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Sample records for juvenile crayfish pacifastacus

  1. Phylogenetic species delimitation for crayfishes of the genus Pacifastacus

    PubMed Central

    Castelin, Magalie; Williams, Bronwyn W.; Olden, Julian D.; Abbott, Cathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic approaches are playing an increasing role in conservation science by identifying biodiversity that may not be evident by morphology-based taxonomy and systematics. So-called cryptic species are particularly prevalent in freshwater environments, where isolation of dispersal-limited species, such as crayfishes, within dendritic river networks often gives rise to high intra- and inter-specific genetic divergence. We apply here a multi-gene molecular approach to investigate relationships among extant species of the crayfish genus Pacifastacus, representing the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of this taxonomic group. Importantly, Pacifastacus includes both the widely invasive signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus, as well as several species of conservation concern like the Shasta crayfish Pacifastacus fortis. Our analysis used 83 individuals sampled across the four extant Pacifastacus species (omitting the extinct Pacifastacus nigrescens), representing the known taxonomic diversity and geographic distributions within this genus as comprehensively as possible. We reconstructed phylogenetic trees from mitochondrial (16S, COI) and nuclear genes (GAPDH), both separately and using a combined or concatenated dataset, and performed several species delimitation analyses (PTP, ABGD, GMYC) on the COI phylogeny to propose Primary Species Hypotheses (PSHs) within the genus. All phylogenies recovered the genus Pacifastacus as monophyletic, within which we identified a range of six to 21 PSHs; more abundant PSHs delimitations from GMYC and ABGD were always nested within PSHs delimited by the more conservative PTP method. Pacifastacus leniusculus included the majority of PSHs and was not monophyletic relative to the other Pacifastacus species considered. Several of these highly distinct P. leniusculus PSHs likely require urgent conservation attention. Our results identify research needs and conservation priorities for Pacifastacus crayfishes in western

  2. Phylogenetic species delimitation for crayfishes of the genus Pacifastacus.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric R; Castelin, Magalie; Williams, Bronwyn W; Olden, Julian D; Abbott, Cathryn L

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic approaches are playing an increasing role in conservation science by identifying biodiversity that may not be evident by morphology-based taxonomy and systematics. So-called cryptic species are particularly prevalent in freshwater environments, where isolation of dispersal-limited species, such as crayfishes, within dendritic river networks often gives rise to high intra- and inter-specific genetic divergence. We apply here a multi-gene molecular approach to investigate relationships among extant species of the crayfish genus Pacifastacus, representing the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of this taxonomic group. Importantly, Pacifastacus includes both the widely invasive signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus, as well as several species of conservation concern like the Shasta crayfish Pacifastacus fortis. Our analysis used 83 individuals sampled across the four extant Pacifastacus species (omitting the extinct Pacifastacus nigrescens), representing the known taxonomic diversity and geographic distributions within this genus as comprehensively as possible. We reconstructed phylogenetic trees from mitochondrial (16S, COI) and nuclear genes (GAPDH), both separately and using a combined or concatenated dataset, and performed several species delimitation analyses (PTP, ABGD, GMYC) on the COI phylogeny to propose Primary Species Hypotheses (PSHs) within the genus. All phylogenies recovered the genus Pacifastacus as monophyletic, within which we identified a range of six to 21 PSHs; more abundant PSHs delimitations from GMYC and ABGD were always nested within PSHs delimited by the more conservative PTP method. Pacifastacus leniusculus included the majority of PSHs and was not monophyletic relative to the other Pacifastacus species considered. Several of these highly distinct P. leniusculus PSHs likely require urgent conservation attention. Our results identify research needs and conservation priorities for Pacifastacus crayfishes in western

  3. Horizontal transmission of Thelohania contejeani in the endangered white-clawed (Austropotamobius pallipes) and the invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus).

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Emily M; Mortimer, Robert J G; Christmas, Martin; Dunn, Alison M

    2012-09-01

    The microsporidian parasite Thelohania contejeani causes porcelain disease and has been implicated in mass mortalities in populations of the endangered European crayfish Austropotamobius pallipes. However, the route of parasite transmission is not known. This paper investigates the horizontal transmission of T. contejeani between A. pallipes hosts as well as its transmissibility to the invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus). Field collected juvenile A. pallipes and P. leniusculus were assigned to 1 of 3 experimental treatments; fed heavily infected A. pallipes tissue, exposed to water from tanks housing heavily parasitized A. pallipes, and a control group to provide an estimate of the baseline infection levels in the field. After 26 weeks, abdominal muscle samples were screened by PCR for T. contejeani. Infection was significantly higher in the treatment groups (83% in the cannibalism treatment, 42% in the water exposure treatment) than in the control group (4%), providing evidence for horizontal transmission of the parasite between A. pallipes hosts. Cannibalism and scavenging are common amongst crayfish, providing transmission opportunities in the field. The study also provides the first direct evidence for transmission of the parasite from an indigenous European crayfish species to the invasive signal crayfish, with 50% of P. leniusculus in each treatment, and 8% of control animals infected. We discuss the possibility that high density populations of the invasive signal crayfish may serve either as reservoirs or sinks for the parasite. PMID:22814084

  4. Disturbance of fluvial gravel substrates by signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Rice, Stephen; Reid, Ian

    2010-05-01

    The reworking of substrates by organisms, termed bioturbation, is considered a fundamental processes in marine and terrestrial environments but has remained relatively unstudied in fluvial environments. This studies looks at the bioturbation of fluvial gravel substrates by signal crayfish, an internationally important invasive species. We investigated the impact of signal crayfish activity in a laboratory flume. Bioturbation by crayfish on both loose arrangements of gravel and water-worked surfaces were studied and two sizes of narrowly-graded gravel were used; 11 - 16 mm and 16 - 22 mm. A laser scanner was used to obtain high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) of gravel surfaces before and after crayfish activity. These DEMs were used to quantify topographic and structural changes to the surfaces due to the activity of crayfish. It was found that crayfish moved substantial quantities of material from all surfaces within six hours of introduction. The majority of the disturbance was associated with small scale (≤ 1 median grain diameter) movements of surface grains due to walking and foraging by crayfish. This textural change resulted in a structural alteration to the substrate surface. After six hours of crayfish activity, there was a 14% reduction in the imbrication of the grains from water-worked surfaces. Crayfish also constructed shallow pits and heaped excavated material into a series of mounds around its edge. Crayfish would always posture in pits in the same way. They would fold their vulnerable tails under their body and place their claws in front of their heads. When in pits crayfish predominately orientated themselves so they were facing an upstream direction. This implies that crayfish dig pits in order to streamline their bodies in the flow and lower their protrusion. Although pits and mounds contributed a relatively small proportion to the overall disturbance of substrates, they significantly increased the roughness of substrates. Pit and

  5. The long-term effects of invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) on instream macroinvertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Kate L; Chadd, Richard P; Dunbar, Michael J; Extence, Chris A; Reeds, Jake; Rice, Stephen P; Wood, Paul J

    2016-06-15

    Non-native species represent a significant threat to indigenous biodiversity and ecosystem functioning worldwide. It is widely acknowledged that invasive crayfish species may be instrumental in modifying benthic invertebrate community structure, but there is limited knowledge regarding the temporal and spatial extent of these effects within lotic ecosystems. This study investigates the long term changes to benthic macroinvertebrate community composition following the invasion of signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, into English rivers. Data from long-term monitoring sites on 7 rivers invaded by crayfish and 7 rivers where signal crayfish were absent throughout the record (control sites) were used to examine how invertebrate community composition and populations of individual taxa changed as a result of invasion. Following the detection of non-native crayfish, significant shifts in invertebrate community composition were observed at invaded sites compared to control sites. This pattern was strongest during autumn months but was also evident during spring surveys. The observed shifts in community composition following invasion were associated with reductions in the occurrence of ubiquitous Hirudinea species (Glossiphonia complanata and Erpobdella octoculata), Gastropoda (Radix spp.), Ephemeroptera (Caenis spp.), and Trichoptera (Hydropsyche spp.); although variations in specific taxa affected were evident between regions and seasons. Changes in community structure were persistent over time with no evidence of recovery, suggesting that crayfish invasions represent significant perturbations leading to permanent changes in benthic communities. The results provide fundamental knowledge regarding non-native crayfish invasions of lotic ecosystems required for the development of future management strategies. PMID:26974569

  6. Intensive removal of signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) from rivers increases numbers and taxon richness of macroinvertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Tom P; Poole, Alison E; Evans, Laura C; Bradley, David C; Macdonald, David W

    2014-02-01

    Invasive species are a major cause of species extinction in freshwater ecosystems, and crayfish species are particularly pervasive. The invasive American signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus has impacts over a range of trophic levels, but particularly on benthic aquatic macroinvertebrates. Our study examined the effect on the macroinvertebrate community of removal trapping of signal crayfish from UK rivers. Crayfish were intensively trapped and removed from two tributaries of the River Thames to test the hypothesis that lowering signal crayfish densities would result in increases in macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness. We removed 6181 crayfish over four sessions, resulting in crayfish densities that decreased toward the center of the removal sections. Conversely in control sections (where crayfish were trapped and returned), crayfish density increased toward the center of the section. Macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness were inversely correlated with crayfish densities. Multivariate analysis of the abundance of each taxon yielded similar results and indicated that crayfish removals had positive impacts on macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness but did not alter the composition of the wider macroinvertebrate community. Synthesis and applications: Our results demonstrate that non-eradication-oriented crayfish removal programmes may lead to increases in the total number of macroinvertebrates living in the benthos. This represents the first evidence that removing signal crayfish from riparian systems, at intensities feasible during control attempts or commercial crayfishing, may be beneficial for a range of sympatric aquatic macroinvertebrates. PMID:24634733

  7. Intensive removal of signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) from rivers increases numbers and taxon richness of macroinvertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Moorhouse, Tom P; Poole, Alison E; Evans, Laura C; Bradley, David C; Macdonald, David W

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are a major cause of species extinction in freshwater ecosystems, and crayfish species are particularly pervasive. The invasive American signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus has impacts over a range of trophic levels, but particularly on benthic aquatic macroinvertebrates. Our study examined the effect on the macroinvertebrate community of removal trapping of signal crayfish from UK rivers. Crayfish were intensively trapped and removed from two tributaries of the River Thames to test the hypothesis that lowering signal crayfish densities would result in increases in macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness. We removed 6181 crayfish over four sessions, resulting in crayfish densities that decreased toward the center of the removal sections. Conversely in control sections (where crayfish were trapped and returned), crayfish density increased toward the center of the section. Macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness were inversely correlated with crayfish densities. Multivariate analysis of the abundance of each taxon yielded similar results and indicated that crayfish removals had positive impacts on macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness but did not alter the composition of the wider macroinvertebrate community. Synthesis and applications: Our results demonstrate that non-eradication-oriented crayfish removal programmes may lead to increases in the total number of macroinvertebrates living in the benthos. This represents the first evidence that removing signal crayfish from riparian systems, at intensities feasible during control attempts or commercial crayfishing, may be beneficial for a range of sympatric aquatic macroinvertebrates. PMID:24634733

  8. Topographic disturbance of subaqueous gravel substrates by signal crayfish ( Pacifastacus leniusculus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew F.; Rice, Stephen P.; Reid, Ian

    2010-11-01

    The impact of signal crayfish ( Pacifastacus leniusculus) on the topography and fabric of six narrowly graded, gravel substrates was investigated using repeat laser scanning of sediment surfaces in still-water aquaria. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of the gravel surfaces were obtained before and after exposure to crayfish for five predetermined periods. The impact on the substrate was quantified by establishing topographic and volumetric changes using DEMs of difference (DoD). The presence of an individual, medium sized crayfish for 24 h resulted in an average volume change in surface topography of 450 cm 3 over an area of 2400 cm 2, giving a sediment displacement of 1.7 kg m -2 d - 1 . The majority (78%) of this volume change was associated with small scale (≤ 1 median grain diameter) movements of surface grains. This fabric adjustment altered grain orientations and friction angles. Crayfish also constructed pits and mounds that increased significantly the roughness of the gravel substrates and altered the protrusion of individual grains. Crayfish were able to move material up to 38 mm in diameter that had a submerged weight six times that of the individuals used in this study. By modifying the arrangement of grains on the surface of fluvial substrates, signal crayfish may counteract the low flow physical consolidation of gravel beds and reduce the entrainment stresses required to move river bed material. The results of this study suggest that signal crayfish, an internationally widespread invasive species, may have substantial impacts on the physical environment of streams and rivers, as well as on local benthic ecological communities.

  9. Histological changes and antioxidant enzyme activity in signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) associated with sub-acute peracetic acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Chupani, Latifeh; Zuskova, Eliska; Stara, Alzbeta; Velisek, Josef; Kouba, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a powerful disinfectant recently adopted as a therapeutic agent in aquaculture. A concentration of 10 mg L(-1) PAA effectively suppresses zoospores of Aphanomyces astaci, the agent of crayfish plague. To aid in establishing safe therapeutic guideline, the effects of PAA on treated crayfish were investigated through assessment of histological changes and oxidative damage. Adult female signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus (n = 135) were exposed to 2 mg L(-1) and 10 mg L(-1) of PAA for 7 days followed by a 7 day recovery period in clean water. Superoxide dismutase activity was significantly lower in gill and hepatopancreas after three days exposure to 10 mg L(1) PAA than in the group treated with 2 mg L(-1) PAA and a control in only clean water. Catalase activity in gill and hepatopancreas remained unaffected by both exposures. Glutathione reductase was significantly decreased in gill of 10 mg L(-1) PAA treated crayfish and increased in group exposed to 2 mg L(-1) compared to control after 7 days exposure. Antioxidant enzyme activity in exposed groups returned to control values after recovery period. Gill, hepatopancreas, and antennal gland showed slight damage in crayfish treated with 2 mg L(-1) of PAA compared to the control group. The extent and frequency of histological alterations were more pronounced in animals exposed to 10 mg L(-1). The gill was the most affected organ, infiltrated by granular hemocytes and displaying malformations of lamella tips and disorganization of epithelial cells. After a 7 day recovery period, the infiltrating cells in affected tissues of the exposed crayfish began to return to normal levels. Results suggested that the given concentrations could be applied to signal crayfish against crayfish plague agent in aquaculture; however, further studies are required for safe use. PMID:26611721

  10. Distribution and Abundance of California Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus) and Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) in the Upper Redwood Creek Watershed, Marin County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fong, Darren; Howell, Judd A.

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted in 1997-1998 to identify the distribution of non-native signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and larval California giant salamanders (Dicamptodon ensatus) within the upper Redwood Creek watershed (Marin County, California). The crayfish is widely distributed along the mainstem Redwood Creek. It was found in lower Fern Creek but not in any first order tributaries or above fish barriers. While present throughout the study area, larval California giant salamanders were found mainly in small headwater tributaries. Larval salamanders appear to use habitats in accordance to their availability, while signal crayfish were rarely found in shallow water habitats and appeared to prefer scour pools. Evidence of predation by signal crayfish on larval giant salamanders was found under confined conditions. Controlled laboratory and field experiments would be needed to determine whether competitive exclusion is occurring. Because of its widespread occurrence in the headwater streams surveyed in this project, California giant salamanders would be an appropriate indicator species for those interested in monitoring the health of small headwater streams. Future long-term monitoring using California giant salamanders should be based on permanent monitoring reaches with periodic basinwide habitat and animal surveys to determine if reaches are representative of basinwide conditions.

  11. First results on the genetic diversity of the invasive signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana, 1852) in Europe using novel microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Froufe, E; Varandas, S; Teixeira, A; Sousa, R; Filipová, L; Petrusek, A; Edsman, L; Lopes-Lima, M

    2015-08-01

    The introduction of non-native crayfish in aquatic ecosystems is very common due to human activities (e.g. aquaculture, recreational and commercial fisheries). The signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana, 1852), is one of the most widespread invasive species in Europe. Although several important ecological and economic impacts of this species have been reported, its European population genetic characterisation has never been undertaken using nuclear markers. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop and characterise new microsatellite markers for signal crayfish that can be useful in future studies in its invaded range, since only five are available so far. In total, 93 individuals from four geographically distinct European populations (Portugal, Great Britain, Finland and Sweden) were scored for the new markers and for those previously described, with the Bayesian analysis revealing a clear distinction among populations. These markers are suitable for future studies of the population genetic structure of this important invasive species, by increasing information about the possible pathways of introduction and dispersal, and by giving insights about the most important vectors of introduction. PMID:25638230

  12. Does juvenile competition explain displacement of a native crayfish by an introduced crayfish?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, E.R.; Magoulick, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    The coldwater crayfish Orconectes eupunctus is endemic to the Spring and Eleven Point Rivers of Arkansas and Missouri, and appears to have been displaced from a portion of its range by the recently introduced ringed crayfish Orconectes neglectus. We examined competition among juveniles as a potential mechanism for this crayfish species displacement through laboratory and field experiments. Orconectes eupunctus juveniles survived and grew in stream cages in their former range, implicating biotic interactions rather than habitat degradation in the displacement. Laboratory experiments revealed O. neglectus juveniles were dominant in the presence of limited food, whereas size rather than species determined occupancy of limited shelter. In a field competition experiment using stream cages, O. neglectus juveniles did not inhibit growth or reduce survival of O. eupunctus juveniles. Consequently, laboratory evidence of O. neglectus dominance did not correspond with competition under field conditions. Combined with previous studies examining the effects of O. neglectus on O. eupunctus, these results suggest that competition may not be a factor in this crayfish species displacement. Alternate mechanisms for the apparent displacement of O. eupunctus by O. neglectus, such as differential predation or reproductive interference, should be investigated. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  13. Protein modification in the post-mating spermatophore of the signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus: insight into the tyrosine phosphorylation in a non-motile spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Niksirat, Hamid; Vancová, Marie; Andersson, Liselotte; James, Peter; Kouba, Antonín; Kozák, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    After mating, spermatophores of signal crayfish are stored on the body of the female for a period before fertilization. This study compared the post-mating protein profile and pattern of protein tyrosine phosphorylation of the signal crayfish spermatophore to that of the freshly ejaculated spermatophore and found substantial differences. Two major bands of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of molecular weights 10 and 50kDa were observed in the freshly ejaculated spermatophore of the signal crayfish. While the tyrosine-phosphorylated protein band with molecular weight 10kDa was formed by protein(s) of similar pH, the band with molecular weight of 50kDa consisted of proteins of varying pH. In the post-mating spermatophore, the band with molecular weight of 50kDa was not detected, and an increase in the level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation was observed in the 10kDa band. The microtubular radial arms of the spermatozoon showed a positive reaction to an anti-tyrosine antibody conjugated with gold particles in both the freshly ejaculated and post-mating spermatophores. In conclusion, the male gamete of the signal crayfish undergoes molecular modification during post-mating storage on the body of the female including changes in the level of protein expression and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Structural similarity of the radial arms in the crayfish immotile spermatozoon with flagellum, which is the main site of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the mammalian motile spermatozoa, raises questions regarding evolution and function of such organelles across the animal kingdom that must be addressed in the future studies. PMID:27481552

  14. Sublethal exposure to cadmium interferes with cover-seeking behavior of juvenile crayfish, Procambarus clarkii (Girard)

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, R.; Antonelli, J.; Misra, K.; Steele, C.; Skinner, C.

    1996-12-31

    The behavioral effects of heavy metals on crayfishes may significantly affect their survival in the environment. Changes in their ability to remain under cover could substantially decrease their survivorship due to increased predation. The effect of sublethal cadmium exposure on the ability of juvenile crayfish to remain in cover was evaluated. Four different treatment groups wee used: a control group and three experimental groups exposed to 1, 2, or 3 mg Cd/L for 7 d. Crayfish were placed, individually, into glass aquaria containing 3 L of laboratory water pre-treated to detoxify all heavy metals, with continuous aeration. Each crayfish was provided with a dark, thigmotactic shelter. Cadmium was introduced into the aquaria on days 1 and 4 to maintain the nominal concentrations. Beginning on day 5 and continuing through day 7, observations were taken on each crayfish five times per day, with a minimum of 30 minutes between observations. Crayfish position was recorded as in cover or in the open area of an aquarium. Juveniles in the control groups were in cover 78.35 of the observations. Over the 3 d of observations, juveniles in the 1 mg Cd/L exposure groups used cover 72.1%. Those in the 2 and 3 mg Cd/L groups used cover 53.9% and 60%, respectively, indicating hyperactivity induced by cadmium exposure. Examining the daily results, however, those juveniles in the 1 mg Cd/L group were in cover only 60% of the time by day 7, indicating a latency to produce hyperactivity at this concentration.

  15. Thermal resistance of juvenile crayfish, Cambarus bartoni (fabricius): experiment and model

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.K.; Beauchamp, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    Juvenile crayfish, Cambarus bartoni, were subjected to acute thermal changes after being acclimated to temperatures of 15, 20 or 25 C for at least 1 week. Groups of 10 individuals each were exposed to various combinations of time and temperature, after which they were returned to their original acclimation temperature. Observations of latent mortality made 72 hr later indicated that some crayfish experience lethal temperature stress between 30 and 33 C; their ultimate upper incipient lethal temperature is estimated to be 32.5 C. A linear logistic model was used to construct contours of constant mortality (30, 50 and 90%) as a function of time and temperature.

  16. Thermal resistance of juvenile crayfish, Cambarus bartoni (Fabricius): experiment and model

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.K.; Beauchamp, J.J.

    1982-07-01

    Juvenile crayfish, Cambarus bartoni, were subjected to acute thermal changes after being acclimated to temperatures of 15, 20 or 25 C for at least 1 week. Groups of 10 individuals each were exposed to various combinations of time and temperature, after which they were returned to their original acclimation temperature. Observations of latent mortality made 72 hr later indicated that some crayfish experience lethal temperature stress between 30 and 33 C; their ultimate upper incipient lethal temperature is estimated to be 32.5 C. A linear logistic model was used to construct contours of constant mortality (30, 50 and 90%) as a function of time and temperature.

  17. Do environmental changes or juvenile competition act as mechanisms of species displacement in crayfishes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westhoff, J.T.; DiStefano, R.J.; Magoulick, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    The Big Creek Crayfish, Orconectes peruncus, is native to the St. Francis River drainage in Missouri, USA and is often absent where the introduced Woodland Crayfish, Orconectes hylas, has established. We performed a field experiment to determine whether effects of current abiotic conditions and interspecific competition with O. hylas were responsible for displacement of O. peruncus from parts of their former range. We examined growth and survival of juvenile male O. peruncus exposed to juvenile male O. hylas in enclosures at two sites in the former range of O. peruncus. Enclosures contained 8 (low density) or 16 individuals (high density) and had O. peruncus only (control) or both species (interspecific treatment). Juvenile O. peruncus were able to survive and grow in portions of their former range, implicating biotic versus abiotic factors in the displacement of O. peruncus. Survival rates of O. peruncus did not differ among treatments at either site. Orconectes peruncus showed significant growth in all treatments and interspecific effects were not greater than intraspecific effects on O. peruncus growth rates. High-density treatments showed significantly reduced O. peruncus growth rates compared to low-density treatments, except in Carver Creek interspecific treatments. When considered in the context of previous studies examining the effects of O. hylas on O. peruncus, results suggest that neither direct competition between juvenile males of the two species or abiotic change are responsible for the decreased range of O. peruncus. Additional research is required to determine the mechanism(s) driving the displacement of O. peruncus. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. Effects of sublethal exposure to cadmium on shelter-seeking behavior of juvenile Orconectes rusticus (Girard) crayfish

    SciTech Connect

    Alberstadt, P.; Steele, C.; Misra, K.; Skinner, C.; Wilson, B.; Robaskiewicz, S.

    1999-07-01

    Sublethal behavioral effect of heavy metals on crayfishes may adversely effect their survival in the environment. They may experience increased predation due to changes in their ability to remain in or under shelter. The effect of sublethal cadmium exposure on the ability of juvenile Orconectes rusticus crayfish to remain in shelter was evaluated. Four different treatment groups were used: a control group not exposed to cadmium, and three experimental groups exposed to 1, 2 ,or 3 mg Cd/L for 7 days. Crayfish were placed, individually, into small glass aquaria containing 3 L of laboratory water, with continuous aeration. Each crayfish was provided with a dark, thigmotactic shelter. Cadmium was introduced into the aquaria on days 1 and 4 to establish and maintain the nominal concentration. On days 5 through 7, observations were taken on each crayfish five times per day, with a minimum of 30 minutes between observations. The locations of the animals were recorded as in cover or in the open area of an aquarium. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to examine the effects of sublethal exposure to cadmium on shelter use by the juveniles.

  19. Effects of atrazine on growth and sex differentiation, in juveniles of the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Mac Loughlin, Camila; Canosa, Ivana S; Silveyra, Gabriela R; López Greco, Laura S; Rodríguez, Enrique M

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the herbicide atrazine was assayed in early juveniles of the redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Four cohorts of juveniles (a total of 280 animals) were exposed for 4 wk to each one of three atrazine concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 2.5mg/L) or a control (0mg/L), from a commercial formulation having 90% of active principle. At the end of the exposure, no significant (p>0.05) differences in either mortality or molting were noted. However, the weight gain and the protein content of abdominal muscle decreased significantly (p<0.05) in the highest atrazine concentration as compared to control, indicating that atrazine acted as a relevant stressor, although at a concentration higher than those reported in the environment. Besides, the proportion of females increased progressively as the atrazine concentration increases, being significantly (p<0.05) higher than that of controls at the highest concentration assayed. Both macroscopic and histological analysis revealed a normal architecture of gonopores and gonads in both control and exposed animals. The obtained results strongly suggest that atrazine could be causing an endocrine disruption on the hormonal system responsible for the sexual differentiation of the studied species, increasing the proportion of female proportion without disturbing the gonad structure. PMID:27213565

  20. SURVIVAL OF 'DAPHNIA', CRAYFISH, AND STONEFLIES IN AIR-SUPERSATURATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Daphnia magna, the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus, and nymphs of the stoneflies, Acroneuria californica, A. pacifica, and Pteronarcys californica were tested in the laboratory to determine their survival in different concentrations of air-supersaturated water. The mean 96-h LC...

  1. Toxicity of cadmium and lead to juvenile red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, and effects on fecundity of adults

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.M.; Howell, R.D. )

    1993-08-01

    Heavy metals such as Cd and Pb may affect aquatic organisms adversely if they are sublethally exposed for a long time. Acute toxicities of a number of heavy metals to different species of crayfish have been reported by several investigators. However, the chronic toxicities of different heavy metals have not been reported as frequently. P. clarkii is of considerable commercial importance to the economy of Louisiana, which produces 98% of the total harvest of the US, worth approximately 143 million dollars annually. This prompted us to use this crayfish for: (1) determining the 96-hr LC[sub 50] values for Cd and Pb using juvenile P. clarkii and (2) assessing the chronic effects of Cd and Pb on the fecundity of adults and hatching success of metal-exposed eggs. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Compensatory Growth in Juveniles of Freshwater Redclaw Crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus Reared at Three Different Temperatures: Hyperphagia and Food Efficiency as Primary Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Liane; López Greco, Laura S

    2015-01-01

    Feeding restriction, as a trigger for compensatory growth, might be considered an alternative viable strategy for minimizing waste as well as production costs. The study assessed whether juvenile redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (initial weight 0.99 ± 0.03 g) was able to compensate for feeding restriction at different temperatures (23 ± 1, 27 ± 1 and 31 ± 1 ° C). Hyperphagia, food utilization efficiency, energetic reserves, and hepatopancreas structure were analyzed. Three temperatures and two feeding regimes (DF-daily fed throughout the experiment and CF- 4 days food deprivation followed by 4 days of feeding, intermittently) were tested. The restriction period was from day 1 to 45, and the recovery period was from day 45 to 90. The previously restricted crayfish held at 23, 27, and 31 ± 1 ° C displayed complete body weight catch-up through compensatory growth following the restriction period with depressed growth. The mechanisms that might explain this response were higher feed intake (hyperphagia), and increased food utilization efficiency. Hepatopancreatic lipids were used as a metabolic fuel and hepatosomatic index was reduced in the previously restricted crayfish, but recovery at the same level of unrestricted crayfish occurred after the shift to daily feeding. The highest temperature affected adversely growth, feed intake, food efficiency, and metabolism of crayfish, whereas the lowest temperature and feeding restriction induced a more efficient growth of the crayfish. PMID:26422508

  3. Compensatory Growth in Juveniles of Freshwater Redclaw Crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus Reared at Three Different Temperatures: Hyperphagia and Food Efficiency as Primary Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Liane; López Greco, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Feeding restriction, as a trigger for compensatory growth, might be considered an alternative viable strategy for minimizing waste as well as production costs. The study assessed whether juvenile redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (initial weight 0.99 ±0.03 g) was able to compensate for feeding restriction at different temperatures (23±1, 27±1 and 31±1°C). Hyperphagia, food utilization efficiency, energetic reserves, and hepatopancreas structure were analyzed. Three temperatures and two feeding regimes (DF-daily fed throughout the experiment and CF- 4 days food deprivation followed by 4 days of feeding, intermittently) were tested. The restriction period was from day 1 to 45, and the recovery period was from day 45 to 90. The previously restricted crayfish held at 23, 27, and 31 ± 1°C displayed complete body weight catch-up through compensatory growth following the restriction period with depressed growth. The mechanisms that might explain this response were higher feed intake (hyperphagia), and increased food utilization efficiency. Hepatopancreatic lipids were used as a metabolic fuel and hepatosomatic index was reduced in the previously restricted crayfish, but recovery at the same level of unrestricted crayfish occurred after the shift to daily feeding. The highest temperature affected adversely growth, feed intake, food efficiency, and metabolism of crayfish, whereas the lowest temperature and feeding restriction induced a more efficient growth of the crayfish. PMID:26422508

  4. Effects of glyphosate on growth rate, metabolic rate and energy reserves of early juvenile crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus M.

