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Sample records for k-alpha emission spectra

  1. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations of K alpha line emission from S, Ar, Ca and Fe are presented. It is reported that on the basis of data for hard X-ray bursts, the flux during most impulsive, non-thermal events is likely to be weak, though for a few strong bursts, a flux of approximately 100 photons/cm/s may be expected. The amount of S K alpha emission particularly is sensitively dependent on the value of the lower energy bound of the non-thermal electron distribution, offering a possible means of determining this. Thermal K alpha emission is only significant for Fe ions. The calculated thermal K alpha radiation is much less than that observed during an intense soft X-ray burst. It is concluded that a detailed temperature structure for the emission source is required in order to explain the discrepancy.

  2. Optimization of cold K-alpha emission using copper foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Amina; Hager, Jonathan; Flippo, Kirk

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Trident Laser Facility to increase the conversion efficiency of short-pulse, copper K-alpha x-ray backlighter sources. New target designs using copper foams are in development to investigate the role of underdense/near-critical density targets on the optimization of cold K-alpha emission. K-alpha emission was measured using Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphic (HOPG) and imaged with a toroidally bent quartz crystal to determine uniformity, spatial resolution and conversion efficiency of the new designs. Results from this experiment will help inform the development of short-pulse Cu K-alpha back-lighters on facilities like Omega, OmegaEP and the NIF, with a particular emphasis on creating advanced narrow-band backlighter sources capable of producing strong signal to noise with high x-ray fluxes.

  3. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The expected flux of K alpha line emission from sulfur, argon, calcium, and iron is calculated during both thermal and nonthermal solar X-ray events. Such emission is shown to be weak during the course of most of the nonthermal hard X-ray bursts that Kane and Anderson (1970) have observed. If Compton backscattering is significant at high energies, the flux is reduced still further for disk flares, but it is noted that the strong, near-limb burst of June 26 would have produced about 100 photons /sq cm/sec of sulfur and iron K alpha emission. The impulsive hard X-ray bursts may in general be too short-lived for much K alpha emission. It may be noted that sulfur K alpha emission in particular depends sensitively on the lower-energy limit of the nonthermal electron spectrum, assuming such a sharply defined boundary exists. During soft X-ray bursts, when temperatures of a few 10 to the 7th power K are obtained, K alpha emission from certain iron ions, specifically Fe XVIII-XXIII, may be important.

  4. Impulsive phase Fe K-alpha emission in a flare of 1989 March

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, D. M.; Dennis, B. R.; Slater, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    Evidence for enhanced Fe K-alpha line emission that is coincident (to within 15 s) of an intense hard X-ray (greater than 50 keV) burst is presented on the basis of observations of the Fe K-alpha soft X-ray line made with the SMM. Three different models for explaining the K-alpha enhancement are investigated, namely, photoexcitation by soft X-ray thermal bremsstrahlung radiation from an isothermal source, collisional excitation by nonthermal thick-target electrons, and photoexcitation by a nonthermal hard X-ray flux distribution which extends with a power-law spectrum down to the Fe K-alpha ionization threshold at 7.1 keV. It is found that, to within the limits of isothermal temperature and emission measure set by soft X-ray observations, the thermal photoexcitation model cannot reproduce satisfactorily the intensity of enhanced K-alpha emission during the hard X-ray impulsive phase. The impulsive phase K-alpha flux exceeds that predicted by the thermal photoexcitation model by about 3 sigma. The implications of these results for the nonthermal interpretation of impulsive hard X-ray bursts in solar flares are discussed.

  5. K-alpha X-ray emission in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Arati

    2013-05-01

    Advances in diagnostic techniques at the Sandia Laboratories Z-facility have facilitated the production of very detailed spectral data. X-ray emission from moderately high atomic number plasmas such as Fe and Cu wire array implosions often include substantial 2p-1s K-alpha radiation. In a Z-pinch plasma, K-shell vacancies can be produced by e-beams, hot electrons at the tail of a Maxwellian and also by photopumping from energetic photons emitted near the axis. K-alpha emission that originates from collisional processes involving energetic electrons in the final phase of a pinching plasma are associated with radiationless electron capture, inner-shell electron collisional excitation and ionization. In a Cu wire implosion, K-alpha lines from various ionization stages of Cu as well as from minor constituents including Ni, Fe and Cr are observed. We have calculated K-alpha production within a full simulation of a Cu implosion, including contributions from energetic electrons and photons. Photo-pumped K-alpha emission can be distinguished from that produced by e-beams; K-shell vacancies will be produced near the axis for a beam, and near the outer edge of the plasma for energetic photons. Spectroscopic modeling of these K-alpha lines as well as K- and L-shell emission from valence electrons can provide quantitative diagnostics of plasma parameters. This methodology can also be used to investigate K-alpha emission from other laboratory experiments such as EBIT and astrophysical plasmas. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  6. Structure of the Co and FeK alpha(3,4) Satellite Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Daimant,R.; Sharon, R.; Caliebe, W.; Kao, C.; Deutsch, M.

    2006-01-01

    The K{alpha}{sub 3,4} satellite spectra, originating in the [1s2p]{sup -1}{yields} [2p]{sup -2} transition, were measured with high resolution for Co and Fe, using photoexcitation by tunable monochromatized synchrotron radiation. Fits to a phenomenological sum of Voigt functions and to ab initio relativistic Dirac-Fock-calculated spectra resolved the structure underlying the spectra. The dependence of the satellites' intensity on the excitation energy yielded accurate values for the excitation thresholds. The shake-theory-based Thomas model was found to deviate from the measured intensities, indicating near-threshold major contributions from non-shake excitation processes, such as the knockout, or 'two step one,' effect.

  7. Fluorescent excitation of photospheric Fe K-alpha emission during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, A. N.; Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    The Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the NASA Solar Maximum Mission satellite provides high spectral and temporal resolution observations of the Fe K-alpha lines. Analyses have been conducted of spectra from almost 50 solar flares that occurred during 1980. These data strongly support fluorescent excitation of photospheric iron by photons of E greater than 7.11 keV emitted by the hot coronal plasma produced during the flare. After comparison of the data with a model, the observed K-alpha line widths are discussed along with estimates of the size of the emitting region, the height of the coronal source and the photospheric iron abundance.

  8. XMM-Newton Observation of Fe K(alpha) Emission from a BAL QSO: Mrk 231

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a 20 ksec XMM-Newton observation of Mrk 231. EPIC spectral data reveal strong line emission due to Fe K alpha, which has rarely been detected in this class, as BAL QSOs are very faint in the X-ray band. The line energy is consistent with an origin in neutral Fe. The width of the line is equivalent to a velocity dispersion approximately 18,000 kilometers per second and thus the line may be attributed to transmission and/or reflection from a distribution of emitting clouds. If, instead, the line originates in the accretion disk then the line strength and flat X-ray continuum support some contribution from a reflected component, although the data disfavor a model where the hard X-ray band is purely reflected X-rays. The line parameters are similar to those obtained for the Fe Ka line detected in another BAL QSO, H1413 + 117.

  9. Evolution of Iron K Alpha Line Emission in the Black Hole Candidate GX 339-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y. X.; Zhang, S. N.; Sun, X.; Durouchoux, Ph.; Chen, Wan; Cui, Wei

    2001-01-01

    GX 339-4 was regularly monitored with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer during a period (in 1999) when its X-ray flux decreased significantly (from 4.26 x 10(exp -10) to 7.6 x 10(exp -12) ergs in the 3-20 keV band), as the source settled into the 'off state.' Our spectral analysis revealed the presence of a prominent iron K alpha line in the observed spectrum of the source for all observations. The line shows an interesting evolution: it is centered at approx. 6.4 keV when the measured flux is above 5 x 10(exp -1) ergs per sq cm/s but is shifted to approx. 6.7 keV at lower fluxes. The equivalent width of the line appears to increase significantly toward lower fluxes, although it is likely to be sensitive to calibration uncertainties. While the fluorescent emission of neutral or mildly ionized iron atoms in the accretion disk can perhaps account for the 6.4 keV line, as is often invoked for black hole candidates, it seems difficult to understand the 6.7 keV line with this mechanism because the disk should be less ionized at lower fluxes (unless its density changes drastically). On the other hand, the 6.7 keV line might be due to a recombination cascade of hydrogen- or helium-like iron ions in an optically thin, highly ionized plasma. We discuss the results in the context of proposed accretion models.

  10. The Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 2110: Hard X-Ray Emission Observed by NuStar and Variability of the Iron K-Alpha Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Bianchi, S.; Lu, T. N.; Arevalo, P.; Balokovic, M.; Ballantyne, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Stern, D.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the bright Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110 obtained in 2012, when the source was at the highest flux level ever observed, and in 2013, when the source was at a more typical flux level. We include archival observations from other X-ray satellites, namely XMM-Newton, Suzaku, BeppoSAX, Chandra and Swift. Simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift broad band spectra (in the 3-80 keV range) indicate a cutoff energy E(sub c) greater than 210 keV, with no detectable contribution from Compton reflection. NGC 2110 is one of the very few sources where no evidence for distant Compton thick scattering is found and, by using temporal information collected over more than a decade, we investigate variations of the iron K(alpha) line on time scales of years. The Fe K alpha line is likely the sum of two components: one constant (originating from distant Compton-thick material) and the other one variable and linearly correlated with the source flux (possibly arising from Compton-thin material much closer to the black hole).

  11. High-resolution measurements of the K-alpha spectra of low-ionizationm species of iron: A new spectral signature of nonequilibrium ionization conditions in young supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decaux, V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A.; Chen, M.; Kahn, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first systematic laboratory measurements of high-resolution K-alpha spectra of intermediate ions of iron, Fe X-XVII. These lines are not produced in collisional equilibrium plasmas because of the relevant charge states cannot exist at the high electron temperatures required for appreciable excitation of the K-alpha transitions. However, they can provide excellent spectral diagnostics for nonequilibrium ionization conditions, such the ionizing plasmas of young supernova remnants. To facilitate the line identifications, we compare our spectra with theoretical atomic calculations performed using multiconfiguration parametric potential and Dirac-Fock atomic codes. Our measurements also allow direct comparison with time-dependent ionization balance calculations for ionizing plasmas, and good agreement is found.

  12. The role of hot electron refluxing in laser-generated K-alpha sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P.; Aurand, B.; Basko, M.; Ecker, B.; Gibbon, P.; Karmakar, A.; Hochhaus, D. C.; Kazakov, E.; Kuehl, T.; Labaune, C.; Rosmej, O.; Tauschwitz, An.

    2010-10-15

    A study of the contribution of refluxing electrons in the production of K-alpha radiation from high-intensity laser irradiated thin targets has been performed. Thin copper foils both freestanding, and backed by a thick substrate were irradiated with laser pulses of energies around 100 J at intensities ranging from below 10{sup 17} to above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. At high laser intensities we find a strong reduction in the K-alpha yield from targets backed by the substrate. The observed yield reduction is in good agreement with a simple model using hot electron spectra from particle-in-cell simulations or directly inferred from the measured bremsstrahlung emission and can therefore be interpreted as due to the suppression of hot electron refluxing. The study shows that refluxing electrons play a dominant role in high-intensity laser driven K- alpha generation and have to be taken into account in designing targets for laser driven high-flux K-alpha sources.

  13. K{alpha} satellite transitions in elements with 12{<=}Z{<=}30 produced by electron incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Limandri, Silvina P.; Carreras, Alejo C.; Trincavelli, Jorge C.; Bonetto, Rita D.

    2010-09-15

    The emission of x-ray satellite lines in the K{alpha} region of Mg, Si, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn induced by electron incidence was studied by means of wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The satellite lines studied were K{alpha}{sup '}, K{alpha}{sub 3}, K{alpha}{sub 4}, K{alpha}{sub 5}, K{alpha}{sub 6}, and two transitions denoted here as K{alpha}{sub 22} and K{alpha}{sub 12}. Energy shifts with respect to the main K{alpha}{sub 1} diagram line and transition probabilities relative to the whole K{alpha} group were determined for a number of lines through a careful spectral processing. The dependence of these parameters, as well as of the K{beta}:K{alpha} intensity ratio, on the atomic number was compared with previous experimental and theoretical determinations when available. A discussion about the different mechanisms responsible for vacancy creation involved in the production of double-ionization satellites was performed in the light of the results obtained. Finally, the behavior of the satellite intensities as a function of the incidence energy was discussed for silicon.

  14. K-alpha X-rays from cosmic ray oxygen. [Detection and calculation of equilibrium charge fractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium charge fractions are calculated for subrelativistic cosmic ray oxygen ions in the interstellar medium. These are used to determine the expected flux of K-alpha rays arising from atomic processes for a number of different postulated interstellar oxygen spectra. Relating these results to the diffuse X-ray background measured at the appropriate energy level suggests an observable line feature. If the flux of low energy cosmic ray oxygen is sufficiently large, K-alpha X-ray line emission from these nuclei will comprise a significant fraction of the total diffuse flux at approximately 0.6 keV. A satellite borne detector with a resolution greater than 30 percent could observe this feature if the subrelativistic interstellar cosmic ray oxygen spectrum is as large as certain theoretical estimates expressed in the text.

  15. Emission spectra of meteorites during thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, J. A.; Townsend, P. D.; Jassemnejad, B.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    1986-02-01

    The emission spectra of four ordinary chondrite meteorites of petrological type 5 have been recorded during thermoluminescence. Spectra from all four samples are similar. A very broad emission structure peaked near 470 nm and extending from 300 to at least 700 nm is found for the glow peaks from about 150 to 250 C. The higher temperature peak, 300-500 C, exhibits a different character with a narrow emission band near 400 nm. A tentative model for a luminescence site is offered. The broad similarity between the four samples is particularly interesting as the samples include chondrites of different shock history. The importance of the changes in glow curve spectra with temperature are noted for kinetic analyses of conventional glow curves.

  16. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  17. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sobrino, Jose A.; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jimenez-Munoz, Juan C.; Hook, Simon J.; Baldridge, Alice; Ibanez, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 {mu}m with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  18. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

    2008-04-22

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  19. Retrieval of constituent mixing ratios from limb thermal emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, William A.; Kunde, Virgil G.; Conrath, Barney J.

    1988-01-01

    An onion-peeling iterative, least-squares relaxation method to retrieve mixing ratio profiles from limb thermal emission spectra is presented. The method has been tested on synthetic data, containing various amounts of added random noise for O3, HNO3, and N2O. The retrieval method is used to obtain O3 and HNO3 mixing ratio profiles from high-resolution thermal emission spectra. Results of the retrievals compare favorably with those obtained previously.

  20. Thermal Emission and Reflected Light Spectra of Super Earths with Flat Transmission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Line, Michael; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole; Cahoy, Kerri

    2015-12-01

    Planets larger than Earth and smaller than Neptune are some of the most numerous in the galaxy, but observational efforts to understand this population have proved challenging because optically thick clouds or hazes at high altitudes obscure molecular features. We present models of super Earths that include thick clouds and hazes and predict their transmission, thermal emission, and reflected light spectra. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. Cloudy thermal emission spectra have muted features more like blackbodies, and hazy thermal emission spectra have emission features caused by an inversion layer at altitudes where the haze forms. Close analysis of reflected light from warm (˜400-800 K) planets can distinguish cloudy spectra, which have moderate albedos (0.05-0.20), from hazy models, which are very dark (0.0-0.03). Reflected light spectra of cold planets (˜200 K) accessible to a space-based visible light coronagraph will have high albedos and large molecular features that will allow them to be more easily characterized than the warmer transiting planets. We suggest a number of complementary observations to characterize this population of planets, including transmission spectra of hot (≳ 1000 K) targets, thermal emission spectra of warm targets using the James Webb Space Telescope, high spectral resolution (R ˜ 105) observations of cloudy targets, and reflected light spectral observations of directly imaged cold targets. Despite the dearth of features observed in super Earth transmission spectra to date, different observations will provide rich diagnostics of their atmospheres.

  1. Extreme ultraviolet emission spectra of Gd and Tb ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, D.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2010-11-15

    Theoretical extreme ultraviolet emission spectra of gadolinium and terbium ions calculated with the Cowan suite of codes and the flexible atomic code (FAC) relativistic code are presented. 4d-4f and 4p-4d transitions give rise to unresolved transition arrays in a range of ions. The effects of configuration interaction are investigated for transitions between singly excited configurations. Optimization of emission at 6.775 nm and 6.515 nm is achieved for Gd and Tb ions, respectively, by consideration of plasma effects. The resulting synthetic spectra are compared with experimental spectra recorded using the laser produced plasma technique.

  2. Synthesized Spectra of Optically Thin Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olluri, K.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.; De Pontieu, B.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years realistic 3D numerical models of the solar atmosphere have become available. The models attempt to recreate the solar atmosphere and mimic observations in the best way, in order to make it possible to couple complicated observations with physical properties such as the temperatures, densities, velocities, and magnetic fields. We here present a study of synthetic spectra created using the Bifrost code in order to assess how well they fit with previously taken solar data. A study of the synthetic intensity, nonthermal line widths, Doppler shifts, and correlations between any two of these three components of the spectra first assuming statistical equilibrium is made, followed by a report on some of the effects nonequilibrium ionization will have on the synthesized spectra. We find that the synthetic intensities compare well with the observations. The synthetic observations depend on the assumed resolution and point-spread function (PSF) of the instrument, and we find a large effect on the results, especially for intensity and nonthermal line width. The Doppler shifts produce the reported persistent redshifts for the transition region (TR) lines and blueshifts for the upper TR and corona lines. The nonthermal line widths reproduce the well-known turnoff point around (2-3) × 105 K, but with much lower values than those observed. The nonthermal line widths tend to increase with decreasing assumed instrumental resolution, also when nonequilibrium ionization is included. Correlations between the nonthermal line width of any two TR line studies as reported by Chae et al. are reproduced, while the correlations of intensity to line width are reproduced only after applying a PSF to the data. Doppler shift correlations reported by Doschek for the TR lines and correlations of Doppler shift to nonthermal line width of the Fe xii19.5 line reported by Doschek et al. are reproduced.

  3. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin synchrotron radiation are likely required in a full explanation of the spectral peaks or breaks of the GRB prompt emission phase. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Mars - Far-infrared spectra and thermal-emission models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Erickson, E. F.; Strecker, D. W.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1981-11-01

    Spectra of Mars from 100 to 360 kaysers were obtained during three different observation periods from NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Also, a new thermal model was constructed for the surface of Mars, and synthetic spectra were computed from the models to compare with the observations. The models include the effects of a dusty atmosphere which absorbs, scatters, and reradiates energy. The synthetic spectra show significant effects on disk-averaged brightness temperatures, as well as absorption features due to silicate dust. The spectra of Mars, which are ratios of Mars to the moon, do not fit the synthetic spectra unless the surface emissivities of Mars and the moon have different dependencies on wavelength. A possible explanation for this behavior is a difference in soil particle-size distributions between Mars and the moon, with Mars being depleted in large particles compared to the moon. Small particles are consistent with clay minerals which have been suggested elsewhere as constituents of the Martian surface.

  5. Hot Electron Generation and Transport Using K(alpha) Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K U; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Chawla, S; Chen, C D; Fedosejevs, R; Freeman, R R; Friesen, H; Giraldez, E; Green, J S; Hey, D S; Higginson, D P; Hund, J; Jarrott, L C; Kemp, G E; King, J A; Kryger, A; Lancaster, K; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; McLean, H S; Murphy, C; Norreys, P A; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P K; Ping, Y; Sawada, H; Schumacher, D; Theobald, W; Tsui, Y Y; Van Woerkom, L D; Wei, M S; Westover, B; Yabuuchi, T

    2009-10-15

    We have conducted experiments on both the Vulcan and Titan laser facilities to study hot electron generation and transport in the context of fast ignition. Cu wires attached to Al cones were used to investigate the effect on coupling efficiency of plasma surround and the pre-formed plasma inside the cone. We found that with thin cones 15% of laser energy is coupled to the 40{micro}m diameter wire emulating a 40{micro}m fast ignition spot. Thick cone walls, simulating plasma in fast ignition, reduce coupling by x4. An increase of prepulse level inside the cone by a factor of 50 reduces coupling by a factor of 3.

  6. K-alpha conversion efficiency measurments for x-ray scattering in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Urry, M K; Robey, H; Niemann, C; Landen, O L; Morse, E; Glenzer, S H

    2006-11-21

    The conversion efficiency of ultra short-pulse laser radiation to K-{alpha} x-rays has been measured for various chlorine-containing targets to be used as x-ray scattering probes of dense plasmas. The spectral and temporal properties of these sources will allow spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering probing with picosecond temporal resolution required for measuring the plasma conditions in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Simulations of x-ray scattering spectra from these plasmas show that fuel capsule density, capsule ablator density, and shock timing information may be inferred.

  7. Emission Spectra Of Hemoglobin In The Picosecond Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, Enrico; Malak, Henryk; Fronticelli, Clara; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    1988-06-01

    We describe steady state emission spectra and fluorescent decay times from highly purified solutions of human hemoglobin, and the precautions necessary to obtain reliable measurements on the highly quenched intrinsic tryptophan emission. Hemoglobin displays a wide range of decay times (10 ps to 8 ns). The ps component are probably due to Hb itself, and the ns components are probably due to impurities. The ps emission appears to have emission maxima near 320 nm, which is characteristic of tryptophan residues which are shielded from contact with water. The ns components appear to have emission maxima near 340 nm. Our results indicate that the intrinsic emission of Hb can be a useful probe for its functional behavior.

