, reaching the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:25066796

  7. Characterization and purification of juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase

    E-print Network

    Peck, Kenneth Elden

    1989-01-01

    , and JH-III acid was found when AdoMet was in limited supply. This suggests that the final steps in JH synthesis in M. sexta are epoxidation and methylation in that order. The terminal step is catalyzed by an O-methyltransferase, juvenile hormone acid...) Govindan Bhaskaran (Member) cger W. Meola (Member) Timothy C. Hal'1 (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT Characterization and Purification of Juvenile Hormone Acid Nethyltransferase. (December 1989) Kenneth Elden Peck, B, S. , Texas A&N...

  8. Imaging findings of juvenile xanthogranuloma of the penis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ray K. Bradford; Arabinda K. Choudhary

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a rare benign self-limiting lesion presenting in early childhood. It is the commonest variant\\u000a of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis and usually presents as a cutaneous mass. It might have a systemic component and also\\u000a might be associated with other conditions, notably neurofibromatosis and juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia. Penile masses\\u000a are unusual in childhood and we describe a

  9. Reliability of self-report of health in juvenile offenders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dianna T Kenny; Jennifer Grant

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the accuracy of self-reports of juvenile offenders on physical factors (e.g. sleep difficulties, weight-related behaviours and weight perceptions), health risk behaviours (e.g. alcohol use), trauma history (e.g. physical and sexual abuse) and psychological factors (e.g. anxiety, suicidal and self-harm behaviours). Self-reports obtained via a Health Questionnaire from 242 incarcerated juvenile offenders

  10. Uses of rational emotive behavior therapy with juvenile sex offenders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Whitford; Vincent Parr

    1995-01-01

    Juvenile sexual offenses appear to be on the rise. This contributes to harm and trauma to the victims and the community at\\u000a large. For many years the major interest in sex offender treatment has been directed toward assessment and treatment of the\\u000a adult offender in spite of the reported large proportion of all sex crimes committed by juveniles (Uniform Crime

  11. The Moral Judgment of Juvenile Delinquents: A Meta-Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geert Jan Stams; Daniel Brugman; Maja Dekovi?; Lenny van Rosmalen; Peter van der Laan; John C. Gibbs

    2006-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 50 studies was conducted to investigate whether juvenile delinquents use lower levels of moral judgment than their nondelinquent age-mates and, if so, what factors may influence or moderate the developmental delay. The results show a lower stage of moral judgment for juvenile delinquents (d=.76). Effect sizes were large for comparisons involving male offenders, late adolescents, delinquents with

  12. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits subtrate control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the cloning, sequencing, characterization, 3D modeling and docking of Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the enzyme that converts juvenile hormone acid (JHA) into juvenile hormone (JH). Purified recombinant AeaJHAMT was extensively characterized for enzym...

  13. Familial juvenile polyposis coli; increased risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, H; Franssila, K O

    1984-01-01

    Six patients from one family and one solitary patient with juvenile polyposis coli are described. The histological changes in colonic polyps formed a spectrum from juvenile polyps, through focal to extensive adenomatous change, to adenocarcinomas. One patient aged 49 years had an adenocarcinoma of the colon and in another, aged 33, with rectal polyps and metastatic cancer this was suspected although the primary tumour was not located. Two additional patients, aged 19 and 41 years, had severe adenomatous dysplasia in a juvenile polyp. Four patients also had gastroduodenal polyps. The present findings clearly contradict the previous view that juvenile polyposis coli is not premalignant and only rarely needs surgical treatment. As other recent reports also describe frequent occurrence of neoplastic changes in juvenile polyps, colectomy, and ileorectostomy at the age of about 20 years is recommended as the treatment of choice for juvenile polyposis coli, as in patients with familial adenomatosis coli. Follow up should ideally include gastroduodenoscopy and inspection of the rectal remnant at regular intervals. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:6735258

  14. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and familial adenomatous polyposis: an association?

    PubMed

    Ferouz, A S; Mohr, R M; Paul, P

    1995-10-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign neoplasm affecting the nasopharynx of male adolescents. Two patients treated at Temple University Hospital for this condition were also diagnosed with familial adenomatous polyposis. Familial adenomatous polyposis results from the inheritance of a mutated adenomatous polyposis coli gene in an autosomal dominant pattern. The development of colorectal carcinoma in middle age is seen almost invariably in familial adenomatous polyposis, if a prophylactic colectomy is not performed. To identify a possible association between juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and familial adenomatous polyposis, chart reviews and patient interviews were carried out for all patients treated for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma at Temple University Hospital between 1985 and 1993. Single-strand conformational polymorphism was performed to detect the presence of certain adenomatous polyposis coli gene mutations within the germline DNA of those juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma patients not previously found to have familial adenomatous polyposis. Although no more patients with both juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and familial adenomatous polyposis were found by these methods, the two patients with both disorders previously identified constitute 22% of our juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma series. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7567017

  15. The role of structuring benthos for juvenile flatfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaut, M.; Audfroid Calderón, M.; Van de Moortel, L.; van Dalfsen, J.; Vincx, M.; Degraer, S.; Desroy, N.

    2013-11-01

    Within coastal nurseries, the distribution of juvenile flatfish may depend on small-scale habitat variability. The presence of ecosystem engineers is known to have important impacts in coastal sediments. Lanice conchilega is a well-known marine ecosystem engineer of shallow soft bottom ecosystems, shaping the macrobenthic community and attracting flatfish. The present study examines the relation between juvenile flatfish and L. conchilega reefs through two experiments. In a field experiment in the Dutch part of the North Sea, the benthic habitat is evaluated by comparing relative differences in numbers of juvenile flatfish between ecosystem engineered habitats and adjacent bare sand (i.e. non-ecosystem engineered) habitats. The hypothetical shelter seeking behaviour was further examined using stomach content analyses. Results show that juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa was the dominant species within the tube worm habitat and the species selects specifically for this biogenic habitat. This selection was explained as feeding behaviour. In a complementary laboratory study, food was excluded and the shelter function of the ecosystem engineered habitat was investigated. This experiment quantifies the selection for this habitat by juveniles of the common sole Solea solea. Results from the flume experiment, manipulating the number of tube worms, show that distribution of sole was not random when current velocities are high. The selected habitat is the one with low density tube worm aggregations. Overall, we conclude that structuring benthos plays an important role for juvenile flatfish, both as refuge and as feeding ground.