    PubMed

    Avigliano, L; Fassiano, A V; Medesani, D A; Ríos de Molina, M C; Rodríguez, E M

    2014-06-01

    Early juveniles of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus were exposed for 60 days to 10 and 40 mg/L of pure glyphosate (acid form) in freshwater. Mortality was 33 % at the highest concentration, while no differences in molting were noted among treatments. After the first month of exposure, weight gain was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the 40 mg/L group. At the end of the assay, lipid levels in muscle, as well as protein level in both hepatopancreas and muscle were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced. These results suggest long-term utilization of both lipid and protein as main energetic reserves, likely in response to the chronic stress associated with herbicide exposure. Besides, the lower pyruvate kinase activity in muscle suggests a possible metabolic depression in this tissue. The hemolymphatic ASAT:ALAT ratio showed higher levels than the control at the highest glyphosate concentration, indicating possible damage to several tissues. PMID:24584268

  5. Mercury and trace elements in crayfish from northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hothem, R.L.; Bergen, D.R.; Bauer, M.L.; Crayon, J.J.; Meckstroth, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    We collected two species of crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus and Procambarus clarkii, from Cache and Putah Creeks, California, and analyzed them for mercury and trace elements. Trace elements were higher in carcasses in 40 cases, higher in tails in 5 cases, and not different in 35 cases; no concentration exceeded levels considered harmful. Mercury concentrations were similar among sites, with no overall sex or species effect in tails. Mercury and methylmercury concentrations were higher in tails at all sites. Methylmercury concentrations in crayfish tails (0.156-0.256 ??g/g) exceeded concentrations reported in health advisories for consumption of fish and crayfish from these watersheds. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  6. Sensitivity of juvenile freshwater crayfish Cherax destructor (Decapoda: Parastacidae) to trace metals.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahnaz; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2007-11-01

    Juvenile Cherax destructor was investigated as a potential test species for toxicity testing of trace metals in Australian freshwater systems. Adult male and female C. destructor were bred in the laboratory to obtain 4-week old juveniles, which were used in the toxicity tests. Animals were exposed to a range of concentrations of the trace metals ions copper (377-1275 microg/L), cadmium (377-1275 microg/L), nickel (300-1013 mg/L) and iron (36-168 mg/L) in static-renewal 96-h bioassays. The 96-h LC50 value for cadmium was 379, 494 microg/L for copper, 50 mg/L for iron and 327 mg/L for nickel demonstrating a decreasing toxicity of these metals to C. destructor. Comparison of LC50 values for metals for this species with those for other aquatic organisms reveals that C. destructor is less sensitive to trace metals than most other tested species. PMID:17011034

  7. Prevalence of the pathogen Aphanomyces astaci in freshwater crayfish populations in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Ivana; Jelić, Mišel; Klobučar, Goran; Delpy, Mylène; Delaunay, Carine; Grandjean, Frederic

    2016-02-11

    The Oomycete Aphanomyces astaci is an obligate crayfish parasite that co-evolved with American crayfish species, and they therefore generally live in a balanced relationship. On the contrary, European native crayfish are highly susceptible to A. astaci, and infestation with it causes development of the lethal disease termed crayfish plague. Until now, 5 A. astaci strains have been described from the freshwater crayfish present in Europe. In this study we aimed to investigate the occurrence of the pathogen A. astaci in Croatian native and non-native crayfish populations, as well as to genotype established strains using microsatellite markers and obtain information on the pathogen's epidemiology. Our results showed that the pathogen is widespread in both native and non-native crayfish populations. Agent level, when positive, in non-native crayfish was generally low; in native species it was higher. Genotyping from microsatellites proved the presence of the B (Ps) strain in non-native species (Pacifastacus leniusculus), while the A (As) strain was detected from viable native species (Astacus astacus and Austropotamobius torrentium) that are distributed in areas lacking non-native crayfish. The genotype from A. torrentium differed from a typical A (As) by 1 allele. Strain B (Ps) was identified in native Astacus leptodactylus from the population that co-occurs with P. leniuscuslus. Interestingly, in 1 A. leptodactylus population both A (As) and B (Ps) strains were present. PMID:26865234

  8. Identification of the major lipoproteins in crayfish hemolymph as proteins involved in immune recognition and clotting.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; van Heusden, M C; Söderhäll, K

    1995-11-22

    Lipid-containing hemolymph proteins from males of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two major lipoproteins, one high density lipoprotein (HDL) and one very high density lipoprotein (VHDL), were characterized. The HDL and the VHDL were found to be identical to two proteins previously studied for their roles in immune recognition and hemolymph clotting, namely the beta-1,3-glucan binding protein and the clotting protein. These results imply that crayfish lipoproteins have dual functions, and that they are involved in immunity, hemolymph clotting, and lipid transport in these animals. Also, the oxygen-transporting protein hemocyanin was found to have a small lipid content. PMID:7488215

  9. Passive samplers accurately predict PAH levels in resident crayfish.

    PubMed

    Paulik, L Blair; Smith, Brian W; Bergmann, Alan J; Sower, Greg J; Forsberg, Norman D; Teeguarden, Justin G; Anderson, Kim A

    2016-02-15

    Contamination of resident aquatic organisms is a major concern for environmental risk assessors. However, collecting organisms to estimate risk is often prohibitively time and resource-intensive. Passive sampling accurately estimates resident organism contamination, and it saves time and resources. This study used low density polyethylene (LDPE) passive water samplers to predict polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus. Resident crayfish were collected at 5 sites within and outside of the Portland Harbor Superfund Megasite (PHSM) in the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. LDPE deployment was spatially and temporally paired with crayfish collection. Crayfish visceral and tail tissue, as well as water-deployed LDPE, were extracted and analyzed for 62 PAHs using GC-MS/MS. Freely-dissolved concentrations (Cfree) of PAHs in water were calculated from concentrations in LDPE. Carcinogenic risks were estimated for all crayfish tissues, using benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq). ∑PAH were 5-20 times higher in viscera than in tails, and ∑BaPeq were 6-70 times higher in viscera than in tails. Eating only tail tissue of crayfish would therefore significantly reduce carcinogenic risk compared to also eating viscera. Additionally, PAH levels in crayfish were compared to levels in crayfish collected 10 years earlier. PAH levels in crayfish were higher upriver of the PHSM and unchanged within the PHSM after the 10-year period. Finally, a linear regression model predicted levels of 34 PAHs in crayfish viscera with an associated R-squared value of 0.52 (and a correlation coefficient of 0.72), using only the Cfree PAHs in water. On average, the model predicted PAH concentrations in crayfish tissue within a factor of 2.4 ± 1.8 of measured concentrations. This affirms that passive water sampling accurately estimates PAH contamination in crayfish. Furthermore, the strong predictive ability of this simple model suggests

  10. Feeding response by northern squawfish to a hatchery release of juvenile salmonids in the Clearwater River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shively, R.S.; Poe, T.P.; Sauter, S.T.

    1996-01-01

    We collected gut contents from northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis captured in the Clearwater River, Idaho, 0–6 km from its confluence with the Snake River, following the release of 1.1 million yearling chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha from the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery. Before the hatchery release, northern squawfish gut contents (by weight) in the study area were 38% crayfish Pacifastacus spp., 26% insects, 19% nonsalmonid fish, and 16% wheat kernels Triticum spp. Juvenile salmonids constituted 54% of gut contents about 24 h after the hatchery release, 78% after 5 d, and 86% after 7 d. The mean number of salmonids per gut (1.2) after release was higher than typically seen in guts from northern squawfish collected in mid-reservoir areas away from hydroelectric dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Length-frequency distributions of juvenile salmonids eaten and those captured in a scoop trap 4 km upstream of the study area indicated that northern squawfish were selectively feeding on the smaller individuals. We attribute the high rates of predation in the study area to the artificially high density of juvenile salmonids resulting from the hatchery release and to the physical characteristics of the study area in which the river changed from free flowing to impounded. Our results suggest that northern squawfish can quickly exploit hatchery releases of juvenile salmonids away from release sites in the Columbia River basin.

  11. A very-high-density lipoprotein with clotting ability from hemolymph of sand crayfish, Ibacus ciliatus.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, M; Ando, S

    1998-03-01

    A very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) with a density of 1.27-1.29 g/ml was the most abundant lipoprotein in the hemolymph of the sand crayfish Ibacus ciliatus. The VHDL isolated by a density gradient ultracentrifugation consisted of 94% protein and 6% lipid reflecting its high density, and phospholipid was a predominant lipid component. The VHDL had an apolipoprotein of molecular mass 195 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was identified as follows: LQPGLEYQYRYNGRVAA. This sequence was similar to those of clotting proteins from the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus and the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. Transglutaminase and Ca2+ also induced the VHDL to clot. Considering large amounts of VHDL in the hemolymph of sand crayfish, the VHDL not only functions as lipid carrier but plays an important role in the defense process of crustacea. PMID:9571775

  12. Effect of experimental exposure to differently virulent Aphanomyces astaci strains on the immune response of the noble crayfish Astacus astacus.

    PubMed

    Becking, Thomas; Mrugała, Agata; Delaunay, Carine; Svoboda, Jiří; Raimond, Maryline; Viljamaa-Dirks, Satu; Petrusek, Adam; Grandjean, Frédéric; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2015-11-01

    European crayfish are sensitive to the crayfish plague pathogen, Aphanomyces astaci, carried by North American crayfish species due to their less effective immune defence mechanisms against this disease. During a controlled infection experiment with a susceptible crayfish species Astacus astacus using three A. astaci strains (representing genotype groups A, B, and E), we investigated variation in their virulence and in crayfish immune defence indicators (haemocyte density, phenoloxidase activity, and production of reactive oxygen species). Experimental crayfish were exposed to two dosages of A. astaci spores (1 and 10 spores mL(-1)). The intensity and timing of the immune response differed between the strains as well as between the spore concentrations. Stronger and faster change in each immune parameter was observed in crayfish infected with two more virulent strains, indicating a relationship between crayfish immune response and A. astaci virulence. Similarly, the immune response was stronger and was observed earlier for the higher spore concentration. For the first time, the virulence of a strain of the genotype group E (isolated from Orconectes limosus) was experimentally tested. Total mortality was reached after 10 days for the two higher spore dosages (10 and 100 spores mL(-1)), and after 16 days for the lowest (1 spore mL(-1)), revealing equally high and rapid mortality as caused by the genotype group B (from Pacifastacus leniusculus). No mortality occurred after infection with genotype group A during 60 days of the experimental trial. PMID:26410255

  13. Aphanomyces astaci in wild crayfish populations in Slovenia: first report of persistent infection in a stone crayfish Austropotamobius torrentium population.

    PubMed

    Kusar, Darja; Vrezec, Al; Ocepek, Matja; Jencic, Vlasta

    2013-03-26

    All 5 crayfish species inhabiting Slovenian freshwaters, of which 3 are indigenous crayfish species (ICS: Astacus astacus, Austropotamobius pallipes, and A. torrentium) and 2 are non-indigenous (NICS: Pacifastacus leniusculus and Cherax quadricarinatus), were inspected for the presence of Aphanomyces astaci, the causative agent of crayfish plague. Wild crayfish populations showing no clinical signs of infection were inspected using A. astaci-specific real-time PCR. In addition, a conventional PCR assay was employed and confirmative sequencing was performed. Out of 88 analyzed crayfish, 15/27 (55.6%) specimens of A. torrentium from Borovnišcˇ%%KERN_ERR%%ica Brook and 4/35 (11.4%) of P. leniusculus from the Mura River tested positive, showing low to moderate levels of infection (agent levels A1-A4 and A1-A3, respectively). Results revealed the presence of A. astaci not only in the resistant NICS but also in ICS, since the infected population of A. torrentium presumably had no contact with the NICS carrier and appeared to sustain A. astaci infection in the 2 sampling years. Although the A. astaci genotype has not yet been identified, a connection between the latent infection in ICS and a Group A strain of A. astaci, co-evolving with A. torrentium since its first introduction to Slovenia, is suggested as the most plausible conclusion. This is the first reported population of the genus Austropotamobius with persistent infection, in addition to the already known populations of the genus Astacus. Findings of the presumed co-evolution of A. astaci and ICS hosts open new perspectives, necessitating additional studies on the presence of A. astaci genotypes in the persistently infected ICS populations. PMID:23548366

  14. Phylogeographic insights into the invasion history and secondary spread of the signal crayfish in Japan.

    PubMed

    Usio, Nisikawa; Azuma, Noriko; Larson, Eric R; Abbott, Cathryn L; Olden, Julian D; Akanuma, Hiromi; Takamura, Kenzi; Takamura, Noriko

    2016-08-01

    Successful invasion by nonindigenous species is often attributed to high propagule pressure, yet some foreign species become widespread despite showing reduced genetic variation due to founder effects. The signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) is one such example, where rapid spread across Japan in recent decades is believed to be the result of only three founding populations. To infer the history and explore the success of this remarkable crayfish invasion, we combined detailed phylogeographical and morphological analyses conducted in both the introduced and native ranges. We sequenced 16S mitochondrial DNA of signal crayfish from across the introduced range in Japan (537 samples, 20 sites) and the native range in western North America (700 samples, 50 sites). Because chela size is often related to aggressive behavior in crayfish, and hence, their invasion success, we also measured chela size of a subset of specimens in both introduced and native ranges. Genetic diversity of introduced signal crayfish populations was as high as that of the dominant phylogeographic group in the native range, suggesting high propagule pressure during invasion. More recently established crayfish populations in Japan that originated through secondary spread from one of the founding populations exhibit reduced genetic diversity relative to older populations, probably as a result of founder effects. However, these newer populations also show larger chela size, consistent with expectations of rapid adaptations or phenotypic responses during the invasion process. Introduced signal crayfish populations in Japan originate from multiple source populations from a wide geographic range in the native range of western North America. A combination of high genetic diversity, especially for older populations in the invasive range, and rapid adaptation to colonization, manifested as larger chela in recent invasions, likely contribute to invasion success of signal crayfish in Japan. PMID

  15. Biotic drivers of fluvial sediment transport: Aggregate effects of sediment mobilisation by crayfish on catchment-scale sediment yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Stephen; Mathers, Kate; Reeds, Jake; Extence, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Small but prolific organisms may be significant zoogeomorphic agents that make cumulative contributions to the large-scale terrestrial sediment cascade in, as yet, unknown and unquantified ways. One such organism is the signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), which has invaded many European rivers. The geographical extent and abundance of this animal ensure innumerable local, small-scale interactions with the fluvial sediment system that have the potential to yield a substantial effect when aggregated across larger spatial and temporal scales. Here we estimate, for the first time, the proportion of the total annual sediment yield associated with crayfish activity in an infested river and examine the variability in crayfish-driven sediment flux integrated across daily, monthly and seasonal time scales. We focused on one of several mechanisms by which crayfish activities affect sediment dynamics: the mobilisation of fine sediments by foraging, fighting and burrowing under hydraulic conditions that are otherwise insufficient to entrain sediment. On the Brampton Branch of the River Nene, UK, a 12-month record of suspended sediment concentration (derived from a calibration of turbidity data against measured SSC) allowed calculation of sediment fluxes and integrated sediment loads at ten-minute intervals. Concurrent measurements of water depth and crayfish movements (using PIT tagging) confirmed that night-time crayfish activity was often associated with increased sediment fluxes in the absence of any change in hydraulic conditions. Sediment loads calculated for these periods of crayfish activity were compared with total loads to estimate the contribution made to sediment mobilisation by crayfish. Crayfish-induced fluxes were most significant during summer low-flows, becoming less important during winter when the crayfish were inactive and competent high flows dominated sediment transport. Nevertheless, the seasonal cumulative effect of crayfish was substantial and

  16. Crazy about Crayfish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endreny, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Crayfish, also known as "crawfish" or "crawdads," are easy to keep in the classroom, and with patience and luck, students will observe the complete life cycle of the crayfish. They will also learn about aquatic animals and habitats and get to conduct inquiry experiments about animal behavior. This article describes how a third-grade teacher used…

  17. Crayfish for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulos, C. Jean

    1977-01-01

    This article describes how Robert LeBleu's interest in aquatic life developed and that today he owns a large hydroculture operation supplying research crayfish nationwide. Suggested laboratory experiments with crayfish are described, as well as information on additional studies, equipment needs, and tours of the hatchery. (MA)

  18. Differences in aggression, activity and boldness between native and introduced populations of an invasive crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pintor, L.M.; Sih, A.; Bauer, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressiveness, along with foraging voracity and boldness, are key behavioral mechanisms underlying the competitive displacement and invasion success of exotic species. However, do aggressiveness, voracity and boldness of the invader depend on the presence of an ecologically similar native competitor in the invaded community? We conducted four behavioral assays to compare aggression, foraging voracity, threat response and boldness to forage under predation risk of multiple populations of exotic signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus across its native and invaded range with and without a native congener, the Shasta crayfish P. fortis. We predicted that signal crayfish from the invaded range and sympatric with a native congener (IRS) should be more aggressive to outcompete a close competitor than populations from the native range (NR) or invaded range and allopatric to a native congener (IRA). Furthermore, we predicted that IRS populations of signal crayfish should be more voracious, but less bold to forage under predation risk since native predators and prey likely possess appropriate behavioral responses to the invader. Contrary to our predictions, results indicated that IRA signal crayfish were more aggressive towards conspecifics and more voracious and active foragers, yet also bolder to forage under predation risk in comparison to NR and IRS populations, which did not differ in behavior. Higher aggression/voracity/ boldness was positively correlated with prey consumption rates, and hence potential impacts on prey. We suggest that the positive correlations between aggression/voracity/boldness are the result of an overall aggression syndrome. Results of stream surveys indicated that IRA streams have significantly lower prey biomass than in IRS streams, which may drive invading signal crayfish to be more aggressive/voracious/bold to acquire resources to establish a population. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  19. Tag retention, growth, and survival of red swamp crayfish marked with a visible implant tag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isely, J.J.; Stockett, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Eighty juvenile (means: 42.4 mm total length, 1.6 g) red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii were implanted with sequentially numbered visible implant tags and held in the laboratory. Tags were injected transversely into the musculature just beneath the exoskeleton of the third abdominal segment from the cephalothorax; tags were visible upon inspection. An additional 20 crayfish were left untagged and served as controls. After 150 d, tag retention was 80% and all tags were readable. No tagged crayfish died during the study, and no differences in total length or weight were detected between tagged and control crayfish. All individuals molted at least three times during the 150-d study, and some individuals molted up to six times, suggesting that most tags would be permanently retained. The readability in the field without specialized equipment makes the visible implant tag ideal for studies of crayfish ecology, management, and culture.

  20. Tag retention, growth, and survival of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isely, J.J.; Eversole, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    Juvenile red swamp crayfish (or crawfish), Procambarus clarkii (20-41 mm in total length) were collected from a crayfish culture pond by dipnetting and tagged with sequentially numbered, standard length, binary-coded wire tags. Four replicates of 50 crayfish were impaled perpendicular to the long axis of the abdomen with a fixed needle. Tags were injected transversely into the ventral surface of the first or second abdominal segment and were imbedded in the musculature just beneath the abdominal sternum. Tags were visible upon inspection. Additionally, two replicates of 50 crayfish were not tagged and were used as controls. Growth, survival, and tag retention were evaluated after 7 d in individual containers, after 100 d in aquaria, and after 200 d in field cages. Tag retention during each sample period was 100%, and average mortality of tagged crayfish within 7 d of tagging was 1%. Mortality during the remainder of the study was high (75-91%) but was similar between treatment and control samples. Most of the deaths were probably due to cannibalism. Average total length increased threefold during the course of the study, and crayfish reached maturity. Because crayfish were mature by the end of the study, we concluded that the coded wire tag was retained through the life history of the crayfish.

  1. Habitat and co-occurrence of native and invasive crayfish in the Pacific Northwest, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Adams, Michael J.; McCreary, Brome

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions can have dramatic effects on freshwater ecosystems and introduced crayfish can be particularly impacting. We document crayfish distribution in three large hydrographic basins (Rogue, Umpqua, Willamette/Columbia) in the Pacific Northwest USA. We used occupancy analyses to investigate habitat relationships and evidence for displacement of native Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana, 1852) by two invaders. We found invasive Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852), in 51 of 283 sites and in all three hydrographic basins. We found invasive Orconectes n. neglectus (Faxon, 1885) at 68% of sites in the Rogue basin and provide first documentation of their broad distribution in the Umpqua basin. We found P. clarkii in both lentic and lotic habitats, and it was positively associated with manmade sites. P. leniusculus was positively associated with lotic habitats and negatively related to manmade sites. In the Rogue and Umpqua basins, O. n. neglectus and P. leniusculus were similar in their habitat associations. We did not find a negative relationship in site occupancy between O. n. neglectus and P. leniusculus. Our data suggest that P. clarkii has potential to locally displace P. leniusculus. There is still time for preventive measures to limit the spread of the invasive crayfish in this region.

  2. Laboratory agonistic interactions demonstrate failure of an introduced crayfish to dominate two imperiled endemic crayfishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahm, E.J.; Griffith, S.A.; Noltie, D.B.; DiStefano, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Following its introduction into the St. Francis River drainage, Missouri, U.S.A., the woodland crayfish, Orconectes hylas has expanded its range there; simultaneously populations of two imperiled endemic species, the Big Creek crayfish, O. peruncus, and the St. Francis River crayfish, O. quadruncus have declined therein. In seeking a basis for this decline, our study objective was to test whether the outcome of aggressive inter-specific interactions would favor O. hylas. We studied agonistic encounters between size-matched pairs of same-sex individuals of the introduced and the endemic species in a laboratory setting, first with juveniles and then with adults. Within each life stage, we conducted four sets of laboratory experiments, with approximately 20 trials in each set: (1) O. hylas males versus O. peruncus males, (2) O. hylas males versus O. quadruncus males, (3) O. hylas females versus O. peruncus females, and (4) O. hylas females versus O. quadruncus females. In addition, these same four experiment sets were repeated using larger adult O. hylas crayfish matched with smaller-sized adult endemics, mimicking the mismatch in adult sizes that occurs in the wild. Within each experiment, every trial was analysed to quantify the frequency of occurrence of three initiation behaviors and to determine the overall outcome of the trial. Results did not show O. hylas (juveniles or adults) to be behaviorally dominant over either endemic species. Orconectes hylas displayed the majority of one of the initiation behaviors significantly more often than did the endemic species in only two of the twelve experiments. Because direct aggressive interaction was not demonstrated to be the mechanism whereby O. peruncus and O. quadruncus are being replaced by O. hylas, other life history and ecological factors will require investigation. ?? Koninklijke Brill NV, 2005.

  3. Habitat use and growth of the western painted crayfish Orconectes palmeri longimanus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyer, Joseph J.; Mouser, Joshua; Brewer, Shannon K.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying ontogenetic shifts in habitat use by aquatic organisms is necessary for improving conservation strategies; however, our ability to designate life stages based on surrogate metrics (i.e., length) is questionable without validation. This study identified growth patterns of age-0 western painted crayfish Orconectes palmeri longimanus (Faxon, 1898) reared in the laboratory, provided support for field-based designations of age-0 lengths, and identified microhabitat factors important to adult and juvenile presence from field collections. Two growth periods of a laboratory crayfish population were described using a broken line model: a rapid, early-growth period (weeks 2-20, slope = 0.81 ± 0.03SE), and a slower, late-growth period (weeks 22-50, slope = 0.13 ± 0.03SE). A smoothed curve was generated to represent the size distribution of juveniles from our laboratory population to determine the probability that an age-0 crayfish from our laboratory population had a carapace length (CL) similar to that found in previous field studies using onset of maturity (22.4 mm CL). We determined that the probability of the age-0 crayfish in our summer laboratory population exceeding 22.4 mm CL was 0.06. The threshold between the lower 0.95 and upper 0.05 probabilities was 22.9 mm CL, confirming previous field observations of onset at maturity. We used this threshold to identify juveniles and adults from our field collections, and found that both life stages were positively associated with coarse substrate and negatively associated with water depth. Adults, however, were negatively related to gravel, whereas juveniles showed a positive relationship. This result is reflective of the relationship between crayfish body size and refuge use within the interstitial spaces of substrates, whereby adult crayfish are unable to seek refuge in the small interstitial spaces of gravel.

  4. The significance of droughts for hyporheic dwellers: evidence from freshwater crayfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Antonín; Tíkal, Jan; Císař, Petr; Veselý, Lukáš; Fořt, Martin; Příborský, Josef; Patoka, Jiří; Buřič, Miloš

    2016-05-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is globally threatened by various factors while severe weather events like long-term droughts may be substantially devastating. In order to remain in contact with the water or stay in a sufficiently humid environment at drying localities, the ability to withstand desiccation by dwelling in the hyporheic zone, particularly through vertical burrowing is crucial. We assessed the ability of three European native and five non-native crayfish as models to survive and construct vertical burrows in a humid sandy-clayey substrate under a simulated one-week drought. Three native species (Astacus astacus, A. leptodactylus, and Austropotamobius torrentium) suffered extensive mortalities. Survival of non-native species was substantially higher while all specimens of Cherax destructor and Procambarus clarkii survived. The native species and Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited no ability to construct vertical burrows. Procambarus fallax f. virginalis and P. clarkii constructed bigger and deeper burrows than C. destructor and Orconectes limosus. In the context of predicted weather fluctuations, the ability to withstand desiccation through constructing vertical burrows into the hyporheic zone under drought conditions might play a significant role in the success of particular crayfish species, as well as a wide range of further hyporheic-dwelling aquatic organisms in general.

  5. The significance of droughts for hyporheic dwellers: evidence from freshwater crayfish.

    PubMed

    Kouba, Antonín; Tíkal, Jan; Císař, Petr; Veselý, Lukáš; Fořt, Martin; Příborský, Josef; Patoka, Jiří; Buřič, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is globally threatened by various factors while severe weather events like long-term droughts may be substantially devastating. In order to remain in contact with the water or stay in a sufficiently humid environment at drying localities, the ability to withstand desiccation by dwelling in the hyporheic zone, particularly through vertical burrowing is crucial. We assessed the ability of three European native and five non-native crayfish as models to survive and construct vertical burrows in a humid sandy-clayey substrate under a simulated one-week drought. Three native species (Astacus astacus, A. leptodactylus, and Austropotamobius torrentium) suffered extensive mortalities. Survival of non-native species was substantially higher while all specimens of Cherax destructor and Procambarus clarkii survived. The native species and Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited no ability to construct vertical burrows. Procambarus fallax f. virginalis and P. clarkii constructed bigger and deeper burrows than C. destructor and Orconectes limosus. In the context of predicted weather fluctuations, the ability to withstand desiccation through constructing vertical burrows into the hyporheic zone under drought conditions might play a significant role in the success of particular crayfish species, as well as a wide range of further hyporheic-dwelling aquatic organisms in general. PMID:27225308

  6. The significance of droughts for hyporheic dwellers: evidence from freshwater crayfish

    PubMed Central

    Kouba, Antonín; Tíkal, Jan; Císař, Petr; Veselý, Lukáš; Fořt, Martin; Příborský, Josef; Patoka, Jiří; Buřič, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is globally threatened by various factors while severe weather events like long-term droughts may be substantially devastating. In order to remain in contact with the water or stay in a sufficiently humid environment at drying localities, the ability to withstand desiccation by dwelling in the hyporheic zone, particularly through vertical burrowing is crucial. We assessed the ability of three European native and five non-native crayfish as models to survive and construct vertical burrows in a humid sandy-clayey substrate under a simulated one-week drought. Three native species (Astacus astacus, A. leptodactylus, and Austropotamobius torrentium) suffered extensive mortalities. Survival of non-native species was substantially higher while all specimens of Cherax destructor and Procambarus clarkii survived. The native species and Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited no ability to construct vertical burrows. Procambarus fallax f. virginalis and P. clarkii constructed bigger and deeper burrows than C. destructor and Orconectes limosus. In the context of predicted weather fluctuations, the ability to withstand desiccation through constructing vertical burrows into the hyporheic zone under drought conditions might play a significant role in the success of particular crayfish species, as well as a wide range of further hyporheic-dwelling aquatic organisms in general. PMID:27225308

  7. The thermal tolerance of crayfish could be estimated from respiratory electron transport system activity.

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Pajk, Franja; Jaklič, Martina; Brancelj, Anton; Vrezec, Al

    2014-04-01

    Whether electron transport system (ETS) activity could be used as an estimator of crayfish thermal tolerance has been investigated experimentally. Food consumption rate, respiration rates in the air and water, the difference between energy consumption and respiration costs at a given temperature ('potential growth scope', PGS), and ETS activity of Orconectes limosus and Pacifastacus leniusculus were determined over a temperature range of 5-30°C. All concerned parameters were found to be temperature dependent. The significant correlation between ETS activity and PGS indicates that they respond similarly to temperature change. The regression analysis of ETS activity as an estimator of thermal tolerance at the mitochondrial level and PGS as an indicator of thermal tolerance at the organismic level showed the shift of optimum temperature ranges of ETS activity to the right for 2° in O. limosus and for 3° in P. leniusculus. Thus, lower estimated temperature optima and temperatures of optimum ranges of PGS compared to ETS activity could indicate higher thermal sensitivity at the organismic level than at a lower level of complexity (i.e. at the mitochondrial level). The response of ETS activity to temperature change, especially at lower and higher temperatures, indicates differences in the characteristics of the ETSs in O. limosus and P. leniusculus. O. limosus is less sensitive to high temperature. The significant correlation between PGS and ETS activity supports our assumption that ETS activity could be used for the rapid estimation of thermal tolerance in crayfish species. PMID:24679968

  8. Nitrite toxicity to the crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Gutzmer, M.P.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of acute nitrite exposure to the crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Decapoda). Specific objectives of this study included (1) determining the 24-, 48-, 72- and 96-h LC-50's of nitrite to crayfish of different weights and genders in freshwater, (2) determining the LC-50's of nitrite to crayfish in water with elevated chloride concentrations, and (3), in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of nitrite toxicity in crayfish, determining hemolymph nitrite concentrations in crayfish exposed to nitrite in freshwater and water with elevated chloride concentrations.

  9. Effects of Different Social and Environmental Conditions on Established Dominance Relationships in Crayfish.

    PubMed

    Herberholz, Jens; Swierzbinski, Matthew E; Birke, Juliane M

    2016-04-01

    Like most social animals, crayfish readily form dominance relationships and linear social hierarchies when competing for limited resources. Competition often entails dyadic aggressive interactions, from which one animal emerges as the dominant and one as the subordinate. Once dominance relationships are formed, they typically remain stable for extended periods of time; thus, access to future resources is divided unequally among conspecifics. We previously showed that firmly established dominance relationships in juvenile crayfish can be disrupted by briefly adding a larger conspecific to the original pair. This finding suggested that the stability of social relationships in crayfish was highly context-dependent and more transient than previously assumed. We now report results that further identify the mechanisms underlying the destabilization of crayfish dominance relationships. We found that rank orders remained stable when conspecifics of smaller or equal size were added to the original pair, suggesting that both dominant and subordinate must be defeated by a larger crayfish in order to destabilize dominance relationships. We also found that dominance relationships remained stable when both members of the original pair were defeated by larger conspecifics in the absence of their original opponent. This showed that dominance relationships are not destabilized unless both animals experience defeat together. Lastly, we found that dominance relationships of pairs were successfully disrupted by larger intruders, although with reduced magnitude, after all chemical cues associated with earlier agonistic experiences were eliminated. These findings provide important new insights into the contextual features that regulate the stability of social dominance relationships in crayfish and probably in other species as well. PMID:27132137

  10. Invasion biology in non-free-living species: interactions between abiotic (climatic) and biotic (host availability) factors in geographical space in crayfish commensals (Ostracoda, Entocytheridae)

    PubMed Central

    Mestre, Alexandre; Aguilar-Alberola, Josep A; Baldry, David; Balkis, Husamettin; Ellis, Adam; Gil-Delgado, Jose A; Grabow, Karsten; Klobučar, Göran; Kouba, Antonín; Maguire, Ivana; Martens, Andreas; Mülayim, Ayşegül; Rueda, Juan; Scharf, Burkhard; Soes, Menno; S Monrós, Juan; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    In invasion processes, both abiotic and biotic factors are considered essential, but the latter are usually disregarded when modeling the potential spread of exotic species. In the framework of set theory, interactions between biotic (B), abiotic (A), and movement-related (M) factors in the geographical space can be hypothesized with BAM diagrams and tested using ecological niche models (ENMs) to estimate A and B areas. The main aim of our survey was to evaluate the interactions between abiotic (climatic) and biotic (host availability) factors in geographical space for exotic symbionts (i.e., non-free-living species), using ENM techniques combined with a BAM framework and using exotic Entocytheridae (Ostracoda) found in Europe as model organisms. We carried out an extensive survey to evaluate the distribution of entocytherids hosted by crayfish in Europe by checking 94 European localities and 12 crayfish species. Both exotic entocytherid species found, Ankylocythere sinuosa and Uncinocythere occidentalis, were widely distributed in W Europe living on the exotic crayfish species Procambarus clarkii and Pacifastacus leniusculus, respectively. No entocytherids were observed in the remaining crayfish species. The suitable area for A. sinuosa was mainly restricted by its own limitations to minimum temperatures in W and N Europe and precipitation seasonality in circum-Mediterranean areas. Uncinocythere occidentalis was mostly restricted by host availability in circum-Mediterranean regions due to limitations of P. leniusculus to higher precipitation seasonality and maximum temperatures. The combination of ENMs with set theory allows studying the invasive biology of symbionts and provides clues about biogeographic barriers due to abiotic or biotic factors limiting the expansion of the symbiont in different regions of the invasive range. The relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors on geographical space can then be assessed and applied in conservation plans. This

  11. Copper accumulation in the crayfish (Orconectes rusticus)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the crayfish, O. rusticus could fulfill Nehring's (1976) criteria for a good biological monitor of heavy metal pollution. Since there is some evidence that the cupric ion is the most toxic form of aqueous copper, crayfish-accumulated copper was compared to both total and cupric copper in the culture water.

  12. Invasive crayfish in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; McCreary, Brome; Adams, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species directly threaten freshwater biodiversity, particularly in regions of high aquatic richness like the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Crayfish are among the most impactful of aquatic invasive species. Invasive crayfish are considered ecosystem engineers due to their ability to alter basic wetland properties, such as reducing vegetation and bank integrity and increasing turbidity. In areas where invasion is advanced, crayfish pose major economic and ecological problems. Crayfish have been widely introduced for aquaculture and can become established in a wide range of habitat conditions. They also may be spread by anglers who use them as bait. Several non-native crayfish are established in the PNW, but the extent of their invasion is not well known. At least two groups are known from scattered sites in the PNW, and both have proven problematic for native species in other parts of the world: Red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and several members of the genus Orconectes. Both groups are native to areas of the eastern United States. Both are identified globally as invasives of high concern and appear on the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's "10 Most Unwanted" and the U.S. Forest Service's "Primary Species of Concern" lists for stream systems in the PNW. Despite the presence of introduced crayfish in the PNW and their high potential for negative effects, the scope of their invasion and effects on aquatic systems are not well known. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), along with local groups and state agencies, is working to clarify crayfish distribution and to outline which basins may not yet be invaded. Other goals are to improve understanding of habitat associations of invasive crayfish and their potential effects on native crayfish.