  8. (Neutron emission spectra for cobalt, yttrium, and niobium). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation is to determine double-differential neutron emission spectra for incident neutron energies between 5 and 10 MeV. The experimental method, results, and proposals for future research are presented. 3 refs., 2 figs. (DWL)

  9. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  10. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating

  11. A CORRELATION BETWEEN STELLAR ACTIVITY AND HOT JUPITER EMISSION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard

    2010-09-10

    We present evidence for a correlation between the observed properties of hot Jupiter emission spectra and the activity levels of the host stars measured using Ca II H and K emission lines. We find that planets with dayside emission spectra that are well-described by standard one-dimensional atmosphere models with water in absorption (HD 189733, TrES-1, TrES-3, WASP-4) orbit chromospherically active stars, while planets with emission spectra that are consistent with the presence of a strong high-altitude temperature inversion and water in emission orbit quieter stars. We estimate that active G and K stars have Lyman {alpha} fluxes that are typically a factor of 4-7 times higher than quiet stars with analogous spectral types and propose that the increased UV flux received by planets orbiting active stars destroys the compounds responsible for the formation of the observed temperature inversions. In this paper, we also derive a model-independent method for differentiating between these two atmosphere types using the secondary eclipse depths measured in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands on the Spitzer Space Telescope and argue that the observed correlation is independent of the inverted/non-inverted paradigm for classifying hot Jupiter atmospheres.

  12. Structural Effects of Oncogenic PI3K alpha Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    S Gabelli; C Huang; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Physiological activation of PI3K{alpha} is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3K{alpha} result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  13. Analysis of far-infrared emission Fourier transform spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.; Carli, B.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis method that uses the nonlinear least-squares fit technique has been developed for emission spectra obtained with a Fourier transform spectrometer. This method is used for the analysis of submillimeter-region atmospheric emission spectra obtained with a balloon-borne FT spectrometer that was carried out as a correlative measurement for the Limb IR Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) satellite experiment. The retrieved mixing ratios of H2O and O3 in the stratosphere from four spectral intervals have standard deviations of about 10 percent, and the average values agree to within 10 percent of corresponding results from the LIMS satellite experiment which used a broadband emission radiometer in the IR region.

  14. A new scheme for multidimensional line transfer. II - ETLA method in one dimension with application to iron K-alpha lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castor, John I.; Dykema, Pieter G.; Klein, Richard I.

    1992-01-01

    The 1D version of the radiation hydrodynamics computer code ALTAIR is discribed. It is an implementation of the equivalent two-level atom method, and also incorporates a variety of other iterative techniques to achieve a fast, accurate solution of the problem of coupled atomic kinetics and radiative transfer. All the techniques are described in sufficient detail to enable their use by others. The application of the program is illustrated by a set of calculations of the iron X-ray emission spectrum from intercloud hot gas that may exist in the broad-line region of active galactic nuclei. These calculations demonstrate that such spectra may be a rich load to mine for information about the hot gas in AGNs, and also that the concept of 'the iron K-alpha line' inadequately depicts the spectrum.

  15. Study of silver K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung radiation from short-pulse laser-matter interactions with applications for x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Beg, F. N.; MacPhee, A.; Chen, C.; Hey, D.; Maddox, B.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ma, T.

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of K{alpha} radiation yield and x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from thin-foil silver targets are presented. The targets were irradiated by a short pulse laser with intensities from 5x10{sup 16} to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} at 40 ps. Single hit charge-coupled device detectors, differential filter-stack detectors, and a crystal spectrometer were used to investigate the angular distribution of the K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung x-rays. This study is the first to use a broadband detector to estimate the absolute numbers of K{alpha} photons and to determine K{alpha} to bremsstrahlung ratios. The relevance of this work in the context of x-ray diffraction and x-ray radiography is discussed.

  16. A K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum pulse energy of 110 mJ before compression. The source has an x-ray conversion efficiency of greater than 10−5 into K-alpha line emission. In preparation for phase contrast imaging applications, the size of the resultant K-alpha x-ray emission spot has been also characterized. The source exhibits sufficient spatial coherence to observe phase contrast. We observe a relatively small broadening of the K-alpha source size compared to the size of the laser beam itself. Detailed characterization of the source including the x-ray spectrum and the x-ray average yield along with phase contrast images of test objects will be presented. PMID:20046807

  17. Emission spectra of pyrotechnic mixtures of heat flux simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Kratsko, L. E.; Chubryk, N. I.; Goncharik, S. V.; Miatselskaya, N. S.; Yakshonak, P. P.; Hamayunau, V. I.

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive optical spectroscopic studies of the combustion process of solid-state pyrotechnic mixtures based on Mg and Sr(NO3)2 have been carried out. Emission spectra of the mixtures in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared wavelength regions have been studied under various atmospheric conditions taking into account radiation transfer in air along an optical path of observation up to 5 km long.

  18. Terrestrial FeO Continuum Emission Observed in Sky Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, Tom G.; Melchiorri, R.; Saran, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial continuum emission in the visible spectral region has often been studied by both astronomers and aeronomers, in order to clarify backgrounds and the nature of the emissions. New observations from the ESI spectrograph on the Keck II telescope, as well as from the OSIRIS/Odin spectrograph and orbiter, have established that a major component of the emission originates with the FeO molecule [Evans et al., 2010]. This quasi-continuum peaks at 5950 A and extends from 5000 A well into the infrared. The identity has been demonstrated by comparison with meteor trains and laboratory measurements [Jenniskens et al., 2000]. Early studies of the continuum show consistency with the FeO emission as presently observed [Gadsden and Marovich, 1973]. Analysis of spectra from Kitt Peak [Neugent and Massey, 2010] demonstrates the great similarity between FeO emission in a clean atmosphere and high pressure sodium lamp emission in a polluted atmosphere. This research was supported by NSF Aeronomy under Grant ATM-0637433 . Evans, W.F.J., et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. [in press, 2010] Gadsden, M. and E. Marovich, J. Atm. Terr. Phys., 35, 1601-1614 [1973] Jenniskens, P., et al., Earth, Moon and Planets, 82-83, 429-434 [2000] Neugent, K.F. and P. Massey, PASP [in press, 2010

  19. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  20. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 . The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  1. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-01-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  2. Infrared emission spectra from operating elastohydrodynamic sliding contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra from an operating EHD sliding contact were obtained through a diamond window for an aromatic polymer solute present in equal concentration in four different fluids. Three different temperature ranges, three different loads, and three different speeds for every load were examined. Very sensitive Fourier spectrophotometric (Interferometric) techniques were employed. Band Intensities and band intensity ratios found to depend both on the operating parameters and on the fluid. Fluid film and metal surface temperatures were calculated from the spectra and their dependence on the mechanical parameters plotted. The difference between these temperatures could be plotted against shear rate on one curve for all fluids. However, at the same shear rate the difference between bulk fluid temperature and diamond window temperature was much higher for one of the fluids, a traction fluid, than for the others.

  3. Emissivity spectra estimated with the MaxEnTES algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barducci, A.; Guzzi, D.; Lastri, C.; Nardino, V.; Pippi, I.; Raimondi, V.

    2014-10-01

    Temperature and Emissivity Separation (TES) applied to multispectral or hyperspectral Thermal Infrared (TIR) images of the Earth is a relevant issue for many remote sensing applications. The TIR spectral radiance can be modeled by means of the well-known Planck's law, as a function of the target temperature and emissivity. The estimation of these target's parameters (i.e. the Temperature Emissivity Separation, aka TES) is hindered by the circumstance that the number of measurements is less than the unknown number. Existing TES algorithms implement a temperature estimator in which the uncertainty is removed by adopting some a priori assumption that conditions the retrieved temperature and emissivity. Due to its mathematical structure, the Maximum Entropy formalism (MaxEnt) seems to be well suited for carrying out this complex TES operation. The main advantage of the MaxEnt statistical inference is the absence of any external hypothesis, which is instead characterizes most of the existing the TES algorithms. In this paper we describe the performance of the MaxEnTES (Maximum Entropy Temperature Emissivity Separation) algorithm as applied to ten TIR spectral channels of a MIVIS dataset collected over Italy. We compare the temperature and emissivity spectra estimated by this algorithm with independent estimations achieved with two previous TES methods (the Grey Body Emissivity (GBE), and the Model Emittance Calculation (MEC)). We show that MaxEnTES is a reliable algorithm in terms of its higher output Signal-to-Noise Ratio and the negligibility of systematic errors that bias the estimated temperature in other TES procedures.

  4. Investigation of the Emission and Absorption Spectra of Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, N. I.; Il'in, Yu. A.; Sadykov, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Emission and absorption spectra of water vapor are measured and analyzed for temperatures 350-2500 K in the spectral range 0.57-25 μm. Based on the developed mathematical model of radiative transfer, the parameters of spectral transmission functions of N2O vapors are obtained at different temperatures. Practical application of the obtained radiative characteristics is considered for solving problems of radiative heat exchange in high-temperature media and designing optoelectronic systems intended for monitoring of aero carriers.

  5. Interpreting the ionization sequence in AGN emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.; Allen, James T.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the physical cause of the great range in the ionization level seen in the spectra of narrow-lined active galactic nuclei (AGN). We used a recently developed technique called mean field independent component analysis to identify examples of individual Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies whose spectra are not dominated by emission due to star formation (SF), which we therefore designate as AGN. We assembled high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) composite spectra of a sequence of these AGN defined by the ionization level of their narrow-line regions (NLR), and extending down to very low ionization cases. We then used a local optimally emitting cloud (LOC) model to fit emission-line ratios in this AGN sequence, including the weak lines that can be measured only in the co-added spectra. These weak line ratios provide consistency checks on the density, temperature, abundances and ionizing continuum of Seyfert galaxies determined from strong-line ratios. After integrating over a wide range of clouds at different radii and densities, our models indicate that the radial extent of the NLR is the major parameter in determining the position of higher to moderate ionization AGN along our sequence. This provides a physical interpretation for their systematic variation. Higher ionization AGN contain optimally emitting clouds that are more concentrated towards the central continuum source than in lower ionization AGN. Our LOC models indicate that for the special set of objects that lie on our AGN sequence, the ionizing luminosity is anti-correlated with the NLR ionization level, and hence anticorrelated with the radial concentration and actual physical extent of the NLR. A possible interpretation that deserves further exploration is that the ionization sequence might be an age sequence where low ionization objects are older and have systematically cleared out their central regions by radiation pressure. We consider the alternative that our AGN sequence instead represents a mixing curve combining SF and AGN spectra in different proportions, but argue that while many galaxies in fact do have this type of composite spectra, our AGN sequence appears to be a special set of objects with negligible SF excitation.

  6. Spectra of hybrid synchrotron emission in hot black hole winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Ken; Fukue, Jun

    2015-12-01

    We solve radiative transfer to obtain the hybrid synchrotron spectra from a hot, optically thin black hole wind, by integrating the radiative transfer equation in the comoving frame and considering the relativistic effect of wind flow as well as the emission and absorption along the line-of-sight. We find two primary characteristics in the hybrid model: (1) a shoulder at low frequencies and (2) a power-law tail at high frequencies. Even if only 10-4 of the total electron energy is injected as non-thermal electrons, higher luminosity can be produced compared to the pure thermal model. Thus, there is a large difference between the pure thermal model and the hybrid one. In addition, as the wind velocity becomes large, the thermal peak of the comoving spectra shifts toward the high-frequency regime, due to the relativistic Doppler effect. As the wind velocity increases, on the other hand, the thermal peak of the observed spectra shifts toward the low-frequency regime, due to the redshifted part in the far side and limb side.

  7. A Thermal Infrared Emission Spectra Library for Unpowdered Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J. W.; Christensen, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Mid-infrared thermal emission spectra have been obtained for whole-rock (unpowdered) samples of the following 25 meteorites: Abee, Admire, Allende, Bondoc, Brahin, Bruderheim, Canyon Diablo, Carichic, Clover Springs, Dhofar 007, Estherville, Holbrook, Juancheng, Kapoeta, Long Island, Marion, Modoc, ALH77225, ALH77233, ALH84082, LEW85322, ALH85025, ALH79029, ALH77004, and LEW86015. Meteorites were provided through the Center for Meteorite Studies at ASU, Johnson Space Center and the NASA Antarctic Meteorite Working Group, and from private collections. The database was prepared to aid in the on-going detection and interpretation of meteorites on Mars using the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) instruments on both Mars Exploration Rovers. It therefore includes several specimens of low, moderate, and high weathering intensities, reflecting different levels of water exposure in desert and non-desert environments. Unweathered falls are also considered. Samples represent all three chondrite classes, stony irons (mesosiderites and pallasites), and select achondrites. Special consideration is given to dust-covered iron-nickel meteorites as part of a separate study designed to evaluate the Mini-TES spectra of iron-nickel meteorites on Mars. All samples were analyzed at or near a temperature of 80° C using a modified Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR spectrometer at the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University. Data were collected within the 2000 to 200 wavenumber (5 to 50 microns) mid-infrared range. The results show that many meteorite types display moderate to wide variability in the depth and position of prominent absorption features, making them easily distinguishable from each other. Most previous meteorite spectroscopy studies have either focused on near-infrared reflectance spectra [e.g. 1], and/or involved powdered samples to represent asteroid regoliths in the mid-infrared [e.g. 2 & 3]. Particle size- related issues are often at the heart of interpretation of asteroid spectroscopic studies in the mid-infrared [4]. However, the high-resolution Itokawa imaging results of the Hayabusa mission have shown that not all asteroid surfaces are dominated by powdered materials [e.g. 5]. It is therefore anticipated that whole-rock, mid-infrared emission spectra may serve a further purpose in studies conducted with Spitzer Space Telescope and other space-born observatories equipped with mid-infrared detectors. The library will therefore continue to be augmented with additional spectra, to include unweathered carbonaceous chondrites and achondrites at a minimum. All spectra are available through the Arizona State University Thermal Emission Spectral Library. References: [1] Sato K. and Miyamoto M. (1998) Antarctic Meteorite Research 11, 155-162. [2] Salisbury J.W. et al. (1991) NASA Technical Memorandum #4300, 262-204. [3] Dameron S.N. and Burbine T.H. (2006) LPSC XXXVII, abstract #1828. [4] Emery J.P. et al. (2006) Icarus 182, 496-512. [5] Miyamoto et al. (2007) Science 316, 1011- 1014.

  8. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  9. Common substructure in otoacoustic emission spectra of land vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, Geoffrey A.; Köppl, Christine; Bergevin, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In humans, a similar spectral periodicity is found in all otoacoustic emission types and in threshold fine structure. This may reflect travelling wave phase and reflectance from "structural roughness" in the organ of Corti, or entrainment and suppressive interactions between emissions. To further understand these phenomena, we have examined spontaneous otoacoustic emission (SOAE) spectra in 9 lizard species and the barn owl and find a comparable periodicity. Importantly, the frequency spacing between SOAE peaks was independent of the physical spacing and of the frequency space constants in hearing organs. In 9 lizard species, median spectral gaps lay between 219 and 461 Hz, with no correlation to papillar length (0.3 to 2.1 mm). Similarly in much longer organs: In humans (35 mm), SOAE spectral gaps vary up to 220 Hz at 4 kHz; in the barn owl (11 mm), the median SOAE peak spacing was 395Hz. In the barn owl, a very large space constant between 5 and 10 kHz (5 mm/octave) contrasts with stable SOAE spacing between 1 and 11 kHz. Similar SOAE spectral gaps across all species suggests they represent a basic frequency grating revealing local phase-dependent interactions between active hair cells, a feature not determined by macro-structural anatomy. Emission spectral spacing is independent of cochlear length, of the frequency space constant, of the existence of travelling waves or of a tectorial membrane. Our data suggest that there are greater similarities between frequency selectivity reflected at the level of the hair cells' spontaneous mechanical output (OAEs) than there are at the level of the auditory nerve, where macro-structural anatomy links hair-cell activity differentially to the neural output. Apparently, all hair-cell arrays show a similar frequency substructure not directly replicated in neural tuning.

  10. The emission spectra of radioweak quasars. 1: The far-infrared emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Martina; Biermann, Peter L.

    1993-11-01

    We model far infrared (FIR) spectra of radioweak quasars with the assumption that the emission is from heated dust, and that the heating is due to the central engine via energetic particles. These energetic particles are diffusing from a postulated source near the central engine through a tenuous galactic halo to arrive at the dust which is taken to be in molecular clouds in a disk configuration. This picture does not depend on a particular geometry of the disk such as warps. This concept can readily reproduce the range of observed mm/submm/FIR/IR spectra.

  11. X-ray bumps, iron K-alpha lines, and X-ray suppression by obscuring tori in Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.; Madau, Piero; Zycki, Piotr T.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the X-ray spectral properties of unobscured type 1 and obscured type 2 Seyferts as predicted by the unified Seyfert scheme. We consider the reprocessing of X-ray photons by photoelectric absorption, iron fluorescence, and Compton downscattering in the obscuring tori surrounding these active nuclei, and compute by Monte Carlo methods the reprocessed spectra as a function of the viewing angle. Depending on the optical depth and shape of the torus, and on the viewing angle, the X-ray flux can be suppressed by substantial factors when our line of sight is obscured. We show that an immediate consequence of the existence of an obscuring thick torus is the production in the spectra of type 1 Seyfert galaxies of a bump in the continuum above 10-20 keV and an Fe K-alpha line with significant equivalent width. In those type 2 Seyferts for which the hard X-ray spectrum has been substantially suppressed, the equivalent width of the Fe K-alpha line in the transmitted spectrum can be very large.

  12. Seeing Through the Clouds: Thermal Emission and Reflected Light Spectra of Super-Earths with Flat Transmission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark; Zahnle, Kevin; Line, Michael R.; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Cahoy, Kerri

    2015-12-01

    Vast resources have been dedicated to characterizing the handful of planets with radii between Earth’s and Neptune’s that are accessible to current telescopes. Observations of their transmission spectra have been inconclusive and do not constrain their atmospheric compositions. Of the planets smaller than Neptune studied to date, all have radii in the near-infrared consistent with being constant in wavelength, likely showing that these small planets are consistently enshrouded in thick hazes and clouds. We explore the types of clouds and hazes that can completely obscure transmission spectra and find that very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities.We present a path forward for understanding this class of small planets: by understanding the thermal emission and reflectivity of small planets, we can break the degeneracies and better constrain the atmospheric compositions. Cloudy thermal emission spectra have muted features more like blackbodies, and hazy thermal emission spectra have emission features caused by an inversion layer at altitudes where the haze forms. Analysis of reflected light from warm (~400-800 K) planets can distinguish cloudy planets, which have moderate albedos (Ag=0.05-0.20), from hazy planets, which are very dark (Ag=0.0-0.03). Reflected light spectra of cold planets (~200 K) accessible to a space-based visible light coronagraph may be the key to understanding small planets: they will have high albedos and large molecular features that actually allow them to be more easily characterized than the warmer transiting planets. We suggest a number of complementary observations to characterize super Earths, including transmission spectra of hot (~1000 K) targets, thermal emission spectra of warm targets using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and high spatial resolution spectral observations of directly-imaged cold targets in reflected light. These observations may provide rich diagnostics of molecules and clouds in small planets, in contrast to the limited success to date.

  13. New downshifted maximum in stimulated electromagnetic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Evgeny; Grach, Savely

    A new spectral maximum in spectra of stimulated electromagnetic emission of the ionosphere (SEE, [1]) was detected in experiments at the SURA facility in 2008 for the pump frequencies f0 4.4-4.5 MHz, most stably for f0 = 4.3 MHz, the lowest possible pump frequency at the SURA facility. The new maximum is situated at frequency shifts ∆f -6 kHz from the pump wave frequency f0 , ∆f = fSEE - f0 , somewhat closer to the f0 than the well known [2,3] Downshifted Maximum in the SEE spectrum at ∆f -9 kHz. The detection and detailed study of the new feature (which we tentatively called the New Downshifted Maximum, NDM) became possible due to high frequency resolution in spectral analysis. The following properties of the NDM are established. (i) The NDM appears in the SEE spectra simultaneously with the DM and UM features after the pump turn on (recall that the less intensive Upshifted Maximum, UM, is situated at ∆f +(6-8) kHz [2,3]). The NDM can't be attributed to 1 DM [4] or Narrow Continuum Maximum (NCM, 2 [5]) SEE features, as well as to splitted DM near gyroharmonics [2]. (ii) The NDM is observed as prominent feature for maximum pump power of the SURA facility P ≈ 120 MW ERP, for which the DM is almost covered by the Broad Continuum SEE feature [2,3]. For P ˜ 30-60 MW ERP the DM and NDM have comparable intensities. For the lesser pump power the DM prevails in the SEE spectrum, while the NDM becomes invisible being covered by the thermal Narrow Continuum feature [2]. (iii) The NDM is exactly symmetrical for the UM relatively to f0 when the former one is observed, although the UM frequency offset increases up to ∆fUM ≈ +9 kHz with a decrease of the pump power up to P ≈ 4 MW ERP. The DM formation in the SEE spectrum is attributed to a three-wave interaction between the upper and lower hybrid waves in the ionosphere, and the lower hybrid frequency ( 7 kHz) determines the frequency offset of the DM high frequency flank [2,6]. The detection of the NDM with lesser |∆fNDM | ˜ 6 kHz and observed values ∆fDM ˜ -20 kHz at f0 ˜ 9300 kHz confirm the experimentally observed dependence |∆fDM,UM | 2f0 · 10-3 [3,4] and give a hint to a possible competition of different mechanisms of the SEE generation in the DM and UM frequency range [4]. The work is supported by RFBR grants 10-02-00642, 09-02-01150 and Federal Special-purpose Program "Scientific and pedagogical personnel of innovative Russia". 1. Thide B. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 1982, 49, pp. 1561-1564. 2. Leyser T.B., Space Sci. Rev., 2001, 98, 3-4, pp. 223-328. 3. Sergeev E.N. et al., J. Adv. in Space Res., 2006, 38, 11, pp. 2518-2526. 4. Stubbe P. et al., J.Geophys. Res., 1984, 89, pp.7523-7536. 5. Thide B. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 95, 25, p. 255002. 6. Shvarts M.M. et al., JASTP, 1997, 59, 18, pp.2421-2429.