  16. Juvenile delinquency treatment and prevention: a literature review.

    PubMed

    May, Jessica; Osmond, Kristina; Billick, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    In the last three decades there has been ample research to demonstrate that instituting Multisystemic Therapy for serious juvenile offenders, keeping them in the community with intensive intervention, can significantly reduce recidivism. When there is recidivism, it is less severe than in released incarcerated juveniles. Multisystemic Therapy provides 24 h available parental guidance, family therapy, individual therapy, group therapy, educational support and quite importantly a change of peer group. In New York City, there is the new mandate through the Juvenile Justice Initiative to implement interventions to keep juvenile offenders in the community rather than sending them to be incarcerated. However, this paper aims to examine how teaching prosocial values in early childhood can reduce the incidence of first-time juvenile delinquency. Programs such as the Perry School Project will be discussed to demonstrate that although somewhat expensive, these innovative programs nonetheless are quite cost-effective as the cost to society of adjudication, incarceration and victim damages are significantly greater. Along with teaching prosocial 0020 values, there has been renewed interest in early identification of youth at risk for developing Antisocial Personality Disorder. An update is given on the status of both promising approaches in early intervention to prevent serious juvenile delinquency and hence adult criminality. PMID:24610601

  17. Lack of association between interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-beta gene polymorphisms and juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Arezou; Ziaee, Vahid; Sharabian, Fatemeh Tahghighi; Harsini, Sara; Mahmoudi, Maryam; Soltani, Samaneh; Sadr, Maryam; Moradinejad, Mohammad Hassan; Aghighi, Yahya; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-06-01

    As abundant types of genetic predisposition and environmental factors seem to be associated with the development of juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), we investigated the gene polymorphisms of two anti-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-?), which were previously found to be associated with SLE in adults, in a group of patients with JSLE. We studied a group of 59 Iranian patients with JSLE in comparison with 140 healthy controls and assessed the frequency of alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes of IL-10 and TGF-? single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers method. The CA genotype was significantly more frequent at position -592 in IL-10 in patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus than in the controls (P?=?0.01). Genotype CC was detected at the same position in 32.7 % of the patients; this frequency was significantly lower than the frequency of 50.7 % recorded in the healthy controls (P?=?0.03). The TC haplotype of TGF-? (codon 10, codon 25) was significantly more frequent in the patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus than in the healthy controls (P?=?0.02). Nevertheless, these significant associations disappear after Bonferroni correction. Our findings suggest that IL-10 (-1082, -819, -592) and TGF-? (codon 10, codon 25) gene variants may not be associated with the development of JSLE in Iranian population. PMID:25633651

  18. Exome sequencing as a diagnostic tool in a case of undiagnosed juvenile-onset GM1-gangliosidosis

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David A.; Markello, Thomas; Golas, Gretchen; Yang, Sandra; Sincan, Murat; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin; Hansen, Nancy F.; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Cruz, Pedro; Teer, Jamie K.; Mullikin, James C.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; Tifft, Cynthia J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To utilize high-throughput sequencing to determine the etiology of juvenile-onset neurodegeneration in a 19-year-old woman with progressive motor and cognitive decline. Methods: Exome sequencing identified an initial list of 133,555 variants in the proband's family, which were filtered using segregation analysis, presence in dbSNP, and an empirically derived gene exclusion list. The filtered list comprised 52 genes: 21 homozygous variants and 31 compound heterozygous variants. These variants were subsequently scrutinized with predicted pathogenicity programs and for association with appropriate clinical syndromes. Results: Exome sequencing data identified 2 GLB1 variants (c.602G>A, p.R201H; c.785G>T, p.G262V). ?-Galactosidase enzyme analysis prior to our evaluation was reported as normal; however, subsequent testing was consistent with juvenile-onset GM1-gangliosidosis. Urine oligosaccharide analysis was positive for multiple oligosaccharides with terminal galactose residues. Conclusions: We describe a patient with juvenile-onset neurodegeneration that had eluded diagnosis for over a decade. GM1-gangliosidosis had previously been excluded from consideration, but was subsequently identified as the correct diagnosis using exome sequencing. Exome sequencing can evaluate genes not previously associated with neurodegeneration, as well as most known neurodegeneration-associated genes. Our results demonstrate the utility of “agnostic” exome sequencing to evaluate patients with undiagnosed disorders, without prejudice from prior testing results. PMID:22675082

  19. 36 CFR 1280.34 - What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior? 1280.34 Section...Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES USE OF NARA FACILITIES What Are the General Rules of...

  20. 36 CFR 1280.34 - What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior? 1280.34 Section...Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES USE OF NARA FACILITIES What Are the General Rules of...

  1. 36 CFR 1280.34 - What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior? 1280.34 Section...Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES USE OF NARA FACILITIES What Are the General Rules of...

  2. 36 CFR 1280.34 - What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior? 1280.34 Section...Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES USE OF NARA FACILITIES What Are the General Rules of...

  3. Nursing Facilities (Medicaid)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... provided by Medicaid or other state agencies. Where Nursing Facility Services are provided Medicaid coverage of Nursing ... the Medicaid Nursing Facility benefit. Who may receive Nursing Facility Services Nursing facility services for are required ...

