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Sample records for k-210-130-3 steam turbine

  1. Steam Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Turbonetics Energy, Inc.'s steam turbines are used as power generating systems in the oil and gas, chemical, pharmaceuticals, metals and mining, and pulp and paper industries. The Turbonetics line benefited from use of NASA research data on radial inflow steam turbines and from company contact with personnel of Lewis Research Center, also use of Lewis-developed computer programs to determine performance characteristics of turbines.

  2. Refurbishing steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1997-12-01

    Power-plant operators are reducing maintenance costs of their aging steam turbines by using wire-arc spray coating and shot peening to prolong the service life of components, and by replacing outmoded bearings and seals with newer designs. Steam-turbine operators are pressed with the challenge of keeping their aging machines functioning in the face of wear problems that are exacerbated by the demand for higher efficiencies. These problems include intense thermal cycling during both start-up and shutdown, water particles in steam and solid particles in the air that pit smooth surfaces, and load changes that cause metal fatigue.

  3. Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

  4. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  5. 8. TURBINE DECK (UPPER FLOOR) INSIDE STEAM PLANT, SHOWING STEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. TURBINE DECK (UPPER FLOOR) INSIDE STEAM PLANT, SHOWING STEAM TURBINES AND GENERATORS, LOOKING NORTH. November 13, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  7. Steam turbine materials and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Dogan, O.N.; Rawers, J.C.; Schrems, K.K.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2007-12-01

    Ultra-supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This project examines the steamside oxidation of candidate alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines. As part of this research a concern has arisen about the possibility of high chromia evaporation rates of protective scales in the turbine. A model to calculate chromia evaporation rates is presented.

  8. Steam-injected gas turbine analysis: Steam rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, I.G.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of steam rates in steam-injected gas turbines (simple and reheat). In considering a gas turbine of this type, the steam-injection flow is separated from the main gas stream for analysis. Dalton`s and Avogadro`s laws of partial pressure and gas mixtures are applied. Results obtained provide for the accurate determination of heat input, gas expansion based on partial pressures, and heat-rejection steam-enthalpy points.

  9. Brush Seals for Improved Steam Turbine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnquist, Norman; Chupp, Ray; Baily, Fred; Burnett, Mark; Rivas, Flor; Bowsher, Aaron; Crudgington, Peter

    2006-01-01

    GE Energy has retrofitted brush seals into more than 19 operating steam turbines. Brush seals offer superior leakage control compared to labyrinth seals, owing to their compliant nature and ability to maintain very tight clearances to the rotating shaft. Seal designs have been established for steam turbines ranging in size from 12 MW to over 1200 MW, including fossil, nuclear, combined-cycle and industrial applications. Steam turbines present unique design challenges that must be addressed to ensure that the potential performance benefits of brush seals are realized. Brush seals can have important effects on the overall turbine system that must be taken into account to assure reliable operation. Subscale rig tests are instrumental to understanding seal behavior under simulated steam-turbine operating conditions, prior to installing brush seals in the field. This presentation discusses the technical challenges of designing brush seals for steam turbines; subscale testing; performance benefits of brush seals; overall system effects; and field applications.

  10. Steam Turbine Materials and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.H.; Hsu, D.H.

    2008-07-01

    Ultra-supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760 °C. In prior years this project examined the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in high- and intermediate-pressure USC turbines. This steamside oxidation research is continuing and progress is presented, with emphasis on chromia evaporation.

  11. Designing an ultrasupercritical steam turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, H.; Davis, K.; Pickering, E.

    2009-07-15

    Carbon emissions produced by the combustion of coal may be collected and stored in the future, but a better approach is to reduce the carbon produced through efficient combustion technologies. Increasing the efficiency of new plants using ultrasupercritical (USC) technology will net less carbon released per megawatt-hour using the world's abundant coal reserves while producing electricity at the lowest possible cost. The article shows how increasing the steam turbine operating conditions for a new USC project in the USA and quantify the potential CO{sub 2} reduction this advanced design makes possible. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Steam turbine materials and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines. The list of alloys being examined is discussed, including the addition of new alloys to the study. These include alloy 625, selected because of its use as one of the two alloys used for turbine rotors, valves, casings, blading and bolts in the European AD700 full-scale demonstration plant (Scholven Unit F). The other alloy, alloy 617, is already one of the alloys currently being examined by this project. Other new alloys to the study are the three round robin alloys in the UK-US collaboration: alloys 740, TP347HFG, and T92. Progress on the project is presented on cyclic oxidation in 50% air – 50% water vapor, furnace exposures in moist air, and thermogravimetric analysis in argon with oxygen saturated steam. An update on the progress towards obtaining an apparatus for high pressure exposures is given.

  13. The value of steam turbine upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, K.; Olear, D.

    2005-11-01

    Technological advances in mechanical and aerodynamic design of the turbine steam path are resulting in higher reliability and efficiency. A recent study conducted on a 390 MW pulverized coal-fired unit revealed just how much these new technological advancements can improve efficiency and output. The empirical study showed that the turbine upgrade raised high pressure (HP) turbine efficiency by 5%, intermediate pressure (IP) turbine efficiency by 4%, and low pressure (LP) turbine efficiency by 2.5%. In addition, the unit's highest achievable gross generation increased from 360 MW to 371 MW. 3 figs.

  14. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-15

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  15. Steam cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian David; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Li, Ming Cheng; Hyde, Susan Marie; Mashey, Thomas Charles; Wesorick, Ronald Richard; Glynn, Christopher Charles; Hemsworth, Martin C.

    2002-01-01

    The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows.

  16. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOEpatents

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar; Smith, Raub Warfield

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  17. Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2006-04-15

    The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

  18. Oxidation of Alloys for Advanced Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.E.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-09-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steam oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  19. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  20. 23. STEAM PLANT TURBINE DECK FROM NORTH END OF BUILDING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. STEAM PLANT TURBINE DECK FROM NORTH END OF BUILDING, SHOWING FOURTH STEAM UNIT IN PLACE AT FAR SOUTH END. April 6, 1950 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. Selection of labyrinth seals in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency, vibration stability, operational durability, and cost of the main types of peripheral seals used in steam turbines are considered. A comparison between the conventional and honeycomb seals is given. Conditions subject to which replacement of conventional seals by honeycomb ones can be justified are pointed out. The use of variable-pitch multicomb seals as the most promising ones is recommended.

  2. Rotor thermal stress monitoring in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonín, Bouberle; Jan, Jakl; Jindřich, Liška

    2015-11-01

    One of the issues of steam turbines diagnostics is monitoring of rotor thermal stress that arises from nonuniform temperature field. The effort of steam turbine operator is to operate steam turbine in such conditions, that rotor thermal stress doesn't exceed the specified limits. If rotor thermal stress limits are exceeded for a long time during machine operation, the rotor fatigue life is shortened and this may lead to unexpected machine failure. Thermal stress plays important role during turbine cold startup, when occur the most significant differences of temperatures through rotor cross section. The temperature field can't be measured directly in the entire rotor cross section and standardly the temperature is measured by thermocouple mounted in stator part. From this reason method for numerical solution of partial differential equation of heat propagation through rotor cross section must be combined with method for calculation of temperature on rotor surface. In the first part of this article, the application of finite volume method for calculation of rotor thermal stress is described. The second part of article deals with optimal trend generation of thermal flux, that could be used for optimal machine loading.

  3. Large steam turbine repair: A survey

    SciTech Connect

    Findlan, S.J.; Lube, B. )

    1991-07-01

    This report covers a survey taken to document the current state-of-the-art in repairs to large steam turbines. One objective was to provide information to assist utilities in making repair or replacement decisions. The survey revealed that a large number of repairs have been successfully repaired involving both mechanical and welding repair techniques. Repair techniques have been improving in recent years and are being used more frequently. No guidelines or codes exist for the repair of steam turbine components so each repair is primarily controlled by agreement between the utility, contractor and insurer. Types of repairs are reviewed in this report and in addition, the capabilities of various contractors who are currently active in providing repair service. 40 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Prospective steam turbines for combined-cycle plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinberg, G. D.; Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.

    2008-08-01

    The design features and basic thermal scheme of the steam turbines developed on the basis of series-produced steam turbines of ZAO Ural Turbine Works for combined-cycle plants are presented, and their efficiency during operation as part of these plants is considered.

  5. Materials for advanced ultrasupercritical steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Purgert, Robert; Shingledecker, John; Saha, Deepak; Thangirala, Mani; Booras, George; Powers, John; Riley, Colin; Hendrix, Howard

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have sponsored a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired power plants capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than the current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction for boilers and for steam turbines. The overall project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F)/35MPa (5000 psi). This final technical report covers the research completed by the General Electric Company (GE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), with support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) – Albany Research Center, to develop the A-USC steam turbine materials technology to meet the overall project goals. Specifically, this report summarizes the industrial scale-up and materials property database development for non-welded rotors (disc forgings), buckets (blades), bolting, castings (needed for casing and valve bodies), casting weld repair, and casting to pipe welding. Additionally, the report provides an engineering and economic assessment of an A-USC power plant without and with partial carbon capture and storage. This research project successfully demonstrated the materials technology at a sufficient scale and with corresponding materials property data to enable the design of an A-USC steam turbine. The key accomplishments included the development of a triple-melt and forged Haynes 282 disc for bolted rotor construction, long-term property development for Nimonic 105 for blading and bolting, successful scale-up of Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 castings using

  6. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  7. Ultra supercritical turbines--steam oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Alman, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538?C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620?C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760?C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  8. Thermoelastic steam turbine rotor control based on neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzadkowski, Romuald; Dominiczak, Krzysztof; Radulski, Wojciech; Szczepanik, R.

    2015-12-01

    Considered here are Nonlinear Auto-Regressive neural networks with eXogenous inputs (NARX) as a mathematical model of a steam turbine rotor for controlling steam turbine stress on-line. In order to obtain neural networks that locate critical stress and temperature points in the steam turbine during transient states, an FE rotor model was built. This model was used to train the neural networks on the basis of steam turbine transient operating data. The training included nonlinearity related to steam turbine expansion, heat exchange and rotor material properties during transients. Simultaneous neural networks are algorithms which can be implemented on PLC controllers. This allows for the application neural networks to control steam turbine stress in industrial power plants.

  9. 11. Power room, view of Westinghouse steam turbine: turbine RPM6,000, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Power room, view of Westinghouse steam turbine: turbine RPM-6,000, governor RPM-1017, turbine number 8695, manufactured by Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing company, East Pittsburg, Pennsylvania - Norfolk Manufacturing Company Cotton Mill, 90 Milton Street, Dedham, Norfolk County, MA

  10. 20. BASE OF STEAM TURBINE NO. 1 UNDER CONSTRUCTION, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. BASE OF STEAM TURBINE NO. 1 UNDER CONSTRUCTION, SHOWING WORTHINGTON CONDENSER IN PLACE. April 14, 1941 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, Paul W.; Bannister, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    A gas turbine system in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas.

  12. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, P.W.; Bannister, R.L.

    1995-07-11

    A gas turbine system is described in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas. 4 figs.

  13. Flow studies in a wet steam turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. H.; Pouchot, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    The design and test results of a four stage wet vapor turbine operating with slightly superheated inlet steam and expanding to 10% exit moisture are presented. High speed movies at 3000 frames per second of liquid movement on the pressure side and along the trailing edge of the last stator blade are discussed along with back lighted photographs of moisture drops as they were torn from the stator blade trailing edge. Movies at lower framing rates were also taken of the exit of the last rotating blade and the casing moisture removal slot located in line with the rotor blade shroud. Also moisture removal data are presented of casing slot removal at the exit of the third and fourth rotor blades and for slots located in the trailing edge of the last stator blade. Finally, the degradation of turbine thermodynamic performance due to condensation formation and movement is discussed.

  14. Cogeneration steam turbines for combined-cycle installations of 170 230 MW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinberg, G. D.; Valamin, A. E.; Kogan, P. V.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.

    2008-06-01

    Design specifics, principal thermal schemes, and efficiency of cogeneration steam turbines operating as part of combined-cycle installations are considered. These turbines are developed on the basis of serially manufactured steam turbines of ZAO Ural Turbine Works.

  15. 2D-simulation of wet steam flow in a steam turbine with spontaneous condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lan-Xin; Zheng, Qun; Liu, Shun-Long

    2007-06-01

    Removal of condensates from wet steam flow in the last stages of steam turbines significantly promotes stage efficiency and prevents erosion of rotors. In this paper, homogeneous spontaneous condensation in transonic steam flow in the 2-D rotor-tip section of a stage turbine is investigated. Calculated results agree with experimental data reasonably well. On the basis of the above work, a 2-D numerical simulation of wet steam flow in adjacent root sections of a complex steam turbine stage was carried out. Computational results were analyzed and provide insights into effective removal of humidity.

  16. Single pressure steam bottoming cycle for gas turbines combined cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Zervos, N.

    1990-01-30

    This patent describes a process for recapturing waste heat from the exhaust of a gas turbine to drive a high pressure-high temperature steam turbine and a low pressure steam turbine. It comprises: delivering the exhaust of the gas turbine to the hot side of an economizer-reheater apparatus; delivering a heated stream of feedwater and recycled condensate through the cold side of the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus to elevate the temperature below the pinch point of the boiler; delivering the discharge from the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine through the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus; driving the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine with the discharge stream of feedwater and recycled condensate which is heated to a temperature below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus; and driving the low pressure steam turbine with the discharged stream of the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine reheated below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus.

  17. 22. STEAM PLANT TURBINE DECK FROM SOUTH END OF BUILDING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. STEAM PLANT TURBINE DECK FROM SOUTH END OF BUILDING, SHOWING TOPS OF DIESEL ENGINES AT FAR NORTH END, PRIOR TO INSTALLATION OF STEAM UNIT NO. 4. Ca. 1948 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Geothermal noncondensable gas removal from turbine inlet steam

    SciTech Connect

    Coury, G.; Guillen, H.V.; Cruz, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    Noncondensable gas (NCG), which is always present in geothermal steam, causes power plant inefficiencies that result in increased steam consumption and higher plant costs. In many steam fields over the world, the NCG content exceeds 5%w in the steam, a level at which steam consumption and costs increase rapidly as a function of the NCG concentration. Steam rates increase as the NCG level rises because of two factors. First, the steam jet ejectors and vacuum pumps that evacuate NCG from the turbine-condenser require more steam and electric power for their operation. Second, higher gas levels lead to a higher condenser pressure (that is, a higher turbine outlet pressure), thus yielding a lower power output per unit of steam feeding the turbine. The increased steam rate leads to higher costs for steam field development. Cooling water consumption also increases per unit of net power output when the NCG level increases, mainly due to the added cooling needs of the inter and after condensers within the vacuum system. Thus, costs of the cooling water system, and parasitic power losses within the circulating pump and tower fans, will also increase. These problems can be alleviated when a reboiler system is used for steam cleaning--that is, the reboiler system removes NCG from steam upstream of the turbine. This is accomplished with a simple, standard heat exchanger (the reboiler) within which geothermal steam is condensed and its NCG components are discharged. The heat of condensation is used to produce NCG-free steam by evaporation of clean water. The source of clean water is the same condensate recovered from condensing steam. The reboiler system design and operation is described, and then applied to the Botong geothermal plant on Luzon in the Philippines. The reduction in steam rate and cooling water usage is summarized.

  19. Features of steam turbine cooling by the example of an SKR-100 turbine for supercritical steam parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkadyev, B. A.

    2015-10-01

    Basic principles of cooling of high-temperature steam turbines and constructive solutions used for development of the world's first cooled steam turbine SKR-100 (R-100-300) are described. Principal differences between the thermodynamic properties of cooling medium in the steam and gas turbines and the preference of making flow passes of cooled cylinders of steam turbines as reactive are shown. Some of its operation results and their conclusions are given. This turbine with a power of 100 MW, initial steam parameters approximately 30 MPa and 650°C, and back pressure 3 MPa was made by a Kharkov turbine plant in 1961 and ran successfully at a Kashira GRES (state district power plant) up to 1979, when it was taken out of use in a still fully operating condition. For comparison, some data on construction features and operation results of the super-high pressure cylinder of steam turbines of American Philo 6 (made by General Electric Co.) and Eddystone 1 (made by Westinghouse Co.) power generating units, which are close to the SKR-100 turbine by design initial steam parameters and the implementation time, are given. The high operational reliability and effectiveness of the cooling system that was used in the super-high pressure cylinder of the SKR-100 turbine of the power-generating unit, which were demonstrated in operation, confirms rightfulness and expediency of principles and constructive solutions laid at its development. As process steam temperatures are increased, the realization of the proposed approach to cooling of multistage turbines makes it possible to limit for large turbine parts the application of new, more expensive high-temperature materials, which are required for making steam boilers, and, in some cases, to do completely away with their utilization.

  20. Improvement of the designs of steam turbines produced by the ZAO ural turbine works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. E.; Ivanovskii, A. A.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present fundamentally new design solutions aimed at making the steam turbines produced by the ZAO Ural Turbine Works more reliable, economically efficient, maneuverable, and suitable for massscale production.

  1. Steam turbine development for advanced combined cycle power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oeynhausen, H.; Bergmann, D.; Balling, L.; Termuehlen, H.

    1996-12-31

    For advanced combined cycle power plants, the proper selection of steam turbine models is required to achieve optimal performance. The advancements in gas turbine technology must be followed by advances in the combined cycle steam turbine design. On the other hand, building low-cost gas turbines and steam turbines is desired which, however, can only be justified if no compromise is made in regard to their performance. The standard design concept of two-casing single-flow turbines seems to be the right choice for most of the present and future applications worldwide. Only for very specific applications it might be justified to select another design concept as a more suitable option.

  2. Variable speed, condensing steam turbine and power system

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.A.

    1980-09-30

    The variable speed condensing steam turbine is a simplified and effective steam expander which is built mainly of simple, lowcost sheet metal parts and is designed to provide a variable speed/torque output range. The turbine concept is based on the past tesla turbine principle of equally spaced rotor discs to provide a long helical path for steam expansion with high operating efficiency and minimum friction. Unlike the cylindrical tesla turbine this unit is in conical form with uniformly varying diameter discs used to provide a variable speed/torque power output range. A further purpose of having a uniform conical housing and uniformly increasing diameter discs is to achieve maximum steam expansion which will lead to rapid steam condensation, or a precondensation condition for the expended steam passing through the conical turbine. A fuel conservation feature of the condensing turbine is a provision for separating hydrogen gas from a portion of the expanded/expended steam which will be conducted to the external fuel burner of the vapor generator, as part of the complete power system.

  3. BOILER HOUSE AND STEAM TURBINE STATION (SOUTHERN DIVISION). PHOTOCOPY FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILER HOUSE AND STEAM TURBINE STATION (SOUTHERN DIVISION). PHOTOCOPY FROM c. 1910 VIEW LOOKING EAST. From the collection of the Manchester Historic Association, Manchester, N. H. - Amoskeag Millyard, Canal Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  4. Looking south at boiler feedwater pumps (steam turbine pump on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking south at boiler feedwater pumps (steam turbine pump on left, electric motor pump on right). - Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation, Allenport Works, Boiler House, Route 88 on West bank of Monongahela River, Allenport, Washington County, PA

  5. NORTHERN DIVISION BOILER HOUSE AND STEAM TURBINE STATION. PHOTOCOPY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERN DIVISION BOILER HOUSE AND STEAM TURBINE STATION. PHOTOCOPY OF 1909 VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST. From the collection of the Manchester Historic Association, Manchester, N. H. - Amoskeag Millyard, Canal Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  6. Fatigue damage of steam turbine shaft at asynchronous connections of turbine generator to electrical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovsunovsky, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    The investigations of cracks growth in the fractured turbine rotors point out at theirs fatigue nature. The main reason of turbine shafts fatigue damage is theirs periodical startups which are typical for steam turbines. Each startup of a turbine is accompanied by the connection of turbine generator to electrical network. During the connection because of the phase shift between the vector of electromotive force of turbine generator and the vector of supply-line voltage the short-term but powerful reactive shaft torque arises. This torque causes torsional vibrations and fatigue damage of turbine shafts of different intensity. Based on the 3D finite element model of turbine shaft of the steam turbine K-200-130 and the mechanical properties of rotor steel there was estimated the fatigue damage of the shaft at its torsional vibrations arising as a result of connection of turbine generator to electric network.

  7. Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Tip Fact Sheet No.21

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    Steam turbines are well suited as prime movers for driving boiler feedwater pumps, forced or induced-draft fans, blowers, air compressors, and other rotating equipment. This service generally calls for a backpressure non-condensing steam turbine. The low-pressure steam turbine exhaust is available for feedwater heating, preheating of deaerator makeup water, and/or process requirements.

  8. EPRI research related to the steam turbine generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lansing, N.

    1983-11-01

    This document summarizes current EPRI work related to steam turbine-generators (ST-G's) in terms of individual research activities. It was prepared for the EPRI Steam-Turbine Generator Coordinating Committee to provide a guide to these activities primarily for the benefit of utilities as well as others concerned with ST-G's. Generally, the summaries describe the status of the work as of December 31, 1982, but some status descriptions are more recent.

  9. Steam turbine stress control using NARX neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominiczak, Krzysztof; Rzadkowski, Romuald; Radulski, Wojciech

    2015-11-01

    Considered here is concept of steam turbine stress control, which is based on Nonlinear AutoRegressive neural networks with eXogenous inputs. Using NARX neural networks,whichwere trained based on experimentally validated FE model allows to control stresses in protected thickwalled steam turbine element with FE model quality. Additionally NARX neural network, which were trained base on FE model, includes: nonlinearity of steam expansion in turbine steam path during transients, nonlinearity of heat exchange inside the turbine during transients and nonlinearity of material properties during transients. In this article NARX neural networks stress controls is shown as an example of HP rotor of 18K390 turbine. HP part thermodynamic model as well as heat exchange model in vicinity of HP rotor,whichwere used in FE model of the HP rotor and the HP rotor FE model itself were validated based on experimental data for real turbine transient events. In such a way it is ensured that NARX neural network behave as real HP rotor during steam turbine transient events.

  10. Closed circuit steam cooled turbine shroud and method for steam cooling turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Sexton, Brendan Francis; Kellock, Iain Robertson

    2002-01-01

    A turbine shroud cooling cavity is partitioned to define a plurality of cooling chambers for sequentially receiving cooling steam and impingement cooling of the radially inner wall of the shoud. An impingement baffle is provided in each cooling chamber for receiving the cooling media from a cooling media inlet in the case of the first chamber or from the immediately upstream chamber in the case of the second through fourth chambers and includes a plurality of impingement holes for effecting the impingement cooling of the shroud inner wall.

  11. Infrared applications for steam turbine condenser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanius, Mark A.

    2000-03-01

    Infrared inspection of the main steam condensers at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station has been utilized successfully in detecting condenser air in-leakage problems. Air in-leakage lowers the condenser's vacuum, thus decreasing the condenser's efficiency. This creates backpressure on the turbine which lowers its efficiency, resulting in fewer megawatts generated. Air in-leakage also creates an increase in off-gas flow which is a radiological concern for both the plant and the public. Inspections are normally performed on the condenser's manway covers and rupture disks prior to an outage during coast down and post outage. The optimum conditions are 100% power and temperature, however, a high radiation field prevents the inspection until reactor power is down to 65% or less. Anomalies are typically indicated by cooling in the effected areas of the air in-leakage. The anomalies are not limited to air in-leakage. Intermittent water out-leakage, due to a heater dump valve cycling, has been detected when visual inspections field nothing.

  12. Experimental investigation of the steam wetness in a 1000 MW steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovratník, Michal; Bartoš, Ondřej

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the experimental data of the wetness distribution obtained in the year 2015 in front of and behind the last stage of the 1000MW steam turbine in the power plant Temelín. Two different optical probes developed at Czech Technical University were used. For the first time in the Czech Republic pneumatic and optical measurement of the wet steam flow field in front of the last stage of a nuclear power-station steam turbine was provided. This unique measurement opportunity provided lots of new information for the manufacturer and operator of the steam turbine and valuable experimental data for the phase transition modelling in the wet steam flow. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  13. Steam turbine control valve for cyclic duty

    SciTech Connect

    Dawawala, S.K.; La Coste, B.L.

    1987-07-14

    This patent describes a turbine control valve comprising: a body having a cavity with an elongated generally round first opening on one side. The first opening has a circumferential sealing surface adjacent. A generally round second opening with a valve seat disposes on a side opposite the first opening, and a third opening for admitting steam to the cavity; a valve plug which mates with the valve seat to close off the second opening; a bonnet having a generally cylindrical portion with an integral flange on one end of the cylindrical portion, the flange has a circumferential seal surface which mates with the circumferential sealing surface adjacent the first opening; the bonnet has a centrally disposed bore extending with two counter bores inwardly from the end without the flange; the first counter bore is long and terminates with a large fillet radius; the second counter bore is sufficiently deep to receive the plug and also terminates with a fillet radius. The cylindrical portion has a first raised land on the outer surface adjacent the flange and a second raised land on the outer surface and spaced from the first land and the first raised land is larger in diameter than the second raised land. A plug guide is slidably disposed in the hardened sleeve and on the valve stem and affixed to the valve plug so that the sliding motion between the valve stem and the plug guide is small; the valve plug has a centrally disposed port extending which cooperates with the valve stem to provide means for reducing the force required to remove the plug from the seat to form a control valve operable for cyclic duty where large temperature changes occur at the plug.

  14. Alloys for advanced steam turbines--Oxidation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-10-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. Current research on the oxidation of candidate materials for advanced steam turbines is presented with a focus on a methodology for estimating chromium evaporation rates from protective chromia scales. The high velocities and pressures of advanced steam turbines lead to evaporation predictions as high as 5 × 10-8 kg m-2s-1 of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760°C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.077 mm per year of solid Cr loss.

  15. Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Salamah, Samir A.; DeStefano, Thomas Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

  16. Steam turbine high pressure vent and seal system

    SciTech Connect

    Groenendaal, J.C. Jr.; Brown, B.

    1987-04-28

    A steam turbine is described comprising: an outer cylinder; an inner cylinder disposed within the outer cylinder; a blade ring disposed partially within the inner cylinder and partially within the outer cylinder; a nozzle chamber assembly disposed within the inner cylinder for introducing motive steam to the turbine and having nozzle chamber and nozzle block portions; a rotor having circular array of rotatable blades and a thrust balance piston disposed thereon; a dummy ring disposed within one end of the inner cylinder adjacent the balance piston; labyrinth sealing means disposed between the dummy ring and the balance piston forming a rotating seal.

  17. Biomass-gasifer steam-injected gas turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.D.; Williams, R.H. . Center for Energy and Environmental Studies)

    1990-04-01

    Steam injection for power and efficiency augmentation in aeroderivative gas turbines is now commercially established for natural gas-fired cogeneration. Steam-injected gas turbines fired with coal and biomass are being developed. In terms of efficiency, capital cost, and commercial viability, the most promising was to fuel steam-injected gas turbines with biomass is via the biomass-integrated gasifier/steam-injected gas turbine (BIG/STIG). The R and D effort required to commercialize the Big/STIG is modest because it can build on extensive previous coal-integrated gasifier/gas turbine development efforts. An economic analysis of BIG/STIG cogeneration is presented for cane sugar factories, where sugar cane residues would be the fuel. A BIG/STIG investment would be attractive for sugar producers, who could sell large quantities of electricity, or for the local electric utility, as a low-cost generating option. Worldwide, the cane sugar industry could support some 50,000 MW of BIG/STIG capacity, and there are many potential applications in the forest products and other biomass-based industries.

  18. A model for liquid film in steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Amelie; Marcelet, Meryem; Herard, Jean-Marc; Dorey, Jean-Marc; Lance, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Wetness in steam turbines induces losses and erosion. Drops are created due to the fast expansion of the steam (homogeneous nucleation) and the impurities in the steam (heterogeneous nucleation). The droplets grow and some among them settle on the blade leading to a thin liquid film. This film may then be atomized into coarse water drops which crash on the following blades. The liquid film configuration is a thin film on a curved surface, created by the drop deposit and under high steam friction. In steam turbines, the liquid film is subject to high rotational effect (rotor) and/or to negative gravity. Moreover, due to interfacial instabilities, some drops are torn off from the film. The retained approach is an integral formulation of the Navier-Stokes equation (or shallow water equation) with specific terms. The derivation of these equations requires some closure laws for the convection contributions, the Coriolis terms and for terms related to the additional mass coming from the drops deposit. Once chosen, mathematical and mechanical analyses are performed (hyperbolicity, entropy, galilean and rotational invariance). A two-dimensional code has been developed based on finite volume method to simulate numerically this liquid film model for steam turbines.

  19. Steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works for combined-cycle plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinberg, G. D.; Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Linder, T. Yu.

    2009-09-01

    Matters concerned with selecting the equipment for combined-cycle plants within the framework of work on implementing the investment program of Russian power engineering are discussed. The proposals of ZAO Ural Turbine Works regarding the supplies of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants used at retrofitted and newly constructed power stations are described.

  20. The modern overspeed protection system for steam turbines of the ZAO Ural Turbine Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, V. B.; Shekhter, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    Approaches that the specialists of the ZAO Ural Turbine Works use in constructing and organizing the steam turbine protection system as part of the electrohydraulic control system are presented. The design and structural features of the system and its main advantages are described.

  1. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines. However, to quantify steam as a coolant, there exists practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  2. 13. VIEW OF WESTINGHOUSE STEAM TURBINE. 1500 kilowatt (max kw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF WESTINGHOUSE STEAM TURBINE. 1500 kilowatt (max kw 1875). AC Westinghouse generator (1875 KVA, 2400 volts, 450 amps, 3 phase, 60 cycles). - Juniata Shops, Power Plant & Boiler House, East of Fourth Avenue at Second Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  3. Design with constructal theory: Steam generators, turbines and heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Sung

    This dissertation shows that the architecture of steam generators, steam turbines and heat exchangers for power plants can be predicted on the basis of the constructal law. According to constructal theory, the flow architecture emerges such that it provides progressively greater access to its currents. Each chapter shows how constructal theory guides the generation of designs in pursuit of higher performance. Chapter two shows the tube diameters, the number of riser tubes, the water circulation rate and the rate of steam production are determined by maximizing the heat transfer rate from hot gases to riser tubes and minimizing the global flow resistance under the fixed volume constraint. Chapter three shows how the optimal spacing between adjacent tubes, the number of tubes for the downcomer and the riser and the location of the flow reversal for the continuous steam generator are determined by the intersection of asymptotes method, and by minimizing the flow resistance under the fixed volume constraints. Chapter four shows that the mass inventory for steam turbines can be distributed between high pressure and low pressure turbines such that the global performance of the power plant is maximal under the total mass constraint. Chapter five presents the more general configuration of a two-stream heat exchanger with forced convection of the hot side and natural circulation on the cold side. Chapter six demonstrates that segmenting a tube with condensation on the outer surface leads to a smaller thermal resistance, and generates design criteria for the performance of multi-tube designs.

  4. Life Assessment of Steam Turbine Components Based on Viscoplastic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo-Sung; Fleury, Eric; Kim, Bum-Shin; Hyun, Jung-Seob

    Unsteady thermal and mechanical loading in turbine components is caused due to the transient regimes arising during start-ups and shut-downs and due to changes in the operating regime in steam power plants; this results in nonuniform strain and stress distribution. Thus, an accurate knowledge of the stresses caused by various loading conditions is required to ensure the integrity and to ensure an accurate life assessment of the components of a turbine. Although the materials of the components of the steam turbine deform inelastically at a high temperature, currently, only elastic calculations are performed for safety and simplicity. Numerous models have been proposed to describe the viscoplastic (time-dependent) behavior; these models are rather elaborate and it is difficult to incorporate them into a finite element code in order to simulate the loading of complex structures. In this paper, the total lifetime of the components of a steam turbine was calculated by combining the viscoplastic constitutive equation with the ABAQUS finite element code. Viscoplastic analysis was conducted by focusing mainly on simplified constitutive equations with linear kinematic hardening, which is simple enough to be used effectively in computer simulation. The von Mises stress distribution of an HIP turbine rotor was calculated during the cold start-up operation of the rotor, and a reasonable number of cycles were obtained from the equation of Langer.

  5. Some problems of steam turbine lifetime assessment and extension

    SciTech Connect

    Berlyand, V.; Pozhidaev, A.; Glyadya, A.; Plotkin, E.; Avrutsky, G.; Leyzerovich, A.

    1999-11-01

    The problems of lifetime assessment and extension in reference to power equipment (including high-temperature rotors and casings of power steam turbines) and theoretical and normative grounds for these procedures, as well as some specific measures to prolong the turbine service time and diagnose the turbine components` conditions in the operation process, were covered in many published works, including the authors` ones. The present paper is to consider in more details some aspects of these problems that have not been sufficiently considered in known publications. In particular, it seems important to dwell on experimental verification of some mathematical models for calculating temperatures, stresses, and strains in the turbine casings on the basis of direct measurements at turbines in service. Another item to be discussed ia an approach to choosing the system of interrelated criteria and safety factors referring to the upper admissible values of stresses, strains, cycles, and accumulated damage, as well as crack resistance, as applied to an adopted conception of the limiting states for the rotors and casings with taking into consideration their loads and resulted stress-strain states. In this connection, it is important to arrange and use properly the continuous monitoring of temperatures, stresses, and accumulated metal damage to assess the residual lifetime of the rotors and casings more accurately. Certain design, technology, and repair measures are briefly described. They have successfully been employed at fossil power plants of the former Soviet Union to raise the steam turbine reliability and durability.

  6. Some matters concerned with selecting steam parameters and process-circuit solutions to optimize the parameters of steam turbine equipment and engineering design developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Stepanov, M. Yu.; Polyaeva, E. N.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility and advantages of increasing steam pressure in the steam-turbine low-pressure loop for combined-cycle power plants are considered. The question about the advisability of developing and manufacturing steam turbines for being used in combined-cycle power units equipped with modern class F gas turbines for supercritical and ultrasupercritical steam parameters is raised.

  7. Gas turbine row #1 steam cooled vane

    DOEpatents

    Cunha, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    A design for a vane segment having a closed-loop steam cooling system is provided. The vane segment comprises an outer shroud, an inner shroud and an airfoil, each component having a target surface on the inside surface of its walls. A plurality of rectangular waffle structures are provided on the target surface to enhance heat transfer between each component and cooling steam. Channel systems are provided in the shrouds to improve the flow of steam through the shrouds. Insert legs located in cavities in the airfoil are also provided. Each insert leg comprises outer channels located on a perimeter of the leg, each outer channel having an outer wall and impingement holes on the outer wall for producing impingement jets of cooling steam to contact the airfoil's target surface. Each insert leg further comprises a plurality of substantially rectangular-shaped ribs located on the outer wall and a plurality of openings located between outer channels of the leg to minimize cross flow degradation.

  8. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  9. Superalloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines--oxidation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2008-09-01

    Goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so called ultra-supercritical (USC) steam conditions. One of the important materials performance considerations is steam-side oxidation resistance. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism under USC conditions. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales with cylindrical geometries was developed that allows for the effects of CrO2(OH)2 saturation within the gas phase. This approach was combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles as a function of exposure time and to predict the time until the alloy surface concentration of Cr reaches zero. This time is a rough prediction of the time until breakaway oxidation. A hypothetical superheater tube, steam pipe, and high pressure turbine steam path was examined. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. The predicted time until breakaway oxidation increases dramatically with decreases in temperature and total pressure. Possible mitigation techniques were discussed, including those used in solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects (lowering the activity of Cr in the oxide scale by adding Mn to the alloy), and thermal barrier coating use on high pressure turbine blades for both erosion and chromia evaporation protection.

  10. Bore tube assembly for steam cooling a turbine rotor

    SciTech Connect

    DeStefano, Thomas Daniel; Wilson, Ian David

    2002-01-01

    An axial bore tube assembly for a turbine is provided to supply cooling steam to hot gas components of the turbine wheels and return the spent cooling steam. A pair of inner and outer tubes define a steam supply passage concentric about an inner return passage. The forward ends of the tubes communicate with an end cap assembly having sets of peripheral holes communicating with first and second sets of radial tubes whereby cooling steam from the concentric passage is supplied through the end cap holes to radial tubes for cooling the buckets and return steam from the buckets is provided through the second set of radial tubes through a second set of openings of the end cap into the coaxial return passage. A radial-to-axial flow transitioning device, including anti-swirling vanes is provided in the end cap. A strut ring adjacent the aft end of the bore tube assembly permits axial and radial thermal expansion of the inner tube relative to the outer tube.

  11. Open-Cycle Gas Turbine/Steam Turbine Combined Cycles with synthetic fuels from coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. P.; Corman, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The Open-Cycle Gas Turbine/Steam Turbine Combined Cycle can be an effective energy conversion system for converting coal to electricity. The intermediate step in this energy conversion process is to convert the coal into a fuel acceptable to a gas turbine. This can be accomplished by producing a synthetic gas or liquid, and by removing, in the fuel conversion step, the elements in the fuel that would be harmful to the environment if combusted. In this paper, two open-cycle gas turbine combined systems are evaluated: one employing an integrated low-Btu gasifier, and one utilizing a semi-clean liquid fuel. A consistent technical/economic information base is developed for these two systems, and is compared with a reference steam plant burning coal directly in a conventional furnace.

  12. Oxidation of alloys targeted for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-03-12

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  13. Vibration reliability of steam-turbine unit supporting elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esperov, D. G.

    2013-02-01

    The effect of such factors as design of friction bearings, operational misalignments of shaft system supports, and degraded stiffness of the support system on the vibration reliability of steam turbine support elements is analyzed. The analysis is carried out using the data obtained from investigations of full-scale friction bearings performed on test rigs, as well as from tests and measurements performed at operating power stations in Russia and abroad.

  14. Compatibility of gas turbine materials with steam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, V.; Tamboli, D.; Patel, Y.