  13. Effects of depth and crayfish size on predation risk and foraging profitability of a lotic crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flinders, C.A.; Magoulick, D.D.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted field surveys and experiments to determine whether observed distributions of crayfish among habitats were influenced by differential resource availability, foraging profitability, and predation rates and whether these factors differed with crayfish size and habitat depth. We sampled available food resources (detritus and invertebrates) and shelter as rock substrate in deep (>50 cm) and shallow (<30 cm) habitats. We used an enclosure-exclosure experiment to examine the effects of water depth and crayfish size on crayfish biomass and survival, and to determine whether these factors affected silt accrual, algal abundance (chlorophyll a [chl a]), and detritus and invertebrate biomass (g ash-free dry mass) differently from enclosures without crayfish. We conducted tethering experiments to assess predation on small (13-17 mm carapace length [CL]) and large (23-30 mm CL) Orconectes marchandi and to determine whether predation rates differed with water depth. Invertebrate biomass was significantly greater in shallow water than in deep water, whereas detritus biomass did not differ significantly between depths. Cobble was significantly more abundant in shallow than in deep water. Depth and crayfish size had a significant interactive effect on change in size of enclosed crayfish when CL was used as a measure of size but not when biomass was used as a measure of size. CL of small crayfish increased significantly more in enclosures in shallow than in deep water, but CL of large crayfish changed very little at either depth. Silt, chl a, and detritus biomass were significantly lower on tiles in large- than in small- and no-crayfish enclosures, and invertebrate biomass was significantly lower in large- than in no-crayfish enclosures. Significantly more crayfish were consumed in deep than in shallow water regardless of crayfish size. Our results suggest that predation and resource availability might influence the depth distribution of small and large crayfish. Small

  14. Environmental enrichment influences neuronal stem cells in the adult crayfish brain

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Neishay; Benton, Jeanne L.; Zhang, Yi; Beltz, Barbara S.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are incorporated throughout life into the brains of many vertebrate and non-vertebrate species. This process of adult neurogenesis is regulated by a variety of external and endogenous factors, including environmental enrichment, which increases the production of neurons in juvenile mice and crayfish. The primary goal of the present study was to exploit the spatial separation of the neuronal precursor cell lineage in crayfish to determine which generation(s) of precursors is altered by environmental conditions. Further, in crayfish, an intimate relationship between the 1st generation neuronal precursors (stem cells) and cells circulating in the hemolymph has been proposed (Zhang et al., 2009). Therefore, a second goal was to assess whether environmental enrichment alters the numbers or types of cells circulating in the hemolymph. We find that neurogenesis in the brains of sexually differentiated procambarid crayfish is enhanced by environmental enrichment as previously demonstrated by Sandeman and Sandeman (2000) in young, sexually undifferentiated Cherax destructor. We also show that environmental enrichment increases the cell cycle rate of neuronal stem cells. While there was no effect of environment on the overall numbers of cells circulating in the hemolymph, enrichment resulted in increased expression of glutamine synthetase, a marker of the neuronal stem cells, in a small percentage of circulating cells; there was little or no expression of this enzyme in hemolymph cells extracted from deprived animals. Thus, environmental enrichment influences the rate of neuronal stem cell division in adult crayfish, as well as the composition of cells circulating in the hemolymph. PMID:21485010

  15. Heavy metals in Tuskegee Lake crayfish

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.T.

    1995-12-31

    The crayfish, Onconectes virifis, is a bottom dweller and eats insect larvae, worms, crustaceans, small snails, fishes, and dead animal matter. They can be used to monitor the aquatic environment such as lakes, ponds and creeks. To monitor the environmental contamination of heavy metals (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cu, Co, Ni, and Zn) in Tuskegee Lake, Tuskegee, Alabama, adult crayfish were collected and analyzed for these metals. The Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn concentrations were 3.91, 0.22, 8.06, 1.11, and 33.37 ppm in muscle and 28.98, 1.15, 9.86, 2.1 8, and 32.62 ppm in exoskeleton of crayfish, respectively. The concentrations of Pb and Cd were significantly higher in exoskeleton than those of muscle. However, the concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Zn did not show any significant difference between the muscle and the exoskeleton of the crayfish. The concentrations of Hg and Co were undetected in both the exoskeleton and muscle of the crayfish.

  16. Control of nuisance populations of crayfish with traps and toxicants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Crayfish have long been a nuisance in fish-rearing ponds at fish hatcheries. The rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus ) has displaced endemic species and caused serious declines of aquatic plants in some ponds and lakes in the midwestern USA. The authors attempted to evaluate the effect of intensive trapping on a crayfish population and to identify a selective chemical control agent and evaluate its effectiveness under field conditions. A crayfish population in a small pond was suppressed but not eliminated by trapping: adults were effectively harvested but efficiency diminished sharply as the population declined. Of 19 chemicals tested as possible control agents for crayfish, a synthetic pyrethroid (Baythroid) was by far the most toxic; 25 mu g/L produced a complete kill of crayfish in the pond and was also the most selective for crayfish in laboratory tests.

  17. Exposure of the eggs to 17alpha-methyl testosterone reduced hatching success and growth and elicited teratogenic effects in postembryonic life stages of crayfish.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter

    2007-12-30

    Testosterone is regularly found in the tissues of decapod crustaceans. Although this vertebrate-type sex hormone is not the principal factor of sex differentiation in crustaceans, it was shown to be capable of acting on the reproductive organs of shrimps and crabs. In the present study I have exposed developing eggs and stage 5 juveniles of the parthenogenetic all female marbled crayfish to 17alpha-methyl testosterone in order to test whether in freshwater crayfish sex can be changed from female to male by this androgen. MT did not elicit sex change, neither when administered during embryonic development nor during juvenile stage 5, the main period of proliferation of the oocytes. However, exposure to 100 microg/L MT from 64% to 84% embryonic development resulted in prolonged embryonic development, reduced hatching success, reduced growth of the juveniles, and severe malformations of the appendages in the juveniles. The marbled crayfish is recommended to be considered for toxicity tests due to its easy culture in the laboratory and its genotypical uniformity. PMID:17983674

  18. Crayfish plague Aphanomyces astaci detected in redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Yu; Huang, Chen-Wei; Pan, Yi-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Between December 2013 and January 2014, five outbreaks of an unknown disease with moderate to high cumulative mortality were observed among the freshwater redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) populations at four crayfish farms in Miaoli and Changhua counties (northern Taiwan) and at one crayfish farm in Pingtung County (southern Taiwan). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis allowed the detection of Aphanomyces astaci DNA in dead crayfish. Histopathological examination revealed an infection of host tissue by fungal hyphae that presented as typical non-septate hyphae within the soft abdominal cuticle from the first to second segment and in the tail fan. In PCR assays completed for the detection of crayfish plague, an expected 568-bp product, specific for the A. astaci ITS gene, was obtained from all sub-adults and adults examined. In a comparison of our strains with the known strains of A. astaci in Europe, nucleotide sequence identities were very similar, with 99.8-100% sequence similarity in that gene region. Positive reactions to in situ hybridization, using a digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled DNA probe, further confirmed A. astaci as the causative agent. This is the first report concerning natural infection of A. astaci in freshwater redclaw crayfish in Asia. PMID:27039156

  19. Investigation of hatching and early post-embryonic life of freshwater crayfish by in vitro culture, behavioral analysis, and light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter

    2008-07-01

    The late embryonic and early post-embryonic life period of freshwater crayfish, which is the main time period of organogenesis, is poorly investigated because of the protective brooding behavior of crayfish mothers. A combination of in vitro culture, behavioral observations, and microscopic investigations of organs involved in hatching, attachment, exploration of the environment, and searching and processing of food yielded deeper insights in this important period of life. Experiments were performed with the robust parthenogenetic marbled crayfish. The following results were obtained: (1) Marbled crayfish can be raised in simple in vitro systems from 80% embryonic development to juvenile Stage 4 with up to 100% survival; (2) Hatching is prepared by chemical weakening of the egg shell and completed by levering actions of the hatchling's appendages; (3) The telson thread, a safety line that keeps the hatchling secured to the mother, is formed by secretions from the telson and the detaching inner layer of the egg case; (4) Molting Stage-1 juveniles are secured by an anal thread that results from delayed molting of the hindgut; (5) Active attachment of the hatchlings to the maternal pleopods with their 1st pereiopods is achieved by an innate fixed action pattern; (6) In vitro, juveniles are motile from Stage 2 despite incomplete development of their balance controlling statocysts. Movement pattern and social behavior vary greatly among individuals; and (7) Feeding starts in Stage 3, when the mouthparts and the gastric mill are fully developed. Onset of feeding is innate and does not require maternal contributions. In vitro culture of the isogenic marbled crayfish is recommended for broader use in research because it enables not only time and stage-specific sampling but also precisely timed experimental manipulations. PMID:18438781

  20. Distribution and conservation standing of West Virginia crayfishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Welsh, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of crayfishes in West Virginia represents a transition between the species-rich southern Appalachian faunas and the depauperate crayfish diversity in the northeastern United States. Currently, 22 described species occur in the state, of which 6 are given S1 status, and 3 are introduced species. One species, Orconectes limosus (Spinycheek Crayfish) is considered extirpated within the past decade. Imperiled species include Cambarus veteranus (Big Sandy Crayfish),Cambarus elkensis (Elk River Crayfish), Cambarus longulus (Atlantic Slope Crayfish), andCambarus nerterius (Greenbrier Cave Crayfish). Three species—O. virilis (Virile Crayfish),Orconectes rusticus (Rusty Crayfish), and Procambarus zonangulus (Southern White River Crawfish)—have introduced populations within the state. Procambarus acutus (White River Crawfish) occurs in bottomland forest along the Ohio River floodplain, and is considered native. Several undescribed taxa have been identified and currently are being described. A statewide survey was initiated in 2007 to document the current distribution and conservation status of crayfishes in West Virginia.

  1. Effects of glyphosate and polyoxyethylenamine on growth and energetic reserves in the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Decapoda, Parastacidae).

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jimena L; Vatnick, Itzick; Chaulet, Anouk; Rodríguez, Enrique M

    2011-11-01

    Freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus have a high commercial value and are cultured in farms where they are potentially exposed to pesticides. Therefore, we examined the sublethal effects of a 50-day exposure to glyphosate acid and polyoxyethylenamine (POEA), both alone and in a 3:1 mixture, on the growth and energetic reserves in muscle, hepatopancreas and hemolymph of growing juvenile crayfish. Exposure to two different glyphosate and POEA mixtures caused lower somatic growth and decreased muscle protein levels. These effects, caused by both compounds interacting in the mixture, could also be synergistic because they were expressed even at the lowest concentration. The decrease in protein levels could be related to the greater use of other energy reserves. This hypothesis is supported by the decrease in muscle glycogen stores due to glyphosate exposure and the decrease in lipid reserves associated with exposure to POEA. PMID:21424220

  2. Stream Crayfish Distribution Patterns and Habitat Associations in northern Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, S. B.; Warren, M. L.

    2005-05-01

    Distribution patterns and habitat associations of crayfishes in Mississippi are largely unexplored. During summers 1999-2003, we sampled crayfishes, fishes and habitat in 119 stream sites in northern Mississippi. We captured over 1,200 crayfish of 9 species from 3 genera. Species co-occurrence analyses and principal components analyses (PCA) of species abundances indicated significant species structuring among crayfish assemblages. We infer from co-occurrence patterns that both competitive interactions and historic processes led to present distributions. Mantel tests and PCA both indicated that crayfish assemblage characteristics are significantly related to stream size, but not to other habitat variables. In contrast to the nearly-universal rule for aquatic taxa that species richness increases with stream size, crayfish richness, abundance, and density were inversely related to stream size. Crayfish densities dropped precipitously when watershed area exceeded about 2,500 hectares. The low richness and abundance of crayfishes in medium and large streams may be due, in part, to the extreme disturbance from channelization and incisement in middle to lower reaches of most of the drainages we studied. Intermittent and very small perennial streams are sometimes regarded as biologically unimportant by land managers, but are primary strongholds of stream crayfishes in northern Mississippi.

  3. Response of crayfish to hyporheic water availability and excess sedimentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyer, Joseph J.; Worthington, Thomas A.; Brewer, Shannon K.

    2015-01-01

    Crayfish in many headwater streams regularly cope with seasonal drought. However, it is unclear how landscape changes affect the long-term persistence of crayfish populations. We designed two laboratory experiments to investigate the acute effects of common landscape stressors on crayfish: water withdrawal and sedimentation. The first experiment tested the interaction among water withdrawals (four 24-h water reductions of 0, 15, 30, or 45 cm) and two substrate treatments (pebble and cobble) on the burrowing depth of crayfish. The second experiment evaluated the effects of excess fine sediment (three treatments of 0, 45, and 90% sediment) and substrate type (cobble and pebble) on crayfish burrowing depth. Crayfish were able to burrow deeper into the simulated hyporheic zone in cobble substrate when compared to pebble. Crayfish subjected to greater water withdrawals in the pebble treatment were not able to reach the simulated hyporheic zone. Excess fine sediment reduced the depth that crayfish burrowed, regardless of substrate type. Results from this study suggest excess fine sediment may reduce crayfish persistence, particularly when seeking refuge during prolonged dry conditions.

  4. Transglutaminase activity in the hematopoietic tissue of a crustacean, Pacifastacus leniusculus, importance in hemocyte homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xionghui; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Background Transglutaminases (TGases) form a group of enzymes that have many different substrates and among the most well known are fibrin for Factor XIIIa and the clotting protein in crustaceans. We also found that TGase is an abundant protein in the hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cells of crayfish and hence we have studied the possible function of this enzyme in hematopoiesis. Results TGase is one of the most abundant proteins in the Hpt and its mRNA expression as well as enzyme activity is very high in the Hpt cells, lesser in the semi-granular hemocytes and very low in the granular cells. In cultured hematopoietic tissues, high activity was present in cells in the centre of the tissue, whereas cells migrating out of the tissue had very low TGase activity. RNAi experiments using dsRNA for TGase completely knocked down the transcript and as a result the cell morphology was changed and the cells started to spread intensely. If astakine, a cytokine directly involved in hematopoiesis, was added the cells started to spread and adopt a morphology similar to that observed after RNAi of TGase. Astakine had no effect on TGase expression, but after a prolonged incubation for one week with this invertebrate cytokine, TGase activity inside and outside the cells was completely lost. Thus it seems as if astakine addition to the Hpt cells and RNAi of TGase in the cell culture will lead to the same results, i.e. loss of TGase activity in the cells and they start to differentiate and spread. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that TGase is important for keeping the Hpt cells in an undifferentiated stage inside the hematopoietic tissue and if expression of TGase mRNA is blocked the cells start to differentiate and spread. This shows a new function for transglutaminase in preventing hematopoietic stem cells from starting to differentiate and migrate into the hemolymph, whereas their proliferation is unaffected. Astakine is also important for the hematopoiesis, since it

  5. Sex identification in female crayfish is bimodal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquiloni, Laura; Massolo, Alessandro; Gherardi, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Sex identification has been studied in several species of crustacean decapods but only seldom was the role of multimodality investigated in a systematic fashion. Here, we analyse the effect of single/combined chemical and visual stimuli on the ability of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii to identify the sex of a conspecific during mating interactions. Our results show that crayfish respond to the offered stimuli depending on their sex. While males rely on olfaction alone for sex identification, females require the combination of olfaction and vision to do so. In the latter, chemical and visual stimuli act as non-redundant signal components that possibly enhance the female ability to discriminate potential mates in the crowded social context experienced during mating period. This is one of the few clear examples in invertebrates of non-redundancy in a bimodal communication system.

  6. Estimating prey size and number in crayfish-eating snakes, genus Regina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godley, J.S.; McDiarmid, R.W.; Rojas, N.N.

    1984-01-01

    Snakes of the genus Regina feed almost exclusively on crayfish. The paired, symmetrical gastroliths of crayfish are not digested and are detectable from x-rays of the snake. Gastrolith length is directly proportional to carapace length and can be obtained from x-rays. Carapace length can be converted to kcal of ingested energy. Using these relationships and repeated captures of radio-telemetered Regina, estimates of food consumption and energy intake by freeliving snakes are feasible. New information on prey selectivity, feeding behavior, and predator-prey size relations in Regina grahami and R. septemvittata are presented and compared with similar data for other snakes.

  7. Effects of Crayfish on Quality of Fine Particulate Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemarano, J. J.; Kershner, M. W.; Leff, L. G.

    2005-05-01

    The origin and ontogeny of detritus often determines its bioavailability. Crayfish shred and consume detrital organic matter, influencing fine particulate organic matter (FPOM) availability, composition and quality. Given consumption of FPOM by many invertebrates, crayfish can indirectly affect these organisms by altering FPOM bioavailability through organic matter fragmentation, biofilm disturbance, and defecation. These effects may or may not vary among coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) from different leaf species. To assess crayfish effects on FPOM quality, crayfish were fed stream-conditioned maple or oak leaves in hanging 1-mm mesh-bottom baskets in aquaria. After 12 h, crayfish and remaining leaves were removed. FPOM fragments that fell through the mesh were vacuum filtered and analyzed for percent organic matter, C:N ratio, and bacterial abundance. The same analyses were conducted on crayfish feces collected using finger cots encasing crayfish abdomens. C:N ratios did not differ between feces and maple leaf CPOM, but were lower in FPOM produced through fragmentation and disturbance (P = 0.023). Overall, crayfish alter the ontogeny of detritus, which may, in turn, affect stream FPOM dynamics.

  8. To signal or not to signal? Chemical communication by urine-borne signals mirrors sexual conflict in crayfish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sexual selection theory predicts that females, being the limiting sex, invest less in courtship signals than males. However, when chemical signals are involved it is often the female that initiates mating by producing stimuli that inform about sex and/or receptivity. This apparent contradiction has been discussed in the literature as 'the female pheromone fallacy'. Because the release of chemical stimuli may not have evolved to elicit the male's courtship response, whether these female stimuli represent signals remains an open question. Using techniques to visualise and block release of urine, we studied the role of urine signals during fighting and mating interactions of crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus). Test individuals were blindfolded to exclude visual disturbance from dye release and artificial urine introduction. Results Staged female-male pairings during the reproductive season often resulted in male mating attempts. Blocking female urine release in such pairings prevented any male courtship behaviour. Artificial introduction of female urine re-established male mating attempts. Urine visualisation showed that female urine release coincides with aggressive behaviours but not with female submissive behaviour in reproductive interactions as well as in intersexual and intrasexual fights. In reproductive interactions, females predominately released urine during precopulatory aggression; males subsequently released significantly less urine during mating than in fights. Conclusions Urine-blocking experiments demonstrate that female urine contains sex-specific components that elicit male mating behaviour. The coincidence of chemical signalling and aggressive behaviour in both females and males suggests that urine release has evolved as an aggressive signal in both sexes of crayfish. By limiting urine release to aggressive behaviours in reproductive interactions females challenge their potential mating partners at the same time as they trigger a sexual

  9. Effects of habitat structure and risk of cannibalism on life-history traits of red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarki)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, D.; Fradette, K. J.; Usowski, A. E.

    2005-05-01

    The effects of habitat structure on predator-prey interactions and intra-guild predation have been well studied in a number of ecological and laboratory systems. How intraspecific interactions among members of cannibalistic species are affected by habitat structure has received less attention. We measured the impacts of habitat structure on interspecific aggression, cannibalism, and life-history traits of Procambarus clarki. Crayfish were randomly assigned to structured or simple habitats. Structured habitats consisted of aquaria with four ceramic fire bricks each with three circular holes for shelter; simple habitats lacked shelters. We hypothesized that habitat structure would lead to decreased injury frequency, increased molting frequency, greater survival, and higher reproductive output in crayfish. Reproductive output did not differ between treatments, but juvenile survival was higher in the structured habitat. Molting was more frequent in the structured habitat. In sharp contrast to predictions, survival was lower in the structured habitat. We concluded the increased mortality in the structured habitat was due to the high degree of exposure to cannibalism and aggression among the crayfish immediately following molting.

  10. Founder event and its effect on genetic variation in translocated populations of noble crayfish (Astacus astacus).

    PubMed

    Bláha, Martin; Žurovcová, Martina; Kouba, Antonín; Policar, Tomáš; Kozák, Pavel

    2016-02-01

    Establishing translocated populations is a common process to preserve and maintain genetic diversity of threatened species. In 2001, three translocated populations of noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) were established in the Czech Republic, founded by either adult or juvenile individuals from three particular source populations. We assessed genetic diversity at seven microsatellite loci after one decade (assumed three generations) from establishment. Although the translocated populations exhibited a slight but non-significant reduction in genetic diversity (A R = 2.2-5.0; H O = 0.11-0.31), the most striking result was generally very low genetic diversity in source populations (A R = 3.0-5.3; H O = 0.15-0.38). Similarly, a high degree of inbreeding (F IS = 0.36-0.60) demonstrates the nature of source populations, already affected by isolation and small size. In spite of that, based on the results of this study, the establishment of new translocated noble crayfish populations was successful, since there is no significant decline in genetic variability and all populations are still viable. Although source populations did not exhibit high genetic diversity, their distinctiveness makes them possible to use for conservation purposes. Continued monitoring is necessary to track the long-term progress of the translocation program, including other parameters describing the state of the population, such as the occurrence and frequency of diseases or morphological changes. PMID:26077200

  11. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Christopher L.; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts. PMID:25561670

  12. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Christopher L; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A

    2015-02-19

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts. PMID:25561670

  13. Crayfish (Orconectes virilis) predation on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Joy; Savino, Jacqueline F.

    1993-01-01

    In laboratory studies, we quantified predation rates and handling time of crayfish (Orconectes virilis) on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and rainbow trout (Oncorhhynchus mykiss) eggs. In single prey species tests, crayfish ate zebra mussels at similar rates as they ate rainbow trout eggs. When both prey were present, crayfish preferred rainbow trout eggs. Handling time of mussels was about twice that of rainbow trout eggs, and energetic content of mussels was lower. Therefore, net benefit for foraging on rainbow trout eggs was about three times that of foraging on zebra mussels.

  14. Serotonin modulation of caudal photoreceptor in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; Calderón-Rosete, Gabina; Porras Villalobos, Mercedes Graciela; Mendoza Zamora, Elena; Anaya González, Víctor

    2006-01-01

    The sixth abdominal ganglion (6th AG) of the crayfish contains two photosensitive neurons. This caudal photoreceptor (CPR) displays spontaneous electrical activity and phasic-tonic responses to light pulses. In this paper, we analyzed the presence of serotonin in the 6th AG and its effects in the modulation of the activity of CPR. In the first part of our study, we identified serotonergic neurons in the 6th AG by immunostaining using an antibody against serotonin. Next, we quantified the serotonin contents in the 6th AG by using liquid chromatography. Finally, we searched for serotonergic modulation of the CPR electrical activity by using conventional extracellular recordings. We found 13 immunopositive neurons located in the ventral side of the 6th AG. The mean diameter of their somata was 23+/-9 microm. In addition, there was immunopositive staining in neuropilar fibers and varicosities. The contents of serotonin and its precursors in the 6th AG varied along the 24-h cycle. Its maximum value was reached by midday. Topic application of serotonin to ganglia kept in darkness increased the CPR spontaneous firing rate and reduced its light responsiveness. Both effects were dose-dependent within ED(50) approximately 1 microM and were blocked by the 5-HT antagonist methysergide. These observations support the role of serotonin as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the CPR of the two species of crayfish Procambarus clarkii and Cherax quadricarinatus. PMID:16298168

  15. Impacts of drought and crayfish invasion on stream ecosystem structure and function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoulick, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Drought and seasonal drying can be important disturbance events in many small streams, leading to intermittent or isolated habitats. Many small streams contain crayfish populations that are often keystone or dominant species in these systems. I conducted an experiment in stream mesocosms to examine the effects of drought and potential ecological redundancy of a native and invasive crayfish species. I examined the effects of drought (drought or control) and crayfish presence (none, native crayfish Orconectes eupunctus or invasive crayfish Orconectes neglectus) on stream mesocosm structure and function (leaf breakdown, community metabolism, periphyton, sediment and chironomid densities) in a fully factorial design. Each mesocosm contained a deep and shallow section, and drought treatments had surface water present (5-cm depth) in deep sections where tiles and leaf packs were placed. Drought and crayfish presence did not interact for any response variable. Drought significantly reduced leaf breakdown, and crayfish presence significantly increased leaf breakdown. However, the native and invasive crayfish species did not differ significantly in their effects on leaf breakdown. Drought significantly reduced primary production and community respiration overall, whereas crayfish presence did not significantly affect primary production and community respiration. Neither drought nor crayfish presence significantly affected periphyton overall. However, drought significantly reduced autotrophic index (AI), and crayfish presence increased AI. Inorganic sediment and chironomid density were not affected by drought, but both were significantly reduced by crayfish presence. O. eupunctus reduced AI and sediment more than O. neglectus did. Neither drought nor crayfish species significantly affected crayfish growth or survival. Drought can have strong effects on ecosystem function, but weaker effects on benthic structure. Crayfish can have strong effects on ecosystem

  16. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  17. Human exposure to methylmercury from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Greenfield, Ben K; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan

    2016-02-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in aquatic food raises global concerns about human exposure to MeHg. Crayfish is the world's third largest farmed crustacean species and a favorite aquatic food in many countries. However, human health hazard due to MeHg exposure via crayfish consumption is unclear, partly because appropriate survey data are lacking. We report on mercury concentrations and speciation in edible tail muscle of crayfish collected from restaurants in 23 Chinese cities. On average, MeHg constituted 99.1 % of mercury in tail muscle, and MeHg concentrations were comparable with those reported for fish in China. Variation in MeHg concentrations was not attributable to broad geographic region (i.e., provinces) or tail length. For different populations, potential health risk (characterized by hazard quotient or HQ) of MeHg exposure through crayfish consumption depended largely on crayfish consumption rates. In particular, a health hazard (HQ > 1) was found for high-rate consumers (i.e., 95 %ile or higher) in some cities in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLYR), during the peak consumption season. Our results suggest that more attention should be paid to dietary MeHg intake via crayfish consumption in China, particularly for communities with high consumption in MLYR. PMID:25850898

  18. Habituation of LG-mediated tailflip in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Toshiki; Araki, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Crayfish escape from threatening stimuli by tailflipping. If a stimulus is applied to the rear, crayfish escape up and forwards in a summersault maneuver that is mediated by the activation of lateral giant (LG) interneurons. The occurrence probability of LG-mediated tailflip, however, diminishes and habituates if a stimulus is repeatedly applied. Since crayfish have a relatively simple CNS with many identifiable neurons, crayfish represent a good animal to analyze the cellular basis of habituation. A reduction in the amplitude of the EPSP in the LGs, caused by direct chemical synaptic connection from sensory afferents by repetitive stimulations, is essential to bring about an inactivation of the LGs. The spike response of the LGs recovers within several minutes of habituation, but the LGs subsequently fail to spike when an additional stimulus is applied after specific periods following habituation. These results indicate that a decline in synaptic efficacy from the mechanosensory afferents recovers readily after a short delay, but then the excitability of the LGs themselves decreases. Furthermore, the processes underlying habituation are modulated depending on a social status. When two crayfish encounter each other, a winner-loser relationship is established. With a short interstimulus interval of 5 s, the rate of habituation of the LG in both socially dominant and subordinate crayfish becomes lower than in socially isolated animals. Serotonin and octopamine affect this social status-dependent modulation of habituation by means of activation of downstream second messenger system of cAMP and IP3 cascades, respectively. PMID:25796506

  19. Conservation and management of crayfishes: Lessons from Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lieb, D.A.; Bouchard, R.W.; Carline, R.F.; Nuttall, T.R.; Wallace, J.R.; Burkholder, C.L.

    2011-01-01

    North America's crayfish fauna is diverse, ecologically important, and highly threatened. Unfortunately, up-to-date information is scarce, hindering conservation and management efforts. In Pennsylvania and nearby states, recent efforts allowed us to determine the conservation status of several native crayfishes and develop management strategies for those species. Due to rarity and proximity to urban centers and introduced (exotic) crayfishes, Cambarus (Puncticambarus) sp., an undescribed member of the Cambarus acuminatus complex, is critically imperiled in Pennsylvania and possibly range-wide. Orconectes limosus is more widespread; however, recent population losses have been substantial, especially in Pennsylvania and northern Maryland, where its range has declined (retreated eastward) by greater than 200 km. Introduced congeners likely played a major role in those losses. Although extirpated from some areas, Cambarus bartonii bartonii remains widespread and is not an immediate conservation concern. In light of these findings, the role of barriers (e.g., dams), environmental protection, educational programs, and regulations in preventing crayfish invasions and conserving native crayfishes is discussed, and management initiatives centered on those factors are presented. The need for methods to eliminate exotics and monitor natives is highlighted. Although tailored to a specific regional fauna, these ideas have broad applicability and would benefit many North American crayfishes. ?? copyright 2011. Periodicals postage paid at Bethesda.

  20. Dose-dependent mortality of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) to different strains of the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci).

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Jenny; Kokko, Harri; Vainikka, Anssi; Kortet, Raine; Jussila, Japo

    2014-01-01

    Several reports of the European crayfish species carrying a latent infection of the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci) have emerged and the discussion has focused especially on the lowered virulence of As-genotypes behind decreased mortality. The aim of this study was to compare the killing rate of different A. astaci strains in controlled infection experiments. Two separate infection experiments with three A. astaci strains (UEFT2B (As), Evira6462/06 (As) and UEF8866-2 (PsI)) were made to compare the noble crayfish populations from the Lake Viitajärvi, Tervo, (Expt I) and the Lake Mikitänjärvi, Hyrynsalmi (Expt II). In the Expt III, the Lake Koivujärvi population noble crayfish were infected with A. astaci strains UEF8866-2 (PsI) and Evira6462/06 (As) using different dosages (1, 10, 100 and 1000sporesml(-1)) of A. astaci zoospores. The results confirmed that PsI-genotype strain is highly virulent and kills all the crayfish within a few days. The tested two As-genotype strains caused the mortalities more slowly, and part of the challenged crayfish survived until the end of the follow-up period. Our results also confirmed the variance of virulence among A. astaci strains within the As-genotype and demonstrated that the mortality is dependent on the number of zoospores used in the infections. It also appeared, that some noble crayfish populations show increased resistance towards the crayfish plague, especially against the As-genotype of A. astaci. PMID:24184185

  1. Ontogenetic Variation in Food Consumption of Rusty Crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) in a Central New York Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Nack, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    We examined feeding periodicity of three size groups of the rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) at four-hour intervals over a 28-hour period during July in a headwater stream of the Susquehanna River drainage in central New York. Feeding activity was expressed as the ratio of stomach weight divided by the crayfish wet weight. The diel food consumption patterns of all three size groups of rusty crayfish (i.e., ≤ 10 mm, 11–20 mm, and > 20 mm carapace length) were significantly different. Peak feeding of the smallest crayfish occurred during crepuscular periods. Food consumption of the intermediate size crayfish was highest at 2000 h, and feeding of large crayfish was consistently high from 1200 h to 0400 h. Feeding intensity of both small and intermediate size crayfish was highest when feeding intensity of large crayfsh was lowest. Ontogenetic differences in feeding periodicity may be associated with predation pressure from large rusty crayfish on smaller individuals.

  2. Ontogenetic variation in food consumption of rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) in a central New York stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.H.; Nack, C.C.

    2010-01-01

    We examined feeding periodicity of three size groups of the rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) at four-hour intervals over a 28-hour period during July in a headwater stream of the Susquehanna River drainage in central New York. Feeding activity was expressed as the ratio of stomach weight divided by the crayfish wet weight. The diel food consumption patterns of all three size groups of rusty crayfish (i.e., ??? 10 mm, 11-20 mm, and > 20 mm carapace length) were significantly different. Peak feeding of the smallest crayfish occurred during crepuscular periods. Food consumption of the intermediate size crayfish was highest at 2000 h, and feeding of large crayfish was consistently high from 1200 h to 0400 h. Feeding intensity of both small and intermediate size crayfish was highest when feeding intensity of large crayfsh was lowest. Ontogenetic differences in feeding periodicity may be associated with predation pressure from large rusty crayfish on smaller individuals.