  4. Prevention and intervention programs for juvenile offenders.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade researchers have identified intervention strategies and program models that reduce delinquency and promote pro-social development. Preventing delinquency, says Peter Greenwood, not only saves young lives from being wasted, but also prevents the onset of adult criminal careers and thus reduces the burden of crime on its victims and on society. It costs states billions of dollars a year to arrest, prosecute, incarcerate, and treat juvenile offenders. Investing in successful delinquency-prevention programs can save taxpayers seven to ten dollars for every dollar invested, primarily in the form of reduced spending on prisons. According to Greenwood, researchers have identified a dozen "proven" delinquency-prevention programs. Another twenty to thirty "promising" programs are still being tested. In his article, Greenwood reviews the methods used to identify the best programs, explains how program success is measured, provides an overview of programs that work, and offers guidance on how jurisdictions can shift toward more evidence-based practices The most successful programs are those that prevent youth from engaging in delinquent behaviors in the first place. Greenwood specifically cites home-visiting programs that target pregnant teens and their at-risk infants and preschool education for at-risk children that includes home visits or work with parents. Successful school-based programs can prevent drug use, delinquency, anti-social behavior, and early school drop-out. Greenwood also discusses community-based programs that can divert first-time offenders from further encounters with the justice system. The most successful community programs emphasize family interactions and provide skills to the adults who supervise and train the child. Progress in implementing effective programs, says Greenwood, is slow. Although more than ten years of solid evidence is now available on evidence-based programs, only about 5 percent of youth who should be eligible participate in these programs. A few states such as Florida, Pennsylvania, and Washington have begun implementing evidence-based programs. The challenge is to push these reforms into the mainstream of juvenile justice. PMID:21338003

  5. Elevated streamflows increase dam passage by juvenile coho salmon during winter: Implications of climate change in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kock, Tobias J.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Serl, John D.; Kohn, Mike; Bumbaco, Karin A.

    2012-01-01

    A 4-year evaluation was conducted to determine the proportion of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch passing Cowlitz Falls Dam, on the Cowlitz River, Washington, during winter. River and reservoir populations of coho salmon parr were monitored using radiotelemetry to determine if streamflow increases resulted in increased downstream movement and dam passage. This was of interest because fish that pass downstream of Cowlitz Falls Dam become landlocked in Riffe Lake and are lost to the anadromous population. Higher proportions of reservoir-released fish (0.391-0.480) passed Cowlitz Falls Dam than did river-released fish (0.037-0.119). Event-time analyses demonstrated that streamflow increases were important predictors of dam passage rates during the study. The estimated effect of increasing streamflows on the risk of dam passage varied annually and ranged from 9% to 75% for every 28.3 m3/s increase in streamflow. These results have current management implications because they demonstrate the significance of dam passage by juvenile coho salmon during winter months when juvenile fish collection facilities are typically not operating. The results also have future management implications because climate change predictions suggest that peak streamflow timing for many watersheds in the Pacific Northwest will shift from late spring and early summer to winter. Increased occurrence of intense winter flood events is also expected. Our results demonstrate that juvenile coho salmon respond readily to streamflow increases and initiate downstream movements during winter months, which could result in increased passage at dams during these periods if climate change predictions are realized in the coming decades.

  6. Immunosuppressive Treatment for Retinal Degeneration in Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Juvenile Batten Disease).

    PubMed

    Drack, Arlene V; Mullins, Robert F; Pfeifer, Wanda L; Augustine, Erika F; Stasheff, Steven F; Hong, Sandy D

    2014-02-19

    Abstract Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (JNCL) presents with progressive vision loss at 4-7 years of age. Blindness results within 2 years, followed by inexorable neurologic decline and death. There is no treatment or cure. Neuroinflammation is postulated to play a role in the neurodegeneration. The JNCL mouse model demonstrated decreased neuroinflammation and improved motor skills with immunosuppression. Based on this work, a short-term human clinical trial of mycophenolate mofetil has begun, however longer term effects, and whether immunosuppression modulates vision loss, have not been studied. We report a JNCL patient treated with immunosuppressive therapy in whom visual function was comprehensively characterized over 2 years. PMID:24547931

  7. Immediate mortality of juvenile clupeids at a Kaplan turbine, on the Connecticut River, Holyoke, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The immediate turbine mortality of juvenile clupeids was estimated at three common modes of operation for a 17 megawatt (MW) Kaplan turbine, at Holyoke Water Power Co., Holyoke, MA. Mark-recapture methods were employed using stained test, control and dead fish, with passive trawls set to recover live fish. Dead fish were released through the turbine with each replicate to obtain a correction factor for turbine mortalities recovered. Mortality was evaluated from the ratio of recovered test fish, to recovered control fish. Immediate turbine mortality was 63% at 16.5 M.W. (4 replicates), 83% at 12 M.W. (3 replicates) and 83% at 5.5 M.W. (2 replicates). A highly significant difference in mortality was found between the 16.5 M.W. mode and the latter two. This result may be due to the minimal cavitation which occurs at maximum turbine efficiency (16.5 M.W.). 24 references, 4 tables.

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 371, Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe, located within Areas 11 and 18 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 comprises two corrective action sites (CASs):;\\u000a;\\u000a 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area;

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet\\/Palanquin Unit Craters, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sloop

    2011-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)\\/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372, Area 20 Cabriolet\\/Palanquin Unit Craters, located within Areas 18 and 20 at the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 372 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs):;\\u000a 18-45-02, Little Feller I

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 274: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant Evenson

    2006-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document\\/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 274, Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 274 is comprised of five corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 03-02-01, WX-6 ETS Building Septic System; (2) CAS 06-02-01, Cesspool; (3) CAS 09-01-01,

  11. Clean Slate 1 Corrective Action Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared to meet the requirements specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE, 1997) was submitted to the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP) January 31, 1997 for the Clean Slate 1 (CS-1) Site in accordance with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE, 1996) and the Soils Media Operable Unit Quality Assurance Project Plan (DOE, 1995). The FFACO lists CS-1 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) number 412.

  12. Mutation Screening in Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pyatt, Robert E.; Pilarski, Robert; Prior, Thomas W.

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by congenital anomalies, hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, and the development of tumors in these tissues. The diagnosis of JPS is often difficult because of the phenotypic overlap with other hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. Germline mutations have been identified in MADH4 and BMPR1A, aiding in presymptomatic genetic testing. In this study, we describe the results from 3 years of molecular diagnostic screening in JPS. Seventy unrelated individuals referred to our lab for JPS testing were examined through the sequence analysis of coding regions and exon-intron boundaries in both genes. Germline mutations were identified in 30% of cases, with 11.4% in BMPR1A and 18.6% in MADH4. All mutation-positive individuals were negative for cancer at testing, and a single pulmonary valve stenosis was the only congenital anomaly reported. A majority of mutations identified were novel including the first splice site alteration in MADH4. Based on the limited number of exons in each gene, low polymorphism frequency, and high frequency of frameshift or nonsense mutations identified, direct sequence analysis is a suitable methodology for mutation screening if all coding regions and exon-intron boundaries are examined in both genes. PMID:16436638