    1995-10-01

    Gas turbines had been traditionally used for peak load plants and remote locations as they offer advantage of low installation costs and quick start up time. Their use as a base load generator had not been feasible owing to their poor efficiency. However, with the advent of gas turbines based combined cycle plants (CCPs), continued advances in efficiency are being made. Coupled with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions, coal compatibility and higher unit output, gas turbines are now competing with conventional power plants for base load power generation. Currently, the turbines are designed with TIT of 2300{degrees}F and metal temperatures are maintained around 1700{degrees}F by using air cooling. New higher efficiency ATS turbines will have TIT as high as 2700{degrees}F. To withstand this high temperature improved materials, coatings, and advances in cooling system and design are warranted. Development of advanced materials with better capabilities specifically for land base applications are time consuming and may not be available by ATS time frame or may prove costly for the first generation ATS gas turbines. Therefore improvement in the cooling system of hot components, which can take place in a relatively shorter time frame, is important. One way to improve cooling efficiency is to use better cooling agent. Steam as an alternate cooling agent offers attractive advantages because of its higher specific heat (almost twice that of air) and lower viscosity.

  15. Steam sterilization of air turbine dental handpieces.

    PubMed

    Edwardsson, S; Svensäter, G; Birkhed, D

    1983-12-01

    The efficacy of autoclaving high-speed dental handpieces was tested in two types of downward displacement steam sterilizers (instrument autoclaves), commonly used in the dentist's office. Eight series of experiments were performed with various sterilization schedules. Lubrication oils with or without antimicrobial agent were used in four of the series. Each handpiece was inoculated with 1 ml of a suspension containing equal amounts of saliva and spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus (approx. 10(6) spores/ml). Neither sterilization at 120-124 degrees C for 20 min nor at 134-136 degrees C for 10 min resulted in complete inactivation of the spores in series in which the instruments were tested without oil or with oil containing no antimicrobial agent. However, when the handpieces were lubricated with oil containing isopropanol and formaldehyde and the schedule 134-136 degrees C/10 min was used, no growth was observed. The results indicate that instrument autoclaves with built-in programs of 120-124 degrees C/20 min and 134-136 degrees C/10 min could have insufficient capacity to sterilize lubricated or unlubricated dental handpieces. The use of oils containing an antimicrobial agent can overcome this problem. PMID:6362319

  16. New ferritic steels increase the thermal efficiency of steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.H.; Bakker, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    The further development of ferritic high-temperature-resistant 9--11%Cr steels has paved the way for fossil-fired power stations to be operated at turbine steam inlet temperatures of up to around 600 C and high supercritical steam pressures with a distinct improvement in thermal efficiency, a significant contribution towards reducing the environmental impact of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} emissions and to a more economical utilization of fossil fuels. Advances in the development of these steels are primarily attributable to joint research projects undertaken by the manufacturers and operators of power stations in Japan (EPDC), in the USA (EPRI) and in Europe (COST 501). The report gives details on the results achieved under EPRI Research Project RP 140 3-15/23 on the creep behavior of modified 9%CrMo cast steel used in the manufacture of steam turbines for coal-fired power plants. The modified 9%CrMo cast steel also offers great benefits as regards improving the useful life and thermal efficiency of existing power plants.

  17. Laser hardening techniques on steam turbine blade and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Zhang, Qunli; Kong, Fanzhi; Ding, Qingming

    Different laser surface hardening techniques, such as laser alloying and laser solution strengthening were adopted to perform modification treatment on the local region of inset edge for 2Cr13 and 17-4PH steam turbine blades to prolong the life of the blades. The microstructures, microhardness and anti-cavitation properties were investigated on the blades after laser treatment. The hardening mechanism and technique adaptability were researched. Large scale installation practices confirmed that the laser surface modification techniques are safe and reliable, which can improve the properties of blades greatly with advantages of high automation, high quality, little distortion and simple procedure.

  18. Fever of undetermined etiology after cleaning of steam turbine condensers.

    PubMed

    Deubner, D C; Gilliam, D K

    1977-01-01

    Two outbreaks of a febrile syndrome marked by chills, headaches, myalgia, nausea, and malaise occurred in workers who had cleaned the steam condensers of electric power turbines. Mean incubation period was 38 hours. Twenty-two of twenty-three exposed men became ill. Clinical and environmental investigation failed to reveal the etiology of the outbreaks. The circumstances and clinical syndrome have points of similarity to fever following inhalation of metal fumes and low-grade, stained cotton dust, and to Pontiac fever. PMID:869594

  19. Arabelle: The most powerful steam turbine in the world

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarque, F.; Deloroix, V.

    1998-07-01

    On the 30th of August 1996 at the CHOOZ power station in the Ardennes, the first 1,500 MW turbine was started up under nuclear steam and connected to the grid. It will reach full power in the spring of 1997, followed shortly afterwards by a second identical machine. This turbine, known as ARABELLE, is currently the most powerful in the world, with a single line rotating at 1,500 rpm. It has been entirely designed, manufactured and installed by the teams of GEC ALSTHOM, within the framework of the Electricite de France N4 PWR program. It represents a new type of nuclear turbine, the fruit of much research and development work which started in the 1980s. It benefits from GEC ALSTHOM's considerable experience in the field of nuclear turbines: 143 machines with a total power output of 100,000 MW and more than ten million hours of operation. It should be remembered that the first 1,000 MW unit for a PWR plant was connected at Fessenheim in 1977, and since then the different EDF plants have been equipped with 58 GEC ALSTHOM turbines, ranging from 1,000 MW to 1,350 MW, this providing the company with a vast amount of information. The process which led to a new design for ARABELLE was based on: Feedback of service experience from previous machines; this provides precious learning material with a view to improving the performance of operating equipment. Research and development work resulting in significant technical advances which could then be integrated into the design of a new generation of turbines. Taking account of the major concerns of the customer-user: Electricite de France (EDF): Improved reliability and operating availability, increased efficiency, reduced investment and maintenance costs.

  20. The cogeneration steam turbine of the Tp-35/40-8.8 type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. Ye.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Goldberg, A. A.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Shekhter, M. V.; Paneque Aguilera, H. C.; Stepanov, M. Yu.; Shibaev, T. L.

    2012-12-01

    The main performance characteristics of the turbine, descriptions of the electrohydraulic control and protection system (EHCPS), the heat flow diagram, arrangement decisions, and motivation for selecting them, are given. The steam turbine presented by the Ural Turbine Works (UTW) is intended for replacing the VPT-25 turbine the service life of which has already expired at the Novokuybyshevsk CHP plant. The mixed-pressure turbine will operate in combination of the double-circuit heat recovery boiler (HRB) in a parallel scheme. High-pressure (HP) steam will be supplied from the main steam header to which high-pressure steam from the power boilers and the HRB will be fed, while low-pressure (LP) steam will be supplied directly from the HRB. For the turbine, nozzle steam distribution and the two-row control stage are adopted. The turbine has a process steam extraction line with its stop and control valve and heating steam extraction line leading to the main steam collector.

  1. Next Generation Engineered Materials for Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Arrell

    2006-05-31

    To reduce the effect of global warming on our climate, the levels of CO{sub 2} emissions should be reduced. One way to do this is to increase the efficiency of electricity production from fossil fuels. This will in turn reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} emissions for a given power output. Using US practice for efficiency calculations, then a move from a typical US plant running at 37% efficiency to a 760 C /38.5 MPa (1400 F/5580 psi) plant running at 48% efficiency would reduce CO2 emissions by 170kg/MW.hr or 25%. This report presents a literature review and roadmap for the materials development required to produce a 760 C (1400 F) / 38.5MPa (5580 psi) steam turbine without use of cooling steam to reduce the material temperature. The report reviews the materials solutions available for operation in components exposed to temperatures in the range of 600 to 760 C, i.e. above the current range of operating conditions for today's turbines. A roadmap of the timescale and approximate cost for carrying out the required development is also included. The nano-structured austenitic alloy CF8C+ was investigated during the program, and the mechanical behavior of this alloy is presented and discussed as an illustration of the potential benefits available from nano-control of the material structure.

  2. Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, R.; Hawk, J.; Schwant, R.; Saha, D.; Totemeier, T.; Goodstine, S.; McNally, M.; Allen, D. B.; Purgert, Robert

    2009-06-30

    The Ultrasupercritical (USC) Steam Turbine Materials Development Program is sponsored and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office, through grants to Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO), a non-profit organization contracted to manage and direct the project. The program is co-funded by the General Electric Company, Alstom Power, Siemens Power Generation (formerly Siemens Westinghouse), and the Electric Power Research Institute, each organization having subcontracted with EIO and contributing teams of personnel to perform the requisite research. The program is focused on identifying, evaluating, and qualifying advanced alloys for utilization in coal-fired power plants that need to withstand steam turbine operating conditions up to 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi). For these conditions, components exposed to the highest temperatures and stresses will need to be constructed from nickel-based alloys with higher elevated temperature strength than the highchromium ferritic steels currently used in today's high-temperature steam turbines. In addition to the strength requirements, these alloys must also be weldable and resistant to environmental effects such as steam oxidation and solid particle erosion. In the present project, candidate materials with the required creep strength at desired temperatures have been identified. Coatings that can resist oxidation and solid particle erosion have also been identified. The ability to perform dissimilar welds between nickel base alloys and ferritic steels have been demonstrated, and the properties of the welds have been evaluated. Results of this three-year study that was completed in 2009 are described in this final report. Additional work is being planned and will commence in 2009. The specific objectives of the future studies will include conducting more detailed evaluations of the weld-ability, mechanical properties and repair-ability of the selected candidate alloys for rotors, casings

  3. Thermosyphon Method for Cooling the Rotor Blades of High-Temperature Steam Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, Alexander R.; Temnikova, Elena Yu.

    2016-02-01

    The design scheme of closed two-phase thermosyphon were suggested that can provide standard thermal operation of blades of high-temperature steam turbine. The method for thermosyphon calculation is developed. The example of thermal calculation was implemented, it showed that to cool the steam turbine blades at their heating by high-temperature steam, the heat can be removed in the rear part of the blades by air with the temperature of about 440°C.

  4. Steam Oxidation and Chromia Evaporation in Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers and Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon H. Holcomb

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s goals include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so-called ultra-supercritical (USC) conditions. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales was developed and combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles and to predict the time until breakaway oxidation. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. Alloy additions such as Ti may allow for a reduction in evaporation rate with time, mitigating the deleterious effects of chromia evaporation.

  5. Technical and economic analysis of steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Eric D.; Williams, Robert H.

    1985-11-01

    Industrial cogeneration is gaining popularity as an energy and money saving alternative to separate steam and electricity generation. Among cogeneration technologies, gas-turbine systems are attractive largely because of their lower capital cost and high thermodynamic efficiency. However, at industrial plants where steam and electricity loads vary daily, seasonally, or unpredictably, the economics of conventional gas turbines are often unfavorable due to low capacity utilization. Steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration overcomes the part-load problem by providing for excess steam to be injected back into the turbine to raise electrical output and generating efficiency. Under provisions of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act, any excess electricity can be sold to the local grid at the prevailing avoided cost of electricity. Steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration can result in a consistently high rate of return on investment over a wide range of variation in process steam loads. Moreover, this technology can also give rise to greater annual electricity production and fuel savings per unit of process steam generated, compared to simple-cycle cogeneration, making the technology attractive from the perspective of society, as well as that of the user. Steam-injected gas-turbines may soon find applications in electric utility base-load generation, as well, since it appears that electrical generating efficiencies in excess of 50% can be obtained from turbines producing of the order of 100 MW of electricity at a fully-installed capital cost as low as 500/kW.

  6. External combustion steam injected gas turbine for cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, P.; Ford, D.; Meher-Homji, C.; Dixon, A.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation of a Texaco entrained-bed coal-gasifier-fueled advanced (2400/sup 0/F) gas turbine and heat-recovery steam turbine combined-cycle design analyzed the alternative control strategies during load-following maneuvers. Boyce Engineering studied the transient operation of this gasification/combined-cycle (GCC) plant to determine open-loop response as a stand-alone plant, as well as closed-loop response while functioning in a large interconnected utility network during specified operating contingencies. A cold-gas clean-up train with a Selexol physical absorption system removed up to 90% of the H/sub 2/S in the raw fuel gas produced from high-sulfur Illinois coal. Control was satisfactory in either gasifier-lead or turbine-lead mode. Supplemental fuel-gas storage was not required, but GCC plant fuel-gas pressure control to minimize pressure transients at the absorber column is recommended. In simulations, the GCC plant responded well and local controllers adequately maintained the GCC plant operation during typical variations in electric power demand and every emergency upset.

  7. Microfabricated rankine cycle steam turbine for power generation and methods of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frechette, Luc (Inventor); Muller, Norbert (Inventor); Lee, Changgu (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, an integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip has been provided. The integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip of the present invention comprises a miniature electric power generation system fabricated using silicon microfabrication technology and lithographic patterning. The present invention converts heat to electricity by implementing a thermodynamic power cycle on a chip. The steam turbine power plant on-a-chip generally comprises a turbine, a pump, an electric generator, an evaporator, and a condenser. The turbine is formed by a rotatable, disk-shaped rotor having a plurality of rotor blades disposed thereon and a plurality of stator blades. The plurality of stator blades are interdigitated with the plurality of rotor blades to form the turbine. The generator is driven by the turbine and converts mechanical energy into electrical energy.

  8. Effect of Gas/Steam Turbine Inlet Temperatures on Combined Cycle Having Air Transpiration Cooled Gas Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, O.

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide efforts are being made for further improving the gas/steam combined cycle performance by having better blade cooling technology in topping cycle and enhanced heat recovery in bottoming cycle. The scope of improvement is possible through turbines having higher turbine inlet temperatures (TITs) of both gas turbine and steam turbine. Literature review shows that a combined cycle with transpiration cooled gas turbine has not been analyzed with varying gas/steam TITs. In view of above the present study has been undertaken for thermodynamic study of gas/steam combined cycle with respect to variation in TIT in both topping and bottoming cycles, for air transpiration cooled gas turbine. The performance of combined cycle with dual pressure heat recovery steam generator has been evaluated for different cycle pressure ratios (CPRs) varying from 11 to 23 and the selection diagrams presented for TIT varying from 1,600 to 1,900 K. Both the cycle efficiency and specific work increase with TIT for each pressure ratio. For each TIT there exists an optimum pressure ratio for cycle efficiency and specific work. For the CPR of 23 the best cycle performance is seen at a TIT of 1,900 K for maximum steam temperature of 570 °C, which gives the cycle efficiency of 60.9 % with net specific work of 909 kJ/kg.

  9. Technical and economic analysis of steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.D.; Williams, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Industrial cogeneration is gaining popularity as an energy and money saving alternative to separate steam and electricity generation. Among cogeneration technologies, gas-turbine systems are attractive largely because of their lower capital cost and high thermodynamic efficiency. However, at industrial plants where steam and electricity loads vary daily, seasonally, or unpredictably, the economics of conventional gas turbines are often unfavorable due to low capacity utilization. Steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration overcomes the part-load problem by providing for excess steam to be injected back into the turbine to raise electrical output and generating efficiency. Under provisions of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act, any excess electricity can be sold to the local grid at the prevailing avoided cost of electricity. Steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration can result in a consistently high rate of return on investment over a wide range of variation in process steam loads. Moreover, this technology can also give rise to greater annual electricity production and fuel savings per unit of process steam generated, compared to simple-cycle cogeneration, making the technology attractive form the perspective of society, as well as that of the user. Steam-injected gas-turbines may soon find applications in electric utility base-load generation. 39 references, 13 figures, 2 tables.

  10. An outbreak of acute fever among steam turbine condenser cleaners.

    PubMed

    Lauderdale, J F; Johnson, C C

    1983-03-01

    Ten of twelve men who participated in the cleaning of an electric power steam turbine condenser clogged with freshwater sponge experienced an acute febrile illness. Two similar outbreaks have been previously described, one of which has been attributed to the Legionnaires' Disease bacterium. Epidemiologic studies of this case showed a syndrome very similar to the two previously reported episodes. However, the exact etiology for this outbreak has not been identified. Environmental sampling was not initiated until after the cleaning was completed. Subsequent testing did not reveal any likely cause for the outbreak. The delayed onset of symptoms and the nature of the illness pointed to an infectious agent. In the absence of any suitable criteria for employee exposure evaluation, it is suggested that crews cleaning condensers under unusually dirty conditions, especially if eye or respiratory symptoms are reported, should be provided with respiratory protection. PMID:6846141

  11. A new steel for single cylinder steam turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Tsuda, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A new steel, 2.25%Cr1.7%NiMoVNbW steel has been developed for the high pressure (HP)-low pressure (LP) single cylinder steam turbine rotor in combined power plants and medium/small rating thermal power plants. This steel has good creep rupture strength equivalent to that of 1%CrMoV steel which has been used as HP rotor fogings and excellent toughness and proof stress considerably superior to the conventional HP-LP single cylinder rotor steels. This paper includes the following contents: The optimization of chemical composition and heat treatment condition; the production and evaluation of a 70 tons trial rotor forging by the application of VCD (Vacuum Carbon Deoxidation) process; the production and evaluation of a 43 tons trial ingot by the application of ESR (Electroslag Remelting) ingot process; and the production and evaluation of rotor forgings for the commercial power plant.

  12. Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam and water-cooled gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the performance of air, steam, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205 C (2200 F), resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4 percent, when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1675 C (3050 F) and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683 C (3062 F) and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6 percent by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1730 C (3150 F) and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205 C (2200 F). The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

  13. Assessment of steam-injected gas turbine systems and their potential application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Results were arrived at by utilizing and expanding on information presented in the literature. The results were analyzed and compared with those for simple gas turbine and combined cycles for both utility power generation and industrial cogeneration applications. The efficiency and specific power of simple gas turbine cycles can be increased as much as 30 and 50 percent, respectively, by the injection of steam into the combustor. Steam-injected gas turbines appear to be economically competitive with both simple gas turbine and combined cycles for small, clean-fuel-fired utility power generation and industrial cogeneration applications. For large powerplants with integrated coal gasifiers, the economic advantages appear to be marginal.

  14. PORST: a computer code to analyze the performance of retrofitted steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Hwang, I.T.

    1980-09-01

    The computer code PORST was developed to analyze the performance of a retrofitted steam turbine that is converted from a single generating to a cogenerating unit for purposes of district heating. Two retrofit schemes are considered: one converts a condensing turbine to a backpressure unit; the other allows the crossover extraction of steam between turbine cylinders. The code can analyze the performance of a turbine operating at: (1) valve-wide-open condition before retrofit, (2) partial load before retrofit, (3) valve-wide-open after retrofit, and (4) partial load after retrofit.

  15. Experience gained with development of steam turbine projects with the use of standardized modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Stepanov, M. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    The possibilities of decreasing the amount of work required for preparing manufacture of the equipment of gas-turbine, boiler, and steam-turbine units in the design and technological respects through the use of standardized components are pointed out. In parallel with this, a fewer number of design and technological errors is achieved, due to which better quality of the products is obtained. The need to develop a series of standard equipment sizes used in the composition of a combined-cycle power plant is considered. Examples of designing a steam turbine using well-elaborated and proven components together with new ones required according to the turbine operating conditions are given.

  16. Development and application of steam turbines with advanced HLP single-cylinder rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, A.; Tsuda, Y.; Suzuki, M.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, the Gas Turbine capacity has been increased step by step to improve initial cost of the Gas turbine and plant efficiency as well as to improve cycle conditions that is, temperature, pressure and cycle. In accordance with this improvement, the steam turbine capacity has been increased gradually in combined-cycle plants. In this application, the steam turbine became larger and the steam turbine is generally equipped with multiple rotors. When the rotor forging with a good combination of creep rupture strength in the HP section and toughness in the LP section is available, the steam turbine can be designed as a single rotor, instead of multiple rotors, which makes the steam turbine to be compact and to be simple. The authors have already developed an HLP rotor forging (first generation), which has been applied to turbine rotors of units having capacities up to around 100 MW with a last stage blade (LSB) of a maximum 26 inch (660 mm) class. Recently, the advanced HLP rotor forging has been developed, which can be applied to longer LSBs of 42 inch (1070 mm) for 50 Hz machines, and 40 inch (1016 mm) for 60 Hz machines. As a result of the development, the steam turbines of 100 to 250 MW capacity in thermal power plants and advanced combined-cycle plants can be made more compact through this single-cylinder design. This paper describes development and application of the steam turbine with the advanced HLP rotor for advanced combined-cycle plants as well as for conventional thermal plants.

  17. 120. View inside power house showing 1929 AllisChalmers steam turbine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. View inside power house showing 1929 Allis-Chalmers steam turbine with engine housing removed; control panel in background. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. 121. Close up view of 1929 AllisChalmers steam turbine with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. Close up view of 1929 Allis-Chalmers steam turbine with engine housing removed. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Process-circuit and layout solutions for steam-turbine units and performance efficiency of thermal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gol'dberg, A. A.; Shibaev, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Criteria for evaluating process-circuit and layout solutions adopted in designing steam-turbine units are presented together with their values for a number of steam-turbine units produced by the Ural Turbine Works. The presented values of the criteria are recommended for being used as tentative ones in designing new thermal power plants or in upgrading them with the use of steam turbine units operating both as basic power installations and as part of combined-cycle power plants. The influence of process-circuit and layout solutions adopted for steam-turbine units on the effectiveness of thermal power plant construction and plant performance efficiency is shown.

  20. A hypothetical profile of ordinary steam turbines with reduced cost and enhanced reliability for contemporary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Leyzerovich, A.S.

    1998-12-31

    Power steam turbines should be characterized with the reduced cost and enhanced reliability and designed on the basis of experience in steam turbine design and operation accumulated in the world`s practice for the latest years. Currently, such turbines have to be particularly matched with requirements of operation for deregulated power systems; so they should be capable of operating in both base-load and cycling modes. It seems reasonable to have such turbines with the single capacity about 250--400 MW, supercritical main steam pressure, and single steam reheat. This makes it possible to design such turbines with the minimum specific metal amount and length, with the integrated HP-IP and one two-flow LP cylinders. With existing ferritic and martensitic-class steels, the main and reheat steam temperatures can be chosen at the level of 565--580 C (1050--1075 F) without remarkable supplemental expenditures and a sacrifice of reliability. To reduce the capital cost and simplify operation and maintenance, the turbine`s regenerative system can be designed deaeratorless with motor-driven boiler-feed pumps. Such turbines could be used to replace existing old turbines with minimum expenditures. They can also be combined with large high-temperature gas-turbine sets to shape highly efficient combined-cycle units. There exist various design and technological decisions to enhance the turbine reliability and efficiency; they are well worked up and verified in long-term operation practice of different countries. For reliable and efficient operation, the turbine should be furnished with advanced automatic and automated control, diagnostic monitoring, and informative support for the operational personnel.

  1. Experimental investigation on flow in diffuser of 1090 MW steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoznedl, Michal; Sedlák, Kamil; Mrózek, Lukáš; Bednář, Lukáš; Kalista, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with flow of wet water steam in diffuser of turbine engine 1090 MW on saturated water steam. Experimental measurements were done while the turbine was in operation for a wide range of outputs. Defining the outlet velocity from the last stage and with knowledge of static pressures on the diffuser outlet, it is possible to define the contribution of the diffuser to the whole low pressure part efficiency.

  2. Effect of steam addition on cycle performance of simple and recuperated gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for the cycle efficiency and specific power of simple and recuperated gas turbine cycles in which steam is generated and used to increase turbine flow. Calculations showed significant improvements in cycle efficiency and specific power by adding steam. The calculations were made using component efficiencies and loss assumptions typical of stationary powerplants. These results are presented for a range of operating temperatures and pressures. Relative heat exchanger size and the water use rate are also examined.

  3. Study of advanced radial outflow turbine for solar steam Rankine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C.; Kolenc, T.

    1979-01-01

    The performance characteristics of various steam Rankine engine configurations for solar electric power generation were investigated. A radial outflow steam turbine was investigated to determine: (1) a method for predicting performance from experimental data; (2) the flexibility of a single design with regard to power output and pressure ratio; and (3) the effect of varying the number of turbine stages. All turbine designs were restricted to be compatible with commercially available gearboxes and generators. A study of several operating methods and control schemes for the steam Rankine engine shows that from an efficiency and control simplicity standpoint, the best approach is to hold turbine inlet temperature constant, vary turbine inlet pressure to match load, and allow condenser temperature to float maintaining constant heat rejection load.

  4. The influence of external cooling system on the performance of supercritical steam turbine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosman, Wojciech

    2010-09-01

    The problem presented in this paper refers to the concepts applied to the design of supercritical steam turbines. The issue under the investigation is the presence of a cooling system. Cooling systems aim to protect the main components of the turbines against overheating. However the cooling flows mix with the main flow and modify the expansion line in the steam path. This affects the expansion process in the turbine and changes the performance when compared to the uncooled turbine. The analysis described here investigates the range of the influence of the cooling system on the turbine cycle. This influence is measured mainly through the change of the power generation efficiency. The paper explains the approach towards the assessment of the cooling effects and presents results of the modeling for three supercritical steam cycles.

  5. Evaluation of Rotordynamic Stability of a Steam Turbine Due to Labyrinth Seal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Toshio; Sasaki, Takashi; Sakakida, Hitoshi; Uchida, Tatsuro; Tsutsui, Masaji; Ikeda, Kazunori

    This paper describes the evaluation of unstable vibration caused by the seal force, which is known as "Steam Whirl" in a steam turbine. Stability of a steam turbine is evaluated by complex eigenvalue analysis of rotordynamics model considering the dynamics of seals, rotor, bearings and pedestals. A commercial CFD program is employed to estimate the dynamic coefficients of labyrinth seal. The labyrinth seal of a large scales steam turbine is taken as an object of analysis and a 3D model with eccentric rotor is solved to obtain the rotordynamic force components. The rotordynamic force is derived by integrating the pressure on the rotor surface. Evaluation formula is formed from the results of numerical calculation, which is used to predict the dynamic coefficient of each seal in a steam turbine. Then rotordynamics model of total system including seal is constructed and stability is evaluated by complex eigenvalue analysis. This procedure is applied to the design of steam turbines and enables the optimization of the turbine structure considering the efficiency and stability.

  6. Flow Characteristics Analysis of Widows' Creek Type Control Valve for Steam Turbine Control

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Yong H.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    The steam turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in the power conversion system of fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the steam turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the steam turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate of steam entering the steam turbine through valves and nozzles. Thus, it is very important to control the steam mass flow rate for the load following operation of power plants. Among various valves that control the steam turbine, the control valve is most significant. The steam flow rate is determined by the area formed by the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. While the ideal control valve linearly controls the steam mass flow rate with its stem lift, the real control valve has various flow characteristic curves pursuant to the stem lift type. Thus, flow characteristic curves are needed to precisely design the control valves manufactured for the operating conditions of nuclear power plants. OMEGA (Optimized Multidimensional Experiment Geometric Apparatus) was built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected for reference. Air was selected as the working fluid in the OMEGA loop to exclude the condensation effect in this simplified approach. Flow characteristic curves were plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate of the air. The flow characteristic curves are expected to be utilized to accurately design and operate the control valve for fossil as well as nuclear plants. (authors)

  7. Methods for disassembling, replacing and assembling parts of a steam cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian D.; Wesorick, Ronald R.

    2002-01-01

    The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows. The bore tube assembly, radial tubes, elbows, manifold segments and crossover tubes are removable from the turbine rotor and replaceable.

  8. Analyzing the influence exerted by individual components of wetness losses on the efficiency of steam turbine stage and compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, G. A.; Gribin, V. G.; Avetisyan, A. R.; Lisyanskii, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    The influence exerted by dispersed moisture on the economic efficiency of steam turbine stages and compartments operating in the wet steam region is analyzed. A procedure for generalizing experimental data is proposed that was used for analyzing the previously published results of experiments on determining the influence of different loss components on the efficiency of steam turbine stages and compartments. The influence of coarsely dispersed moisture on the turbine efficiency indicators is shown.

  9. A Computer Program for Simulating Transient Behavior in Steam Turbine Stage Pressure of AHWR

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Anu; Thangamani, I.; Chakraborty, G.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-07-01

    It is proposed to couple the Advanced Heavy water reactor (AHWR), which is being developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, with a desalination plant. The objective of this coupling is to produce system make-up and domestic water. The proposed desalination plant needs about 1.9 kg/sec of steam and the minimum pressure requirement is 3 bars. The desalination plant can be fed with bled steam extracted from a suitable stage in low pressure turbine. As the turbine stage pressure changes with the load, it is essential to know the availability of bled steam at aforesaid pressure for various load condition. The objective of the present study is to identify a suitable extraction point so as to ensure availability of steam at desired condition for desalination plant, even at part load conditions. In order to fulfill the above objective a steam and feed system analysis code was developed which incorporates the mathematical formulation of different components of the steam and feed system such as, high pressure (HP) and low pressure (LP) turbines, re-heater, feed heaters etc. The dynamic equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the stage pressure at various load conditions. Based on the results obtained, the suitable extraction stage in LP turbine was selected. This enables to determine the lowest possible part load operation up to which availability of desalination plant could be ensured. (authors)

  10. Steam wetness measurement using CCD imaging methods in low-pressure turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Qin, Shiqiao; Huang, Zhuqing; Wang, Xingshu; Hu, Chunsheng

    2010-11-01

    The steam flow in low-pressure turbine contained abundant water droplets, which will decrease the work efficiency and pose potential threaten to operation safety, so measurement of steam wetness has brought great interest in electricity generation industry. In this paper, a new measuring method using CCD (Charge Coupled Device) imaging technique was proposed to determine the wetness in steam turbine based on the forward small angle light scattering theory. A simulated steam turbine facility was designed to generate the wet steam, and light scattering experiments were carried out at various working conditions in this device. The steam wetness parameters and droplet size distribution were obtained by means of numerical inversion of the light intensity distribution based on Mie scattering theory. The results demonstrate that the obtained data from the present analysis is in good agreement with the results of the theory analysis and previous study, and the proposed method is proved to be suitable for steam wetness measuring and monitoring by further development.

  11. The T-125/150-12.8 cogeneration steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Gol'dberg, A. A.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Bilan, V. N.; Stepanov, M. Yu.; Polyaeva, E. N.; Shekhter, M. V.; Shibaev, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the design, the economic indicators, and the main solutions on the thermal process circuit and layout of the T-125/150-12.8 turbine, a new design version of the T-100-12.8 turbine, which is one of the best known, unique and widely used cogeneration turbines in Russia and abroad. The project of the new turbine is supposed to be used both for renovating and upgrading already installed turbines of the T-100 family and for supplying it as a full set for replacing obsolete equipment or constructing new one.

  12. An investigation of nucleating flows of steam in a cascade of turbine blading

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtar, F.; Webb, R.A. . School of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering); Shojaee-Fard, M.H. ); Siraj, M.A. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    During the course of expansion in turbines steam first supercools and than nucleates to become a wet mixture. To reproduce turbine nucleating conditions realistically requires a supply of supercooled vapor. This can be achieved under blow-down conditions and an experimental facility for such studies has been constructed. The results of the first experimental investigation of nucleating flows of steam in a cascade of nozzle blading using the equipment are presented. The experimental results presented consist of surface pressure measurements, Mach-Zehnder and shadow photography. Comparisons with theoretical solutions show reasonable agreement.

  13. Optimized Application of MSR and Steam Turbine Retrofits in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Crossland, Robert; McCoach, John; Gagelin, Jean-Philippe

    2004-07-01

    The benefit to a nuclear power plant from a steam turbine retrofit has often been clearly demonstrated in recent years but, for light water nuclear plants, the Moisture Separator Reheaters (MSRs) are also of prime importance. This paper describes how refurbishment of these crucial components can only provide full potential performance benefit when made in conjunction with a steam turbine retrofit (although in practice these activities are frequently separated). Examples are given to show how combined application is best handled within a single organization to ensure optimized integration into the thermal cycle. (authors)

  14. The series of siemens SST-200 to SST-900 steam turbines in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilov, V. F.

    2015-04-01

    The chronology of cooperation between the transnational German concern Siemens and Russia is given. The designs of the SST-200-SST-900 series of industrial steam turbines for electrical capacities ranging from 10 to 180 MW that were installed at thermal power plants and industrial facilities of Russia in the period 2004-2014 are reviewed. The design features of the SST-600 steam turbine used as part of the PGU-200 combined-cycle plant installed at the Southwest cogeneration station are considered.

  15. An expert system-based, on-line rotor crack monitor for utility steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibel, J.R. ); Iman, I.; Ebben, T.G. . Corporate Research and Development Center); Blomgren, R. )

    1989-01-01

    A steam turbine vibration monitoring system is described that uses a rule-based expert system for data review and fault diagnosis. Steady-state, coast-down, and steam temperature transient vibration signature techniques used by the monitor to detect transverse rotor cracks are summarized. A histogram technique for enhancing the initial appearance of shallow crack 2/rev response is presented. The use of an expert system to fully automate diagnosis of turbine faults is discussed. Rotor crack and misalignment diagnostic rules are outlined.

  16. R and D for improved efficiency small steam turbines. Phase II. Second quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The detailed design of a radial inflow steam turbine (RIT) comprised of two radial inflow turbine stages driving a common bull gear/output shaft designed for rated speeds of 70,000 rpm and 52,500 rpm, respectively, is described. Details are presented on: aerodynamic design; high speed rotors; high speed rotor bearings; high speed rotor sealing; gearing; output shaft; static structure; and predicted performance. (MCW)

  17. Modernization of exhaust hoods of low-pressure sections of steam turbines manufactured by the Ural Turbine Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaltdinov, A. A.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Ryabchikov, A. Yu.; Evdokimov, S. Yu.; Sergach, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    Issues of modernizing the current exhaust hoods of low-pressure sections for steam turbines manufactured by the Ural Turbine Works and designing new ones with the use of modern methods of computational fluid dynamics (ANSYS CFX) are considered. A flow in the exhaust hood is simulated numerically. Verification of obtained data is performed. The use of the finite volume method allowed the three-dimensional flow in the exhaust hood of turbines of the T-100 series to be analyzed and a simple variant for improvement of its characteristics to be developed. The project data on the novel design of the exhaust hood for the T-125/150-12.8 turbine are given.

  18. Steam supply system for superposed turbine and process chamber, such as coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Menger, W.M.

    1986-08-26

    A steam supply system is described for a process chamber consuming superheated steam at a pressure of about 600 psi or below which is driven by a boiler operating at a pressure of about 2000 psi, a pressure range above that needed by the process chamber for also driving a superposed turbine. The system consists of: (a) a high pressure boiler feed pump for supplying highly purified water to the boiler; (b) a condensing reboiler connected to receive steam from the superposed turbine in a high pressure side; (c) the condensing reboiler also having a low pressure side, essentially isolated from fluid contact with the high pressure side, for receiving water for use in the lower operating pressure steam processes; (d) the condensing reboiler further comprising integral superheating means for heating the water received in the low pressure side into superheated low pressure steam with the steam received in the high pressure side; (e) means for conveying fluid from the high pressure side of the condensing reboiler to the boiler feed pump; and (f) means for conveying the low pressure superheated steam from the condensing reboiler to the process chamber.

  19. Thermodynamic evaluation of the possibility to increase cogeneration turbine efficiency by using a heat pump operating with steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenin, V. M.; Datsenko, V. V.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kosoi, A. S.; Sinkevich, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    Cogeneration turbines operate in different operation modes that considerably differ as to the working process conditions. In summer time, when heat demand is minimal, almost all steam flow passes through all turbine stages and enters into the condenser (condensing mode of operation). When heat supply is needed, the steam bleed-offs are used. The several last stages of the turbine (low-pressure part—LPP) have a control diaphragm at the inlet. When the heat supply is large, the diaphragm is maximally closed, and the entire steam flow, with an exception for a minimal ventilation flow is delivered to the steam bleed-offs (cogeneration mode). LPP flow path is designed for the optimal operation in the condensing mode. While running in cogeneration mode, the LPP operating conditions are far from optimal. Depending on the ventilation steam flow rate and outlet pressure, the LPP power can drop to zero or even become negative (ventilation mode). It is proposed to control an outlet steam pressure by using the heat pump that operates with steam. The heat pump energy consumption can be compensated and even exceeded by optimizing the steam expansion process in LPP. In this respect, operating conditions of cogeneration turbine LPPs during the cold season are analyzed. A brief description of a heat pump operating with steam is made. The possibility of increasing cogeneration turbine efficiency by using a steam heat pump is shown.

  20. Assessment of steam work efficiency as applied to a turbine being designed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astvatsaturova, A. A.; Zorin, V. M.; Trukhnii, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Formulas for evaluating the relative internal efficiencies of turbines that have not been designed as yet are given in many publications. Such assessments are required at the first stages of development and calculation of the thermal process circuit of a new steam turbine unit. The above-mentioned formulas are given without indicating the author's name, particular initial material, and evaluation accuracy. To give an answer on these questions, the relevant publications were analyzed, and the results from calculations of relative internal efficiencies carried out using the published formulas and obtained from the hs diagrams of already designed turbines are compared. It is determined that Professor B.M. Troyanovskii, a well-known scientist specializing in turbines, is the author of these formulas. It is shown that these formulas give the "upper" (the best) estimate of efficiency. Formulas having the same structure as those of Troyanovskii but yielding a mean estimate with respect to already designed turbines are proposed. The results from the performed comparison are aimed at helping the developers of thermal process circuits for new steam turbine units to select the values of relative internal efficiencies of the cylinders for a turbine that has not been designed as yet.

  1. Increasing reliability of system water heaters for steam-turbine installations at the design stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezgin, V. I.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Brezgin, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    A system for designing water heaters of steam-turbine installations based on uniting standards, reference information, and some numerical procedures with design procedures via wide use of parameterization is considered. The developed design system is based on extensive application of modern information technologies.

  2. Nonpneumonic, short-incubation-period Legionellosis (Pontiac fever) in men who cleaned a steam turbine condenser.

    PubMed

    Fraser, D W; Deubner, D C; Hill, D L; Gilliam, D K

    1979-08-17

    Pontiac fever affected ten men who had cleaned a steam turbine condenser with compressed air. Previous epidemics of Pontiac fever and Legionnaires' disease--both caused by Legionella Pneumophila (proposed sp. nov.)--involved "airborne spread" from air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers. Aerosols of contaminated water in heat-rejection systems appear to be important sources of epidemic legionellosis. PMID:462175

  3. The Steam Turbine: Technical Terminology Bulletin. Terminotech, Vol. 2, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co. of Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Quebec.