  3. A Crayfish Insulin-like-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a “pulldown” methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23–38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development. PMID:23775079

  4. Juvenile Firesetting.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brittany; Freeman, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile firesetting is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Male gender, substance use, history of maltreatment, interest in fire, and psychiatric illness are commonly reported risk factors. Interventions that have been shown to be effective in juveniles who set fires include cognitive behavior therapy and educational interventions, whereas satiation has not been shown to be an effective intervention. Forensic assessments can assist the legal community in adjudicating youth with effective interventions. Future studies should focus on consistent assessment and outcome measures to create more evidence for directing evaluation and treatment of juvenile firesetters. PMID:26593122

  5. Juvenile Prostitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1986-01-01

    Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

  6. Baited lines: An active nondestructive collection method for burrowing crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Foltz, David A., II; Welsh, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    A new method (baited lines) is described for the collection of burrowing crayfishes, where fishing hooks baited with earthworms and tied to monofilament leaders are used to lure crayfishes from their burrow entrances. We estimated capture rates using baited lines at four locations across West Virginia for a total of four crayfish taxa; the taxa studied were orange, blue, and blue/orange morphs of Cambarus dubius (Upland Burrowing Catfish), and C. thomai (Little Brown Mudbug). Baited-line capture rates were lowest for C. thomai (81%; n = 21 attempts) and highest for the orange morph ofC. dubius (99%; n = 13 attempts). The pooled capture rate across all taxa was 91.5% (n = 50 attempts). Baited lines represent an environmentally nondestructive method to capture burrowing crayfishes without harm to individuals, and without disturbing burrows or the surrounding area. This novel method allows for repeat captures and long-term studies, providing a useful sampling method for ecological studies of burrowing crayfishes.

  7. Aminergic Control of Social Status in Crayfish Agonistic Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Momohara, Yuto; Kanai, Akihiro; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    Using pairings of male crayfish Procambarus clarkii with a 3–7% difference in size, we confirmed that physically larger crayfish were more likely to win encounters (winning probability of over 80%). Despite a physical disadvantage, small winners of the first pairings were more likely to win their subsequent conflicts with larger naive animals (winning probability was about 70%). By contrast, the losers of the first pairings rarely won their subsequent conflicts with smaller naive animals (winning probability of 6%). These winner and loser effects were mimicked by injection of serotonin and octopamine. Serotonin-injected naive small crayfish were more likely to win in pairings with untreated larger naive crayfish (winning probability of over 60%), while octopamine-injected naive large animals were beaten by untreated smaller naive animals (winning probability of 20%). Furthermore, the winner effects of dominant crayfish were cancelled by the injection of mianserin, an antagonist of serotonin receptors and were reinforced by the injection of fluoxetin, serotonin reuptake inhibitor, just after the establishment of social order of the first pairings. Injection of octopamine channel blockers, phentolamine and epinastine, by contrast, cancelled the loser effects. These results strongly suggested that serotonin and octopamine were responsible for winner and loser effects, respectively. PMID:24058575

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  9. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  10. Involvement of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in the physiological compensation of the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus to low temperature and high salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Prymaczok, Natalia C; Pasqualino, Valeria M; Viau, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Enrique M; Medesani, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    This study was aimed at determining the role of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in the physiological compensation to both saline and thermal stress, in the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. By determining the expression of the CHH gene in the eyestalk of juvenile crayfish, we found that maximal induction of CHH was induced at high salinity (10 g/L) and low temperature (20 °C). In order to investigate the role of CHH in the physiological compensation to such stressful conditions, recombinant CHH was supplied to stressed animals. CHH-injected crayfish showed increased hemolymphatic levels of glucose, in accordance with a significant utilization of glycogen reserves from the hepatopancreas. Furthermore, CHH administration allowed stressed animals to regulate hemolymphatic sodium and potassium at more constant levels than controls. Taken together, these results suggest a relevant role of CHH in increasing the energy available intended for processes involved in the physiological compensation of C. quadricarinatus to both saline and thermal stress. PMID:26660884

  11. The marbled crayfish as a paradigm for saltational speciation by autopolyploidy and parthenogenesis in animals

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Günter; Falckenhayn, Cassandra; Schrimpf, Anne; Schmid, Katharina; Hanna, Katharina; Panteleit, Jörn; Helm, Mark; Schulz, Ralf; Lyko, Frank

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The parthenogenetic all-female marbled crayfish is a novel research model and potent invader of freshwater ecosystems. It is a triploid descendant of the sexually reproducing slough crayfish, Procambarus fallax, but its taxonomic status has remained unsettled. By cross-breeding experiments and parentage analysis we show here that marbled crayfish and P. fallax are reproductively separated. Both crayfish copulate readily, suggesting that the reproductive barrier is set at the cytogenetic rather than the behavioural level. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes of marbled crayfish from laboratory lineages and wild populations demonstrates genetic identity and indicates a single origin. Flow cytometric comparison of DNA contents of haemocytes and analysis of nuclear microsatellite loci confirm triploidy and suggest autopolyploidisation as its cause. Global DNA methylation is significantly reduced in marbled crayfish implying the involvement of molecular epigenetic mechanisms in its origination. Morphologically, both crayfish are very similar but growth and fecundity are considerably larger in marbled crayfish, making it a different animal with superior fitness. These data and the high probability of a divergent future evolution of the marbled crayfish and P. fallax clusters suggest that marbled crayfish should be considered as an independent asexual species. Our findings also establish the P. fallax–marbled crayfish pair as a novel paradigm for rare chromosomal speciation by autopolyploidy and parthenogenesis in animals and for saltational evolution in general. PMID:26519519

  12. Parasites alter freshwater communities in mesocosms by modifying invasive crayfish behavior.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Lindsey S; Lodge, David M

    2016-06-01

    Parasites can alter communities by reducing densities of keystone hosts, but few studies have examined how trait-mediated indirect effects of parasites can alter ecological communities. We test how trematode parasites (Microphallus spp.) that affect invasive crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) behavior alter how crayfish impact lake littoral communities. O. rusticus drive community composition in north temperate lakes, and predatory fish can reduce crayfish activity and feeding. In laboratory studies, Microphallus parasites also alter O. rusticus behavior: infected O. rusticus eat fewer macroinvertebrates and are bolder near predatory fish than uninfected individuals. We used a 2 x 2 factorial experiment to test how predatory fish and parasites affect O. rusticus impacts in large mesocosms over 4 weeks. We predicted (1) that when predators were absent, infected crayfish would have lower impacts than uninfected crayfish on macrophytes and macroinvertebrates (as well as reduced growth and higher mortality). However, (2) when predators were present but unable to consume crayfish, infected crayfish would have greater impacts (as well as greater growth and lower mortality) than uninfected crayfish because of increased boldness. Because of its effect on crayfish feeding behavior, we also predicted (3) that infection would alter macrophyte and macroinvertebrate community composition. In contrast to our first hypothesis, we found that infected and uninfected crayfish had similar impacts on lower trophic levels when predators were absent. Across all treatments, infected crayfish were more likely to be outside shelters and had greater growth than uninfected crayfish, suggesting that the reduced feeding observed in short-term experiments does not occur over longer timescales. However, in support of the second hypothesis, when predatory fish were present, infected crayfish ate more macroinvertebrates than did uninfected crayfish, likely due to increased boldness. We also observed a

  13. Temporal dynamics of spore release of the crayfish plague pathogen from its natural host, American spiny-cheek crayfish (Orconectes limosus), evaluated by transmission experiments.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, J; Kozubíková-Balcarová, E; Kouba, A; Buřič, M; Kozák, P; Diéguez-Uribeondo, J; Petrusek, A

    2013-05-01

    The crayfish plague pathogen, Aphanomyces astaci, is one of the most serious threats to indigenous European crayfish species. The North American invasive spiny-cheek crayfish, Orconectes limosus, is an important source of this pathogen in central and western Europe. We evaluated potential changes in A. astaci spore release rate from infected individuals of this species by experiments investigating the pathogen transmission to susceptible noble crayfish, Astacus astacus. We filtered defined volumes of water regularly to quantify spore concentration, and sampled crayfish tissues at the end of the experiment. The filters and tissues were then tested for the presence of A. astaci DNA by species-specific quantitative PCR. Additionally, we tested the efficiency of horizontal transmission to apparently uninfected O. limosus. The experiments confirmed that A. astaci can be transmitted to susceptible crayfish during intermoult periods, and that the pathogen was more frequently detected in noble crayfish recipients than in American ones. The pathogen spore concentrations substantially varied in time, and significantly increased during moulting of infected hosts. Our study strengthens the evidence that although the likelihood of crayfish plague transmission by water transfer from localities with infected American crayfish might increase when these are moulting or dying, no time-periods can be proclaimed safe. PMID:23425502

  14. Lunar-Rhythmic Molting in Laboratory Populations of the Noble Crayfish Astacus astacus (Crustacea, Astacidea): An Experimental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Robert; Hoerstgen-Schwark, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile noble crayfish, Astacusastacus (Crustacea, Astacidea) in the second year of age were kept in the laboratory for a twelve-month period under continuing “summer conditions” (LD 16:8, 19°C). Molting processes in this population could be synchronized by artificial moonlight cycles. Peaks of exuviations occurred at “new moons”. Males showed a slightly higher degree of synchronization than females. A phase-shift of the artificial lunar cycle in relation to the natural cycle resulted in a corresponding shift of the molting cycle. This clearly demonstrates that changes in the nocturnal light regime provide the primary external information for the lunar-monthly molting rhythm. There is a first indication that lunar photic stimuli do not act directly but as a zeitgeber which entrains an endogenous molting rhythm to the lunar cycle. Moreover, the results of the long-term experiments suggest that the hibernal resting period of A. astacus in the field (no molts between October and April) may also involve some endogenous programming. Continuing artificial summer conditions can delay but not completely suppress this resting period. The adaptive significance of the phenomena and how the findings may be applied to improve the management of crowded crayfish stocks are discussed. PMID:23840899

  15. Annual variability in reproduction of the white-clawed crayfish ( Austropotamobius pallipes): implications for survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, André

    2007-07-01

    The white-clawed crayfish is generally considered as an endangered species and it is necessary to estimate the functioning quality in residual population patches, particularly reproduction. For six consecutive years, a population was studied in a forest brook in Normandy (France). The size, state of maturity, density and egg number in mature females as well juvenile density were measured. The proportion of mature females varied between 16% and 31% among all 1078 females (>1+ year old). The number of both ovocytes and eggs laid are correlated with the size of females and the majority of the mature females expel all ripe ovocytes. In June, the potential hatchlings number remains correlated with the female size and this relationship evolves from year to year. The females are more numerous downstream associated with greater structural complexity of the substrate: at laying, the potential egg stock is on average 45.8 m -2 (upstream: 22.2 m -2) and at hatching 15.5 m -2 (upstream: 5.8 m -2). The losses are due above all to reduction of berried females and the smaller females tend to lose eggs more easily than the larger ones. The survival of juveniles during the first summer of independence is greater upstream. Nevertheless, it corresponds to a stable rate of 12% from potential eggs. Some results show a regulation process with an optimum density. The clogging of substrate can reduce greatly juvenile survival and in some years the upstream site can be considered as an ecological trap. The downstream site seems to be the most suitable habitat for conservation purposes, in spite of higher individual egg load upstream. For the future of the species, population functioning must be studied at the scale of the whole population patch. Meanwhile the upstream biotic capacity may be ameliorated by an increase in number of shelters.

  16. Juvenile Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gmuca, Sabrina; Weiss, Pamela F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide a comprehensive update of the pathogenesis, diagnostic imaging, treatments, and disease activity measurements of juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). Recent findings Genetic and microbiome studies have provided new information regarding possible pathogenesis of JSpA. Recent work suggests that children with JSpA have decreased thresholds for pain in comparison to healthy children. Additionally, pain on physical examination and abnormalities on ultrasound of the entheses are not well correlated. Treatment guidelines for juvenile arthritis, including JSpA, were published by the American College of Rheumatology and are based on active joint count and presence of sacroiliitis. Recent studies have established the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in the symptomatic treatment of axial disease, though their efficacy for halting progression of structural damage is less clear. Newly developed disease activity measures for JSpA include the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score and the JSpA Disease Activity index. In comparison to other categories of juvenile arthritis, children with JSpA are less likely to attain and sustain inactive disease. Summary Further microbiome and genetic research may help elucidate JSpA pathogenesis. More randomized therapeutic trials are needed and the advent of new composite disease activity measurement tools will hopefully allow for the design of these greatly needed trials. PMID:26002028

  17. Impacts of Invasive Rusty Crayfish on Stream Ecosystems of the Upper Midwestern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobeldyk, A. M.; Lamberti, G. A.

    2005-05-01

    Invasive species can have detrimental effects on structural characteristics of freshwater ecosystems, but relatively few studies have assessed ecosystem-level impacts of invasive species in streams. We studied the effects of invasive rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) on detritus processing and invertebrate and fish abundance in northern Wisconsin and Michigan, USA, streams. We hypothesized that rusty crayfish would increase the rate of detritus processing and reduce fish and invertebrate abundance due to their aggressiveness and competitive superiority for food and habitat. We measured sugar maple (Acer saccharum) decomposition rates in three reaches of a stream with differing densities of rusty crayfish, high (5.05/m2), intermediate (2.27/m2), and none (0/m2) using leaf bags excluding crayfish and open bags allowing crayfish access. We found that open bags decayed significantly faster (k=0.143) than crayfish excluded bags at all sites (k=0.079) (p=0.0005). The reach lacking crayfish had significantly higher densities of invertebrates (p=0.005). We also surveyed an additional 7 streams that contained or lacked rusty crayfish and found significantly higher fish abundance (p=0.019) and biomass (p=0.001) in streams lacking rusty crayfish. Rusty crayfish appear to indirectly affect detritus processing via negative effects on benthic invertebrates, and may have larger-scale impacts on fishes across streams.

  18. Assessing potential abiotic and biotic complications of crayfish-induced gravel transport in experimental streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statzner, Bernhard; Peltret, Odile

    2006-03-01

    Biogeomorphology adds the element "biological dynamics" (of populations or communities) to chemical and physical geomorphic factors and thus complicates the framework of geomorphic processes. Such biological complications of the animal-induced transport of solids in streams should be particularly important in crayfish, as crayfish affect this transport through their overall activity and intraspecific aggression levels, which could be modified by shelter availability or the establishment of dominance hierarchies among individuals not knowing each other. Using experimental streams, we tested these hypotheses by measuring how shelter availability or residential crayfish group invasion by unknown individuals affected the impact of the crayfish Orconectes limosus on the (i) transport of gravel at baseflow (during 12 experimental days); (ii) sediment surface characteristics (after 12 days); and (iii) critical shear stress causing incipient gravel motion during simulated floods (after 12 days). The two potentially important factors shelter availability or residential group invasion negligibly affected the crayfish impact on gravel sediments, suggesting that habitat unfamiliarity (a third potentially important factor affecting crayfish activity) should increase the crayfish-induced sediment transport. Because habitat unfamiliarity is associated with sporadic long-distance migrations of a few crayfish individuals, this third factor should play a minor role in real streams, where crayfish biomass should be a key factor in relations with crayfish effects on sediments. Therefore, we combined the results of this study with those of previous crayfish experiments to assess how crayfish biomass could serve in modelling the gravel transport. Crayfish biomass explained 47% of the variability in the baseflow gravel transport and, in combination with the coefficient of variation of the bed elevation and algal cover, 72% of the variability in the critical gravel shear stress. These

  19. Modeling the Process of Science: Investigating Sexual Dimorphism in Crayfish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Dennis M.; Rutledge, Michael L.; Swain, Sarah H.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a scientific investigation of sexual dimorphism with regard to chela size in crayfish in which students utilize the skills, tools, and techniques associated with the formulation and testing of scientific hypotheses. Indicates that students find the investigation effective in aiding their understanding of fundamental aspects of scientific…

  20. Crayfish Investigations: Inquiry in Action for Grades 4-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Hansen, Lisa M.

    2005-01-01

    The author, an elementary school teacher, describes a way of incorporating an inquiry approach to teaching by refining a crayfish unit originally found in an ESS (Elementary Science Study) module. She used a "coupled-inquiry" approach, a combination of guided-inquiry and open-inquiry, with an application used for assessment purposes. In five or…

  1. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of triclopyr in the crayfish (Procambarus clarki).

    PubMed

    Barron, M G; Hansen, S C; Ball, T

    1991-01-01

    Crayfish (Procambarus clarki) were exposed to [14C]triclopyr at concentrations of 1 and 2.5 mg/liter, similar to potential field applications. Following 11 days of exposure, the elimination of accumulated residues was followed for 36 days. The majority of the residue in whole crayfish was present in the carcass (shell, hemolymph). HPLC of hepatopancreas showed the residues were primarily parent triclopyr (greater than 80%). The principle metabolite in the hepatopancreas was confirmed by mass spectrometry as the taurine conjugate of triclopyr. Several minor metabolites also were present at very low levels (less than 0.1 ppm) and were not identified. Residues were eliminated with half-lives of 7 to 17 days, depending on the tissue and exposure concentration. Bioconcentration factors, estimated from uptake and elimination rate constants determined using a compartmental model, were about 1 in whole crayfish and hepatopancreas and about 0.2 in muscle. The results of this study indicate that there is a low potential for accumulation of triclopyr and its metabolites in the crayfish. PMID:1673392

  2. Waterborne outbreak of tularemia associated with crayfish fishing.

    PubMed Central

    Anda, P.; Segura del Pozo, J.; Díaz García, J. M.; Escudero, R.; García Peña, F. J.; López Velasco, M. C.; Sellek, R. E.; Jiménez Chillarón, M. R.; Sánchez Serrano, L. P.; Martínez Navarro, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, an outbreak of human tularemia associated with hare-hunting in central Spain affected 585 patients. We describe the identification of Francisella tularensis biovar palaearctica in a second outbreak of ulceroglandular tularemia associated with crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) fishing in a contaminated freshwater stream distant from the hare-associated outbreak. The second outbreak occurred 1 year after the first. PMID:11485678

  3. Crayfish Behavior: Observing Arthropods to Learn about Science & Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rop, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    This is a set of animal behavior investigations in which students will practice scientific inquiry as they observe crayfish, ask questions, and discuss territoriality, social interactions, and other behaviors. In doing this, they hone their skills of observation, learn to record and analyze data, control for variables, write hypotheses, make…

  4. Application of morphologic burrow architects: lungfish or crayfish?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasiotis, Stephen T.; Mitchell, Charles E.; Dubiel, Russell R.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for trace fossil identification using burrowing signatures is tested by evaluating ancient and modern lungfish and crayfish burrows and comparing them to previously undescribed burrows in a stratigraphic interval thought to contain both lungfish and crayfish burrows. Permian burrows that bear skeletal remains of the lungfish Gnathorhiza, from museum collections, were evaluated to identify unique burrow morphologies that could be used to distinguish lungfish from crayfish burrows when fossil remains are absent. The lungfish burrows were evaluated for details of the burrowing mechanism preserved in the burrow morphologies together forming burrowing signatures and were compared to new burrows in the Chinle Formation of western Colorado to test the methodology of using burrow signatures to identify unknown burrows. Permian lungfish aestivation burrows show simple, nearly vertical, unbranched architectures and relatively smooth surficial morphologies with characteristic quasi‐horizontal striae on the burrow walls and vertical striae on the bulbous terminus. Burrow lengths do not exceed 0.5 m. In contrast, modern and ancient crayfish burrows exhibit simple to highly complex architectures with highly textured surficial morphologies. Burrow lengths may reach 4 to 5 m. Burrow morphologies unlike those identified in Gnathorhiza aestivation burrows were found in four burrow groups from museum collections. Two of these groups exhibit simple architectures and horizontal striae that were greater in sinuosity and magnitude, respectively. One of these burrows contains the remains of Lysorophus, but the burrow surface reveals no reliable surficial characteristics. It is not clear whether Lysorophus truly burrowed or merely occupied a pre‐existing structure. The other two groups exhibit surficial morphologies similar to those found on modern and ancient crayfish burrows and may provide evidence of freshwater crayfish in the Permian. Burrows from the Upper Triassic

  5. Brain photoreceptor pathways contributing to circadian rhythmicity in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jeremy M; Genco, Maria C; Marlow, Elizabeth D; Benton, Jeanne L; Beltz, Barbara S; Sandeman, David C

    2009-08-01

    Freshwater crayfish have three known photoreceptive systems: the compound eyes, extraretinal brain photoreceptors, and caudal photoreceptors. The primary goal of the work described here was to explore the contribution of the brain photoreceptors to circadian locomotory activity and define some of the underlying neural pathways. Immunocytochemical studies of the brain photoreceptors in the parastacid (southern hemisphere) crayfish Cherax destructor reveal their expression of the blue light-sensitive photopigment cryptochrome and the neurotransmitter histamine. The brain photoreceptors project to two small protocerebral neuropils, the brain photoreceptor neuropils (BPNs), where they terminate among fibers expressing the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing hormone (PDH), a signaling molecule in arthropod circadian systems. Comparable pathways are also described in the astacid (northern hemisphere) crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Despite exhibiting markedly different diurnal locomotor activity rhythms, removal of the compound eyes and caudal photoreceptors in both C. destructor and P. clarkii (leaving the brain photoreceptors intact) does not abolish the normal light/dark activity cycle in either species, nor prevent the entrainment of their activity cycles to phase shifts of the light/dark period. These results suggest, therefore, that crayfish brain photoreceptors are sufficient for the entrainment of locomotor activity rhythms to photic stimuli, and that they can act in the absence of the compound eyes and caudal photoreceptors. We also demonstrate that the intensity of PDH expression in the BPNs varies in phase with the locomotor activity rhythm of both crayfish species. Together, these findings suggest that the brain photoreceptor cells can function as extraretinal circadian photoreceptors and that the BPN represents part of an entrainment pathway synchronizing locomotor activity to environmental light/dark cycles, and implicating the neuropeptide PDH in these functions

  6. Crayfish (Orconectes virilis) feeding on young lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush): effect of rock size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Miller, John E.

    1991-01-01

    In laboratory studies, we quantified predation rates of crayfish (Orconectes virilis) on the eggs and sac fry of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and a surrogate species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mvkiss), dispersed among different sized substrates (bare bottom, gravel, cobble, large rocks). Predation was most severe when no rocks were present. Feeding rate then decreased as the substrate changed from large rocks to cobble to gravel. Crayfish predation rate did not change with prey type—rainbow trout and lake trout eggs or sac fry. Crayfish foraging in large tanks containing cobble averaged about two eggs or sac fry per day. In most instances, crayfish would have little impact on lake trout egg survival. Only in lake trout spawning grounds with relatively low egg densities, large crayfish populations, and cobble or large rock substrate, would crayfish be expected to have some impact on lake trout egg survival.

  7. Juvenile Spondyloarthropathies.

    PubMed

    Adrovic, Amra; Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-08-01

    Juvenile spondyloarthropathies represent a clinical entity separate from the adult disease. Initial clinical signs of juvenile spondyloarthropathies often include lower extremity arthritis and enthesopathy, without axial involvement at the disease onset. Asymmetrical oligoarthritis of lower extremities is typically seen in this type of arthritis. Enthesopathy, which is the hallmark of the disease, is most commonly seen in the Achilles tendon, being manifested by heel pain. Anterior uveitis and HLA-B27 positivity are seen in a proportion of cases. Sacroiliitis is generally asymptomatic in the pediatric population. Ineffective treatment of childhood disease results in disease progression to typical adult form of ankylosing spondylitis. Therefore, early diagnosis and classification remains one of the most relevant questions in pediatric rheumatology. It should be kept in mind that the disease could be misdiagnosed as FMF or Behçet's syndrome in countries with a high incidence of those conditions. This review revises available classification criteria, clinical manifestations and therapeutic options for patients with juvenile spondyloarthropathies. PMID:27402112

  8. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  9. Cherax (Astaconephrops) gherardii, a new crayfish (Decapoda: Parastacidae) from West Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Patoka, Jiří; Bláha, Martin; Kouba, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Cherax (Astaconephrops) gherardii n. sp. is a moderate burrowing crayfish endemic to the Ajamaru Lakes of West Papua, Indonesia. This species is one of the crayfish species from this region that are exploited for ornamental purposes. Its commonly used commercial name in the pet trade is "Rainbow Crayfish" or "Blue Moon Crayfish", and its native name is "udang kuku biru". The new species is genetically and morphologically similar to Cherax boesemani, however, both species may be easily distinguished morphologically or by using sequence divergence, which is substantial for considering C. gherardii n. sp. to be a valid species. PMID:26249463

  10. Preventing overexploitation in a mutualism: partner regulation in the crayfish-branchiobdellid symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kaitlin J; Creed, Robert P; Brown, Bryan L

    2014-02-01

    For a symbiosis to be a mutualism, benefits received must exceed costs incurred for both partners. Partners can prevent costly overexploitation through behaviors that moderate interactions with the other symbiont. In a symbiosis between crayfish and branchiobdellidan annelids, the worms can increase crayfish survival and growth by removing fouling material from the gills. However, overexploitation by the worms is possible and results in damage to host gills. We used behavioral observations to assess the degree to which two species of crayfish (Cambarus chasmodactylus and Orconectes cristavarius) use grooming to moderate their interaction with branchiobdellids. We found that grooming could effectively reduce worm numbers, and the proportion of total grooming directed at worms differed between crayfish species and as a function of worm number. O. cristavarius increased grooming in response to the addition of a single worm, while C. chasmodactylus only increased grooming in response to ten worms. These differences in the number of worms that trigger grooming behavior reflect differences between crayfish species in field settings. We also assessed whether antibacterial compounds in circulating crayfish hemolymph could limit bacterial gill fouling. O. cristavarius hemolymph inhibited some test bacteria more effectively than C. chasmodactylus did. Differences in the antibacterial properties of crayfish hemolymph may therefore help explain differences in both worm-directed grooming and worm loads in the field. We conclude that crayfish can use grooming to reduce worm numbers, which could lower the potential for gill damage, and that the level of grooming varies between crayfish species. PMID:24072440

  11. Acute Atrazine Exposure has Lasting Effects on Chemosensory Responses to Food Odors in Crayfish (Orconectes virilis).

    PubMed

    Belanger, Rachelle M; Mooney, Lauren N; Nguyen, Hung M; Abraham, Noor K; Peters, Tyler J; Kana, Maria A; May, Lauren A

    2016-02-01

    The herbicide atrazine is known to impact negatively olfactory-mediated behaviors in aquatic animals. We have shown that atrazine exposure has deleterious effects on olfactory-mediated behavioral responses to food odors in crayfish; however, recovery of chemosensory abilities post-atrazine exposure has not been investigated. We examined whether crayfish (Orconectes virilis) recovered chemosensory abilities after a 96-h exposure to sublethal, environmentally relevant concentrations of 80 ppb (µg/L) atrazine. Following treatment, we analyzed the ability of the crayfish to locate a food source using a Y-maze with one arm containing fish-flavored gelatin and the other containing unflavored gelatin. We compared the time spent in the food arm of the Y-maze, near the food source, as well as moving and walking speed of control and atrazine-treated crayfish. We also compared the number of crayfish that handled the food source and the amount of food consumed. Following 24-, 48-, and 72-h recovery periods in fresh water, behavioral trials were repeated to determine if there was any observable recovery of chemosensory-mediated behaviors. Atrazine-treated crayfish spent less time in the food arm, at the odor source, and were less successful at finding the food odor source than control crayfish for all times tested. Additionally, atrazine-treated crayfish consumed less fish-flavored than control crayfish; however, treatment did not affect locomotion. Overall, we found that crayfish are not able to recover chemosensory abilities 72 h post-atrazine exposure. Because crayfish rely heavily on their chemosensory abilities to acquire food, the negative impacts of atrazine exposure could affect population size in areas where atrazine is heavily applied. PMID:26487338

  12. Invasive Crayfish Threaten the Development of Submerged Macrophytes in Lake Restoration

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, Jessica E. M.; Dorenbosch, Martijn; Immers, Anne K.; Vidal Forteza, Constanza; Geurts, Jeroen J. M.; Peeters, Edwin T. H. M.; Koese, Bram; Bakker, Elisabeth S.

    2013-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes enhance water transparency and aquatic biodiversity in shallow water ecosystems. Therefore, the return of submerged macrophytes is the target of many lake restoration projects. However, at present, north-western European aquatic ecosystems are increasingly invaded by omnivorous exotic crayfish. We hypothesize that invasive crayfish pose a novel constraint on the regeneration of submerged macrophytes in restored lakes and may jeopardize restoration efforts. We experimentally investigated whether the invasive crayfish (Procambarus clarkii Girard) affects submerged macrophyte development in a Dutch peat lake where these crayfish are expanding rapidly. Seemingly favourable abiotic conditions for macrophyte growth existed in two 0.5 ha lake enclosures, which provided shelter and reduced turbidity, and in one lake enclosure iron was added to reduce internal nutrient loading, but macrophytes did not emerge. We transplanted three submerged macrophyte species in a full factorial exclosure experiment, where we separated the effect of crayfish from large vertebrates using different mesh sizes combined with a caging treatment stocked with crayfish only. The three transplanted macrophytes grew rapidly when protected from grazing in both lake enclosures, demonstrating that abiotic conditions for growth were suitable. Crayfish strongly reduced biomass and survival of all three macrophyte species while waterfowl and fish had no additive effects. Gut contents showed that crayfish were mostly carnivorous, but also consumed macrophytes. We show that P. clarkii strongly inhibit macrophyte development once favourable abiotic conditions for macrophyte growth are restored. Therefore, expansion of invasive crayfish poses a novel threat to the restoration of shallow water bodies in north-western Europe. Prevention of introduction and spread of crayfish is urgent, as management of invasive crayfish populations is very difficult. PMID:24205271

  13. Effects of climate change, invasive species, and disease on the distribution of native European crayfishes.

    PubMed

    Capinha, César; Larson, Eric R; Tricarico, Elena; Olden, Julian D; Gherardi, Francesca

    2013-08-01

    Climate change will require species to adapt to new conditions or follow preferred climates to higher latitudes or elevations, but many dispersal-limited freshwater species may be unable to move due to barriers imposed by watershed boundaries. In addition, invasive nonnative species may expand into new regions under future climate conditions and contribute to the decline of native species. We evaluated future distributions for the threatened European crayfish fauna in response to climate change, watershed boundaries, and the spread of invasive crayfishes, which transmit the crayfish plague, a lethal disease for native European crayfishes. We used climate projections from general circulation models and statistical models based on Mahalanobis distance to predict climate-suitable regions for native and invasive crayfishes in the middle and at the end of the 21st century. We identified these suitable regions as accessible or inaccessible on the basis of major watershed boundaries and present occurrences and evaluated potential future overlap with 3 invasive North American crayfishes. Climate-suitable areas decreased for native crayfishes by 19% to 72%, and the majority of future suitable areas for most of these species were inaccessible relative to native and current distributions. Overlap with invasive crayfish plague-transmitting species was predicted to increase. Some native crayfish species (e.g., noble crayfish [Astacus astacus]) had no future refugia that were unsuitable for the modeled nonnative species. Our results emphasize the importance of preventing additional introductions and spread of invasive crayfishes in Europe to minimize interactions between the multiple stressors of climate change and invasive species, while suggesting candidate regions for the debatable management option of assisted colonization. PMID:23531056

  14. Comparing the ecological impacts of native and invasive crayfish: could native species' translocation do more harm than good?

    PubMed

    James, J; Slater, F M; Vaughan, I P; Young, K A; Cable, J

    2015-05-01

    Biological invasions are a principal threat to global biodiversity. Omnivores, such as crayfish, are among the most important groups of invaders. Their introduction often results in biodiversity loss, particularly of their native counterparts. Managed relocations of native crayfish from areas under threat from invasive crayfish into isolated 'ark sites' are sometimes suggested as a conservation strategy for native crayfish; however, such relocations may have unintended detrimental consequences for the recipient ecosystem. Despite this, there have been few attempts to quantify the relative impacts of native and invasive crayfish on aquatic ecosystems. To address this deficiency we conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of native and invasive crayfish on nine ecosystem components: decomposition rate, primary productivity, plant biomass, invertebrate density, biomass and diversity, fish biomass and refuge use, and amphibian larval survival. Native and invasive crayfish significantly reduced invertebrate density and biomass, fish biomass and amphibian survival rate and significantly increased decomposition rates. Invasive crayfish also significantly reduced plant biomass and invertebrate diversity and increased primary productivity. These results show that native and invasive crayfish have wide-ranging impacts on aquatic ecosystems that may be exacerbated for invasive species. Subsequent analysis showed that the impacts of invasive crayfish were significantly greater, in comparison to native crayfish, for decomposition and primary productivity but not invertebrate density, biomass and diversity. Overall, our findings reconfirm the ecosystem altering abilities of both native and invasive crayfish, enforcing the need to carefully regulate managed relocations of native species as well as to develop control programs for invasives. PMID:25549809

  15. Fighting Juvenile Gun Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, David; Grant, Heath; Rowe, Wendy; Jacobs, Nancy

    This bulletin describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's efforts to fight juvenile gun violence. The Office awarded four community demonstration grants to implement "Partnerships To Reduce Juvenile Gun Violence." Partnership goals include increasing the effectiveness of existing strategies by enhancing and coordinating…

  16. Uptake and depuration of petroleum hydrocarbons by crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarshis, I.B.