  14. Conversion efficiency and spectral broadening of the K-{alpha} line emitted from planar titanium targets irradiated with ultra-short laser pulses of high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, V.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2011-10-15

    A study of the conversion efficiency and line shape of the K-{alpha} x-ray line radiation from a planar titanium target irradiated by an ultra-short laser pulse is performed. The conversion efficiency and spectral broadening are studied as a function of laser intensity (5 x 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2}), laser pulse duration (45 fs-800 fs), and laser fluence (2 x 10{sup 3}-4.2 x 10{sup 4} J cm{sup -2}). The K-{alpha}{sub 1} line (4510 eV) is observed to be broadened (up to {approx}9 eV), predominantly towards the higher energy side and strongly depends on the laser fluence rather than on laser intensity. The reason for the spectral broadening is attributed to K-{alpha} emission in warm dense plasma. The role of hot electrons and direct laser heating on spectral broadening is outlined. In addition to this, our observations indicates that the presence of pre-plasma strongly contribute to the observed broadening through the inner-shell transitions in multiply charged titanium ions in the pre-plasma. The appropriate laser irradiation parameters to achieve high conversion efficiency and minimum spectral width of the K-{alpha} radiation are identified. The study is important, since the control of the spectral profile is of general interest for diffraction or scattering experiments in view of its potential in increasing temporal resolution.

  15. Classification of hydromagnetic emissions based on frequency--time spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fukunishi, H.; Toya, T.; Koike, K.; Kuwashima, M.; Kawamura, M.

    1981-10-01

    By using 3035 hydromagnetic emission events observed in the frequency range of 0.1--2.0 Hz at Syowa (Lapprox.6), HM emissions have been classified into eight subtypes based on their spectral structures, i.e., HM whistler, periodic HM emission, HM chorus, HM emission burst, IPDP, morning IPDP, Pc 1--2 band, and irregular HM emission. It is seen that each subtype has a preferential magnetic local time interval and also a frequency range for its occurrence. Morning IPDP events and irregular HM emissions occur in the magnetic morning hours, while dispersive periodic HM emissions and HM emission bursts occur around magnetic local noon, then HM chorus emissions occur in the afternoon hours and IPDP events occur in the evening hours. Furthermore, it is noticed that the mid-frequencies of these emissions vary from high frequencies in the morning hours to low frequencies in the afternoon hours. On the basis of these results, the generation mechanisms of each subtype are discussed.

  16. Equilibrium excited state and emission spectra of molecular aggregates from the hierarchical equations of motion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liping; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) method was applied to calculate the emission spectra of molecular aggregates using the Frenkel exciton model. HEOM equations for the one-exciton excited state were first propagated until equilibration. The reduced density operator and auxiliary density operators (ADOs) were used to characterize the coupled system-bath equilibrium. The dipole-dipole correlation functions were then calculated to obtain the emission spectra of model dimers, and the B850 band of light-harvesting complex II (LH2) in purple bacteria. The effect of static disorder on equilibrium excited state and the emission spectra of LH2 was also explicitly considered. Several approximation schemes, including the high temperature approximation (HTA) of the HEOM, a modified version of the HTA, the stochastic Liouville equation approach, the perturbative time-local and time-nonlocal generalized quantum master equations, were assessed in the calculation of the equilibrium excited state and emission spectra.

  17. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  18. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon

  19. Emission spectra of LH2 complex: full Hamiltonian model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heřman, Pavel; Zapletal, David; Horák, Milan

    2013-05-01

    In the present contribution we study the absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra for ring molecular system, which can model B850 ring of peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila (Rhodoblastus acidophilus). LH2 is a highly symmetric ring of nine pigment-protein subunits, each containing two transmembrane polypeptide helixes and three bacteriochlorophylls (BChl). The uncorrelated diagonal static disorder with Gaussian distribution (fluctuations of local excitation energies) simultaneously with the diagonal dynamic disorder (interaction with a bath) in Markovian approximation is used in our simulations. We compare calculated absorption and steady state fluorescence spectra obtained within the full Hamiltonian model of the B850 ring with our previous results calculated within the nearest neighbour approximation model and also with experimental data.

  20. New laboratory measurements of mid-IR emission spectra of simulated planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bradley G.; Lucey, Paul G.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    We present emission spectra of particulate quartz measured in an environment chamber designed to simulate the conditions on actual planetary surfaces. The goal was to investigate near-surface thermal gradients and their effects on emission spectra for other planetary environments. Our experiment parallels that of Logan et al. [1973] but is different, in that our samples were heated at the base by a temperature-controlled hot plate rather than from above by a solar lamp in order to separate infrared surface cooling from solar heating effects. Our spectra show prominent emission peaks which are attributed to the presence of near-surface thermal gradients created by infrared cooling of the uppermost layer of the material. The contrast of the emission peak is maximized under vacuum conditions, for which it is estimated that a temperature difference of at least 40 K existed within the top emission skin depth. The wavelength location of the emission peak occurs near the Christiansen wavelength at 7.35 μm but has been shifted by approximately 0.2 μm to shorter wavelengths. This result is in agreement with the earlier results of Logan et al. [1973] and points out that the existence of a thermal gradient violates the conditions required by Kirchoff's law, and therefore care should be taken when spectra of surfaces on airless bodies are interpreted using emissivity spectra converted from reflectance data. Increasing the atmospheric pressure in the chamber increased the conductivity of the soil, mitigating the thermal gradient and decreasing the contrast of the emission maxima. Although thermal gradients complicate the interpretation of emission spectra of airless bodies, they tend to enhance certain spectral features, and therefore emission spectroscopy should be useful for remote sensing of the surfaces of the Moon and Mercury.

  1. Breakdown of the quasistatic approximation at high densities and its effect on the heliumlike K{alpha} complex of nickel, iron, and calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Oelgoetz, Justin; Fontes, Christopher J.; Zhang Honglin; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2007-12-15

    Recent work to include R-matrix data within a larger model comprised mostly of distorted-wave and plane-wave Born data has resulted in the general spectral modeling (GSM) code. It employs a quasistatic approximation, a standard, low-density methodology that assumes the ionization balance is separable from a determination of the excited-state populations that give rise to the spectra. GSM further allows for some states to be treated statistically as contributions to effective rates, instead of being included explicitly in the kinetics model. While these two approximations are known to be valid at low densities, this work investigates using such methods to model high-density, non-LTE emission spectra and determines at what point the approximations break down by comparing to spectra produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory code ATOMIC which makes no such approximations. As both approximations are used by other astrophysical and low-density modeling codes, the results should be of broad interest. He-like K{alpha} emission spectra are presented for three elements, Ni, Fe, and Ca, in order to gauge the effect of both the statistical methods and the ground-state-only, quasistatic approximation employed in GSM. This work confirms that at and above the temperature of maximum abundance of the He-like ionization stage, the range of validity for both approximations is sufficient for modeling the low- and moderate-density regimes one typically finds in astrophysical and magnetically confined fusion plasmas. However, a breakdown does occur for sufficiently high densities; we obtain quantitative limits that are significantly higher than previous works. Additionally, this work demonstrates that, while the range of validity for both approximations is sufficient to accurately predict the density-dependent quenching of the z line, the approximations begin to break down at higher densities. Thus, these approximations should be used with greater care when modeling high-density plasmas such as those found in laser-driven inertial confinement fusion and electromagnetic pinch devices.

  2. [A new automated method to identify emission line star from massive spectra].

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing-Chang; Zhang, Cai-Ming; Wei, Peng; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2012-06-01

    Stellar spectra are characterized by obvious absorption lines or absorption bands, while those with emission lines are usually special stars such as cataclysmic variable stars (CVs), HerbigAe/Be etc. The further study of this kind of spectra is meaningful. The present paper proposed a new method to identify emission line stars (ELS) spectra automatically. After the continuum normalization is done for the original spectral flux, line detection is made by comparing the normalized flux with the mean and standard deviation of the flux in its neighbor region The results of the experiment on massive spectra from SDSS DR8 indicate that the method can identify ELS spectra completely and accurately. Since no complex transformation and computation are involved in this method, the identifying process is fast and it is ideal for the ELS detection in large sky survey projects like LAMOST and SDSS. PMID:22870668

  3. Inclusive Proton Emission Spectra from Deuteron Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. V.; Capote, R.; Sin, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of deuteron elastic and nonelastic breakup cross sections and angular distributions at deuteron energies below 100 MeV obtained using the post-form DWBA approximation. The elastic breakup cross section was extensively studied in the past. Very few calculations of nonelastic breakup have been performed, however. We compare two forms of the elastic DWBA breakup amplitude but conclude that neither provides a correct description of the inclusive proton emission cross section.

  4. Separation of Atmospheric and Surface Spectral Features in Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2000-01-01

    We present two algorithms for the separation of spectral features caused by atmospheric and surface components in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. One algorithm uses radiative transfer and successive least squares fitting to find spectral shapes first for atmospheric dust, then for water-ice aerosols, and then, finally, for surface emissivity. A second independent algorithm uses a combination of factor analysis, target transformation, and deconvolution to simultaneously find dust, water ice, and surface emissivity spectral shapes. Both algorithms have been applied to TES spectra, and both find very similar atmospheric and surface spectral shapes. For TES spectra taken during aerobraking and science phasing periods in nadir-geometry these two algorithms give meaningful and usable surface emissivity spectra that can be used for mineralogical identification.

  5. A novel zirconium K{alpha} imager for high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K. U.; Jiang, S.; Storm, M. S.; Krygier, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Stephens, R. B.; Pereira, N. R.; Baronova, E. O.; Theobald, W.; Ping, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Key, M. H.

    2011-12-15

    We report on the development and characterization of a zirconium K{alpha} imager for high energy density physics research. The imager consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal operating at 15.7 keV photon energy. We compare the performance of the imager in terms of integrated reflectivity (R{sub int}) and temperature dependent collection efficiency ({eta}{sub Te}) to that of the widely used Cu K{alpha} imager. Our collisional-radiative simulations show that the new imager can be reliably used up to 250 eV plasma temperature. Monte Carlo simulations show that for a 25 {mu}m thick tracer layer of zirconium, the contribution to K{alpha} production from photo-pumping is only 2%. We present, for the first time, 2D spatially resolved images of zirconium plasmas generated by a high intensity short pulse laser interacting with Zr solid targets.

  6. Shaping Emission Spectra of Fluorescent Molecules with Single Plasmonic Nanoresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Ringler, M.; Schwemer, A.; Wunderlich, M.; Feldmann, J.; Nichtl, A.; Kuerzinger, K.; Klar, T. A.

    2008-05-23

    We show that plasmonic nanoresonators composed of two gold nanoparticles change not only the intensity but also the spectral shape of the emission of fluorescent molecules. The plasmonic resonance frequency can be tuned by varying the distance between the nanoparticles, which allows us to selectively favor transitions of a fluorescent molecule to a specific vibrational ground state. Experimental data from correlated scattering and fluorescence microscopy agree well with calculations in the framework of generalized Mie theory. Our results show that the widely used description of a dye molecule near a metal surface as a mere two-level system is inadequate.

  7. NOISE AND SIGNAL FOR SPECTRA OF INTERMITTENT NOISELIKE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D. E-mail: michaeltdh@physics.ucsb.edu

    2011-05-20

    We show that intermittency of noiselike emission, after propagation through a scattering medium, affects the distribution of noise in the observed correlation function. Intermittency also affects correlation of noise among channels of the spectrum, but leaves the average spectrum, average correlation function, and distribution of noise among channels of the spectrum unchanged. Pulsars are examples of such sources: intermittent and affected by interstellar propagation. We assume that the source emits Gaussian white noise, modulated by a time envelope. Propagation convolves the resulting time series with an impulse-response function that represents effects of dispersion, scattering, and absorption. We assume that this propagation kernel is shorter than the time for an observer to accumulate a single spectrum. We show that rapidly varying intermittent emission tends to concentrate noise near the central lag of the correlation function. We derive mathematical expressions for this effect, in terms of the time envelope and the propagation kernel. We present examples, discuss effects of background noise, and compare our results with observations.

  8. Tau-REx II: Retrieval of Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, I. P.; Rocchetto, M.; Tinetti, G.; Barton, E. J.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2015-11-01

    {T}-REx (Tau Retrieval of Exoplanets) is a novel, fully Bayesian atmospheric retrieval code custom built for extrasolar atmospheres. In Waldmann et al., the transmission spectroscopic case was introduced, and here we present the emission spectroscopy spectral retrieval for the {T}-REx framework. Compared to transmission spectroscopy, the emission case is often significantly more degenerate due to the need to retrieve the full atmospheric temperature-pressure (TP) profile. This is particularly true in the case of current measurements of exoplanetary atmospheres, which are either of low signal-to-noise, low spectral resolution, or both. We present a new way of combining two existing approaches to the modeling of the said TP profile: (1) the parametric profile, where the atmospheric TP structure is analytically approximated by a few model parameters, (2) the layer-by-layer approach, where individual atmospheric layers are modeled. Both of these approaches have distinct advantages and disadvantages in terms of convergence properties and potential model biases. The {T}-REx hybrid model presented here is a new two-stage TP profile retrieval, which combines the robustness of the analytic solution with the accuracy of the layer-by-layer approach. The retrieval process is demonstrated using simulations of the hot-Jupiter WASP-76b and the hot-super-Earth 55 Cnc e as well as the secondary eclipse measurements of HD 189733b.

  9. Calculation of gain and luminescence spectra of quantum-cascade laser structures taking into account asymmetric emission line broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, D V; Manak, I S; Kononenko, V K

    2010-05-26

    The energy levels, wave functions, and matrix elements of optical dipole transitions are calculated numerically for superlattice quantum-cascade structures. The effect of spectral broadening on the shape of emission spectra is estimated and semiphenomenological asymmetric profiles of emission line broadening are proposed. It is shown that the electroluminescence spectra well agree with the calculated spontaneous recombination spectra. (lasers)

  10. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K[alpha] transitions in Fe XVIII-XXV

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T. ); Jacobs, V.L. . Condensed Matter and Radiation Sciences Div.); Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Kahn, S.M. )

    1992-11-01

    The iron K[alpha] emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 [Angstrom] is analyzed. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII through Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1--0.4 m[Angstrom]. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with non-spectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2s[sup r]2p[sup s] configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K[alpha] emission from the Sun. While many similarities are found, a few differences arise from the somewhat higher electron density in tokamak plasmas (10[sup 13] cm[sup [minus]3]), which affects the fine-structure level populations of the ground states of the initial ion undergoing electron-impact excitation or dielectronic recombination. We also find that several spectral features are comprised of different transitions from those reported in earlier analyses of solar data.

  11. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K{alpha} transitions in Fe XVIII-XXV

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T.; Jacobs, V.L.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Kahn, S.M.

    1992-11-01

    The iron K{alpha} emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 {Angstrom} is analyzed. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII through Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1--0.4 m{Angstrom}. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with non-spectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2s{sup r}2p{sup s} configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K{alpha} emission from the Sun. While many similarities are found, a few differences arise from the somewhat higher electron density in tokamak plasmas (10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}), which affects the fine-structure level populations of the ground states of the initial ion undergoing electron-impact excitation or dielectronic recombination. We also find that several spectral features are comprised of different transitions from those reported in earlier analyses of solar data.

  12. Analysis of Emission Spectra of Yttrium Monoiodide Produced by the Photodissociation of YI3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenting Wendy; Galvin, Thomas C.; Houlahan, Thomas J., Jr.; Eden, J. Gary

    2015-06-01

    Emission spectra of yttrium monoiodide (YI) spanning the 250 - 940 nm spectral region were generated by the photodissociation of yttrium tri-iodide under photoexcitation at 248 nm (KrF laser). Fluorescent spectra in the13,000 - 19,000 cm-1 and 24,000 - 40,000 cm-1 regions will be first reported. New vibrational transitions of YI in the 20,000 - 25,000 cm-1 interval will be presented as well.

  13. Emission spectra of selected SSME elements and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; Vandyke, David B.; Bircher, Felix E.; Gardner, Donald G.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    Stennis Space Center (SSC) is pursuing the advancement of experimental techniques and theoretical developments in the field of plume spectroscopy for application to rocket development testing programs and engine health monitoring. Exhaust plume spectral data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are routinely acquired. The usefulness of this data depends upon qualitative and quantitative interpretation of spectral features and their correlation with the engine performance. A knowledge of the emission spectral characteristics of effluent materials in the exhaust plume is essential. A study of SSME critical components and their materials identified 30 elements and 53 materials whose engine exhaust plume spectral might be required. The most important were evaluated using SSC's Diagnostic Testbed Facility Thruster (DTFT), a 1200-lbf, liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen rocket engine which very nearly replicates the temperature and pressure conditions of the SSME exhaust plume in the first Mach diamond. This report presents the spectral data for the 10 most important elements and 27 most important materials which are strongly to moderately emitting in the DTFT exhaust plume. The covered spectral range is 300 to 426 nm and the spectral resolution is 0.25 nm. Spectral line identification information is provided and line interference effects are considered.

  14. [Study on the emission spectra of N2 plasma jet by AC glow discharge].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Sun, Dian-Ping; Yang, Xiao-Hua; Chen, Yang-Qin

    2007-09-01

    N2 plasma jet was generated from a nozzle using an AC discharge at about 15 kV. The emission spectra were obtained by using the concentration modulation spectroscopic technique. The dependence of spectral signal on the discharge current was discussed. It was found that the vibrational temperature decreased first and then increased downstream from the nozzle by measuring the emission spectra from different axial positions in the jet. A phenomenological model was presented to explain the vibrational temperature variation with different axial position z. The N2+/N2 ratio varied along the axis and the property of discharge in the experimental system was studied. PMID:18051503

  15. Sulphur Kβ emission spectra reveal protonation states of aqueous sulfuric acid

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Johannes; Sahle, Christoph J.; Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Müller, Harald; Kavčič, Matjaž; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Petric, Marko; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report an X-ray emission study of bulk aqueous sulfuric acid. Throughout the range of molarities from 1 M to 18 M the sulfur Kβ emission spectra from H2SO4 (aq) depend on the molar fractions and related deprotonation of H2SO4. We compare the experimental results with results from emission spectrum calculations based on atomic structures of single molecules and structures from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the S Kβ emission spectrum is a sensitive probe of the protonation state of the acid molecules. Using non-negative matrix factorization we are able to extract the fractions of different protonation states in the spectra, and the results are in good agreement with the simulation for the higher part of the concentration range. PMID:26888159

  16. Sulphur Kβ emission spectra reveal protonation states of aqueous sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niskanen, Johannes; Sahle, Christoph J.; Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Müller, Harald; Kavčič, Matjaž; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Petric, Marko; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we report an X-ray emission study of bulk aqueous sulfuric acid. Throughout the range of molarities from 1 M to 18 M the sulfur Kβ emission spectra from H2SO4 (aq) depend on the molar fractions and related deprotonation of H2SO4. We compare the experimental results with results from emission spectrum calculations based on atomic structures of single molecules and structures from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the S Kβ emission spectrum is a sensitive probe of the protonation state of the acid molecules. Using non-negative matrix factorization we are able to extract the fractions of different protonation states in the spectra, and the results are in good agreement with the simulation for the higher part of the concentration range.

  17. Sulphur Kβ emission spectra reveal protonation states of aqueous sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Johannes; Sahle, Christoph J; Ruotsalainen, Kari O; Müller, Harald; Kavčič, Matjaž; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Petric, Marko; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report an X-ray emission study of bulk aqueous sulfuric acid. Throughout the range of molarities from 1 M to 18 M the sulfur Kβ emission spectra from H2SO4 (aq) depend on the molar fractions and related deprotonation of H2SO4. We compare the experimental results with results from emission spectrum calculations based on atomic structures of single molecules and structures from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the S Kβ emission spectrum is a sensitive probe of the protonation state of the acid molecules. Using non-negative matrix factorization we are able to extract the fractions of different protonation states in the spectra, and the results are in good agreement with the simulation for the higher part of the concentration range. PMID:26888159

  18. The X-ray spectra of galaxies. II - Average spectral properties and emission mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D.-W.; Fabbiano, G.; Trinchieri, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Imaging Proportional Counter data in the Einstein database is used to study the X-ray spectra of normal galaxies. The X-ray emission temperature of spirals is found to be higher on the average than that of ellipticals. This supports the idea that accreting binaries are a major source of X-rays in spirals, while a hot interstellar medium (ISM) is present in ellipticals. The X-ray spectra of Sa galaxies are intermediate between those of ellipticals and spirals, suggesting that these galaxies contain hot gaseous emission as well as emission from accreting binaries. In E and SO galaxies the emission temperature becomes higher with a decreasing X-ray to optical luminosity ratio, which suggests that the emission of X-ray faint early-type galaxies consists of a large evolved stellar component, while the gaseous emission becomes dominant in X-ray brighter galaxies. The group with the lowest X-ray to optical ratio does not follow this trend; in these galaxies a very soft X-ray component, amounting to about half the total X-ray emission, is found in addition to the hard X-ray component. Possible explanations are integrated emission of M stars and a relatively cool ISM. A very soft component is also found in several spiral galaxies. This may indicate that some spirals contain hot gaseous components similar to those seen in NGC 253 and M82.