    This issue of a bulletin of technological terminology is devoted to the steam turbine. A brief narrative on the subject is presented in both French and English. An English-French dictionary of terms comprises the bulk of the document. Explanatory illustrations are appended. (JB)

  4. Development of a procedure for substantiating replacement terms for the condenser tubes of steam turbine installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Ryabchikov, A. Yu.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Loginov, M. I.

    2013-08-01

    Results obtained from elaboration of a procedure for estimating replacement terms for the condenser tube systems of steam turbine installations are presented. Censored data processing methods are used in performing statistical assessment of replacement terms. The service life of condenser tubes blanked off in the course of turbine operation is assumed to be known (complete operation time), and that for tubes blanked off during the turbine repair process is assumed to be undetermined (censored operation time). The criterion for estimating the replacement term for a condenser tube system is defined as the ratio between the number of tubes blanked off during a repair and in the course of turbine operation. The procedure is validated by the results from a study on analyzing the damageability of tubes made of different materials for the condensers of 11 turbines with capacities ranging from 25 to 500 MW.

  5. Test results of a steam injected gas turbine to increase power and thermal efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Messerlie, R.L.; Tischler, A.O.

    1983-08-01

    The desire to increase both power and thermal efficiency of the gas turbine (Brayton cycle) engine has been pursued for a number of years and has involved many approaches. The use of steam in the cycle to improve performance has been proposed by various investigators. This was most recently proposed by International Power Technology, Inc. (IPT) and has been tested by Detroit Diesel Allison (DDA), Division of General Motors. This approach, identified as the Cheng dual-fluid cycle (Cheng/DFC), includes the generation of steam using heat from the exhaust, and injecting this steam into the engine combustion chamber. Test results on an Allison 501-KB engine have demonstrated that use of this concept will increase the thermal efficiency of the engine by 30% and the output power by 60% with no increase in turbine inlet temperature. These results will be discussed, as will the impact of steam rate, location of steam injection, turbine temperature, and engine operational characteristics on the performance of the Cheng/DFC.

  6. A computationally efficient and accurate numerical representation of thermodynamic properties of steam and water for computations of non-equilibrium condensing steam flow in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubý, Jan

    2012-04-01

    Mathematical modeling of the non-equilibrium condensing transonic steam flow in the complex 3D geometry of a steam turbine is a demanding problem both concerning the physical concepts and the required computational power. Available accurate formulations of steam properties IAPWS-95 and IAPWS-IF97 require much computation time. For this reason, the modelers often accept the unrealistic ideal-gas behavior. Here we present a computation scheme based on a piecewise, thermodynamically consistent representation of the IAPWS-95 formulation. Density and internal energy are chosen as independent variables to avoid variable transformations and iterations. On the contrary to the previous Tabular Taylor Series Expansion Method, the pressure and temperature are continuous functions of the independent variables, which is a desirable property for the solution of the differential equations of the mass, energy, and momentum conservation for both phases.

  7. Summary of the development of open-cycle gas turbine-steam cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, M.E.; Thompson, A.S.

    1980-09-01

    Combined-cycle plants employing gas turbine cycles superimposed on conventional steam plants are well developed. Nearly 200 units are operating in the US on clean fuels (natural gas or distillate fuel oils) and giving overall thermal efficiencies as high as 42%. Future plants will have to use coal or coal-derived fuels, and this presents problems because gas turbines are very sensitive to particulates and contaminants in the fuel such as sulfur, potassium, lead, etc. If clean liquid or high-Btu gaseous fuels are made from coal, it appears that the conversion efficiency will be no more than 67%. Thus, the overall efficiency of utilization of coal would be less than if it were burned in a conventional steam plant unless the permissible gas turbine inlet temperature can be increased to approx. 1500/sup 0/C (2732/sup 0/F). Coupling a combined-cycle power plant directly to a low-Btu coal gasifier increases the fuel conversion efficiency and permits salvaging waste heat from the gasifier for feedwater heating in the steam cycle. By using a gas turbine inlet temperature of 1315/sup 0/C (2400/sup 0/F), well above the current maximum of approx. 1040/sup 0/C (1904/sup 0/F), an overall efficiency of approx. 40% has been estimated for the integrated plant. However, as discussed in companion reports, it is doubtful that operation with gas turbine inlet temperatures above 1100/sup 0/C (2012/sup 0/F) will prove practicable in base-load plants.

  8. Experimental research of flow parameters on the last stage of the steam turbine 1090 MW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlák, Kamil; Hoznedl, Michal; Bednář, Lukáš; Mrózek, Lukáš; Kalista, Robert

    2016-06-01

    This article deals with a brief description of measurement and evaluation of flow parameters at the output from the last stage of the low pressure steam turbine casing for the saturated steam with the nominal power 1090 MW. Measurement was carried out using a seven-hole pneumatic probe traversing along the length of the blade in several peripheral positions under nominal and selected partial modes. The result is knowledge of distribution of the static, dynamic and total pressure along the length of the blade and velocity distribution including their components. This information is the input data for determination of efficiency of the last stage, the loss coefficient of the diffuser and other significant parameters describing efficiency of selected parts of the steam turbine.

  9. Non-contact FBG sensing based steam turbine rotor dynamic balance vibration detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Cai, Lin

    2015-10-01

    This paper has proposed a non-contact vibration sensor based on fiber Bragg grating sensing, and applied to detect vibration of steam turbine rotor dynamic balance experimental platform. The principle of the sensor has been introduced, as well as the experimental analysis; performance of non-contact FBG vibration sensor has been analyzed in the experiment; in addition, turbine rotor dynamic vibration detection system based on eddy current displacement sensor and non-contact FBG vibration sensor have built; finally, compared with results of signals under analysis of the time domain and frequency domain. The analysis of experimental data contrast shows that: the vibration signal analysis of non-contact FBG vibration sensor is basically the same as the result of eddy current displacement sensor; it verified that the sensor can be used for non-contact measurement of steam turbine rotor dynamic balance vibration.

  10. Diagnostic methods of a bladed disc mode shape evaluation used for shrouded blades in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strnad, Jaromir; Liska, Jindrich

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with advanced methods for the evaluation of a bladed disc behavior in terms of the wheel vibration and blade service time consumption. These methods are developed as parts of the noncontact vibration monitoring system of the steam turbine shrouded blades. The proposed methods utilize the time-frequency processing (cross spectra) and the method using least squares to analyse the data from the optical and magnetoresistive sensors, which are mounted in the stator radially above the rotor blades. Fundamentally, the blade vibrations are detected during the blade passages under the sensors and the following signal processing, which covers also the proposed methods, leads to the estimation of the blade residual service life. The prototype system implementing above mentioned techniques was installed into the last stage of the new steam turbine (LP part). The methods for bladed disc mode shape evaluation were successfully verified on the signals, which were obtained during the commission operation of the turbine.

  11. Erosion study of final stage blading of low pressure steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehouve, J.; Nardin, P.; Zeghmati, M.

    1999-04-01

    In order to increase our knowledge of erosion phenomena, the Steam Turbine Groupe (STG) of ALSTOM has been using an erosion test facility in the C.R.T.V. (Centre de Recherche Turbines à Vapeur). This test facility simulates erosion in low pressure steam turbine cylinders in order to compare the erosion resistance of various blade materials (12% chromium steel, titanium alloys, etc.) and their protection (superficial hardening, coatings, etc.). This test facility also allows us to understand the mechanism causing damage at a macroscopic level (impact energy of the droplets and the loss of eroded volume) and at a microscopic level (residual stress and metallurgic analysis) and therefore to determine an evolution law of material surface damage. In this paper, the behaviour of the materials (12% chromium steel and titanium alloys), which has been analysed by image production measurement methods, will be presented according to different impact velocities.

  12. The Life Assessment of Steam Turbine Rotors for Fossil Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sungho; Song, Geewook; Kim, Bumshin; Hyun, Jungseb; Ha, Jeongsoo

    The operational mode of thermal power plants has been changed from base load to duty cycle. From the changeover, fossil power plants cannot avoid frequent thermal transient states, for example, start up and stop, which results in thermal fatigue damage at the heavy section components. The rotor is the highest capital cost component in a steam turbine and requires long outage for replacing with a new one. For an optimized power plant operational life, inspection management of the rotor is necessary. It is known in general that the start-up and shutdown operations greatly affect the steam turbine life. The start-up operational condition is especially severe because of the rapid temperature and rotational speed increase, which causes damage and reduction of life of the main components life of the steam turbine. The start-up stress of a rotor which is directly related to life is composed of thermal and rotational stresses. The thermal stress is due to the variation of steam flow temperature and rotational stress is due to the rotational speed of the turbine. In this paper, the analysis method for the start-up stress of a rotor is proposed, which considers simultaneously temperature and rotational speed transition, and includes a case study regarding a 500MW fossil power plant steam turbine rotor. Also, the method of quantitative damage estimation for fatigue-creep damage to operational conditions, is described. The method can be applied to find weak points for fatigue-creep damage. Using the method, total life consumption can be obtained, and can be also be used for determining future operational modes and life extension of old fossil power units.

  13. Modeling a high output marine steam generator feedwater control system which uses parallel turbine-driven feed pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-Qiang; Zou, Hai; Sun, Jian-Hua

    2008-09-01

    Parallel turbine-driven feedwater pumps are needed when ships travel at high speed. In order to study marine steam generator feedwater control systems which use parallel turbine-driven feed pumps, a mathematical model of marine steam generator feedwater control system was developed which includes mathematical models of two steam generators and parallel turbine-driven feed pumps as well as mathematical models of feedwater pipes and feed regulating valves. The operating condition points of the parallel turbine-driven feed pumps were calculated by the Chebyshev curve fit method. A water level controller for the steam generator and a rotary speed controller for the turbine-driven feed pumps were also included in the model. The accuracy of the mathematical models and their controllers was verified by comparing their results with those from a simulator.

  14. Parametric performance analysis of steam-injected gas turbine with a thermionic-energy-converter-lined combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Y. K.; Burns, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of steam-injected gas turbines having combustors lined with thermionic energy converters (STIG/TEC systems) was analyzed and compared with that of two baseline systems; a steam-injected gas turbine (without a TEC-lined combustor) and a conventional combined gas turbine/steam turbine cycle. Common gas turbine parameters were assumed for all of the systems. Two configurations of the STIG/TEC system were investigated. In both cases, steam produced in an exhaust-heat-recovery boiler cools the TEC collectors. It is then injected into the gas combustion stream and expanded through the gas turbine. The STIG/TEC system combines the advantage of gas turbine steam injection with the conversion of high-temperature combustion heat by TEC's. The addition of TEC's to the baseline steam-injected gas turbine improves both its efficiency and specific power. Depending on system configuration and design parameters, the STIG/TEC system can also achieve higher efficiency and specific power than the baseline combined cycle.

  15. Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten; Muley, Nishant

    2013-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

  16. CTU Optical probes for liquid phase detection in the 1000 MW steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovratník, Michal; Bartoš, Ondřej

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the measurement capacity of a new generation of CTU's optical probes to determine the liquid phase distribution in steam turbines and other energy systems. At the same time the paper presents the first part of the results concerning output wetness achieved through the use of experimental research performed with the probes in a new low pressure (LP) part of the steam turbine 1000MW in the Temelin nuclear power plant (ETE). Two different probes were used. A small size extinction probe with a diameter of 25mm which was developed for measuring in a wider range of turbines in comparison with the previous generation with a diameter of 50mm. The second probe used was a photogrammetric probe developed to observe the coarse droplets. This probe is still under development and this measurement was focused on verifying the capabilities of the probe. The data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of the 1000MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o. (DSP).

  17. Thermoeconomic modeling and parametric study of hybrid SOFC-gas turbine-steam turbine power plants ranging from 1.5 to 10 MWe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsalis, Alexandros

    Detailed thermodynamic, kinetic, geometric, and cost models are developed, implemented, and validated for the synthesis/design and operational analysis of hybrid SOFC-gas turbine-steam turbine systems ranging in size from 1.5 to 10 MWe. The fuel cell model used in this research work is based on a tubular Siemens-Westinghouse-type SOFC, which is integrated with a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) integrated in turn with a steam turbine cycle. The current work considers the possible benefits of using the exhaust gases in a HRSG in order to produce steam which drives a steam turbine for additional power output. Four different steam turbine cycles are considered in this research work: a single-pressure, a dual-pressure, a triple pressure, and a triple pressure with reheat. The models have been developed to function both at design (full load) and off-design (partial load) conditions. In addition, different solid oxide fuel cell sizes are examined to assure a proper selection of SOFC size based on efficiency or cost. The thermoeconomic analysis includes cost functions developed specifically for the different system and component sizes (capacities) analyzed. A parametric study is used to determine the most viable system/component syntheses/designs based on maximizing total system efficiency or minimizing total system life cycle cost.

  18. Control valves and cascades for the first stages of turbines with ultrasupercritical steam parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaryankin, A. E.; Rogalev, N. D.; Rogalev, A. N.; Garanin, I. V.; Osipov, S. K.; Grigoriev, E. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers the problems that will unavoidably be encountered in the creation of new-generation turbines operated at ultrasupercritical initial steam parameters, namely, the development of new control and shutoff valves, the reduction of end energy losses in blade cascades and steam leaks in high-pressure cylinders (HPCs), the elimination of effect produced by regenerative steam bleedoffs on the afterextraction stage, the cooling of a blade cascade, etc. Some possible solutions are given for the two first of the listed problems. The conclusion about the need for the transition to new-generation control valves in the development of new advanced steam turbines with ultrasupercritical initial steam parameters has been made. From the viewpoint of their design, the considered new-generation valves differ from the known contemporary constructions by a shaped axially symmetric confusor channel and perforated zones on the streamlined spool surface and the inlet diffuser saddle part. The analysis of the vibration behavior of new-generation valves has demonstrated a decrease in the dynamic loads acting on their stems. To reduce the end energy losses in nozzle or blade cascades with small aspect ratios, it is proposed to use finned shrouds in the interblade channels. The cross section of fins has a triangular profile, and their height must be comparable with the thickness of the boundary layer in the outlet cross section of a cascade and, provisionally, be smaller than 8% of the cascade chord.

  19. Steam turbine generators -from NC manufacturing to CAD/CAM

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, D.R.; King, F.E.; Kiniskern, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    A program has been designed to integrate engineering, manufacturing, and business systems using a common data base. There has been a significant increase in benefits obtained by extending the automation of the design/drafting function to include manufacturing operations. This extension would have been difficult without the existence of highly developed family-of-parts NC programs. The integration concept has also been applied to turbine buckets and is being extended to other turning-generator components.

  20. A 400-kWe high-efficiency steam turbine for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced state-of-the-art steam turbine-generator developed to serve as the power conversion subsystem for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories' Solar Total-Energy Project (STEP) is described. The turbine-generator, which is designed to provide 400-kW of net electrical power, represents the largest turbine-generator built specifically for commercial solar-powered cogeneration. The controls for the turbine-generator incorporate a multiple, partial-arc entry to provide efficient off-design performance, as well as an extraction control scheme to permit extraction flow regulation while maintaining 110-spsig pressure. Normal turbine operation is achieved while synchronized to a local utility and in a stand-alone mode. In both cases, the turbine-generator features automatic load control as well as remote start-up and shutdown capability. Tests totaling 200 hours were conducted to confirm the integrity of the turbine's mechanical structure and control function. Performance tests resulted in a measured inlet throttle flow of 8,450 pounds per hour, which was near design conditions.

  1. A 400-kWe high-efficiency steam turbine for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, H. M.

    1982-07-01

    An advanced state-of-the-art steam turbine-generator developed to serve as the power conversion subsystem for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories' Solar Total-Energy Project (STEP) is described. The turbine-generator, which is designed to provide 400-kW of net electrical power, represents the largest turbine-generator built specifically for commercial solar-powered cogeneration. The controls for the turbine-generator incorporate a multiple, partial-arc entry to provide efficient off-design performance, as well as an extraction control scheme to permit extraction flow regulation while maintaining 110-spsig pressure. Normal turbine operation is achieved while synchronized to a local utility and in a stand-alone mode. In both cases, the turbine-generator features automatic load control as well as remote start-up and shutdown capability. Tests totaling 200 hours were conducted to confirm the integrity of the turbine's mechanical structure and control function. Performance tests resulted in a measured inlet throttle flow of 8,450 pounds per hour, which was near design conditions.

  2. Gas-turbine engines with increased efficiency of two circuits, due to the use of the utilizing steam-turbine circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, O. N.; Kuznetsov, V. I.

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of significantly increasing the efficiency of the two circuits of a turbojet engine is justified. It is assumed that for this purpose the power of an additional steam turbine will be used, when utilizing heat of exhaust gases in the internal circuit of the gas-turbine engine. The main equations describing the working process have been derived. The parameters of the steam-turbine circuit have been assessed. Calculations for an engine with a thrust of 45-50 t for an aircraft, accommodating 500-800 persons, have been made.

  3. A specialized program for life extension of HP-IP steam turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Salamanca, T.; Monaco, M.C.

    1996-12-31

    Significant cracking in the HP stages of two HP-IP steam turbine rotors required the development of programs to assess the impact of the cracking observed at the seal land surfaces on the integrity of the rotor under daily hot starts. Originally designed for base-load operation, the units ar constrained in their operation by design (minimal steam bypass capability to the condenser) and environmental concerns (noise abatement). Combined with daily starts, these operational constraints subject the HP-IP steam turbine rotors to excessive thermal stresses. A program of analysis, inspection, and plant operation modification has been developed to continue operation of the unit for the least overall cost. This paper covers analysis of the cracking, strategies for its control, and innovative nondestructive ultrasonic inspection techniques used to monitor the condition of the rotor. To minimize inspection time, a unique, computer-based ultrasonic boreside scanning system was used to examine the blade attachment areas with the rotors in place. Five boreside inspections have been conducted with an expansion to include a portion of the IP stages. The overall program has extended by ten years the useful operating life of two turbine units previously recommended for replacement or repair. The cost savings to the utility have been considerable because no replacement rotors were required, repair costs were reduced, and the in-place inspection reduced downtime and disassembly costs. Results of the four-year program are presented in this paper.

  4. Operational diagnostics of thermal state and efficiency of steam turbines of TPP and NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhko, V. V.; Kovalenko, A. N.; Lyapunov, V. M.; Khomenok, L. A.

    2016-05-01

    Various ways for solving complex problems of the strength and operating life of steam turbines of TPP and NPP are studied. Diagnostic characters and technical possibilities for their control during the steam turbine operation are determined. It is shown that the effect of various factors on the reliability, maneuverability, and service life of power installations of TPP and NPP is generally determined by the thermal state of steam-electric generating sets. Leading foreign and domestic manufacturers give major attention to the organization of the control of the thermal state of facilities and the development of systems for accounting ("counter") the service life depletion. Zones of high-temperature sites of shafts and disks with maximum parameters of operating environment are determined. A model for on-line computation of thermal stresses with the diagnostic evaluation of the service life depletion (fatigue accumulation) and forecasting of optimum heating conditions for thermostressed turbine units is briefly stated. An example of a program for diagnostics of the quality of the facility operation is given. The program provides the operative control of thermal stresses and the service life depletion in main units of the turbine under various operation conditions, operates in the real-time mode, calculates and represents currents values of thermal stresses in turbine units, and forms and transmits into the industrial control signals on the occurrence of restrictions with respect to thermal stresses and prohibition of an increase or decrease in the vapor temperature and the load in the case of approaching pressures to maximum permissible ones. In the case of stationary operation conditions, the program computed the current efficiency in high (HPC) and mean (MPC) pressure cylinders.

  5. A high-temperature gas-and-steam turbine plant operating on combined fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, A. V.; Milman, O. O.; Shifrin, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    A high-temperature gas-steam turbine plant (GSTP) for ultrasupercritical steam conditions is proposed based on an analysis of prospects for the development of power engineering around the world and in Russia up to 2040. The performance indicators of a GSTP using steam from a coal-fired boiler with a temperature of 560-620°C with its superheating to 1000-1500°C by firing natural gas with oxygen in a mixingtype steam superheater are analyzed. The thermal process circuit and design of a GSTP for a capacity of 25 MW with the high- and intermediate-pressure high-temperature parts with the total efficiency equal to 51.7% and the natural gas utilization efficiency equal to 64-68% are developed. The principles of designing and the design arrangement of a 300 MW GSTP are developed. The effect of economic parameters (the level and ratio of prices for solid fuel and gas, and capital investments) on the net cost of electric energy is determined. The net cost of electric energy produced by the GSTP is lower than that produced by modern combined-cycle power plants in a wide variation range of these parameters. The components of a high-temperature GSTP the development of which determines the main features of such installations are pointed out: a chamber for combusting natural gas and oxygen in a mixture with steam, a vacuum device for condensing steam with a high content of nondensables, and a control system. The possibility of using domestically available gas turbine technologies for developing the GSTP's intermediate-pressure high-temperature part is pointed out. In regard of its environmental characteristics, the GSTP is more advantageous as compared with modern condensing power plants: it allows a flow of concentrated carbon dioxide to be obtained at its outlet, which can be reclaimed; in addition, this plant requires half as much consumption of fresh water.

  6. Using the CAE technologies of engineering analysis for designing steam turbines at ZAO Ural Turbine Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshumova, V. N.; Kortenko, V. V.; Pokhoriler, V. L.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Ivanovskii, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    We describe the experience ZAO Ural Turbine Works specialists gained from mastering the series of CAD/CAE/CAM/PDM technologies, which are modern software tools of computer-aided engineering. We also present the results obtained from mathematical simulation of the process through which high-and intermediate-pressure rotors are heated for revealing the most thermally stressed zones, as well as the results from mathematical simulation of a new design of turbine cylinder shells for improving the maneuverability of these turbines.

  7. Refining the calculation procedure for estimating the influence of flashing steam in steam turbine heaters on the increase of rotor rotation frequency during rejection of electric load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, V. B.; Shekhter, M. V.

    2012-12-01

    A refined procedure for estimating the effect the flashing of condensate in a steam turbine's regenerative and delivery-water heaters on the increase of rotor rotation frequency during rejection of electric load is presented. The results of calculations carried out according to the proposed procedure as applied to the delivery-water and regenerative heaters of a T-110/120-12.8 turbine are given.

  8. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  9. Control of Steam-Turbine Regulators at Transition to an Island State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi

    2009-01-01

    The simple operating algorithm is presented for steam turbine regulators of type Simadin (Siemens) at emergency switching-off of the generator from system together with some, unknown in advance, load. The given situation is known as "a transition to an island state (regime)". Keeping of turbine speed and preservation of its rating value at a generator blackout when its own needs will be load only, is an easy problem. When the generator remains in its island it is necessary to solve "on-line" two additional problems: to reveal a situation "island" and to estimate the island load for translating a regulator on the new task and providing dynamic stability of transition. The algorithm was tried and entered successfully into practice on Varna TPP, CEZ GROUP (Prague), in 2008.

  10. User's manual for PRESTO: A computer code for the performance of regenerative steam turbine cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Standard turbine cycles for baseload power plants and cycles with such additional features as process steam extraction and induction and feedwater heating by external heat sources may be modeled. Peaking and high back pressure cycles are also included. The code's methodology is to use the expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses to calculate the heat rate and generator output. A general description of the code is given as well as the instructions for input data preparation. Appended are two complete example cases.

  11. Effect of internal elements of the steam turbine exhaust hood on losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoznedl, Michal; Pacák, Aleš; Tajč, Ladislav

    2012-04-01

    The document deals with the flow in the exhaust hood of a single flow steam turbine. The effect of the shape of the external case of the hood and the position and dimensions of the internal reinforcements on the energy loss coefficient is evaluated. Using this coefficient, it is possible to determine the gained or lost output in the diffuser and the entire exhaust hood at a known flow and efficiency of the last stage. Flow research in the exhaust hood was performed especially using numeric simulations; some variants were verified experimentally in the aerodynamic wind tunnel.

  12. Blading designs to improve thermal performance of HP and IP steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Martin, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Improved blade designs are available for high pressure and intermediate pressure steam turbines for increased thermal efficiency. These designs and the technology used to develop and verify them are discussed in this paper. The blading designs include twisted blade designs and full three dimensional designs. Appropriate strategies are discussed for the application of these different types of blading for new and retrofit applications. The market place in the electric energy industry in the United States is changing. The impact of this change on the need for improved blade designs and application strategies for the use of this blading is also discussed.

  13. A high-speed photographic system for flow visualization in a steam turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic system was designed to visualize the moisture flow in a steam turbine. Good performance of the system was verified using dry turbine mockups in which an aerosol spray simulated, in a rough way, the moisture flow in the turbine. Borescopes and fiber-optic light tubes were selected as the general instrumentation approach. High speed motion-picture photographs of the liquid flow over the stator blade surfaces were taken using stroboscopic lighting. Good visualization of the liquid flow was obtained. Still photographs of drops in flight were made using short duration flash sources. Drops with diameters as small as 30 micrometers (0.0012 in.) could be resolved. In addition, motion pictures of a spray of water simulating the spray off the rotor blades and shrouds were taken at normal framing rates. Specially constructed light tubes containing small tungsten-halogen lamps were used. Sixteen millimeter photography was used in all cases. Two potential problems resulting from the two-phase turbine flow (attenuation and scattering of light by the fog present and liquid accumulation on the borescope mirrors) were taken into account in the photographic system design but not evaluated experimentally.

  14. A desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine industrial cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Karvelas, D.E.; Teotia, A.P.S.

    1993-01-01

    An integrated desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine system was evaluated as an industrial cogenerator for the production of electricity and dry, heated air for product drying applications. The desiccant can be regenerated using the heated, compressed air leaving the compressor. The wet stream leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature than when it entered the desiccant regenerator, but with little loss of energy. The wet stream returns to the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine system after preheating by exchanging heat with the turbine exhaust strewn. Therefore, the desiccant is regenerated virtually energy-free. In the proposed system, the moisture-laden air exiting the desiccant is introduced into the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine power system. This paper discusses various possible design configurations, the impact of increased moisture content on the combustion process, the pressure drop across the desiccant regenerator, and the impact of these factors on the overall performance of the integrated system. A preliminary economic analysis including estimated potential energy savings when the system is used in several drying applications, and equipment and operating costs are also presented.

  15. A desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine industrial cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Karvelas, D.E.; Teotia, A.P.S.

    1993-12-31

    An integrated desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine system was evaluated as an industrial cogenerator for the production of electricity and dry, heated air for product drying applications. The desiccant can be regenerated using the heated, compressed air leaving the compressor. The wet stream leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature than when it entered the desiccant regenerator, but with little loss of energy. The wet stream returns to the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine system after preheating by exchanging heat with the turbine exhaust strewn. Therefore, the desiccant is regenerated virtually energy-free. In the proposed system, the moisture-laden air exiting the desiccant is introduced into the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine power system. This paper discusses various possible design configurations, the impact of increased moisture content on the combustion process, the pressure drop across the desiccant regenerator, and the impact of these factors on the overall performance of the integrated system. A preliminary economic analysis including estimated potential energy savings when the system is used in several drying applications, and equipment and operating costs are also presented.

  16. Flutter stability investigation of low-pressure steam turbine bladed disks

    SciTech Connect

    Omprakash, V.; Sarlashkar, A.V.; Lam, T.C.T.; Shuster, L.H.; McCloskey, T.H.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a numerical method to analyze flutter stability of low-pressure steam turbine blading. Any bladed disk normal vibration mode as well as the stage operating condition may be considered. The stability considerations are based on a quasi-steady power-per-vibration-cycle approach. The aerodynamic work per cycle of vibration of a bladed disk mode is calculated form the time integral of the product of the periodic time varying force and the specified harmonic vibration amplitude. The aerodynamic forces are obtained from the pressure distribution database generated from a separate 2-D cascade analysis for compressible inviscid flow for a wide range of flow angles. The method accounts for the kinematic corrections of instantaneous relative flow angle due to the vibratory motion. The non-linear material damping energy of the bladed disk as a function of the vibration amplitude is calculated using Lazan`s power law. The flutter stability is determined by the net power flow to the bladed disk at various amplitudes of vibration. Some results for the last stage of a low pressure steam turbine are presented.

  17. Reliability improvements and modernization of low pressure turbine cylinders for steam-turbine generator power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Aneja, I.K. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the use of 2-D and 3-D finite element analysis to determine the cause of distress in certain components in the low pressure turbines for large power plants. The same finite element models are then used for parametric evaluation of various alternates to increase component fatigue life. Finally, the 3-D finite element model is used for designing a new cylinder which can withstand severe cyclic duty operation requirements and can also be used for modernization of existing old power plants.

  18. Use of encoders to measure the position of servomotors in the electrohydraulic systems for automatic control of steam turbines produced by the ZAO Ural Turbine Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, V. B.

    2011-01-01

    Matters relating to the study and development of a sensor for measuring the position of a steam turbine servomotor constructed using an electrical encoder are considered. A procedure for optimizing the conversion of the servomotor piston's linear motion into the rotating motion of its shaft is presented.

  19. Cooling circuit for steam and air-cooled turbine nozzle stage

    DOEpatents

    Itzel, Gary Michael; Yu, Yufeng

    2002-01-01

    The turbine vane segment includes inner and outer walls with a vane extending therebetween. The vane includes leading and trailing edge cavities and intermediate cavities. An impingement plate is spaced from the outer wall to impingement-cool the outer wall. Post-impingement cooling air flows through holes in the outer wall to form a thin air-cooling film along the outer wall. Cooling air is supplied an insert sleeve with openings in the leading edge cavity for impingement-cooling the leading edge. Holes through the leading edge afford thin-film cooling about the leading edge. Cooling air is provided the trailing edge cavity and passes through holes in the side walls of the vane for thin-film cooling of the trailing edge. Steam flows through a pair of intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling of the side walls. Post-impingement steam flows to the inner wall for impingement-cooling of the inner wall and returns the post-impingement cooling steam through inserts in other intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling the side walls of the vane.

  20. The 15 kW sub e (nominal) solar thermal electric power conversion concept definition study: Steam Rankine turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A study to define the performance and cost characteristics of a solar powered, steam Rankine turbine system located at the focal point of a solar concentrator is presented. A two stage re-entry turbine with reheat between stages, which has an efficiency of 27% at a turbine inlet temperature of 732 C was used. System efficiency was defined as 60 Hertz electrical output divided by absorbed thermal input in the working fluid. Mass production costs were found to be approximately 364 dollars/KW.

  1. Thermo-economic comparative analysis of gas turbine GT10 integrated with air and steam bottoming cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, Daniel; Chmielnak, Tadeusz; Lepszy, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    A thermodynamic and economic analysis of a GT10 gas turbine integrated with the air bottoming cycle is presented. The results are compared to commercially available combined cycle power plants based on the same gas turbine. The systems under analysis have a better chance of competing with steam bottoming cycle configurations in a small range of the power output capacity. The aim of the calculations is to determine the final cost of electricity generated by the gas turbine air bottoming cycle based on a 25 MW GT10 gas turbine with the exhaust gas mass flow rate of about 80 kg/s. The article shows the results of thermodynamic optimization of the selection of the technological structure of gas turbine air bottoming cycle and of a comparative economic analysis. Quantities are determined that have a decisive impact on the considered units profitability and competitiveness compared to the popular technology based on the steam bottoming cycle. The ultimate quantity that can be compared in the calculations is the cost of 1 MWh of electricity. It should be noted that the systems analyzed herein are power plants where electricity is the only generated product. The performed calculations do not take account of any other (potential) revenues from the sale of energy origin certificates. Keywords: Gas turbine air bottoming cycle, Air bottoming cycle, Gas turbine, GT10

  2. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    The Steam Turbine critical stationary structural components are high integrity Large Shell and Valve Casing heavy section Castings, containing high temperature steam under high pressures. Hence to support the development of advanced materials technology for use in an AUSC steam turbine capable of operating with steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F) and 35 Mpa (5000 psia), Casting alloy selection and evaluation of mechanical, metallurgical properties and castability with robust manufacturing methods are mandated. Alloy down select from Phase 1 based on producability criteria and creep rupture properties tested by NETL-Albany and ORNL directed the consortium to investigate cast properties of Haynes 282 and Haynes 263. The goals of Task 4 in Phase 2 are to understand a broader range of mechanical properties, the impact of manufacturing variables on those properties. Scale up the size of heats to production levels to facilitate the understanding of the impact of heat and component weight, on metallurgical and mechanical behavior. GE Power & Water Materials and Processes Engineering for the Phase 2, Task 4.0 Castings work, systematically designed and executed casting material property evaluation, multiple test programs. Starting from 15 lbs. cylinder castings to world’s first 17,000 lbs. poured weight, heavy section large steam turbine partial valve Haynes 282 super alloy casting. This has demonstrated scalability of the material for steam Turbine applications. Activities under Task 4.0, Investigated and characterized various mechanical properties of Cast Haynes 282 and Cast Nimonic 263. The development stages involved were: 1) Small Cast Evaluation: 4 inch diam. Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 Cylinders. This provided effects of liquidus super heat range and first baseline mechanical data on cast versions of conventional vacuum re-melted and forged Ni based super alloys. 2) Step block castings of 300 lbs. and 600 lbs. Haynes 282 from 2 foundry heats were evaluated which

  3. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions.

  4. Influence of Intercept Valves on Control of Multiple Stages Steam Turbines During the Switching into the Island Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laštovka, Ladislav; Hejtmánková, Pavla

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents control of a multiple stages steam turbine which is switched into the island operation. The frequency in an electrical grid is stated on nominal value which is in UCTE grid 50 Hz. When deviation of frequency is higher then 0.2 Hz, the switching of particular steam units into the island operation is only the chance how to maintain the supply of, at least, some small grids. The other possibility how to keep power units in operation, to be prepared for the next synchronization to the grid, is to switch them to operation status in which they supply only their self-consumption. This change of the operating state is the most dynamic load change for the control system of the unit. The multiple stages turbines are equipped with high pressure hydraulic valves for steam turbine governing. Influence of the intercept valve on steam turbine control during the switching process into the island operation is examined in Matlab Simuling software.

  5. An optical technique for characterizing the liquid phase of steam at the exhaust of an LP turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.; Simpson, M.L.; Azar, M.; Young, M.

    1993-06-01

    Optical observation of velocity and size of water droplets in powerplant steam has several applications. These include the determination of steam wetness fraction, mass flow rate, and predicting erosion of turbine blades and pipe elbows. The major advantages of optical techniques are that they do not interfere with the flow or perturb the observation. This paper describes the measurement of the size and velocity of particles based on the observation and analysis of visibility patterns created by backscattered circularly polarized light. The size of latex particles in a dry nitrogen stream was measured in the laboratory. Visibility patterns of water droplets were observed in the low pressure turbine of Unit 6 of Alabama Power`s Gorgas Steam Plant.

  6. A CFD Analysis of Steam Flow in the Two-Stage Experimental Impulse Turbine with the Drum Rotor Arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Kukchol; Tajč, L.; Kolovratník, M.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the CFD analysis of the steam flow in the two-stage turbine with a drum rotor and balancing slots. The balancing slot is a part of every rotor blade and it can be used in the same way as balancing holes on the classical rotor disc. The main attention is focused on the explanation of the experimental knowledge about the impact of the slot covering and uncovering on the efficiency of the individual stages and the entire turbine. The pressure and temperature fields and the mass steam flows through the shaft seals, slots and blade cascades are calculated. The impact of the balancing slots covering or uncovering on the reaction and velocity conditions in the stages is evaluated according to the pressure and temperature fields. We have also concentrated on the analysis of the seal steam flow through the balancing slots. The optimized design of the balancing slots has been suggested.

  7. The influence of selected design and operating parameters on the dynamics of the steam micro-turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żywica, Grzegorz; Kiciński, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The topic of the article is the analysis of the influence of selected design parameters and operating conditions on the radial steam micro-turbine, which was adapted to operate with low-boiling agent in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). In the following parts of this article the results of the thermal load analysis, the residual unbalance and the stiffness of bearing supports are discussed. Advanced computational methods and numerical models have been used. Computational analysis showed that the steam micro-turbine is characterized by very good dynamic properties and is resistant to extreme operating conditions. The prototype of micro-turbine has passed a series of test calculations. It has been found that it can be subjected to experimental research in the micro combined heat and power system.

  8. Thermo-economic study on the implementation of steam turbine concepts for flexible operation on a direct steam generation solar tower power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topel, Monika; Ellakany, Farid; Guédez, Rafael; Genrup, Magnus; Laumert, Björn

    2016-05-01

    Among concentrating solar power technologies, direct steam generation solar tower power plants represent a promising option. These systems eliminate the usage of heat transfer fluids allowing for the power block to be run at greater operating temperatures and therefore further increasing the thermal efficiency of the power cycle. On the other hand, the current state of the art of these systems does not comprise thermal energy storage as there are no currently available and techno-economically feasible storage integration options. This situation makes direct steam generation configurations even more susceptible to the already existing variability of operating conditions due to the fluctuation of the solar supply. In the interest of improving the annual performance and competitiveness of direct steam generation solar tower systems, the present study examines the influence of implementing two flexibility enhancing concepts which control the steam flow to the turbine as a function of the incoming solar irradiation. The proposed concepts were implemented in a reference plant model previously developed by the authors. Then, a multi-objective optimization was carried out in order to understand which configurations of the steam turbine concepts yield reductions of the levelized cost of electricity at a lower investment costs when compared to the reference model. Results show that the implementation of the proposed strategies can enhance the thermo-economic performance of direct steam generation systems by yielding a reduction of up to 9.2% on the levelized cost of electricity, mainly due to allowing 20% increase in the capacity factor, while increasing the investment costs by 7.8%.

  9. Comparison of Integrated Gasifier-Combined Cycle and AFB-steam turbine systems for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Abbott, J. M.; Burns, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    In the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS) a number of advanced coal fired systems were examined and systems using a integrated coal gasifier IGCC or a fluid bed combustor AFB were found to yield attractive cogeneration results in industrial cogeneration applications. A range of site requirements and cogeneration sizing strategies using ground rules based on CTAS were used in comparing an IGCC and an AFB. The effect of time variations in site requirements and the sensitivity to fuel and electricity price assumptions are examined. The economic alternatives of industrial or utility ownership are also considered. The results indicate that the IGCC system has potentially higher fuel and emission savings and could be an attractive option for utility ownership. The AFB steam turbine system has a potentially higher return on investment and could be attractive assuming industrial ownership.