    1981-01-01

    No differences were noted in the amount of naphthalene uptake (approximately 125 :g) by individual crayfish exposed for 1, 2, or 4 hr at 25?C in open, non-aerated glass jars containing14C-naphthalene-5% of a water-soluble fraction (WSF) of No. 2 fuel oil. The cephalothorax, containing the hepatopancreas (a food absorption organ), showed greater uptake of naphthalene than the tail flesh or tail skeleton of individual crayfish exposed to the oil for 3 hr at 25?C. Crayfish exposed to the oil for 1, 2, or 4 hr and then placed in open, non-aerated containers of oil-free water lost most of the carbon-14 activity during the first 24 hr, with smaller losses occurring at 24 hr intervals up to and including 96 hr. Carbon-14 naphthalene in a 5% WSF of No. 2 fuel oil held in 12 open, non-aerated, oil-free, glass jars for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 hr at 25?C showed little volatilization (P > 0.4).

  17. Habituation of Backward Escape Swimming in the Marbled Crayfish.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Azusa; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we performed behavioral analyses of the habituation of backward escape swimming in the marbled crayfish, Procambarus fallax. Application of rapid mechanical stimulation to the rostrum elicited backward swimming following rapid abdominal flexion of crayfish. Response latency was very short-tens of msec-suggesting that backward swimming is mediated by MG neurons. When stimulation was repeated with 10 sec interstimulus intervals the MG-like tailflip did not occur, as the animals showed habituation. Retention of habituation was rather short, with most animals recovering from habituation within 10 min. Previous experience of habituation was remembered and animals habituated faster during a second series of experiments with similar repetitive stimuli. About half the number of stimulus trials was necessary to habituate in the second test compared to the first test. This promotion of habituation was observed in animals with delay periods of rest within 60 min following the first habituation. After 90 min of rest from the first habitation, animals showed a similar time course for the second habituation. With five stimuli at 15 min interval during 90 min of the rest, trained animals showed rapid habituation, indicating reinforcement of the memory of previous experiments. Crayfish also showed dishabituation when mechanical stimulation was applied to the tail following habituation. PMID:26853863

  18. Juvenile Justice & Youth Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, James C.

    Youth violence and the juvenile justice system in the United States are explored. Part 1 takes stock of the situation. The first chapter discusses the origins and evaluation of the juvenile justice system, and the second considers the contributions of the Federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act to the existing juvenile justice…

  19. Plasticity in fecundity highlights the females' importance in the spiny-cheek crayfish invasion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pârvulescu, Lucian; Pîrvu, Mălina; Moroşan, Loredana-Giorgiana; Zaharia, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Invasion is one of the most consequential phenomena affecting the distribution of native species. Few in number of species, European crayfish are losing the competition with introduced North American crayfish. The spiny-cheek crayfish, Orconectes limosus, is an outstanding example, successfully competing against the native narrow-clawed crayfish, Astacus leptodactylus. For four years, we collected data regarding crayfish occurrences, their relative abundance, and the structure of populations in the ongoing colonisation process of O. limosus in the lower Danube. The mature females of both invasive and indigenous crayfish species were analysed with respect to biometry and production of oocytes in relation to the dynamics of invasion. The interspecific comparisons showed no significant differences regarding body size, with an average of approximately 102 mm total length and 31 g wet weight for both species. However, the fecundity of the indigenous species was found to be constant throughout the investigated area, whereas the number of eggs produced by the invasive females was significantly increased at the active front of the invasion. The maximum number of ovarian eggs found was 887 and 1156 in the indigenous species and the invasive species, respectively. We propose the scenario that the invasive species, which carries the deadly crayfish plague, creates an ecological advantage by reducing the populations of indigenous crayfish. Subsequently, the invasive females opportunistically use the available resources to enhance their fecundity, resulting in the acute growth of populations. However, the long-term competitiveness and colonisation success of O. limosus still remain in question. PMID:26358988

  20. Influence of instream habitat and water quality on aggressive behavior in crayfish of channelized headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many agricultural drainage ditches that border farm fields of the Midwestern United States are degraded headwater streams that possess communities of crayfish. We hypothesized that crayfish communities at sites with low instream habitat diversity and poor water quality would show greater evidence of...

  1. SEASONAL FORAGING BY CHANNEL CATFISH ON TERRESTRIALLY BURROWING CRAYFISH IN A FLOODPLAIN-RIVER ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The seasonal use of terrestrially burrowing crayfish as a food item by channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was studied in channelized and non-channelized sections of the Yockanookany River (Mississippi, USA). During seasonal inundation of the floodplains, the crayfish occupied o...

  2. ZEBRA MUSSEL COLONIZATION OF RUSTY CRAYFISH IN GREEN BAY, LAKE MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In August, 1995 six rusty crayfish colonized with zebra mussels were captured in small-meshed fyke-nets sets set apart as of a fish sampling effort at Peter's Marsh and Long-Tail Point Wetland in lower Green Bay. Mussels colonized virtually all areas of the crayfish bodies, but ...

  3. Effectiveness of two commercial rotenone formulations in the eradication of virile crayfish Orconectes virillis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The virile or northern crayfish Orconectes virilis is an invasive species throughout much of the USA, damaging aquatic communities where it is introduced. Therefore, identification of effective methods for its eradication from areas in which it is unwanted is important. We studied the effectiveness of two commercial formulations of rotenone, Chem Fish Regular and CFT Legumine, for virile crayfish control. Although both formulations were effective for fish eradication, earlier observations by fisheries managers suggested that the relative effectiveness of the two formulations differs for crayfish. The only noteworthy difference between the formulations is that the former contains a synergist. In our first experiment, we tested each toxicant at the maximum labeled dosage (5 ppm) and found CFT Legumine to be 100% ineffective (0% mortality), while the Chem Fish Regular treatment resulted in 12.5% mortality. After we deemed Chem Fish Regular to be the only toxicant with any effectiveness against virile crayfish, we tested concentrations from 5 to 50 ppm and found 10 times the maximum labeled dosage (50 ppm rotenone) was needed to kill all virile crayfish. Because crayfish burrow and can leave water, and because 100% eradication is usually desired, rotenone applied at the labeled rates will not be effective for crayfish control. However, treating a body of water with CFT Legumine to eradicate invasive fish while leaving desirable crayfish unharmed is possible.

  4. [Juvenile arthritides].

    PubMed

    Horneff, G

    2010-10-01

    Arthritis in children represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The diagnostic spectrum is broad and a very precise indication for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, especially in small children, is important. In addition to acute arthritides - viral arthritis, reactive arthritis, Lyme arthritis and septic arthritis - secondary chronic arthritis related to an underlying disease as well as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic inflammatory systemic disease in children, need to be considered. This overview is a guide to the diagnosis of arthritis in childhood and to evidence-based therapy of JIA in particular. This consists of a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, systemic and intraarticular corticosteroids, traditional DMARDs such as sulfasalazine, methotrexate and leflunomide, the TNF inhibitors etanercept, adalimumab and, with restrictions, infliximab, other biopharmaceuticals such as anakinra, canakinumab and rilonacept, and tocilizumab and finally, abatacept. PMID:20798949

  5. A critical review of freshwater crayfish as amphibian predators: capable consumers of toxic prey?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Natasha J; Williams, Craig R

    2014-05-01

    Consumption of amphibian eggs and larvae by crayfish has been widely reported despite many amphibians being unpalatable and/or toxic to other predators. The aim of this review was to gather information regarding the consumption and/or avoidance of toxic amphibians by these omnivores. We then appraised the extent of toxin consumptive ability in terms of crayfish phylogenetic history so as to speculate as to the evolutionary history of this trait. Reports indicating an ability to tolerate amphibian toxins were collected and reviewed for 12 freshwater crayfish species. In reviewing these, we have established that freshwater crayfish appear to be tolerant of a range of toxic amphibians, often consuming large numbers of eggs and larvae without lethal or apparent sublethal effects. Toxin tolerance was evident within both superfamilies (Astacoidea and Parastacoidea) suggesting that tolerance may be a primitive trait in freshwater crayfish. PMID:24556015

  6. Chronic effects of arsenic on American red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, exposed to monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) herbicide

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.M. ); Flagge, C.T. )

    1990-07-01

    Bioaccumulative and biomagnifying effects of arsenic on crayfish have been reported. However, no work has been done on the chronic effects of this heavy metal on crayfish populations. There is a great concern for MSMA (Monosodium Methanearsonate) herbicide in the vicinity of natural waters due to its high water solubility and bioaccumulative potential. American red crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) account for 98% of the annual crayfish harvest in North America. Those pesticides which have greater water solubility (i.e. MSMA) than other less soluble compounds may cause higher mortalities of aquatic organisms, or cause adverse chronic effects if the non-target animals are sublethally exposed. This work was conducted in the laboratory to assess the possible chronic effects of arsenic on crayfish.

  7. Cadmium and lead uptake by Red Swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) of Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.M.; Howell, R.D. )

    1993-08-01

    Environmental contamination by heavy metals such as cadmium and lead is generally reflected by an increase in the tissue residues of aquatic animals. This is also true for fresh-water crayfish as reported by Bagatto and Khan (1987) for Orconectes virilis collected in the vicinity of Canadian smelters. They found a positive correlation between the residues of Cd and Pb in crayfish tissues and the distance from smelters. Stinson and Eaton reported similar findings for another crayfish, Pacifasticus leniusculus, collected from a lake on the West Coast of the US which was receiving urban runoff. Cadmium and lead were more concentrated in the viscera and exoskeleton, respectively. Madigosky et al. (1991) found that Procambarus clarkii collected from roadside drainage ditches of Louisiana contained greater amounts of Cd and Pb than commercially harvested control groups. Lead accumulation has been attributed to the use of farm machinery runoff in agricultural areas and Cd to rubber tires. Cadmium and lead are known to accumulate even in those crayfish where no known contamination can be established, e.g., Dickson et al. (1980) found metal residues in troglobitic crayfish. Accumulation of Pb and Cd in the tissues in laboratory-exposed crayfish of different species has been documented by several investigators. These metals accumulate in exoskeleton, hepatopancreas, gills, antennal glands, mid-gut glands and abdominal muscles of crayfish. Generally, all studies mentioned above report metal uptake by crayfish but have not quantified the amount of metal remaining after the crayfish are transferred to uncontaminated water (depuration). The purpose of this study was to: (1) assess Cd and Pb accumulation in laboratory-exposed male and female P. clarkii (total body wet weight basis), and (2) to determine how much metal is lost when crayfish are transferred to uncontaminated aged tap water. 17 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Signal crayfish as zoogeomorphic agents: diel patterns of fine sediment suspension in a crayfish-affected river and the implications for fine sediment fluxes and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Stephen; Johnson, Matthew; Reeds, Jake; Longstaff, Holly; Extence, Chris

    2013-04-01

    The signal crayfish (Pacifasticus leniusculus) is a formidable invasive species that has had a deleterious impact on native freshwater fauna across Europe. We contend that the impact of this animal extends beyond ecology into geomorphology and hypothesise that crayfish are significant agents of fine sediment recruitment and mobilisation, with potentially profound impacts on water quality, substrate quality and fine sediment fluxes. Building on pioneering work by colleagues at Queen Mary University, London this poster considers the role of crayfish in fine sediment suspension in a lowland, gravel-bed river. The hypothesis that nocturnal increases in crayfish activity are associated with a greater frequency of sediment suspension events and increases in ambient turbidity, is tested. Strong diel fluctuations in water turbidity were recorded at several sites on the Brampton Arm of the River Nene in England, a river heavily populated by signal crayfish, during August and September 2012. With the exception of three summer flood events, stage measurements during the same period were essentially flat, ruling out a hydraulic cause for overnight rises in turbidity. Water samples collected at midnight and at midday at one site confirm this diel pattern for suspended sediment concentration. Higher mean turbidity values overnight are associated with an increase in the magnitude and frequency of isolated turbidity spikes or events and this is consistent with crayfish nocturnalism. In particular, we suspect that turbidity events are caused by the construction and maintenenance of burrows and by interactions between crayfish and the river bed while foraging, fighting and avoiding each other. Tying the diel SSC signal directly to crayfish activity proved difficult, but several lines of argument presented here suggest that crayfish are the most likely cause of the diel pattern. These results provide substantial support for the idea that signal crayfish are important zoogeomorphic

  9. Life-history notes on Cambarus hubbsi creaser (Hubbs crayfish) from the South Fork Spring River, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, E.R.; Magoulick, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    Many crayfish species native to the southeastern United States are imperiled due to small range sizes and anthropogenic impacts such as habitat loss and introduction of non-native species. Furthermore, effective management of crayfish is limited by the scarcity of life-history and ecological data for many of these species. We report results of the first life-history study of the crayfish Cambarus hubbsi (Hubbs Crayfish). We collected 466 Hubbs Crayfish from the South Fork Spring River, AR throughout 2006 and recorded carapace lengths, wet weights, indicators of reproductive activity, and number of eggs on ovigerous females. Using length-frequency distributions, we identified four Hubbs Crayfish age classes and evaluated growth rates by plotting size by season (winter, spring, summer, autumn). Male Hubbs Crayfish were more common than females in all seasons except autumn, and males weighed more at equivalent lengths than females. Reproductive activity in Hubbs Crayfish peaked in late winter and spring, and ovigerous females were collected in March, April, and June. Ovigerous females were age II or III and carried few eggs relative to co-occurring crayfish of the genus Orconectes. Compared to these Orconectes species, Hubbs Crayfish is comparatively slow growing, long lived, with low reproductive potential, and as a result may be categorized as a K life-history strategist. Based on this species' life-history strategy and previously documented habitat specificity and taxonomic distinctiveness, Hubbs Crayfish may require monitoring and management attention normally reserved for species with smaller ranges.

  10. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in natural and farmed Louisiana crayfish populations: prevalence and implications.

    PubMed

    Brannelly, Laura A; McMahon, Taegan A; Hinton, Mitchell; Lenger, Daniel; Richards-Zawacki, Corinne L

    2015-01-15

    The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been linked to global declines and extinctions of amphibians, making it one of the most devastating wildlife pathogens known. Understanding the factors that affect disease dynamics in this system is critical for mitigating infection and protecting threatened species. Crayfish are hosts of this pathogen and can transmit Bd to amphibians. Because they co-occur with susceptible amphibian communities, crayfish may be important alternative hosts for Bd. Understanding the prevalence and seasonal dynamics of crayfish infections is of agricultural and ecological interest in areas where crayfish are farmed and traded for human consumption. We conducted a survey of Bd in farmed and natural crayfish (Procambarus spp.) populations in Louisiana, USA. We found that Bd prevalence and infection intensity was low in both farmed and native populations and that prevalence varied seasonally in wild Louisiana crayfish. This seasonal pattern mirrors that seen in local amphibians. As crayfish are an important globally traded freshwater taxon, even with low prevalence, they could be an important vector in the spread of Bd. PMID:25590773

  11. Purification, physicochemical and immunological characterization of arginine kinase, an allergen of crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).

    PubMed

    Chen, Heng-Li; Mao, Hai-Yan; Cao, Min-Jie; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Su, Wen-Jin; Zhang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) has attracted considerable attention because it has been identified as a shellfish allergen. However, little information is available about AK in crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). In this study, crayfish AK was purified and cloned. Its physicochemical properties, processing stability, and immunological characteristics were analyzed. Crayfish AK was purified by column chromatography, which revealed a single band with molecular mass of 40 kDa; this result was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. The full-length gene sequence of crayfish AK was 1462 bp and encoded a protein of 357 amino acid residues. The results of this study revealed that crayfish AK is a glycoprotein with an isoelectric point of approximately 6.5. Thermal stability assays revealed that crayfish AK easily forms aggregates at temperatures >44°C and was stable at pH 4.0-8.0. SDS-PAGE and dot blotting were used to assess processing stability of purified AK. The results revealed that the IgE-binding activity of crayfish AK is reduced after boiling. PMID:24055770

  12. Effects of Crayfish and Fish on Sediment Accumulation and Macroinvertebrate Community Structure in a Temperate Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, T. D.; Creed, R. P.

    2005-05-01

    A variety of large taxa can act as ecosystem engineers in stream communities. These taxa are often found in the same stream. We used an enclosure/exclosure experiment to evaluate the individual and combined effects of a crayfish and a benthic-feeding fish on sediment accumulation and macroinvertebrate abundance in a temperate stream. There were 5 treatments in the experiment: 1) central stoneroller enclosure, 2) crayfish enclosure, 3) crayfish plus central stoneroller enclosure, 4) manually brushing the substrate, and 5) a control. The brushed treatment allowed us to separate the consumptive effects of the crayfish and central stonerollers from the indirect effects resulting from their bioturbation. The control contained significantly more sediment than the other 4 treatments indicating that both crayfish and central stonerollers acted as ecosystem engineers. Reduction in sediment abundance had negative effects on the abundance of 2 genera while three taxa were more abundant in sediment-free substrata. Macroinvertebrate abundance in the brushed treatment was not different from the 3 treatments with crayfish or central stonerollers suggesting that the main effects of consumers in this experiment were indirect. Our results demonstrate that both crayfish and central stonerollers can influence lotic community structure by acting as ecosystem engineers.

  13. Competition for food between crayfish (Orconectes virilis) and the slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, John E.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Neely, Robert K.

    1992-01-01

    Interspecific competition for a food resource (fish eggs) was examined in a laboratory setting between two common benthic organisms of the Great Lakes, the slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) and crayfish (Orconectes virilis). In monospecific tests, the median egg predation in aquarium microcosms ranged from 2.5 eggs/d for the sculpin to 3.0 eggs/d for the crayfish. In mixed-species tests, sculpin feeding rates were no different than in the monospecific tests. Feeding rates for crayfish, however, were significantly reduced by the presence of sculpin. In mixed-species treatments in which small refuges were included in the aquaria, crayfish predation of eggs was 50% less than in the monospecific tests, i.e., 1.5 eggs/d, and, crayfish went on 93% fewer excursions outside refuges, spent 94% less time outside refuges, and engaged in 83% fewer feeding bouts than sculpin (P≤ 0.05 for all comparisons). When no refuges were provided, crayfish ceased feeding (0 eggs/d). These results suggest the potential for an asymmetrical competitive interaction in a natural setting in which crayfish may be forced into a suboptimal diet by such an interaction with the slimy sculpin.

  14. Invasive crayfish as vectors of mercury in freshwater food webs of the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Branden L.; Willacker, James J.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Adams, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are important drivers of environmental change in aquatic ecosystems and can alter habitat characteristics, community composition, and ecosystem energetics. Such changes have important implications for many ecosystem processes, including the bioaccumulation and biomagnification of contaminants through food webs. Mercury concentrations were measured in 2 nonnative and 1 native crayfish species from western Oregon (USA). Nonnative red swamp crayfish had mercury concentrations similar to those in native signal crayfish (0.29 ± 0.05 µg/g dry wt and 0.36 ± 0.06 µg/g dry wt, respectively), whereas the nonnative ringed crayfish had lower mercury concentrations (0.10 ± 0.02 µg/g dry wt) than either of the other species. The mean energy content of muscle was similar between the native signal crayfish and nonnative ringed crayfish but was significantly higher in the nonnative red swamp crayfish. Across species, mercury concentrations were negatively correlated with energy density. Such energetic differences could exacerbate changes in mercury transfer through trophic pathways of food webs, especially via alterations to the growth dynamics of consumers. Thus, it is important to consider the role of energy content in determining effective mercury exposure even when mercury concentrations on a per-unit mass basis do not differ between species.

  15. Intermittent Streams and Habitats Function as Refugia for Fish and Crayfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magoulick, D. D.; Bare, C. M.; Dekar, M. P.; Hodges, S. W.; Flinders, C. A.; Dick, A.

    2005-05-01

    Drought and summer drying can be important disturbance events in many small streams leading to intermittent or isolated habitats. We examined the influence of stream permanence on fish and crayfish population and community dynamics in multiple streams over several years. We found total crayfish densities and densities of some crayfish species were significantly greater in intermittent than in permanent streams, whereas crayfish species richness did not differ significantly between the two stream types. There was a significant relationship between crayfish relative abundance and abiotic environmental variables for permanent, but not intermittent streams. Fish densities were high in intermittent streams, especially for small species-size classes. Fish moved at large spatial and temporal scales to use intermittent streams, especially for spawning, and fish moved at smaller spatial and temporal scales to avoid drying habitats, especially riffles. During drying events fish survival was greater in pools than in riffles, and pools were more likely to remain permanent habitats. Intermittent streams and permanent pools within dry portions of stream appear to function as refugia for some species and size classes of fish and crayfish. Understanding this relationship will allow natural resource managers to implement effective conservation strategies for fish and crayfish in intermittent streams.

  16. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  17. Investigation of chloramine-T impact on crayfish Astacus leptodactylus (Esch., 1823) cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Kuklina, Iryna; Sladkova, Svetlana; Kouba, Antonín; Kholodkevich, Sergey; Kozák, Pavel

    2014-09-01

    The crayfish play an essential role in the biomonitoring and may reflect ambient water quality through the biochemical, behavioural and physiological reactions. To assess whether narrow-clawed crayfish Astacus leptodactylus can respond by heart rate changes to presence in water of such biocide as chloramine-T, adult males were exposed to its low (2 and 5 mg L(-1)), moderate (10 mg L(-1), commonly used in industry and aquaculture) and exceeded (20 and 50 mg L(-1)) concentrations. In addition, a physical stress test evaluated energy expenditure following the chemical trials. Three key reactions (cardiac initial, first-hour and daily prolonged exposure) were discussed with particular focus on crayfish initial reaction as the most meaningful in on-line water quality biomonitoring. After short-term exposure to both chloramine-T concentrations, crayfish were found to respond rapidly, within 2-5 min. According to heart rate changes, the 1-h exposure did not adversely affect crayfish at either concentration, as well as during daily exposure to 10 mg L(-1). As assessed by the heart rate, the 24-h exposure to 50 mg L(-1) of chloramine-T was toxic for crayfish and led to substantial loss of energy that became apparent during subsequently conducted physical stress. The results supported a hypothesis that crayfish vital functions are connected with environment they inhabit closely enough to serve as biological monitors. Crayfish were tolerant to short-term chloramine-T exposure, while rapid crayfish reaction to an increased chemical level indicated their high sensitivity, an essential attribute of real-time environmental assessment. PMID:24819440

  18. Crayfish Use of Trash Versus Natural Cover in Incised, Sand-Bed Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Susan B.

    2014-02-01

    Historic land use changes and subsequent river channelization created deeply incised, unstable stream channels largely devoid of natural cover throughout the Yazoo River basin, Mississippi, USA. Large trash (e.g., televisions, toilets, car parts) dumped in streams provided shelter for some aquatic fauna. To determine whether trash served as a surrogate for natural cover, I examined crayfish use of both cover types. I sampled crayfishes by kick-seining 2 × 1-m plots in three cover classes: trash, natural cover, and no cover. I captured 415 crayfishes from 136 of the 294 plots. Most crayfishes were in natural cover (253), followed by trash (154), and no-cover (8) plots. Trash use varied by crayfish genus and size. Frequencies of all size classes of Procambarus and of the smallest Cambarus were higher in natural cover than trash. Many of the smallest individuals were found in live root mats. As Cambarus and Orconectes grew, they shifted more toward trash, and the largest Orconectes size class was significantly more abundant than expected in trash. Trash served as "artificial reefs," providing cover for crayfishes and other fauna, but functioned differently than the remaining natural cover. The results confirmed that stream substrate did not provide adequate instream cover for crayfishes in the study area and suggested that high-quality natural cover for large crayfishes was in short supply, at least for some species. Land management that provides for abundant, ongoing input and retention of complex cover, such as trees and live roots, to stream channels should be beneficial for crayfish assemblages.

  19. Crayfish use of trash versus natural cover in incised, sand-bed streams.

    PubMed

    Adams, Susan B

    2014-02-01

    Historic land use changes and subsequent river channelization created deeply incised, unstable stream channels largely devoid of natural cover throughout the Yazoo River basin, Mississippi, USA. Large trash (e.g., televisions, toilets, car parts) dumped in streams provided shelter for some aquatic fauna. To determine whether trash served as a surrogate for natural cover, I examined crayfish use of both cover types. I sampled crayfishes by kick-seining 2 × 1-m plots in three cover classes: trash, natural cover, and no cover. I captured 415 crayfishes from 136 of the 294 plots. Most crayfishes were in natural cover (253), followed by trash (154), and no-cover (8) plots. Trash use varied by crayfish genus and size. Frequencies of all size classes of Procambarus and of the smallest Cambarus were higher in natural cover than trash. Many of the smallest individuals were found in live root mats. As Cambarus and Orconectes grew, they shifted more toward trash, and the largest Orconectes size class was significantly more abundant than expected in trash. Trash served as "artificial reefs," providing cover for crayfishes and other fauna, but functioned differently than the remaining natural cover. The results confirmed that stream substrate did not provide adequate instream cover for crayfishes in the study area and suggested that high-quality natural cover for large crayfishes was in short supply, at least for some species. Land management that provides for abundant, ongoing input and retention of complex cover, such as trees and live roots, to stream channels should be beneficial for crayfish assemblages. PMID:24248331

  20. Effects of pulsed magnetic stimulation on isolated crayfish heart.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Atsushi; Inase, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac muscular contraction of the neurogenic heart that could be excited by pulsed magnetic stimulation (PMS) was investigated using preparation of the isolated crayfish heart. When a figure-eight magnetic coil was set over the isolated heart, cardiac contraction induced by a single PMS was not observed. Cardiac arrest occurred immediately after repetitive PMS and persisted for dozens of seconds depending on the number of stimuli. We concluded that PMS caused neuronal modulation in the neuronal network in the cardiac ganglion. PMID:25545190

  1. Curve walking in freely moving crayfish (Procambarus clarkii)

    PubMed

    Domenici; Jamon; Clarac

    1998-05-01

    The curve walking of freely moving crayfish trained to walk along a curved path during homing behaviour was investigated using a video-analysis system. The leg kinematics and leg phase relationships, as well as the relationship between stepping patterns and body axis rotation measured relative to external references, were studied.

    The anterior and posterior extreme positions of the power stroke (AEP and PEP, respectively) and step amplitudes were analysed. As in a previous study on crayfish curve walking on a treadmill, PEPs were more posterior in outer legs (the legs on the outside of the turn) than in the inner legs. As a result, outer legs showed larger step amplitudes than inner legs. Leg kinematics varied within each walking sequence. AEP leg angles (the angles between the body and leg axes at the AEP) tended to decrease over time for inner legs and increase for outer legs. This leg angle drift was present mainly in the anterior legs and it suggests that these legs did not completely compensate for the body rotation after each step. In addition, leg angle asymmetries in a direction opposite to that of leg angle drift were observed at the start of each curve-walking sequence, suggesting that the extensive training (3 weeks) may have allowed crayfish to anticipate the leg angle drift.

    The rotational component of curve walking showed a discontinuous pattern, with the animal's body axis turning towards the inside of the curve only periodically. Analysis of cross-correlation functions showed that the angular acceleration of the body axis in the direction of the turn occurred during the power strokes of inner legs 2 and 5 and outer leg 4. While the tripod formed by these three legs showed in-phase relationships, the legs of the corresponding contralateral tripod (outer legs 2 and 5 and inner leg 4) were not in phase. We hypothesize that inner legs 2 and 5 and outer leg 4 act synergically causing the inward body rotation observed in curve-walking crayfish and

  2. Predator detection enables juvenile Lymnaea to form long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Orr, M V; Hittel, K; Lukowiak, K

    2010-01-15

    Learning and memory provide the flexibility an organism requires to respond to changing social and ecological conditions. Juvenile Lymnaea have previously been shown to have a diminished capacity to form long-term memory (LTM) following operant conditioning of aerial respiratory behavior. Juvenile Lymnaea, however, can form LTM following classical conditioning of appetitive behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that laboratory-reared juvenile Lymnaea have the ability to detect the presence of a sympatric predator (i.e. crayfish) and respond to the predator by altering their aerial respiratory behavior. In addition to increasing their total breathing time, predator detection confers on juvenile Lymnaea an enhanced capability to form LTM following operant conditioning of aerial respiratory behavior. That is, these juveniles now have the ability to form long-lasting memory. These data support the hypothesis that biologically relevant levels of stress associated with predator detection induce behavioral phenotypic alterations (i.e. enhanced LTM formation) in juveniles, which may increase their fitness. These data also support the notion that learning and memory formation in conjunction with predator detection is a form of inducible defense. PMID:20038665

  3. Juvenile Delinquency: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile Delinquency is a term which is often inaccurately used. This article clarifies definitions, looks at prevalence, and explores the relationship between juvenile delinquency and mental health. Throughout, differences between males and females are explored. (Contains 1 table.)

  4. Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

  5. Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

  6. Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in 1999, 33…

  7. Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puzzanchera, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

  8. Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles…

  9. Juveniles in court.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Matthew F; Scott, Charles L

    2010-01-01

    Nineteenth-century American reformers were concerned about the influence of immaturity and development in juvenile offenses. They responded to their delinquent youths through the creation of juvenile courts. This early American juvenile justice system sought to treat children as different from adults and to rehabilitate wayward youths through the state's assumption of a parental role. Although these rehabilitative goals were never fully realized, the field of American child psychiatry was spawned from these efforts on behalf of delinquent youths. Early child psychiatrists began by caring for juvenile offenders. The function of a child psychiatrist with juvenile delinquents expanded beyond strictly rehabilitation, however, as juvenile courts evolved to resemble criminal adult courts-due to landmark Supreme Court decisions and also juvenile legislation between 1966 and 1975. In response to dramatically increased juvenile violence and delinquency rates in the 1980s, juvenile justice became more retributional, and society was forced to confront issues such as capital punishment for juveniles, their transfer to adult courts, and their competency to stand trial. In the modern juvenile court, child psychiatrists are often asked to participate in the consideration of such issues because of their expertise in development. In that context we review the role of psychiatrists in assisting juvenile courts. PMID:21080770

  10. Concepts Shaping Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Rob White's paper explores ways in which community building can be integrated into the practices of juvenile justice work. He provides a model of what can be called "restorative social justice", one that builds upon the juvenile conferencing model by attempting to fuse social justice concerns with progressive juvenile justice practices.