  19. Discernment of lint trash in raw cotton using multivariate analysis of excitation-emission luminescence spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excitation-Emission luminescence spectra of basic (pH 12.5) phosphate buffer solution extracts were used to distinguish among botanical components of trash within seed cotton. All components were separated from whole plants removed from a field in southern New Mexico. Unfolded Principal Component An...

  20. A Safe and Interactive Method of Illuminating Discharge Tubes for Studying Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Discharge tubes are useful tools for teaching emission spectra and the discrete energy levels of the Bohr model. A new setup uses a plasma globe to illuminate the discharge tube and allows a higher degree of interactivity owing to the omission of a traditional, high-voltage power source. The decreased power consumption also reduces the heating of

  1. Application of multi-way data analysis on excitation-emission spectra for plant identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to distinguish among diets fed to Damascus goats using excitation-emission luminescence spectra was investigated. These diets consisted of Medicago sativa L. (Alfalfa), Trifolium spp (Clover), Pistacia lentiscus (P. lentiscus), Phyllirea latifolia (P. latifolia), and Pinus brutia (P. bru...

  2. A Safe and Interactive Method of Illuminating Discharge Tubes for Studying Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Discharge tubes are useful tools for teaching emission spectra and the discrete energy levels of the Bohr model. A new setup uses a plasma globe to illuminate the discharge tube and allows a higher degree of interactivity owing to the omission of a traditional, high-voltage power source. The decreased power consumption also reduces the heating of…

  3. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  4. Modification of Optical Properties of Seawater Exposed to Oil Contaminants Based on Excitation-Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The optical behaviour of seawater exposed to a residual amount of oil pollution is presented and a comparison of the fluorescence spectra of oil dissolved in both n-hexane and seawater is discussed based on excitation-emission spectra. Crude oil extracted from the southern part of the Baltic Sea was used to characterise petroleum properties after contact with seawater. The wavelength-independent fluorescence maximum for natural seawater and seawater artificially polluted with oil were determined. Moreover, the specific excitation-emission peaks for natural seawater and polluted water were analysed to identify the natural organic matter composition. It was found that fluorescence spectra identification is a promising method to detect even an extremely low concentration of petroleum residues directly in the seawater. In addition, alien substances disturbing the fluorescence signatures of natural organic substances in a marine environment is also discussed.

  5. Iron Emission Lines in the Spectra of Classical T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, G.; Edwards, S.; Hartigan, P.

    1993-05-01

    The optical and infrared continuum emission excesses in classical T Tauri stars are frequently attributed to accretion disks with characteristic mass accretion rates of 10(-7) Msun yr(-1) . The spectra of classical T Tauri stars are also rich in emission lines, arising from both permitted and forbidden atomic species, which have been attributed to formation in regions as diverse as chromospheres, boundary layers, winds and collimated jets. We have conducted a high resolution spectroscopic survey of 48 T Tauri stars in the Tau-Aur star formation complex covering the wavelength range 3900{\\kern.2em Angstroms} to 7000{\\kern.2em Angstroms} with the aim of determining the origin of the various emission lines and report here on the most prominent metallic species present in the T Tauri spectra, Fe I and Fe II. From our spectra we have both 1) determined the level of optical continuum emission, expressed as the ratio of `veiling' to photospheric flux, and 2) extracted residual Fe emission line profiles, free of contamination from underlying photospheric features. We find that Fe I, II emission is seen only in T Tauri stars which have infrared and optical continuum emission excesses attributed to accretion disks; none of the `weak-line' T Tauri stars, with photospheric IR colors and no optical veiling, have detectable Fe emission. Correlations of Fe emission equivalent widths with both K-L and the ratio of veiling to photospheric flux, r, suggest that the Fe lines arise as a result of accretion related activity. DR Tau's rich emission line spectra permit study of the largest number of unblended Fe I,II profiles, for which we have spectra covering 5 different nights. Multiplet line ratios indicate the Fe lines are optically thick, and line luminosities imply emitting areas covering a few percent of the stellar surface. The lines are typically broad and symmetric, although inverse P Cygni structure in Fe II is seen on one night. For 4 nights, the Fe I and Fe II lines differ in their FWHM by a factor of two, from 40 to 80 km/sec respectively. We suggest the Fe lines may be formed in magnetospheric accretion columns, coupling the accretion disk to the stellar surface, as described by Konigl (1991) and Calvet and Hartmann (1992).

  6. Super-Resolution Imaging of Molecular Emission Spectra and Single Molecule Spectral Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Mlodzianoski, Michael J.; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Gunewardene, Mudalige S.; Carter, Sean; Hess, Samuel T.

    2016-01-01

    Localization microscopy can image nanoscale cellular details. To address biological questions, the ability to distinguish multiple molecular species simultaneously is invaluable. Here, we present a new version of fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM) which detects the emission spectrum of each localized molecule, and can quantify changes in emission spectrum of individual molecules over time. This information can allow for a dramatic increase in the number of different species simultaneously imaged in a sample, and can create super-resolution maps showing how single molecule emission spectra vary with position and time in a sample. PMID:27002724

  7. New insights on the fluorescent emission spectra of Prodan and Laurdan.

    PubMed

    Vequi-Suplicy, Cíntia C; Coutinho, Kaline; Lamy, M Teresa

    2015-05-01

    Prodan and Laurdan are fluorescent probes largely used in biological systems. They were synthetized to be sensitive to the environment polarity, and their fluorescent emission spectrum shifts around 120 nm, from cyclohexane to water. Although accepted that their emission spectrum is composed by two emission bands, the origin of these two bands is still a matter of discussion. Here we analyze the fluorescent spectra of Prodan and Laurdan in solvents of different polarities, both by decomposing the spectrum into two Gaussian bands and by computing the Decay Associated Spectra (DAS), the latter with time resolved fluorescence. Our data show that the intensity of the lower energy emission band of Prodan and Laurdan (attributed, in the literature, to the decay of a solvent relaxed state) is higher in cyclohexane than in water, showing a decrease as the polarity of the medium increases. Moreover, in all solvents studied here, the balance between the two emission bands is not dependent on the temperature, strongly suggesting two independent excited states. Both bands were found to display a red shift as the medium polarity increases. We propose here a new interpretation for the two emission bands of Prodan and Laurdan in homogeneous solvents: they would be related to the emission of two independent states, and not to a pair of non-relaxed and solvent relaxed states. PMID:25753230

  8. Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission (Analysis of UV-X-Ray High-Resolution Emission Spectra)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Paul (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2004-01-01

    The Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission (PINTofALE) is a suite of IDL routines designed to carry out spectroscopic analysis of high-resolution X-ray spectra. The current version is 1.5, and will shortly be upgraded to v2. A detailed description of the package, together with detailed documentation, example walk-throughs, science threads, and downloadable tar files, are available on-line.

  9. Observations of Relativistically Broadened Iron K-Alpha Lines from AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    2016-04-01

    Relativistic X-ray reflection is commonly seen in many unobscured AGN. The iron K-alpha line is usually its most prominent feature. Observations of broad iron lines from ASCA to NUSTAR will be reviewed and their use in measuring the location and shape of the coronaoutlined. They also provide a measure of the spin of the black hole, which is often found to be high. Selection effects involved here will be discussed.

  10. Method for characterization of a spherically bent crystal for K.alpha. X-ray imaging of laser plasmas using a focusing monochromator geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, Nathan; Doeppner, Tilo; Glenzer, Siegfried; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-04-07

    A method is provided for characterizing spectrometric properties (e.g., peak reflectivity, reflection curve width, and Bragg angle offset) of the K.alpha. emission line reflected narrowly off angle of the direct reflection of a bent crystal and in particular of a spherically bent quartz 200 crystal by analyzing the off-angle x-ray emission from a stronger emission line reflected at angles far from normal incidence. The bent quartz crystal can therefore accurately image argon K.alpha. x-rays at near-normal incidence (Bragg angle of approximately 81 degrees). The method is useful for in-situ calibration of instruments employing the crystal as a grating by first operating the crystal as a high throughput focusing monochromator on the Rowland circle at angles far from normal incidence (Bragg angle approximately 68 degrees) to make a reflection curve with the He-like x-rays such as the He-.alpha. emission line observed from a laser-excited plasma.

  11. Thermal-neutron-capture prompt-gamma emission spectra of representative coals. [1. 5 to 11 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C L; Olson, I K

    1981-12-01

    Prompt gamma ray emission spectra have been calculated from 1.5 to 11 MeV for a wide range of coal compositions exposed to a thermal neutron flux. These include contributions to the spectra from all of the major and minor elements present in the coals. Characteristics of the spectra are discussed and correlated with the coal compositions.

  12. Laboratory simulation of infrared astrophysical features. Ph.D. Thesis; [emission spectra of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    Intermediate resolution emission spectroscopy was used to study a group of 9 terrestrial silicates, 1 synthetic silicate, 6 meteorites and 2 lunar soils; comparisons were made with the intermediate resolution spectra of Comet Kohoutek in order to determine which materials best simulate the 10um astrophysical feature. Mixtures of silicates which would yield spectra matching the spectrum of the comet in the 10um region include: (1) A hydrous layer lattice silicate in combination with a high temperature condensate; (2) an amorphous magnesium silicate in combination with a high temperature condensate and (3) glassy olivine and glassy anorthite in approximately equal proportions.

  13. Peculiarities of spectra of induced emission of polymethine dye solutions at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melishchuk, M. V.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Shpak, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Results from studying the induced emission spectra with monochromatic excitation (superluminescent regime) within a temperature range of 300 K - 5.2 K are presented. The significant feature of such operations is the appearance of quasi-lines whose minimum width is realized at 4.2 K. The frequency distribution of the quasi-lines unambiguously characterizes the dye investigated. When interpreting these results, the idea of an inhomogeneous broadening of the polymethine dye spectra in the solution being studied experimentally was used for the first time. The quasi-lines observed are interpreted as a manifestation of the electron vibration structure of singlet states of a complex molecule.

  14. Secondary electron emission characteristics of C(111) and the observation of double-peaked emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yater, J. E.; Shih, A.

    2001-09-01

    Secondary electron emission spectroscopy (SEES) is used to investigate the low-energy electron emission characteristics of the C(111) surface. A negative electron affinity (NEA) is observed at hydrogenated and cesiated C(111) surfaces, and very high secondary electron yields are measured from these surfaces. The emission from both surfaces is sharply peaked at low energy, although the cesiated surface produces greater energy spread than the hydrogenated surface. Yield measurements are uniform across the hydrogenated and cesiated surfaces, but energy distribution curves (EDCs) contain emission features that depend on the measurement position on the surface. Specifically, an intense secondary emission peak centered above Ec is observed in EDCs measured at all positions while a weaker peak lying completely below Ec appears only at specific regions of the surface. The intense peak is well understood and has been observed in EDCs taken from NEA surfaces of C(100) and chemical vapor deposited diamond. However, the weaker peak has not been observed in previous SEES studies of diamond. This peak corresponds to electron emission from surface or defect electronic states in the energy gap, and it is manifested in the EDCs only when χ is sufficiently lowered by the adsorption of H or Cs. Although the origin of the surface or defect states is not known, it appears to be associated with structural properties of the C(111) surface.

  15. On the effect of emergence angle on emissivity spectra: application to small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn; Ferrari, Sabrina; D'Amore, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Dependence of laboratory-measured emissivity spectra from the emergence angle is a subject that still needs a lot of investigations to be fully understood. Most of the previous work is based on reflectance measurements in the VIS-NIR spectral region and on emissivity measurements of flat, solid surfaces (mainly metals), which are not directly applicable to the analysis of remote sensing data. Small bodies in particular (c.f. asteroids Itokawa and 1999JU3, the respective targets of JAXA Hayabusa and Hayabusa 2 missions) have a very irregular surface; hence, the spectra from those rough surfaces are difficult to compare with laboratory spectra, where the observing geometry is always close to "nadir." At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), we have set up a series of spectral measurements to investigate this problem in the 1- to 16-µm spectral region. We measured the emissivity for two asteroid analogue materials (meteorite Millbillillie and a synthetic enstatite) in vacuum and under purged air, at surface temperature of 100 °C, for emergence angles of 0°, 5°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, and 60°. Emissivity of a serpentinite slab, already used as calibration target for the MARA instrument on Hayabusa 2 MASCOT lander and for the thermal infrared imager spectrometer on Hayabusa 2 orbiter, was measured under the same conditions. Additionally, a second basalt slab was measured. Both slabs were not measured at 5° inclination. Complementary reflectance measurements of the four samples were taken. For all the samples measured, we found that for calibrated emissivity, significant variations from values obtained at nadir (0° emergence angle) appear only for emergence angles ≥40°. Reflectance measurements confirmed this finding, showing the same trend of variations.

  16. Local H i Emissivity Measured with Fermi-LAT and Implications for Cosmic-Ray Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casandjian, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    Cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and nuclei interact with the Galactic interstellar gas and produce high-energy γ-rays. The γ-ray emission rate per hydrogen atom, called emissivity, provides a unique indirect probe of the CR flux. We present the measurement and the interpretation of the emissivity in the solar neighborhood for γ-ray energy from 50 MeV to 50 GeV. We analyzed a subset of 4 yr of observations from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) restricted to absolute latitudes 10^\\circ \\lt | b| \\lt 70^\\circ . From a fit to the LAT data including atomic, molecular, and ionized hydrogen column density templates, as well as a dust optical depth map, we derived the emissivities, the molecular hydrogen-to-CO conversion factor {X}{CO}=(0.902+/- 0.007)× {10}20 cm-2 (K km s-1)-1, and the dust-to-gas ratio {X}{DUST}=(41.4+/- 0.3)× {10}20 cm-2 mag-1. Moreover, we detected for the first time γ-ray emission from ionized hydrogen. We compared the extracted emissivities to those calculated from γ-ray production cross sections and to CR spectra measured in the heliosphere. We observed that the experimental emissivities are reproduced only if the solar modulation is accounted for. This provides a direct detection of solar modulation observed previously through the anticorrelation between CR fluxes and solar activity. Finally, we fitted a parameterized spectral form to the heliospheric CR observations and to the Fermi-LAT emissivity and obtained compatible local interstellar spectra for proton and helium kinetic energy per nucleon between between 1 and 100 GeV and for electron-positrons between 0.1 and 100 GeV.

  17. EMISSION LINES BETWEEN 1 AND 2 keV IN COMETARY X-RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Ian; Christian, Damian J.; Bodewits, Dennis; Dennerl, Konrad; Lisse, Carey M.; Wolk, Scott J. E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu

    2013-01-20

    We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0-2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected five comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model. Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV which we identify as being created by SWCX lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700-2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution that these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.

  18. Observation of stimulated emission pumping spectra of jet-cooled NCS and C 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northrup, F. J.; Sears, Trevor J.

    1989-07-01

    The observation of stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of free-jet-cooled NCS and C 3 is reported. These species were generated by UV laser photolysis of a suitable precursor molecule in a large excess of inert gas in the throat of a supersonic free jet expansion. Individual rotational lines in the cold laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum were pumped and stimulated emission induced using two dye lasers pumped by a single excimer laser. The technique should be of general use in measuring vibronic level spacings in the ground electronic state of small free radicals.

  19. Thermoluminescence decay and emission spectra of some γ-irradiated alkali fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khedekar, Atmaram Vishnu; Ramani, Ramaseshan; Sardesai, Suresh Shamrao; Kalkar, Chandrakant Dattatraya

    1981-06-01

    The room temperature thermoluminescence (RTL) decay from γ-irradiated LiF single crystal (Harshaw), NaF and KF powders (40-60 mesh) were studied as a function of the gamma radiation dose. The total luminescence reaches a maximum for a particular dose depending on the nature of the crystal. The emission spectra for LiF, NaF and KF showed one, two and three emission bands, respectively, in the range 375 to 700 nm. The RTL disappears at higher doses for these fluorides. The results are explained on the basis of postulated metastable energy level.

  20. Influence of the projectile charge state on electron emission spectra from a Cu(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archubi, C. D.; Silkin, V. M.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    Double differential electron emission distributions produced by grazing impact of fast dressed ions on a Cu(111) surface are investigated focusing on the effects of the electronic band structure. The process is described within the Band-Structure-Based approximation, which is a perturbative method that includes an accurate representation of the electron-surface interaction, incorporating information of the electronic band structure of the solid. Differences in the behavior of the emission spectra for He+ q, Li+ q, Be+ q and C+ q projectiles with different charge states q are explained by the combined effect of the projectile trajectory and the projectile charge distribution.

  1. Robust red-emission spectra and yields in firefly bioluminescence against temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Wang, Yu; Hiyama, Miyabi; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2014-05-01

    We measured the quantitative spectra of firefly (Photinus pyralis) bioluminescence at various temperatures to investigate the temperature dependence of the luciferin-luciferase reaction at 15-34 °C. The quantitative spectra were decomposed very well into red (1.9 eV), orange (2.0 eV), and green (2.2 eV) Gaussian components. The intensity of the green component was the only temperature sensitive quantity that linearly decreased as the temperature increased at pH 7 and 8. We found the quantitative bioluminescence spectra to be robust below 2.0 eV against temperature and other experimental conditions. The revealed robustness of the red emissions should be useful for quantitative applications such as adenosine-5'-triphosphate detection.

  2. Study of dynamic emission spectra from lubricant films in an elastohydrodynamic contact using Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra were obtained through a diamond window from lubricating fluids in an operating sliding elastohydrodynamic contact and analyzed by comparison with static absorption spectra under similar pressures. Different loads, shear rates and temperatures were used. Most of the spectra exhibited polarization characteristics, indicating directional alignment of the lubricant in the EHD contact. Among the fluids studied were a "traction" fluid, an advanced ester, and their mixtures, a synthetic paraffin, a naphthenic reference fluid (N-1), both neat and containing 1 percent of p-tricresyl phosphate as an anti-wear additive, and a C-ether. Traction properties were found to be nearly proportional to mixture composition for traction fluid and ester mixtures. The anti-wear additive reduced traction and fluid temperature under low loads but increased them under higher loads, giving rise to formation of a friction polymer.

  3. Control of emission spectra in quantum dot microdisk/microring lasers.

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskaya, N V; Mukhin, I S; Moiseev, E I; Shostak, I I; Bogdanov, A A; Nadtochiy, A M; Maximov, M V; Zhukov, A E; Kulagina, M M; Vashanova, K A; Zadiranov, Yu M; Troshkov, S I; Lipovskii, A A; Mintairov, A

    2014-10-20

    Focused ion beam is applied to quantum dot based microresonators to form pits or groove on their surface. The emission spectra of the resonators based lasers are significantly thinned out after the ion beam milling, and one or two modes become dominant instead of a group of modes having comparable intensities. The linewidth of the lasing mode is kept unchanged, whereas the lasing threshold demonstrates an insignificant growth. PMID:25401612

  4. L α X-Ray Emission Spectra of Copper Compounds and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1994-05-01

    With a two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with beryl crystals,the Cu Lα emission spectra in fluorescence have been measuredfor selected copper compounds Cu2O, CuO, CuCl, CuBr, CuI,CuF2, CuCl2, CuBr2, CuF2·2H2O,CuCl2·2H2O and Cu3P, and alloysα-Cu+35%Zn and Cu+2%Be. The measured spectra aregrouped into three classes. The first class comprises the spectraof alloys, which consist of a single broad band similar to thatof Cu metal. The second class includes the spectra of monovalentcopper compounds, which are composed of a prominent peak and itshigh- and low-energy structures. To the third class belong thespectra of divalent copper compounds, which consist of a strongpeak accompanied with a characteristic dip and hump on thehigh-energy side. The Cu Lα emission bands of Cu2O,CuCl and CuBr are compared with available XPS spectra andtheoretical Cu-3d-DOS.

  5. Sources of High-Energy Emission in the Green Pea Galaxies: New Constraints from Magellan Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Derek Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered Green Pea galaxies display extreme starburst activity and may be some of the only possible Lyman continuum emitting galaxies at low redshift. Green Peas are characterized by their unusually high [O III]/[O II] ratios, similar to the ratios observed in high-redshift galaxies. In addition, the presence of the high-energy He II 4686 line shows that the Green Peas are highly ionized. However, the origin of the He II emission in the Green Peas, and many other starburst galaxies, is still an open question. We analyze IMACS and MagE spectra from the Magellan telescopes in order to evaluate the most probable cause of this He II emission. We also analyze other properties like dust content, temperature and density, and kinematic components. Our IMACS spectra show no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features. We set upper limits on the WR populations in our sample and conclude that Wolf-Rayet stars are not a likely candidate for the He II emission. With deeper MagE spectra we investigate energetic shocks as a possible source of the He II, and move one step closer to uncovering the origin of high-energy photons in these unique starbursts.

  6. Variation of Spectra Luminescence Emission of Moganite under Different Stimulation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Guinea, J.; Bustillo, M. A.; Crespo-Feo, E.; Tormo, L.; Finch, A. A.; Hole, D. E.; Townsend, P. D.; Correcher, V.