  13. Mutation screening in juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pyatt, Robert E; Pilarski, Robert; Prior, Thomas W

    2006-02-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by congenital anomalies, hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, and the development of tumors in these tissues. The diagnosis of JPS is often difficult because of the phenotypic overlap with other hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. Germline mutations have been identified in MADH4 and BMPR1A, aiding in presymptomatic genetic testing. In this study, we describe the results from 3 years of molecular diagnostic screening in JPS. Seventy unrelated individuals referred to our lab for JPS testing were examined through the sequence analysis of coding regions and exon-intron boundaries in both genes. Germline mutations were identified in 30% of cases, with 11.4% in BMPR1A and 18.6% in MADH4. All mutation-positive individuals were negative for cancer at testing, and a single pulmonary valve stenosis was the only congenital anomaly reported. A majority of mutations identified were novel including the first splice site alteration in MADH4. Based on the limited number of exons in each gene, low polymorphism frequency, and high frequency of frameshift or nonsense mutations identified, direct sequence analysis is a suitable methodology for mutation screening if all coding regions and exon-intron boundaries are examined in both genes. PMID:16436638

  14. Risk of colorectal cancer in juvenile polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; van Hattem, Arnout; Hylind, Linda M; Iacobuzio?Donahue, Christine; Romans, Katharine E; Axilbund, Jennifer; Cruz?Correa, Marcia; Tersmette, Anne C; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Giardiello, Francis M

    2007-01-01

    Background Juvenile polyposis (JP) is an autosomal?dominant syndrome characterised by the development of hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyps and is associated with colorectal cancer. However, the relative and absolute risk of colorectal malignancy in these patients is not known. Methods The incidence rates of colorectal cancer in patients with JP were compared with that of the general population through person?year analysis with adjustment for demographics. Results In patients with JP, the RR (95% CI) of colorectal cancer was 34.0 (14.4 to 65.7). Similar risks were noted in both males (30.0, 9.6 to 68.6) and females (43.7, 8.8 to 125). The cumulative life?time risk for colorectal cancer was 38.7%. The mean (SD) age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer was 43.9 (10.4)?years. Other gastrointestinal malignancies were not noted in this cohort. Conclusion Patients with JP have a markedly increased RR and absolute risk for colorectal cancer and require vigilant colorectal surveillance starting at young age. A low threshold for recommending surgery with consideration for removal of the entire colorectum seems warranted. PMID:17303595

  15. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Maggiore, Giuseppe; Nastasio, Silvia; Sciveres, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis (JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific and organ-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoantibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature. PMID:25067998

  16. Genetic heterogeneity in familial juvenile polyposis.

    PubMed

    Huang, S C; Chen, C R; Lavine, J E; Taylor, S F; Newbury, R O; Pham, T T; Ricciardiello, L; Carethers, J M

    2000-12-15

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps in the absence of the extraintestinal features that are classic for other hamartomatous polyposis syndromes, such as Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS) and Cowden disease (CD). About 50% of BRRS and >80% of CD demonstrate germ-line mutations in the tumor suppressor and dual phosphatase, PTEN. Germ-line mutation of PTEN as a cause for JPS in a child is controversial because extraintestinal manifestations that would exclude JPS could appear after adolescence, altering the clinical diagnosis. Here, we investigated a family in which the 55-year-old father, who lacks thyroid or skin findings characteristic of CD, demonstrated a germ-line mutation in PTEN that was passed to identical twin daughters, who both manifested JPS. The mutation was a deletion of five bases beginning seven bases from the start of exon 4 of PTEN, which caused aberrant transcripts by reverse transcription-PCR that were absent from a normal individual. Thus, mutations in PTEN are associated with JPS in addition to CD and some BRRS families, although the incidence of PTEN germ-line mutations in JPS might be more rare than that reported for SMAD4, a gene found to be mutated in approximately one-half of the JPS families investigated. PMID:11156385

  17. Comparative genomics of insect juvenile hormone biosynthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, F.G.; Ribeiro, J.M.C.; Koener, J.F.; Valenzuela, J.G.; Hernandez-Martinez, S.; Pham, V.M.; Feyereisen, R.

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of insect juvenile hormone (JH) and its neuroendocrine control are attractive targets for chemical control of insect pests and vectors of disease. To facilitate the molecular study of JH biosynthesis, we analyzed ESTs from the glands producing JH, the corpora allata (CA) in the cockroach Diploptera punctata, an insect long used as a physiological model species and compared them with ESTs from the CA of the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Anopheles albimanus. The predicted genes were analyzed according to their probable functions with the Gene Ontology classification, and compared to Drosophila and Anopheles gambiae genes. A large number of reciprocal matches in the cDNA libraries of cockroach and mosquito CA were found. These matches defined known and suspected enzymes of the JH biosynthetic pathway, but also several proteins associated with signal transduction that might play a role in the modulation of JH synthesis by neuropeptides. The identification in both cockroach and mosquito CA of homologs of the small ligand binding proteins from insects, Takeout/JH binding protein and retinol-binding protein highlights a hitherto unsuspected complexity of metabolite trafficking, perhaps JH precursor trafficking, in these endocrine glands. Furthermore, many reciprocal matches for genes of unknown function may provide a fertile ground for an in-depth study of allatal-specific cell physiology. PMID:16551550

  18. The correct name of the endemic Dasypus (Cingulata: Dasypodidae) from northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Feijó, Anderson; Cordeiro-Estrela, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    We show that Dasypus mazzai Yepes 1933 is a senior synonym of Dasypus yepesi Vizcaíno 1995. We present morphological evidence that the holotype of D. mazzai is not a juvenile of Dasypus novemcinctus or any other species of this genus, but a distinct endemic species from northwestern Argentina undistinguishable from D. yepesi. Therefore, the correct name for the long-nosed armadillo of intermediate size occurring in the Argentinean provinces of Jujuy and Salta is Dasypus mazzai Yepes 1933. PMID:25543926

  19. Criminal history and future offending of juveniles convicted of the possession of child pornography.

    PubMed

    Aebi, Marcel; Plattner, Belinda; Ernest, Melanie; Kaszynski, Katie; Bessler, Cornelia