  10. Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

    1980-11-01

    The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

  11. Data Reconciliation in the Steam-Turbine Cycle of a Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sunde, Svein; Berg, Oivind; Dahlberg, Lennart; Fridqvist, Nils-Olof

    2003-08-15

    A mathematical model for a boiling water reactor steam-turbine cycle was assembled by means of a configurable, steady-state modeling tool TEMPO. The model was connected to live plant data and intermittently fitted to these by minimization of a weighted least-squares object function. The improvement in precision achieved by this reconciliation was assessed from quantities calculated from the model equations linearized around the minimum and from Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that the inclusion of the flow-passing characteristics of the turbines in the model equations significantly improved the precision as compared to simple mass and energy balances, whereas heat transfer calculations in feedwater heaters did not. Under the assumption of linear model equations, the quality of the fit can also be expressed as a goodness-of-fit Q. Typical values for Q were in the order of 0.9. For a validated model Q may be used as a fault detection indicator, and Q dropped to very low values in known cases of disagreement between the model and the plant state. The sensitivity of Q toward measurement faults is discussed in relation to redundancy. The results of the linearized theory and Monte Carlo simulations differed somewhat, and if a more accurate analysis is required, this is better based on the latter. In practical application of the presently employed techniques, however, assessment of uncertainties in raw data is an important prerequisite.

  12. Estimation of the residual life of steam-turbine condensers based on statistical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmansky, B. E.; Aronson, K. E.; Brodov, Yu. M.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the results of a study aimed at estimation of the state and prediction of the residual life of steam-turbine condensers on the basis of statistical analysis. The possibility of such evaluation during the operation of steam-turbine plants with accuracy sufficient for practical purposes is demonstrated. It is shown that identification of the operating period, viz., the initial period, the normal operation period, or the period of the lifetime exhaustion, as well as determination of the condenser's operating time at the moment when the failure of an individual tube occurs, is very important for statistical evaluation of the condenser state. Two statistical models are proposed and comparative analysis of the results calculated by these models for the residual life of the condensers at the Reftinskaya SDPP has been performed. The first model can be used when comprehensive information about the condenser's operating time before the tubes have failed is available as well as a priori information—or information based on analysis of the condenser tube metal—that the condenser is in its normal operation period. In this case, the fact of exhaustion of the condenser's lifetime is established by reaching the limit of the failed condenser tubes, which is determined by technical and economic analysis of losses caused by operating the turbine with a reduced heat-exchange surface of the condenser. The distribution function for the operating time of the failed tubes is approximated by a normal distribution. In the cases when no precise information on the condenser tubes' operating time is available at the thermoelectric power plant (TEPP), the second statistical model based on censored samples is proposed for estimation of the condenser state. An expression to assess the confidence interval that determines the significant difference between the distribution functions for complete and censored operating time values has been derived. It is shown that this model

  13. Design of a Test Loop for Performance Testing of Steam Turbines Under a Variety of Operating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrette, Jonathan

    The steam turbine is one of the most widely used energy conversion devices in the world, providing shaft power for electricity production, chemical processing, and HVAC systems. There are new opportunities in growing renewable and combined cycle applications. End-users are asking for energy efficiency improvements that require manufacturers to renew their experimentally verified design methods. A structured design approach was carried out along three integrated research thrusts. The first two thrusts, Turbine Performance Prediction and Measurement Planning, were carried out with the aim of supporting the theoretical modeling required for the third thrust, System Modeling. The primary use of the steam turbine test loop will be to improve performance prediction techniques. Thus the primary focus of the first thrust was to describe empirical loss correlations found in the literature. For the second thrust, a preliminary review of measurement codes and standards was carried out to determine their impact on overall test loop design. For the third thrust, quasi-steady theoretical models were derived from first principles for the turbine, condenser, pump, boiler, and pipe components using control volume analyses. The theoretical models were implemented in a new open source simulation environment that carries out the calculation process over a range of up-to three turbine model inputs. A parametric study was undertaken with the goal of defining preliminary design specifications for the test loop components. The test loop was simulated across a wide range of steady states for three different turbine blade configurations, each at three different values of the blade row enthalpy-loss coefficient. The parametric study demonstrates full coverage of possible turbine operating conditions. The results of the simulations were analyzed to narrow the required operating range of the test loop to a series of turbine test paths. The final operational envelope yielded a set of test loop

  14. Research and development of improved efficiency small steam turbines (IESST). Technical progress report, Phase I, 16 April-31 December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Choate, D.M.; Tuttle, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    Product Statistical Bulletins of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and Turbodyne's shipment records over a 10-y period were researched to determine quantities installed and to define general parameters of design. Engineering studies were conducted to determine the optimum turbine design to meet the defined design parameters. Two conceptual designs plus an added variation of one design were completed together with designs of gearing required to provide speeds compatible with driven equipment speeds. The calculated performance of the recommended design and currently available small steam turbines were compared and a life cycle cost analysis was conducted to determine the economic competitiveness of the new design.

  15. Modern technologies for rendering information support to cogeneration steam turbine units in their design and operation stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezgin, V. I.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Chubarov, A. A.; Brezgin, D. V.

    2013-08-01

    Application of modern information technologies in different stages of the lifecycle of cogeneration turbines is considered as one of possible ways for improving their competitiveness. Specific features relating to rendering information support for steam turbine units during the periods of their design and operation, which are the main stages of their life cycle, are presented. Three-dimension modeling, adaptive, and parametric design technologies are applied in the equipment design stages. Information support technologies developed by the authors are applied during the operation stage. Information is integrated by using a product lifecycle management (PLM) system.

  16. Determination of the toughness of in-service steam turbine disks using small punch testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulds, J.; Viswanathan, R.

    2001-10-01

    Knowledge of the material toughness is crucial in assessing the integrity of heavy section steel components. Conventional tests to determine the toughness involve extraction of large blocks of materials and therefore are not practical on in-service components. On the other hand, conservative assumptions regarding toughness without regard to actual data can lead to expensive and premature replacement of the components. Previous EPRI studies have demonstrated the use of a relatively nondestructive technique termed the "small punch test" to estimate the fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT) and fracture toughness ( K Ic ) of high-temperature turbine rotor steels and nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. This paper summarizes the results of research into the feasibility of extending the small punch test to characterize the toughness of the 3 to 3.5% NiCrMoV (3-3.5NiCrMoV) low alloy steel used for fossil and nuclear power plant low-pressure (LP) steam turbine disks. Results of the present study show that the small punch transition temperature, T sp , is linearly correlated with FATT, so that measurement of T sp permits estimation of the standard Charpy FATT through empirical use of the correlation. The statistical confidence prediction uncertainty bands for the correlation were found to be narrow enough to make the small punch- based FATT estimation practical for this alloy. Additionally, independent K Ic measurements made by PowerGen, UK, on some of the same test materials were in excellent agreement with measurements made here, indicating that the small punch K Ic measurement can be reproducible across laboratories. Limited testing for fracture initiation toughness showed, as has been demonstrated for other materials, that the small punch test-based initiation fracture toughness ( K Ic ) determination was within ±25% of the ASTM standard measurement of K Ic , suggesting that the test method can be used for direct determination of fracture initiation

  17. Economic analysis of condensers for water recovery in steam injected gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    De Paepe, M.; Huvenne, P.; Dick, E.

    1998-07-01

    Steam injection cycles are interesting for small power ranges because of the high efficiency and the relatively low investment costs. A big disadvantage is the consumption of water by the cycle. Water recovery is seldom realized in industrial practice. In this paper an analysis of the technical and economical possibilities of water recovery by condensation of water out of the exhaust gases is made. Three gas turbines are considered : the Kawasaki M1A-13CC (2.3 MWe), the Allison 501KH (6.8 MWe) and the General Electric LM1600 (17 MWe). For every gas turbine two types of condensers are designed. In the water cooled condenser finned tubes are used to cool the exhaust gases, flowing at the outside of the tubes. The water itself flows at the inside of the tubes and is cooled by a water to air cooler. In the air cooled condenser the exhaust gases flow at the inside of the tubes and the cooling air at the outside. The investment costs of the condensers is compared to the costs of the total installation. The investment costs are relatively smaller if the produced power goes up. The water cooled condenser with water to air cooler is cheaper than the air cooled condenser. Using a condenser results in higher exploitation costs due to the fans and pumps. It is shown that the air cooled condenser has lower exploitation costs than the water cooled one. Pay back time of the total installation does not significantly vary compared to the installation without recovery. Water prices are determined for which water recovery is profitable. For the water cooled condenser the turning point lies at 2.2 Euro/m; for the air cooled condenser this is 0.6 Euro/m.

  18. Upgrading the SPP-500-1 moisture separators-steam reheaters used in the Leningrad NPP turbine units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legkostupova, V. V.; Sudakov, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    The specific features of existing designs of moisture separators-steam reheaters (MSRs) and experience gained with using them at nuclear power plants are considered. Main factors causing damage to and failures of MSRs are described: nonuniform distribution of wet steam flow among the separation modules, breakthrough of moisture through the separator (and sometimes also through the steam reheater), which may lead to the occurrence of additional thermal stresses and, hence, to thermal-fatigue damage to or stress corrosion cracking of metal. MSR failure results in a less efficient operation of the turbine unit as a whole and have an adverse effect on the reliability of the low-pressure cylinder's last-stage blades. By the time the design service life of the SPP-500-1 MSRs had been exhausted in power units equipped with RBMK-1000 reactors, the number of damages inflicted to both the separation part and to the pipework and heating surface tubes was so large, that a considerable drop of MSR effectiveness and turbine unit efficiency as a whole occurred. The design of the upgraded separation part used in the SPP-500-1 MSR at the Leningrad NPP is described and its effectiveness is shown, which was confirmed by tests. First, efforts taken to achieve more uniform distribution of moisture content over the perimeter and height of steam space downstream of the separation modules and to bring it to values close to the design ones were met with success. Second, no noticeable effect of the individual specific features of separation modules on the moisture content was revealed. Recommendations on elaborating advanced designs of moisture separators-steam reheaters are given: an MSR arrangement in which the separator is placed under or on the side from the steam reheater; axial admission of wet steam for ensuring its uniform distribution among the separation modules; inlet chambers with an extended preliminary separation system and devices for uniformly distributing steam flows in the

  19. Experimental analysis of dynamic characteristics for vibration-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Lu-ping; Lu, Xu-xiang; Rao, Hong-de; Liu, Yu-jing

    2008-11-01

    Integral shroud is an advanced technique used to improve reliability of steam turbine blades. In this paper, dynamic characteristics of vibration-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud are studied. To test and verify the reliability of calculation result, a series of experiments are well performed on the platform of contracting and impacting of blades tips. The dynamic strain data under different gaps, different loads and different rotating speeds are surveyed through which the log decrement at each condition is obtained, and the effects of vibration damping are obtained by comparing the log decrement. The results of experimental study show that larger log decrement means larger system damping and better effectives of vibration reduction. Besides, the effects of vibro-impact reduction of different parameters are got and the experimental study results show that the vibro-impact structure is a good vibration damper. The dynamic stress of the blade with integral shroud is insensitive to loads when the gap between adjacent integral shrouds is small. In short, the achievements gained in the paper have revealed dynamic characteristics for vibro-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud, which will bring important engineering application to development and modification design of the integrally shrouded blades.

  20. Investigation into the flow-induced instability of high-pressure rotors or large steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The flow-induced instability of high-pressure rotors of large steam turbine generators has been a world-wide problem, and the subject of some controversy regarding the primary phenomena and major influencing parameters. In this study a simple one-dimensional model for the flow in a labyrinth seal was developed and solved for the linear dynamic coefficients. Dimensional analysis was employed to identify the major influencing parameters. The theoretical values for the dynamic coefficients were compared with published test data and found to be in qualitative agreement. Parametric studies were performed on typical sealing geometries to provide insight into the influence of the major design parameters on the aerodynamic excitation forces affecting rotor-system instability. A computer program utilizing the finite-element method was developed for considering the effect of the flow-induced forces on the damped natural frequencies and linear stability of complex rotor systems. System damping was calculated for several high-pressure rotor designs and results compared with actual operating experience. The importance of the various system components (i.e. seals, blading, bearings, etc.) with regard to the overall system stability was evaluated by means of the relative energy per cycle.

  1. Estimation of lifespan and economy parameters of steam-turbine power units in thermal power plants using varying regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Shkret, A. F.; Garievskii, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    The use of potent power units in thermal and nuclear power plants in order to regulate the loads results in intense wear of power generating equipment and reduction in cost efficiency of their operation. We review the methodology of a quantitative assessment of the lifespan and wear of steam-turbine power units and estimate the effect of various operation regimes upon their efficiency. To assess the power units' equipment wear, we suggest using the concept of a turbine's equivalent lifespan. We give calculation formulae and an example of calculation of the lifespan of a steam-turbine power unit for supercritical parameters of steam for different options of its loading. The equivalent lifespan exceeds the turbine's assigned lifespan only provided daily shutdown of the power unit during the night off-peak time. We obtained the engineering and economical indices of the power unit operation for different loading regulation options in daily and weekly diagrams. We proved the change in the prime cost of electric power depending on the operation regimes and annual daily number of unloading (non-use) of the power unit's installed capacity. According to the calculation results, the prime cost of electric power for the assumed initial data varies from 11.3 cents/(kW h) in the basic regime of power unit operation (with an equivalent operation time of 166700 hours) to 15.5 cents/(kW h) in the regime with night and holiday shutdowns. The reduction of using the installed capacity of power unit at varying regimes from 3.5 to 11.9 hours per day can increase the prime cost of energy from 4.2 to 37.4%. Furthermore, repair and maintenance costs grow by 4.5% and by 3 times, respectively, in comparison with the basic regime. These results indicate the need to create special maneuverable equipment for working in the varying section of the electric load diagram.

  2. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 5: Combined gas-steam turbine cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, D. J.; Foster-Pegg, R. W.; Lee, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The energy conversion efficiency of gas-steam turbine cycles was investigated for selected combined cycle power plants. Results indicate that it is possible for combined cycle gas-steam turbine power plants to have efficiencies several point higher than conventional steam plants. Induction of low pressure steam into the steam turbine is shown to improve the plant efficiency. Post firing of the boiler of a high temperature combined cycle plant is found to increase net power but to worsen efficiency. A gas turbine pressure ratio of 12 to 1 was found to be close to optimum at all gas turbine inlet temperatures that were studied. The coal using combined cycle plant with an integrated low-Btu gasifier was calculated to have a plant efficiency of 43.6%, a capitalization of $497/kW, and a cost of electricity of 6.75 mills/MJ (24.3 mills/kwh). This combined cycle plant should be considered for base load power generation.

  3. Remote temperature measurements of a cold start-up on a low pressure steam turbine using phosphor thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Beshears, D.L.; Cates, M.R.; Cunningham, G.T.; Puri, A.; Schuster, L.

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of using a noncontact, optical method for temperature measurement based on thermographic phosphors was explored during the cold start-up of a low pressure turbine rotor at the TVA Cumberland Steam Plant. A simple optical system delivered low power laser light to a segment of the balance rim and balance weight holes which were coated with phosphor. From analysis of the laser induced fluorescence, temperatures ranging from 37C (99 F) to 121 C (250 F) were determined. There was no discernible condensation of steam on the viewing port optics. This transient temperature history at the exit end of the LP rotor may help to determine the root cause of a recent blade failure experienced in the L-0 blade row of a unit at this plant during an overspeed test.

  4. Development and realization of the concept of an integrated system for the improvement of steam turbine plant reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmanskii, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Main works performed when implementing the concept of an integrated approach to the improvement of the steam turbine plant (STP) reliability were stated. The technique of an integrated approach to the collection and processing of data on the STP equipment reliability was presented. This technique is based on the information on damages resulting in equipment failures, damages revealed during the routine equipment maintenance, and on data concerning equipment faults occurred when operating the STP. There is an implementation example for the technique of defining main elements specifying the reliability of a specific unit based on the statistical analysis of STP operating data.

  5. Operating experience feedback report: Reliability of safety-related steam turbine-driven standby pumps. Commercial power reactors, Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, J.R.

    1994-10-01

    This report documents a detailed analysis of failure initiators, causes and design features for steam turbine assemblies (turbines with their related components, such as governors and valves) which are used as drivers for standby pumps in the auxiliary feedwater systems of US commercial pressurized water reactor plants, and in the high pressure coolant injection and reactor core isolation cooling systems of US commercial boiling water reactor plants. These standby pumps provide a redundant source of water to remove reactor core heat as specified in individual plant safety analysis reports. The period of review for this report was from January 1974 through December 1990 for licensee event reports (LERS) and January 1985 through December 1990 for Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure data. This study confirmed the continuing validity of conclusions of earlier studies by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and by the US nuclear industry that the most significant factors in failures of turbine-driven standby pumps have been the failures of the turbine-drivers and their controls. Inadequate maintenance and the use of inappropriate vendor technical information were identified as significant factors which caused recurring failures.

  6. Off-design analysis of a gas turbine powerplant augmented by steam injection using various fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Results are compared using coal derived low and intermediate heating valve fuel gases and a conventional distillate. The results indicate that steam injection provides substantial increases in both power and efficiency within the available compressor surge margin. The results also indicate that these performance gains are relatively insensitive as to the type of fuel. Also, in a cogeneration application, steam injection could provide some degree of flexibility by varying the split between power and process steam.

  7. Experience gained from using water and steam for bringing the operation of aircraft- and marine-derivative gas-turbine engines in compliance with environmental standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsenko, V. V.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kosoi, A. S.

    2014-04-01

    Practical experience gained from using water and steam admission into the combustion chambers of aircraft- and marine-derivative gas turbines for bringing their operation in compliance with the requirements of environmental standards is described. The design and schematic modifications of combustion chambers and fuel system through which this goal is achieved are considered. The results obtained from industrial and rig tests of combustion chambers fitted with water or steam admission systems are presented.

  8. Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P.; Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A.

    2008-07-15

    Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

  9. Energy analysis of a combined solid oxide fuel cell with a steam turbine power plant for marine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welaya, Yousri M. A.; Mosleh, M.; Ammar, Nader R.

    2013-12-01

    Strong restrictions on emissions from marine power plants (particularly SO x , NO x ) will probably be adopted in the near future. In this paper, a combined solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and steam turbine fuelled by natural gas is proposed as an attractive option to limit the environmental impact of the marine sector. The analyzed variant of the combined cycle includes a SOFC operated with natural gas fuel and a steam turbine with a single-pressure waste heat boiler. The calculations were performed for two types of tubular and planar SOFCs, each with an output power of 18 MW. This paper includes a detailed energy analysis of the combined system. Mass and energy balances are performed not only for the whole plant but also for each component in order to evaluate the thermal efficiency of the combined cycle. In addition, the effects of using natural gas as a fuel on the fuel cell voltage and performance are investigated. It has been found that a high overall efficiency approaching 60% may be achieved with an optimum configuration using the SOFC system. The hybrid system would also reduce emissions, fuel consumption, and improve the total system efficiency.

  10. Continuous monitoring as a tool for more accurate assessment of remaining lifetime for rotors and casings of steam turbines in service

    SciTech Connect

    Leyzerovich, A.; Berlyand, V.; Pozhidaev, A.; Yatskevich, S.

    1998-12-31

    The continuous monitoring of steam parameters and metal temperatures allows assessing the individual remaining lifetime for major high-temperature design components of steam turbines in service more accurately. Characteristic metal temperature differences and corresponding maximum thermal stresses and strains are calculated on-line to estimate the metal fatigue damage accumulated during the operation process. This can be one of the diagnostic functions of the power unit`s computerized Data Acquisition System (DAS) or special Subsystem of Diagnostic monitoring (SDM) for the turbine. In doing so, the remaining lifetime is assessed in terms of actual operating conditions and operation quality for the individual unit, and the problem of lifetime extension for each object is solved more accurately. Such an approach is considered as applied to a specific case of the supercritical-pressure steam turbine of 300-MW output. The applied mathematical models were developed on the basis of combined experimentation (field) and calculation investigations of the metal temperature and strain-stress fields in the high-temperature (HP and IP) rotors and casings under the most characteristic stationary and transient operating conditions. The monitoring results are used for revealing the operating conditions with the extreme thermal stresses and specific metal damage, as well as for making decisions about scheduling the turbine`s overhauls and extension of the turbine lifetime beyond the limits having been set originally.

  11. Exit chimney joint and method of forming the joint for closed circuit steam cooled gas turbine nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Burns, James Lee

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle segment for a gas turbine includes inner and outer band portions and a vane extending between the band portions. The inner and outer band portions are each divided into first and second plenums separated by an impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to the first cavity for flow through the apertures to cool the outer nozzle wall. The steam flows through a leading edge cavity in the vane into the first cavity of the inner band portion for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the inner nozzle wall. Spent cooling steam flows through a plurality of cavities in the vane, exiting through an exit chimney in the outer band. The exit chimney is secured at its inner end directly to the nozzle vane wall surrounding the exit cavities, to the margin of the impingement plate at a location intermediate the ends of the exit chimney and to margins of an opening through the cover whereby each joint is externally accessible for joint formation and for subsequent inspection.

  12. Prospects for constructing cogeneration stations equipped with back-pressure steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovskii, A. A.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Stepanov, M. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    The possibilities of using back-pressure cogeneration turbines developed on the basis of serially produced ones are considered together with the thermal process circuits in which such turbines are applied. Design versions and advantages of cogeneration stations in which the proposed process circuits are implemented are described.

  13. Strategies for steam

    SciTech Connect

    Hennagir, T.

    1996-03-01

    This article is a review of worldwide developments in the steam turbine and heat recovery steam generator markets. The Far East is driving the market in HRSGs, while China is driving the market in orders placed for steam turbine prime movers. The efforts of several major suppliers are discussed, with brief technical details being provided for several projects.

  14. Optimization of the mean radius flow path of a multi-stage steam turbine with evolution algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, Jukka; Larjola, Jaakko; Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Backman, Jari

    2011-08-01

    A prototype model of the mean radius flow path of a four-stage, high speed 1 MWe axial steam turbine was optimized by using evolution algorithms, DE (differential evolution) algorithm in this case. Also the cost-benefits of the optimization were inspected. The optimization was successfully performed but the accuracy of the optimization was slightly less than hoped when compared to the control modeling executed with the CFD (computational fluid dynamics). The mentioned inaccuracy could have been hardly avoided because of problems with an initial presumption involving semi-empiric calculations and of the uncertainty concerning the absolute areas of qualification of the functions. This kind of algebraic modeling was essential for the success of the optimization because e.g. CFD-calculation could not have been done on each step of the optimization. During the optimization some problems occurred with the adequacy of the computer capacity and with finding a suitable solution that would keep the algorithms within mathematically allowable boundaries but would not restrict the progress of the optimization too much. The rest of the problems were due to the novelty of the application and problems with preciseness when handling the areas of qualification of the functions. Although the accuracy of the optimization results was not exactly in accordance with the objective, they did have a favorable effect on the designing of the turbine. The optimization executed with the help of the DE-algorithm got at least about 3.5 % more power out of the turbine which means about 150 000 € cost-benefit per turbine in the form of additional electricity capacity.

  15. Microstructure and fracture mode of a martensitic stainless steel steam turbine blade characterized via scanning auger microscopy and potentiodynamic polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, D.; Zaid, B.; Souami, N.; Negache, M.; Ahmed, A. Si

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure, the fracture and the resistance to pitting corrosion, in a10-2M (NaCl + Na2SO4) solution, of steam turbine blades, made of martensitic stainless steel (12% Cr), were analysed prior and after their utilization (during about 100 000 hours). The unused blades display an inter-granular fracture mode whereas a trans-granular one emerges in used blades. The SAM analysis of the fractured surfaces reveals that this change is concomitant with carbon and chromium redistribution from the grain boundaries to the grain interior. The potentiodynamic polarization curves and the SEM-EDS analysis of the pitting sites show that the used blades are less susceptible to pitting corrosion than the unused ones. These results are interpreted as a further qualitative evidence of an evolution of the microstructure leading to the formation of new precipitates.

  16. Development of small gas-turbine-based steam cogeneration system. Phase 1. Final report, July 1987-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing cost of electricity, the availability of low-cost natural gas and the promotion of cogeneration by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has increased the attractiveness of cogeneration as an alternate energy source. A study of the commercial/military/industrial segments indicates a viable market for the proposed system in hotels/motels, hospitals, nursing homes, shopping centers, district-heating plants, military bases, and light manufacturing. Design analysis indicates that a packaged cogeneration system utilizing the Teledyne Continental Motors TP500 gas-turbine engine, developed as a low-cost aircraft engine, when modified to include an industrial gearbox, exhaust recuperator with variable bypass and single can combustor with dual fuel capability can compete favorably in cost, durability and fuel consumption with current converted diesel engine powered systems with the advantage of producing 100 psig steam at variable rates.

  17. Combined Effect of Co and W on Deformation Resistance of 12Cr Heat-Resistant Steel for USC Steam Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huiran; Sun, Feng; Chen, Ke; Wu, Jiansheng

    2011-12-01

    12Cr heat-resistant steels with different concentrations of Co and W, with Mo equivalent (Mo + 1/2W) fixed at 1.6 wt.%, were prepared by arc-melting and hot rolling processes. Mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile tests conducted at a low strain rate 2 × 10-5 s-1 at 575, 600, and 625 °C. Microstructure of the steels was investigated via optical microscopy (OM) and electron transmission microscopy (TEM). The results show that when the content of W is fixed, the steel with 3.1 wt.% Co and the steel with 3.8 wt.% Co are found to obtain the best deformation resistance values at 575, 600, and at 625 °C; when the Co content is fixed, the steel with 1.5 wt.% W shows better performance. The highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield stress (YS) were achieved for the steel when its W content is at 1.5 wt.% and Co content is at 3.1 wt.% or 3.8 wt.%. Deformation resistance is related to the initial dislocation density in the steels, which increases with increasing Co content and decreases with increasing W content. It is verified that the deformation mechanism of the tested steels during high-temperature tensile tests at a low strain rate is that of the recovery-controlled dislocation creep. Furthermore, the thermodynamic calculation result is in agreement with the experimental result, demonstrating that 0.85Mo-1.5W-3.8Co steel has the best deformation resistance at 625 °C. Therefore, 0.85Mo-1.5W-3.1Co steel is recommended as a potential candidate material for 600 °C class steam turbines, and 0.85Mo-1.5W-3.8Co steel is also a potential material for 625 °C class Ultra supercritical (USC) steam turbines.

  18. R and D for improved efficiency small steam turbines, Phase II. Report No. 1380-3. First quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Dr., W.; Maillar, K. M.; Bender, D. A.; Brassert, W. L.; Capone, P. A.; Carter, A. F.; Heitmann, A. M.; Holland, J. E.; Lord, R. E.; Thirumalaisamy, S. N.

    1980-09-01

    Progress made in the second phase of a two-phase research, design and prototype development program is presented. Phase II consists of the detailed design of the prototype radial inflow steam turbine configuration selected during the first phase and subsequent fabrication and testing. At this time, the detailed aerodynamic design of the stage flowpath has been completed except for the crossover piping from the first stage exhaust to the second stage inlet. In addition, mechanical design effort has resulted in a definition of a rotor system. The aerodynamic design included the optimization of the overall flowpath geometry of the stages specified in the initial phase of the program. The detailed aerodynamic designs of the rotor blades, nozzle vanes, scroll and diffuser were based on the optimized geometry. The final blading selected for the stage is a radial design with 26 blades, 13 of which are splitters. Sixteen nozzle vanes have been specified. The mechanical design of the rotor system to date has included the specification of the rotor wheels and shafts with their polygon connection, and the design of the thrust and journal bearings and the gearing. In addition, various shaft sealing arrangements have been evaluated, subject to the constraints indicated by initial rotordynamic analyses. Indications are that a reasonably effective labyrinth seal is not precluded by shaft length limitations. As this type of seal has been long accepted by steam turbine users, its use in the prototype is most likely. Proven components have been specified wherever possible, i.e., redesign/development could not be justified. The rotor system has been designed for at least 100,000 hours life with the most severe operating conditions and loads. The system cannot be considered complete, however, until dynamic response of the rotors for all possible operating conditions is shown to be within acceptable limits.

  19. Technique of optimization of minimum temperature driving forces in the heaters of regeneration system of a steam turbine unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamarokov, A. S.; Zorin, V. M.; Dai, Fam Kuang

    2016-03-01

    At the current stage of development of nuclear power engineering, high demands on nuclear power plants (NPP), including on their economy, are made. In these conditions, improving the quality of NPP means, in particular, the need to reasonably choose the values of numerous managed parameters of technological (heat) scheme. Furthermore, the chosen values should correspond to the economic conditions of NPP operation, which are postponed usually a considerable time interval from the point of time of parameters' choice. The article presents the technique of optimization of controlled parameters of the heat circuit of a steam turbine plant for the future. Its particularity is to obtain the results depending on a complex parameter combining the external economic and operating parameters that are relatively stable under the changing economic environment. The article presents the results of optimization according to this technique of the minimum temperature driving forces in the surface heaters of the heat regeneration system of the steam turbine plant of a K-1200-6.8/50 type. For optimization, the collector-screen heaters of high and low pressure developed at the OAO All-Russia Research and Design Institute of Nuclear Power Machine Building, which, in the authors' opinion, have the certain advantages over other types of heaters, were chosen. The optimality criterion in the task was the change in annual reduced costs for NPP compared to the version accepted as the baseline one. The influence on the decision of the task of independent variables that are not included in the complex parameter was analyzed. An optimization task was decided using the alternating-variable descent method. The obtained values of minimum temperature driving forces can guide the design of new nuclear plants with a heat circuit, similar to that accepted in the considered task.

  20. Non-destructive measurement and role of surface residual stress monitoring in residual life assessment of a steam turbine blading material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu-Gaunkar, Gajanana; Rawat, M. S.; Prasad, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Steam turbine blades in power generation equipment are made from martensitic stainless steels having high strength, good toughness and corrosion resistance. However, these steels are susceptible to pitting which can promote early failures of blades in the turbines, particularly in the low pressure dry/wet areas by stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue. Presence of tensile residual stresses is known to accelerate failures whereas compressive stresses can help in delaying failures. Shot peening has been employed as an effective tool to induce compressive residual stresses which offset a part of local surface tensile stresses in the surface layers of components. Maintaining local stresses at stress raisers, such as pits formed during service, below a threshold level can help in preventing the initiation microcracks and failures. The thickness of the layer in compression will, however, depend of the shot peening parameters and should extend below the bottom of corrosion pits. The magnitude of surface compressive drops progressively during service exposure and over time the effectiveness of shot peening is lost making the material susceptible to micro-crack initiation once again. Measurement and monitoring of surface residual stress therefore becomes important for assessing residual life of components in service. This paper shows the applicability of surface stress monitoring to life assessment of steam turbine blade material based on data generated in laboratory on residual surface stress measurements in relation to fatigue exposure. An empirical model is proposed to calculate the remaining life of shot peened steam turbine blades in service.

  1. Shaft seals with an easily removable cylinder holder for low-pressure steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. E.; Rodionov, D. A.; Pimenov, E. V.; Sobolev, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problems that occur at the operation of LPC shaft seals (SS) of turbines, particularly, their bearings. The problems arising from the deterioration of oil-protecting rings of SS and bearings and also the consequences in which they can result are considered. The existing SS housing construction types are considered. Their operational features are specified. A new SS construction type with an easily removable holder is presented. The construction of its main elements is described. The sequence of operations of the repair personnel at the restoration of the new SS type spacings is proposed. The comparative analysis of the new and the existing SS construction types is carried out. The assessment results of the efficiency, the operational convenience, and the economic effect after the installation of the new type seals are given. The conclusions about the offered construction prospects are made by results of the comparative analysis and the carried-out assessment. The main advantage of this design is the possibility of spacings restoration both in SS and in oil-protecting rings during a short-term stop of a turbine, even without its cooling. This construction was successfully tested on the working K-300-23.5 LMP turbine. However, its adaptation for other turbines is quite possible.

  2. RELAP5/MOD3 Analysis of Transient Steam-Generator Behavior During Turbine Trip Test of a Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor MONJU

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshihisa Shindo; Hiroshi Endo; Tomoko Ishizu; Kazuo Haga

    2006-07-01

    In order to develop a thermal-hydraulic model of the steam-generator (SG) to simulate transient phenomena in the sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR) MONJU, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) verified the SG model using the RELAP5/MOD3 code against the results of the turbine trip test at a 40% power load of MONJU. The modeling by using RELAP5 was considered to explain the significant observed behaviors of the pressure and the temperature of the EV steam outlet, and the temperature of water supply distributing piping till 600 seconds after the turbine trip. The analysis results of these behaviors showed good agreement with the test results based on results of parameter study as the blow efficiency (release coef.) and heat transferred from the helical coil region to the down-comer (temperature heating down-comer tubes). It was found that the RELAP5/MOD3 code with a two-fluids model can predict well the physical situation: the gas-phase of steam generated by the decompression boiling moves upward in the down-comer tubes accompanied by the enthalpy increase of the water supply chambers; and that the pressure change of a 'shoulder' like shape is induced by the mass balance between the steam mass generated in the down-comer tubes and the steam mass blown from the SG. The applicability of RELAP5/MOD3 to SG modeling was confirmed by simulating the actual FBR system. (authors)

  3. On high suppression of NO x and CO emissions in gas-turbine plants with combined gas-and-steam cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Ermakov, A. N.; Shlyakhov, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this work are given results of analyzing processes of production of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and afterburning of CO when firing natural gas at combined-cycle gas-turbine plants. It is shown that for suppressing emissions of the said microcomponents it is necessary to lower temperature in hot local zones of the flame in which NOx is formed, and, in so doing, to avoid chilling of cold flame zones that prevents afterburning of CO. The required lowering of the combustion temperature can be provided by combustion of mixtures of methane with steam, with high mixing uniformity that ensures the same and optimum fraction of the steam "ballast" in each microvolume of the flame. In addition to chilling, the steam ballast makes it possible to maintain a fairly high concentration of hydroxil radicals in the flame zone as well, and this provides high burning out of fuel and reduction in carbon monoxide emissions (active steam ballast). Due to this fact the fraction of steam when firing its mixtures with methane in a gas-turbine plant can be increased up to the weight ratio 4: 1. In this case, the concentrations of NO x and CO in emissions can be reduced to ultra-low values (less than 3 ppm).

  4. Integrated gasification combined cycle and steam injection gas turbine powered by biomass joint-venture evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sterzinger, G J

    1994-05-01

    This report analyzes the economic and environmental potential of biomass integrated gasifier/gas turbine technology including its market applications. The mature technology promises to produce electricity at $55--60/MWh and to be competitive for market applications conservatively estimated at 2000 MW. The report reviews the competitiveness of the technology of a stand-alone, mature basis and finds it to be substantial and recognized by DOE, EPRI, and the World Bank Global Environmental Facility.

  5. Achieving reliable operation of a steam turbine's automatic control and protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, S. A.; Naumov, A. S.; Shvetsov, D. P.; Krymskii, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The algorithms, procedures, and modules for making expert estimates of the technical state of automatic control and protection systems for different types of turbines by means of the SPIDER mobile computerized automation system are presented. It is shown that owing to high trustworthiness with which the kind and location of hidden defects of units are determined without disassembling them, repair works can be scheduled in the optimal way and the costs for carrying them out can be reduced.

  6. High performance steam development

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1995-12-31

    DOE has launched a program to make a step change in power plant to 1500 F steam, since the highest possible performance gains can be achieved in a 1500 F steam system when using a topping turbine in a back pressure steam turbine for cogeneration. A 500-hour proof-of-concept steam generator test module was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. It has four once-through steam generator circuits. The complete HPSS (high performance steam system) was tested above 1500 F and 1500 psig for over 102 hours at full power.

  7. Influence of variable operating modes of a steam turbine on the growth of creep cracks in the metal of shell parts made of austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladshtein, V. I.

    2011-09-01

    Results obtained from assessing the crack resistance of type EI-612 VDP steel by testing notched cylindrical samples under the temperature and stress conditions simulating the loading of metal in shell parts in variable operating modes of a steam turbine are presented. Recommendations for conducting variable operating modes and for the time of carrying out operational checks are given taking into account the influence of cyclic loading on the growth of cracks.

  8. Castability of Traditionally Wrought Ni-Based Superalloys for USC Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P D; Cowen, C J; Hawk, J A; Evens, N; Maziasz, P

    2011-02-27

    The high temperature components within conventional coal fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. In order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased. The proposed steam temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work due to temperature limitations of this class of materials; thus Ni-based superalloys are being considered. The full size castings are quite substantial: ~4in thick, several feet in diameter and weigh 5-10,000lb each half. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled in order to produce relevant microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed in order to better deploy the alloy constituents. The castability of two traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys to which minor alloy adjustments have been made in order to improve foundry performance is further explored.

  9. Recovery of exhaust waste heat for a hybrid car using steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababatin, Yasser

    A number of car engines operate with an efficiency rate of approximately 22% to 25% [1]. The remainder of the energy these engines generate is wasted through heat escape out of the exhaust pipe. There is now an increasing desire to reuse this heat energy, which would improve the overall efficiency of car engines by reducing their consumption of fuel. Another benefit is that such reuse would minimize harmful greenhouse gases that are emitted into the environment. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to examine how the wasted heat energy can be reused and/or recovered by use of a heat recovery system that would store this energy in a hybrid car battery. Green turbines will be analyzed as a possible solution to recycle the lost energy in a way that will also improve the overall automotive energy efficiency.