  11. Juvenile Court Statistics - 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Youth Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This report is a statistical study of juvenile court cases in 1972. The data demonstrates how the court is frequently utilized in dealing with juvenile delinquency by the police as well as by other community agencies and parents. Excluded from this report are the ordinary traffic cases handled by juvenile court. The data indicate that: (1) in…

  12. WSSV-induced crayfish Dscam shows durable immune behavior.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tze Hann; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Chiang, Yi-An; Lin, Jia-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ning; Chuang, Ya-Chu; Wang, Han-Ching

    2014-09-01

    One of the major gaps in our understanding of arthropod specific immune priming concerns the mechanism[s] by which the observed long-term (>2 weeks) protective effects might be mediated. Hypervariable Dscam (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule) might support arthropod innate immunity with specificity for more extended periods. We show here that, in the relatively long-lived arthropod Cherax quadricarinatus, CqDscam does not behave like a typical, immediately-acting, short-lived innate immune factor: CqDscam was not induced within hours after challenge with a lethal virus, but instead was only up-regulated after 2-5 days. This initial response faded within ∼ 2 weeks, but another maximum was reached ∼ 1 month later. At around 2 months after the initial challenge, the virus-induced CqDscam bound to the virus virion and acted to neutralize the virus However, although CqDscam helped crayfish to survive during persistent infection, it nevertheless failed to provide any enhanced protection against a subsequent WSSV challenge. Thus, CqDscam is capable of supporting extended anti-virus immune memory in arthropods. Also, during a persistent virus infection, the balance of "immune firepower" in crayfish appears to be altered such that the general immune factors become depleted while CqDscam becomes relatively predominant. PMID:24973514

  13. The distribution of polarization sensitivity in the crayfish retinula.

    PubMed

    Glantz, Raymon M

    2007-08-01

    In many arthropod eyes the ommatidia contain two classes of retinular cells with orthogonally oriented microvilli. These receptors provide the basis for two-channel polarization vision. In several contexts such as navigation or the detection of polarization contrast, two channels may be insufficient. While solutions to this problem are known (e.g. in insects and stomatopod crustaceans) none have been found in the majority of decapods. To examine this issue further, the polarization sensitivity and the E-vector angle eliciting a maximum response (theta (max)) were measured at over 300 loci on the crayfish retinula. The polarization response ratio (which is proportional to polarization sensitivity) was similar at all locations on the retinula. Around the central pole of the eye, theta (max) was distributed about the vertical and horizontal axes. Along the dorsal rim, the distribution of theta (max) exhibits modes at 0 degrees , 45 degrees and 90 degrees and a small mode at 135 degrees relative to the dorso-ventral axis of the eyestalk (0 degrees ). Smaller numbers of cells (20 to 25%) with theta (max )near the diagonal were also found in anterior and posterior retinula areas. Thus crayfish visual interneurons, which integrate signals from multiple ommatidia may have access to a multi-channel polarization analyzer. PMID:17598114

  14. Fan organs of crayfish enhance chemical information flow.

    PubMed

    Breithaupt, T

    2001-04-01

    Animals as well as autonomous robots need to acquire environmental signals in order to adjust their activity in time and space. Some information is accessible to the sensors only as a result of specific behaviors for stimulus acquisition. Due to the slow rate of molecular diffusion, dispersal of chemical stimuli depends on fluid flow. Aquatic crustaceans can generate directed water currents by specialized appendages. Here I describe the crayfish fan organs, which are feathered flagella of the mouthparts, and their activity in sending and receiving chemical signals in environments with stagnant flow conditions. During the power-stroke, the fan opens and displaces water; during the return stroke, it collapses and thereby minimizes drag. These organs can create a variety of flow fields including water jets, and in many different directions. Bilateral upward fanning draws water horizontally from all directions toward the anterior chemoreceptors. Unilateral upward fanning draws water from only one side towards the body. The versatility of the crayfish fan organ makes it a candidate for biomimetic reconstruction and use in autonomous robots that can search chemical sources. PMID:11341576

  15. The parthenogenetic Marmorkrebs (marbled crayfish) produces genetically uniform offspring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peer; Kohlmann, Klaus; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2007-10-01

    Genetically identical animals are very much in demand as laboratory objects because they allow conclusions about environmental and epigenetic effects on development, structures, and behavior. Furthermore, questions about the relative fitness of various genotypes can be addressed. However, genetically identical animals are relatively rare, in particular, organisms that combine a high reproduction rate and a complex organization. Based on its exclusively parthenogenetic reproduction mode, it has been suggested that the Marmorkrebs (Crustacea, Decapoda, Astacida), a recently discovered crayfish, is an excellent candidate for research addressing the aforementioned questions. However, until now, a study using molecular markers that clearly proves the genetic uniformity of the offspring has been lacking. Here, with this first molecular study, we show that this crayfish indeed produces genetically uniform clones. We tested this with 19 related individuals of various generations of a Marmorkrebs population by means of six different microsatellite markers. We found that all examined specimens were identical in their allelic composition. Furthermore, half of the analyzed loci were heterozygous. These results and the absence of meioses in previous histological studies of the ovaries lead us to conclude the Marmorkrebs propagates apomictically. Thus, a genetically uniform organism with complex morphology, development, and behavior is now available for various laboratory studies.

  16. Trophic overlap between native and invasive stream crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoulick, Daniel D.; Piercey, Glenn L.

    2016-01-01

    We examined trophic dynamics of a stream food web where invasive Orconectes neglectusappear to be displacing native O. eupunctus in the Spring River drainage of the Ozark Highlands, Missouri and Arkansas, USA. We collected crayfish species and possible food sources seasonally from a site of sympatry on the South Fork Spring River. We determined diet overlap and potential for competition between O. eupunctus and O. neglectus, and investigated seasonal variation using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses and gut content analyses. Gut content analysis showed both species of crayfish consumed mainly detritus during summer and spring, with other prey categories varying by species and season. Stable isotope analysis showed that O. eupunctus and O. neglectus relied on invertebrates as a major energy and nutrient source throughout summer, autumn, and spring, and the two species showed differences in their stable isotope signatures during spring and summer, but not autumn. Given the trophic overlap between O. eupunctus and O. neglectus, there is a potential for the two species to compete for food and to be ecologically redundant. Ecological redundancy can lead to reduced effects on ecosystem function post-invasion, and therefore examining ecological redundancy of potential invaders should be a conservation priority.

  17. Heavy metal speciation and uptake in crayfish and tadpoles

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, K.J.; Berzins, D.; Millet, L.

    1996-12-31

    Developing valid pollution recording methods is central to assessing environmental damage and remediation. This often is difficult, however, because of speciation and multiphase distribution of contaminants. Polarography, an electroanalytical technique capable of detection and quantification of trace levels of elements and ionic complexes, is a promising method for analyzing environmental samples. Here, polarography has been used to determine lead concentration in water, sediment, bullfrogs, tadpoles, and adsorbed onto kaolin. It has also been used to measure hexavalent chromium concentration in crayfish. This research involves field studies and two laboratory experiments. Studies of a Louisiana swamp have shown lead`s affinity for sediment and water particulate phases, rather than being ionically dissolved in the aqueous phase. In swamp bullfrogs, lead was found in greater concentrations in bone compared to muscle. In the first laboratory experiment, lead uptake originating from water and sediment increased in tadpoles as exposure time and concentration increased. Also, this animal`s development was hindered at higher concentrations. The second laboratory experiment exposed crayfish to aqueous hexavalent chromium. Total chromium uptake increased with exposure time and concentration. The chromium tissue abundance was hepatopancreas > gills > muscle. A substantial portion of tissue hexavalent chromium converted to the less toxic trivalent form.

  18. Locomotor patterns in freely moving crayfish (Procambarus clarkii)

    PubMed

    Jamon; Clarac

    1995-01-01

    Freely walking crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, were studied using a video analysis procedure adapted especially for use with crayfish. The animals were placed in a tank and their homing behaviour was filmed as they returned in a straight line to their shelter. Various sequences were studied at the two following levels. First, the trajectory of each pair of legs (from leg 2 to leg 5) during the step cycle (power stroke and return stroke) was studied to measure stride length and to analyse in detail changes in acceleration. Each leg was found to contribute in a specific manner to locomotion. Second, ipsi- and contralateral leg coordination was investigated. Ipsilateral coordination was found to involve a metachronal organization from front to back in all the walking sequences recorded, whereas contralateral coordination involved, in addition to the weak alternate coupling commonly observed in treadmill walking, another coordination pattern where the legs on each side (legs 3 and 4) are in phase. The results obtained in these free-walking sequences are discussed and compared with those obtained previously, in particular in treadmill situations. PMID:9318428

  19. Influence of elevated temperature and acid mine drainage on mortality of the crayfish Cambarus bartonii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, K.J.; Hom, C.D.; Mazik, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of elevated temperature and acid mine drainage (AMD) on crayfish mortality were investigated in the Stony River, Grant County, West Virginia. During summers 2003 and 2004, four-week in situ bioassays were performed along a thermal and AMD gradient with the native crayfish Cambarus bartonii. Crayfish mortality was analyzed in conjunction with temperature and AMD related variables (pH, specific conductivity). Mortality was significantly higher (48-88%) at sites with high temperatures during 2003 (max = 33.0??C), but no significant differences were observed in 2004 (max = 32.0??C). Temperatures were higher in 2003 than 2004 due to increased discharge from a cooling reservoir flowing into the river. Additionally, duration of high temperature was approximately four days in 2003 as compared with only one day in 2004. No significant relationship between acid mine drainage variables and crayfish mortality was apparent.

  20. Ecological effects of lead mining on Ozark streams: In-situ toxicity to woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allert, A.L.; Fairchild, J.F.; DiStefano, R.J.; Schmitt, C.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Besser, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Viburnum Trend mining district in southeast Missouri, USA is one of the largest producers of lead-zinc ore in the world. Previous stream surveys found evidence of increased metal exposure and reduced population densities of crayfish immediately downstream of mining sites. We conducted an in-situ 28-d exposure to assess toxicity of mining-derived metals to the woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas). Crayfish survival and biomass were significantly lower at mining sites than at reference and downstream sites. Metal concentrations in water, detritus, macroinvertebrates, fish, and crayfish were significantly higher at mining sites, and were negatively correlated with caged crayfish survival. These results support previous field and laboratory studies that showed mining-derived metals negatively affect O. hylas populations in streams draining the Viburnum Trend, and that in-situ toxicity testing was a valuable tool for assessing the impacts of mining on crayfish populations.

  1. Are Chinese consumers at risk due to exposure to metals in crayfish? A bioaccessibility-adjusted probabilistic risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Nunes, Luís M; Greenfield, Ben K; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan

    2016-03-01

    Freshwater crayfish, the world's third largest crustacean species, has been reported to accumulate high levels of metals, while the current knowledge of potential risk associated with crayfish consumption lags behind that of finfish. We provide the first estimate of human health risk associated with crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) consumption in China, the world's largest producer and consumer of crayfish. We performed Monte Carlo Simulation on a standard risk model parameterized with local data on metal concentrations, bioaccessibility (φ), crayfish consumption rate, and consumer body mass. Bioaccessibility of metals in crayfish was found to be variable (68-95%) and metal-specific, suggesting a potential influence of metal bioaccessibility on effective metal intake. However, sensitivity analysis suggested risk of metals via crayfish consumption was predominantly explained by consumption rate (explaining >92% of total risk estimate variability), rather than metals concentration, bioaccessibility, or body mass. Mean metal concentrations (As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn) in surveyed crayfish samples from 12 provinces in China conformed to national safety standards. However, risk calculation of φ-modified hazard quotient (HQ) and hazard index (HI) suggested that crayfish metals may pose a health risk for very high rate consumers, with a HI of over 24 for the highest rate consumers. Additionally, the φ-modified increased lifetime risk (ILTR) for carcinogenic effects due to the presence of As was above the acceptable level (10(-5)) for both the median (ILTR=2.5×10(-5)) and 90th percentile (ILTR=1.8×10(-4)), highlighting the relatively high risk of As in crayfish. Our results suggest a need to consider crayfish when assessing human dietary exposure to metals and associated health risks, especially for high crayfish-consuming populations, such as in China, USA and Sweden. PMID:26773397

  2. The Effects of Biodiesel and Crude Oil on the Foraging Behavior of Rusty Crayfish, Orconectes rusticus.

    PubMed

    Jurcak, Ana M; Gauthier, Steven J; Moore, Paul A

    2015-11-01

    Environmental pollutants, such as crude oil and other petroleum-based fuels, inhibit and limit an organism's ability to perceive a chemical stimulus. Despite the increased use of alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, there have been few studies investigating the impact of these chemicals on the behavior of aquatic organisms. The purpose of this study was to compare the sublethal effects of biodiesel and crude oil exposure on chemically mediated behaviors in a freshwater keystone species. Crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) were tested on their ability to respond appropriately to a positive chemical stimulus within a Y-maze choice paradigm. Behavior was quantified by measuring time spent finding an odor source, duration of time spent at the odor source, percentage of crayfish that found the odor source, and percentage of crayfish that chose the correct arm of the arena. Results indicated negative impacts of both biodiesel and crude oil on the ability of crayfish to locate the food source. However, there were no significant differences between behavioral performances when crayfish were exposed to crude oil compared with biodiesel. Thus, biodiesel and crude oil have equally negative effects on the chemosensory behavior of crayfish. These findings indicate that biodiesel has the potential to have similar negative ecological impacts as other fuel source toxins. PMID:26115694

  3. Laboratory experiments to determine if crayfish can communicate chemically in a flow-through system

    SciTech Connect

    Itagaki, H.; Thorp, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The importance of chemical cues for transmitting information concerning sexual identity, agonistic state, and stress-related condition in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) was examined in a flow-through system. Experiments tested the effects of conditioned water from stimulus tanks on the behavior of solitary male or female crayfish. Twenty males and 20 females were subjected to a random sequence of five treatments: unconditioned water (control), conditioned water flowing through tanks containing a solitary male or female, and conditioned water from tanks holding either two males or two females. Durations of the following behaviors were recorded: chelae up, chela(e) in baffle hole, chela waving, climbing, digging, grooming, gross body movement, and meral spread. Results indicated that crayfish chemically detected another animal within 0.25 m without additional visual or tactile stimuli; however, crayfish apparently did not communicate information on sexual identity, agonistic state, or stress condition, nor does this detection necessarily imply discrimination between stimuli from crayfish and other taxa (e.g., fish). Our conclusions are contrasted with the two previous reports on chemical communication in crayfish in which experimental animals were tested in static systems. We suggest that a temporal separation of molting and copulation and a long reproductive receptivity period for females (which would allow abundant intersexual encounters) could account for a lack of selective pressure to evolve long-distance sex pheromones.

  4. Incomes, Attitudes, and Occurrences of Invasive Species: An Application to Signal Crayfish in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gren, Ing-Marie; Campos, Monica; Edsman, Lennart; Bohman, Patrik

    2009-02-01

    This article analyzes and carries out an econometric test of the explanatory power of economic and attitude variables for occurrences of the nonnative signal crayfish in Swedish waters. Signal crayfish are a carrier of plague which threatens the native noble crayfish with extinction. Crayfish are associated with recreational and cultural traditions in Sweden, which may run against environmental preferences for preserving native species. Econometric analysis is carried out using panel data at the municipality level with economic factors and attitudes as explanatory variables, which are derived from a simple dynamic harvesting model. A log-normal model is used for the regression analysis, and the results indicate significant impacts on occurrences of waters with signal crayfish of changes in both economic and attitude variables. Variables reflecting environmental and recreational preferences have unexpected signs, where the former variable has a positive and the latter a negative impact on occurrences of waters with signal crayfish. These effects are, however, counteracted by their respective interaction effect with income.

  5. Hardy exotics species in temperate zone: can "warm water" crayfish invaders establish regardless of low temperatures?

    PubMed

    Veselý, Lukáš; Buřič, Miloš; Kouba, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    The spreading of new crayfish species poses a serious risk for freshwater ecosystems; because they are omnivores they influence more than one level in the trophic chain and they represent a significant part of the benthic biomass. Both the environmental change through global warming and the expansion of the pet trade increase the possibilities of their spreading. We investigated the potential of four "warm water" highly invasive crayfish species to overwinter in the temperate zone, so as to predict whether these species pose a risk for European freshwaters. We used 15 specimens of each of the following species: the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), the marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis), the yabby (Cherax destructor), and the redclaw (Cherax quadricarinatus). Specimens were acclimatized and kept for 6.5 months at temperatures simulating the winter temperature regime of European temperate zone lentic ecosystems. We conclude that the red swamp crayfish, marbled crayfish and yabby have the ability to withstand low winter temperatures relevant for lentic habitats in the European temperate zone, making them a serious invasive threat to freshwater ecosystems. PMID:26572317

  6. Effects of mining-derived metals on riffle-dwelling crayfish in southwestern Missouri and southeastern Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allert, Ann L.; DiStefano, Robert J.; Schmitt, Christopher J.; Fairchild, James F.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Riffle-dwelling crayfish populations were sampled at 16 sites in 4 tributaries of the Spring River located within the Tri-State Mining District in southwest Missouri. Crayfish density, physical habitat quality, and water quality were examined at each site to assess the ecological effects of mining-derived metals on crayfish. Metals (lead, zinc, and cadmium) were analyzed in samples of surface water, sediment, detritus, and whole crayfish. Sites were classified a posteriori into reference, mining, and downstream sites primarily based on metal concentrations in the materials analyzed. Three species of crayfish (Orconectes neglectus neglectus, O. macrus, and O. virilis) were collected during the study; however, only O. n. neglectus was collected at all sites. Mean crayfish densities were significantly lower at mining sites than at reference sites. Mean concentrations of metals were significantly correlated among the materials analyzed and were significantly greater at mining and downstream sites than at reference sites. Principal component analyses showed a separation of sites due to an inverse relationship among crayfish density, metals concentrations, and physical habitat quality variables. Sediment probable-effects quotients and surface-water toxic unit scores were significantly correlated; both indicated risk of toxicity to aquatic biota at several sites. Metals concentrations in whole crayfish at several sites exceeded concentrations known to be toxic to carnivorous wildlife. Mining-derived metals have the potential to impair ecosystem function through decreased organic matter processing and nutrient cycling in streams due to decreased crayfish densities.

  7. Evaluation of Crayfish Growth and Assimilation on Animal and Detrital Food Sources: Are Stable Isotopes Telling the Whole Story?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. L.; Wotton, R. S.; Wharton, G.; Fortino, K.; Ulseth, A. J.; Hershey, A. E.

    2005-05-01

    Crayfish are the dominant omnivores of many ecosystems and have strong direct and indirect effects through predation and organic matter processing. Despite this, the importance of detritus for crayfish production is poorly understood. We conducted a laboratory experiment where we fed crayfish an ad. lib. diet of only detritus, only fish tissue, or a mixture the above. The crayfish grew more on a diet which contained meat but growth was highly correlated with the amount of food consumed. The least amount of food was consumed in the detritus treatment, an intermediate amount of food in the meat treatment, and the most food in the mix treatment, suggesting that consumption of detritus by crayfish is related to more than simply the abundance of detritus. Nonetheless, isotopic evidence indicated that the crayfish were not assimilating leaf C and N. Additionally, crayfish in the meat containing treatments never exceeded the del 15N signature of their source by the approximately 3 units expected following fractionation, despite coming to isotopic equilibrium with their source. These findings suggest that crayfish may fractionate C and N uniquely. This difference may have to do with gut microbial activity and may have implications for the interpretation crayfish isotopic signatures.

  8. Contrasting patterns of habitat use by prawns and crayfish in a headwater marsh of the St. Johns River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, Frank; Babbitt, Kimberly J.; McIvor, Carole C.; Miller, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    We compared seasonal patterns of habitat use by the prawn Palaemonetes paludosus and the crayfish Procambarus alleni in Blue Cypress Marsh Conservation Area, Florida. Prawn densities were similar to those found in other oligotrophic wetlands of southern Florida, whereas crayfish densities were much greater than reported previously for other wetlands in the area. Prawns and crayfish had strikingly different patterns of habitat use. Prawn density and biomass were similar in wet prairies and sloughs, whereas crayfish density and biomass were significantly higher in wet prairies. Within habitats, the abundance of prawns and crayfish generally increased with increasing structural complexity and the abundance of crayfish generally decreased with increasing water depth. Differences in risk of predation, frequency of agonistic encounters, food availability, and other factors likely contributed to observed patterns of habitat use. Because of differences in their ability to burrow and avoid concentration into dry-season refugia, prawns and crayfish responded very differently to seasonal variation in hydrologic conditions. Prawn densities were initially low (following a severe drought) and then increased during much of the study period, whereas crayfish densities were relatively stable throughout the study period. Overall, it appears that prawns are more responsive to antecedent hydrologic conditions and crayfish are more responsive to the availability of suitable habitats such as wet prairies.

  9. Cryptic asymmetry: unreliable signals mask asymmetric performance of crayfish weapons.

    PubMed

    Angilletta, Michael J; Wilson, Robbie S

    2012-08-23

    Animals commonly use their limbs as signals and weapons during territorial aggression. Asymmetries of limb performance that do not relate to asymmetries of limb size (cryptic asymmetry) could substantially affect disputes, but this phenomenon has not been considered beyond primates. We investigated cryptic asymmetry in male crayfish (Cherax dispar), which commonly use unreliable signals of strength during aggression. Although the strength of a chela can vary by an order of magnitude for a given size, we found repeatable asymmetries of strength that were only weakly related to asymmetries of size. Size-adjusted strength of chelae and the asymmetry of strength between chelae were highly repeatable between environmental conditions, suggesting that asymmetries of strength stemmed from variation in capacity rather than motivation. Cryptic asymmetry adds another dimension of uncertainty during conflict between animals, which could influence the evolution of unreliable signals and morphological asymmetry. PMID:22417793

  10. Genetic analysis of the freshwater crayfish Cherax tenuimanus.

    PubMed

    Imgrund, J; Groth, D; Wetherall, J

    1997-08-01

    The marron (Cherax tenuimanus) is one of the few species of freshwater crayfish native to Australia that is suitable for aquaculture and occurs only in the southwest of Western Australia. This study describes polymorphic microsatellite markers which differentiate marron populations from several geographically distinct regions (including rivers and streams, dams, and commercial marron farms) throughout Western Australia. Twenty microsatellite loci, primarily of the (CA)n. (GT)n type, were isolated and sequenced from a marron cosmid library. Three of these loci were characterised further. Two loci exhibited extensive polymorphism and one was monomorphic. The polymorphic loci exhibited Mendelian codominant inheritance in the family group comprising two individual parents and approximately 100 offspring bred for this study. These loci permitted differentiation between the five geographically distinct populations studied and thus provide a basis for genetic characterisation of marron stock in Western Australia. PMID:9378141

  11. Cryptic asymmetry: unreliable signals mask asymmetric performance of crayfish weapons

    PubMed Central

    Angilletta, Michael J.; Wilson, Robbie S.

    2012-01-01

    Animals commonly use their limbs as signals and weapons during territorial aggression. Asymmetries of limb performance that do not relate to asymmetries of limb size (cryptic asymmetry) could substantially affect disputes, but this phenomenon has not been considered beyond primates. We investigated cryptic asymmetry in male crayfish (Cherax dispar), which commonly use unreliable signals of strength during aggression. Although the strength of a chela can vary by an order of magnitude for a given size, we found repeatable asymmetries of strength that were only weakly related to asymmetries of size. Size-adjusted strength of chelae and the asymmetry of strength between chelae were highly repeatable between environmental conditions, suggesting that asymmetries of strength stemmed from variation in capacity rather than motivation. Cryptic asymmetry adds another dimension of uncertainty during conflict between animals, which could influence the evolution of unreliable signals and morphological asymmetry. PMID:22417793

  12. Glutamatergic postsynaptic block by Pamphobeteus spider venoms in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Araque, A; Ferreira, W; Lucas, S; Buño, W

    1992-01-31

    The effects of toxins from venom glands of two south american spiders (Pamphobeteus platyomma and P. soracabae) on glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission were studied in the neuromuscular junction of the opener muscle of crayfish. The toxins selectively and reversibly blocked both excitatory postsynaptic currents and potentials in a dose-dependent manner. They also reversibly abolished glutamate-induced postsynaptic membrane depolarization. They had no effect on resting postsynaptic membrane conductance nor on postsynaptic voltage-gated currents. The synaptic facilitation and the frequency of miniature postsynaptic potentials were unaffected by the toxins, indicating that presynaptic events were not modified. Picrotoxin, a selective antagonist of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor, did not modify toxin effects. We conclude that both toxins specifically block the postsynaptic glutamate receptor-channel complex. PMID:1319261

  13. Dopaminergic modulation of the caudal photoreceptor in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; Calderón-Rosete, Gabina; Calvillo, Minerva E; Guevara, Jorge; Flores, Gonzalo

    2011-06-01

    In our study we investigated the influence of dopamine (DA) on the caudal photoreceptor (CPR) in crayfish. Here we report the following: (a) the chromatographic determination of DA in the sixth abdominal ganglion (6th AG) shows a variation in the content during a 24-h cycle with the maximum value at dawn. (b) There are possibly dopaminergic neurons in the 6th AG with antityrosine hydroxylase antibodies. Immunopositive neurons (164) were located in the anterior and posterior regions of the 6th AG with the mean (± SE) diameter of their somata 23 ± 1 μm. In addition, there is immunopositive staining in axons, neuropilar fibers, and varicosities. (c) We also identified, using immunohistochemistry, 108 neurons in the sixth AG that contain dopamine D1-like receptors, with the mean (±SE) diameter of their somata 18 ± 1 μm. (d) We examined the exogenous action of DA on the electrical activity of the CPR in the isolated sixth AG by conventional extracellular-recording methods. This CPR displays spontaneous activity and phasic-tonic responses to light pulses. Topical application of dopamine to ganglia kept in the dark increased the spontaneous firing rate of the CPR, whereas the photoresponse of the CPR remained unchanged. The effect on the spontaneous activity is dose-dependent with an ED₅₀ of 33 μM, and is blocked by the dopamine D1-like antagonist SCH23390. These observations suggested that the DA is playing the role of a neurotransmitter or a neuromodulator of the CPR in the 6th AG in both species of crayfish, Procambarus clarkii and Cherax quadricarinatus. PMID:20936686

  14. Effects of natural flooding and manual trapping on the facilitation of invasive crayfish-native amphibian coexistence in a semi-arid perennial stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kats, Lee B.; Bucciarelli, Gary; Vandergon, Thomas L.; Honeycutt, Rodney L.; Mattiasen, Evan; Sanders, Arthur; Riley, Seth P.D.; Kerby, Jacob L.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic amphibians are known to be vulnerable to a myriad of invasive predators. Invasive crayfish are thought to have eliminated native populations of amphibians in some streams in the semi-arid Santa Monica Mountains of southern California. Despite their toxic skin secretions that defend them from native predators, newts are vulnerable to crayfish attacks, and crayfish have been observed attacking adult newts, and eating newt egg masses and larvae. For 15 years, we have observed invasive crayfish and native California newts coexisting in one stream in the Santa Monica Mountains. During that period, we monitored the densities of both crayfish and newt egg mass densities and compared these to annual rainfall totals. After three seasons of below average rainfall, we reduced crayfish numbers by manual trapping. Our long-term data indicated that crayfish did not fare well in years when rainfall is above the historic average. This invasive predator did not evolve with high velocity streams, and observations indicated that southern California storm events washed crayfish downstream, killing many of them. Newts exhibit increased reproduction in years when crayfish numbers were reduced. A comparison with a nearby stream that does not contain crayfish indicated that newt reproduction positively responded to increased rainfall, but that fluctuations were much greater in the stream that contains crayfish. We suggest that rainfall patterns help explain invasive crayfish/newt coexistence and that management for future coexistence may benefit from manual trapping.

  15. Phenogenetic analysis of crayfishes Astacus astacus population dynamics after introduction into natural lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapunov, Valentin; Fedotov, Valery

    2016-04-01

    Phenogenetic indication is check of environment state by detectable characters of population, such as morphological variability, sex relation and sex dimorphism. This characters dynamics was followed within crayfish population during process of adaptation for pond. Crayfishes are stenobionts needing clean water. The pattern of different crayfish species is criteria for pond dynamics. Mathematical model describing occupation of lake by Nobel crayfishes Astacus astacus is describing by two variants. The first is general universal model, the second is model appropriate for lake Berezno from Pskov region (North - West of Russia). This situation may be considered as representative for different lakes taking into account ecological specific of every lake. Crayfishes were introduced into the lake at 1995. At 1998 population was reorganized by switching on genetic program of migration for maximal using of assimilating capacity of lake. During 2000 - 2015 population was stable and its characters were oscillated according to ecological state and automatic genetics processes. Population is monomorphic, the one morphotype is dominant. Sizes within this morpotype are distributed according to Gauss law (making correction for methods of catching). The square deviation increases in first generation and decreases in accordance to population adaptation. The Nobel crayfish is typical macrohydrobiont and may be used as biological indicator of ecological state of water. Such a method of monitoring is cheap and effective and may be used as adding to tradition monitoring manner. Parallel to monitoring of natural crayfish population the program of use of artificial test system for water quality was introduced in water-supply station of St. Petersburg.

  16. Energy sources and ecological role of crayfishes in an Ozark stream: Insights from stable isotopes and gut analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitledge, G.W.; Rabeni, C.F.

    1997-01-01

    Energy sources for the crayfishes Orconectes luteus and O. punctimanus in the Jacks Fork River, Missouri, were quantified using stable isotopes (??13C and ??15N) and gut-content analysis. A dual-isotope mixing model indicated that about two thirds of crayfish production originated from allochthonous carbon sources, and 30-50% of crayfish production was derived from direct consumption of animal matter. Young-of-the-year crayfishes and adult O. luteus were more carnivorous than the larger adult O. punctimanus. Contributions of energy sources determined using the stable isotope mixing model were similar to results of gut-content analysis corrected for differential assimilation of dietary components. Proportions of crayfish production attributed to animal matter by these two methods were four to five times greater than estimates derived from uncorrected gut-content analysis. Unadjusted gut-content analysis overestimated the percentage of crayfish production from feeding directly on detritus. Production-based calculations of crayfish food consumption rates indicated that crayfishes were the dominant consumers of benthic invertebrates, detritus, and algae and may strongly influence lower trophic levels, organic matter processing, and energy flow in this system.

  17. The Effect of the Crayfish Orconectes virilis (Crustacea: Decapoda: Cambaridae) in the Decomposition and Succession of Submerged Small Mammal Carrion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, G. D.; Chadwick, J. W.

    2005-05-01

    The role of the crayfish Orconectes virilis in the decomposition of submerged rat carrion and succession of other benthic macroinvertebrates was experimentally investigated in Slaughterhouse Gulch, a small, urban stream in Littleton, Colorado. Crayfish participation in carrion decomposition significantly altered the decomposition rate of the carrion. Nine carcasses were exposed in anchored minnow traps at three degrees of crayfish access: crayfish always present, crayfish having free access, and crayfish excluded. These three treatments required 23 days, 29 days, and 65 days, respectively, for complete decomposition of the rat carrion (<2% original biomass). Sample variability increased with number of crayfish present, especially as decomposition proceeded. Seven other macroinvertebrate taxa were collected from the carcasses, but their presence or absence could not be correlated with crayfish presence. The leech Haemopis marmoratus was generally the first macroinvertebrate to arrive at the carrion, being present in densities of <5 individuals/carcass early in succession and in larger densities (up to 25 individuals/carcass) after extensive decomposition and exposure of the viscera.

  18. Juvenile Delinquency in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Irving, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Contains nine articles which describe the causes and treatment of juvenile delinquency in China. Focuses on the social causes of delinquency, family factors shaping juvenile crimes and mistakes, criminal peer groups, psychological factors related to delinquency, and the role of education in prevention of delinquency. (JDH)

  19. Standards for Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flicker, Barbara

    1977-01-01

    The Juvenile Justice Standards Project at New York University has proposed a plan to restructure family court procedure. These standards, outlined here by a former project director, cover significant aspects of the relationship of juveniles to social institutions. (Editor/RK)

  20. Juvenile Confinement in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

  1. Helpful Juvenile Detention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive, research-based rationale for rejecting "get-tough," punitive approaches to juvenile detention and implementing "helpful programs" in detention settings instead. Offers a review of the information that explains why and how juvenile detention should be a first step in the treatment of young offenders, rather than simply a…

  2. Renewing Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macallair, Daniel; Males, Mike; Enty, Dinky Manek; Vinakor, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) was commissioned by Sierra Health Foundation to critically examine California's juvenile justice system and consider the potential role of foundations in promoting systemic reform. The information gathered by CJCJ researchers for this report suggests that foundations can perform a key leadership…

  3. Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, Jessica

    This handbook is designed to teach communities how to develop an effective juvenile firesetter intervention program. The six chapters of this handbook can be viewed as the six building blocks essential to construct a successful program. The cornerstone of the blueprint is understanding the personality profiles of juvenile firesetters and their…

  4. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yagnik, Vipul D.