    2014-08-01

    Most child pornography is distributed online. It is estimated that 3% to 15% of child pornography consumers are juveniles. The present study analyzed a consecutive sample of 54 male juveniles convicted of the possession of child pornography. Demographic characteristics, criminal history, and subsequent offending were assessed from criminal files and official reports. Juvenile possessors of child pornography were compared to three different groups of juveniles: Juvenile possessors of other illegal pornography (n = 42), juveniles who committed a sexual contact offense against a child (n = 64), and juveniles who committed a sexual contact offense against a peer or adult (n = 104). Juvenile possessors of child pornography were found to have downloaded the illegal material more frequently and over a longer time period than juvenile possessors of other illegal pornography. Furthermore, juvenile possessors of child pornography differed from juveniles who had committed a sexual contact offense in terms of demographics and showed fewer previous and subsequent offending than juveniles who sexually offended against a peer or adult. We conclude that juvenile possessors of child pornography need a specific target intervention focusing on dysfunctional Internet use and sexually deviant arousal. PMID:23813492

  20. An assessment of juvenile Pacific Ocean perch ( Sebastes alutus) habitat use in a deepwater nursery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooper, Christopher N.; Boldt, Jennifer L.; Zimmermann, Mark

    2007-11-01

    It is believed that juvenile habitats are important to determining recruitment to adult fish populations through density dependence that occurs in nursery areas. For deepwater marine fishes, the characteristics of nursery areas are generally unknown. The objectives of this study were to examine a potential nursery area for juvenile Pacific ocean perch (POP, Sebastes alutus), determine the specific microhabitats used by juvenile POP, and compare the distribution of juvenile POP to adults. Juvenile POP habitat use was examined at three sites near Samalga Pass in the Aleutian Islands. Presence or absence and density estimates of juvenile POP were made from underwater video collected at 11 transects and from 6 bottom tows at the study sites. Juvenile POP were found predominantly in mixed sand and boulder substrata to the exclusion of most other habitat types. Juvenile POP were found within one body length of complex structure such as boulders, upright coral or sponges. There were higher densities of juvenile POP at the site south of Samalga Pass than at the other sites, while adult POP were found in highest abundance at the site north of Samalga Pass. An examination of large-scale patterns of juvenile and adult POP distribution indicates that juveniles use shallower depth zones on the continental shelf. Combined with the geographic separation we observed in this study, this suggests juvenile POP use nursery habitats that are different from adult POP. Conservation and management of this species should address the habitat requirements of juveniles to maintain the goal of healthy adult populations.

  1. National Institute of Corrections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Institute of Corrections hosts a wealth of information for anyone in criminal corrections, by "providing federal, state, and local corrections agencies with training, technical assistance, information services, and policy/program development assistance." Their left-hand navigation menu makes it easy to find your way through their site. The Training Services & Resources link allows users to find opportunities for learning, whether one is interested in classroom-based learning, or non-traditional studies via the Internet or other avenues. The Research Center hosts site-developed resources as well as links to other websites relevant to corrections.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

  3. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Gustafason

    2001-02-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2000). The CAU includes two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 1; and 25-23-03, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 2. Investigation of CAU 143 was conducted in 1999. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine constituents of concern for CAU 143. Radionuclide concentrations in disposal pit soil samples associated with the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility West Trenches, the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility East Trestle Pit, and the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility Trench are greater than normal background concentrations. These constituents are identified as constituents of concern for their respective CASs. Closure-in-place with administrative controls involves use restrictions to minimize access and prevent unauthorized intrusive activities, earthwork to fill depressions to original grade, placing additional clean cover material over the previously filled portion of some of the trenches, and placing secondary or diversion berm around pertinent areas to divert storm water run-on potential.

  4. Corrections in spoken dialogue systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Swerts; Diane J. Litman; Julia Hirschberg

    2000-01-01

    This study analyzes user corrections of system errors in the TOOT spoken dialogue system. We find that corrections differ from non- corrections prosodically, in ways consistent with hyperar ticulated speech, although many corrections are not hyperarticulated. Yet both are misrecognized more frequently than non-corrections — though no more likely to be rejected by the system. Corrections more distant from the

  5. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Z. Daniel; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

  6. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 2. Three-dimensional tracking and passage outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z Daniel; Weiland, Mark A; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Carlson, Thomas J; Eppard, M Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

  7. Housekeeping category corrective action unit work plan

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Work Plan is to provide a strategy to be used by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the US Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) (formerly the Defense Nuclear Agency), and contractor personnel for conducting corrective actions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Nevada off-site locations including the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), the Project Shoal Area, and the Central Nevada Test Area. This Work Plan applies to housekeeping category CAUs already listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Appendices (FFACO, 1996) as well as newly identified Corrective Action Sites (CASs) that will follow the housekeeping process.

  8. Home range and movements of juvenile Puerto Rican parrots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, G.D.; Arendt, W.J.; Kalina, J.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    We studied home range and movements of 15 radio-marked, juvenile Puerto Rican parrots (Amazona vittata) fledging from wild nests during summer and fall, 1985-87. When juvenile parrots remained in the nest valley, home ranges during 1986 (.hivin.x = 32 .+-. 10 [SE] ha, n = 4) were larger (P = 0.0079) than during 1987 (.hivin.x = 13 .+-. 6 ha, n = 5). After radio-marked parrots integrated into adult flocks, home ranges during 1986 (.hivin.x = 1,075 .+-. 135 ha, n = 3) were similar (P = 0.10) to 1987 (.hivin.x = 416 .+-. 62 ha, n = 2). Juvenile parrots restricted their movements to nest valleys an average of 58 .+-. 29 days following fledging. After joining adult flocks, juvenile parrots routinely flew between the east and west slopes of the Luquillo Mountains but did not exhibit a seaonal pattern of movement. We recommend that captive-raised, juvenile parrots used in release programs be .gtoreq. 5 months old to ensure they are mature enough to integrate into wild flocks.