    2009-08-01

    This work focuses on a characterization of various type of luminescence in Moganite-rich silica minerals from Mogan (Gran Canaria, Spain). The silica minerals formed by complicated hydrous processes exhibit luminescence emissions, which depend on sample temperature and type of an irradiation for excitation such as heat, laser, ion-beam, X-ray, incident electron beam and so on. Here we examined thermoluminescence (TL), ion beam luminescence (IBL), radioluminescence (RL), cathodoluminescence (CL) of moganite aliquots combined with Raman spectroscopy for clarification of relationship between lattice defects and the spectral luminescence emissions. The spatially-resolved CL spectroscopy coupled to the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM-CL) displays different luminescence spectral signals between the moganite veined core (dull emission) and the rim (bright emission) together with larger porosity and additional ions in the outer part, suggesting a later alteration process with alkali, metals and volatile ions for the moganite formation. RL and IBL spectra of silica minerals in core and rim mainly show a progressive increase in intensity of RL emission band at 470-500 nm with decrease in sample temperature, which is caused by cryogenic stress on the [AlO4]0 centers. Continuous H+ ion beam implantation on samples at room temperature produces a subtle diminishing of blue emission and a quite brightening of red emission at 700 nm assigned to Fe3+ point defects. The white turbid rim with opaline SiO2 in cavities emits bright CL emission in panchromatic CL image, and has spectral emission bands at 290 nm with high intensity (100 000 a.u.) and one at 520 nm which are probably related to H2O(Si-OH) groups, H+, Na+ and metallic ions such as Fe3+, Ti4+ and Nb4+. Moganite core zones only display emission bands at 390 nm and 670 nm (8500 a.u.) attributed to [AlO4/Na+]0 centers and silanol groups, respectively.

  7. Thermal Emission Spectra of Phobos, Vesta, Ceres, and Pallas: A Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet, visual, and near-infrared spectra of Phobos, obtained by Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiters, were interpreted to suggest a compositional similarity with carbonaceous chrondrites. Such a composition would be inconsistent with the moon's origin in the proto-Mars region, as Mars is composed chiefly of differentiated silicates. This interpretation was used to suggest that the moons originated in the main-asteroid belt, with subsequent capture and orbital evolution into their current locations. Interpretations of more recent visual and near-infrared spectra, obtained by Phobos-2 and Mars Pathfinder, have demonstrated that the Phobos spectrum is more similar to spectra of other classes of asteroids and lunar soils. If lunar mare soil is the correct analogy, then such a composition suggests a formation of Phobos from materials similar to that on Mars, i.e. basalts, and would not require a dynamically difficult capture and orbital evolution. During the science phasing orbits of the Mars Global Surveyor mission Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations of Phobos were acquired at each of four encounters. The spectral variability observed for localized surface regions on Phobos has been previously reported and is greatest near the northern wall of Stickney crater. Interpretation of the thermal infrared spectra of airless bodies, based upon most existing laboratory measurements, is complicated by the absence of interstitial gases on the celestial objects that would act to minimize potential thermal gradients in the upper layers of the surface. As an aid to interpretation of the TES Phobos spectra are compared to telescopic and airborne thermal infrared spectra of asteroids from several classes, including Ceres (G), Pallas (B), and Vesta (V). The asteroid spectra provide a direct analogy to the physical situation encountered at the surface of Phobos, albeit different thermal gradients may exist for each surface. This work is supported by NASA RTOP's 344-30-30-01 and 344-34-21-08.

  8. Doppler effects on 3-D non-LTE radiation transport and emission spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Davis, J.; DasGupta, A.; Apruzese, John P.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Clark, R. W.; Ampleford, David J.; Bailey, James E.; Thornhill, Joseph W.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-10-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved X-ray emission lines contain information about temperatures, densities, velocities, and the gradients in a plasma. Extracting this information from optically thick lines emitted from complex ions in dynamic, three-dimensional, non-LTE plasmas requires self-consistent accounting for both non-LTE atomic physics and non-local radiative transfer. We present a brief description of a hybrid-structure spectroscopic atomic model coupled to an iterative tabular on-the-spot treatment of radiative transfer that can be applied to plasmas of arbitrary material composition, conditions, and geometries. The effects of Doppler line shifts on the self-consistent radiative transfer within the plasma and the emergent emission and absorption spectra are included in the model. Sample calculations for a two-level atom in a uniform cylindrical plasma are given, showing reasonable agreement with more sophisticated transport models and illustrating the potential complexity - or richness - of radially resolved emission lines from an imploding cylindrical plasma. Also presented is a comparison of modeled L- and K-shell spectra to temporally and radially resolved emission data from a Cu:Ni plasma. Finally, some shortcomings of the model and possible paths for improvement are discussed.

  9. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  10. TDDFT prediction of UV-vis absorption and emission spectra of tocopherols in different media.

    PubMed

    Bakhouche, Kahina; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Lahmar, Souad; Hammoutène, Dalila

    2015-06-01

    We use the TDDFT/PBE0/6-31+G* method to determine the electronic absorption and emission energies, in different media, of the four forms of tocopherol, which differ by the number and the position of methyl groups on the chromanol. Geometries of the ground state S0 and the first singlet excited state S1 were optimized in the gas phase, and various solvents. The solvent effect is evaluated using an implicit solvation model (IEF-PCM). Our results are compared to the experimental ones obtained for the vitamin E content in several vegetable oils. For all forms of tocopherols, the HOMO-LUMO first vertical excitation is a π-π* transition. Gas phase and non-polar solvents (benzene and toluene) give higher absorption wavelengths than polar solvents (acetone, ethanol, methanol, DMSO, and water); this can be interpreted by a coplanarity between the O-H group and the chroman, allowing a better electronic resonance of the oxygen lone pairs and the aromatic ring, and therefore giving an important absorption wavelength, whereas the polar solvents give high emission wavelengths comparatively to gas phase and non-polar solvents. Fluorescence spectra permit the determination, the separation, and the identification of the four forms of tocopherols by a large difference in emission wavelength values. Graphical Abstract Scheme from process methodological to obtain the absorption and emission spectra for tocopherols. PMID:26026299

  11. K-(alpha) Radiography at 20-100 keV Using Short-Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H S; Chambers, D; Clarke, R; Eagleton, R; Giraldez, E; Goldsack, T; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; Key, M; King, J; Koch, J; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Remington, B; Robey, H; Snavely, R; Steinman, D; Stephenson, R; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Town, R J

    2005-08-29

    X-ray radiography is an important tool for diagnosing and imaging planar and convergent hydrodynamics phenomena for laser experiments. Until now, hydrodynamics experiments at Omega and NIF utilize E{sub x-ray} < 9 keV backlighter x-rays emitted by thermal plasmas. However, future experiments will need to diagnose larger and denser targets and will require x-ray probes of energies from 20-100 keV and possibly up to 1 MeV. Hard K-{alpha} x-ray photons can be created through high-energy electron interactions in the target material after irradiation by petawatt-class high-intensity-short-pulse lasers with > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have performed several experiments on the JanUSP, and the Vulcan 100TW, and Vulcan Petawatt lasers to understand K-{alpha} sources and to test radiography concepts. 1-D radiography using an edge-on foil and 2-D radiography using buried wires and cone-fiber targets were tested. We find that 1-D thin edge-on foils can have imaging resolution better than 10 {micro}m. Micro volume targets produce bright sources with measured conversion efficiency from laser energy to x-ray photons of {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. This level of conversion may not be enough for 2-D point projection radiography. A comparison of our experimental measurements of small volume sources with the LSP/PIC simulation show similar K-{alpha} creation profiles but discrepancy in absolute yields.

  12. Emissitivity spectra obtained from field and laboratory measurements using the temperature and emissivity separation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Munoz, Juan C.; Sobrino, Jose A

    2006-09-20

    Surface emissivities play an important role in thermal remote sensing, since knowledge of them is required to estimate land surface temperature with enough accuracy. They are also important in other environmental or geological studies.We show the results obtained for the emissivity spectra of different natural surfaces (water, green, and senescent vegetation) by applying the temperature and emissivity separation (TES) algorithm to ground-based measurements collected at the field with a multiband thermal radiometer. The results have been tested with data included in spectral libraries, and rms errors lower than 0.01 have been found, except for senescent vegetation. Two methods are also proposed to apply the TES algorithm to measurements achieved in the laboratory: (i) by heating the sample and (ii) using a box with reflective walls.

  13. Emissitivity spectra obtained from field and laboratory measurements using the temperature and emissivity separation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C; Sobrino, José A

    2006-09-20

    Surface emissivities play an important role in thermal remote sensing, since knowledge of them is required to estimate land surface temperature with enough accuracy. They are also important in other environmental or geological studies. We show the results obtained for the emissivity spectra of different natural surfaces (water, green, and senescent vegetation) by applying the temperature and emissivity separation (TES) algorithm to ground-based measurements collected at the field with a multiband thermal radiometer. The results have been tested with data included in spectral libraries, and rms errors lower than 0.01 have been found, except for senescent vegetation. Two methods are also proposed to apply the TES algorithm to measurements achieved in the laboratory: (i) by heating the sample and (ii) using a box with reflective walls. PMID:16946789

  14. Calcium pyroxenes at Mercurian surface temperatures: investigation of in-situ emissivity spectra and thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, S.; Nestola, F.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Alvaro, M.; Domeneghetti, M.; Massironi, M.; Hiesinger, H.

    2013-12-01

    The European Space Agency and Japan Aerospace Agency mission to Mercury, named BepiColombo, will carry on board the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) that will be able to provide surface Thermal Infra-Red (TIR) emissivity spectra from 7 to 14 μm. This range of wavelengths is very useful to identify the fine-scale structural properties of several silicates. For mineral families as pyroxenes, the emissivity peak positions are good indicators of the composition. A complication in the interpretation of MERTIS data could arise from the extreme daily surface temperature range of Mercury (70 to 725 K) that significantly affects the crystal structure and density of minerals and consequently should affect the TIR spectral signature of each single mineral present on the surface of the planet. In preparation for the MERTIS data analysis, we are extensively investigating at high temperatures conditions several mineral phases potentially detectable on the surface of Mercury. Two C2/c augitic pyroxenes, with constant calcium content and very different magnesium to iron ratio, were studied by in situ high-temperature thermal infrared spectroscopy (up to 750 K) and in situ high-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction (up to 770 K). The emissivity spectra of the two samples show similar band center shifts of the main three bands toward lower wavenumbers with increasing temperature. Our results indicate that the center position of bands 1 and 2 is strictly dependent on temperature, whereas the center position of band 3 is a strong function of the composition regardless the temperature. These data suggest that MERTIS spectra will be able to provide indications of C2/c augitic pyroxene with different magnesium contents and will allow a correct interpretation independently on the spectra acquisition temperature.

  15. Somatic mutations in PI3K[alpha]: Structural basis for enzyme activation and drug design

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelli, Sandra B.; Mandelker, Diana; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The PI3K pathway is a communication hub coordinating critical cell functions including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation, motility and metabolism. Because PI3K{alpha} harbors recurrent somatic mutations resulting in gains of function in human cancers, it has emerged as an important drug target for many types of solid tumors. Various PI3K isoforms are also being evaluated as potential therapeutic targets for inflammation, heart disease, and hematological malignancies. Structural biology is providing insights into the flexibility of the PI3Ks, and providing basis for understanding the effects of mutations, drug resistance and specificity.

  16. Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Resonances in 234,236,238U Measured Using the Dance Detector at Lansce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2013-03-01

    An accurate knowledge of the radiative strength function and level density is needed to calculate of neutron-capture cross sections. An additional constraint on these quantities is provided by measurements of ?-ray emission spectra following capture. We present ?-emission spectra from several neutron resonances in 234,236,238U, measured using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. The measurements are compared to preliminary calculations of the cascade. It is observed that the generalized Lorentzian form of the E1 strength function cannot reproduce the shape of the emission spectra, but a better description is made by adding low-lying M1 Lorentzian strength.

  17. Discovery of the Red-Skewed K-alpha Iron Line in Cyg X-2 with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; Titarchuk, Lev; Laurent, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    We report on the Suzaku observation of neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 which reveals strong iron K-alpha emission line. The line profile shows a prominent red wing extending down to 4 keV. This discovery increases the number of neutron star sources where red-skewed iron lines were observed and strongly suggests that this phenomenon is common not only in black holes but also in other types of compact objects. We examine the line profile by fitting it with the model which attributes its production to the relativistic effects due to disk reflection of X-ray radiation. We also apply an alternative model where the red wing is a result of down-scattering effect of the first order with respect to electron velocity in the wind outflow. Both models describe adequately the observed line profile. However, the X-ray variability in a state similar to that in the Suzaku observation which we establish by analysing RXTE observation favors the wind origin of the line formation.

  18. Detection and Characterisation of H-{alpha} Emission Lines from Gaia BP/RP Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenes, Juergen; Laur, Sven; Kolka, Indrek

    2008-12-05

    The Gaia probe, set to launch in 2011, will measure an estimated billion astronomical objects, producing an enormous amount of data. One of the data analysis tasks will be the identification and classification of measured objects. A vast majority of them will be 'ordinary' stars from our Galaxy but a certain percentage will belong to 'peculiar' objects. We are interested in detecting emission line stars (ELS). The characteristic feature of most ELS is the presence of a H-{alpha} emission line in their spectra. In the case of Gaia measurements, the influence of this line could be detected in low resolution prismatic spectra which will be recorded both in blue (BP) and red (RP) spectral region. In this work, we compare different algorithms for detecting and characterising H-{alpha} lines in Gaia spectra. These include a simple, integrated flux ratio-based algorithm and several machine learning algorithms, such as neural networks, support vector machines and support vector regression. We study line detection both from single-transit and over-sampled end-of-mission data.

  19. Temperature measurements in microwave argon plasma source by using overlapped molecular emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, E.; Bazavan, M.; Shindo, H.

    2015-09-01

    The electron excitation temperature Texc, vibrational Tvib, and rotational Trot temperatures were measured in a high-pressure line-shaped microwave plasma source in argon over a wide range of gas pressure and microwave power, by using optical emission spectra. The selected ArI transition lines 5p-4s and 4p-4s were chosen to calculate electron excitation temperature using Boltzmann's plot method. Meanwhile, the emission spectra of hydroxyl OH molecular ( A 2 Σ + - X 2 Π i , Δ ν = 0 ) band and the nitrogen N2 second positive system ( C 3 Π u - B 3 Π g , Δ ν = + 1 ), both second diffraction order, were used to evaluate the vibrational Tvib and rotational Trot temperatures using the method of comparing the measured and calculated spectra with a chi-squared minimization procedure. The components of the overlapped spectrum are greatly influenced by the gas pressure; however, they are independent on microwave power. For temperatures, it was found that the Texc dramatically decreases from 2.5 to 0.75 eV, which qualitatively agrees with T e deduced from zero-global model. Both of Tvib and Trot significantly decrease with as gas pressure increase from 0.4 to 50 Torr. Yet, they behave differently with microwave power.

  20. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  1. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2013-06-01

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines, and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of water-soluble SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and α-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ∼100 ppb ammonia in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (∼0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for λexcitation = 420 ± 50 nm and λemission = 475 ± 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to λexcitation = 320 ± 25 nm and λemission = 425 ± 38 nm for the α-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the EEM spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles may have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols. PMID:23663151

  2. Excitation and emission spectra of rubidium in rare-gas thin-films

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Sin, Kyungseob; Momose, Takamasa

    2012-07-07

    To understand the optical properties of atoms in solid state matrices, the absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of rubidium doped thin-films of argon, krypton, and xenon were investigated in detail. A two-dimensional spectral analysis extends earlier reports on the excitation and emission properties of rubidium in rare-gas hosts. We found that the doped crystals of krypton and xenon exhibit a simple absorption-emission relation, whereas rubidium in argon showed more complicated spectral structures. Our sample preparation employed in the present work yielded different results for the Ar crystal, but our peak positions were consistent with the prediction based on the linear extrapolation of Xe and Kr data. We also observed a bleaching behavior in rubidium excitation spectra, which suggests a population transfer from one to another spectral feature due to hole-burning. The observed optical response implies that rubidium in rare-gas thin-films is detectable with extremely high sensitivity, possibly down to a single atom level, in low concentration samples.

  3. TIR Emissivity Spectra of Thermally Processed Sulfates, Carbonates and Phyllosilicates as Analog Materials for Asteroid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.

    2013-12-01

    At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin we are building a database of spectral measurements of several meteorites and other analogs for asteroid surfaces. Bi-directional reflectance of samples in the 1 to 100 ?m spectral range, are measured by using an evacuated (10-4 bar) Bruker Vertex 80V FTIR spectrometer and a Bruker A513 reflection unit, allowing phase angles between 26 and 170. Emissivity in the 1 to 100 ?m spectral range is measured with the same instrument coupled with an external emissivity chamber, for sample temperatures ranging from low (50 C) to very high (above 800 C). We present here new measurements on sulfates, carbonates, and phyllosilicates in various grain size ranges. The setup was configured to simulate the thermal history of surface minerals on the asteroid 2008 EV5 during its revolution around the Sun. This asteroid is the scientific target of the ESA Marco Polo-R mission. The samples in vacuum (< 0.8 mbar) are measured at surface temperature around 70 C, then the same samples are heated to 220 C, and maintained at this temperature for one hour. Slowly the sample temperature is reduced back again to 70 C and a second measurement is taken. Emissivity spectra before and after thermal processing of the samples are complemented with reflectance measurements on samples fresh and after thermal processing. This comparison show us that for some minerals no spectral/structural changes appear, while others show signs of dehydration and among them some species show structural changes. We conclude that a proper spectral library of emissivity spectra for asteroid analogue materials must include thermally processed samples, reproducing the thermal evolution for the asteroid that is target of the actual investigation.

  4. The quantum emission spectra of rapidly-rotating Kerr black holes: Discrete or continuous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-10-01

    Bekenstein and Mukhanov (BM) have suggested that, in a quantum theory of gravity, black holes may have discrete emission spectra. Using the time-energy uncertainty principle they have also shown that, for a (non-rotating) Schwarzschild black hole, the natural broadening δω of the black-hole emission lines is expected to be small on the scale set by the characteristic frequency spacing Δω of the spectral lines: ζSch ≡ δω / Δω ≪ 1. BM have therefore concluded that the expected discrete emission lines of the quantized Schwarzschild black hole are unlikely to overlap. In this paper we calculate the characteristic dimensionless ratio ζ (a bar) ≡ δω / Δω for the predicted BM emission spectra of rapidly-rotating Kerr black holes (here a bar ≡ J /M2 is the dimensionless angular momentum of the black hole). It is shown that ζ (a bar) is an increasing function of the black-hole angular momentum. In particular, we find that the quantum emission lines of Kerr black holes in the regime a bar ≳ 0.9 are characterized by the dimensionless ratio ζ (a bar) ≳ 1 and are therefore effectively blended together. Our results thus suggest that, even if the underlying mass (energy) spectrum of these rapidly-rotating Kerr black holes is fundamentally discrete as suggested by Bekenstein and Mukhanov, the natural broadening phenomenon (associated with the time-energy uncertainty principle) is expected to smear the black-hole radiation spectrum into a continuum.

  5. An algorithm for identification of substances using a finite set of secondary-emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, N. S.; Golyak, Il. S.; Morozov, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    A problem of identification of chemical composition in the absence of sampling procedures is considered. A method that allows identification using spectra of a desired substance is proposed. The measure of the difference between spectral sets is determined. The method is employed in the experiments using a visible and near-UV Fourier spectrometer. The secondary emission of samples is excited by UV sources with maximum intensities at wavelengths of 280 and 310 nm. Anthracene, POPOP, PPO, stilbene, and tryptophan are used in experiments. The ROC curves are constructed and compared to specify the parameters that are used in the algorithm for searching for substances in the database of reference spectra. The results will make it possible to improve the reliability and applicability of express analyzers of chemical substances.

  6. Reliable extraction of transmission and emission spectra using deterministic and stochastic systematics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Neale

    2015-08-01

    Time-series photometry and spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets allow us to study their atmospheres. Unfortunately, the required precision to extract atmospheric information surpasses the design specifications of most general purpose instrumentation. This results in instrumental systematics in the light curves that are typically larger than the target precision. Systematics must therefore be modelled, leaving the inference of light-curve parameters conditioned on the subjective choice of systematics models and model-selection criteria. These choices are significant contributors to the error budget, yet are often neglected when extracting exoplanet spectra. I will review the use of deterministic and stochastic systematics models commonly used for transmission and emission spectroscopy. This will cover model selection, marginalisation over families of systematic models, and Gaussian processes. I will focus on how these techniques may be used to objectively extract spectra of exoplanets in the presence of complex noise sources, therefore reliably inferring the composition and structure of their atmospheres.

  7. Emission spectra of the cations of some fluoro-substituted phenols in the gaseous phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, John Paul; Marthaler, O.; Mohraz, Manijeh; Shiley, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Emission spectra of the cations of 2,5- and 3,5-difluorophenol, of 2,3,4- and 2,4,5-trifluorophenol, of 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenol and of 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenol have been obtained in the gas phase using low-energy electron beam excitation. The band systems are assigned to the B??(??-1) ??? X??(??-1) electronic transitions of these cations by reference to photoelectron spectroscopic data. The He(I??) photoelectron spectra and the ionisation energies of ten fluoro-substituted phenols are reported. The symmetries of the four lowest electronic states of these cations are inferred from the radiative decay studies. The lifetimes of the lowest vibrational levels of the B??(??-1) state of the six fluoro-substituted phenol cations above have also been measured. ?? 1980.