    2011-01-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice. PMID:24765310

  5. Guide to Juvenile Restitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Anne L., Ed.

    This guide is designed to assist programs in developing, expanding, or improving restitution activities for juvenile offenders. The guide is divided into five major sections. Part I focuses on the most fundamental decisions for restitution programs: program philosophy and goals, organizational structure, location within the juvenile justice…

  6. Accumulation of Heavy Metals in Crayfish and Fish from Selected Czech Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Kuklina, Iryna; Kouba, Antonín; Buřič, Miloš; Horká, Ivona; Ďuriš, Zdeněk; Kozák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accumulation of aluminium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc in crayfish and fish organ tissues, specimens from three drinking water reservoirs (Boskovice, Landštejn, and Nová Říše) and one contaminated site (Darkovské moře) in the Czech Republic were examined. Crayfish hepatopancreas was confirmed to be the primary accumulating site for the majority of metals (Cu > Zn > Ni > Cd > Cr), while Hg and Cr were concentrated in abdominal muscle, and Al and Pb were concentrated in gill. Metals found in Nová Říše specimens included Cu > Zn > Ni and those found in Boskovice included Zn > Hg > Cr. Cd concentrations were observed only in Landštejn specimens, while contaminated Darkovské moře specimens showed the highest levels of accumulation (Cu > Al > Zn > Pb). The majority of evaluated metals were found in higher concentrations in crayfish: Cu > Al > Zn > Ni > Cr > Cd > Pb, with Hg being the only metal accumulating higher in fish. Due to accumulation similarities of Al in crayfish and fish gill, differences of Hg in muscle, and features noted for the remaining metals in examined tissues, biomonitoring should incorporate both crayfish and fish to produce more relevant water quality surveys. PMID:24738051

  7. Accumulation of heavy metals in crayfish and fish from selected Czech reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Kuklina, Iryna; Kouba, Antonín; Buřič, Miloš; Horká, Ivona; Duriš, Zdeněk; Kozák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accumulation of aluminium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc in crayfish and fish organ tissues, specimens from three drinking water reservoirs (Boskovice, Landštejn, and Nová Říše) and one contaminated site (Darkovské moře) in the Czech Republic were examined. Crayfish hepatopancreas was confirmed to be the primary accumulating site for the majority of metals (Cu > Zn > Ni > Cd > Cr), while Hg and Cr were concentrated in abdominal muscle, and Al and Pb were concentrated in gill. Metals found in Nová Říše specimens included Cu > Zn > Ni and those found in Boskovice included Zn > Hg > Cr. Cd concentrations were observed only in Landštejn specimens, while contaminated Darkovské moře specimens showed the highest levels of accumulation (Cu > Al > Zn > Pb). The majority of evaluated metals were found in higher concentrations in crayfish: Cu > Al > Zn > Ni > Cr > Cd > Pb, with Hg being the only metal accumulating higher in fish. Due to accumulation similarities of Al in crayfish and fish gill, differences of Hg in muscle, and features noted for the remaining metals in examined tissues, biomonitoring should incorporate both crayfish and fish to produce more relevant water quality surveys. PMID:24738051

  8. Dishonest signals of strength in male slender crayfish (Cherax dispar) during agonistic encounters.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robbie S; Angilletta, Michael J; James, Rob S; Navas, Carlos; Seebacher, Frank

    2007-08-01

    Many animals resolve disputes without combat by displaying signals of potential strength during threatening displays. Presumably, competitors use each other's displays to assess their relative strengths, and current theory predicts that these signals of strength should generally be honest. We tested this prediction by investigating the relationships among morphology, performance, and social dominance in males of the slender crayfish Cherax dispar. Crayfish routinely use their enlarged front claws (chelae) for both intimidation and fighting, making this species ideal for studying the honesty of weapon size. We evaluated five competing models relating morphological and physiological traits to dominance during paired competitive bouts. Based on the best model, larger chelae clearly resulted in greater dominance; however, chela strength had no bearing on dominance. Thus, displays of chela size were dishonest signals of strength, and the enlarged chelae of males seemingly function more for intimidation than for fighting. In addition, an analysis of the performance of isolated chela muscle showed that muscle from male crayfish produced only half the force that muscle from female crayfish produced (236.6+/-26.4 vs. 459.5+/-71.6 kN m(-2)), suggesting that males invest more in developing larger chelae than they do in producing high-quality chela muscle. From our studies of crayfish, we believe dishonest signaling could play a greater role in territorial disputes than previously imagined. PMID:17874378

  9. Effects of Current Velocity, Particle Size, and Substrate Heterogeneity on Crayfish (Orconectes propinquus) Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. M.; Kershner, M. W.

    2005-05-01

    The use of flow refugia (e.g., substrate) by lotic invertebrates often increases their likelihood of survival during flood events. Movement to potential refugia becomes risky as velocities increase, and the range of velocities that benthic invertebrates can withstand is variable. In this study, activity time and slip velocities of small [carapace length (CL)=10-20 mm] and large (CL=20-30 mm) Orconectes propinquus were measured in an artificial flume across ranges of current velocity and substrate heterogeneity. Particle sizes included small pebbles (16-32 mm), large pebbles (32-64 mm), and small cobble (64-128 mm). Water velocity was increased by 0.1 m/s increments from 0.1-1.5 m/s at 5-minute intervals or until the crayfish was dislodged from the substrate. As current velocity increased, the probability of slipping increased for all crayfish. Regardless of the degree of substrate heterogeneity, small crayfish held their position at higher velocities than large crayfish and were also less active. Slip rates were generally lower for both sizes as substrate heterogeneity increased. Essentially, the availability and probability of finding refugia increased with increased habitat heterogeneity and allowed crayfish to avoid being swept into the drift.

  10. Toxicological studies of cadmium and zinc on the crayfish Orconectes virilis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirenda, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The acute toxicities of cadmium and of zinc to the crayfish Oronectes virilis were determined. Adult, intermolt crayfish were exposed to a series of concentrations of either cadmium or zinc for a two week period. Cadmium was found to be a cumulative poison to the crayfish; LC50 values decreased from 6.1 mg Cd/I for 96 hours to 0.7 mg Cd/I for two weeks. An incipient LC50 was also estimated to be 0.0604 mg Cd/I. Zinc was found to have a relatively low toxicity to O. virilis under the present exposure conditions. Whole animal and tissue analyses for cadmium or zinc were performed on the crayfish used in the acute toxicity tests. Whole animals concentrations both for cadmium and for zinc exhibited a linear relationship to exposure concentrations (r = 0.85 and 0.87, respectively). The gills had the highest concentrations (r = 0.85 and 0.87, respectively). The gills had the highest concentrations of cadmium and zinc, and displayed a linear relationship to exposure concentrations (r = 0.82 and 0.87 respectively). The hepatopancreas displayed a plateau in metal concentrations and is probably the main storage site for both metals in the crayfish. The relationship of cadmium concentration to exposure concentration in the antennal glands also showed linearity (r = 0.65), while zinc levels reached a steady state level. All the remaining tissues analyzed exhibited a plateau in metal concentration.

  11. Physical habitat and water quality correlates of crayfish distributions in a mined watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Loughman, Zachary J.

    2014-01-01

    In mined watersheds, water quality alters aquatic faunas, but few studies have focused on associations between stream habitat and crayfish distributions. We examined associations of water quality and physical habitat quality on presence/absence of six crayfish species in the upper Kanawha River drainage of southern West Virginia, USA, a region with a long history of surface and mountaintop removal mining of coal. Data supported an association of physical habitat quality with the presence of four species (Cambarus carinirostris, Cambarus robustus, Cambarus cf. sciotensis, and Orconectes sanbornii). Cambarus bartonii cavatus and the non-native Orconectes virilis were associated with lower quality physical habitat than that of the other four species. Relative to other species, C. b. cavatus was associated with the lowest conductivity values, whereas O. virilis was associated with the highest conductivity values. Secondary and tertiary burrowers were generally associated with relatively high-quality physical habitat. However, C. b. cavatus, a crayfish known to burrow extensively in headwater streams, was associated with the lowest quality physical habitat. Physical habitat quality was generally supported over stream conductivity as a variable influencing crayfish distributions. Our data demonstrate the importance of stream habitat quality when assessing crayfish assemblages within mined watersheds.

  12. Cadmium-binding proteins in midgut gland of freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.; Torreblanca, A.; Medina, J.; Diza-Mayans, J.

    1989-02-01

    Metallothioneins, metal binding proteins, were originally isolated and characterized by Margoshes and Vallee. These proteins have a high affinity for various heavy metals, particularly cadmium and mercury and have extensively been studied in mammals. Metal binding proteins have been observed in a variety of marine invertebrates; however, there is very little information available on metal binding proteins in freshwater invertebrates, and particularly in freshwater crustaceans. Cadmium is an ubiquitous non essential element which possesses high toxicity to aquatic organisms. Cadmium binding proteins observed in invertebrates have similar characteristics to mammalian metallothioneins. In 1978, the American red crayfish appeared in Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields (Valencia, Spain). Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields waters are subjected to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. In previous reports the authors studied the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium on Procambarus clarkii of Albufera Lake. This crayfish shows a high resistance to cadmium and a great accumulation rate of this metal in several tissues, including midgut gland. Since Procambarus clarkii shows a high resistance to cadmium, the presence of cadmium binding proteins (Cd-BP) in midgut gland of these crayfish would be expected. This report describes results on the characterization of Cd-BPs obtained from cadmium exposed crayfish Procambarus clarkii, demonstrating their presence in this freshwater crayfish.

  13. A successful crayfish invader is capable of facultative parthenogenesis: a novel reproductive mode in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Buřič, Miloš; Hulák, Martin; Kouba, Antonín; Petrusek, Adam; Kozák, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the "tens rule" which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group. PMID:21655282

  14. A Successful Crayfish Invader Is Capable of Facultative Parthenogenesis: A Novel Reproductive Mode in Decapod Crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Buřič, Miloš; Hulák, Martin; Kouba, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the “tens rule” which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group. PMID:21655282

  15. Juvenile Justice in California, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Justice, Sacramento. Bureau of Criminal Statistics and Special Services.

    This publication provides an overview of the processing of juvenile delinquency cases through the California juvenile justice system; provides information to aid administrators, planners, and researchers in the administration of juvenile justice; and maintains baseline data for further studies of the system. Information on juvenile arrests and…

  16. Conservation status of North American freshwater crayfish (Decapoda: Cambaridae) from the southern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Welsh, Stuart; Fetzner, James W.; Thoma, Roger F.

    2015-01-01

    A list is provided of all crayfishes (family Cambaridae) in the southern United States, which includes common names, global conservation status, an alternative review of the conservation status based on the IUCN red list criteria, and state distribution. This list includes 357 native crayfishes, of which 12 (3.4%) are critically endangered, 37 (10.4%) are endangered, 126 (35.3%) are vulnerable, 181 (50.7%) are lower risk, and 1 (0.3%) is not evaluated. The leading factors causing imperilment are restricted ranges caused by anthropogenic impacts from changes in land use, contaminants, invasion by non-indigenous species, and habitat fragmentation. In order to conserve and manage diversity of native crayfish, consistency is needed in determining conservation status and more complete distribution and life history information are needed for about 60% of species.

  17. Experimental inoculation of Louisiana red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).

    PubMed

    Pace, Barcley T; Hawke, John P; Subramanian, Ramesh; Green, Christopher C

    2016-07-01

    The red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii represents an important aquaculture species responsible for over half of all commercial aquaculture profits in Louisiana, USA. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is highly pathogenic in crustacean species and induces mass mortality in aquaculture operations worldwide. Natural outbreaks of WSSV occur yearly in cultured populations of crayfish in Louisiana. The goal of this study was to better understand the infectivity of WSSV in P. clarkii, by determining the minimum lethal dose necessary to initiate infection and to measure the resulting cumulative mortality following infection with different doses. A real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method was used to detect WSSV in DNA extracted from gill tissue to ensure P. clarkii study populations were WSSV-free before the start of trials. Viable viral particles were isolated from naturally infected P. clarkii gill tissue and quantified using a novel digital PCR approach. Three infectivity trials were performed, and WSSV inocula were created by serial dilution, generating 5 treatments per trial. Five crayfish (weighing ~25 g) per dilution per trial received viral inoculations. Mortality was monitored daily for the duration of the trial in order to construct a median lethal dose (LD50) curve, and probit regression analysis was used to determine LD50 concentrations of viral particles. Knowledge of the infectivity of WSSV in native crayfish populations is of critical importance to the management of the commercial crayfish aquaculture industry in Louisiana. This is the first study to investigate the infectivity and to determine the LD50 of the Louisiana strain of WSSV in native crayfish. PMID:27409237

  18. Effects of predators on fish and crayfish survival in intermittent streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dekar, Matthew P.; Magoulick, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Predation from aquatic and terrestrial predators arc important factors structuring the size and depth distribution of aquatic prey. We conducted mesocosm and tethering experiments on Little Mulberry Creek in northwest Arkansas during low flows to examine the effects of predators on fish and crayfish survival in intermittent streams Using shallow artificial pools (10 cm deep) and predator exclusions, we tested the hypothesis that large-bodied fish are at greater risk from terrestrial predators in shallow habitats compared to small-bodied individuals. Twenty-four circular pools (12 open top. 12 closed top) were stocked with two size classes of Campostoma anomalum (Central Stonerller) and deployed systematically in a single stream pool. In addition, we used a crayfish tethering experiment to test the hypothesis that the survival of small and large crayfish is greater in shallow and deep habitats, respectively. We tethered two size classes of Orconectes meeki meeki (Meek's Crayfish) along shallow and deep transects in two adjacent stream pools and measured survival for 15 days. During both experiments, we monitored the presence or absence of predators by visual observation and from scat surveys. We demonstrated a negative effect of terrestrial predators on Central Stonerller survival in the artificial pools, and larger individuals were more susceptible to predation. In contrast, small crayfish experienced low survival at all depths and large crayfish were preyed upon much less intensively during the tethering study, particularly in the pool with larger substrate. More studies are needed to understand how stream drying and environmental heterogeneity influence the complex interactions between predator and prey populations in intermittent streams.

  19. Histamine operates Cl -gated channels in crayfish neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Cebada, Jorge; García, Ubaldo

    2007-11-01

    We describe a histamine-activated Cl(-) conductance in the X-organ neurons from crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, which has comparable properties to the homomultimeric histamine-gated ion channels described in Drosophila. Topical application of histamine inhibited spontaneous neuronal firing in the X-organ sinus gland tract, concomitant with an increase in the membrane conductance. In X-organ neurons in culture and under voltage-clamp conditions, histamine evoked outward currents at -40 mV that reversed at the Cl(-) equilibrium potential. Histamine sensitivity in these neurons had a half-maximal response (EC(50))=3.3+/-1 micromol l(-1), with a Hill number of 2.6+/-0.4. The histamine-evoked current was blocked by tiotidine, cimetidine, ranitidine and 256+/-11 and 483+/-11 micromol l(-1), respectively) and d-tubocurarine (IC(50)=21+/-2 micromol l(-1)), but was insensitive to picrotoxin, bicuculline and strychnine. Neither GABA nor glutamate was capable of desensitizing the histamine response, indicating that histamine activates a particular Cl(-) conductance. The presence of immunoreactive neurons to histamine in the medulla terminalis with axonal projections to the neuropile suggests a possible histaminergic modulation of the X-organ sinus gland system. PMID:17981864

  20. Mitochondrial phylogeography of New Zealand freshwater crayfishes, Paranephrops spp.

    PubMed

    Apte, S; Smith, P J; Wallis, G P

    2007-05-01

    Tectonic movement at the boundary of the Indo-Australian and Pacific Plates during the Miocene and Pliocene is recognized as a driving force for invertebrate speciation in New Zealand. Two endemic freshwater crayfish (koura) species, Paranephrops planifrons White 1842 and Paranephrops zealandicus White 1842, represent good model taxa to test geological hypotheses because, due to their low dispersal capacity and life history, geographical restriction of populations may be caused by vicariant processes. Analysis of a mitochondrial DNA marker (cytochrome oxidase subunit I) reveals not two, but three major koura lineages. Contrary to expectation, the cryptic West Coast group appears to be more closely related to P. zealandicus than to P. planifrons and has diverged earlier than the final development (Late Pleistocene) of Cook Strait. Our date estimates suggest that koura lineage diversification probably coincided with early to mid-Alpine orogeny in the mid-Pliocene. Estimates of node ages and the phylogenies are inconsistent with both ancient Oligocene and recent postglacial Pleistocene range expansion, but suggest central to north colonization of North Island and west to east movement in South Island during mid- to late Pliocene. Crypsis and paraphyly of the West Coast group suggest that morphological characters presently used to classify koura species could be misleading. PMID:17444900

  1. Calcium transport mechanism in molting crayfish revealed by microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuhira, V.; Ueno, M.

    1983-01-01

    Crayfish provide a good model in which to study the transport mechanism of Ca ions. During the molting stage, decalcified Ca ions are transferred into the blood and accumulate in the gastrolith epithelium, after which a gastrolith is formed on the surface of the epithelium. The gastrolith is dissolved in the stomach after molting, and the Ca is reabsorbed and redistributed throughout the newly formed exoskeleton. We studied the mechanism of Ca transport by cytochemical precipitation of Ca ions and by electron microanalysis, including X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), with a computer. In EDX analysis, the fine precipitates of K-antimonate in the gastrolith mitochondria clearly defined Ca with antimony; we also observed a large amount of Ca-oxalate in the mitochondria, and Ca-K X-ray pulses were clearly defined. Ca-K X-rays were also detected from fresh freeze-substituted mitochondria. Finally, we succeeded in taking a Ca-L EELS image from the mitochondria of fresh freeze-substituted thin sections. Only a very small amount of Ca was detected from the cell membrane and other organelles. Ca-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and Mg-ATPase activity was also very clearly demonstrated in the mitochondria. These enzymes may play an important role in Ca metabolism.

  2. Development of sensory processes during limb regeneration in adult crayfish.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R L

    1998-06-01

    The capacity of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii to regenerate its walking legs provides a system for studying the mechanisms of neural regeneration and repair. A set number of excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons innervate all the limb musculature throughout the normal development and regeneration of a limb. The cell bodies of the motor neurons reside within the segmental ganglion and, upon loss of the limb, their axons regrow from their severed distal ends. The cell bodies of the sensory neurons, in contrast, are located close to their sensory endings within the limb, and they are therefore lost, along with the limb, upon autotomy, leaving the severed, distal axonal stumps of the sensory neurons within the ganglionic root. During the regeneration of a limb, new sensory neurons develop within the limb, and their axons must then grow into the ganglionic root to make the appropriate connections for the new limb to become functional. Evidence is presented in the present paper that the sensory axonal stumps do not degenerate before the new sensory neurons appear within the root as the limb regenerates. These results also indicate a progressive advance of growth cones, presumably sensory in origin, towards the neuropil within the ganglion over time. PMID:9576885

  3. Acute toxicity and accumulation of zinc in the crayfish, Orconectes virilis (Hagen)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Zinc produces acute toxicity to freshwater organisms over a range of concentrations from 90 to 58, 100..mu..g Zn/L; with the range of acute median effect concentrations being similar for freshwater fish and invertebrates. The capacity to regulate internal zinc concentrations in decapod crustaceans has been described. Studies with the crayfish Austropotambius pallipes suggested a relatively high degree of tolerance to zinc by this animal. The present study is designed to describe the toxicity of zinc to the crayfish Orconectes virilis over a 2-wk exposure period. In addition, whole animal and tissue analyses were performed on the test organisms and compared to previous results.

  4. Discovery of four natural clones in a crayfish species Procambarus clarkii

    PubMed Central

    Yue, G. H.; Wang, G. L.; Zhu, B. Q.; Wang, C. M.; Zhu, Z .Y.; Lo, L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Self-cloning is quite rare in shrimp, lobsters, crayfish and crabs. Here we report the discovery of four natural clones of red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), each containing 2-6 genetically identical individuals, during the genotyping of 120 individuals with five microsatellites. The four clones were heterozygote at most of the five microsatellite loci. Phylogenetic analysis using microsatellite genotypes suggests recent origin of the four clones. Sequencing a part of the mitochondrial gene Cox I confirmed that the four clones were from the species Procambarus clarkii. PMID:18781225

  5. Polyneuropathy in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Vogelgesang, S A; Gutierrez, J; Klipple, G L; Katona, I M

    1995-07-01

    We describe 2 patients in whom juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) was associated with well defined clinical polyneuropathies, and review the clinical and serological data. Light and electron microscopy were used to study muscle and nerve tissues from one patient. Neuropathy in our patients was associated with ulcerative skin lesions and elevated serum levels of factor VIII related antigen. Light microscopic studies of muscle revealed perifascicular atrophy and microinfarcts consistent with juvenile DM. Light microscopy of the affected sural nerve showed axonal degeneration. Electron microscopy of the same nerve demonstrated capillary endothelial inclusions characteristic of those observed as manifestations of early endothelial injury in juvenile DM muscle tissue. Polyneuropathy in patients with juvenile DM is a rare complication and is likely due to ischemia secondary to endothelial damage. PMID:7562774

  6. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eileen P; Otonichar, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Sexual offending by juveniles accounts for a sizable percentage of sexual offenses, especially against young children. In this article, recent research on female juvenile sex offenders (JSOs), risk factors for offending in juveniles, treatment, and the ways in which these youth may differ from general delinquents will be reviewed. Most JSOs do not go on to develop paraphilic disorders or to commit sex offenses during adulthood, and as a group, they are more similar to nonsexual offending juvenile delinquents than to adult sex offenders. Recent research has elucidated some differences between youth who commit sex offenses and general delinquents in the areas of atypical sexual interests, the use of pornography, and early sexual victimization during childhood. PMID:27222141

  7. The complete mitogenome of the Australian spiny crayfish Euastacus yarraensis (McCoy, 1888) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Parastacidae).

    PubMed

    Gan, Han Ming; Tan, Mun Hua; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Australian crayfish, Euastacus yarraensis, is documented and compared with other Australian crayfish genera. Euastacus yarraensis has a mitogenome of 15,548 base pairs consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of E. yarraensis mitogenome is 32.39% for T, 22.45% for C, 34.43% for A, and 10.73% for G, with an AT bias of 66.82%. The mitogenome gene order conforms to what is considered the primitive arrangement for parastacid crayfish. PMID:24938115

  8. Effects of predation risk on habitat selection by water column fish, benthic fish and crayfish in stream pools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoulick, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Predation risk can affect habitat selection by water column stream fish and crayfish, but little is known regarding effects of predation risk on habitat selection by benthic fish or assemblages of fish and crayfish. I used comparative studies and manipulative field experiments to determine whether, (1) habitat selection by stream fish and crayfish is affected by predation risk, and (2) benthic fish, water column fish, and crayfish differ in their habitat selection and response to predation risk. Snorkeling was used to observe fish and crayfish in, (1) unmanipulated stream pools with and without large smallmouth bass predators (Micropterus dolomieui >200 mm total length, TL) and (2) manipulated stream pools before and after addition of a single large smallmouth bass, to determine if prey size and presence of large fish predators affected habitat selection. Observations of microhabitat use were compared with microhabitat availability to determine microhabitat selection. Small fish (60-100 mm TL, except darters that were 30-100 mm TL) and crayfish (40-100 mm rostrum to telson length; TL) had significantly reduced densities in pools with large bass, whereas densities of large fish and crayfish (> 100 mm TL) did not differ significantly between pools with and without large bass. Small orangethroat darters (Etheostoma spectabile), northern crayfish (Orconectes virilis), and creek chubs (Semotilus atromaculatus) showed significantly greater densities in pools without large bass. The presence of large smallmouth bass did not significantly affect depths selected by fish and crayfish, except minnows, which were found significantly more often at medium depths when bass were present. Small minnows and large and small crayfish showed the greatest response to additions of bass to stream pools by moving away from bass locations and into shallow water. Small darters and sunfish showed an intermediate response, whereas large minnows showed no significant response to bass additions

  9. Zinc, iron, manganese, and magnesium accumulation in crayfish populations near copper-nickel smelters at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bagatto, G.; Alikhan, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    The Sudbury basin has been subjected to extreme ecological disturbances from logging, mining and smelting activities. Elevated concentrations of copper, cadmium, and nickel have been reported in crayfish populations close to the Sudbury smelting works. The present study compares concentrations of zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and magnesium (Mg) in freshwater crayfish at selected distances of the habitat from the emission source. These metals were selected since they are known to be emitted in moderately high quantities into the Sudbury environment as byproduct of the smelting process. Various tissue concentrations in crayfish were also examined to determined specific tissue sites for these accumulations.

  10. A comparison of two gears for quantifying abundance of lotic-dwelling crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Kristi; Brewer, Shannon K.; Ellersieck, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Crayfish (saddlebacked crayfish, Orconectes medius) catch was compared using a kick seine applied two different ways with a 1-m2 quadrat sampler (with known efficiency and bias in riffles) from three small streams in the Missouri Ozarks. Triplicate samples (one of each technique) were taken from two creeks and one headwater stream (n=69 sites) over a two-year period. General linear mixed models showed the number of crayfish collected using the quadrat sampler was greater than the number collected using either of the two seine techniques. However, there was no significant interaction with gear suggesting year, stream size, and channel unit type did not relate to different catches of crayfish by gear type. Variation in catch among gears was similar, as was the proportion of young-of-year individuals across samples taken with different gears or techniques. Negative binomial linear regression provided the appropriate relation between the gears which allows correction factors to be applied, if necessary, to relate catches by the kick seine to those of the quadrat sampler. The kick seine appears to be a reasonable substitute to the quadrat sampler in these shallow streams, with the advantage of ease of use and shorter time required per sample.

  11. Exploratory behavior and withdrawal signs in crayfish: chronic central morphine injections and termination effects.

    PubMed

    Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola; Okon, Marvin; Huber, Robert; Nathaniel, Thomas I

    2014-05-01

    Functional and evolutionary conservation of neural circuits of reward seeking >is a symbol of survival. It is found in most animals from insects to humans. Exploration is a component of a wide range of drug-elicited behaviors that reflects an appetitive motivational state when animals seek natural rewards such as food, water, and shelter for survival. Not only does the characterization of exploratory behaviors indicate the specific components of appetitive motor patterns, it also reveals how exploratory behavioral patterns are implemented via increased incentive salience of environmental stimuli. The current work demonstrates that novel stimuli appear to directly augment exploration in crayfish, while injections of morphine directly into the brain of crayfish enhanced robust arousal resulting in increased locomotion and exploration of the environment. Elimination of morphine suppressed exploratory motor patterns. Crayfish displayed atypical behavioral changes evident of withdrawal-like states when saline is injected into the brain. With proven evidence of rewarding to the exposure to mammalian drugs of abuse, modularly organized and experimentally accessible nervous system makes crayfish exceptionally suitable for characterizing the central workings of addiction at its key behavioral and neuroanatomic locations. PMID:24512767

  12. Cadmium accumulation in the crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Mayans, J.; Hernandez, F.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Torreblanca, A.

    1986-11-01

    Lake Albufera and the surrounding rice-field waters are being subject to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals and pesticides) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. The American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii is native to the Louisiana marshes (USA). In 1978, the crayfish appeared in Lake Albufera near Valencia (Spain), and presently, without adequate sanitary controls, the crayfish is being fished commercially for human consumption. In view of this interest, it is important to have accurate information on concentrations of cadmium in natural waters and cadmium levels of tissues of freshwaters animals used as human food, as well as the accumulation rates of this metal in this animal. In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of cadmium in several tissues of the red crayfish, P clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following cadmium exposure. Determinations of cadmium were made by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy and the standard additions method. Digestion of samples was made by wet ashing in open flasks with concentrated HNO/sub 3/ at 80-90/sup 0/C.

  13. Characterizing the Invasion Front of the Rusty Crayfish, Orconectes Rusticus, in a Pennsylvania Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. M.; Wallace, J. R.; Perry, W. L.

    2005-05-01

    The rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, was an unknown species in Pennsylvania during the last major assessment of crayfish as documented in a 1906 survey. An intensive survey of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 2000 revealed that O. rusticus had successfully invaded many streams. Orconectes rusticus are also sold in local bait shops suggesting its introduction was likely due to its use as bait. Orconectes rusticus has the potential to cause serious ecological harm to aquatic systems by displacing native crayfish species via competition and hybridization leading to alteration of food web dynamics. In order to predict the extent of invasions, identification of the physical and chemical parameters predisposing stream habitats to invasion is needed. Our objectives were to determine how a suite of physical and chemical parameters might influence the distribution of crayfish species along a stream continuum, with particular emphasis on characterizing the invasion front of Orconectes rusticus. Rather than an invasion front, we encountered a distinct invasion boundary created by a natural series of small waterfalls. Our data suggest that parameters such as water velocity, depth, pH, and temperature have little effect on the distribution and invasion of Orconectes rusticus along a stream continuum when natural barriers are present.

  14. Ionoregulatory responses of the crayfish Orconectes immunis to selenium in fresh water

    SciTech Connect

    Short, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic exposure to sublethal concentrations of selenium on fluid and tissue electrolyte balance of the crayfish Orconcectes immunis. An ionic profile of O. immunis was obtained from measurements of hemolymph sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and copper in several populations of crayfish in eastern Colorado. The bioassay portion of the study consisted of groups of crayfish maintained in reconstituted fresh water while exposed for 30 days to concentrations of 0.01 mg/liter, 0.10 mg/liter, or 1.00 mg/liter selenium as sodium selenite. Exposure to selenium resulted in various branchial histopathologies to include hypertrophy, necrosis, and sloughing of the cuticular membrane. Hemolymph potassium and copper, however, were significantly reduced in crayfish exposed for 10 days to 1.00 mg/liter selenium and 30 days to 0.10 mg/liter selenium. Copper appeared to be the more responsive to selenium toxicity with reductions of 47.4%-53.7% in hemolymph levels after exposure for 30 days to 1.00 mg/liter selenium. Selenium-induced changes in tissue ionic content (abdominal muscle and carapace) were most evident with respect to muscle levels of potassium and calcium. It is suggested that the observed alterations in fluid and tissue ionic content are largely in response to changes in concentration or electrochemical potential gradients brought about by selenium-induced disturbance of membrance permeability and ionic transport characteristics.

  15. Determination of lead in treated crayfish Procambarus clarkii: accumulation in different tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, A.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Torreblanca, A.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Hernandez, F.