  9. Detecting Mental Disorder in Juvenile Detainees: Who Receives Services

    PubMed Central

    Teplin, Linda A.; Abram, Karen M.; McClelland, Gary M.; Washburn, Jason J.; Pikus, Ann K.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We determined whether or not juvenile detainees with major mental disorders received treatment, and the variables that predicted who received services. Methods. Our sample was 1829 randomly selected juvenile detainees taking part in the Northwestern Juvenile Project. To determine need for mental health services, independent interviewers administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children and rated functional impairment using the Child Global Assessment Scale. Records on service provision were obtained from the juvenile justice and public health systems. Results. Among detainees who had major mental disorders and associated functional impairments, 15.4% received treatment in the detention center and 8.1% received treatment in the community by the time of case disposition or 6 months, whichever came first. Significantly more girls than boys were detected and treated. Receiving treatment was predicted by clinical variables (having a major mental disorder or reported treatment history or suicidal behavior) and demographic variables. Conclusions. The challenge to public health is to provide accessible, innovative, and effective treatments to juvenile detainees, a population that is often beyond the reach of traditional services. PMID:16186454

  10. Maternal immune activation increases seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Zhang, Xin-Ting; Li, Jun; Yu, Lin; Wang, Ji-Wen; Lei, Ge-Fei; Sun, Ruo-Peng; Li, Bao-Min

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological data suggest a relationship between maternal infection and a high incidence of childhood epilepsy in offspring. However, there is little experimental evidence that links maternal infection with later seizure susceptibility in juvenile offspring. Here, we asked whether maternal immune challenge during pregnancy can alter seizure susceptibility and seizure-associated brain damage in adolescence. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or normal saline (NS) on gestational days 15 and 16. At postnatal day 21, seizure susceptibility to kainic acid (KA) was evaluated in male offspring. Four groups were studied, including normal control (NS-NS), prenatal infection (LPS-NS), juvenile seizure (NS-KA), and "two-hit" (LPS-KA) groups. Our results demonstrated that maternal LPS exposure caused long-term reactive astrogliosis and increased seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring. Compared to the juvenile seizure group, animals in the "two-hit" group showed exaggerated astrogliosis, followed by worsened spatial learning ability in adulthood. In addition, prenatal immune challenge alone led to spatial learning impairment in offspring but had no effect on anxiety. These data suggest that prenatal immune challenge causes a long-term increase in juvenile seizure susceptibility and exacerbates seizure-induced brain injury, possibly by priming astroglia. PMID:25982885

  11. Common raven juvenile survival in a human-augmented landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, W.C.; Boarman, W.I.; Rotenberry, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    Anthropogenic resource subsidies have contributed to the dramatic increase in the abundance of Common Ravens (Corvus corax) in the western Mojave Desert, California, during the past 30 years. To better understand the effects of these subsidies on raven demography, we examined whether survival to juvenile departure from the natal territory could be predicted by a set of environmental and morphological variables, such as nest proximity to anthropogenic resources and juvenile condition. We captured 240 juvenile ravens over 2 years and marked them prior to fledging. Nest proximity to anthropogenic resources and earlier fledging dates significantly predicted raven juvenile survival to departure from the natal territory. The best-fitting mark-recapture models predicted postdeparture survival as a function of time since fledging, nest proximity to anthropogenic resources, and year hatched. The positive effect of nest proximity to anthropogenic resources influenced postdeparture survival for at least 9 months after fledging, as revealed by the mark-recapture analysis. Annual survival was 47% for first-year, 81% for second-year, and 83% for third-year birds. Our results support the hypothesis that anthropogenic resources contribute to increasing raven numbers via increased juvenile survival to departure as well as increased postdeparture survival. We expect raven numbers to grow in concert with the growing human presence in the Mojave Desert unless raven access to anthropogenic resources is diminished.

  12. Spatial movements and social networks in juvenile male song sparrows

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Veronica A.; Campbell, S. Elizabeth; Beecher, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The time between fledging and breeding is a critical period in songbird ontogeny, but the behavior of young songbirds in the wild is relatively unstudied. The types of social relationships juveniles form with other individuals can provide insight into the process through which they learn complex behaviors crucial for survival, territory establishment, and mate attraction. We used radio telemetry to observe social associations of young male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) from May to November. Juvenile song sparrows were frequently observed in social flocks and generally associated with more birds in the summer than in the autumn months. Most juvenile subjects formed stable social relationships with other birds and were seen with the same individual on up to 60% of the days observed. The strongest associations occurred with other juvenile males, and these individuals were often seen <1 m from the subject, even when the subject moved large distances between tracking observations. Associations also had long-term behavioral consequences as subjects were more likely to establish territories near their associates and learn shared song types. Our results indicate that male song sparrows spend a large percentage of the juvenile life stage forming social relationships and suggest that these associations may be important for the ecology of young birds and the ontogeny of their behaviors. PMID:22479140

  13. 28 CFR 2.4 - Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents. 2.4 Section...DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.4 Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents. Committed...

  14. BLACK SPOT INFESTATION IN JUVENILE COHO SALMON AND THE INFLUENCE OF OREGON COASTAL STREAM SUMMER TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater survival and growth of juvenile salmon are affected by many factors, including high summer temperatures and other stressors such as parasitism. Delayed or suppressed growth related to stress can influence subsequent survival of juvenile salmonids in freshwater and mar...

  15. Wilson Bull., 115(4), 2003, pp. 423430 SURVIVAL AND MOVEMENT OF POSTFLEDGING JUVENILE

    E-print Network

    to managers. I studied postfledging survival and movements of juvenile Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) in the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, using radio marking and capture). I investigated survival and movements of juvenile Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus his- trionicus

  16. 28 CFR 19.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 19.5 Section 19.5 ...CHILDREN § 19.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. DOJ will compile...

  17. 15 CFR 23.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 23.5 Section 23.5 ...CHILDREN § 23.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Department of...

  18. 15 CFR 23.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 23.5 Section 23.5 ...CHILDREN § 23.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Department of...

  19. 28 CFR 19.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 19.5 Section 19.5 ...CHILDREN § 19.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. DOJ will compile...

  20. 28 CFR 19.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 19.5 Section 19.5 ...CHILDREN § 19.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. DOJ will compile...

  1. 28 CFR 19.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 19.5 Section 19.5 ...CHILDREN § 19.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. DOJ will compile...

  2. 28 CFR 19.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 19.5 Section 19.5 ...CHILDREN § 19.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. DOJ will compile...

  3. 15 CFR 23.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 23.5 Section 23.5 ...CHILDREN § 23.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Department of...