  10. Axial seal system for a gas turbine steam-cooled rotor

    DOEpatents

    Mashey, Thomas Charles

    2002-01-01

    An axial seal assembly is provided at the interface between adjacent wheels and spacers of a gas turbine rotor and disposed about tubes passing through openings in the rotor adjacent the rotor rim and carrying a thermal medium. Each seal assembly includes a support bushing for supporting a land of the thermal medium carrying tube, an axially registering seat bushing disposed in the opposed opening and a frustoconical seal between the seal bushing and seat. The seal bushing includes a radial flange having an annular recess for retaining the outer diameter edge of the seal, while the seat bushing has an axially facing annular surface forming a seat for engagement by the inner diameter edge of the seal.

  11. Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C. C.; Lieb, D. P.; Margulies, A. E.; Fusegni, L. J.; Lovell, B. J.

    A design for the insertion of thermionic converters into the wall of a conventional combustor to produce electricity in a topping cycle is described, and a study for applications in gas and steam generators of 70 and 30 MW is evaluated for engineering and economic feasibility. Waste heat from the thermionic elements is used to preheat the combustor air; the heat absorbed by the elements plus further quenching of the exhaust gases with ammonia is projected to reduce NO(x) emissions to acceptable levels. Schematics, flow diagrams, and components of a computer model for cost projections are provided. It was found that temperatures around the emitters must be maintained above 1,600 K, with maximum efficiency and allowable temperature at 1,800 K, while collectors generate maximally at 950 K, with a corresponding work function of 1.5 eV. Cost sensitive studies indicate an installed price of $475/kW for the topping cycle, with improvements in thermionic converter characteristics bringing the cost to $375/kW at a busbar figure of 500 mills/kWh.

  12. Pouring on the steam

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1996-02-01

    Engineers at Solar Turbines Inc. in San Diego have achieved a breakthrough in steam power by using modern gas-turbine technology, high-temperature-resistant superalloys, advanced manufacturing technologies, and a new class of steam generators to build a high-performance steam system (HPSS). The system is a full-scale, 4-megawatt industrial prototype steam power plant that produces steam heated to 1,500 F and pressurized to 1,500 psig. In a cogeneration steam cycle, these temperatures and pressures can double the power generated using the same amount of steam, according to the US Department of Energy (DOE), which sponsored the project as part of the Advanced Turbine System Program.

  13. Advanced rotor forgings for high-temperature steam turbines. Volume 1. Ingot and forging production. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, V.P.; Steiner, J.E.; Mitchell, A.

    1986-05-01

    Three advanced steel-melting processes - low-sulfur vacuum silicon deoxidation, electroslag remelting, and vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD) - were applied to produce three CrMoV (ASTM A470, Class 8) steel forgings for steam turbine application. Ingots weighing about 100 t each were produced using these three processes, and rotors were forged with final weights of about 30 t each. Compared to the conventionally produced forgings, the advanced technology forgings show better tensile ductility and better uniformity along the radial and longitudinal directions. Charpy upper-shelf energy shows about 40% improvement, and no temper embrittlement was found using step-cooled and isothermal-aging treatments. Significant improvement in fracture toughness (K/sub IC/ and J/sub IC/) is realized for these forgings. Low-cycle fatigue life is better at high temperatures because of the absence of nonmetallic inclusions. Creep strength shows slight improvement. However, creep ductility is improved, probably because of low residual elements. The VCD forgings show excellent creep ductility, even with long lives. Both the toughness and creep properties are equal to or better than those of oil-quenched rotors produced by European practices. These improvements are attributed to cleaner steel, better control of ingot solidification, low residual elements (especially very low sulfur content), and the associated reduction of nonmetallic inclusions. These three rotors have been placed in service in three operating power plants in units rated at 520 MW each. Volume 1 of this report covers ingot and forging production, and volume 2 covers mechanical property evaluation.

  14. Enhanced Droplet Erosion Resistance of Laser Treated Nano Structured TWAS and Plasma Ion Nitro-Carburized Coatings for High Rating Steam Turbine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, B. K.; Arya, Vivek; Mann, B. S.

    2010-09-01

    This article deals with surface modification of twin wire arc sprayed (TWAS) and plasma ion nitro-carburized X10CrNiMoV1222 steel using high power diode laser (HPDL) to overcome water droplet erosion occurring in low pressure steam turbine (LPST) bypass valves and LPST moving blades used in high rating conventional, critical, and super critical thermal power plants. The materials commonly used for high rating steam turbines blading are X10CrNiMoV1222 steel and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy. The HPDL surface treatment on TWAS coated X10CrNiMoV1222 steel as well as on plasma ion nitro-carburized steel has improved water droplet resistance manifolds. This may be due to combination of increased hardness and toughness as well as the formation of fine grained structure due to rapid heating and cooling rates associated with the laser surface treatment. The water droplet erosion test results along with their damage mechanism are reported in this article.

  15. Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation

    SciTech Connect

    Souza Dos Santos, R.

    2012-07-01

    In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

  16. Component testing of a ground based gas turbine steam cooled rich-burn primary zone combustor for emissions control of nitrogeneous fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    This effort summarizes the work performed on a steam cooled, rich-burn primary zone, variable geometry combustor designed for combustion of nitrogeneous fuels such as heavy oils or synthetic crude oils. The steam cooling was employed to determine its feasibility and assess its usefulness as part of a ground based gas turbine bottoming cycle. Variable combustor geometry was employed to demonstrate its ability to control primary and secondary zone equivalence ratios and overall pressure drop. Both concepts proved to be highly successful in achieving their desired objectives. The steam cooling reduced peak liner temperatures to less than 800 K. This low temperature offers the potential of both long life and reduced use of strategic materials for liner fabrication. These degrees of variable geometry were successfully employed to control air flow distribution within the combustor. A variable blade angle axial flow air swirler was used to control primary zone air flow, while the secondary and tertiary zone air flows were controlled by rotating bands which regulated air flow to the secondary zone quench holes and the dilutions holes respectively.

  17. Development of a system for monitoring technical state of the equipment of a cogeneration steam turbine unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Novoselov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Generalized results from the work on developing elements of a comprehensive system for monitoring technical state of the equipment of cogeneration turbines are presented. The parameters of the electrohydraulic turbine control system are considered together with a number of problems concerned with assessing the state of condensers and delivery water heaters.

  18. Turbine Manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The machinery pictured is a set of Turbodyne steam turbines which power a sugar mill at Bell Glade, Florida. A NASA-developed computer program called NASTRAN aided development of these and other turbines manufactured by Turbodyne Corporation's Steam Turbine Division, Wellsville, New York. An acronym for NASA Structural Analysis Program, NASTRAN is a predictive tool which advises development teams how a structural design will perform under service use conditions. Turbodyne uses NASTRAN to analyze the dynamic behavior of steam turbine components, achieving substantial savings in development costs. One of the most widely used spinoffs, NASTRAN is made available to private industry through NASA's Computer Software Management Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia.

  19. New features and applications of PRESTO, a computer code for the performance of regenerative, superheated steam turbine cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Y. K.; Staiger, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The code was designed to analyze performance at valves-wide-open design flow. The code can model conventional steam cycles as well as cycles that include such special features as process steam extraction and induction and feedwater heating by external heat sources. Convenience features and extensions to the special features were incorporated into the PRESTO code. The features are described, and detailed examples illustrating the use of both the original and the special features are given.

  20. Heat transfer performance comparison of steam and air in gas turbine cooling channels with different rib angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaojun; Gao, Jianmin; Xu, Liang; Li, Fajin

    2013-11-01

    Using steam as working fluid to replace compressed air is a promising cooling technology for internal cooling passages of blades and vanes. The local heat transfer characteristics and the thermal performance of steam flow in wide aspect ratio channels ( W/ H = 2) with different angled ribs on two opposite walls have been experimentally investigated in this paper. The averaged Nusselt number ratios and the friction factor ratios of steam and air in four ribbed channels were also measured under the same test conditions for comparison. The Reynolds number range is 6,000-70,000. The rib angles are 90°, 60°, 45°, and 30°, respectively. The rib height to hydraulic diameter ratio is 0.047. The pitch-to-rib height ratio is 10. The results show that the Nusselt number ratios of steam are 1.19-1.32 times greater than those of air over the range of Reynolds numbers studied. For wide aspect ratio channels using steam as the coolant, the 60° angled ribs has the best heat transfer performance and is recommended for cooling design.

  1. Some perspective decisions for the regeneration system equipment of the thermal and nuclear power plants decreasing the probability of water ingress into the turbine and rotor acceleration by return steam flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, N. N.; Svyatkin, F. A.; Sintsova, T. G.; Ukhanova, M. G.; Yesin, S. B.; Nikolayenkova, E. K.; Yurchenko, A. Yu.; Grigorieva, E. B.

    2016-03-01

    The regeneration system heaters are one of the sources of possible ingress of the water into the turbine. The water penetrates into the turbine either at the heaters overflow or with the return flow of steam generated when the water being in the heater boils up in the dynamic operation modes or at deenergization of the power-generating unit. The return flow of steam and water is dangerous to the turbine blades and can result in the rotor acceleration. The known protective devices used to prevent the overflow of the low-pressure and high-pressure heaters (LPH and HPH), of the horizontal and vertical heaters of heating-system water (HWH and VWH), as well as of the deaerators and low-pressure mixing heaters (LPMH) were considered. The main protective methods of the steam and water return flows supplied by the heaters in dynamic operation modes or at deenergization of the power-generating unit are described. Previous operating experience shows that the available protections do not fully prevent water ingress into the turbine and the rotor acceleration and, therefore, the development of measures to decrease the possibility of ingress of the water into the turbine is an actual problem. The measures allowing eliminating or reducing the water mass in the heaters are expounded; some of them were designed by the specialists of OAO Polzunov Scientific and Development Association on Research and Design of Power Equipment (NPO CKTI) and are efficiently introduced at heat power plants and nuclear power plants. The suggested technical solutions allow reducing the possibility of the water ingress into the turbine and rotor acceleration by return steam flow in the dynamic operation modes or in the case of power generating unit deenergization. Some of these solutions have been tested in experimental-industrial exploitation and can be used in industry.

  2. A Comparison of Creep-Rupture Tested Cast Alloys HR282, IN740 and 263 for Possible Application in Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbine and Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P D; Evens, N; Yamamoto, Y; Maziasz, P

    2011-02-27

    Cast forms of traditionally wrought Ni-base precipitation-strengthened superalloys are being considered for service in the ultra-supercritical conditions (760°C, 35MPa) of next-generation steam boilers and turbines. After casting and homogenization, these alloys were given heat-treatments typical for each in the wrought condition to develop the gamma-prime phase. Specimens machined from castings were creep-rupture tested in air at 800°C. In their wrought forms, alloy 282 is expected to precipitate M23C6 within grain boundaries, alloy 740 is expected to precipitate several grain boundary phases including M23C6, G Phase, and η phase, and alloy 263 has M23C6 and MC within its grain boundaries. This presentation will correlate the observed creep-life of these cast alloys with the microstructures developed during creep-rupture tests, with an emphasis on the phase identification and chemistry of precipitated grain boundary phases. The suitability of these cast forms of traditionally wrought alloys for turbine and boiler components will also be discussed.

  3. Thermo-fluid dynamic design study of single and double-inflow radial and single-stage axial steam turbines for open-cycle thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment facility in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Schlbeiri, T. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    The results of the study of the optimum thermo-fluid dynamic design concept are presented for turbine units operating within the open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. The concept is applied to the first OC-OTEC net power producing experiment (NPPE) facility to be installed at Hawaii's natural energy laboratory. Detailed efficiency and performance calculations were performed for the radial turbine design concept with single and double-inflow arrangements. To complete the study, the calculation results for a single-stage axial steam turbine design are also presented. In contrast to the axial flow design with a relatively low unit efficiency, higher efficiency was achieved for single-inflow turbines. Highest efficiency was calculated for a double-inflow radial design, which opens new perspectives for energy generation from OC-OTEC systems.

  4. The influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of condensing flow around a rotor tip section of steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Salmaniyeh, F.; Izadi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of the steam flow field around a rotor tip section is investigated. An Eulerian-Eulerian method, based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamics model for simulating the wet flow is employed. In this study, the effects of incidence angle on different design parameters such as: outflow Mach number, outflow gas phase mass fraction, loss coefficient and deviation angle are studied.

  5. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  6. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  7. Apparatus and methods for supplying auxiliary steam in a combined cycle system

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, William G.; Carberg, William George; Jones, Charles Michael

    2002-01-01

    To provide auxiliary steam, a low pressure valve is opened in a combined cycle system to divert low pressure steam from the heat recovery steam generator to a header for supplying steam to a second combined cycle's steam turbine seals, sparging devices and cooling steam for the steam turbine if the steam turbine and gas turbine lie on a common shaft with the generator. Cooling steam is supplied the gas turbine in the combined cycle system from the high pressure steam turbine. Spent gas turbine cooling steam may augment the low pressure steam supplied to the header by opening a high pressure valve whereby high and low pressure steam flows are combined. An attemperator is used to reduce the temperature of the combined steam in response to auxiliary steam flows above a predetermined flow and a steam header temperature above a predetermined temperature. The auxiliary steam may be used to start additional combined cycle units or to provide a host unit with steam turbine cooling and sealing steam during full-speed no-load operation after a load rejection.

  8. Steam turbines of the T-50/60-8.8, K-63-8.8, and Tp-100/110-8.8 types destined for modernization of thermal power plants with K-50-90 and K-100-90 turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. Ye.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Shekhter, M. V.; Stepanov, M. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the design, schemes of regulation, and control and protection of steam turbines of the T-50/60-8.8, K-63-8.8, and Tp-100/110-8.8 types destined for modernization of thermal power plants with replacement of K-50-90 and K-100-90 turbines that have very low efficiency and exhausted not only their designed, but also fleet life. The replacement proposed is based on state-of-the-art engineering solutions and will be carried out at concrete thermal power plants and CHP plants.

  9. Advanced rotor forgings for high-temperature steam turbines. Volume 2. Mechanical property evaluation. Final report. [CrMoV steels

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, V.P.; Landes, J.D.

    1986-05-01

    Three advanced steel-melting processes - low-sulfur vacuum silicon deoxidation, electroslag remelting, and vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD) - were applied to produce three CrMoV (ASTM A470, Class 8) steel forgings for steam turbine application. Ingots weighing about 100 t each were produced using these three processes, and rotors were forged with final weights of about 30 t each. Compared to the conventionally produced forgings, the advanced technology forgings show better tensile ductility and better uniformity along the radial and longitudinal directions. Charpy upper-shelf energy shows about 40% improvement, and no temper embrittlement was found using step-cooled and isothermal-aging treatments. Significant improvement in fracture toughness (K/sub IC/ and J/sub IC/) is realized for these forgings. Low-cycle fatigue life is better at high temperatures because of the absence of nonmetallic inclusions. Creep strength shows slight improvement. However, creep ductility is improved, probably because of low residual elements. The VCD forgings show excellent creep ductility, even with long lives. Both the toughness and creep properties are equal to or better than those of oil-quenched rotors produced by European practices. These improvements are attributed to cleaner steel, better control of ingot solidification, low residual elements (especially very low sulfur content), and the associated reduction of nonmetallic inclusions. These three rotors have been placed in service in three operating power plants in units rated at 520 MW each. Volume 1 of this report covers ingot and forging production, and volume 2 covers mechanical property evaluation. 40 refs., 84 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Stationary Engineers Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 15.1-15.5 Turbines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This learning module, one in a series of 20 related training modules for apprentice stationary engineers, deals with turbines. addressed in the individual instructional packages included in the module are the following topics: types and components of steam turbines, steam turbine auxiliaries, operation and maintenance of steam turbines, and gas…

  11. The T-53/67-8.0 cogeneration steam turbine for the PGU-230 combined-cycle plant at the Minsk TETs-3 cogeneration station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinberg, G. D.; Valamin, A. E.; Gol'Dberg, A. A.; Ivanovskii, A. A.; Novoselov, V. B.; Plakhtii, V. N.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.

    2008-08-01

    The design features of the turbine unit and the basic solutions found for its thermal scheme and layout are considered. The fundamental principles for controlling the turbine are described, and its economic indicators are given.

  12. Heat recovery steam generator outlet temperature control system for a combined cycle power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.; McCarty, W.L.; Wescott, K.R.

    1986-04-01

    This patent describes a command cycle electrical power plant including: a steam turbine and at least one set comprising a gas turbine, an afterburner and a heat recovery steam generator having an attemperator for supplying from an outlet thereof to the steam turbine superheated steam under steam turbine operating conditions requiring predetermined superheated steam temperature, flow and pressure; with the gas turbine and steam turbine each generating megawatts in accordance with a plant load demand; master control means being provided for controlling the steam turbine and the heat recovery steam generator so as to establish the steam operating conditions; the combination of: first control means responsive to the gas inlet temperature of the heat recovery steam generator and to the plant load demand for controlling the firing of the afterburner; second control means responsive to the superheated steam predetermined temperature and to superheated steam temperature from the outlet for controlling the attemperator between a closed and an open position; the first and second control means being operated concurrently to maintain the superheated steam outlet temperature while controlling the load of the gas turbine independently of the steam turbine operating conditions.

  13. 60. 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE LOOKING WEST. VISIBLE THROUGH HIGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE LOOKING WEST. VISIBLE THROUGH HIGH ARCHED PASSAGEWAYS AT LEFT (FORMER WINDOWS) IS 1902 STEAM TURBINE. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  14. Geothermal steam condensate reinjection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasteen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Geothermal electric generating plants which use condensing turbines and generate and excess of condensed steam which must be disposed of are discussed. At the Geysers, California, the largest geothermal development in the world, this steam condensate has been reinjected into the steam reservoir since 1968. A total of 3,150,000,000 gallons of steam condensate has been reinjected since that time with no noticeable effect on the adjacent producing wells. Currently, 3,700,000 gallons/day from 412 MW of installed capacity are being injected into 5 wells. Reinjection has also proven to be a satisfactory method of disposing of geothermal condensate a Imperial Valley, California, and at the Valles Caldera, New Mexico.

  15. Solar-Power System Produces High-Pressure Steam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Combination of three multistaged solar collectors produces highpressure steam for large-scale continuously operating turbines for generating mechanical or electrical energy. Superheated water vapor drives turbines, attaining an overall system efficiency about 22 percent.

  16. Ukraine Steam Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Gurvinder Singh

    2000-02-15

    The Ukraine Steam Partnership program is designed to implement energy efficiency improvements in industrial steam systems. These improvements are to be made by the private plants and local government departments responsible for generation and delivery of energy to end-users. One of the activities planned under this program was to provide a two-day training workshop on industrial steam systems focusing on energy efficiency issues related to the generation, distribution, and consumption of steam. The workshop was geared towards plant managers, who are not only technically oriented, but are also key decision makers in their respective companies. The Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology (ARENA-ECO), a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization founded to promote energy efficiency and environmental protection in Ukraine, in conjunction with the Alliance staff in Kiev sent out invitations to potential participants in all the regions of Ukraine. The purpose of this report is the describe the proceedings from the workshop and provide recommendations from the workshop's roundtable discussion. The workshop was broken down into two main areas: (1) Energy efficient boiler house steam generation; and Energy efficient steam distribution and consumption. The workshop also covered the following topics: (1) Ukrainian boilers; (2) Water treatment systems; (3) A profile of UKRESCO (Ukrainian Energy Services Company); (4) Turbine expanders and electricity generation; (5) Enterprise energy audit basics; and (6) Experience of steam use in Donetsk oblast.

  17. ULTRA-SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Bullard, S.B.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2003-04-22

    Efficiency increases in fossil energy boilers and steam turbines are being achieved by increasing the temperature and pressure at the turbine inlets well beyond the critical point of water. To allow these increases, advanced materials are needed that are able to withstand the higher temperatures and pressures in terms of strength, creep, and oxidation resistance. As part of a larger collaborative effort, the Albany Research Center (ARC) is examining the steam-side oxidation behavior for ultrasupercritical (USC) steam turbine applications. Initial tests are being done on six alloys identified as candidates for USC steam boiler applications: ferritic alloy SAVE12, austenitic alloy Super 304H, the high Cr-high Ni alloy HR6W, and the nickel-base superalloys Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Inconel 740. Each of these alloys has very high strength for its alloy type. Three types of experiments are planned: cyclic oxidation in air plus steam at atmospheric pressure, thermogravimetric ana lysis (TGA) in steam at atmospheric pressure, and exposure tests in supercritical steam up to 650 C (1202 F) and 34.5 MPa (5000 psi). The atmospheric pressure tests, combined with supercritical exposures at 13.8, 20.7, 24.6, and 34.5 MPa (2000, 3000, 4000, and 5000 psi) should allow the determination of the effect of pressure on the oxidation process.

  18. Combined cycle electric power plant with coordinated plural feedback turbine control

    SciTech Connect

    Kiscaden, R.W.; Martz, L.F.; Uram, R.

    1980-01-22

    A combined cycle electric power plant includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube through which a fluid, E.G. Water, is directed to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner further heats the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube. The temperature of the gas turbine exhaust gases is sensed for varying the fuel flow to the afterburner by a fuel valve, whereby the temperatures of the gas turbine exhaust gases and therefore of the superheated steam, are controlled. A plant load demand error signal is utilized for correcting a coordinated gas turbine load reference and for trimming a feedforward afterburner control signal derived from the sensed gas turbine exhaust temperatures.

  19. Theoretical prediction of physical and chemical characteristics of the first drop'' of condensate from superheated geothermal steam: Implications for corrosion and scaling in turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, P. . Dipartimento Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche); Corsi, R. ); Guidi, M.; Marini, L. )

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes a method for computing: (1) the chemical composition of the first drop of condensate which forms at dew-point temperature through expansion of superheated steam, and (2) the saturation index of the drop with respect to relevant solid phases, such as halite, amorphous silica, boric acid, borax and sal ammoniac. Boiling-point elevation is taken into account in these calculations. Preliminary application to some wells in the Larderello geothermal field indicate that: (1) the high concentration of HCl in the steam causes both the low pH and very high TDS of the first drop; (2) the lower the dew-point temperature, the higher the TDS of the first drop; (3) for a given chemical composition, the lower the steam pressure, the higher the risk of corrosion and scaling in the steam path.

  20. 46 CFR 11.516 - Service requirements for national endorsement as third assistant engineer of steam, motor, and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 3 months of service in the engine department of steam, motor, or gas turbine-propelled vessels; (5... ABET, together with 6 months of service in the engine department of steam, motor, or gas turbine... assistant engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.516 Section 11.516...

  1. 46 CFR 11.518 - Service requirements for national endorsement as chief engineer (limited) of steam, motor, and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... engineer (limited) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.518 Section 11.518 Shipping... requirements for national endorsement as chief engineer (limited) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled... (limited) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels is 5 years of total service in...

  2. 46 CFR 11.522 - Service requirements for national endorsement as assistant engineer (limited) of steam, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... assistant engineer (limited) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.522 Section 11.522... requirements for national endorsement as assistant engineer (limited) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine... engineer (limited) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels is 3 years of service in...

  3. 46 CFR 11.514 - Service requirements for national endorsement as second assistant engineer of steam, motor, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... assistant engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.514 Section 11.514 Shipping... requirements for national endorsement as second assistant engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine... assistant engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels is— (1) One year of service as...

  4. 46 CFR 11.512 - Service requirements for national endorsement as first assistant engineer of steam, motor, and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... assistant engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.512 Section 11.512 Shipping... requirements for national endorsement as first assistant engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled... engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels is— (1) One year of service as an...

  5. District steam and the St. Louis steam loop

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, T.M.; Sauer, H.J. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Owned and operated by large public electric utilities, district steam systems flourished in most northern US cities in the first half of this century. Following World War II, however, district steam systems became minor and, in some cases, unprofitable portions of the utilities' operations. Consequently, public utilities ceased promoting district steam to existing and potential customers, leading to the decline of their use. In recent years, district steam systems have been revitalized by independent enterprises that have the commitment and expertise to make these systems once again reliable and cost-effective energy sources. This paper reports on one such system, The St. Louis Steam Loop. The St. Louis steam loop consists of 22 miles of insulated underground steam piping encompassing a 400-square block area in the city's downtown business district. The loop is supplied with steam by the Ashley Plant, which was built in 1904 for the St. Louis World's Fair. Due to the rising cost of oil, which has been used to fuel the Ashley Plant since 1972, and the subsequent loss of customers, many people considered the steam system a dinosaur in the jet age. In 1982, Trigen-St. Louis Energy Corporation purchased the steam system and embarked on an aggressive campaign to upgrade all aspects of the system, including valves, piping, and meters. In 1999, Trigen-St. Louis will install an ISMW state-of-the-art combustion turbine cogenerator to provide 95% of the steam to the steam loop. A primary reason for the St. Louis Steam Loop's longevity is that it has reliably supplied steam to many downtown buildings for the better part of the 20th century.

  6. Millwright Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 8.1-8.5 Turbines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This packet, part of the instructional materials for the Oregon apprenticeship program for millwright training, contains five modules covering turbines. The modules provide information on the following topics: types, components, and auxiliaries of steam turbines; operation and maintenance of steam turbines; and gas turbines. Each module consists…

  7. Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jan; Griffin, Mr. Bob; Wright, Anthony L

    2006-01-01

    Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

  8. High performance steam cogeneration (proof-of-concept phases). Phase 2, HRSG 500-hour test report: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.H.

    1992-12-01

    Recent advances in small once-through Alloy 800 steam generators, improved materials technology, and application of small industrial gas turbine technology to steam turbine cogeneration offers the potential to make a step increase in steam temperature from around 1000{degree}F, where industry has been for almost fifty years, to 1500{degree}F. In small cogeneration systems, it is economically practical to introduce new technology and make a step change in temperature where it may not be possible (given the regulatory environment and economic risk) for a major change in steam temperature to be introduced in the hundreds of megawatt size of an electric utility. Increasing the peak steam temperature in a steam turbine cycle allows more work to be extracted or electrical power to be generated from a given quantity of heat input. Figure 1 plots steam efficiency as a function of superheat steam temperature and pressure for a turbine-back pressure of 166 psia. This figure clearly shows that increasing the steam conditions from the typical current practice of 900{degree}F and 900 psia to 1500{degree}F and 1500 psia will increase the steam cycle efficiency by 53%. The combination of higher cycle efficiency with an advanced high efficiency steam turbine design provides a substantial increase in turbine output power for a given steam flowrate. The output of this advanced high temperature steam turbine is approximately twice that of a current industrial practive turbine for the same turbine flowrate as seen in Figure 2.

  9. Dynamics and stability of wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.; Nolan, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous and induction generators are considered. A comparison is made between wind turbines, steam, and hydro units. The unusual phenomena associated with wind turbines are emphasized. The general control requirements are discussed, as well as various schemes for torsional damping such as speed sensitive stabilizer and blade pitch control. Integration between adjacent wind turbines in a wind farm is also considered.

  10. Gas turbines for APFBC repowering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.; Freier, M.D.; Weinstein, R.E.

    1999-07-01

    It is often difficult to repower an existing steam unit with a natural gas fired power turbine. This is because the gas turbine exhaust is generally too low in temperature to meet the superheat and reheat steam needs of existing steam turbines without making compromises that make less than effective use of existing equipment. However, advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) technology has several features that make it an effective option for repowering. The main feature is that existing steam turbine superheat and reheat steam demand can be met by firing char and, if necessary, coal in the fluid bed combustor. The heat energy rejected from the gas turbine can then be used as a supplement to the steam generated in the fluid bed combustor. APFBC repowering significantly improves plant efficiency, environmental performance, and reduces operating costs. This paper describes APFBC-modifications of gas turbines, from several manufacturers that have potential for repowering existing steam plants with high efficiency APFBC technology. The paper discusses the issues that must be addressed by the gas turbine manufacturers for APFBC repowering service.

  11. Harnessing steam

    SciTech Connect

    Petroski, H.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the history of steam power, starting with the elements of the steam engine known to the Greeks. The story continues in the 17th century, goes through the late 18th century when steam engine use changed from use as pumps by Watt`s invention of a double acting cylinder which drove a piston, and followed both the way it shaped industry and society and the major questions posed by the hazards of steam energy. The article concludes with an explaination of the development and a summary of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code now in effect. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Materials Performance in USC Steam

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  13. 46 CFR 11.510 - Service requirements for national endorsement as chief engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.510 Section 11.510 Shipping COAST GUARD... endorsement as chief engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. (a) The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for endorsement as chief engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas...

  14. Steaming Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoverson, Rick

    2006-01-01

    Schools can provide a cleaner, more healthful school environment by simply combining heat and water. Steam vapor systems use only tap water with no chemicals added. Low-pressure (12 psi to 65 psi) steam vapor sanitizes and deodorizes. This process can then be used safely in many situations, but is especially suited for restrooms and food-service…

  15. Thermal chemical recuperation method and system for use with gas turbine systems

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wen-Ching; Newby, Richard A.; Bannister, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    A system and method for efficiently generating power using a gas turbine, a steam generating system (20, 22, 78) and a reformer. The gas turbine receives a reformed fuel stream (74) and an air stream and produces shaft power and exhaust. Some of the thermal energy from the turbine exhaust is received by the reformer (18). The turbine exhaust is then directed to the steam generator system that recovers thermal energy from it and also produces a steam flow from a water stream. The steam flow and a fuel stream are directed to the reformer that reforms the fuel stream and produces the reformed fuel stream used in the gas turbine.

  16. Thermal chemical recuperation method and system for use with gas turbine systems

    DOEpatents

    Yang, W.C.; Newby, R.A.; Bannister, R.L.

    1999-04-27

    A system and method are disclosed for efficiently generating power using a gas turbine, a steam generating system and a reformer. The gas turbine receives a reformed fuel stream and an air stream and produces shaft power and exhaust. Some of the thermal energy from the turbine exhaust is received by the reformer. The turbine exhaust is then directed to the steam generator system that recovers thermal energy from it and also produces a steam flow from a water stream. The steam flow and a fuel stream are directed to the reformer that reforms the fuel stream and produces the reformed fuel stream used in the gas turbine. 2 figs.

  17. Power enhancement of the Brayton cycle by steam utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesionek, Krzysztof; Chrzczonowski, Andrzej; Ziółkowski, Paweł; Badur, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    The paper presents thermodynamic analysis of the gas-steam unit of the 65 MWe combined heat and power station. Numerical analyses of the station was performed for the nominal operation conditions determining the Brayton and combined cycle. Furthermore, steam utilization for the gas turbine propulsion in the Cheng cycle was analysed. In the considered modernization, steam generated in the heat recovery steam generator unit is directed into the gas turbine combustion chamber, resulting in the Brayton cycle power increase. Computational flow mechanics codes were used in the analysis of the thermodynamic and operational parameters of the unit.

  18. 40 CFR 60.4335 - How do I demonstrate compliance for NOX if I use water or steam injection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... monitor and record the fuel consumption and the ratio of water or steam to fuel being fired in the turbine... if I use water or steam injection? 60.4335 Section 60.4335 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... compliance for NOX if I use water or steam injection? (a) If you are using water or steam injection...

  19. Code System for Calculating the Nonlinear Transient Behavior of a Natural Circulation U-Tube Steam Generator with Its Main Steam System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-04-20

    Version 00 The code is based on a non-linear theoretical model describing the steady-state and transient behavior of a vertical natural-circulation U-tube steam generator together with its main steam system. The steam generator is considered to consist of a heat exchange section, a top plenum, a down-comer region and a main steam system (with a sequence of relief and/or safety valves, isolation, bypass, turbine-trip and turbine-control valves and a steam turbine). Possible perturbations from outsidemore » can be: inlet water temperature, inlet water mass flow and system pressure on the primary side, feedwater temperature, feed-water mass flow and outlet steam mass flow disturbed by actions of the different valves within the main steam system on the secondary side.« less

  20. Water spray ejector system for steam injected engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, W.R.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes a method of increasing the power output of a steam injected gas turbine engine. It comprises: a compressor, a combustor having a dome which receives fuel and steam from a dual flow nozzle, and a turbine in series combination with a gas flow path passing therethrough, and a system for injection of superheated steam into the gas flow path, the method comprising spraying water into the steam injection system where the water is evaporated by the superheated steam, mixing the evaporated water with the existing steam in the steam injection system so that the resultant steam is at a temperature of at least 28 degrees celsius (50 degrees fahrenheit) superheat and additional steam is added to the dome from the fuel nozzle to obtain a resultant increased mass flow of superheated steam mixture for injection into the gas flow path, and controlling the amount of water sprayed into the steam injection system to maximize the mass flow of superheated steam without quenching the flame.

  1. Development of Advanced Seals for Industrial Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Raymond E.; Aksit, Mahmut F.; Ghasripoor, Farshad; Turnquist, Norman A.; Dinc, Saim; Mortzheim, Jason; Demiroglu, Mehmet

    2002-10-01

    A critical area being addressed to improve industrial turbine performance is reducing the parasitic leakage flows through the various static and dynamic seals. Implementation of advanced seals into General Electric (GE) industrial turbines has progressed well over the last few years with significant operating performance gains achieved. Advanced static seals have been placed in gas turbine hot gas-path junctions and steam turbine packing ring segment end gaps. Brush seals have significantly decreased labyrinth seal leakages in gas turbine compressors and turbine interstages, steam turbine interstage and end packings, industrial compressor shaft seals, and generator seals. Abradable seals are being developed for blade-tip locations in various turbine locations. This presentation summarizes the status of advanced seal development for industrial turbines at GE.

  2. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion steam control and bypass system

    DOEpatents

    Wittig, J. Michael; Jennings, Stephen J.

    1980-01-01

    Two sets of hinged control doors for regulating motive steam flow from an evaporator to a condenser alternatively through a set of turbine blades in a steam bypass around the turbine blades. The evaporator has a toroidal shaped casing situated about the turbine's vertical axis of rotation and an outlet opening therein for discharging motive steam into an annular steam flow path defined between the turbine's radially inner and outer casing structures. The turbine blades extend across the steam flow path intermediate the evaporator and condenser. The first set of control doors is arranged to prevent steam access to the upstream side of the turbine blades and the second set of control doors acts as a bypass around the blades so as to maintain equilibrium between the evaporator and condenser during non-rotation of the turbine. The first set of control doors preferably extend, when closed, between the evaporator casing and the turbine's outer casing and, when open, extend away from the axis of rotation. The second set of control doors preferably constitute a portion of the turbine's outer casing downstream from the blades when closed and extend, when open, toward the axis of rotation. The first and second sets of control doors are normally held in the open and closed positions respectively by locking pins which may be retracted upon detecting an abnormal operating condition respectively to permit their closing and opening and provide steam flow from the evaporator to the condenser.

  3. 62. 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE LOOKING SOUTH THROUH TO 1902 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE LOOKING SOUTH THROUH TO 1902 STEAM TURBINE ROOM COLUMNS SUPPORT TRUE EXTERIOR WEST WALL OF THE BUILDING. PORTION TO RIGHT OF COLUMNS IS A LOWER CONNECTOR BETWEEN THE ENGINE HOUSE AND THE 1873 WING. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  4. 7. ONE OF THREE CIRCULATING WATER PUMPS FOR STEAM PLANT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ONE OF THREE CIRCULATING WATER PUMPS FOR STEAM PLANT, LOCATED ON FIRST FLOOR UNDER TURBINE DECK. VIEW OF PUMP LOCATED FARTHEST NORTH. November 13, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. ADVANCED STEAM GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Geo. A.; Casleton, Kent H.; Lewis, Robie E.; Rogers, William A.; Woike, Mark R.; Willis; Brian P.

    2001-11-06

    Concerns about climate change have encouraged significant interest in concepts for ultra-low or ''zero''-emissions power generation systems. In some proposed concepts, nitrogen is removed from the combustion air and replaced with another diluent such as carbon dioxide or steam. In this way, formation of nitrogen oxides is prevented, and the exhaust stream can be separated into concentrated CO{sub 2} and steam or water streams. The concentrated CO{sub 2} stream could then serve as input to a CO{sub 2} sequestration process or utilized in some other way. Some of these concepts are illustrated in Figure 1. This project is an investigation of one approach to ''zero'' emission power generation. Oxy-fuel combustion is used with steam as diluent in a power cycle proposed by Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) [1,2]. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to produce nearly pure oxygen for combustion. In this particular concept, the combustion temperatures are moderated by steam as a diluent. An advantage of this technique is that water in the product stream can be condensed with relative ease, leaving a pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration. Because most of the atmospheric nitrogen has been separated from the oxidant, the potential to form any NOx pollutant is very small. Trace quantities of any minor pollutants species that do form are captured with the CO{sub 2} or can be readily removed from the condensate. The result is a nearly zero-emission power plant. A sketch of the turbine system proposed by CES is shown in Figure 2. NETL is working with CES to develop a reheat combustor for this application. The reheat combustion application is unusual even among oxy-fuel combustion applications. Most often, oxy-fuel combustion is carried out with the intent of producing very high temperatures for heat transfer to a product. In the reheat case, incoming steam is mixed with the oxygen and natural gas fuel to control the temperature of the output stream to about

  6. Basic investigation of turbine erosion phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouchot, W. D.; Kothmann, R. E.; Fentress, W. K.; Heymann, F. J.; Varljen, T. C.; Chi, J. W. H.; Milton, J. D.; Glassmire, C. M.; Kyslinger, J. A.; Desai, K. A.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical-empirical model is presented of turbine erosion that fits and explains experience in both steam and metal vapor turbines. Because of the complexities involved in analyzing turbine problems, in a pure scientific sense, it is obvious that this goal can be only partially realized. Therefore, emphasis is placed on providing a useful model for preliminary erosion estimates for given configurations, fluids, and flow conditions.