    1988-09-01

    The continual loading of trace metals into our environment represents a water pollution problem due to their toxic effects on aquatic biota. In addition, metal ions can be incorporated into food chains and concentrated by aquatic organisms to a level that affects their physiological state. There are several investigations on the toxic effects and bioaccumulation of lead in fishes, molluscs, and crustaceans. Lake Albufera (Valencia, Spain) and the surrounding rice-field waters are subjected to large loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals) from many urban wastewaters in the area. In 1978, the American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) appeared in Lake Albufera. The crayfish have reached a high density producing ecological and agricultural economic problems in rice crops. The crayfish is being fished commercially for human consumption without adequate protection to human health. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the accumulation of lead in tissues of the crayfish P. clarkii following short term lead exposure at several sublethal concentrations. The gills, midgut glands, antennal glands and muscle were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  16. Dietary chitosan nanoparticles protect crayfish Procambarus clarkii against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baozhen; Quan, Haizhi; Zhu, Fei

    2016-07-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles have exhibited potential antibacterial activity or anticancer activity as their unique character. In this study, we investigated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles protect crayfish Procambarus clarkii against WSSV. Chitosan (from crab shell) nanoparticles were prepared by ultrafine milling. The physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles were determined by particle size measure, zeta potential analysis and scanning electron microscope observation. The total hemocyte count (THC), phenoloxidase (PO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured at days 1, 4, 9 and 12, and the survival rate was also recorded after WSSV challenge. The results showed that chitosan nanoparticles could enhance the survival rate of WSSV-challenged crayfish. And crayfish fed diets supplemented with 10 mg/g chitosan nanoparticles (65% mortality) showed a significantly higher survival rate when compared to the control group (100% mortality). The analysis of immunological parameters revealed that 10 mg/g chitosan nanoparticles showed significantly higher level of prophenoloxidase (proPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total hemocyte count (THC) when compared to the control group. It was found that chitosan nanoparticles could inhibit WSSV replication in crayfish. Our results demonstrated that dietary chitosan nanoparticles effectively improve innate immunity and survival of P. clarkii challenged with WSSV. PMID:27071520

  17. From blood to brain: the neurogenic niche of the crayfish brain.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-08-11

    Adult neurogenic niches are present in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Where do stem cells populating these niches originate, and what are the mechanisms maintaining their self-renewal? In this issue of Developmental Cell, Benton et al. (2014) show that in crayfish, hemolymph-derived cells enter a neurogenic niche to replenish neural progenitors. PMID:25117680

  18. Heart rate within male crayfish: social interactions and effects of 5-HT.

    PubMed

    Listerman, L R; Deskins, J; Bradacs, H; Cooper, R L

    2000-02-01

    Behaviors, such as those that establish dominant and subordinate social status, are thought to be driven by various neuromodulators and hormones. In crustaceans, the level of serotonin (5-HT) in the hemolymph is correlated with degree of aggressiveness. The crustacean heart is neurogenic and is modulated by neural secretion of 5-HT in the hemolymph, which bathes the cardiac tissue. We discuss and present the results of measuring heart rate (HR) of crayfish during interactions, as an indication of their state of excitability. HR is the result of multiple influences: a cocktail of hormones and modulators. HR was monitored during the periods in which crayfish established aggressive and submissive social status, during sham injections, and following injections of various doses of 5-HT. Crayfish, during an interaction to establish social status, can increase HR. Both the aggressive and submissive crayfish can dampen their HR within seconds during a pause in the interaction, while still posturing in an aggressive or submissive state. Injections of 5-HT to obtain systemic levels of approximately 100 nM-10 microM increase HR substantially for hours. This suggests that aggressive interactions and the establishment of a dominant posture may not be related to large increases in the free concentrations of 5-HT within the circulating hemolymph, since a sustained HR is not observed in aggressive animals. Instead, the results may demonstrate that inhibitory cardiac regulation is present in the aggressors during interactions and that a regulator is possibly 5-HT. PMID:10825697

  19. Genotypic analyses and virulence characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).

    PubMed

    Li, Jinquan; Du, Pujun; Li, Zhi; Zhou, Yang; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Si; Chen, Fusheng; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause invasive illness in humans and farm animals. It is frequently isolated from dairy products and poultry. However, there have been few literatures on the genetic diversity and virulence potential of L. monocytogenes from freshwater animal. Thirty-nine L. monocytogenes strains from crayfish were isolated and identified in this study. Molecular subtyping and polymorphism of each isolate were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). MLST divided the isolates into eight sequence types (STs), six of which from crayfish were the same with the isolates from environment and clinic. PCR detection of the eight genes related to virulence and multiplex PCR for serotyping showed that the eight virulence factors were present in the isolates and all the isolates belonged to four major L. monocytogenes serotype groups (1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 4b) frequently isolated from patients. In vivo pathogenicity of isolates was also evaluated in murine model and survival curve of infected mice suggested that ST1, ST4, and ST9 isolates were as virulent as the reference strain EGDe. This study provides preliminary insights into the genetic diversity of L. monocytogenes from crayfish and the genetic correlation between crayfish and clinical L. monocytogenes isolates. The results indicate the contamination in aquaculture could be the source of Listeria contamination and the isolates are likely to cause human listeriosis. PMID:25586079

  20. Sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer DNA of the crayfish parasite Psorospermium haeckeli.

    PubMed

    Bangyeekhun, E; Ryynänen, H J; Henttonen, P; Huner, J V; Cerenius, L; Söderhäll, K

    2001-10-01

    Two morphotypes of the crayfish parasite Psorospermium haeckeli were isolated from 2 crayfish species of different geographical origin. The oval-shaped sporocysts were obtained from the epidermal and connective tissue beneath the carapace of the noble crayfish Astacus astacus from Sweden and Finland. Elongated spores were isolated from the abdominal muscle tissue of the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii from USA. To compare genetic divergence of 2 morphotypes of the parasite, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) DNA (ITS 1 and ITS 2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene were cloned and sequenced. The analysed region is variable in length, with the ribosomal ITS sequence of the European morphotype longer than the North American one. Sequence diversity is found mainly in ITS 1 and ITS 2 regions, and there is 66% and 58% similarity between the 2 morphotypes, respectively. Thus, analysis of the ribosomal ITS DNA suggests that P. haeckeli forms obtained from Europe and North America are genetically diverse, which supports the previously reported morphological characteristics. PMID:11710556

  1. Zoogeography, taxonomy, and conservation of West Virginia’s Ohio River floodplain crayfishes (Decapoda, Cambaridae)

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Simon, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The crayfish fauna of West Virginia consists of 23 species and several undescribed taxa. Most survey efforts documenting this fauna have been conducted in lotic waterways throughout the Appalachian plateau, Allegheny Mountains, and Ridge and Valley physiographic provinces. Bottomland forests, swamps, and marshes associated with large river floodplain such as the Ohio River floodplain historically have been under-surveyed in the state. These habitats harbor the richest primary burrowing crayfish fauna in West Virginia, and are worthy of survey efforts. In an effort to fill this void, the crayfish fauna of West Virginia’s Ohio River floodplain was surveyed from 2004 through 2009. From this survey, nine species from four genera were documented inhabiting the floodplain. Zoogeography, biology, and conservation status is provided for all nine crayfishes. The dominant genus along the floodplain is Cambarus, which includes Cambarus (Cambarus) carinirostris, Cambarus (Cambarus) bartonii cavatus, Cambarus (Procambarus) robustus and Cambarus (Tubericambarus) thomai. Cambarus (Tubericambarus) thomai is the most prevalent burrowing species occurring along the floodplain. The genus Orconectes consists of two native species, Orconectes (Cambarus) obscurus and Orconectes (Cambarus) sanbornii; and two invasive taxa, Orconectes (Gremicambarus) virilis and Orconectes (Procambarus) rusticus. Orconectes (Cambarus) obscurus has experienced a range extension to the south and occupies streams formerly occupied by Orconectes (Cambarus) sanbornii. Both invasive taxa were allied with anthropogenic habitats and disturbance gradients. The genera Fallicambarus and Procambarus are represented by a single species. Both Fallicambarus (Cambarus) fodiens and Procambarus (Orconectes) acutus are limited to the historic preglacial Marietta River Valley. PMID:21594135

  2. Occupancy rates of primary burrowing crayfish in natural and disturbed large river bottomlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Welsh, Stuart; Simon, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Among crayfish, primary burrowing species are the least understood ecologically. Many primary burrowing crayfish inhabit floodplains where forested landscapes have been fragmented by agricultural, industrial, or residential uses. In this study, site occupancy rates (ψ) were modeled for two primary burrowing crayfish, Fallicambarus fodiens (Cottle, 1863) and Cambarus thomai Jezerinac, 1993, from Ohio and Kanawha river floodplains in West Virginia, U.S.A. Fallicambarus fodiens is one of West Virginia’s rarest crayfish, while C. thomai is prevalent in most wetlands along both river floodplains. Occupancy rate modeling incorporated four environmental covariates (forest age, soil type, tree frequency, and land use). Based on presence/absence data, forests with tree ages >100 years (ΔQAICc = 0) and sites with loam soils (ΔQAICc = 1.80) were most likely to harbor F. fodiens populations. For C. thomai, several models were supported owing to model selection uncertainty, but those with the land use covariate had more total model weight (total w i = 0 . 54 ) than all other covariate models. Cambarus thomai rarely occupied industrial/agricultural sites, but were often present in forested and residential sites. Although the influence of covariates on site occupancy differed between species, both taxa readily utilized mature forested habitats when available. Conservation actions for F. fodiens and C. thomai should focus on preserving forested tracts along large river floodplains

  3. Evoked potentials elicited by natural stimuli in the brain of unanesthetized crayfish.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Falcón, J; Serrato, J; Ramón, F

    1999-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to test some characteristics of vision by crayfish underwater and in air, and determine possible motion reactions elicited in response to naturalistic or quasi-ethological visual stimuli. Chronically implanted electrodes on the brain were used to record visually evoked potentials in response to moving bars at different speeds or to fish of different sizes. Electroretinograms were also recorded to detect when an object or a shadow appeared in the crayfish visual field. Ongoing brain activity is mild under basal conditions, but increases in RMS by approximately 6% in response to bar passage and 12 to 53% in response to fish motionless or swimming in front of the crayfish. When crayfish are free to move, fish swimming in front of them elicit intense brain activity, together with displacement toward them and an attempt to grab them. Visual evoked potentials are elicited by moving objects as small as 1 degree at a distance of 30 cm in air as well as underwater. None of the stimuli used induced evident behavioral responses under our conditions. We conclude that vision-action activities can be divided into (a) vision of irrelevant objects with short lasting electrical activity and no motion in response to it; (b) vision of mildly interesting objects with long-lasting electrical effects, but no motion in response to it; and (c) vision of relevant objects with appropriate motion reaction. PMID:10357428

  4. Electrophysiological Evidence for Intrinsic Pacemaker Currents in Crayfish Parasol Cells.

    PubMed

    Mellon, DeForest

    2016-01-01

    I used sharp intracellular electrodes to record from parasol cells in the semi-isolated crayfish brain to investigate pacemaker currents. Evidence for the presence of the hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier potassium current was obtained in about half of the parasol cells examined, where strong, prolonged hyperpolarizing currents generated a slowly-rising voltage sag, and a post-hyperpolarization rebound. The amplitudes of both the sag voltage and the depolarizing rebound were dependent upon the strength of the hyperpolarizing current. The voltage sag showed a definite threshold and was non-inactivating. The voltage sag and rebound depolarization evoked by hyperpolarization were blocked by the presence of 5-10 mM Cs2+ ions, 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium chloride, and 10 mM cobalt chloride in the bathing medium, but not by the drug ZD 7288. Cs+ ions in normal saline in some cells caused a slight increase in mean resting potential and a reduction in spontaneous burst frequency. Many of the neurons expressing the hyperpolarization-activated inward potassium current also provided evidence for the presence of the transient potassium current IA, which was inferred from experimental observations of an increased latency of post-hyperpolarization response to a depolarizing step, compared to the response latency to the depolarization alone. The latency increase was reduced in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific blocker of IA. The presence of 4-AP in normal saline also induced spontaneous bursting in parasol cells. It is conjectured that, under normal physiological conditions, these two potassium currents help to regulate burst generation in parasol cells, respectively, by helping to maintain the resting membrane potential near a threshold level for burst generation, and by regulating the rate of rise of membrane depolarizing events leading to burst generation. The presence of post-burst hyperpolarization may depend upon IA channels in parasol cells. PMID

  5. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  6. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  7. Electrophysiological Evidence for Intrinsic Pacemaker Currents in Crayfish Parasol Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, DeForest

    2016-01-01

    I used sharp intracellular electrodes to record from parasol cells in the semi-isolated crayfish brain to investigate pacemaker currents. Evidence for the presence of the hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier potassium current was obtained in about half of the parasol cells examined, where strong, prolonged hyperpolarizing currents generated a slowly-rising voltage sag, and a post-hyperpolarization rebound. The amplitudes of both the sag voltage and the depolarizing rebound were dependent upon the strength of the hyperpolarizing current. The voltage sag showed a definite threshold and was non-inactivating. The voltage sag and rebound depolarization evoked by hyperpolarization were blocked by the presence of 5–10 mM Cs2+ ions, 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium chloride, and 10 mM cobalt chloride in the bathing medium, but not by the drug ZD 7288. Cs+ ions in normal saline in some cells caused a slight increase in mean resting potential and a reduction in spontaneous burst frequency. Many of the neurons expressing the hyperpolarization-activated inward potassium current also provided evidence for the presence of the transient potassium current IA, which was inferred from experimental observations of an increased latency of post-hyperpolarization response to a depolarizing step, compared to the response latency to the depolarization alone. The latency increase was reduced in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific blocker of IA. The presence of 4-AP in normal saline also induced spontaneous bursting in parasol cells. It is conjectured that, under normal physiological conditions, these two potassium currents help to regulate burst generation in parasol cells, respectively, by helping to maintain the resting membrane potential near a threshold level for burst generation, and by regulating the rate of rise of membrane depolarizing events leading to burst generation. The presence of post-burst hyperpolarization may depend upon IA channels in parasol cells

  8. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile polyposis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the third type, known as juvenile polyposis coli, affected individuals develop polyps only in their colon. People with generalized juvenile polyposis and juvenile polyposis coli typically develop polyps during childhood. Most juvenile polyps ...

  9. Juvenile Incarceration and Health.

    PubMed

    Barnert, Elizabeth S; Perry, Raymond; Morris, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Addressing the health status and needs of incarcerated youth represents an issue at the nexus of juvenile justice reform and health care reform. Incarcerated youth face disproportionately higher morbidity and higher mortality compared to the general adolescent population. Dental health, reproductive health, and mental health needs are particularly high, likely as a result of lower access to care, engagement in high-risk behaviors, and underlying health disparities. Violence exposure and injury also contribute to the health disparities seen in this population. Further, juvenile incarceration itself is an important determinant of health. Juvenile incarceration likely correlates with worse health and social functioning across the life course. Correctional health care facilities allow time for providers to address the unmet physical and mental health needs seen in this population. Yet substantial challenges to care delivery in detention facilities exist and quality of care in detention facilities varies widely. Community-based pediatricians can serve a vital role in ensuring continuity of care in the postdetention period and linking youth to services that can potentially prevent juvenile offending. Pediatricians who succeed in understanding and addressing the underlying social contexts of their patients' lives can have tremendous impact in improving the life trajectories of these vulnerable youth. Opportunities exist in clinical care, research, medical education, policy, and advocacy for pediatricians to lead change and improve the health status of youth involved in the juvenile justice system. PMID:26548359

  10. In-Depth Transcriptome Analysis of the Red Swamp Crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Huaishun; Hu, Yacheng; Ma, Yuanchao; Zhou, Xin; Xu, Zenghong; Shui, Yan; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Peng; Sun, Xiaowen

    2014-01-01

    The red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii is a highly adaptable, tolerant, and fecund freshwater crayfish that inhabits a wide range of aquatic environments. It is an important crustacean model organism that is used in many research fields, including animal behavior, environmental stress and toxicity, and studies of viral infection. Despite its widespread use, knowledge of the crayfish genome is very limited and insufficient for meaningful research. This is the use of next-generation sequencing techniques to analyze the crayfish transcriptome. A total of 324.97 million raw reads of 100 base pairs were generated, and a total of 88,463 transcripts were assembled de novo using Trinity software, producing 55,278 non-redundant transcripts. Comparison of digital gene expression between four different tissues revealed differentially expressed genes, in which more overexpressed genes were found in the hepatopancreas than in other tissues, and more underexpressed genes were found in the testis and the ovary than in other tissues. Gene ontology (GO) and KEGG enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed that metabolite- and immune-related pathway genes were enriched in the hepatopancreas, and DNA replication-related pathway genes were enriched in the ovary and the testis, which is consistent with the important role of the hepatopancreas in metabolism, immunity, and the stress response, and with that of the ovary and the testis in reproduction. It was also found that 14 vitellogenin transcripts were highly expressed specifically in the hepatopancreas, and 6 transcripts were highly expressed specifically in the ovary, but no vitellogenin transcripts were highly expressed in both the hepatopancreas and the ovary. These results provide new insight into the role of vitellogenin in crustaceans. In addition, 243,764 SNP sites and 43,205 microsatellite sequences were identified in the sequencing data. We believe that our results provide an important genome resource

  11. The effects of bt corn on rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Linn, Matthew D; Moore, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Bt crops are one of the most commonly used genetically modified crops worldwide. Bt crops contain a gene that is derived from the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis, which produces the Cry1Ab toxin. Bt corn that contains the Cry1Ab toxin is used throughout the Midwest United States to control crop pests such as the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis). Headwater streams in regions known for intensive agriculture receive Bt corn detritus after the fall harvest, which is then consumed by a diverse community of stream invertebrates. The rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) is a common invertebrate detritivore in these headwater streams. Both isogenic and Bt corn were grown under the controlled environmental conditions of a greenhouse and, after senescence, were tested for nutritional equality. Rusty crayfish were exposed to one of several detrital treatments composed of Bt corn, Bt corn plus American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), isogenic corn alone, isogenic corn plus P. occidentalis, or P. occidentalis alone for 8 weeks. Both strains of corn were grown under the controlled environmental conditions in a greenhouse and were tested for nutritional equality after senescence. Crayfish were housed in live streams with a water temperature of 12.8 °C and a 12:12 h light-to-dark photoperiod. Survival and growth of animals within each experimental treatment were monitored each week. After 8 weeks of exposure, there was no statistically significant difference in growth between crayfish in Bt and isogenic treatments. However, survivorship was 31 % lower in the Bt treatment compared with the isogenic treatment. These results suggest that the Bt corn and isogenic corn were of equivalent nutritional value but that Bt corn does have a toxic effect on rusty crayfish during long-term exposure. PMID:25001246

  12. Arsenic uptake and depuration by red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, exposed to various concentrations of monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) herbicide

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.M.; Flagge, C.T.; Hawkins, R.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Like many other heavy metals, arsenic is known to accumulate in the tissues of aquatic organisms including crayfish. One of the earliest reports on red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, reported the bioaccumulation factor (BF) ratios for radioactive sodium methanearsonate to range from 80-480. Other heavy metals, i.e., Cr, Cd, Pb and Hg have also been reported to accumulate experimentally in P. clarkii tissues. This study was conducted to evaluate in the laboratory the bio-accumulative potential of As by the American red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, which is abundant in Louisiana; and also to assess the level of arsenic present in the tissues of fieldcollected individuals. Total revenues from the sales of this crayfish exceeds $143 million annually.

  13. Epidemiology of juvenile violence.

    PubMed

    Farrington, D P; Loeber, R

    2000-10-01

    It is difficult to review the epidemiology of juvenile violence because few studies focus specifically on this topic as opposed to childhood aggression or delinquency in general. More research is needed specifically on juvenile violence, which is generally measured using official records or self-reports. Self-report research shows that a substantial fraction of the male juvenile population commits violence, and that very few violent acts are followed by arrests or convictions. Racial differences in violence may be explainable by reference to racial differences in community contexts. There is a great deal of versatility in juvenile violence. Juveniles who commit one type of violent offense also tend to commit other types and nonviolent offenses. Violent offenders tend to be persistent or frequent offenders, and there is little difference between violent offenders and nonviolent but equally frequent offenders. Nevertheless, there is some degree of specialization in violence. More research is needed to investigate whether risk factors exist for violence that are not risk factors for serious nonviolent delinquency (e.g., biologic factors). Violent juveniles tend to have co-occurring problems such as victimization, substance abuse, and school failure. Often, they might be described as multiple-problem youth. There is considerable continuity from childhood aggression to juvenile violence. An early age of onset of violence predicts a large number of violent offenses. The major long-term risk factors for juvenile violence are individual (high impulsiveness and low intelligence, possibly linked to the executive functions of the brain), family (poor supervision, harsh discipline, child physical abuse, a violent parent, large family size, poverty, a broken family), peer delinquency, gang membership, urban residence, and living in a high-crime neighborhood (characterized by gangs, guns, and drugs in the United States). More research is needed on interactions among risk factors

  14. Copper, cadmium, and nickel accumulation in crayfish populations near copper-nickel smelters at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bagatto, G.; Aikhan, M.A.

    1987-03-01

    The Sudbury basin, an elliptical 646 square mile depression containing a number of freshwater reservoirs, has been subjected to extreme ecological disturbances from logging, mining and smelting activities. The purpose of the present study was to compare tissue concentration of copper, cadmium and nickel in freshwater crayfish at selected distances of the habitat from the emission source. Various tissue concentrations in crayfish from the sites were also examined to determine if particular body tissues were specific sites for metal accumulation.

  15. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eileen P

    2016-01-01

    Public policy has tended to treat juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) as adult sex offenders in waiting, despite research that contradicts this notion. Although as a group, JSOs are more similar to general delinquents than to adult sex offenders, atypical sexual interests and sexual victimization during childhood may be a pathway for sexual offending that differentiates some JSOs from their nonsexually delinquent peers. Developmental considerations must be considered in risk assessment evaluations of these youth. This article reviews theories of sexual offending in youth, risk factors for juvenile offending and reoffending, psychopathology in JSOs, risk assessment, and treatment. PMID:26593121

  16. Suitability of the clonal marbled crayfish for biogerontological research: a review and perspective, with remarks on some further crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter

    2010-12-01

    This article examines the suitability of the parthenogenetic marbled crayfish for research on ageing and longevity. The marbled crayfish is an emerging laboratory model for development, epigenetics and toxicology that produces up to 400 genetically identical siblings per batch. It is easily cultured, has an adult size of 4-9 cm, a generation time of 6-7 months and a life span of 2-3 years. Experimental data and biological peculiarities like isogenicity, direct development, indeterminate growth, high regeneration capacity and negligible senescence suggest that the marbled crayfish is particularly suitable to investigate the dependency of ageing and longevity from non-genetic factors such as stochastic developmental variation, allocation of metabolic resources, damage and repair, caloric restriction and social stress. It is also well applicable to examine alterations of the epigenetic code with increasing age and to identify mechanisms that keep stem cells active until old age. As a representative of the sparsely investigated crustaceans and of animals with indeterminate growth and extended brood care the marbled crayfish may even contribute to evolutionary theories of ageing and longevity. Some relatives are recommended as substitutes for investigation of topics, for which the marbled crayfish is less suitable like genetics of ageing and achievement of life spans of decades under conditions of low food and low temperature. Research on ageing in the marbled crayfish and its relatives is of practical relevance for crustacean fisheries and aquaculture and may offer starting points for the development of novel anti-ageing interventions in humans. PMID:20582627

  17. Astaxanthin is the major carotenoid in tissues of white storks (Ciconia ciconia) feeding on introduced crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).

    PubMed

    Negro, J J; Garrido-Fernández, J

    2000-07-01

    We studied the carotenoid pigments in plasma, skin and body fat of white storks (Ciconia ciconia) from a colony in Spain feeding mainly on the recently introduced red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). In control colonies, where crayfish was absent, plasma was collected for comparison. Our objective was to determine whether the astaxanthin contained in the crayfish reached the blood, accumulated in fat, and finally was deposited in the red-colored bill and legs. If that was true, the visual cues provided by those tegumentary areas would be altered, with potential behavioral consequences. Plasma carotenoids were directly extracted with acetone, whereas skin and fat samples needed harsher conditions, i.e. grinding, sonication and extraction with diethyl ether. The extracts were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and UV/Vis spectroscopy. In crayfish-eating storks, astaxanthin was confirmed to be the dominant pigment in all analyzed tissues. This red pigment was absorbed unchanged in the gut, and was responsible for the red color of plasma and the abnormal orange pigmentation of the feather-covered skin. It was also present in large quantities in the exposed bill and tarsi, which are typically red-colored in the stork. Control storks with no crayfish in the diet only presented lutein in their plasma. PMID:11007176

  18. Hardy exotics species in temperate zone: can “warm water” crayfish invaders establish regardless of low temperatures?

    PubMed Central

    Veselý, Lukáš; Buřič, Miloš; Kouba, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    The spreading of new crayfish species poses a serious risk for freshwater ecosystems; because they are omnivores they influence more than one level in the trophic chain and they represent a significant part of the benthic biomass. Both the environmental change through global warming and the expansion of the pet trade increase the possibilities of their spreading. We investigated the potential of four “warm water” highly invasive crayfish species to overwinter in the temperate zone, so as to predict whether these species pose a risk for European freshwaters. We used 15 specimens of each of the following species: the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), the marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis), the yabby (Cherax destructor), and the redclaw (Cherax quadricarinatus). Specimens were acclimatized and kept for 6.5 months at temperatures simulating the winter temperature regime of European temperate zone lentic ecosystems. We conclude that the red swamp crayfish, marbled crayfish and yabby have the ability to withstand low winter temperatures relevant for lentic habitats in the European temperate zone, making them a serious invasive threat to freshwater ecosystems. PMID:26572317

  19. Influence of Coarse Woody Debris and Particulate Organic Matter on Density and Biomass of the Crayfish Procambarus versutus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. M.; Feminella, J. W.

    2005-05-01

    We estimated the density and growth of several populations of the crayfish Procambarus versutus (Cambaridae) in small sandy-bottom streams within the Southeastern Coastal Plain, at Fort Benning, Georgia. Study streams had varying levels of coarse woody debris (CWD, 4-13% of stream bottom surface) and benthic particulate organic matter (>2cm, BPOM, 1-5% of substrate). Limited work has been done to assess if CWD or BPOM, primary habitat and food resources, respectively, influence crayfish population dynamics, despite the high bioenergetic importance of crayfish in many streams. Mean monthly densities were highest in the stream with the highest %CWD and %BPOM compared with other streams; however, monthly biomass was not always highest in the high-density, high-%CWD/BPOM stream. Instead, the intermediate-%CWD stream typically had the highest crayfish biomass. This disparity may be explained by differential food quality among streams and omnivory. Benthic macroinvertebrate density and biomass both were highest in the intermediate-%CWD/POM stream, and higher macroinvertebrate biomass may have compensated for lower BPOM abundance in crayfish diets, and thus provide a better food resource for P. versutus. We are currently using stable isotope data from crayfish and potential food resources among streams to test this hypothesis.

  20. Juvenile Battens Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayton, Romayne

    1987-01-01

    Ten children diagnosed with juvenile Battens disease were tested over a three-year period in general intelligence, memory, listening and speech, motor skills, and general learning. Results showed that the patients followed a predetermined pattern but that the time span for development of memory, communication, and behavior problems varied greatly.…

  1. Treating the Juvenile Offender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Robert D., Ed.; Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Boxer, Paul, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This authoritative, highly readable reference and text is grounded in the latest knowledge on how antisocial and criminal behavior develops in youth and how it can effectively be treated. Contributors describe proven ways to reduce juvenile delinquency by targeting specific risk factors and strengthening young people's personal, family, and…

  2. Effects of historical lead–zinc mining on riffle-dwelling benthic fish and crayfish in the Big River of southeastern Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allert, A.L.; DiStefano, R.J.; Fairchild, J.F.; Schmitt, C.J.; McKee, M.J.; Girondo, J.A.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; May, T.W.

    2013-01-01

    The Big River (BGR) drains much of the Old Lead Belt mining district (OLB) in southeastern Missouri, USA, which was historically among the largest producers of lead–zinc (Pb–Zn) ore in the world. We sampled benthic fish and crayfish in riffle habitats at eight sites in the BGR and conducted 56-day in situ exposures to the woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas) and golden crayfish (Orconectes luteus) in cages at four sites affected to differing degrees by mining. Densities of fish and crayfish, physical habitat and water quality, and the survival and growth of caged crayfish were examined at sites with no known upstream mining activities (i.e., reference sites) and at sites downstream of mining areas (i.e., mining and downstream sites). Lead, zinc, and cadmium were analyzed in surface and pore water, sediment, detritus, fish, crayfish, and other benthic macro-invertebrates. Metals concentrations in all materials analyzed were greater at mining and downstream sites than at reference sites. Ten species of fish and four species of crayfish were collected. Fish and crayfish densities were significantly greater at reference than mining or downstream sites, and densities were greater at downstream than mining sites. Survival of caged crayfish was significantly lower at mining sites than reference sites; downstream sites were not tested. Chronic toxic-unit scores and sediment probable effects quotients indicated significant risk of toxicity to fish and crayfish, and metals concentrations in crayfish were sufficiently high to represent a risk to wildlife at mining and downstream sites. Collectively, the results provided direct evidence that metals associated with historical mining activities in the OLB continue to affect aquatic life in the BGR.

  3. The complete mitogenome of the Australian land crayfish Engaeus lyelli (Clark 1936) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Parastacidae).

    PubMed

    Gan, Han Ming; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Schultz, Mark B; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the enigmatic freshwater crayfish Engaeus lyelli was sequenced using the MiSeq Personal Sequencer (Illumina, San Diego, CA). The mitogenome has 16,027 bp consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 23 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of E. lyelli is 29.01% for T, 27.13% for C, 31.43% for A, and 12.44% for G, with an AT bias of 60.44%. The species has the distinctive gene order characteristic of parastacid crayfish with the exception of some minor rearrangements involving the tRNA genes. PMID:24730605

  4. White spot syndrome virus enters crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiajun; Li, Fang; Wu, Junjun; Yang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen of aquacultured shrimp. However, the mechanism of its entry remains poorly understood. In this study, by analyzing the internalization of WSSV using crayfish hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells, we showed that WSSV virions were engulfed by cell membrane invaginations sharing the features of clathrin-coated pits and then internalized into coated cytoplasmic vesicles. Further investigation indicated that WSSV internalization was significantly inhibited by chlorpromazine (CPZ) but not genistein. The internalized virions were colocalized with endogenous clathrin as well as transferrin which undergoes clathrin-dependent uptake. Preventing endosome acidification by ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) or chloroquine (CQ) dramatically reduced WSSV entry as well. Moreover, disturbance of dynamin activity or depletion of membrane cholesterol also blocked WSSV uptake. These data indicate that WSSV enters crayfish HPT cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a pH-dependent manner, and membrane cholesterol as well as dynamin is critical for efficient viral entry. PMID:26397221

  5. The complete mitogenome of the New Zealand freshwater crayfish Paranephrops planifrons White 1842 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Parastacidae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Yin Peng; Gan, Han Ming; Tan, Mun Hua; Lys, Isabelle; Page, Rachel; Dias Wanigasekera, Beatrice; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    The mitogenome of Paranephrops planifrons, was obtained by next generation sequencing. This crayfish has a mitochondrial genome of 16,174 base pairs with 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs (tRNA), and a non-coding AT-rich region of 771 bp. The P. planifrons nucleotide composition is: 33.63% for T, 21.92% for C, 34.46% for A, and 9.98% for G and has a 68.09% AT bias. While the mitogenome gene order for this species is consistent with aspects of the highly distinctive parastacid crayfish mitogenome gene arrangement, it has a novel gene order involving the rearrangements of a protein coding and several tRNA genes. PMID:25707411

  6. Individual recognition in crayfish (Cherax dispar): the roles of strength and experience in deciding aggressive encounters.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; Wilson, Robbie S

    2007-10-22

    The outcomes of agonistic interactions modulate access to resources and thereby affect fitness. Success in agonistic encounters may depend on intrinsic physical and physiological performance, and on social experience. Here we test the hypothesis that previous experience will override physical strength in determining the outcome of fights in the freshwater crayfish Cherax dispar. Between unfamiliar opponents, greater chelae closing force significantly increases the chances of winning. However, even when the chelae of the original winners were disabled, the winners kept on winning against the same opponents after 30min and 24h. This winner effect disappeared when previous winners encountered unfamiliar individuals. Similarly, a previous loss did not affect the outcomes of subsequent encounters with unknown crayfish. We suggest that this prolonged recognition of individuals and their relative fighting ability is a mechanism that can reduce the number of agonistic encounters experienced by individuals. PMID:17623630

  7. West Virginia crayfishes (Decapoda: Cambaridae): observations on distribution, natural history, and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Simon, Thomas P.; Welsh, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    West Virginia's crayfishes have received moderate attention since publication of Jezerinac et al.'s (1995) monograph of the state fauna. Survey efforts were initiated over the summers of 2006 and 2007 to gather voucher material for the Indiana Biological Survey's Crustacean Collection. These collections have provided new information regarding the distribution, natural history, life history, taxonomy, and conservation status of Cambarus (Cambarus) carinirostris, C. (C.) bartonii cavatus, C. (C.) sciotensis, C. (Hiaticambarus) chasmodactylus, C. (H.) elkensis, C. (H.) longulus, C. (Jugicambarus) dubius, C. (Puncticambarus) robustus, Orconectes (Procericambarus) cristavarius, and O. (P.) rusticus. Orconectes (Faxonius) limosus has apparently been extirpated from West Virginia and should be removed from the state's list of extant crayfishes.

  8. De Novo assembly and annotation of the freshwater crayfish Astacus astacus transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Theissinger, Kathrin; Falckenhayn, Cassandra; Blande, Daniel; Toljamo, Anna; Gutekunst, Julian; Makkonen, Jenny; Jussila, Japo; Lyko, Frank; Schrimpf, Anne; Schulz, Ralf; Kokko, Harri

    2016-08-01

    We generated RNA-seq data to assemble the transcriptome of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) from four combined tissues (abdominal muscle, hepatopancreas, ovaries, green glands). A total of 194 million read pairs with a length of 100 bp were generated. The transcriptome was assembled de novo using Trinity software, producing 158,649 non-redundant transcripts. Lowly expressed transcripts were filtered out leaving 45,415 transcripts of which 14,559 were found to contain open reading frames with predicted gene function. The Transrate software revealed that 91% of the total reads were realigned to the assembly. Furthermore, BUSCO analysis indicated that our assembly is 64% complete. A total of 13,770 transcripts were assigned at least one GO term. This first de novo transcriptome assembly is an important foundation for future genomic research on the noble crayfish and adds to the general knowledge and further characterization of transcriptomes of non-model organisms. PMID:26988698

  9. West Virginia crayfishes (Decapoda: Cambaridae): observations on distribution, natural history, and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Simon, Thomas P.; Welsh, Stuart A.

    2009-01-01

    West Virginia's crayfishes have received moderate attention since publication of Jezerinac et al.'s (1995) monograph of the state fauna. Survey efforts were initiated over the summers of 2006 and 2007 to gather voucher material for the Indiana Biological Survey's Crustacean Collection. These collections have provided new information regarding the distribution, natural history, life history, taxonomy, and conservation status of Cambarus (Cambarus) carinirostris, C. (C.) bartonii cavatus, C. (C.) sciotensis, C. (Hiaticambarus) chasmodactylus, C. (H.) elkensis, C. (H.) longulus, C. (Jugicambarus) dubius, C. (Puncticambarus) robustus, Orconectes (Procericambarus) cristavarius, and O. (P.) rusticus. Orconectes (Faxonius) limosus has apparently been extirpated from West Virginia and should be removed from the state's list of extant crayfishes.

  10. System-Wide Significance of Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia and Snake River Reservoirs : Annual Report of Research 1991.

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    We indexed consumption rates of northern squawfish (Ptychoch oregonensis) preying upon juvenile salmonids in four lower Snake River reservoirs. Stomach contents were also collected from smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui), channel catfish (Ictaluris gunctatus), and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum). Northern squawfish digestive tracts were analyzed and the overall diet (% weight) was dominated by fish and crustaceans. Examination of stomach contents smallmouth bass showed that crustaceans (primarily crayfish) dominated their diets. Overall, the consumption rate of juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass was low. The northern squawfish consumption index (CI) at Snake River locations ranged from zero at all mid-reservoir locations to 1.2 at Lower Granite forebay. In John Day Reservoir, CI values ranged from 0.5 to 1.9 in May and from 0.9 to 3.0 in July. Consumption index values were highest in forebay and tailrace areas, and were slightly higher in BRZs than in non-restricted zones.