  8. Emission spectra analysis of arc plasma for synthesis of carbon nanostructures in various magnetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field in arc plasmas, high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and large-scale graphene flakes can be obtained in a single step. In this paper, ultraviolet-visible emission spectra of arc in different spots under various magnetic conditions are analyzed to provide an in situ investigation for transformation processes of evaporated species and growth of carbon nanostructures in arc. Based on the arc spectra of carbon diatomic Swan bands, vibrational temperature in arc is determined. The vibrational temperature in arc center was measured around 6950 K, which is in good agreement with our simulation results. Experimental and simulation results suggest that SWCNT are formed in the arc periphery region. Transmission electronic microscope and Raman spectroscope are also employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures.

  9. Plagioclase compositions derived from thermal emission spectra of compositionally complex mixtures: Implications for Martian feldspar mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Keith A.; McSween, Harry Y.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2007-10-01

    The compositions of plagioclase, the most abundant mineral in the Martian crust, reflect changing conditions during magmatic evolution. Plagioclase contains spectral features at thermal infrared wavelengths that permit its detection by thermal emission spectrometers (Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and Miniature TES (Mini-TES)) on Mars spacecraft. Previous studies have determined the accuracy with which average plagioclase compositions can be modeled in simple two-component sand mixtures and terrestrial volcanic rocks. Studies of terrestrial rock analogs suffer from difficulties in accurately determining the average plagioclase composition for comparison with the spectrally modeled composition. Sand mixtures, however, provide a means of controlling plagioclase compositions for direct comparison to those modeled by linear deconvolution. This has allowed us to address how compositional complexity may affect our ability to derive average plagioclase compositions from thermal emission data. In this study, we examine the accuracy with which average plagioclase compositions can be modeled from emission spectra of complex mixtures of three, four, and five compositions of coarse (500-850 μm) plagioclase sand. Additionally, we examine multiphase mixtures of plagioclase with pyroxene, olivine, magnetite, and ilmenite that are analogous to selected Martian surface materials. Increasing the number of plagioclase compositions or introducing additional mineral phases does not affect the accuracy previously reported for modeling average plagioclase compositions. Plagioclase can be modeled to within 6 An of measured compositions at laboratory, TES, THEMIS, and Mini-TES resolution (within 1σ standard deviation).

  10. Effects of Space Weathering on Thermal Infrared Emissivity Spectra of Bulk Lunar Soils Measured Under Simulated Lunar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Pieters, C. M.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Glotch, T. D.; Lucey, P. G.

    2015-11-01

    In this initial study, TIR emissivity spectral measurements are made under lunar-like conditions of two highland soil samples that are similar in composition, but differing maturities to understand the effects of space weathering on TIR spectra.

  11. PHASE-AVERAGED SPECTRA AND LUMINOSITIES OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS FROM YOUNG ISOLATED PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Jiang, Z. J.; Zhang, L.

    2013-03-10

    We study the phase-averaged spectra and luminosities of {gamma}-ray emissions from young, isolated pulsars within a revised outer gap model. In the revised version of the outer gap, there are two possible cases for the outer gaps: the fractional size of the outer gap is estimated through the photon-photon pair process in the first case (Case I), and is limited by the critical field lines in the second case (Case II). The fractional size is described by Case I if the fractional size at the null charge surface in Case I is smaller than that in Case II, and vice versa. Such an outer gap can extend from the inner boundary, whose radial distance to the neutron star is less than that of the null charge surface to the light cylinder for a {gamma}-ray pulsar with a given magnetic inclination. When the shape of the outer gap is determined, assuming that high-energy emission at an averaged radius of the field line in the center of the outer gap, with a Gaussian distribution of the parallel electric field along the gap height, represents typical emission, the phase-averaged {gamma}-ray spectrum for a given pulsar can be estimated in the revised model with three model parameters. We apply the model to explain the phase-averaged spectra of the Vela (Case I) and Geminga (Case II) pulsars. We also use the model to fit the phase-averaged spectra of 54 young, isolated {gamma}-ray pulsars, and then calculate the {gamma}-ray luminosities and compare them with the observed data from Fermi-LAT.

  12. Non-detection of X-ray emission from sterile neutrinos in stacked galaxy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Michael E.; Churazov, Eugene; Bregman, Joel N.

    2015-10-01

    We conduct a comprehensive search for X-ray emission lines from sterile neutrino dark matter, motivated by recent claims of unidentified emission lines in the stacked X-ray spectra of galaxy clusters and the centres of the Milky Way and M31. Since the claimed emission lines lie around 3.5 keV, we focus on galaxies and galaxy groups (masking the central regions), since these objects emit very little radiation above ˜2 keV and offer a clean background against which to detect emission lines. We develop a formalism for maximizing the signal-to-noise of decaying dark matter emission lines by weighing each X-ray event according to the expected dark matter profile. In total, we examine 81 and 89 galaxies with Chandra and XMM-Newton, respectively, totalling 15.0 and 14.6 Ms of integration time. We find no significant evidence of any emission lines, placing strong constraints on the mixing angle of sterile neutrinos with masses between 4.8 and 12.4 keV. In particular, if the 3.57 keV feature from Bulbul et al. were due to 7.1 keV sterile neutrino emission, we would have detected it at 4.4σ and 11.8σ in our two samples. The most conservative estimates of the systematic uncertainties reduce these constraints to 4.4σ and 7.8σ, or letting the line energy vary between 3.50 and 3.60 keV reduces these constraints to 2.7σ and 11.0σ, respectively. Unlike previous constraints, our measurements do not depend on the model of the X-ray background or on the assumed logarithmic slope of the centre of the dark matter profile.

  13. Calcium Pyroxenes at Mercurian Surface Temperatures: Investigation of In-Situ Emissivity Spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Sabrina; Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn; Rossi, Manuela; Nestola, Fabrizio; D'Amore, Mario; Hiesinger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Several observations point to the possibility that Ca-rich (and low-Fe) clinopyroxenes could be common constituent minerals of the surface of Mercury. The upcoming ESA-JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury will carry on board the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) that will provide surface emissivity spectra in the wavelength range from 7-14 μm. This spectral range is very useful to identify the fine-scale structural properties of several silicates including pyroxenes. The extreme daily surface temperature range of Mercury (70 to 725 K) that significantly affects the spectral signature of minerals will make the interpretation of MERTIS observations challenging. It has been shown that spectra of clinopyroxenes with similar calcium content display a deepening of the main absorption bands, and a shift of the band minima toward higher wavelengths with increasing temperatures. Similar shifts can also be observed at constant temperature with increasing iron content in the M2 site. Therefore, the thermal expansion induced by the increasing temperature simulates the presence of a larger cation (e.g., iron vs. magnesium) within the mineral structure. Interestingly, each band shifts by a different amount, representing a marker for the real chemistry of the sample. A detailed study of the described mineral behavior is fundamental to localize those spectral bands sensitive to the daily temperature range of the Mercury surface. In combination with the temperature measurements obtained independently by the radiometer channel of MERTIS this will help to further constrain the mineralogical interpretation of the MERTIS spectral data. Here we present high-temperature (up to 750 K) laboratory emissivity spectra of several augitic pyroxenes with different calcium contents and very different magnesium to iron ratios. The spectra were derived from individual well-preserved natural crystals of several pyroxenes of less than 125 ?m in size, which approaches the presumable size of Mercurian regolith particles. The emissivity measurements of the heated samples under vacuum have been conducted using the Mercury simulation chamber at the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) in Berlin.

  14. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  15. K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra in MnF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.; Parlebas, J. C.; Uozumi, T.; Kotani, A.; Kao, C.-C.

    2000-01-15

    We report experimental and theoretical results on Mn K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra (K{beta} RXES) at the pre-edge region of K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy in a powdered MnF{sub 2} sample. The experimental results are studied theoretically in terms of coherent second-order optical process, using a MnF{sub 6}{sup -4} cluster model with the effects of intra-atomic multiplet coupling and interatomic hybridization in the space of three configurations and taking into account both the Mn 1s-3d quadrupole excitation and the Mn 1s-4p dipole excitation. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. Moreover, we show that if the sample is a single crystal the resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy caused by the quadrupole excitation has a strong sensitivity to the angle of the incident photon. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Thermal emission from particulate surfaces: A comparison of scattering models with measured spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moersch, J. E.; Christensen, P. R.

    1995-01-01

    Emissivity spectra of particulate mineral samples are highly dependent on particle size when that size is comparable to the wavelength of light emitted (5-50 micrometers for the midinfrared). Proper geologic interpretation of data from planetary infrared spectrometers will require that these particle size effects be well understood. To address this issue, samples of quartz powders were produced with narrow, well-characterized particle size distributions. Mean particle diameters in these samples ranged from 15 to 227 micrometers. Emission spectra of these powders allow the first detailed comparison of the complex spectral variations with particle size observed in laboratory data with the predictions of radiative transfer models. Four such models are considered here. Hapke's relectance theory (converted to emissivity via Kirchoff's law) is the first model tested. Hapke's more recently published emission theory is also employed. The third model, the 'Mie/Conel' model, uses Mie single scattering with a two-stream approximation for multiple scattering. This model, like the first, is a converted reflec- tance model. Mie scattering assumes particles are both spherical and well separated, which is not true for the quartz powders, but includes diffraction effects. The fourth model uses the Mie solution for single scattering by spheres and inputs those results into the multiple scattering formalism of Hapke's emission theory. The results of the four models are considered in relation to the values of the optical constants n and k. We have grouped these as class 1 (k large), class 2 (k moderate, n is approximately 2), class 3 (k small, n is approximately 2), and class 4 (k small, n is approximately 1). In general, the Mie/Hapke hybrid model does best at predicting variations with grain size. In particular, it predicts changes of the correct pattern, although incorrect magnitude, for class 1 bands, where large increases in emissivity with decreasing grain size are observed. This model also does an excellent job on moderate (class 2) and very weak and intraband (class 3) regions, and correctly predicts the emission maximum and its invariance with grain size near the Christiansen frequency (class 4). The Mie/Hapke hybrid model also has the fewest free parameters of the four models examined, while maintaining the most physical treatment of the radiative transfer. The Mie/Conel model performs as well as the Mie/Hapke hybrid model in strong bands (class 1) but does not accurately model the behavior of moderate (class 2) and very weak (class 3) bands.

  17. Thermal emission from particulate surfaces: A comparison of scattering models with measured spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moersch, J. E.; Christensen, P. R.

    1995-04-01

    Emissivity spectra of particulate mineral samples are highly dependent on particle size when that size is comparable to the wavelength of light emitted (5-50 micrometers for the midinfrared). Proper geologic interpretation of data from planetary infrared spectrometers will require that these particle size effects be well understood. To address this issue, samples of quartz powders were produced with narrow, well-characterized particle size distributions. Mean particle diameters in these samples ranged from 15 to 227 micrometers. Emission spectra of these powders allow the first detailed comparison of the complex spectral variations with particle size observed in laboratory data with the predictions of radiative transfer models. Four such models are considered here. Hapke's reflectance theory (converted to emissivity via Kirchoff's law) is the first model tested. Hapke's more recently published emission theory is also employed. The third model, the 'Mie/Conel' model, uses Mie single scattering with a two-stream approximation for multiple scattering. This model, like the first, is a converted reflectance model. Mie scattering assumes particles are both spherical and well separated, which is not true for the quartz powders, but includes diffraction effects. The fourth model uses the Mie solution for single scattering by spheres and inputs those results into the multiple scattering formalism of Hapke's emission theory. The results of the four models are considered in relation to the values of the optical constants n and k. We have grouped these as class 1 (k large), class 2 (k moderate, n is approximately 2), class 3 (k small, n is approximately 2), and class 4 (k small, n is approximately 1). In general, the Mie/Hapke hybrid model does best at predicting variations with grain size. In particular, it predicts changes of the correct pattern, although incorrect magnitude, for class 1 bands, where large increases in emissivity with decreasing grain size are observed. This model also does an excellent job on moderate (class 2) and very weak and intraband (class 3) regions, and correctly predicts the emission maximum and its invariance with grain size near the Christiansen frequency (class 4). The Mie/Hapke hybrid model also has the fewest free parameters of the four models examined, while maintaining the most physical treatment of the radiative transfer.

  18. Oscillating bubble concentration and its size distribution using acoustic emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Avvaru, Balasubrahmanyam; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2009-01-01

    New method has been proposed for the estimation of size and number density distribution of oscillating bubbles in a sonochemical reactor using acoustic emission spectra measurements. Bubble size distribution has been determined using Minnaert's equation [M. Minnaert, On musical air bubbles and sound of running water, Philanthr. Mag. 16 (1933) 235], i.e., size of oscillating bubble is inversely related to the frequency of its volume oscillations. Decomposition of the pressure signal measured by the hydrophone in frequency domain of FFT spectrum and then inverse FFT reconstruction of the signal at each frequency level has been carried out to get the information about each of the bubble/cavity oscillation event. The number mean radius of the bubble size is calculated to be in the range of 50-80 microm and it was not found to vary much with the spatial distribution of acoustic field strength of the ultrasound processor used in the work. However, the number density of the oscillating bubbles and the nature of the distribution were found to vary in different horizontal planes away from the driving transducer surface in the ultrasonic bath. A separate set of experiments on erosion assessment studies were carried out using a thin aluminium foil, revealing a phenomena of active region of oscillating bubbles at antinodal points of the stationary waves, identical to the information provided by the acoustic emission spectra at the same location in the ultrasonic bath. PMID:18752981

  19. Near-infrared emission spectra of TeS, TeSe and Te2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setzer, K. D.; Fink, E. H.

    2014-10-01

    Emission spectra of the radicals TeS, TeSe and Te2 in the near-infrared spectral region have been measured with a high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer. The molecules were generated in a fast-flow system by reacting microwave-discharged mixtures of Tex, Sx, and/or Sex vapour and Ar carrier gas and excited by energy transfer and energy pooling processes in collisions with metastable oxygen O2(a1Δg). The b1Σ+(b0+) → X3Σ-(X10+,X21) electric dipole transitions of TeS and TeSe and the b1Σ+g(b0+g) → X3Σ-g(X21g) magnetic dipole transition of Te2 were measured at medium and high spectral resolution. A very weak emission at 3356 cm-1 observed in the spectrum of TeSe was identified to be the 0-0 band of the hitherto unknown a1Δ(a2) → X3Σ-(X21) transition of the molecule. Analyses of the spectra have yielded a number of new or improved spectroscopic parameters of the molecules.

  20. Evaluation of potential emission spectra for the reliable classification of fluorescently coded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2011-06-01

    The conservation and efficient use of natural and especially strategic resources like oil and water have become global issues, which increasingly initiate environmental and political activities for comprehensive recycling programs. To effectively reutilize oil-based materials necessary in many industrial fields (e.g. chemical and pharmaceutical industry, automotive, packaging), appropriate methods for a fast and highly reliable automated material identification are required. One non-contacting, color- and shape-independent new technique that eliminates the shortcomings of existing methods is to label materials like plastics with certain combinations of fluorescent markers ("optical codes", "optical fingerprints") incorporated during manufacture. Since time-resolved measurements are complex (and expensive), fluorescent markers must be designed that possess unique spectral signatures. The number of identifiable materials increases with the number of fluorescent markers that can be reliably distinguished within the limited wavelength band available. In this article we shall investigate the reliable detection and classification of fluorescent markers with specific fluorescence emission spectra. These simulated spectra are modeled based on realistic fluorescence spectra acquired from material samples using a modern VNIR spectral imaging system. In order to maximize the number of materials that can be reliably identified, we evaluate the performance of 8 classification algorithms based on different spectral similarity measures. The results help guide the design of appropriate fluorescent markers, optical sensors and the overall measurement system.

  1. Leaf Level Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emission Spectra: Narrow Band versus Full 650-800 nm Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, E.; Zhang, Q.; Campbell, P. K.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Corp, L.; Cheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) retrievals in narrow spectral regions (< 1 nm, between 750-770 nm) of the near infrared (NIR) region of Earth's reflected radiation have been achieved from satellites, including the Japanese GOSAT and the European Space Agency's Sciamachy/Envisat. However, these retrievals sample the total full-spectrum ChlF and are made at non-optimal wavelengths since they are not located at the peak fluorescence emission features. We wish to estimate the total full-spectrum ChlF based on emissions obtained at selected wavelengths. For this, we drew upon leaf emission spectra measured on corn leaves obtained from a USDA experimental cornfield in MD (USA). These emission spectra were determined for the adaxial and abaxial (i.e., top and underside) surfaces of leaves measured throughout the 2008 and 2011 growing seasons (n>400) using a laboratory instrument (Fluorolog-3, Horiba Scientific, USA), recorded in either 1 nm or 5 nm increments with monochromatic excitation wavelengths of either 532 or 420 nm. The total ChlF signal was computed as the area under the continuous spectral emission curves, summing the emission intensities (counts per second) per waveband. The individual narrow (1 or 5 nm) waveband emission intensities were linearly related to full emission values, with variable success across the spectrum. Equations were developed to estimate total ChlF from these individual wavebands. Here, we report the results for the average adaxial/abaxial emissions. Very strong relationships were achieved for the relatively high fluorescence intensities at the red chlorophyll peak, centered at 685 nm (r2= 0.98, RMSE = 5.53 x 107 photons/s) and in the nearby O2-B atmospheric absorption feature centered at 688 nm (r2 = 0.94, RMSE = 4.04 x 107), as well as in the far-red peak centered at 740 nm (r2=0.94, RMSE = 5.98 x107). Very good retrieval success occurred for the O2-A atmospheric absorption feature on the declining NIR shoulder centered at 760 nm (r2 = 0.88, RMSE = 7.54 x 107). When perfect retrievals were assumed (0% noise), retrievals remained good in the low emission regions on either side of the peaks-- those associated with the H alpha line at 655 nm (r2 = 0.83, RMSE =8.87 x 107) and the far-NIR wavelengths recently utilized for satellite retrievals: a K line at 770 nm (r2 = 0.85, RMSE = 8.36 x 107) and the 750-770 nm interval (r2 = 0.88, RMSE = 6.92 x 107). However, the atmosphere and satellite observations are expected to add noise to retrievals. Adding 5% random error to these relationships did not seriously impair the retrieval successes in the red and far-red peaks (r2 ~ 0.85, RMSEs = 6.31 x 107). A greater impact occurred (reducing retrieval success by ~10%) when adding 5% noise for the far-NIR narrow band at 770 nm (r2 ~ 0.70, RMSE ~ 8.5 x 107). When a 10% random error was added, the retrieval successes fell to ~68 ± 7% for all retrieval wavebands, and RMSEs increased by a factor of 10. This laboratory approach will be critical to calibrate space borne retrievals, but additional information across plant species is needed. Furthermore, this experiment indicates that ChlF retrievals from space should include information from the red and far-red peak emission regions, since the true total fluorescence signal is the desired parameter for Earth carbon and energy budgets.

  2. K-(alpha) X-ray Thomson Scattering From Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Castor, J; Doppner, T; Falcone, R W; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Morse, E C; Ng, A; Pollaine, S; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2009-05-07

    Spectrally resolved Thomson scattering using ultra-fast K-{alpha} x-rays has measured the compression and heating of shocked compressed matter. The evolution and coalescence of two shock waves traveling through a solid density LiH target were characterized by the elastic scattering component. The density and temperature at shock coalescence, 2.2 eV and 1.7 x 10{sup 23}cm{sup -3}, were determined from the plasmon frequency shift and the relative intensity of the elastic and inelastic scattering features in the collective scattering regime. The observation of plasmon scattering at coalescence indicates a transition to the dense metallic state in LiH. The density and temperature regimes accessed in these experiments are relevant for inertial confinement fusion experiments and for the study of planetary formation.

  3. Analysis of Emission Spectra from Arc-jet Shock Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokcen, T.; Park, C. S.; Newfield, M. E.; Fletcher, D. G.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports computational comparisons with experimental studies of a nonequilibrium blunt body shock layer in a high enthalpy arc-jet wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the existence of a thermochemical equilibrium region in the shock layer. The existence of such an equilibrium region is of interest for following reasons: (1) to understand the equilibration process behind the shock in an arc-jet flow environment; (2) to interpret measured surface heat transfer data for purpose of determining surface catalytic efficiency, and (3) to determine the total enthalpy from the spectroscopic measurements. The paper will present an analysis of the experimental data obtained in the arc-jet wind tunnel. Experimental data includes measurements of emission spectra of radiation emanating from a shock layer formed in front of a 6-inch flat-faced cylinder. The measurements, obtained using a two dimensional CCD camera mounted on a spectrograph, provide spatially resolved spectra along the stagnation streamline of the model. Computational analysis includes simulation of nonequilibrium flow in the arc-jet facility (flow in the conical nozzle and shock layer in front of a flat-faced cylinder) using 2-D/axisymmetric Navier-Stokes codes and prediction of the radiation spectra from the axisymmetric flowfield using NEQAIR radiation code. Various line-of-sight averaged flow properties such as vibrational and rotational temperatures, species number densities within the shock layer are deduced from the experimental spectra. Comparison of the computed and experimental line-of-sight averaged flow properties provides assessment of thermochemical equilibration processes in an arc-jet shock layer.