  7. Reviews Exhibitions: Collider: Step inside the World's Greatest Experiment Equipment: Hero Steam Turbine Classroom Video: Most of Our Universe is Missing Book: Serving the Reich Book: Breakthrough to CLIL for Physics Book: The Good Research Guide Apps: Popplet Web Watch Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Collider: step inside the world's greatest experiment A great exhibition at the Science Museum in London Hero Steam Turbine Superb engine model gets up to 2500 rpm Most of Our Universe is Missing BBC video explores the dark truth Serving the Reich Science and morality in Nazi Germany The Good Research Guide A non-specialist book for teachers starting out in education research WORTH A LOOK Breakthrough to CLIL for Physics A book based on a physics curriculum for non-English students WEB WATCH Electric cycles online: patterns of use APPS The virtual laboratory advances personal skills

  8. H gas turbine combined cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Corman, J.

    1995-10-01

    A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System - {open_quotes}H{close_quotes} Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1430 C (2600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The {open_quotes}H{close_quotes} Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

  9. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  10. Supercritical steam in power production--A materials review

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Alman, David E.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    The use of higher temperatures and higher pressures in steam boilers and turbines allows for increased efficiencies, which increases the amount of energy and decreases the emissions from a given amount of fuel. Extensive development of high strength ferritic steels has occurred, and is continuing, for use in boilers and turbines. Ferritic steels are widely used with steam temperatures of 565 C. The limit for ferritic steels is believed to be about 650 C. Research efforts throughout the world are underway to increase steam temperatures to 650 C, 700 C, and 760 C using ferritic steels, austenitic steels, high-nickel alloys, and nickel-based superalloys. Selected topics are presented to provide a background into the development of ultra supercritical power generation, including background on boiler systems, water properties, the steam cycle, worldwide research efforts, materials requirements, proposed alloys, and corrosion in supercritical steam.

  11. Experimental and numerical study on condensation in transonic steam flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkut, Mirosław; Dykas, Sławomir; Strozik, Michał; Smołka, Krystian

    2015-09-01

    The present paper describes an experimental and numerical study of steam condensing flow in a linear cascade of turbine stator blades. The experimental research was performed on the facility of a small scale steam power plant located at Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice, Poland. The test rig of the facility allows us to perform the tests of steam transonic flows for the conditions corresponding to these which prevail in the low-pressure (LP) condensing steam turbine stages. The experimental data of steam condensing flow through the blade-to- blade stator channel were compared with numerical results obtained using the in-house CFD numerical code TraCoFlow. Obtained results confirmed a good quality of the performed experiment and numerical calculations.

  12. Turbine modifications for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Sawhney, H.S.; Oliker, I.; Silaghy, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the technical and economic feasibilities of retrofitting existing turbine-generators and replacing existing turbine-generators with specially designed district heating units. Topics considered include turbine retrofit options (approach and design criteria, district heating equipment), new district heating turbines (approach and design criteria, turbine selection), and heat generation costs. The conclusions of the analysis include: no technical barrier was discovered for converting the Potomac River Power Plant to a cogeneration facility, additional equipment required for the district heating operation is of conventional design, the existing steam turbines and associated system components can be retrofitted for district heating operation, the modified units retain the flexibility of producing 100% electric power output when the district heating load is disconnected, the district heating system uses indirect heating of water by extraction steam (the purity of which is not degraded), about three and a half times more heat can be extracted from units designed specifically for cogeneration than from modified units, and the described methodology can be used for the assessment of retrofitting existing units to cogeneration operation for power plants located close to heat load centers.

  13. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  14. Losses estimation in transonic wet steam flow through linear blade cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykas, Sławomir; Majkut, Mirosław; Strozik, Michał; Smołka, Krystian

    2015-04-01

    Experimental investigations of non-equilibrium spontaneous condensation in transonic steam flow were carried out in linear blade cascade. The linear cascade consists of the stator blades of the last stage of low pressure steam turbine. The applied experimental test section is a part of a small scale steam power plant located at Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice. The steam parameters at the test section inlet correspond to the real conditions in low pressure part of 200MWe steam turbine. The losses in the cascade were estimated using measured static pressure and temperature behind the cascade and the total parameters at inlet. The static pressure measurements on the blade surface as well as the Schlieren pictures were used to assess the flow field in linear cascade of steam turbine stator blades.

  15. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing

  16. Application of the balancing holes on the turbine stage discs with higher root reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrózek, Lukáš; Tajč, Ladislav; Hoznedl, Michal; Miczán, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The influence of the flow area of balancing holes in the discs of a steam turbine on its thermodynamic efficiency is examined for turbine stages operating in the increased root reaction regime. The interstage seal flooding with steam is modelled. The impact is given on stage reaction changes, on mass flow adjustments, and on overpressure operating in the rotor disc.

  17. Steam Digest Volume IV

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  18. Experimental research of heterogeneous nuclei in superheated steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoš, Ondřej; Kolovratník, Michal; Šmíd, Bohuslav; Hrubý, Jan

    2016-03-01

    A mobile steam expansion chamber has been developed to investigate experimentally homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation processes in steam, both in the laboratory and at power plants using the steam withdrawn from the steam turbine. The purpose of the device is to provide new insight into the physics of nonequilibrium wet steam formation, which is one of the factors limiting the efficiency and reliability of steam turbines. The expanded steam or a mixture of steam with a non-condensable gas rapidly expands in the expansion chamber. Due to adiabatic cooling, the temperature drops below the dew point of the steam at a given pressure. When reaching a sufficiently high supersaturation, droplets are nucleated. By tuning the supersaturation in the so-called nucleation pulse, particles of various size ranges can be activated. This fact is used in the present study to measure the aerosol particles present in the air. Homogeneous nucleation was negligible in this case. The experiment demonstrates the functionality of the device, data acquisition system and data evaluation methods.

  19. 67. TURBINE BUILDING (LOCATION N), FIRST LEVEL, B AND D ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. TURBINE BUILDING (LOCATION N), FIRST LEVEL, B AND D LOOP STEAM HEATERS FROM NORTHWEST - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  20. 66. TURBINE BUILDING (LOCATION N), FIRST LEVEL, B AND D ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. TURBINE BUILDING (LOCATION N), FIRST LEVEL, B AND D LOOP STEAM HEATERS FROM NORTH - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  1. 25. GENERAL VIEW OF LUBE OIL PUMPS FOR TURBINES #1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. GENERAL VIEW OF LUBE OIL PUMPS FOR TURBINES #1 AND #2. THE TANK IN BACKGROUND HOLDS OIL FOR STEP BEARINGS - Georgetown Steam Plant, South Warsaw Street, King County Airport, Seattle, King County, WA

  2. Properties of Nickel-Based Hydrogen-Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, D. P.; Warren, J. P.; Cowles, B. A.; Shoemaker, D.; Teel, J. R. J.; Pearson, D. L.; Annis, C. G. J.; Wilson, D. A.; Schwartz, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    120 page report presents data on mechanical properties of cast nickelbased alloys for turbine blades operating in hydrogen and steam at high temperatures. Tests on alloys for hydrogen-burning engines of future are described.

  3. Debris trap in a turbine cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian David

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine having a rotor and a plurality of stages, each stage comprising a row of buckets mounted on the rotor for rotation therewith; and wherein the buckets of at least one of the stages are cooled by steam, the improvement comprising at least one axially extending cooling steam supply conduit communicating with an at least partially annular steam supply manifold; one or more axially extending cooling steam feed tubes connected to the manifold at a location radially outwardly of the cooling steam supply conduit, the feed tubes arranged to supply cooling steam to the buckets of at least one of the plurality of stages; the manifold extending radially beyond the feed tubes to thereby create a debris trap region for collecting debris under centrifugal loading caused by rotation of the rotor.

  4. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for national endorsement as designated duty engineer (DDE) of steam, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... qualified member of the engine department or equivalent position; (2) For designated duty engineer of steam... engine department or equivalent position; and (3) For designated duty engineer of steam, motor, and/or... designated duty engineer (DDE) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.524 Section...

  5. Improved plant performance through evaporative steam condensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, D.

    1998-07-01

    Combining an open cooling tower and a steam condenser into one common unit is a proven technology with many advantages in power generation application, including reduced first cost of equipment, reduced parasitic energy consumption, simplified design, reduced maintenance, and simplified water treatment, Performance of the steam turbine benefits from the direct approach to wet bulb temperature, and operating flexibility and reliability improve compared to a system with a cooling tower and surface condenser. System comparisons and case histories will be presented to substantiate improved systems economies.

  6. AFB/open cycle gas turbine conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, T. W.; Tashjian, R.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed gas turbine systems in industrial cogeneration are identified. Based on site-specific conceptual designs, the potential benefits of the AFB/gas turbine system were compared with an atmospheric fluidized design steam boiler/steam turbine system. The application of these cogeneration systems at four industrial plant sites is reviewed. A performance and benefit analysis was made along with a study of the representativeness of the sites both in regard to their own industry and compared to industry as a whole. A site was selected for the conceptual design, which included detailed site definition, AFB/gas turbine and AFB/steam turbine cogeneration system designs, detailed cost estimates, and comparative performance and benefit analysis. Market and benefit analyses identified the potential market penetration for the cogeneration technologies and quantified the potential benefits.

  7. Numerical Research of Steam and Gas Plant Efficiency of Triple Cycle for Extreme North Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashov, Nikolay; Tsibulskii, Svjatoslav; Matveev, Aleksandr; Masjuk, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The present work shows that temperature decrease of heat rejection in a cycle is necessary for energy efficiency of steam turbine plants. Minimum temperature of heat rejection at steam turbine plant work on water steam is 15°C. Steam turbine plant of triple cycle where lower cycle of steam turbine plant is organic Rankine cycle on low-boiling substance with heat rejection in air condenser, which safely allows rejecting heat at condensation temperatures below 0°C, has been offered. Mathematical model of steam and gas plant of triple cycle, which allows conducting complex researches with change of working body appearance and parameters defining thermodynamic efficiency of cycles, has been developed. On the basis of the model a program of parameters and index cycles design of steam and gas plants has been developed in a package of electron tables Excel. Numerical studies of models showed that energy efficiency of steam turbine plants of triple cycle strongly depend on low-boiling substance type in a lower cycle. Energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net 60% higher can be received for steam and gas plants on the basis of gas turbine plant NK-36ST on pentane and its condensation temperature below 0°C. It was stated that energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net linearly depends on condensation temperature of low-boiling substance type and temperature of gases leaving reco very boiler. Energy efficiency increases by 1% at 10% decrease of condensation temperature of pentane, and it increases by 0.88% at 15°C temperature decrease of gases leaving recovery boiler.

  8. Biomass externally fired gas turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Eidensten, L.; Yan, J.; Svedberg, G.

    1996-07-01

    This paper is a presentation of a systematic study on externally fired gas turbine cogeneration fueled by biomass. The gas turbine is coupled in series with a biomass combustion furnace in which the gas turbine exhaust is used to support combustion. Three cogeneration systems have been simulated. They are systems without a gas turbine, with a non-top-fired gas turbine, and a top-fired gas turbine. For all systems, three types of combustion equipment have been selected: circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, grate fired steam boiler, and grate fired hot water boiler. The sizes of biomass furnaces have been chosen as 20 MW and 100 MW fuel inputs. The total efficiencies based on electricity plus process heat, electrical efficiencies, and the power-to-heat ratios for various alternatives have been calculated. For each of the cogeneration systems, part-load performance with varying biomass fuel input is presented. Systems with CFB boilers have a higher total efficiency and electrical efficiency than other systems when a top-fired gas turbine is added. However, the systems with grate fired steam boilers allow higher combustion temperature in the furnace than CFB boilers do. Therefore, a top combustor may not be needed when high temperature is already available. Only one low-grade fuel system is then needed and the gas turbine can operate with a very clean working medium.

  9. Parametric studies influencing condensation evolution in compressible steam flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Kermani, M. J.; Piroozi, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of operational and geometrical parameters on the location of condensation onset and the rate of condensations are considered. These parameters are expansion rate of different geometry, inlet stagnation condition and the waves. To do so, a numerical method is presented to solve the two-dimensional two-phase steam flow over a series of geometries (such as nozzles, expansion corners and steam turbine blade-to-blade passages) by means of equilibrium thermodynamics model.

  10. Advanced technology cogeneration system conceptual design study: Closed cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, E. A. T.; Daudet, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a three task study performed for the Department of Energy under the direction of the NASA Lewis Research Center are documented. The thermal and electrical energy requirements of three specific industrial plants were surveyed and cost records for the energies consumed were compiled. Preliminary coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed heated closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration system designs were developed for each industrial plant. Preliminary cost and return-on-equity values were calculated and the results compared. The best of the three sites was selected for more detailed design and evaluation of both closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration systems during Task II. Task III involved characterizing the industrial sector electrical and thermal loads for the 48 contiguous states, applying a family of closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration systems to these loads, and conducting a market penetration analysis of the closed cycle gas turbine cogeneration system.

  11. Steam conservation and boiler plant efficiency advancements

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, D.P.

    1999-07-01

    This paper examines several cost-effective steam conservation and boiler plant efficiency advancements that were implemented during a recently completed central steam boiler plant replacement project at a very large semiconductor manufacturing complex. They were: (1) Reheating of dehumidified clean room makeup air with heat extracted during precooling; (2) Preheating of deionization feedwater with refrigerant heat of condensation; (3) Preheating of boiler combustion air with heat extracted from boiler flue gas; (4) Preheating of boiler feedwater with heat extracted from gas turbine exhaust; (5) Variable-speed operation of boiler feedwater pumps and forced-draft fans; and (6) Preheating of boiler makeup water with heat extracted from boiler surface blow-down. The first two advancements (steam conservation measures) saved about $1,010,000 per year by using recovered waste heat rather than steam-derived heat at selected heating loads. The last four advancements (boiler plant efficiency measures) reduced the cost of steam produced by about 13%, or $293,500 per year, by reducing use of natural gas and electricity at the steam boiler plant. These advancements should prove of interest to industrial energy users faced with replacement of aging, inefficient boiler plants, rising fuel and power prices, and increasing pressures to reduce operating costs in order to enhance competitiveness.

  12. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  13. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  14. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  16. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  17. Modernization and life time extension on steam power plants in Eastern Europe and Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupetz, M.; Jenikejew, E.; Hiss, F.

    2014-06-01

    The Eastern European electricity markets with focus on Russia and Ukraine are suffering severe aging of the existing LMZ, UTZ and Turboatom steam turbine fleets after more than 25 years of operation. Energy efficient modernizations along with life time extension beyond the designed life time of existing old power plants is an economical option to address the increasing power demand. Steam Turbine modernizations are using latest state of the art materials and technology-enhanced turbine components such as blades, sealing, guide blade carriers, inner casings and rotors as well as components for auxiliary systems e.g. lube and lifting oil thus providing increased efficiency and optimized maintainability. This paper outlines unique design features and pre-engineered modules of the Siemens steam turbine modernization applications for thermal power stations, emphasizing the solutions for Turboatom 300 MW and LMZ 200 MW turbine-generators. The paper concludes with references and operational experience.

  18. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiaguo; Lu, Yonggi; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  19. Theory and Tests of Two-Phase Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    New turbines open possibility of new types of power cycles. Report describes theoretical analysis and experimental testing of two-phase impulse turbines. Such turbines open possibility of new types of power cycles operating with extremely wet mixtures of steam and water, organic fluids, or immiscible liquids and gases. Possible applications are geothermal power, waste-heat recovery, refrigerant expansion, solar conversion, transportation, and engine-bottoming cycles.

  20. New high temperature steels for steam power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hald, J.; Nath, B.

    1998-07-01

    Development of high efficiency ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plant is based on the availability of improved high temperature steels for key components in the steam cycle i.e: Thick section boiler components and steam lines; turbine rotors, casings, valves and bolts; superheaters; furnace panels. New martensitic high creep strength 9--12%Cr steels like the P91, P92 and P122 allow increased steam parameters in steam headers and steam lines, and similar martensitic steels are used for rotors, casings and valves of advanced steam turbines. The development of these steels have included demonstration of fabricability like welding and bending, fabrication of demonstration components built into existing plants, and the validation of long term creep properties with testing times of more than 30,000 hours. The development work has been made in international projects like the EPRI RP1403, COST 501 and ECCC. The first use of the new steels have followed in USC plants in Europe and Japan, leading to plant efficiencies up to 47%. Superheater steels must have high corrosion and oxidation resistance, and a number of new austenitic steels have been developed for this purpose. Tests are currently running to obtain long term corrosion and oxidation data for design of superheaters in the new steels. Steels for furnace panels need to be welded without post weld heat treatment, and also for this purpose new ferritic and martensitic steels are available. With the materials development described above it is today possible to construct a USC plant with steam parameters 325bar/610 C/630 C/630 C and an efficiency approaching 50%. Future developments in the European THERMIE demonstration project ``Advanced (700 C) PF Power Plant'' will address the use of nickel or cobalt base superalloys for boilers, steam lines and turbines. This may lead to efficiencies in the range 52--55%.

  1. Turbine speed control system based on a fuzzy-PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian-Hua; Wang, Wei; Yu, Hai-Yan

    2008-12-01

    The flexibility demand of marine nuclear power plant is very high, the multiple parameters of the marine nuclear power plant with the once-through steam generator are strongly coupled, and the normal PID control of the turbine speed can’t meet the control demand. This paper introduces a turbine speed Fuzzy-PID controller to coordinately control the steam pressure and thus realize the demand for quick tracking and steady state control over the turbine speed by using the Fuzzy control’s quick dynamic response and PID control’s steady state performance. The simulation shows the improvement of the response time and steady state performance of the control system.

  2. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.; Doyle, Edward F.; DiBella, Francis A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

  3. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOEpatents

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

    1994-03-08

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

  4. 4. STEAM PLANT MARINE BOILERS WEST OF STEAM PLANT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. STEAM PLANT MARINE BOILERS WEST OF STEAM PLANT AND SOUTH OF ORIGINAL STEAM PLANT BOILERS, FROM SOUTH. November 13, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 77 FR 75674 - Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, PPL Susquehanna, LLC, Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... COMMISSION Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, PPL Susquehanna, LLC, Exemption 1.0 Background... and NPF-22, which authorizes operation of the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES), Units 1 and 2... unplanned Unit 1 outage necessary due to fatigue cracking experienced on the Unit 1 turbine blades...

  6. APPARATUS FOR CONTROL OF A BOILING REACTOR RESPONSIVE TO STEAM DEMAND

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1963-07-23

    A method of controlling a fuel-rod-in-tube-type boilingwater reactor having nozzles at the point of water entry into the tube is described. Water is pumped into the nozzles by an auxiliary pump operated by steam from an interstage position of the associated turbine, so that the pumping speed is responsive to turbine demand. (AEC)

  7. Steam Digest 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  8. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Muir, James F.; Wayland, Jr., J. Robert

    1987-01-01

    An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

  9. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Muir, J.F.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1985-06-19

    The present invention relates to an empirical electrical method for remote sensing of steam quality utilizing flow-through grids which allow measurement of the electrical properties of a flowing two-phase mixture. The measurement of steam quality in the oil field is important to the efficient application of steam assisted recovery of oil. Because of the increased energy content in higher quality steam it is important to maintain the highest possible steam quality at the injection sandface. The effectiveness of a steaming operation without a measure of steam quality downhole close to the point of injection would be difficult to determine. Therefore, a need exists for the remote sensing of steam quality.

  10. Project DEEP STEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. W.

    Development of technology for thermally efficient downhole delivery of surface generated steam and for downhole steam generators are the major elements of Project DEEP STEAM. Specific activities include development of advanced concept thermal packers, evaluation of the thermal performance of insulated tubing designs in a test tower and in a field environment, and development of downhole steam generator concepts. Field tests were performed in both technology areas and the results and status are presented.

  11. Project DEEP STEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Development of technology for thermally efficient downhole delivery of surface-generated steam and for downhole steam generators are the major elements of Project DEEP STEAM. Specific activities include development of advanced concept thermal packers, evaluation of the thermal performance of insulated tubing designs in a test tower and in a field environment, and development of downhole steam generator concepts. Field tests have been performed in both technology areas and the results and status are presented.

  12. Research and development of ceramic gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuo

    1993-12-31

    The CO{sub 2} caused by the consumption of hydrocarbon fuel is one of the main gases which affect the global climate. In order to reduce the formation of CO{sub 2}, it is necessary to conserve energy as effectively as possible. Therefore the heat energy provided by the fuel should be utilized in multi-cascades. The energy at the high temperature should be used for the generation of electric power and the energy at low temperature could be used for making the steam and the hot water. The gas turbine is preferable for this purpose. The heat energy of exhaust gas can be reused more easily. The two systems are proposed by using the gas turbine as the high temperature stage. One is the cogeneration system and the other is the combined cycle. The former generates electric power by the gas turbine and make steam or hot water in the exhaust gas. The latter employs the gas turbine as the high temperature cycle and the steam turbine as the low temperature cycle.

  13. 43 CFR 3276.13 - What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... flow into the turbine in klbs; for dual flash facilities, you must separate the steam flow into high... BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? 3276.13 Section 3276.13 Public Lands... What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

  14. 43 CFR 3276.13 - What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... flow into the turbine in klbs; for dual flash facilities, you must separate the steam flow into high... BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? 3276.13 Section 3276.13 Public Lands... What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

  15. 43 CFR 3276.13 - What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... flow into the turbine in klbs; for dual flash facilities, you must separate the steam flow into high... BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? 3276.13 Section 3276.13 Public Lands... What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

  16. The Invisibility of Steam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Almost everyone "knows" that steam is visible. After all, one can see the cloud of white issuing from the spout of a boiling tea kettle. In reality, steam is the gaseous phase of water and is invisible. What you see is light scattered from the tiny droplets of water that are the result of the condensation of the steam as its temperature…

  17. Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a steam driven power system by steam mixing

    DOEpatents

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Durst, Bruce M.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Reid, Bruce D.; Burritt, James

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a steam driven power plant wherein addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant results in a surprising increase in plant performance. For Example, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler may be installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

  18. Turbine system

    DOEpatents

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson

    2016-05-03

    A turbine system is disclosed. The turbine system includes a transition duct having an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The turbine system further includes a turbine section connected to the transition duct. The turbine section includes a plurality of shroud blocks at least partially defining a hot gas path, a plurality of buckets at least partially disposed in the hot gas path, and a plurality of nozzles at least partially disposed in the hot gas path. At least one of a shroud block, a bucket, or a nozzle includes means for withstanding high temperatures.

  19. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  20. Use of Cooling Thermal Storage as a Heat Sink for Steam Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Ahmed Sabry

    In the present paper, a system is proposed for improving the performance of steam power plant with air-cooled condenser during peak loads. In this system, the power plant comprises two steam turbines, and the air-cooled condenser is replaced by two condensers. The first one is air-cooled (dry) and used for condensing the exhaust steam of the first turbine, while the second is water-cooled and serves to condense the steam outlet of the second turbine. The warm cooling water exiting the wet condenser is pumped to a cooling storage container, where it is cooled and re-circulated to the wet condenser. Cooling is produced by a refrigeration machine driven by the extra electric power generated by the two turbines during the time of the off-peak-loads (low electricity rates). Simple energy analyses have been developed to predict the energy characteristics of this system. The results of this paper showed that the proposed system leads to improving the plant power output at peak-loads. About 6, 16, 24 and 33% increase in generated plant power can be achieved at peak-loads (high electricity rates) when the ambient temperature is 20, 30, 40 and 50°C respectively, and the whole steam exiting both turbines is cooled in a wet condenser to a design temperature of 20°C. The results showed also that choice of the capacity of each turbine is essentially affected by the quality of the refrigeration machine and ambient temperature.

  1. The evaporative gas turbine (EGT) cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Horlock, J.H.

    1998-04-01

    Humidification of the flow through a gas turbine has been proposed in a variety of forms. The STIG plant involves the generation of steam by the gas turbine exhaust in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and its injection into or downstream of the combustion chamber. This increases the mass flow through the turbine and the power output from the plant, with a small increase in efficiency. In the evaporative gas turbine (or EGT) cycle, water is injected in the compressor discharge in a regenerative gas turbine cycle (a so-called CBTX plant--compressor [C], burner [B], turbine [T], heat exchanger [X]); the air is evaporatively cooled before it enters the heat exchanger. While the addition of water increases the turbine mass flow and power output, there is also apparent benefit in reducing the temperature drop in the exhaust stack. In one variation of the basic EGT cycle, water is also added downstream of the evaporative aftercooler, even continuously in the heat exchanger. There are several other variations on the basic cycle (e.g., the cascaded humidified advanced turbine [CHAT]). The present paper analyzes the performance of the EGT cycle. The basic thermodynamics are first discussed, and related to the cycle analysis of a dry regenerative gas turbine plant. Subsequently some detailed calculations of EGT cycles are presented. The main purpose of the work is to seek the optimum pressure ratio in the EGT cycle for given constraints (e.g., fixed maximum to minimum temperature). It is argued that this optimum has a relatively low value.

  2. UEM boosts cogeneration activity with frame 6 gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Boissenin, Y.; Moliere, M.; Remyl, P.

    1995-05-01

    In 1991, after EC directives allowed the use of natural gas for electricity production, Usine d`Electricite de Metz (UEM) decided to install a new combined-cycle plant based on a 38 MW MS6001B gas turbine supplied by European Gas Turbines. This selection was made after a screening of twenty or so solutions. The cogeneration/combined-cycle system based on a heavy-duty gas turbine was found to be the best because it ensured high efficiency, low environment impact and a profitability ratio of 20%, providing a payback of five years. The system consisting of the gas turbine, HRSG and other structures of the Chambiere plant has an efficiency of over 80% in cogeneration mode and approaching 50% in the combined-cycle configuration. A major factor in this flexibility is the Frame 6 gas turbine. The UEM Frame 6 gas turbine at site conditions has a rated ISO output of 38.15 MW without steam injection, 40.5 MW with 10.5 t/h of steam and 43.5 MW with 24.7 t/h of steam. NO{sub x} emissions are 152, 42 and less than 42 ppm respectively, at 15% O{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} emissions are below 100 g/MJ at base load, and a 14% increase in output by steam injection will only cause a 7% increase in CO{sub 2} emissions.

  3. Steam generator performance degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, J.T.; Dow, B.L. )

    1991-09-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the range and severity of steam generator performance degradation effects experienced by PWRs in the United States. The survey results were tabulated and correlated with steam generator age and design. Operating experience at several PWRs was examined in detail. The operating experience at US PWRs was compared to that of PWRs in Japan and Germany. Possible causes for the performance degradation were postulated and evaluated. The sensitivity of steam generator output pressure to changes in various parameters (such as fouling factor, average reactor coolant temperature, and percentage of steam generator tubes plugged) was calculated. These calculations were used in the evaluation of possible causes of steam generator performance degradation. Several deposit exfoliation scenarios were evaluated in terms of the calculated effect on fouling factor trends and associated steam generator output pressure trends. 15 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, James E.

    1987-01-01

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

  5. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, J.E.

    1987-08-25

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

  6. The Invisibility of Steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2014-11-01

    Almost everyone "knows" that steam is visible. After all, one can see the cloud of white issuing from the spout of a boiling tea kettle. In reality, steam is the gaseous phase of water and is invisible. What you see is light scattered from the tiny droplets of water that are the result of the condensation of the steam as its temperature falls below 100 °C (under standard conditions).

  7. 67. VIEW, LOOKING WEST, OF A STEAM LAUNDRY LOCATED IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. VIEW, LOOKING WEST, OF A STEAM LAUNDRY LOCATED IN THE CONDENSER GALLERY UNDER THE TURBINE HALL. THE FACILITY WAS USED TO WASH WORKERS CLOTHES. THE WASH TUB IS LOCATED AT THE LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE TUB WAS LOADED WITH LAUNDRY, SOAP AND WATER. STEAM WAS BLOWN IN THROUGH THE PIPE AT THE EXTREME LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE ROUNDED RIGHT END OF THE TUB PROMOTED TUMBLING AND SCRUBBING ACTION. ON THE RIGHT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS A STEAM POWERED CENTRIFUGE FOR SPIN DRYING LAUNDRY. THE WIRE FRAMES AT THE CENTER BACKGROUND ARE PANTS STRETCHERS. THEY WERE INSERTED INTO OVERALL OR TROUSER LEGS TO MINIMIZE WRINKLING AND ENCOURAGE DRYING. LAUNDRY WAS DRIED ON NEARBY STEAM PIPES. (WITH SCALE) - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  8. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C.; Sanderson, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

  9. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wenglarz, R.A.

    1994-08-01

    Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

  10. Downhole steam injector

    DOEpatents

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Hoke, Donald E.

    1983-01-01

    An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

  11. Economic effectiveness of using super-high values of initial steam parameters in cogeneration power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilov, V. F.; Zakharenkov, E. A.

    2014-09-01

    The present paper reports the results of numerical investigations into both thermodynamic and economic components of the effect of an increase in the initial steam parameters to super-high values for cogeneration power units. As an initial variant, the heat flow diagram of the turbine plant equipped with the T-250/300-23.5 TMZ steam turbine was adopted. In the course of investigations, the ranges of initial steam pressure p 0 = 23.5-30.0 MPa, steam temperature t 0 = 540-600°C, and steam pressure after single reheat p rh = 3.6-4.5 MPa were considered. In the calculations of the thermodynamic efficiency, the extent of the effect of an increase in steam parameters on the out and the electric efficiency of a power unit when a cogeneration steam turbine operates in condensing and heat-extraction modes were estimated. In the economic part of the calculations, indicators of the commercial efficiency of investments into appropriate projects and the levels of total investment and production costs were determined. The results of the calculations made it possible to estimate the optimum level of super-high values of the initial steam parameters for a cogeneration power unit equipped with the T-280/335-26.1 steam turbine. The best indicators of the commercial efficiency were achieved for the variant with the following parameters of live steam and steam in the reheater: p 0 = 26.1 MPa, p rh = 4.035 MPa, t 0/ t rh = 575/575°C. In this case, the following values were obtained: 42.56% gross efficiency, 40.94% net efficiency, 334 MW rated capacity in the condensing operation mode, and 279.1 MW in the heat-extraction mode at Q T = 1381.6 GJ/h (330 Gcal/h). The use of higher steam parameters would result in a significant increase in the cost of projects. It has been shown that the restoration of initial design values of both live steam temperature and its temperature after reheat t 0/ t rh = 565/560°C may be advisable at the upgrading of power units equipped with T-250

  12. 5. STEAM PLANT COOLING TOWER LOCATED WEST OF STEAM PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. STEAM PLANT COOLING TOWER LOCATED WEST OF STEAM PLANT BUILDING, FROM SOUTH. SHOWS CURRENT LEVEL OF DISREPAIR. December 4, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. 14. MARINE STEAM BOILERS AT WEST SIDE OF CROSSCUT STEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. MARINE STEAM BOILERS AT WEST SIDE OF CROSSCUT STEAM PLANT BUILDING, FROM SOUTH. August 4, 1947 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. High performance steam development. Final report, Phase No. 3: 1500{degree}F steam plant for industrial cogeneration prototype development tests

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1996-01-01

    As a key part of DOE`s and industry`s R&D efforts to improve the efficiency, cost, and emissions of power generation, a prototype High Performance Steam System (HPSS) has been designed, built, and demonstrated. The world`s highest temperature ASME Section I coded power plant successfully completed over 100 hours of development tests at 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psig on a 56,000 pound per hour steam generator, control valve and topping turbine at an output power of 5500 hp. This development advances the HPSS to 400{degrees}F higher steam temperature than the current best technology being installed around the world. Higher cycle temperatures produce higher conversion efficiencies and since steam is used to produce the large majority of the world`s power, the authors expect HPSS developments will have a major impact on electric power production and cogeneration in the twenty-first century. Coal fueled steam plants now produce the majority of the United States electric power. Cogeneration and reduced costs and availability of natural gas have now made gas turbines using Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG`s) and combined cycles for cogeneration and power generation the lowest cost producer of electric power in the United States. These gas fueled combined cycles also have major benefits in reducing emissions while reducing the cost of electricity. Development of HPSS technology can significantly improve the efficiency of cogeneration, steam plants, and combined cycles. Figure 2 is a TS diagram that shows the HPSS has twice the energy available from each pound of steam when expanding from 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psia to 165 psia (150 psig, a common cogeneration process steam pressure). This report describes the prototype component and system design, and results of the 100-hour laboratory tests. The next phase of the program consists of building up the steam turbine into a generator set, and installing the power plant at an industrial site for extended operation.

  15. Exhaust system for use with a turbine and method of assembling same

    SciTech Connect

    Dalsania, Prakash Bavanjibhai; Sadhu, Antanu

    2015-08-18

    An exhaust system for use with a steam turbine is provided. An exhaust hood includes an input and an output, the input receiving fluid from the steam turbine. The exhaust hood includes a first side wall that extends between the input and the output. The first side wall includes an aperture. An ejector is coupled to the exhaust hood. The ejector includes inlets and an outlet. At least one of the inlets receives fluid from the exhaust hood via the aperture.

  16. Task 1—Steam Oxidation (NETL-US)

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam in let temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A·USC) steam turbine is high enough (760°C) Ihat traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferr;tic/manensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature lim itations of this class of materials. Cast versions of three traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys (Haynes 263. Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantia l: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 nun thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equi valem microslruclUre •. A multi_step homogenization heat treatment was d~ve loped to better disperse the al loy constituents. These castings were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (al 760 and 800 "C).

  17. Cooling system for a bearing of a turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2002-01-01

    In a gas turbine, a bore tube assembly radially inwardly of an aft bearing conveys cooling steam to the buckets of the turbine and returns the cooling steam to a return. To cool the bearing and thermally insulate the bearing from the cooling steam paths, a radiation shield is spaced from the bore tube assembly by a dead air gap. Additionally, an air passageway is provided between the radiation shield and the inner surface of an aft shaft forming part of the rotor. Air is supplied from an inlet for flow along the passage and radially outwardly through bores in the aft shaft disk to cool the bearing and insulate it from transfer of heat from the cooling steam.

  18. STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kinyon, B.W.; Whitman, G.D.

    1963-07-16

    The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

  19. Turbine design review text

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Three-volume publication covers theoretical, design, and performance aspects of turbines. Volumes cover thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic concepts, velocity diagram design, turbine blade aerodynamic design, turbine energy losses, supersonic turbines, radial-inflow turbines, turbine cooling, and aerodynamic performance testing.

  20. STEAM INJECTION TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The approach used is to inject steam into 1- dimensional columns that have been packed with contaminated soil from the site. Temperatures in the system are monitored aliquots of the effluent collected for analysis. A sample of the initial soil, the final steamed soil, the effluen...

  1. Steampunk: Full Steam Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Heather M.

    2010-01-01

    Steam-powered machines, anachronistic technology, clockwork automatons, gas-filled airships, tentacled monsters, fob watches, and top hats--these are all elements of steampunk. Steampunk is both speculative fiction that imagines technology evolved from steam-powered cogs and gears--instead of from electricity and computers--and a movement that…

  2. Running Out of Steam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Promod

    2000-01-01

    Explains why schools should evaluate whether their older steam-heating systems are still cost-effective, or need to be repaired or replaced. The symptoms of deterioration are listed along with discussions on repair or replacement decision making on three areas of steam heating systems: boilers; distribution system; and terminal equipment. (GR)

  3. Investigation of unsteady flow in axial turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Tomáš; Němec, Martin

    2012-04-01

    The never ending process to increase the efficiency of turbine stages introduced an idea to create an axial turbine stage test rig as part of closed loop transonic wind tunnel at Vyzkumny a zkusebni letecky ustav (VZLU). Studying of unsteady flow field behaviours in turbine stages is nowadays essential in the development process. Therefore, the test rig was designed with focusing on possibility of detailed studying of unsteady flow fields in turbine stages. New methodologies and new instrumentations were developed at VZLU and successfully integrated to gain valuable information from experiments with turbine stages. Two different turbine stages were tested during the facility introduction process. The measurement of these two models demonstrated how flexible the test rig is. One of them was an enlarged model of small gas turbine stage. The other was scaled-down model of stage of intermediate-pressure steam turbine. The external characteristics of both models were acquired during experiments as well as the detailed unsteady flow field measurement. Turbine stages were tested in various regimes in order to check the capabilities of the facility, methodology and instrumentation together. The paper presents results of unsteady flow field investigation in the enlarged turbine stage with unshrouded rotor. The interaction of structures developed in a stator with the rotor flow field is depicted and the influence of turbine load on evolution of secondary flows in rotor is analysed.

  4. Progress on the biphase turbine at Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect

    Cerini, D.; Hays, L.; Studhalter, W.

    1997-12-31

    The status of a Biphase turbine power plant being installed at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field is presented. The major modules for the power plant are completed except for a back pressure steam turbine. The power plant will be started in April 1997 with the Biphase turbine alone followed by the addition of the steam turbine module two months later. The current power plant performance level is 2780 kWe due to a decline in the well. An increase in power output to 4060 kWe by adding the flow from another well is planned. The addition of five Biphase power plants with a total power output of 21.2 megawatts is described.

  5. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  6. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs. Cormos, C. C. Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  7. Modernization of experimental air turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimko, Marek; Okresa, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    This article briefly describes a modernization of the experimental device - air turbine (VT-400), which is a part of the research activities at the Department of Power System Engineering, University of West Bohemia (KKE-UWB). This device serves for the research of steam turbine blades within the framework of a long-term cooperation between the Department and Doosan Skoda Power (DSPW). Due to the age of the device, some necessary changes had to be performed and some obsolete components had to be replaced or new ones added. A part of this article is also a comparison with the previous state and an evaluation of the contribution after the reconstruction.

  8. The Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G.; Polsky, M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper introduces the Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT) plant, a gas turbine based power generation plant utilizing intercooling, reheat, and humidification. It is based upon the integration of an existing heavy duty gas turbine with an additional shaft comprising industrial compressors and high pressure expander. CHAT capitalizes on the latest proven gas turbine technology, which, combined with a sophisticated thermal cycle configuration, results in substantial improvement in gas turbine efficiency, compared to a simple cycle, while still maintaining typical advantages and merits of a combustion turbine plant. Built with a commercial combustion turbine and available industrial compressors and expanders, the CHAT plant does not require extensive product development and testing. As a result, the CHAT power plant can be offered with specific capital costs up to 20 percent lower than the combined cycle plant, and with competing efficiency. Compared to a combined cycle plant, the CHAT plant offers lower emissions (due to air humidification) and other significant operating advantages with regard to start-up time and costs, better efficiency at part load, lower power degradation at higher ambient temperatures, and simpler operations and maintenance due to elimination of the complexities and costs associated with steam production. The CHAT plant also integrates very effectively with coal gasification and particularly well with the water quench design. This feature has been discussed in previous publications.

  9. Wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  10. Okeelanta Cogeneration Project: Electricity and steam from sugar cane

    SciTech Connect

    Schaberg, D.