  4. 15 CFR 23.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 23.5 Section 23.5 ...CHILDREN § 23.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Department of...

  5. 15 CFR 23.5 - Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 23.5 Section 23.5 ...CHILDREN § 23.5 Report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The Department of...

  6. 77 FR 75299 - Standards To Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Sexual Abuse and Assault in Confinement Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ...rely on staffing and technology to varying degrees depending...diminish in future years as technology advances. DHS, however...it can play a key role in reducing opportunities...the facility houses adults or juveniles, the length...monitoring and other technology may reduce...

  7. Effect of a behavioural health and specialty care telemedicine programme on goal attainment for youths in juvenile detention.

    PubMed

    Fox, Karen C; Connor, Pamela; McCullers, Elizabeth; Waters, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a pre-post study of the effect of a telepsychiatry counselling service on youths housed in three juvenile detention facilities. In the first year of the telemedicine programme, 321 psychiatry consultations were conducted via telemedicine; in the second year of the programme, 573 psychiatry consultations were conducted. Records for 190 students were then examined by two raters. The total number of behavioural goals for each adolescent increased from 8.2 in the pre-telemedicine year to 8.7 in the first year of telemedicine and then to 10.0 in the second year (P < 0.05). In Year 2 of the study, subjects also had a significantly higher number of goals in four of the five categories: education, family, health and social skills (P < 0.05). Although other changes at the youth detention facilities or in the juvenile justice system may have been partly responsible for the effects observed, the study suggests that telemedicine may be useful for improving the rate of attainment of goals associated with family relations and personality/behaviour. PMID:18632995

  8. Comments and Corrections to \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan Stojmenovic

    2004-01-01

    The paper by I. Stojmenovic et al. (2002) generated a lot of interest among researchers in ad hoc networks. A number of researchers questioned, through their articles, or directly to the first author, the correctness of the described procedure, and the correctness of the claim that the procedure does not need any communication exchange between nodes, in addition to \\

  9. Interdepartmental Correction of

    E-print Network

    Texas at Austin, University of

    for it to be corrected. Corrections can only be done by the creator of the original document or by the office which owns" in the Action field, a brief explanation in the Summary field, "01" in Format and either the Document ID: -- COVER SHEET -- Document ID: ___________ Action: new Summary: transfer partial shipping charges for sept

  10. In-process inspection and correction facilities subject to errors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Irianto

    1994-01-01

    Inspection error is one important cause of consumer dissatisfaction particularly in consumer products. For decades, inspection for quality of product has been performed mostly at the end of production line. Therefore, any nonconformance from product's specification is known at the time they are inspected. One solution is applying in or between process's inspection. This becomes available by the use of

  11. Evaluation of juvenile salmonid behavior near a prototype weir box at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kock, Tobias J.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Tomka, Ryan G.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Collection of juvenile salmonids at Cowlitz Falls Dam is a critical part of the effort to restore salmon in the upper Cowlitz River because the majority of fish that are not collected at the dam pass downstream and enter a large reservoir where they become landlocked and lost to the anadromous fish population. However, the juvenile fish collection system at Cowlitz Falls Dam has failed to achieve annual collection goals since it first began operating in 1996. Since that time, numerous modifications to the fish collection system have been made and several prototype collection structures have been developed and tested, but these efforts have not substantially increased juvenile fish collection. Studies have shown that juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) tend to locate the collection entrances effectively, but many of these fish are not collected and eventually pass the dam through turbines or spillways. Tacoma Power developed a prototype weir box in 2009 to increase capture rates of juvenile salmonids at the collection entrances, and this device proved to be successful at retaining those fish that entered the weir. However, because of safety concerns at the dam, the weir box could not be deployed near a spillway gate where the prototype was tested, so the device was altered and re-deployed at a different location, where it was evaluated during 2013. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted an evaluation using radiotelemetry to monitor fish behavior near the weir box and collection flumes. The evaluation was conducted during April–June 2013. Juvenile steelhead and coho salmon (45 per species) were tagged with a radio transmitter and passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag, and released upstream of the dam. All tagged fish moved downstream and entered the forebay of Cowlitz Falls Dam. Median travel times from the release site to the forebay were 0.8 d for steelhead and 1.2 d for coho salmon. Most fish spent several days in the dam forebay; median forebay residence times were 4.4 d for juvenile steelhead and 5.7 d for juvenile coho salmon. A new radio transmitter model was used during the study period. The transmitter had low detection probabilities on underwater antennas located within the collection system, which prevented us from reporting performance metrics (discovery efficiency, entrance efficiency, retention efficiency) that are traditionally used to evaluate fish collection systems. Most tagged steelhead (98 percent) and coho salmon (84 percent) were detected near the weir box or collection flume entrances during the study period; 39 percent of tagged steelhead and 55 percent of tagged coho salmon were detected at both entrances. Sixty-three percent of the tagged steelhead that were detected at both entrances were first detected at the weir box, compared to 52 percent of the coho salmon. Twelve steelhead and 15 coho salmon detected inside the weir box eventually left the device and were collected in collection flumes or passed the dam. Overall, collection rates were relatively high during the study period. Sixty-five percent of the steelhead and 80 percent of the coho salmon were collected during the study, and most of the remaining fish passed the dam and entered the tailrace (24 percent of steelhead; 13 percent of coho salmon). The remaining 11 percent of steelhead and 7 percent of coho salmon did not pass the dam while their transmitters were operating. We were able to confirm collection of tagged fish at the fish facility using three approaches: (1) detection of radio transmitters in study fish; (2) detection of PIT-tags in study fish; (3) observation of study fish by staff at the fish facility. Data from all three methods were used to develop a multistate mark-recapture model that estimated detection probabilities for the various monitoring methods. These estimates then were used to describe the percent of tagged fish that were collected through the weir box and collection flumes. Detection probabilities of PIT-tag antennas in