  4. Precision Fe K-Alpha and Fe K-Beta Line Spectroscopy of the Seyfert 1.9 Galaxy NGC 2992 with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Murphy, Kendrah D.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Haba, Yoshito; Inoue, Hajime; Itoh, Takeshi; Kelley, Richard; Kokubun, Motohide; Markowitz, Alex; Mushotzky, Richard; Okajima, Takashi; Ptak, Andrew; Reeves, James; Selemitos, Peter J.; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Terashima, Yuichi

    2006-01-01

    We present detailed time-averaged X-ray spectroscopy in the 0.5-10 keV band of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992 with the Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XIS). The source had a factor approximately 3 higher 2-10 keV flux (approximately 1.2 x l0(exp -11) erg per square cm per s) than the historical minimum and a factor approximately 7 less than the historical maximum. The XIS spectrum of NGC 2992 can be described by several components. There is a primary continuum, modeled as a power-law with a photon index of Gamma = 1.57(sup +0.06) (sup -0.03) that is obscured by a Compton-thin absorber with a column density of 8.01(sup +0.6) (sup -0.5)x l0 (exp 21) per square cm. . There is another, weaker, unabsorbed power-law component (modeled with the same slope as the primary), that is likely to be due to the primary continuum being electron-scattered into our line-of-sight by a region extended on a scale of hundreds of parsecs. We measure the Thomson depth of the scattering zone to be Tau = 0.072 +/- 0.021. An optically-thin thermal continuum emission component, which probably originates in the same extended region, is included in the model and yields a temperature and luminosity of KT = 0.656(sup +0.088) (sup -0.0.61) keV and approximately 1.2 +/- 0.4 x l0 (exp 40) erg per s respectively. We detect an Fe K emission complex which we model with broad and narrow lines and we show that the intensities of the two components are decoupled at a confidence level > 3 sigma. The broad Fe K alpha line has an equivalent width of 118(sup +32) (sup -61) eV and could originate in an accretion disk (with inclination angle greater than approximately 30 deg) around the putative central black hole. The narrow Fe K alpha line has an equivalent width of 1632(sup +47) (sup -26) eV and is unresolved (FWHM < 4630 km per s) and likely originates in distant matter. The absolute flux in the narrow line implies that the column density out of the line-of-sight could be much higher than measured in the line-of-sight, and that the mean (historically-averaged) continuum luminosity responsible for forming the line could be a factor of several higher than that measured from the data. We also detect the Fe K Beta line (corresponding to the narrow Fe K alpha line) with a high signal-to-noise ratio and describe a new robust method to constrain the ionization state of Fe responsible for the Fe K alpha and Fe K Beta lines that does not require any knowledge of possible gravitational and Doppler energy shifts affecting the line energies. For the distant line-emitting matter (e. g. the putative obscuring torus) we deduce that the predominant ionization state is lower than Fe VIII (at 99% confidence), conservatively taking into account residual calibration uncertainties in the XIS energy scale and theoretical and experimental uncertainties in the Fe K fluorescent line energies. From the limits on a possible Compton-reflection continuum it is likely that the narrow Fe K alpha and Fe K Beta lines originate in a Compton-thin structure.

  5. TL emission spectra from differently doped LiF:Mg detectors.

    PubMed

    Mandowska, E; Bilski, P; Ochab, E; Swiatek, J; Mandowski, A

    2002-01-01

    There are two widely applied types of thermoluminescent detectors based on LiF:Mg luminophor: Lif:Mg,Ti and highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P. The role of luminescence centres in these materials is usually attributed to defects connected with, respectively, titanium and phosphorus dopants. In order to check how composition of dopants introduced into the LiF lattice influences emission spectra, measurements on a series of variously doped LiF:Mg samples were performed. Apart from LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Ti detectors with different concentration of activators, an experimental sample being a kind of a 'hybrid' between both standard materials was also prepared. It was synthesised with concentrations of magnesium and copper identical to those used for LiF:Mg,Cu,P preparation. but instead of phosphorus it was doped with titanium (LiF:Mg,Cu,Ti). The measurements of the emission spectra were performed by using a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD 1024E detector with an SP150 spectrograph. During the measurements the samples were placed inside a cryostat in a vacuum. Resulting data were numerically deconvoluted for individual peaks with respect to the wavelength and the temperature. The glow curve shape of this material resembles that of LiF:Mg,Cu,P, while sensitivity is at the level of LiF:Mg,Ti. Preliminary results indicate that emission of the LiF:Mg,Cu,Ti sample is similar to that of LiF:Mg,Cu,P rather than to LiF:Mg,Ti, showing a maximum for wavelengths well below 400 nm. PMID:12382919

  6. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  7. Random mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon spectra match interstellar infrared emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Marissa J. F.; Berné, Olivier; Boersma, Christiaan

    2014-06-01

    The mid-infrared (mid-IR; 5-15 μm) spectrum of a wide variety of astronomical objects exhibits a set of broad emission features at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 μm. About 30 years ago it was proposed that these signatures are due to emission from a family of UV heated nanometer-sized carbonaceous molecules known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), causing them to be referred to as aromatic IR bands (AIBs). Today, the acceptance of the PAH model is far from settled, as the identification of a single PAH in space has not yet been successful, and physically relevant theoretical models involving true PAH cross sections do not reproduce the AIBs in detail. In this paper, we use the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database, which contains over 500 quantum-computed spectra, in conjunction with a simple emission model, to show that the spectrum produced by any random mixture of at least 30 PAHs converges to the same kernel-spectrum. This kernel-spectrum captures the essence of the PAH emission spectrum and is highly correlated with observations of AIBs, strongly supporting PAHs as their source. Furthermore, the fact that a large number of molecules are required implies that spectroscopic signatures of the individual PAHs contributing to the AIBs spanning the visible, near-IR, and far-IR spectral regions are weak, explaining why they have not yet been detected. An improved effort, joining laboratory, theoretical, and observational studies of the PAH emission process, will support the use of PAH features as a probe of physical and chemical conditions in the near and distant Universe. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Emissivity Spectra of Meteoritic Powders mixed with Liquid Formamide (NH2COH) at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaele, S.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Helbert, J.

    2013-12-01

    We set-up an experiment at the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) to investigate a key aspect in the prebiotic chemistry of formamide: the surface reactivity of minerals used as catalysts. The interaction of formamide and the reaction products on mineral surface, as well as, the sequestration processes in the mineral pores, can facilitate the concentration of products allowing for possible polymerization. Three meteorites, NWA2828 (PEL ID 00000887), Al Haggounia (PEL ID 00000888), and Dhofar959 (PEL ID 00000889), were used in this experiment. All the samples were reduced in the grain size fraction < 125 μm and stored in a desiccator before measuring. Each sample was poured in one from a set of identical stainless steel cups, having 5 mm thick bottom, internal diameter 50 mm, rim thickness 2 mm, and 20 mm total height. Emissivity of the samples was measured by means of a Bruker Vertex 80V coupled to an emissivity chamber (equipped with a rotating carousel to measure several samples without breaking the vacuum), both evacuable to < 1 mbar. The dry samples were placed in the emissivity chamber, each of them having a temperature sensor in contact with the surface of the sample, reading the effective temperature of the emitting skin. The 'dry' meteorites were measured in vacuum (0.8 mbar) at 70° C on the sample surface, successively liquid formamide was vaporized on the samples surface, the cup was immediately transferred in the emissivity chamber, and evacuated. Each sample was measured at 70°, 100°, 140°, and 200° C. Then each cup was cooled in vacuum and put back in the desiccator. For each sample after this thermal processing, a small amount of heated material was used to fill a cup for reflectance measurements. Since cold reflectance measurements cannot be compared with hot emissivity, those measurements have been taken to better understand the processes happening in the moisturized soil after heating. For all of the samples, when heating at 70°C we noticed in the emissivity spectra strong signatures attributable to liquid formamide. We interpret them as being originated from a column of hot vaporized formamide, lying above the sample surface. For all the samples this effect vanished already at 100°C, probably due to complete evaporation of liquid formamide that was deposited on the meteorite sample surfaces. However, all the spectra measured at 100° and 140° C show signs of the presence of formamide, that we infer from comparing them with the 70° C dry measurement of the same sample. For 2 samples out of 3, when heating at 200°C (and only there) a new feature appears at 7.08 μm. This band is very close to a similar band that liquid formamide has at 7.19 μm, and that was even present in all the spectra of wet meteorites taken at 70°C. We interpret this band shift as a possible sign of interaction of formamide with the catalyst (the meteorite powder): the CH bend responsible for that is probably strengthening.

  9. Neutral Gas Temperature Estimates in an Inductively Coupled CF4 Plasma by Fitting Diatomic Emission Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines the accuracy of plasma neutral temperature estimates by fitting the rotational band envelope of different diatomic species in emission. Experiments are performed in an inductively coupled CF4 plasma generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell. Visible and ultraviolet emission spectra are collected at a power of 300 W (approximately 0.7 W/cc) and pressure of 30 mtorr. The emission bands of several molecules (CF, CN, C2, CO, and SiF) are fit simultaneously for rotational and vibrational temperatures and compared. Four different rotational temperatures are obtained: 1250 K for CF and CN, 1600 K for CO, 1800 K for C2, and 2300 K for SiF. The vibrational temperatures obtained vary from 1750-5950 K, with the higher vibrational temperatures generally corresponding to the lower rotational temperatures. These results suggest that the different species have achieved different degrees of equilibration between the rotational and vibrational modes and may not be equilibrated with the translational temperatures. The different temperatures are also related to the likelihood that the species are produced by ion bombardment of the surface, with etch products like SiF, CO, and C2 having higher temperatures than species expected to have formed in the gas phase.

  10. Reflection and Emission Spectra of Fe-Oxides Under Venus-Like Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Mark A.; Tsang, Con C. C.; Durda, Dan D.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The Solar System’s last solid planet for which we have no mineralogy data is Venus. Soviet landers acquired images and elemental abundances at six locations on the surface of Venus. γ-ray and XRF spectroscopy performed by the landers showed that the plains are made of mafic basalts. Very large concentrations of K at the Venera 8 and 13 landing sites indicated the presence of alkaline basalts.Near-IR and thermal IR remote sensing of Mars, both from orbit and at the surface, have revealed the layered mineralogical complexity of that planet. Dominated by basalts and a wide-variety of fluid-altered phases, the mineralogy of Mars tells a complex story of wet and dry epochs in a history of dramatic climate change.At the surface of Venus, optical pathlengths are small and there is little scattering due to hazes. The environment around a lander or rover on Venus can be mapped from 0.4 to 3 μm just as well as it has been on Mars. Laboratory spectra show that the ferric edge at 0.55 μm that makes Mars red shifts to 1 μm at Venus surface temperatures (Pieters et al., 1986). This spectral feature is caused by strong charge transfer transitions in the UV between overlapping orbitals of iron and oxygen, and crystal-field electronic transition bands of ferric Fe (Pieters and Englert, 1993). Pressure and temperature will alter and broaden crystal-field electronic transition bands. Johnson and Fegley (2000) showed that a halogenated/hydrated amphibole (tremolite) is metastable on Venus; thus, metamorphic remnants of an ancient hydrosphere could still exist. In future work the reflectance and emission spectra of this phase will also be studied at high temperatures.We will present reflection and emission spectra of several Fe-oxides up to 450°C and 100 bars. These environmental conditions are programmable in a small, off-the-shelf 1 cc chamber that sits in the optical path of a Nicolet FTIR spectrometer. Our work will show that ambient pressure and temperature have significant effects on Fe-oxide spectra, and that both must be understood to use near-IR spectroscopy to diagnose the mineralogy near a Venus lander.

  11. Absorption, Fluorescence and Emission Anisotropy Spectra of 4-Cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline in Different Media and at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Piszczek, G.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of temperature on fluorescence and emission anisotropy spectra of 4-cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline (CDMA) was investigated in viscous (glycerol and paraffin oil) and rigid (polyvinyl alcohol) PVA and polyvinyl chloride) PVC) media. A strong effect of temperature on the intensity of a and b emission bands was observed. It was also found that the emission anisotropy, r, does not vary in the longwave emission band a at a fixed temperature but decreases in the emission band b together with the decreasing wavelength. The latter effect is due to the fact that the transition moment in this band is perpendicular to the long axis of the CDMA molecule. For CDMA in paraffin oil, a normal b band with negative emission anisotropy only occurs. In all other media used, the emission anisotropy has lower values, approaching zero, which results from the considerable covering of band b with a broad emission band a.

  12. Potential use of milk mid-infrared spectra to predict individual methane emission of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dehareng, F; Delfosse, C; Froidmont, E; Soyeurt, H; Martin, C; Gengler, N; Vanlierde, A; Dardenne, P

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the feasibility to predict individual methane (CH(4)) emissions from dairy cows using milk mid-infrared (MIR) spectra. To have a large variability of milk composition, two experiments were conducted on 11 lactating Holstein cows (two primiparous and nine multiparous). The first experiment aimed to induce a large variation in CH(4) emission by feeding two different diets: the first one was mainly composed of fresh grass and sugar beet pulp and the second one of maize silage and hay. The second experiment consisted of grass and corn silage with cracked corn, soybean meal and dried pulp. For each milking period, the milk yields were recorded twice daily and a milk sample of 50 ml was collected from each cow and analyzed by MIR spectrometry. Individual CH(4) emissions were measured daily using the sulfur hexafluoride method during a 7-day period. CH(4) daily emissions ranged from 10.2 to 47.1 g CH(4)/kg of milk. The spectral data were transformed to represent an average daily milk spectrum (AMS), which was related to the recorded daily CH(4) data. By assuming a delay before the production of fermentation products in the rumen and their use to produce milk components, five different calculations were used: AMS at days 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 compared with the CH(4) measurement. The equations were built using Partial Least Squares regression. From the calculated R(2)(cv), it appears that the accuracy of CH(4) prediction by MIR changed in function of the milking days. In our experimental conditions, the AMS at day 1.5 compared with the measure of CH(4) emissions gave the best results. The R(2) and s.e. of the cross-validation were equal to 0.79 and 5.14 g of CH(4)/kg of milk. The multiple correlation analysis performed in this study showed the existence of a close relationship between milk fatty acid (FA) profile and CH(4) emission at day 1.5. The lower R(2) (R(2) = 0.76) obtained between FA profile and CH(4) emission compared with the one corresponding to the obtained calibration (R(2)(c) = 0.87) shows the interest to apply directly the developed CH(4) equation instead of the use of correlations between FA and CH(4). In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest the feasibility of direct CH(4) prediction from milk MIR spectra. Additional research has the potential to improve the calibrations even further. This alternative method could be useful to predict the individual CH(4) emissions at farm level or at the regional scale and it also could be used to identify low-CH(4)-emitting cows. PMID:23031566

  13. The glassy random laser: replica symmetry breaking in the intensity fluctuations of emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antenucci, Fabrizio; Crisanti, Andrea; Leuzzi, Luca

    2015-11-01

    The behavior of a newly introduced overlap parameter, measuring the correlation between intensity fluctuations of waves in random media, is analyzed in different physical regimes, with varying amount of disorder and non-linearity. This order parameter allows to identify the laser transition in random media and describes its possible glassy nature in terms of emission spectra data, the only data so far accessible in random laser measurements. The theoretical analysis is performed in terms of the complex spherical spin-glass model, a statistical mechanical model describing the onset and the behavior of random lasers in open cavities. Replica Symmetry Breaking theory allows to discern different kinds of randomness in the high pumping regime, including the most complex and intriguing glassy randomness. The outcome of the theoretical study is, eventually, compared to recent intensity fluctuation overlap measurements demonstrating the validity of the theory and providing a straightforward interpretation of qualitatively different spectral behaviors in different random lasers.

  14. Expected gamma ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th, and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines are calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions are those of Reedy and Arnold (1972) and Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The areal resolution of the experiment is calculated to be around 70-140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method is described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  15. Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  16. [Study of emission spectra of N atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui; Yu, Ran; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-06-01

    The emission spectra of nitrogen (N) atom produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge in air were detected successfully at one atmosphere, and the excited transition spectral line at 674.5 nm with maximum value of relative intensity was selected to investigate the influences of air and electrical parameters on N atom relative density. The results indicate that N atom relative density in ionization region increases with the increase in power; decreases with increasing discharge gap and relative humidity; and with the increase in N2 content, the relative density of N active atom firstly increases and then decreases. Under present experimental conditions, the maximum value of N atom relative density appears at the axial distance from needle point r = 1 mm. PMID:22870624

  17. Dust emission features in 3-micron spectra of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, T. Y.; Tokunaga, A. T.; Strom, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to low- and medium-resolution spectra in the 3-micron region of 24 Herbig Ae/Be stars obtained in a search for organic features from the dust around young stars. The 3.29-micron emission feature from aromatic hydrocarbons was detected in three objects: Lk H-alpha 25, XY Per, and AS 310. Two other stars, HD 245185 and HK Ori, may have weak features. About 20 percent of the Herbig Ae/Be surveyed to date have firmly detected 3.29-micron features. The available data indicate that the 3.29-micron feature is more extended around Herbig Ae/Be stars of earlier spectral type, possibly due to dehydrogenization or destruction of the aromatics near these stars. It is suggested that the total number of aromatics excited by the stars is also greater around the earlier-type objects.

  18. Atomic Emission Spectra Diagnosis and Electron Density Measurement of Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hongyan; Zhu, Shunguan; Zhang, Lin; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Yan; Shen, Ruiqi

    2010-02-01

    Emission spectra of a semiconductor bridge (SCB) plasma in a visible range was studied in air. The electron density was measured in a conventional way from the broadening of the A1 I 394.4 nm Stark width. Based on the Saha equation, a system for recording the intensity of Si I 390.5 nm and Si II 413.1 nm was designed. With this technique, the SCB plasma electron density was measured well and accurately. Moreover, the electron density distribution Vs time was acquired from one SCB discharge. The individual result from the broadening of the Al I 394.4 nm Stark width and Saha equation was all in the range of 1015 cm-3 to 1016 cm-3. Finally the presumption of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was validated.

  19. The glassy random laser: replica symmetry breaking in the intensity fluctuations of emission spectra

    PubMed Central

    Antenucci, Fabrizio; Crisanti, Andrea; Leuzzi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of a newly introduced overlap parameter, measuring the correlation between intensity fluctuations of waves in random media, is analyzed in different physical regimes, with varying amount of disorder and non-linearity. This order parameter allows to identify the laser transition in random media and describes its possible glassy nature in terms of emission spectra data, the only data so far accessible in random laser measurements. The theoretical analysis is performed in terms of the complex spherical spin-glass model, a statistical mechanical model describing the onset and the behavior of random lasers in open cavities. Replica Symmetry Breaking theory allows to discern different kinds of randomness in the high pumping regime, including the most complex and intriguing glassy randomness. The outcome of the theoretical study is, eventually, compared to recent intensity fluctuation overlap measurements demonstrating the validity of the theory and providing a straightforward interpretation of qualitatively different spectral behaviors in different random lasers. PMID:26616194

  20. Extreme Ultraviolet Emission Lines of Fe XIII in Solar and Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Foster, V. J.; Drake, J. J.; Tayal, S. S.; Widing, K. G.

    1995-11-01

    Recent R-matrix calculations of electron impact excitation rates for Fe XIII are used to derive the theoretical electron density sensitive emission line ratios R1 = I(3s23p2 1D-3s3p3 1D)/I(3s23p2 3P2-3s3p3 3P2) = I(318.12 Å)/I(320.80 Å) and R2 = I(3s23p2 1D-3s3p3 1P)/I(3s22p2 3P2-3s3p3 3S) = 1(256.42 Å)/I(251.95 Å), which are found to be up to 70% different from earlier diagnostics. A comparison of the current line ratios with both solar flare and active region observations, obtained by the Naval Research Laboratory's S082A spectrograph on board Skylab, reveals generally good agreement between densities deduced from Fe XIII and those estimated from diagnostic line ratios in species formed at similar temperatures, such as I(219.12 Å)/I(211.32 Å) in Fe XIV. This provides experimental support for the accuracy of the line ratio calculations, and hence the atomic data adopted in their derivation. In Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite (EUVE) spectra the Fe XIII emission lines are found to be severely blended. However, an analysis of these lines measured in the spectra of Procyon and α Cen demonstrates that they still allow very approximate values of the electron density to be inferred. Moreover, it should be possible to increase the accuracy of the measured line fluxes, and hence of the inferred densities, if longer exposures of the stars concerned can be obtained.

  1. Deriving chlorophyll fluorescence emissions of vegetation canopies from high resolution field reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Daughtry, Craig S.; Entcheva Campbell, Petya K.; Butcher, L. Maryn

    2005-11-01

    Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) peaks centered at 685 nm and 735 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SIF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops and small tree plots of three deciduous species (red maple, tulip poplar, sweet gum). Leaf level measurements were also made of foliage which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) contents). As part of ongoing experiments, measurements were made on N application plots within corn (280, 140, 70, and 0 kg N/ha) and tree (0, 37.5, 75, 112.5, 150 kg N /ha) sites at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrow- band regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red SIF ratio (SIFratio) derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment ratios altered by N application rates in both corn crops. This ratio was also positively correlated to the C/N ratio at leaf and canopy levels, for the available corn data (e.g., 2004). No consistent N treatment or species differences in SIF were detected in the tree foliage, but additional 2005 data are forthcoming. This study has relevance to future passive satellite remote sensing approaches to monitoring C dynamics from space.