    1994-12-31

    The Okeelanta Cogeneration Project is a Bagasse- and wood chip-fired cogeneration project with a net electrical output of approximately 70MW, located at the Okeelanta Corporation`s sugar mill in South Bay, Florida. The Project is comprised of three stoker type boilers each capable of producing 440,000 lbs/hr of steam at 1455 psia, 955F, and a single extraction/condensing steam turbine with a gross output of 75 MW. The electrical output will be sold to Florida Power and Light under the terms of an executed power purchase agreement and delivered at 138kV.

  11. Overview of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, R.L.; Bevc, F.P.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J.

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse`s experience with land based gas turbines started in 1945 with the development of a 2000 hp gas turbine-generator set that consisted of a single reduction gear, compressor, 12 combustors and turbine. A thermal efficiency of 18% was obtained. By 1954, Westinghouse had developed a 15 MW unit (with a regenerator and intercooler) that was designed for a full-load simple cycle efficiency of 29%. As the initial step in the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, Westinghouse has already developed a 230 MW gas turbine that has a simple cycle efficiency of 38.5% without the use of regeneration and intercooler concepts. In 1967, Westinghouse developed its first gas turbine combined cycle, a synergistic combination of the Brayton and the Rankine cycles. In a combined cycle the heat rejected by the higher temperature topping cycle is recovered in the lower temperature bottoming cycle to produce additional power from the energy initially released by the fuel. In this first Westinghouse combined cycle, a 1450{degrees}F burner outlet temperature gas turbine, rated at 25 MW, supplied exhaust heat which was used in a boiler to furnish steam to drive an 85 MW steam turbine. This plant achieved an annual average efficiency of 39.6%.

  12. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems reference system definition update

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the the Direct Coal-Fueled 80 MW Combustion Turbine Program is to establish the technology required for private sector use of an advanced coal-fueled combustion turbine power system. Under this program the technology for a direct coal-fueled 80 MW combustion turbine is to be developed. This unit would be an element in a 207 MW direct coal-fueled combustion turbine combined cycle which includes two combustion turbines, two heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. Key to meeting the program objectives is the development of a successful high pressure slagging combustor that burns coal, while removing sulfur, particulates, and corrosive alkali matter from the combustion products. Westinghouse and Textron (formerly AVCO Research Laboratory/Textron) have designed and fabricated a subscale slagging combustor. This slagging combustor, under test since September 1988, has been yielding important experimental data, while having undergone several design iterations.

  13. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 2: Advanced energy conversion systems. Part 1: Open-cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. H.; Corman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Ten energy conversion systems are defined and analyzed in terms of efficiency. These include: open-cycle gas turbine recuperative; open-cycle gas turbine; closed-cycle gas turbine; supercritical CO2 cycle; advanced steam cycle; liquid metal topping cycle; open-cycle MHD; closed-cycle inert gas MHD; closed-cycle liquid metal MHD; and fuel cells. Results are presented.

  14. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  15. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  16. Solar steam nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Polman, Albert

    2013-01-22

    Silica-gold core-shell nanoparticles that are immersed in water act as efficient nanoscale generators of steam when illuminated with sunlight. In their paper in this issue of ACS Nano, Halas, Nordlander, and co-workers demonstrate this intriguing phenomenon that results from the nucleation of steam at the surface of individual nanoparticles that are heated by the sun. The same effect is also used to demonstrate distillation of ethanol. The solar steam nanobubble generation phenomenon results from the complex interplay of many different phenomena that occur at the nanoscale, and can find a broad range of applications. PMID:23282196

  17. Performance Diagnosis using Optical Torque Sensor for Selection of a Steam Supply Plant among Advanced Combined Cycle Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Shuichi

    A newly developed optical torque sensor was applied to select a steam supply plant among advanced combined cycle, i.e. ACC, power plants of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. The sensor uses laser beams focused on small stainless steel reflectors having bar-code patterns attached on the surface of the rotating shaft, and a technique of signal processing using a correlation function featuring high frequency. The plant that supplied steam was selected on the basis of diagnosis of each steam turbine performance of the plants. Heat balance program was developed to analyze steam turbine performance using data of turbine output measured by the torque sensor and data measured by existing instruments of the power station. The steam turbine that supplied steam was determined by the present method using the optical torque sensor. The accuracy of the method to determine the steam supply plant was analyzed. It was then confirmed that the accuracy was greatly improved as compared with that of existing method.

  18. Real gas properties and Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel turbine performance prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The H2/H2O mixture thermodynamic and transport properties variations for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuel turbine over a range of temperatures and pressures are examined. The variation of molecular viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, and Prandtl number for the hydrogen/steam mixture are fitted using polynominal relationships for future turbine performance use. The mixture property variations are calculated using GASP and WASP computer programs. The air equivalent performance of the SSME fuel turbine is computed.

  19. Materials Performance in USC Steam

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; N. M. Yanar

    2011-09-07

    Materials Performance in USC Steam: (1) pressure effects on steam oxidation - unique capability coming on-line; (2) hydrogen evolution - hydrogen permeability apparatus to determine where hydrogen goes during steam oxidation; and (3) NETL materials development - steam oxidation resource for NETL developed materials.

  20. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  1. High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M.W.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

  2. Airfoil Heat Transfer Characteristics in Syngas and Hydrogen Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzotta, D.W.; Chyu, M.K.; Alvin, M.A.

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen or coal-derivative syngas turbines promise increased efficiency with exceptionally low NOx emissions compared to the natural gas based turbines. To reach this goal, turbine inlet temperature (TIT) will need to be elevated to a level exceeding 1700°C [1, 2]. The thermal load induced by such a temperature increase alone will lead to immense challenges in maintaining material integrity of turbine components. In addition, as working fluid in the gas path will primarily be steam, possibly mixed with carbon oxides, the aero-thermal characteristic in a hydrogen turbine is expected to be far different from that of air/nitrogen enriched gas stream in a gas turbine. For instance, steam has distinctly higher density and specific heat in comparison to a mixture of air and combustion gases as they are expanded in a conventional gas turbine. Even if the temperature limits remain about the same, the expansion in a hydrogen turbine will have to proceed with a greater enthalpy drop and therefore requires a larger number of stages. This also implies that the flow areas may need to be expanded and blade span to be enlarged. Meanwhile, a greater number of stages and hot surfaces need to be protected. This also suggests that current cooling technology available for modern day gas turbines has to be significantly improved. The ultimate goal of the present study is to systematically investigate critical issues concerning cooling technology as it is applicable to oxy-fuel and hydrogen turbine systems, and the main scope is to develop viable means to estimate the thermal load on the turbine “gas side”, that is eventually to be removed from the “coolant side”, and to comparatively quantify the implication of external heat load and potential thermal barrier coating (TBC) degradation on the component durability and lifing. The analysis is based on two well-tested commercial codes, FLUENT and ANSYS.

  3. CORCO downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, B.

    1982-03-01

    The opening of a new frontier in steaming moved forward in Jan. 1982 when a CORCO (Chemical Oil Recovery Co.) generator described as the first commercial down-hole steam generator went into operation in Kern County's Devils Den field, 60 miles northwest of Bakersfield, CA. A major reason for selecting the down-hole generator for the Devils Den field is that along with steam the unit puts away flue gas resulting from combustion. There is no pressure to speak of in the escudo, and it is hoped that the inert gas will build up bottom-hole pressure to assist in oil recovery. Another reason is that the down-hole generator, rated for 7 million btu/hr, makes it possible to tailor steam injection to the well's requirements. The advantages and disadvantages of the CORCO generator are described, along with its application in the Kern River field.

  4. Continuous steam explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D.; Yu, E.K.C.

    1995-02-01

    StakeTech has focused on developing steam explosion on a commercial basis. The company essentially a biomass conversion company dealing with cellulosic biomass such as wood, crop residues and, more recently, wastepaper and municipal solid waste (MSW). They are faced with a tremendous opportunity to develop uses for the 50% of biomass that is currently wasted. The StakeTech steam explosion process is able to break the bonds using only high-pressure steam with no chemical additives. The continuous StakeTech System now has been installed in five countries and has proved effective in processing a wide variety of raw materials including wood chips, straw, sugarcane bagasse, and waste paper. End-use applications range from specialty chemicals to large-volume agricultural products. The increase of development activities in steam explosion should lead to expanded end-use applications, and acceptance of the technology by industry should accelerate in the years to come.

  5. Cost Reduction Strategies - Steam

    SciTech Connect

    2001-03-01

    Boilers play a particularly important role in integrated mills because they not only provide the steam needed for key processes but also consume by-product fuels generated in the coke ovens, blast furnace, and BOF.

  6. Steam Properties Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 10 NIST/ASME Steam Properties Database (PC database for purchase)   Based upon the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) 1995 formulation for the thermodynamic properties of water and the most recent IAPWS formulations for transport and other properties, this updated version provides water properties over a wide range of conditions according to the accepted international standards.

  7. Technical and economic comparison of steam-injected versus combined- cycle retrofits on FT-4 engines

    SciTech Connect

    Silaghy, F.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation of the technical and economic aspects of converting the TPM FT4 simple cycle combustion turbines into either the steam injected gas turbine (SIGT) cycle or the combined cycle (CC). It describes the selection of the best retrofit alternatives through the evaluation and data analysis of a large number of sites and units at two utilities. Conceptual designs are performed on the best retrofit alternatives. Flow diagrams and general arrangement drawings are developed for various configurations utilizing drum type and once-through type multipressure heat recovery steam generators. Auxiliary power consumption and capital cost estimates are presented together with an economic evaluation and comparison of the retrofit alternatives. While the investigation is performed utilizing the FT4 combustion turbines, the steps presented in the report may be used as a guide for investigating the conversion of other gas turbines to either cycle at any utility site.

  8. Hydro-flow supra-turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Neale, A.B.

    1981-08-04

    A turbine engine operates at high pressure and at relatively low temperatures and revolutions per minute through the use of special carburetion, compressor, combustion unit, and turbine arrangements. The system is characterized by the use of water which is vaporized and concurrently reduces the temperature of the vaporized fuel and air mixture as compression occurs, and is not physically intermixed with the combustion gases until after initial combustion takes place. The compressor includes a pair of back-to-back, four stage composite compressors to which synchronized dual carburetion or meter-flow arrangements separately supply water and gasoline or other fuel, along with air. The water absorbs heat from the compression of both of the two compressors, and the resultant vaporous product gases are routed to the jacket of a combustion chamber in which the compressed fuel and air mixture is burned. Following initial ignition and some burning of the fuel, the superheated steam and combustion products are combined, and the combination is supplied to a multistage transverse flow turbine having in the order of 17 pressure stages. The turbine includes arrangements for directing the high pressure gases back and forth through the rotor blades at different radial distances from the axis of the turbine. Exhaust gases from the turbine are applied to a ''floating'' muffler, including a rotatable inner chamber to facilitate mixing exhaust gases with the ambient air, and to disperse the high moisture content of the exhaust gases.

  9. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply

  10. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Esbeck, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    DOE`s ATS Program will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in the 3 to 20 MW class. Market studies were conducted for application of ATS to the dispersed/distributed electric power generation market. The technology studies have led to the design of a gas-fired, recuperated, industrial size gas turbine. The Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program continues. In the High Performance Steam Systems program, a 100 hour development test to prove the advanced 1500 F, 1500 psig system has been successfully completed. A market transformation will take place: the customer will be offered a choice of energy conversion technologies to meet heat and power generation needs into the next century.

  11. Correlation of operating parameters on turbine shaft vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar; Rajora, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    The new generation of condition monitoring and diagnostics system plays an important role in efficient functioning of power plants. In most of the rotating machine, defects can be detected by such a system much before dangerous situation occurs. It allows the efficient use of stationary on-line continuous monitoring system for condition monitoring and diagnostics as well. Condition monitoring of turbine shaft can not only reduce expenses of maintenance of turbo generator of power plants but also prevents likely shutdown of plant, thereby increases plant load factor. Turbo visionary parameters are essential part of health diagnosis system of turbo generator. Particularly steam pressure, steam temperature and lube oil temperature are important parameters to monitor because they are having much influence on turbine shaft vibration and also governing systems are available for change values of those parameters. This paper includes influence of turbo visionary parameters i.e., steam temperature, steam pressure, lube oil temperature, turbine speed and load on turbine shaft vibration at turbo generator at 195 MW unit-6,Kota Super Thermal Power Station by measuring vibration amplitude and analyze them in MATLAB.

  12. 70. TURBINE HALL, LOOKING NORTH AT THE REAR OF UNIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. TURBINE HALL, LOOKING NORTH AT THE REAR OF UNIT 2, SHOWING STEAM PIPE, QUICK STOP VALVE, GOVERNOR, AND OIL COOLER; ALSO SHOWING UNIT 5 TO RIGHT (SEE DRAWING No. 12 OF 13) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  13. Practical solutions to turbine control system retrofit problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, M.; Lovejoy, K.

    1996-10-01

    This paper addresses the use of microprocessors in retrofitting turbine control systems. The topics of the paper include modern control system architecture, human machine interface, steam flow linearization and automatic valve calibration, retrofit hydraulic interfacing, reliability considerations, and advanced valve positioning technique (quarter cycle damping).

  14. Single Rotor Turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2004-10-26

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a centrifugal compressor having axially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and an axial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the centrifugal compressor flows.

  15. Steam separator modeling for various nuclear reactor transients

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, C Y; Mullen, G; Knoess, C; Griffith, P

    1987-06-01

    In a pressurized water reactor steam generator, a moisture separator is used to separate steam and liquid and to insure that essentially dry steam is supplied to the turbine. During a steam line break or combined steam line break plus tube rupture, a number of phenomena can occur in the separator which have no counterparts during steady-state operation. How the separator will perform under these circumstances is important for two reasons, it affects the carry-over of radioactive iodine and the water inventory in the secondary side. This study has as its goal the development of a simple separator model which can be applied to a variety of steam generator for off-design conditions. Experiments were performed using air and water on three different types of centrifugal separators: a cyclone as a generic separator, a Combustion Engineering type stationary swirl vane separator, and a Westinghouse type separator. The cyclone separator system has three stages of separation: first the cyclone, then a gravity separator, and finally a chevron plate separator. The other systems have only a centrifugal separator to isolate the effect of the primary separator. Experiments were also done in MIT blowdown rig, with and without a separator, using steam and water. The separators appear to perform well at flow rates well above the design values as long as the downcomer water level is not high. High downcomer water level rather than high flow rates appear to be the primary cause of degraded performance. Appreciable carry-over from the separator section of a steam generator occurs when the drain lines from three stages of separation are unable to carry off the liquid flow. Failure scenarios of the separator for extreme range of conditions from the quasi-steady state transient to the fast transients are presented. A general model structure and simple separator models are provided.

  16. Materials Performance in USC Steam Portland

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; R. Hu

    2011-04-26

    Goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 C and 340 atm, co-called advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. A limitation to achieving the goal is a lack of cost-effective metallic materials that can perform at these temperatures and pressures. Some of the more important performance limitations are high-temperature creep strength, fire-side corrosion resistance, and steam-side oxidation resistance. Nickel-base superalloys are expected to be the materials best suited for steam boiler and turbine applications above about 675 C. Specific alloys of interest include Haynes 230 and 282, Inconel 617, 625 and 740, and Nimonic 263. Further validation of a previously developed chromia evaporation model is shown by examining the reactive evaporation effects resulting from exposure of Haynes 230 and Haynes 282 to moist air environments as a function of flow rate and water content. These two alloys differ in Ti and Mn contents, which may form outer layers of TiO{sub 2} or Cr-Mn spinels. This would in theory decrease the evaporation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} from the scale by decreasing the activity of chromia at the scale surface, and be somewhat self-correcting as chromia evaporation concentrates the Ti and Mn phases. The apparent approximate chromia activity was found for each condition and alloy that showed chromia evaporation kinetics. As expected, it was found that increasing the gas flow rate led to increased chromia evaporation and decreased chromia activity. However, increasing the water content in moist air increased the evaporation, but results were mixed with its effect on chromia activity.

  17. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Micheli, Paul L.; Williams, Mark C.; Parsons, Edward L.

    1995-01-01

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

  18. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

    1995-09-12

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes. 1 fig.

  19. 32. 48' MILL STEAM ENGINE ADMISSION BOX (?), STEAM VALVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 48' MILL STEAM ENGINE ADMISSION BOX (?), STEAM VALVE, AND REVERSING MECHANISM LIFTING CYLINDER. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, 48" Plate Mill, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  20. 14. STEAM CABINETS & SITZ BATH IN STEAM ROOM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. STEAM CABINETS & SITZ BATH IN STEAM ROOM. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  1. Plan Turbines 3 & 4, Side View Turbines ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plan - Turbines 3 & 4, Side View - Turbines 3 & 4, Section A-A - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  2. Performance comparison of two combined SOFC-gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    A necessary step in the use of natural gas (methane) in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is its preliminary conversion to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. To perform methane conversion within fuel cells and avoid catalyst carbonization the molar ratio between methane and steam (or steam with carbon dioxide) should be 1:2 or higher at the SOFC inlet. In this article two possible technological approaches to provide this desirable ratio in a combined SOFC-gas turbine system are compared. The first approach involves generation of the required steam in the coupled gas turbine cycle. The second (which is more traditional) involves recycling some part of the exhaust gases around the anodes of the SOFC stack. Exergy and energy analyses for the two SOFC-gas turbine systems are conducted to determine their efficiencies and capabilities to generate power at different rates of oxygen conductivity through the SOFC electrolyte (ion conductive membrane), as well as various efficiencies for natural gas conversion to electricity in the SOFC stack. It is determined that with a fixed SOFC stack the scheme with recycling has higher exergy and energy efficiencies (requiring less natural gas for a fixed electricity output) and the scheme with steam generation is associated with a higher capability for power generation. The question of which scheme permits a higher reduction in natural gas consumption (per unit of time), in the case of its implementation instead of a contemporary combined gas turbine-steam power cycle is considered. The greater capability of power generation while retaining high efficiency of fuel consumption in the scheme with steam generation makes its implementation more favorable. This scheme provides a better relative reduction in natural gas consumption (relative to the scheme with exhaust gas recycling) calculated per unit of time which reaches values of about 20%. At higher values of oxygen conductivity and efficiency of natural gas conversion to electricity in the

  3. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Traudt, R.F.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a wind turbine device having a main rotatable driven shaft, elongated blades operatively mounted on the main shaft for unitary rotation with the main shaft. The blade extends substantially radially away from the main shaft and is adapted to fold downwind under naturally occurring forces and simultaneously feather in direct response to the folding movement. A means associated with the blades is included for increasing the rate of fold relative to the rate of feather as the speed of rotation increases.

  4. High performance steam development

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1995-10-01

    Over 30 years ago U.S. industry introduced the world`s highest temperature (1200{degrees}F at 5000 psig) and most efficient power plant, the Eddystone coal-burning steam plant. The highest alloy material used in the plant was 316 stainless steel. Problems during the first few years of operation caused a reduction in operating temperature to 1100{degrees}F which has generally become the highest temperature used in plants around the world. Leadership in high temperature steam has moved to Japan and Europe over the last 30 years.

  5. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  6. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  7. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  8. Calculation of flow distribution in large radius ratio stages of axial flow turbines and comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, J.

    1974-01-01

    A method of calculating stage parameters and flow distribution of axial turbines is described. The governing equations apply to space between the blade rows and are based on the assumption of rotationally symmetrical, compressible, adiabatic flow conditions. Results are presented for stage design and flow analysis calculations. Theoretical results from the calculation system are compared with experimental data from low pressure steam turbine tests.

  9. Steam exit flow design for aft cavities of an airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Storey, James Michael; Tesh, Stephen William

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. A skirt or flange structure is provided for shielding the steam cooling impingement holes adjacent the inner wall aerofoil fillet region of the nozzle from the steam flow exiting the aft nozzle cavities. Moreover, the gap between the flash rib boss and the cavity insert is controlled to minimize the flow of post impingement cooling media therebetween. This substantially confines outflow to that exiting via the return channels, thus furthermore minimizing flow in the vicinity of the aerofoil fillet region that may adversely affect impingement cooling thereof.

  10. Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

    1993-11-01

    The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

  11. Evaluating the thermodynamic efficiency of hydrogen cycles at wet-steam nuclear power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Egorov, A. N.

    2013-04-01

    Various schematic solutions for implementing a hydrogen cycle on the basis of thermal and nuclear power stations are discussed. Different approaches to construction of cooling systems for the combustion chambers used in hydrogen-oxygen steam generators are described. An example of solution is given in which the combustion chamber is cooled by steam, which is the most efficient one in the thermodynamic respect. Results from an assessment of the thermodynamic efficiency of hydrogen cycles organized on the basis of the power unit of a wet-steam nuclear power station equipped with a K-1000-60/1500 turbine are presented. The thermodynamic efficiency of different schematic and parametric versions of implementing a hydrogen cycle, including those with a satellite turbine operating on displaced steam, is carried out. It is shown that the use of satellite turbines allows the power output and efficiency of the power unit of a wet-steam nuclear power station to be upgraded in a reliable and effective manner.

  12. Steamer of steam circulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, M.

    1986-09-23

    A conveyor steamer is described which consists of: a room enclosed with heat-insulated walls, floor, and ceiling, the room having an entrance and an exit for goods to be steamed, a conveyor means for carrying the goods to be steamed, the conveyor means traversing into the entrance of the room, through the room, and out of the exit of the room; a source of heated primary steam; first pipe means, arranged beneath the conveyor means, for jetting the heated primary steam upwardly from across the floor of the room; second pipe means disposed across the entire ceiling of the room arranged above the conveyor means, for scavenging spent steam from across the entire ceiling of the room; and an ejector-condenser means, interconnected between the first pipe means, the source of primary heated steam and the second pipe means, for mixing the spent steam from the second pipe means with the heated primary steam in the first pipe means; whereby the spent steam mixed with the heated primary steam is caused to recirculate in the first pipe means through the room, thus saving energy and consuming less heated primary steam so that cost reductions will result.

  13. Crude oil steam distillation in steam flooding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.H.; Elder, R.B.

    1980-08-01

    Steam distillation yields of sixteen crude oils from various parts of the United States have been determined at a saturated steam pressure of 200 psig. Study made to investigate the effect of steam pressure (200 to 500 psig) on steam distillation yields indicates that the maximum yields of a crude oil may be obtained at 200 psig. At a steam distillation correlation factor (V/sub w//V/sub oi/) of 15, the determined steam distillation yields range from 12 to 56% of initial oil volume for the sixteen crude oils with gravity ranging from 12 to 40/sup 0/API. Regression analysis of experimental steam distillation yields shows that the boiling temperature (simulated distillation temperature) at 20% simulated distillation yield can predict the steam distillation yields reasonably well: the standard error ranges from 2.8 to 3.5% (in yield) for V/sub w//V/sub oi/ < 5 and from 3.5 to 4.5% for V/sub w//V/sub oi/ > 5. The oil viscosity (cs) at 100/sup 0/F can predict the steam distillation yields with standard error from 3.1 to 4.3%. The API gravity can predict the steam distillation yields with standard error from 4.4 to 5.7%. Characterization factor is an unsatisfactory correlation independent variable for correlation purpose.

  14. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb, P. D. Jablonski, and P. Wang

    2010-10-01

    Develop advanced coal-based power systems capable of 45–50 % efficiency at <$1,000/kW (in 2002 dollars). Develop technologies for capture and sequestration of CO2 that result in: • <10% increase in the cost of electricity in an IGCC-based plant • <35% increase in the cost of electricity for pulverized coal boilers Demonstrate coal-based energy plants that offer near-zero emissions (including CO2) with multiproduct production

  15. Topping PCFB combustion plant with supercritical steam pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; White, J.

    1997-11-01

    Research is being conducted to develop a new type of coal fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a second generation or topping pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustion (topping PCFB) plant, offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 46 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized coal fired plants with scrubbers. The topping PCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer fuel gas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2,300 F and higher. After completing pilot plant tests of a carbonizer, a PCFB, and a gas turbine topping combustor, all being developed for this new plant, the authors calculated a higher heating value efficiency of 46.2 percent for the plant. In that analysis, the plant operated with a conventional 2,400 psig steam cycle with 1,000 F superheat and reheat steam and a 2.5 inch mercury condenser back pressure. This paper identifies the efficiency gains that this plant will achieve by using supercritical pressure steam conditions.

  16. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  17. Project DEEP STEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschliman, D. P.; Clay, R. G.; Donaldson, A. B.; Eisenhawer, S. W.; Fox, R. L.; Johnson, D. R.; Mulac, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology to economically produce heavy oils from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this project are the development of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. During the period January 1-March 31, 1981, effort has continued on a low pressure combustion downhole generator (Rocketdyne), and on two high pressure designs (Foster-Miller Associates, Sandia National Laboratories). The Sandia design was prepared for deployment in the Wilmington Field at Long Beach, California. Progress continued on the Min-Stress II packer concept at L'Garde, Inc., and on the extruded metal packer at Foster-Miller. Initial bare string field data are reported on the insulated tubular test at Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, Canada.

  18. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  19. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  20. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  1. Technical and economic comparison of steam-injected versus combined- cycle retrofits on FT-4 engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Silaghy, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation of the technical and economic aspects of converting the TPM FT4 simple cycle combustion turbines into either the steam injected gas turbine (SIGT) cycle or the combined cycle (CC). It describes the selection of the best retrofit alternatives through the evaluation and data analysis of a large number of sites and units at two utilities. Conceptual designs are performed on the best retrofit alternatives. Flow diagrams and general arrangement drawings are developed for various configurations utilizing drum type and once-through type multipressure heat recovery steam generators. Auxiliary power consumption and capital cost estimates are presented together with an economic evaluation and comparison of the retrofit alternatives. While the investigation is performed utilizing the FT4 combustion turbines, the steps presented in the report may be used as a guide for investigating the conversion of other gas turbines to either cycle at any utility site.

  2. Rotor bore and turbine rotor wheel/spacer heat exchange flow circuit

    DOEpatents

    Caruso, Philip M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Ladhani, Azad A.; DeMania, Alan Richard; Palmer, Gene David; Wilson, Ian David; Rathbun, Lisa Shirley; Akin, Robert Craig

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine having closed-circuit steam-cooling passages about the rim of the rotor during steady-state operation, compressor discharge air is supplied to the rotor bore for passage radially outwardly into the wheel space cavities between the wheels and spacers. Communicating slots and channels in the spacers and wheels at circumferentially spaced positions enable egress of the compressor discharge air into the hot gas flow path. At turbine startup, cooling air flows through the closed-circuit steam passages to cool the outer rim of the rotor while compressor discharge air pre-warms the wheels and spacers. At steady-state, cooling steam is supplied in the closed-circuit steam-cooling passages and compressor discharge air is supplied through the bore and into the wheel space cavities to cool the rotor.

  3. Steam drive recovery method utilizing a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Snavely, E. S.; Hopkins, D. N.

    1984-09-18

    Viscous oil is recovered from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation by a steam flooding technique wherein steam is generated in a downhole steam generator located in an injection well by spontaneous combustion of a pressurized mixture of a water-soluble fuel such as sugars and alcohols dissolved in water and substantially pure oxygen. The generated mixture of steam and combustion gases pass through the formation, displacing oil and reducing the oil's viscosity and the mobilized oil is produced from the formation via a spaced-apart production well.

  4. Steam drive oil recovery method utilizing a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nopkins, D. N.; Snavely, E. S.

    1984-10-23

    Viscous oil is recovered from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation by a steam flooding technique wherein steam is generated in a downhole steam generator located in an injection well by spontaneous combustion of a pressurized mixture of a water-soluble fuel such as sugars and alcohols dissolved in water or a stable hydrocarbon fuel-in-water emulsion and substantially pure oxygen. The generated mixture of steam and combustion gases pass through the formation, displacing oil and reducing the oil's viscosity and the mobilized oil is produced from the formation via a spaced-apart production well.

  5. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Sy Ali

    2002-03-01

    The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these

  6. Downhole steam generator shows merit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Production from a 5-spot pattern in Kern River Field reached 25,000 bbl during a 5-month test of a down-hole steam generator-equivalent to the amount of oil expected if steam injection from the conventional source had been continued. The test evaluated the down-hole generator as a steam source relatively free of atmospheric pollutants. The biggest objection to steam recovery of heavy crude is the volume of combustion products vented to the atmosphere, and these frequently contain small amounts of sulfur compounds. One big advantage of generating steam down hole is elimination of heat losses in the injection well. The practical limit for conventional steam injection is in a reservoir approximately 2,500 ft deep; the down-hole generator should operate economically to 6,000 ft. The test proved the feasibility of the method, and cleared the way for a series of down-hole generator installation and retrieval tests.

  7. White noise response of turbine blades subjected to heat flux and thermal gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, V.; Aba, E.; Morguel, O.K.

    1997-07-01

    Design and production of the complex mechanical structures rarely result in an optimal solution. A typical example for this is a turbine blade design. Fatigue failures of the turbine blades is one of the most vexing problems of turbo-machine manufacturers, ever since the steam turbine became the main stay for power generating equipment and the gas turbines are increasingly used in air transport. Turbine blade failures due to fatigue are predominantly vibration related. The dynamic loads on the blading can arise from many different sources such as the high rotational speed, the high operating temperatures, the asymmetric aerofil tapered form of the turbine blade etc. Therefore, vibratory analysis is one of the most important stage in the designing of the turbine blades. In this study, the random response of the turbine blade to white noise excitation has been consistently calculated, including the internal damping mechanisms of the blade. Beside the damping effects, the rotational speed and the linear thermal gradient along the turbine blade are incorporated into the analysis. Pressure difference between the two surfaces of the turbine blades are modelled as white noise excitation along all over the turbine blade. The system dynamic equation of motion are derived and solved by using the combined Finite Element-Modal Analysis Method.

  8. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2003-04-08

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  9. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  10. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August--October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the tasks completed for the advanced turbine systems program. The topics of the report include last row turbine blade development, single crystal blade casting development, ceramic materials development, combustion cylinder flow mapping, shroud film cooling, directional solidified valve development, shrouded blade cooling, closed-loop steam cooling, active tip clearance control, flow visualization tests, combustion noise investigation, TBC field testing, catalytic combustion development, optical diagnostics probe development, serpentine channel cooling tests, brush seal development, high efficiency compressor design, advanced air sealing development, advanced coating development, single crystal blade development, Ni-based disc forging development, and steam cooling effects on materials.

  11. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.T.

    1980-04-01

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment of solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  12. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    DOEpatents

    Li, Charles T.

    1980-01-01

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  13. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    DOEpatents

    Li, C.T.

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  14. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  15. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  16. Experimental Simulation of Turbine-Exhaust Oxygen Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Jim A.; Branch, Ryan W.

    2004-01-01

    In some liquid-propellant rocket engines, the liquid-oxygen boost pump is driven by a turbine that is powered by high-pressure gaseous oxygen. Once it exits the turbine, this gaseous oxygen can be salvaged by injecting it into the subcooled liquid oxygen exiting the boost pump. If the main LOX pump is to function correctly under these circumstances, complete condensation of the gaseous oxygen must quickly follow its injection into the boost-pump discharge. The current investigation uses steam and water in a simple rig that allows the condensation process to be visualized and quantified. This paper offers dimensionless-parameter correlations of the data and trends observed.

  17. Theory and tests of two-phase turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, D.G.

    1982-03-15

    Two-phase turbines open the possibility of new types of power cycles operating with extremely wet mixtures of steam and water, organic fluids, or immiscible liquids and gases. Possible applications are geothermal power, waste-heat recovery, refrigerant expansion, solar conversion, transportation turbine engines, and engine bottoming cycles. A theoretical model for two-phase impulse turbines was developed. Apparatus was constructed for testing one- and two-stage turbines (using speed decrease from stage to stage). Turbines were tested with water-and-nitrogen mixtures and Refrigerant 22. Nozzle efficiencies were 0.78 (measured) and 0.72 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures at a water/nitrogen mixture ratio of 68, by mass; and 0.89 (measured) and 0.84 (theoretical) for Refrigerant 22 expanding from 0.02 quality to 0.28 quality. Blade efficiencies (shaft power before windage and bearing loss divided by nozzle jet power) were 0.63 (measured) and 0.71 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures and 0.62 (measured) and 0.63 (theoretical) for Refrigerant 22 with a single-stage turbine, and 0.70 (measured) and 0.85 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures with a two-stage turbine.

  18. Upgrading of HP turbines for nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, B.A.; Brown, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    Many papers have been written on the upgrading of nuclear plant LP turbines but there are also strong reasons for the upgrading of the HP turbines. Two principal reasons are discussed in this paper. Fouling by deposition on the feedwater side of the stream generator tubes, frequently results in a reduction of pressure at the turbine stop valve and a consequent loss of power output. This loss of power can be largely offset by fitting increased capacity blading in part of the HP turbine which increases the swallowing capacity of the turbine. It is necessary to consider the increased capacity blading, bypassing of heaters and future fouling to arrive at an optimum solution. Since the design of the operating nuclear stations GEC ALSTHOM have made very significant advances in the design of steam turbine HP blading and it is now possible to upgrade the HP turbine with blades of modern design to give a substantial increase in power output. The pay back period for such a upgrade is short and the paper describes some of the Company`s successful nuclear HP upgrading in the UK. The two actions described above can be combined, or indeed, be carried out in conjunction with an LP upgrade.

  19. Steam distillation of crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, J.H.; Hsueh, L.

    1983-04-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to generate crude oil steam distillation data for the prediction of phase behavior in steamflood simulation and to correlate the steam distillation yields for a variety of crude oils. Thirteen steam distillation tests were run on 10 crude oils ranging in gravity from 9.4 to 37/sup 0/API (1.004 to 0.840 g/cm/sup 3/). In each test the crude was steam distilled sequentially at about 220, 300, 400, and 500/sup 0/F (104, 149, 204, and 260/sup 0/C). The cumulative steam distillation yields at 400/sup 0/F (204/sup 0/C) ranged from about 20 to 55 vol%. Experimental results showed that crude oil steam distillation yields at steamflood conditions are significant, even for heavy oils. The effects of differences in steam volume throughput and steam temperature were taken into account when comparing yields for different crudes or repeat runs on the same crude. Steam distillation yields show a high correlation with crude oil API gravity and wax content.

  20. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Ronald L.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  1. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.

    1983-04-19

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (Atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  2. Experimental research on coarse water formation in steam condensing flow on a transition through the shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykas, S.; Majkut, M.; Strozik, M.; Smołka, K.

    2014-08-01

    In this work the condensation phenomena in steam turbine were discussed. The motivation for presented research was an interaction of liquid phase with shock waves existing in the transonic flow. The paper presents the experimental results of the steam condensing transonic flow in Laval nozzles. For the tests the geometries of the half arc nozzles were used. The behaviour of shock waves in the wet steam region was investigated. Due to the high back pressure, in the divergent part of the nozzle the shock wave was induced and interacting with the nozzle walls caused instability in the flow.

  3. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  4. Large wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Donovon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The development associated with large wind turbine systems is briefly described. The scope of this activity includes the development of several large wind turbines ranging in size from 100 kW to several megawatt levels. A description of the wind turbine systems, their programmatic status and a summary of their potential costs is included.

  5. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION STEAM TECH ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steam Enhanced Remediation is a process in which steam is injected into the subsurface to recover volatile and semivolatile organic contaminants. It has been applied successfully to recover contaminants from soil and aquifers and at a fractured granite site. This SITE demonstra...

  6. The effects of solarization on the performance of a gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homann, Christiaan; van der Spuy, Johan; von Backström, Theodor

    2016-05-01

    Various hybrid solar gas turbine configurations exist. The Stellenbosch University Solar Power Thermodynamic (SUNSPOT) cycle consists of a heliostat field, solar receiver, primary Brayton gas turbine cycle, thermal storage and secondary Rankine steam cycle. This study investigates the effect of the solarization of a gas turbine on its performance and details the integration of a gas turbine into a solar power plant. A Rover 1S60 gas turbine was modelled in Flownex, a thermal-fluid system simulation and design code, and validated against a one-dimensional thermodynamic model at design input conditions. The performance map of a newly designed centrifugal compressor was created and implemented in Flownex. The effect of the improved compressor on the performance of the gas turbine was evident. The gas turbine cycle was expanded to incorporate different components of a CSP plant, such as a solar receiver and heliostat field. The solarized gas turbine model simulates the gas turbine performance when subjected to a typical variation in solar resource. Site conditions at the Helio100 solar field were investigated and the possibility of integrating a gas turbine within this system evaluated. Heat addition due to solar irradiation resulted in a decreased fuel consumption rate. The influence of the additional pressure drop over the solar receiver was evident as it leads to decreased net power output. The new compressor increased the overall performance of the gas turbine and compensated for pressure losses incurred by the addition of solar components. The simulated integration of the solarized gas turbine at Helio100 showed potential, although the solar irradiation is too little to run the gas turbine on solar heat alone. The simulation evaluates the feasibility of solarizing a gas turbine and predicts plant performance for such a turbine cycle.

  7. A comparative analysis of the economic effect from using cogeneration gas-turbine units and combined-cycle plants in a power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treshchev, D. A.; Loshchakov, I. I.; Romakhova, G. A.

    2010-06-01

    The net cost of heat production at cogeneration stations equipped with gas turbine units, steam turbine units, and combined-cycle plants is analyzed by way of comparison. It is shown that the minimal net cost will be achieved in the case of using certain types of power installations depending on the network tariff for electric energy.

  8. Tools to Boost Steam System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    The Steam System Scoping Tool quickly evaluates your entire steam system operation and spots the areas that are the best opportunities for improvement. The tool suggests a range of ways to save steam energy and boost productivity.

  9. Retrofit of LP rotors on nuclear turbines in Belgium

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, P.; Billerey, B.; Goffin, J.P.

    1996-11-01

    Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE) had several options available for eliminating the defects related to stress-corrosion in the LP shrunk-on disk rotors of 500 and 1,000 MW turbines. After conducting a technical and financial analysis, TEE decided to replace the existing rotors with welded rotors associated with a new steam path: the performance improvements proposed and guaranteed by Gec Alsthom (GA) have helped to economically justify the replacement solution. Moreover the new technology implemented will increase turbine reliability and availability. The heat rate tests carried out on Tihange 1 have revealed a gain greater than expected, thus confirming the better performance of the new steam path, designed by GA and the right choice made by TEE and its customers.