  12. Segregation analysis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Weissbecker, K.A. [Louisiana State Univ., Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States); Delgado-Escueta, A.V.; Medina, M.T. [California Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a non-progressive epilepsy characterized by involuntary jerks and an adolescent age of onset. There conflicting reports regarding the mode of inheritance of JME - polygenic, autosomal recessive, and two-locus models have all been proposed. We performed a segregation analysis of 53 nuclear families of JME probands using the Elston and Stewart algorithm (S.A.G.E version 2.1). Relatives of the proband were classified as affected if they had a confirmed history of JME, absence or grand mal epilepsy, or if they were clinically asymptomatic but had 3.5-6 Hz multispike wave complexes on electroencephalography. Using these criteria, 40 relatives were affected in addition to the 53 probands. All Mendelian models were rejected when compared to the unrestricted model which estimated transmission probabilities. The environmental models were also rejected. Of the Mendelian modes, the most parsimonious model was the autosomal recessive model with 53% penetrance and a rate of sporadic cases of 0.0039. We conclude that although there is evidence for a genetic component contributing to the familiality of JME, this component can not be explained by a single major gene. These results, along with contradictory reports regarding the linkage of JME to the short arm of chromosome 6, suggest the presence of genetic heterogeneity and/or a more complex mode of inheritance, such as a two-locus model. Since lod score linkage analyses are dependent on the assumption of a single major gene mode, these findings emphasize the necessity of performing non-parametric linkage analyses when studying JME.

  13. A New Mass Mortality of Juvenile Protoceratops and Size-Segregated Aggregation Behaviour in Juvenile Non-Avian Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Hone, David W. E.; Farke, Andrew A.; Watabe, Mahito; Shigeru, Suzuki; Tsogtbaatar, Khishigjav

    2014-01-01

    Background Monodominant bonebeds are a relatively common occurrence for non-avian dinosaurs, and have been used to infer associative, and potentially genuinely social, behavior. Previously known assemblages are characterized as either mixed size-classes (juvenile and adult-sized specimens together) or single size-classes of individuals (only juveniles or only adult-sized individuals within the assemblage). In the latter case, it is generally unknown if these kinds of size-segregated aggregations characterize only a particular size stage or represent aggregations that happened at all size stages. Ceratopsians (“horned dinosaurs”) are known from both types of assemblages. Methods/Principal Findings Here we describe a new specimen of the ceratopsian dinosaur Protoceratops andrewsi, Granger and Gregory 1923 from Mongolia representing an aggregation of four mid-sized juvenile animals. In conjunction with existing specimens of groups of P. andrewsi that includes size-clustered aggregations of young juveniles and adult-sized specimens, this new material provides evidence for some degree of size-clustered aggregation behaviour in Protoceratops throughout ontogeny. This continuity of size-segregated (and presumably age-clustered) aggregation is previously undocumented in non-avian dinosaurs. Conclusions The juvenile group fills a key gap in the available information on aggregations in younger ceratopsians. Although we support the general hypothesis that many non-avian dinosaurs were gregarious and even social animals, we caution that evidence for sociality has been overstated and advocate a more conservative interpretation of some data of ‘sociality’ in dinosaurs. PMID:25426957

  14. Juvenile polyposis syndrome affecting the stomach: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Steven; Dwerryhouse, Simon; Safranek, Peter; Hardwick, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Juvenile polyposis syndrome(JPS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited condition. Hamartomatous polyps can affect the entire gastrointestinal tract but usually predominate in the colon. In this case report we present an unusual case of JPS that presented with massive gastric polyposis requiring a total gastrectomy. Case presentation A 51-year-old man presented with symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastroscopy showed massive gastric polyposis with a large antral polyp that had prolapsed through the pylorus causing gastric outlet obstruction. Initially endoscopic polypectomy was performed, but due to progressive symptoms a total gastrectomy was then performed. Histology confirmed massive gastric juvenile polyposis. Conclusion Massive gastric polyposis is an uncommon manifestation of juvenile polyposis syndrome. This case illustrates important principles in managing this condition. PMID:18826596

  15. [Hypertrophic and polypoid gastropathy associated with juvenile adenomatous polyposis coli].

    PubMed

    Di Blasi, A; Marino-Marsilia, G; Boscaino, A

    2000-04-01

    Juvenile Polyposis is a syndrome with gastrointestinal polyps and increased cancer risk. The commonest form of this syndrome is inherited as autosomal dominant trait and presents as Familial Juvenile Polyposis Coli. Another variant involves mainly the stomach and another is generalized throughout the gastrointestinal tract. We present the case of two brothers with polyposis coli complicated by colonic cancer. The polyps were of juvenile, adenomatous and mixed types. The two patients after a decade of colonic endoscopic polypectomies presented gastric involvement by polyps and needed multiple endoscopic gastric resections. One brother underwent total gastrectomy. This stomach showed diffuse polyposis of hyperplastic and fundic gland types within an unexpected background of foveolar and glandular hypertrophic gastropathy. The patients at present are followed up with endoscopic procedures. PMID:10838872

  16. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed.

  17. Pennsylvania Juvenile Justice Manual for Junior High School and Middle School Students and Accompanying Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. School of Law.

    Designed for grades six through nine, this manual teaches students how the Pennsylvania juvenile justice system works. It explains what a juvenile can expect if accused of violating Pennsylvania law in the hope of convincing students to stay out of trouble with the law. The manual gives a brief history of juvenile justice and a description of the…

  18. Privacy and Juvenile Justice Records: A Mid-Decade Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belair, Robert R.

    In 1982, a national report examining law and policy for juvenile justice records concluded that the public's faith in the potential for rehabilitating juvenile offenders had eroded. To understand better the nature of juvenile crime, it was suggested that data surrounding this issue be systematically collected. Some of that information effort is…

  19. Variation in surrounding forest habitat influences the initial orientation of juvenile amphibians emigrating from breeding ponds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leroy J. Walston; Stephen J. Mullin

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile dispersal is important for the persistence of . amphibian populations. Previous studies have observed nonrandom orientation in juvenile amphibians emigrating from breeding ponds; however, the environmental cues associ- ated with these movements are not well understood. We examined the emigration behavior of recently metamorphosed ju- veniles of three pond-breeding amphibian species from three woodland ponds. We found that juvenile

  20. School and Community Interventions To Prevent Serious and Violent Offending. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catalano, Richard F.; Loeber, Rolf; McKinney, Kay C.

    Recent research indicates that children exposed to certain risk factors in their families, at school, among their peers, and in their communities are at greater risk of becoming serious violent juvenile (SVJ) offenders. The Study Group on Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders, a group of 22 researchers convened by the Office of Juvenile Justice…