  10. Turbine Imaging Technology Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2004-12-31

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging alternatives for observing the behavior of juvenile fish within an operating Kaplan turbine unit with a focus on methods to quantify fish injury mechanisms inside an operating turbine unit. Imaging methods are particularly needed to observe the approach and interaction of fish with turbine structural elements. This evaluation documents both the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. The information may be used to acquire the scientific knowledge to make structural improvements and create opportunities for industry to modify turbines and improve fish passage conditions.

  11. Steam/fuel system optimization report: 6000-tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Vakil, T.D.

    1983-07-01

    The design and configuration of the steam and fuel system for the 6000-ton-per-day (tpd) SRC-I Demonstration plant have been optimized, based on requirements for each area of the plant that were detailed in Area Baseline Designs of December 1982. The system was optimized primarily for the two most likely modes of plant operation, that is, when the expanded-bed hydrocracker (EBH) is operating at either high or low conversion, with all other units operating. However, the design, as such, is also operable under four other anticipated operating modes. The plant is self-sufficient in fuel except when the coker/calciner unit is not operating; then the required fuel oil import ranges from 80 to 125 MM Btu/h, lower heating value (LHV). The system affords stable operation under varying fuel gas availability and is reliable, flexible, and efficient. The optimization was based on maximizing overall efficiency of the steam system. The system was optimized to operate at five different steam-pressure levels, which are justifiable based on the plant's team requirements for process, heat duty, and power. All identified critical equipment drives will be run by steam turbines. Also part of the optimization was elimination of the steam evaporator in the wastewater treatment area. This minimized the impact on the steam system of operating in either the discharge of zero-discharge mode; the steam system remains essentially the same for either mode. Any further optimization efforts should be based on overall cost-effectiveness.

  12. Steam drying -- Modeling and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmerstedt, R.; Hager, J.

    1996-08-01

    The concept of steam drying originates from the mid of the last century. However, a broad industrial acceptance of the technique has so far not taken place. The paper deals with modelling the steam drying process and applications of steam drying within certain industrial sectors where the technique has been deemed to have special opportunities. In the modelling section the mass and heat transfer processes are described along with equilibrium, capillarity and sorption phenomena occurring in porous materials during the steam drying process. In addition existing models in the literature are presented. The applications discussed involve drying of fuels with high moisture contents, cattle feed exemplified by sugar beet pulp, lumber, paper pulp, paper and sludges. Steam drying is compared to flue gas drying of biofuels prior to combustion in a boiler. With reference to a current installation in Sweden, the exergy losses, as manifested by loss of co-generation capacity, are discussed. The energy saving potential when using steam drying of sugar beet pulp as compared to other possible plant configurations is demonstrated. Mechanical vapor recompression applied to steam drying is analyzed with reference to reported data from industrial plants. Finally, environmental advantages when using steam drying are presented.

  13. IN SITU STEAM EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ steam extraction removes volatile and semivolatile hazardous contaminants from soil and groundwater without excavation of the hazardous waste. aste constituents are removed in situ by the technology and are not actually treated. he use of steam enhances the stripping of v...

  14. Cooling systems for ultra-high temperature turbines.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes an introduction of research and development activities on steam cooling in gas turbines at elevated temperature of 1500 C and 1700 C level, partially including those on water cooling. Descriptions of a new cooling system that employs heat pipes are also made. From the view point of heat transfer, its promising applicability is shown with experimental data and engine performance numerical evaluation. PMID:11460628

  15. Wind turbine rotor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, H. W.

    1984-11-20

    A vertical axis wind turbine having a horizontal arm member which supports an upright blade assembly. Bearing structure coupling the blade assembly to the turbine arm permits blade movement about its longitudinal axis as well as flexing motion of the blade assembly about axes perpendicular to the longitudinal axis. A latching mechanism automatically locks the blade assembly to its supporting arm during normal turbine operation and automatically unlocks same when the turbine is at rest. For overspeed prevention, a centrifugally actuated arm functions to unlatch the blade assembly permitting same to slipstream or feather into the wind. Manually actuated means are also provided for unlatching the moving blade assembly. The turbine arm additionally carries a switching mechanism in circuit with a turbine generator with said mechanism functioning to open and hence protect the generator circuit in the event of an overspeed condition of the turbine.

  16. Bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.

    PubMed

    Sahemey, R; Warfield, A T; Ahmed, S

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas are the most common benign osteoclastic tumours of the paranasal sinuses. However, nasal cavity and turbinate osteomas are extremely rare. Only nine middle turbinate, three inferior turbinate and one inferior turbinate osteoma cases have been reported to date. The present case report describes the management and follow-up of symptomatic bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.A 60-year-old female presented with symptoms of bilateral nasal obstruction and right-sided epiphora. Radiological investigation found hypertrophic bony changes involving both inferior turbinates. The patient was managed successfully by endoscopic inferior turbinectomies in order to achieve a patent airway, with no further recurrence of tumour after 3 months postoperatively.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. We describe a safe and minimally invasive method of tumour resection, which has a better cosmetic outcome compared with other approaches. PMID:27534890

  17. Steam Digest 2001: Office of Industrial Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles Best Practices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  18. Steam generator tube integrity program

    SciTech Connect

    Dierks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Muscara, J.

    1996-03-01

    A new research program on steam generator tubing degradation is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at Argonne National Laboratory. This program is intended to support a performance-based steam generator tube integrity rule. Critical areas addressed by the program include evaluation of the processes used for the in-service inspection of steam generator tubes and recommendations for improving the reliability and accuracy of inspections; validation and improvement of correlations for evaluating integrity and leakage of degraded steam generator tubes, and validation and improvement of correlations and models for predicting degradation in steam generator tubes as aging occurs. The studies will focus on mill-annealed Alloy 600 tubing, however, tests will also be performed on replacement materials such as thermally-treated Alloy 600 or 690. An overview of the technical work planned for the program is given.

  19. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1995-10-19

    Carbonate fuel cells developed by Energy Research Corporation, in commercial 2.85 MW size, have an efficiency of 57.9 percent. Studies of higher efficiency hybrid power cycles were conducted in cooperation with METC to identify an economically competitive system with an efficiency in excess of 65 percent. A hybrid power cycle was identified that includes a direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine and a steam cycle, which generates power at a LHV efficiency in excess of 70 percent. This new system is called a Tandem Technology Cycle (TTC). In a TTC operating on natural gas fuel, 95 percent of the fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for the reforming of the fuel, and flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell system which generates 72 percent of the power. The portion of the fuel cell anode exhaust which is not recycled, is burned and heat is transferred to the compressed air from a gas turbine, raising its temperature to 1800{degrees}F. The stream is then heated to 2000{degrees}F in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 13 percent of the power. Half the exhaust from the gas turbine flows to the anode exhaust burner, and the remainder flows to the fuel cell cathodes providing the O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the fuel cells flows to a steam system which includes a heat recovery steam generator and stages steam turbine which generates 15 percent of the TTC system power. Studies of the TTC for 200-MW and 20-MW size plants quantified performance, emissions and cost-of-electricity, and compared the characteristics of the TTC to gas turbine combined cycles. A 200-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 72.6 percent, and is relatively insensitive to ambient temperature, but requires a heat exchanger capable of 2000{degrees}F. The estimated cost of electricity is 45.8 mills/kWhr which is not competitive with a combined cycle in installations where fuel cost is under $5.8/MMBtu.

  20. Investigation and adjustment of the pilot power unit equipped with a K-300-170-1R turbine produced by OAO Silovye Mashiny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisyanskii, A. S.; Sukhorukov, E. M.; Nazarov, V. V.; Shklyarov, M. I.; Mironov, A. M.; Nasredinov, V. D.; Ryzhkov, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    Results obtained from investigations and adjustment works on a K-300-170-1R steam turbine carried out concurrently with a comprehensive set of works (adjustment of the support and suspension system of pipelines, analysis of thermal expansions of the cylinders and operating conditions of the bearings, optimization of the steam admission system, balancing works, and others) aimed at improving the turbine unit vibration performance are presented. The use of such integrated approach makes it possible to efficiently settle matters concerned with removing increased vibration of a turbine unit.

  1. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the globalmore » meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions« less

  2. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions

  3. Turbine turbobrake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodisman, Michael I.

    Short duration rotating turbine facilities are a recent development in the field of turbine research. Turbine braking devices can be used to maintain the turbine at the desired test speed, resulting in a longer usable test time. The Isentropic Light Piston Cascade at the Defence Research Agency in Pyestock will perform heat transfer and aerodynamic tests on the first stage of a Rolls-Royce turbine (MT1) linked to a new type of brake, the 'axial turbo brake'. The axial turbo brake is driven by the turbine's exhaust gas and is isolated from the turbine by a choked throat. The turbo brake's power absorption must be controlled to match the power developed by the turbine stage for a constant speed run. Both the turbo brake blade shape and novel power control system were developed from tests on a 0.17 scale test rig. The turbo brake's braking is controlled through by-pass of flow over the blade tips and partial blockage of the turbo brake's exit annulus. Also described is the mechanical design, development and manufacture of the full size turbo brake, turbine disc and turbine blades, which have been successfully spun tested to their overspeed condition. Finally, a theory for self-pumping turbo brakes is developed. These devices would have additional applications because they do not require a supply of high pressure gas to drive them.

  4. Turbine engine interstage seal

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, L.L.

    1993-08-10

    A seal structure is described for a turbine engine, the turbine engine including a housing surrounding a centrifugal compressor having a rotor, and a radial inflow turbine including a turbine rotor, the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor being disposed in back-to-back relation, the turbine rotor being drivingly connected with the compressor rotor and axially spaced therefrom to define an annular gap there between, the gap radially bounded at its outer periphery by the housing and at its inner periphery by an annular surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor an annular sealing member disposed in the gap to control air flow from the compressor toward the turbine; the annular sealing member the first axial direction, and a third annular wall portion joining with the second annular wall portion and extending inward therefrom towards the surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor, and biasing means cooperating with the housing for urging the seal structure toward the turbine rotor.

  5. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-01

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a “triplet” structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. The turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions.

  6. Experimental investigation on combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribaturin, N. A.; Fedorov, V. A.; Alekseev, M. V.; Bogomolov, A. R.; Sorokin, A. L.; Azikhanov, S. S.; Shevyrev, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental data are represented on the investigation of combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated (initial temperature of approximately 150°C) steam at atmospheric pressure. The influence of the ratio of mass flows of the combustible mixture and steam on the qualitative composition of combustion products and the temperature of produced steam is revealed. Main laws for combustion of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, which affect the completeness of mixture combustion, are determined. Experimental data on the influence of concentrations of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the flow of the steam and the combustible mixture upon the completeness of combustion are given. It is found that, when burning the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow with a temperature of 1000-1200°C, it is possible using a variation of the combustible mixture flow. At the same time, the volume fraction of noncondensable gases in the produced steam is no more than 2%. It is revealed that there are several combustion modes of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, in which, in one case, the steam always suppresses combustion and, in another one, detonation of the combustible mixture combustible mixture occurs. It is found that with the excess air factor close to unit, the combustion of the methane-oxygen mixture within steam and the vapor conversion of methane, which result in the appearance of free hydrogen in the produced high-temperature steam, are possible. The description and the principle of the operation of the experimental bench for investigation of combustion of methane-oxygen and hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in the medium of steam are given. Results of experimental investigations of burning fuel and oxygen in the medium of steam are used in the development of a steam superheater for a hightemperature steam turbine.

  7. Downhole steam generation: material studies

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, E.K.; Weirick, L.J.; Muir, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    One enhanced oil recovery technique for extracting heavy crude from deep reservoirs by steam at the bottom of an injection well. Development of a downhole steam generator that will produce steam and inject it into formations at depths greater than 2500 feet is one objective of a Department of Energy/Sandia National Laboratories development effort - Project DEEP STEAM. Extensive material studies have been performed in support of Project DEEP STEAM; current efforts are devoted primarily to the selection and evaluation of materials for use in downhole steam generators. This paper presents observations of the performance of candidate metals and refractory ceramics (combustor liners) during tests of two prototypic, high pressure, diesel/air combustion, direct contact, downhole steam generators. The first downhole test of such a generator provides data on the performance of various metals (304L, 310 and 316S stainless steels and plain carbon steel) exposed for several weeks to a warm, aerated saltwater environment. A number of corrosion mechanisms acted to cause severely degraded perforance of some of the metals. Several refractory liner designs were evaluated during ground level tests of a generator having a ceramic-lined combustion chamber. Of the two refractories employed, alumina and silicon carbide, the alumina liners exhibited more serious surface degradation and corrosion.

  8. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  9. 30. VICTOR WATER TURBINE, STILWELLBIERCE CO., DAYTON, OHIO. SIMILAR TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VICTOR WATER TURBINE, STILWELL-BIERCE CO., DAYTON, OHIO. SIMILAR TURBINE TO LEFT (DOUBLE TURBINE SYSTEM), PHOTO TAKEN FROM PENSTOCK. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  10. Gas turbine and combined-cycle capacity enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This report presents interim results of a study of capacity enhancement of gas turbines and combined cycles. A portion of the study is based on a tailored collaboration study for Missouri Public Service. The techniques studied include water injection, steam injection, increased firing temperature, supercharging, and inlet cooling for the gas turbines. The inlet cooling approaches cover evaporative cooling with and without media, water cooling, thermal energy storage (TES) systems using ice or water and continuous refrigeration. Results are given for UTC FT4/GG4, GE MS5001, MS7001, W501 and W251 gas turbines. Duct firing of a three-pressure HRSG for peaking capacity is investigated. The GE PG7221(FA) is used as the reference gas turbine for this combined cycle. The results to-date indicate that the utilities have a number of viable options for capacity enhancement that are dependent on the mission of the gas turbine, local climate, and the design of the gas turbine.

  11. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  12. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  13. Bioequivalent chemical steam sterilization indicators.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, A; Manne, S

    1984-01-01

    Biological indicators used to monitor steam sterilization cycles have two major shortcomings--the incubation period needed to determine if sterilization was accomplished, and the reliance on test packs for gathering information in each load. Chemical indicators do not suffer from these shortcomings. Chemical indicators can respond to time, temperature, and steam parameters to thus parallel the BI reaction. Nine commercially available chemical indicators and four biological indicators were evaluated under the conditions of dry heat, in a biological indicator-evaluator resistometer vessel, and in a hospital sterilizer. The results indicate that wider use of integrated chemical steam sterilization indicators is recommended. PMID:6493101

  14. Characteristics pertinent to propagation of pulsating pressure in the channels of turbine machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Chen, Zuoyi

    2007-01-01

    A new model describing the propagation of the pressure pulsations in the intricately shaped channels of turbine machines is presented. The proposed model was successfully used to analyze two emergency events: a failure of a steam turbine’s cast diaphragm and a failure of a rocket engine’s oxygen pump booster stage.

  15. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  16. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  17. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  18. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  19. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  20. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  1. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  2. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  3. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  4. Small turbines, big unknown

    SciTech Connect

    Gipe, P.

    1995-07-01

    While financial markets focus on the wheeling and dealing of the big wind companies, the small wind turbine industry quietly keeps churning out its smaller but effective machines. Some, the micro turbines, are so small they can be carried by hand. Though worldwide sales of small wind turbines fall far short of even one large windpower plant, figures reach $8 million to $10 million annually and could be as much as twice that if batteries and engineering services are included.

  5. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  6. Steam distillation effect and oil quality change during steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, K.T.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Steam distillation is an important mechanism which reduces residual oil saturation during steam injection. It may be the main recovery mechanism in steamflooding of light oil reservoirs. As light components are distilled the residual (initial) oil, the residuum becomes heavier. Mixing the distilled components with the initial oil results in a lighter produced oil. A general method has been developed to compute steam distillation yield and to quantify oil quality changes during steam injection. The quantitative results are specific because the California crude data bank was used. But general principles were followed and calculations were based on information extracted from the DOE crude oil assay data bank. It was found that steam distillation data from the literature can be correlated with the steam distillation yield obtained from the DOE crude oil assays. The common basis for comparison was the equivalent normal boiling point. Blending of distilled components with the initial oil results in API gravity changes similar to those observed in several laboratory and field operations.

  7. Rampressor Turbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ramgen Power Systems

    2003-09-30

    The design of a unique gas turbine engine is presented. The first Rampressor Turbine engine rig will be a configuration where the Rampressor rotor is integrated into an existing industrial gas turbine engine. The Rampressor rotor compresses air which is burned in a traditional stationary combustion system in order to increase the enthalpy of the compressed air. The combustion products are then expanded through a conventional gas turbine which provides both compressor and electrical power. This in turn produces shaft torque, which drives a generator to provide electricity. The design and the associated design process of such an engine are discussed in this report.

  8. Wind Turbine Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop on wind turbine structural dynamics was held to review and document current United States work on the dynamic behavior of large wind turbines, primarily of the horizontal-axis type, and to identify and discuss other wind turbine configurations that may have lower cost and weight. Information was exchanged on the following topics: (1) Methods for calculating dynamic loads; (2) Aeroelasticity stability (3) Wind loads, both steady and transient; (4) Critical design conditions; (5) Drive train dynamics; and (6) Behavior of operating wind turbines.

  9. Hermetic turbine generator

    DOEpatents

    Meacher, John S.; Ruscitto, David E.

    1982-01-01

    A Rankine cycle turbine drives an electric generator and a feed pump, all on a single shaft, and all enclosed within a hermetically sealed case. The shaft is vertically oriented with the turbine exhaust directed downward and the shaft is supported on hydrodynamic fluid film bearings using the process fluid as lubricant and coolant. The selection of process fluid, type of turbine, operating speed, system power rating, and cycle state points are uniquely coordinated to achieve high turbine efficiency at the temperature levels imposed by the recovery of waste heat from the more prevalent industrial processes.

  10. Experimental turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Milčák, Petr; Noga, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The experimental air turbine VT400 is located in hall laboratories of the Department of Power System Engineering. It is a single-stage air turbine located in the suction of the compressor. It is able to solve various problems concerning the construction solution of turbine stages. The content of the article will deal mainly with the description of measurements on this turbine. The up-to-now research on this test rig will be briefly mentioned, too, as well as the description of the ongoing reconstruction.

  11. Increasing the efficiency of geothermal power plants using optimum pressures for turbocompressors and steam jet ejectors in gas extraction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harns, Karsten Franz

    Geothermal power plants generate electricity by extracting energy from the earth's interior. The radioactive decay of the earth's core causes heat to conduct towards the surface. When water flows into the fissures of this hot rock a naturally occurring geothermal well is formed. Geothermal power plants use the steam in these wells to drive a turbine and thus generate electricity. The steam in the earth however, is always accompanied by a small fraction of non-condensable gases that build up in the power plant's condenser unless actively removed by some gas extraction system. Because these gases contribute significantly to the total backpressure on the turbine, it is in the interest of power generation to remove them from the condenser. The industry standard for removing these non-condensable gases has been steam jet ejectors or a hybrid system of steam jet ejectors and liquid ring vacuum pumps. This thesis focuses on finding the optimum operating pressures for a hybrid steam jet ejector system and a hybrid turbocompressor system. It was found that plants with steam jet ejectors and liquid ring vacuum pumps provide maximum power output when the liquid ring vacuum pump is operated at its maximum pressure ratio. However, plants with a turbocompressor and liquid ring vacuum pump were found to provide maximum power output when the turbocompressor was operated at its maximum pressure ratio.

  12. Second law analysis of a conventional steam power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Geng; Turner, Robert H.; Cengel, Yunus A.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical investigation of exergy destroyed by operation of a conventional steam power plant is computed via an exergy cascade. An order of magnitude analysis shows that exergy destruction is dominated by combustion and heat transfer across temperature differences inside the boiler, and conversion of energy entering the turbine/generator sets from thermal to electrical. Combustion and heat transfer inside the boiler accounts for 53.83 percent of the total exergy destruction. Converting thermal energy into electrical energy is responsible for 41.34 percent of the total exergy destruction. Heat transfer across the condenser accounts for 2.89 percent of the total exergy destruction. Fluid flow with friction is responsible for 0.50 percent of the total exergy destruction. The boiler feed pump turbine accounts for 0.25 percent of the total exergy destruction. Fluid flow mixing is responsible for 0.23 percent of the total exergy destruction. Other equipment including gland steam condenser, drain cooler, deaerator and heat exchangers are, in the aggregate, responsible for less than one percent of the total exergy destruction. An energy analysis is also given for comparison of exergy cascade to energy cascade. Efficiencies based on both the first law and second law of thermodynamics are calculated for a number of components and for the plant. The results show that high first law efficiency does not mean high second law efficiency. Therefore, the second law analysis has been proven to be a more powerful tool in pinpointing real losses. The procedure used to determine total exergy destruction and second law efficiency can be used in a conceptual design and parametric study to evaluate the performance of other steam power plants and other thermal systems.

  13. Lubricating system for thermal medium delivery parts in a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Mashey, Thomas Charles

    2002-01-01

    Cooling steam delivery tubes extend axially along the outer rim of a gas turbine rotor for supplying cooling steam to and returning spent cooling steam from the turbine buckets. Because of the high friction forces at the interface of the tubes and supporting elements due to rotor rotation, a low coefficient of friction coating is provided at the interface of the tubes and support elements. On each surface, a first coating of a cobalt-based alloy is sprayed onto the surface at high temperature. A portion of the first coating is machined off to provide a smooth, hard surface. A second ceramic-based solid film lubricant is sprayed onto the first coating. By reducing the resistance to axial displacement of the tubes relative to the supporting elements due to thermal expansion, the service life of the tubes is substantially extended.

  14. Steam reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kramarz, Kurt W.; Bloom, Ira D.; Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Wilkenhoener, Rolf; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel. A vapor of the hydrocarbon fuel and steam is brought in contact with a two-part catalyst having a dehydrogenation powder portion and an oxide-ion conducting powder portion at a temperature not less than about 770.degree.C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich. The H.sub.2 content of the hydrogen gas is greater than about 70 percent by volume. The dehydrogenation portion of the catalyst includes a group VIII metal, and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide from the group crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure and mixtures thereof. The oxide-ion conducting portion of the catalyst is a ceramic powder of one or more of ZrO.sub.2, CeO.sub.2, Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3, (BiVO).sub.4, and LaGaO.sub.3.

  15. Enhanced tubes for steam condensers. Volume 1, Summary of condensation and fouling; Volume 2, Detailed study of steam condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.L.; Chamra, L.; Jaber, H.

    1992-02-01

    Electric utility steam condensers typically use plain tubes made of titanium, stainless steel, or copper alloys. Approximately two-thirds of the total thermal resistance is on the water side of the plain tube. This program seeks to conceive and develop a tube geometry that has special enhancement geometries on the tube (water) side and the steam (shell) side. This ``enhanced`` tube geometry, will provide increased heat transfer coefficients. The enhanced tubes will allow the steam to condense at a lower temperature. The reduced condensing temperature will reduce the turbine heat rate, and increase the plant peak load capability. Water side fouling and fouling control is a very important consideration affecting the choice of the tube side enhancement. Hence, we have consciously considered fouling potential in our selection of the tube side surface geometry. Using appropriate correlations and theoretical models, we have designed condensation and water side surface geometries that will provide high performance and be cleanable using sponge ball cleaning. Commercial tube manufacturers have made the required tube geometries for test purposes. The heat transfer test program includes measurement of the condensation and water side heat transfer coefficients. Fouling tests are being run to measure the waterside fouling resistance, and to the test the ability of the sponge ball cleaning system to clean the tubes.

  16. Single rotor turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

  17. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  18. The boundary element analysis of steady-state and transient temperature fields of turbine rotors and discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shu H.; Ma, Zhi Y.

    The paper presents a formulation of the boundary element method for axisymmetric heat transfer. The main advantage of this technique compared with conventional methods is that it reduces the dimensionality of the problem, resulting in a smaller system of equations to be solved. The method is also well suited for solving problems where high gradients occur. The formulation is used to compute the temperature fields of a gas turbine disk and of a steam turbine rotor.

  19. Studying the possibility of extending the service life of VPT-50-4 turbines after long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, S. N.; Sudakov, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    We describe the stages of works on examining the technical state and extending the service life of the main elements of steam turbines. As an example we analyze unique experience gained from activities performed from 1993 to 2010 for examining the technical state and determining the remaining service life of VPT-50-4 turbines operating under the same conditions at the same thermal power station with a view to extend their service life.

  20. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  1. Graphene in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. K.; Swain, P. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene, the two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, draws interest of several researchers due to its many superior properties. It has extensive applications in numerous fields. A turbine is a hydraulic machine which extracts energy from a fluid and converts it into useful work. Recently, Gudukeya and Madanhire have tried to increase the efficiency of Pelton turbine. Beucher et al. have also tried the same by reducing friction between fluid and turbine blades. In this paper, we study the advantages of using graphene as a coating on Pelton turbine blades. It is found that the efficiency of turbines increases, running and maintenance cost is reduced with more power output. By the application of graphene in pipes, cavitation will be reduced, durability of pipes will increase, operation and maintenance cost of water power plants will be less.

  2. Cascaded humidified advanced turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhamkin, M.; Swenson, E.C.; Cohn, A.; Bradshaw, D.; Taylor, R.; Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G.; Jahnke, F.; Polsky, M.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes how, by combining the best features of simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants, the CHAT cycle concept offers power producers a clean, more efficient and less expensive alternative to both. The patented cascaded advanced turbine and its cascaded humidified advanced turbine (CHAT) derivative offer utilities and other power producers a practical advanced gas turbine power plant by combining commercially-available gas turbine and industrial compressor technologies in a unique way. Compared to combined-cycle plants, a CHAT power plant has lower emissions and specific capital costs-approximately 20 percent lower than what is presently available. Further, CHAT`s operating characteristics are especially well-suited to load following quick start-up scenarios and they are less susceptible to power degradation from higher ambient air temperature conditions.

  3. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  4. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-12-17

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  5. Evaluation of a superheater enhanced geothermal steam power plant in the Geysers area. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Janes, J.

    1984-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the attainable generation increase and to evaluate the economic merits of superheating the steam that could be used in future geothermal steam power plants in the Geyser-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). It was determined that using a direct gas-fired superheater offers no economic advantages over the existing geothermal power plants. If the geothermal steam is heated to 900/sup 0/F by using the exhaust energy from a gas turbine of currently available performance, the net reference plant output would increase from 65 MW to 159 MW (net). Such hybrid plants are cost effective under certain conditions identified in this document. The power output from the residual Geyser area steam resource, now equivalent to 1437 MW, would be more than doubled by employing in the future gas turbine enhancement. The fossil fuel consumed in these plants would be used more efficiently than in any other fossil-fueled power plant in California. Due to an increase in evaporative losses in the cooling towers, the viability of the superheating concept is contingent on development of some of the water resources in the Geysers-Calistoga area to provide the necessary makeup water.

  6. Comparative analysis of steam delivery cost for surface and downhole steam drive technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, C.M.

    1981-10-01

    A basis is established for evaluating the economic performances of the technologies for enhanced recovery of heavy crude being investigated through the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM. Conventional surface steam drive is compared with: (1) thermally efficient delivery (through insulated strings) of surface generated steam; (2) low pressure combustion downhole steam generation; (3) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation; (4) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation using air as the oxygen source; and (5) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation substituting pure oxygen for air. A parametric analysis is performed for varying depths, injection rates, and steam qualities.

  7. Coordinated optimization of the parameters of the cooled gas-turbine flow path and the parameters of gas-turbine cycles and combined-cycle power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kler, A. M.; Zakharov, Yu. B.; Potanina, Yu. M.

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the coordinated solution to the optimization problem for the parameters of cycles in gas turbine and combined cycle power plants and to the optimization problem for the gas-turbine flow path parameters within an integral complex problem. We report comparative data for optimizations of the combined cycle power plant at coordinated and separate optimizations, when, first, the gas turbine and, then, the steam part of a combined cycle plant is optimized. The comparative data are presented in terms of economic indicators, energy-effectiveness characteristics, and specific costs. Models that were used in the present study for calculating the flow path enable taking into account, as a factor influencing the economic and energy effectiveness of the power plant, the heat stability of alloys from which the nozzle and rotor blades of gas-turbine stages are made.

  8. Steam injection impact on the performances of nozzle grid in wet-vapor stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, G. A.; Gribin, V. G.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Gavrilov, I. Yu.; Tishchenko, V. A.; Khomiakov, S. V.; Popov, V. V.; Sorokin, I. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Results of experimental study of the efficiency of intra-channel steam injection on the surface of nozzle grids of steam turbines operating in the wet steam flow are presented. The main objective of this study was to determine the basic mechanisms of the steam injection impact on the kinematic characteristics of the liquid phase outside an isolated nozzle grid. The kinetic energy loss distributions of the liquid phase and sliding coefficients of droplets along the grid spacing depending on the injected steam pressure at different theoretical values of the Mach number and the initial wetness are presented. The efficiency index was determined taking into account the kinetic energy loss distribution for the liquid phase along the grid spacing, depending on the pressure reduction on the slot. The investigation was conducted using the total pressure probe placed behind the object under study. The average diameters of large droplets of erosion-hazardous liquid phase at a certain distance from the grid were determined. In measuring the characteristics of the liquid phase particles, a laser diagnostics system of streams was used, based on the "POLIS" complex. The main advantage of this complex is the fact that it is contactless, which allows one to measure characteristics of the liquid phase particles without any distortion of the results and aerodynamic influence on the main stream. It is established that an intra-channel steam injection promotes the destruction of liquid film that formed as a result of the condensation of liquid droplets on the surfaces of nozzle blades, as well as the alignment of the velocity field and the average size reduction of droplets behind the grid. The experimental results have shown that the efficiency of injection (relative to the reduction of the amount of erosion-hazardous droplets) of hot steam substantially depends on the flowing regime of wet steam.

  9. Automotive gas turbine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel control system is reported for automotive-type gas turbines and particulary advanced gas turbines utilizing variable geometry components to improve mileage and reduce pollution emission. The fuel control system compensates for fuel density variations, inlet temperature variations, turbine vane actuation, acceleration, and turbine braking. These parameters are utilized to control various orifices, spool valves and pistons.

  10. Steam Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Qimin; Healey, T; Allen, Lloyd; Irving, Patricia M.

    2002-12-01

    has developed a proprietary catalyst formulation for the fuel processor that is being developed for use with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The catalyst has been tested for the steam reforming of various hydrocarbons such as natural gas, iso-octane, retail gasoline, and hexadecane. A 300h continuous test has shown that the catalyst has very stable performance for steam reforming of iso-octane at 800?C with a steam/C ratio of 3.6. The same catalyst was also tested for steam reforming hexadecane (a surrogate of diesel) for 73h as well as natural gas for over 150h continuously, without deactivation or carbon deposition. Sulfur tolerance of the catalyst was tested using iso-octane containing various concentrations of sulfur. There was no catalyst deactivation after a 220h continuous test using iso-octane with 100ppm sulfur. For comparison, a nickel catalyst (12wt.% Ni/Al2O3) was also tested using different levels of sulfur in iso-octane. The results indicated that the InnovaTek catalyst has a substantially improved sulfur resistance compared to the nickel catalysts currently used for steam reforming. In addition, a variation of the catalyst was also used to reduce CO concentration to < 1% by water gas shift reaction.

  11. Steam generator hand hole shielding.

    PubMed

    Cox, W E

    2000-05-01

    Seabrook Station is an 1198 MWE Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that began commercial operation in 1990. Expensive and dose intensive Steam Generator Replacement Projects among PWR operators have led to an increase in steam generator preventative maintenance. Most of this preventative maintenance is performed through access ports in the shell of the steam generator just above the tube sheet known as secondary side hand holes. Secondary side work activities performed through the hand holes are typically performed without the shielding benefit of water in the secondary side of the steam generator. An increase in cleaning and inspection work scope has led to an increase in dose attributed to steam generator secondary side maintenance. This increased work scope and the station goal of maintaining personnel radiation dose ALARA led to the development of the shielding concept described in this article. This shield design saved an estimated 2.5 person-rem (25 person-Smv) the first time it was deployed and is expected to save an additional 50 person-rem (500 person-mSv) over the remaining life of the plant. PMID:10770158

  12. Performance analysis and optimization of power plants with gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besharati-Givi, Maryam

    The gas turbine is one of the most important applications for power generation. The purpose of this research is performance analysis and optimization of power plants by using different design systems at different operation conditions. In this research, accurate efficiency calculation and finding optimum values of efficiency for design of chiller inlet cooling and blade cooled gas turbine are investigated. This research shows how it is possible to find the optimum design for different operation conditions, like ambient temperature, relative humidity, turbine inlet temperature, and compressor pressure ratio. The simulated designs include the chiller, with varied COP and fogging cooling for a compressor. In addition, the overall thermal efficiency is improved by adding some design systems like reheat and regenerative heating. The other goal of this research focuses on the blade-cooled gas turbine for higher turbine inlet temperature, and consequently, higher efficiency. New film cooling equations, along with changing film cooling effectiveness for optimum cooling air requirement at the first-stage blades, and an internal and trailing edge cooling for the second stage, are innovated for optimal efficiency calculation. This research sets the groundwork for using the optimum value of efficiency calculation, while using inlet cooling and blade cooling designs. In the final step, the designed systems in the gas cycles are combined with a steam cycle for performance improvement.

  13. Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

  14. Terry turbine controls guide

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, R.S. . Steam Turbine Motor and Generator Div.); Wheeler, K.A. )

    1990-09-01

    While utility experience with Terry turbines has been positive, controls and adjustments of controls have required frequent attention. This technical guide addresses the Terry turbine controls, such as trip system, throttle valve linkage and governors. This guide will familiarize personnel who have not had prior experience with the design, organization and setup of these control systems. This document provides instructions for a broad range of utility personnel on optimum methods for the repair, maintenance, adjustment, and troubleshooting of the Terry turbine controls. The guide includes an engineering description of the operation and prevalent failure mechanisms, preventive and predictive maintenance suggestions, repair and adjustment methods, and spare parts recommendations. This guide will be a standalone updated reference manual. It will include drawings and descriptions affecting all required maintenance on the control system, and does not cover site specific appurtenances. Included are both generic and specific recommendations for utility maintenance engineers and technicians. These recommendations will help implement an effective maintenance or upgrade program for Terry turbine controls. This guide is a valuable resource for operating history and common control related problems. The preparation of this manual included the review of the applicable INPO Standby Turbine-Driven Pump Operating Experience Compilation. Individual utilities can use this guide to review their specific maintenance practices and develop improved procedures where applicable. The guide can also be used by some utilities to upgrade their Terry turbine control system. The guide is applicable to the nuclear industry and any other industry utilizing the Terry turbine models included in the document.

  15. Characteristics Evaluation of a CO2-Caputuring Power Generation System with Reheat Cycle Utilizing Regenerative Oxygen-Combustion Steam-Superheater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Pyong Sik

    A new CO2-capturing power generation system is proposed that can be easily realized by applying conventional technologies. In the proposed system, the temperature of middle-pressure steam in a thermal power plant is raised by utilizing oxygen-combusting regenerative steam-superheater. The generated CO2 by combusting fuel in the superheater can be easily separated and captured from the exhaust gas at condenser outlet, and is liquefied. The superheated steam is used to drive a steam turbine power generation system. By adopting a high efficient combined cycle power generation system as an example, it has been shown that the proposed system can increase power output by 10.8%, decrease the CO2 emission amount of the total integrated system by 18.6% with power generation efficiency drop of 2.36% compared with the original power plant without CO2-capture, when superheated steam temperature is 750°C

  16. Fast fluidized bed steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Bryers, Richard W.; Taylor, Thomas E.

    1980-01-01

    A steam generator in which a high-velocity, combustion-supporting gas is passed through a bed of particulate material to provide a fluidized bed having a dense-phase portion and an entrained-phase portion for the combustion of fuel material. A first set of heat transfer elements connected to a steam drum is vertically disposed above the dense-phase fluidized bed to form a first flow circuit for heat transfer fluid which is heated primarily by the entrained-phase fluidized bed. A second set of heat transfer elements connected to the steam drum and forming the wall structure of the furnace provides a second flow circuit for the heat transfer fluid, the lower portion of which is heated by the dense-phase fluidized bed and the upper portion by the entrained-phase fluidized bed.

  17. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  18. Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft Engines. Part 2; Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, preliminary studies on two turbine engine applications relevant to the tilt-rotor rotary wing aircraft are performed. The first case-study is the application of variable pitch turbine for the turbine performance improvement when operating at a substantially lower shaft speed. The calculations are made on the 75 percent speed and the 50 percent speed of operations. Our results indicate that with the use of the variable pitch turbines, a nominal (3 percent (probable) to 5 percent (hypothetical)) efficiency improvement at the 75 percent speed, and a notable (6 percent (probable) to 12 percent (hypothetical)) efficiency improvement at the 50 percent speed, without sacrificing the turbine power productions, are achievable if the technical difficulty of turning the turbine vanes and blades can be circumvented. The second casestudy is the contingency turbine power generation for the tilt-rotor aircraft in the One Engine Inoperative (OEI) scenario. For this study, calculations are performed on two promising methods: throttle push and steam injection. By isolating the power turbine and limiting its air mass flow rate to be no more than the air flow intake of the take-off operation, while increasing the turbine inlet total temperature (simulating the throttle push) or increasing the air-steam mixture flow rate (simulating the steam injection condition), our results show that an amount of 30 to 45 percent extra power, to the nominal take-off power, can be generated by either of the two methods. The methods of approach, the results, and discussions of these studies are presented in this paper.

  19. Estimating turbine limit load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for estimating turbine limit-load pressure ratio from turbine map information is presented and demonstrated. It is based on a mean line analysis at the last-rotor exit. The required map information includes choke flow rate at all speeds as well as pressure ratio and efficiency at the onset of choke at design speed. One- and two-stage turbines are analyzed to compare the results with those from a more rigorous off-design flow analysis and to show the sensitivities of the computed limit-load pressure ratios to changes in the key assumptions.

  20. Aviation turbine fuels, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, E M

    1981-03-01

    Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1980 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1980 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 98 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5 and commercial type Jet A.