  2. Measuring nickel masses in Type Ia supernovae using cobalt emission in nebular phase spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Michael J.; Hillier, D. John; Seitenzahl, Ivo; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Taubenberger, Stefan; Scalzo, Richard; Ruiter, Ashley; Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Camacho, Yssavo; Castillo, Jayden; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Fraser, Morgan; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Graham, Melissa; Howell, D. Andrew; Inserra, Cosimo; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kumar, Sahana; Mazzali, Paolo A.; McCully, Curtis; Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia; Pandya, Viraj; Polshaw, Joe; Schmidt, Brian; Smartt, Stephen; Smith, Ken W.; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Tucker, Brad; Valenti, Stefano; Walton, Nicholas; Wolf, Christian; Yaron, Ofer; Young, D. R.; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Bonnie

    2015-12-01

    The light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powered by the radioactive decay of 56Ni to 56Co at early times, and the decay of 56Co to 56Fe from ˜60 d after explosion. We examine the evolution of the [Co III] λ5893 emission complex during the nebular phase for SNe Ia with multiple nebular spectra and show that the line flux follows the square of the mass of 56Co as a function of time. This result indicates both efficient local energy deposition from positrons produced in 56Co decay and long-term stability of the ionization state of the nebula. We compile SN Ia nebular spectra from the literature and present 21 new late-phase spectra of 7 SNe Ia, including SN 2014J. From these we measure the flux in the [Co III] λ5893 line and remove its well-behaved time dependence to infer the initial mass of 56Ni (MNi) produced in the explosion. We then examine 56Ni yields for different SN Ia ejected masses (Mej - calculated using the relation between light-curve width and ejected mass) and find that the 56Ni masses of SNe Ia fall into two regimes: for narrow light curves (low stretch s ˜ 0.7-0.9), MNi is clustered near MNi ≈ 0.4 M⊙ and shows a shallow increase as Mej increases from ˜1 to 1.4 M⊙; at high stretch, Mej clusters at the Chandrasekhar mass (1.4 M⊙) while MNi spans a broad range from 0.6 to 1.2 M⊙. This could constitute evidence for two distinct SN Ia explosion mechanisms.

  3. Molecular phonons and their absorption/emission spectra from the far-IR to microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoular, R.

    2015-07-01

    Together with their fingerprint modes, molecules carry coherent vibrations of all their atoms (phonons). Phonon spectra extend from ˜20 to more than 104 μm, depending on molecular size. These spectra are discrete but large assemblies of molecules of the same family, differing only by minor structural details, will produce continua. As such assemblies are expected to exist in regions where dust accumulates, they are bound to contribute to the observed continua underlying the unidentified infrared bands and the 21 μm band of planetary nebulae as well as to the diffuse galactic emission surveyed by the Planck astronomical satellite and other means. The purpose of this work is to determine, for carbon-rich molecules, the intensity of such continua and their extent into the millimetric range, and to evaluate their detectability in this range. The rules governing the spectral distributions of phonons are derived and shown to differ from those which obtain in the solid state. Their application allows the extinction cross-section per H atom, and its maximum wavelength, to be determined as a function of molecular size and dimensionality. Chemical modelling of more than 15 large molecules illustrates these results. It is found that the maximum phonon wavelength of a 2D structure increases roughly as the square of its larger dimension. Spectral energy distributions were computed as far as 4000 μm, for molecules up to 50 Å in length.

  4. Development of a high-efficiency high-resolution particle-induced x-ray emission system for chemical state analysis of environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, J.; Tada, T.; Oguri, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Toriyama, T.; Kawabata, T.; Masai, K.

    2007-07-15

    We have developed a high-efficiency high-resolution particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) system employing a von Hamos-type crystal spectrometer for a chemical state identification of trace elements in environmental samples. The energy resolution of the system was determined to be about 0.05% through the observation of Si K{alpha}{sub 1,2} x rays (1.74 keV) from elemental silicon. The throughput efficiency of the system was also evaluated quasitheoretically to be 1.6x10{sup -7} counts/incident proton for Si K{alpha}{sub 1,2} emission. To demonstrate a chemical state analysis using the high-resolution PIXE system, Si K{alpha}{sub 1,2} and K{beta} x-ray spectra for SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and SiO{sub 2} were measured and compared. The observed chemical shifts of the Si K{alpha}{sub 1,2} peaks for SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and SiO{sub 2} relative to elemental silicon were 0.20, 0.40, and 0.55 eV, respectively. The tendency of these shifts were well explained by the effective charges of the silicon atoms calculated by a molecular orbital method.

  5. Simulated infrared emission spectra of highly excited polyatomic molecules: a detailed model of the PAH-UIR hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A detailed description of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/unidentified infrared band (UIR) mechanism is presented in which experimental spectral bandshape functions are used to simulate IR emission spectra for individual molecules. These spectra are additively superimposed to produce a conglomerate spectrum representative of a family of PAH molecules. Ab initio vibrational frequencies and intensities for nine PAHs (neutral and cationic) as large as ovalene are used in conjunction with measured bandshape and temperature-dependent redshift data to simulate the UIR bands. The calculated spectra of cations provide a closer match to the UIRs than do those of the neutrals. However, the PAH cations used in the simulations fail to reproduce the details of the UIR emission spectra. The discrepancies are potentially alleviated if both larger PAHs and a greater number of PAHs were included in the simulation.

  6. [Application study of the thermal infrared emissivity spectra in the estimation of salt content of saline soil].

    PubMed

    Xia, Jun; Tashpolat, Tiyip; Mamat, Sawut; Zhang, Fei; Han, Gui-Hong

    2012-11-01

    Studying of soil salinization is of great significance for agricultural production in arid area oasis, thermal infrared remote sensing technology provides a new technology and method in this field. Authors used Fourier transform infrared spectrometer to measure the oasis saline soil in field, employed iterative spectrally smooth temperature/emissivity separation algorithm (ISSTES) to separate temperature and emissivity, and acquired the thermal infrared emissivity data of the saline soil. Through researching the emissivity spectral feature of saline soil, and concluded that soil emissivity will reduce with the increasing of salt content from 8 to 13 microm, so emissivity spectra is more sensitive to salt factor from 8 to 9.5 microm. Then, analyzed the correlation between original emissivity spectra and its first derivative, second derivative and normalized ratio with salt content, the result showed that they have a negative correlation relationship between soil emissivity and salt content, and the correlation between emissivity first derivative and salt content is highest, reach to 0.724 2, the corresponding bands are from 8.370 745-8.390 880 microm. Finally, established the quadratic function regression model, its determination coefficient is 0.741 4, and root mean square error is 0.235 5, the result explained that the approach of using thermal infrared emissivity to retrieve the salt content of saline soil is feasible. PMID:23387157

  7. Lyman-alpha emission from the Lyman-alpha forest. [in high red shift quasar spectra due to molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.; Weymann, Ray J.

    1987-01-01

    It is suggested that high-dispersion long-slit spectra or very narrow-band etalon images of 'blank' sky could reveal patches of Ly-alpha line emission from the population of clouds whose absorption produces the 'Ly-alpha forest' in QSO spectra. A nonobservation can put limits on the ionizing background at high redshift which are better than those obtainable by direct measurements of background light.

  8. Emission spectra and kinetics of copolymer films of styrene and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Donald B.; Scott, Gary W.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The temperature-dependent steady-state emission spectra and fluorescence kinetics of copolymer films of styrene and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene are reported. The polystyrene excimer emission is efficiently quenched in the presence of relatively small amounts of the pentafluorophenyl quencher in spite of the fact that direct energy transfer from the excimer to the quencher chromophores is not possible. The quenching of the polystyrene excimer emission at room temperature and of the polystyrene monomer emission at 13 K is attributed to the interception of the migrating monomer excitation by the quencher. The data suggest that this quenching mechanism is independent of temperature.

  9. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of pyrrolo-C analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxia; Liu, Jianhua; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of Pyrrolo-C (PyC) and its analogues which are modified via the conjugation or fusion of different aromatic ring to the PyC core. We also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent pyrrolo-C analogues can pair with guanosine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The calculated absorption peaks of modified deoxyribonucleosides agree well with the measured data. The absorption and emission maxima of the pyrrolo-C analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature C. The solvent effects can induce wavelength blue shift and increase the oscillator strengths in both the absorption and emission spectra. With regard to the WC base pairs, the B3LYP functional reveals that the lowest energy transitions of modified GC base pairs are charge transfer excitation while the CAM-B3LYP functional predicts that all the lowest transitions are localised on the pyrrolo-C analogues. The M062X and CAM-B3LYP functionals show good agreement with respect to both the value of the lowest energy transitions as well as the oscillator strengths.

  10. Time resolved spectra in the infrared absorption and emission from shock heated hydrocarbons. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Borchardt, D. B.

    1990-01-01

    The wavelength range of a previously constructed multichannel fast recording spectrometer was extended to the mid-infrared. With the initial configuration, light intensities were recorded simultaneously with a silicon-diode array simultaneously at 20 adjacent wavelengths, each with a 20-micron time resolution. For studies in the infrared, the silicon diodes were replaced by a 20-element PbSe array of similar dimensions, cooled by a three-stage thermoelectric device. It is proposed that infrared emissions could be due to shock-heated low molecular-weight hydrocarbons. The full Swan band system appeared in time-integrated emission spectra from shock-heated C2H2; no soot was generated. At low resolution, the profiles on the high-frequency side of the black body maximum show no distinctive features. These could be fitted to Planck curves, with temperatures that declined with time from an initial high that was intermediate between T5 (no conversion) and T5(eq).

  11. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1

  12. Electromagnetic Emission from Long-lived Binary Neutron Star Merger Remnants. II. Lightcurves and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Ciolfi, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations indicate that in a large fraction of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers a long-lived neutron star (NS) may be formed rather than a black hole. Unambiguous electromagnetic (EM) signatures of such a scenario would strongly impact our knowledge on how short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and their afterglow radiation are generated. Furthermore, such EM signals would have profound implications for multimessenger astronomy with joint EM and gravitational-wave (GW) observations of BNS mergers, which will soon become reality thanks to the ground-based advanced LIGO/Virgo GW detector network. Here we explore such EM signatures based on the model presented in a companion paper, which provides a self-consistent evolution of the post-merger system and its EM emission up to ˜107 s. Light curves and spectra are computed for a wide range of post-merger physical properties. We present X-ray afterglow light curves corresponding to the “standard” and the “time-reversal” scenario for SGRBs (prompt emission associated with the merger or with the collapse of the long-lived NS). The light curve morphologies include single and two-plateau features with timescales and luminosities that are in good agreement with Swift observations. Furthermore, we compute the X-ray signal that should precede the SGRB in the time-reversal scenario, the detection of which would represent smoking-gun evidence for this scenario. Finally, we find a bright, highly isotropic EM transient peaking in the X-ray band at ˜102-104 s after the BNS merger with luminosities of LX ˜ 1046-1048 erg s-1. This signal represents a very promising EM counterpart to the GW emission from BNS mergers.

  13. Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Regional Integration to Quantify Spectra for Dissolved Organic Matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, W.; Westerhoff, P.; Leenheer, J.A.; Booksh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water and soil. However, interpreting the >10,000 wavelength-dependent fluorescence intensity data points represented in EEMs has posed a significant challenge. Fluorescence regional integration, a quantitative technique that integrates the volume beneath an EEM, was developed to analyze EEMs. EEMs were delineated into five excitation-emission regions based on fluorescence of model compounds, DOM fractions, and marine waters or freshwaters. Volumetric integration under the EEM within each region, normalized to the projected excitation-emission area within that region and dissolved organic carbon concentration, resulted in a normalized region-specific EEM volume (??i,n). Solid-state carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, and EEMs were obtained for standard Suwannee River fulvic acid and 15 hydrophobic or hydrophilic acid, neutral, and base DOM fractions plus nonfractionated DOM from wastewater effluents and rivers in the southwestern United States. DOM fractions fluoresced in one or more EEM regions. The highest cumulative EEM volume (??T,n = ????i,n) was observed for hydrophobic neutral DOM fractions, followed by lower ??T,n values for hydrophobic acid, base, and hydrophilic acid DOM fractions, respectively. An extracted wastewater biomass DOM sample contained aromatic protein- and humic-like material and was characteristic of bacterial-soluble microbial products. Aromatic carbon and the presence of specific aromatic compounds (as indicated by solid-state 13C NMR and FTIR data) resulted in EEMs that aided in differentiating wastewater effluent DOM from drinking water DOM.

  14. Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission (Analysis of UV-X-Ray High-Resolution Emission Spectra)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashyap, Vinay; Hunter, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PINTofALE is an IDL based package to analyze high-resolution grating spectra. The first version was made available to the public on 3 February 2001. Since then we have carried out numerous changes, and the current release is version 1.5, released on 9 October 2002. The changes include upgrades to handle higher versions of IDL, the new version of the CHIANTI database (v4), major enhancements in user-friendliness, improved handling of response matrices, the ability to handle 24-bit color, access to the Atomic Plasma Emission Database (APED), and beta releases of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based DEM fitting routines. Plans for the future include: inclusion of MCMC techniques in the fitting programs, enhanced graphics capabilities, an overhaul of the line and continuum database structure, and bug fixes. In September 2002, we hired a data analyst (LiWei Lin) to work on PINTofALE. Mr.Lin is concentrating on incorporating MCMC as well as simpler Monte-Carlo techniques, fast RMF convolution, etc., into the code base, as well as reviewing the existing documentation and searching for bugs. A detailed description of the package, together with fairly detailed documentation, example walks-throughs, and downloadable tar files, are available on-line from http://hea-www. harvard.edu/PINTofALE/

  15. Ultrafast K-(alpha) X-ray Thomson Scattering from Shock Compressed Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Castor, J; Doeppner, T; Falcone, R W; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Holst, B; Redmer, R; Morse, E C; Ng, A; Pollaine, S; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2008-12-10

    Spectrally and temporally resolved x ray Thomson scattering using ultrafast Ti K-{alpha} x-rays has provided experimental validation for modeling of the compression and heating of shocked matter. The coalescence of two shocks launched into a solid density LiH target by a shaped 6 nanosecond heater beam was observed from rapid heating to temperatures of 2.2 eV, enabling tests of shock timing models. Here, the temperature evolution of the target at various times during shock progression was characterized from the intensity of the elastic scattering component. The observation of scattering from plasmons, electron plasma oscillations, at shock coalescence indicates a transition to a dense metallic plasma state in LiH. From the frequency shift of the measured plasmon feature the electron density was directly determined with high accuracy, providing a material compression of a factor of three times solid density. The quality of data achieved in these experiments demonstrates the capability for single-shot dynamic characterization of dense shock compressed matter. The conditions probed in this experiment are relevant for the study of the physics of planetary formation and to characterize inertial confinement fusion targets for experiments such as on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), LLNL.

  16. Decay Associated Fluorescence Emission Spectra Of Hydrocarbons Physically Bound To DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. F.; Strunk, S. J.; Martinez, K. G.; Meehan, T.

    1987-01-01

    We are using time-dependent and steady state measurements of fluorescence to study the physical interaction between DNA and carcinogenic hydrocarbons. The ()7,8-diol-benzo[a]pyrene(7,8-diolBaP) is used as a model compound that forms a physical complex with DNA by intercalating between the DNA base pairs. An exact emission spectrum can be obtained by measuring the decay-associated emission spectra. In this technique the time-dependent fluorescence decay is measured using time-correlated single-photon counting detection. The data is fit to a sum of exponentials using a weighted non-linear regression program to obtain amplitudes and lifetimes of the emitting species at various wavelengths. Plotting the normalized intensities of a particular lifetime as a function of wavelength yields the emission spectrum associated with the lifetime. The measured fluorescence lifetime is 26.7 nsec for the free 7,8-diolBaP in solution and 5.0 nsec for the bound 7,8-diolBaP. The time resolved emission spectrum of bound hydrocarbon is red-shifted by 6 nm, characteristic of an intercalated complex. Fluorescence quenching experiments with iodide, an external quencher of DNA, gave a bimolecular dynamic quenching constant, 1.4 (10)9 (Msec)-1, for the free hydrocarbon and a constant lifetime and amplitude for the bound 7,8-diolBaP. Fluorescence quenching with low concentrations of silver ions, which bind predominantly to guanine sites of DNA, results in reduced fluorescence intensity of the bound hydrocarbon, with the lifetime remaining unchanged. These quenching studies indicate that at least part of the fluorescence emitted is from 7,8-diolBaP bound at guanine sites. In addition, results of quantum yield experiments have been used to calculate the fraction of bound hydrocarbon which is totally quenched (52%) and not totally quenched (25%). The remainder is free in solution. Quenching experiments with mercury ions suggest that the totally quenched hydrocarbon is bound at adenine-containing sites.

  17. Infrared and near infrared emission spectra of TeH and TeD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Shayesteh, Alireza; Fu, Dejian; Bernath, Peter F.

    2005-04-01

    The vibration-rotation emission spectra for the X2Π ground state and the near infrared emission spectra of the X2Π 1/2- X2Π 3/2 system of the TeH and TeD free radicals have been measured at high resolution using a Fourier transform spectrometer. TeH and TeD were generated in a tube furnace with a DC discharge of a flowing mixture of argon, hydrogen (or deuterium), and tellurium vapor. In the infrared region, for the X2Π 3/2 spin component we observed the 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 vibrational bands for most of the eight isotopologues of TeH and the 1-0 and 2-1 bands for three isotopologues of TeD. For the X2Π 1/2- X2Π 3/2 transition, we observed the 0-0 and 1-1 bands for TeH and the 0-0, 1-1, and 2-2 bands for TeD. Except for a few lines, the tellurium isotopic shift was not resolved for the X2Π 1/2- X2Π 3/2 transitions of TeH and TeD. Local perturbations with Δ v = 2 between the two spin components of the X2Π state of TeH were found: X2Π 1/2, v = 0 with X2Π 3/2, v = 2; X2Π 1/2, v = 1 with X2Π 3/2, v = 3. The new data were combined with the previous data from the literature and two kinds of fits (Hund's case (a) and Hund's case (c)) were carried out for each of the 10 observed isotopologues: 130TeD, 128TeD, 126TeD, 130TeH, 128TeH, 126TeH, 125TeH, 124TeH, 123TeH, and 122TeH.

  18. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emissions of Vegetation Canopies From High Resolution Field Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Corp, L. A.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva

    2006-01-01

    A two-year experiment was performed on corn (Zea mays L.) crops under nitrogen (N) fertilization regimes to examine the use of hyperspectral canopy reflectance information for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vegetation production. Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll ChlF peaks centered at 685V10 nm and 735V5 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops, as part of an ongoing multi-year experiment at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. A spectroradiometer (ASD-FR Fieldspec Pro, Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., Boulder, CO) was used to measure canopy radiances 1 m above plant canopies with a 22deg field of view and a 0deg nadir view zenith angle. Canopy and plant measurements were made at the R3 grain fill reproductive stage on 3-4 replicate N application plots provided seasonal inputs of 280, 140, 70, and 28 kg N/ha. Leaf level measurements were also made which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and N contents). Crop yields were determined at harvest. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrowband regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red S F ratio derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment levels (e.g., total chlorophyll, Chl) associated with N application rates in both corn crops. This canopy-level spectral ratio was also positively correlated to the foliar C/N ratio (r = 0.89, n = go), as was a leaf-level steady state fluorescence ratio (Fs/Chl, r = 0.92). The latter ratio was inversely correlated with crop grain yield (Kg 1 ha) (r = 0.9). This study has relevance to future passive satellite remote sensing approaches to monitoring C dynamics from space.

  19. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  20. Alpha-particle emission as a probe of nuclear shapes and structure effects in proton evaporation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolis, N.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Abenante, V.; Adler, L.A.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M.; Stracener, D.W. . Dept. of Chemistry); Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A. ); Griffin, H.C. . Dep

    1990-01-01

    Emission barriers and subbarrier anisotropies from {alpha} decay of Sn* and Yb* compound nuclei are examined in the light of calculations incorporating deformation effects in the decay process. For the Yb* systems deformation which increases with spin is necessary to explain the data. For the Sn* systems the spectral shapes and anisotropies can be explained without deformation. For systems lighter than Sn this probe is not sensitive to the deformation. Energy spectra and angular correlations of evaporated protons from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S, 2n2p){sup 82}Sr reaction were measured in coincidence with discrete transitions. Large shifts in proton spectra were observed when high spin states in different rotational bands are populated. They are interpreted as due to near-yrast stretched proton emission preferentially populating the yrast band by subbarrier protons. Simulations show that channel selected proton spectra cannot be used as probes of deformation.

  1. Electronic spectra of 2- and 3-tolunitrile in the gas phase. II. Geometry changes from Franck-Condon fits of fluorescence emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Gmerek, Felix; Stuhlmann, Benjamin; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-02-28

    We determined the changes of the geometries of 2- and 3-tolunitrile upon excitation to the lowest excited singlet states from Franck-Condon fits of the vibronic intensities in several fluorescence emission spectra and of the rotational constant changes upon excitation. These structural changes can be connected to the altered electron distribution in the molecules and are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. We show how the torsional barriers of the methyl groups in both components are used as probe of the molecular changes upon electronic excitation. PMID:26931699

  2. Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Houck, Joshua D. T.; Clark, Pamela A.; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2013-08-01

    A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate open-air burning of garbage. Although the particulate emissions are likely dominated by particles <1 μm diameter, only the spectra of supermicron particles were measured here. The overall fluorescence spectral profiles exhibit either one or two broad bands peaked around 300-450 nm within the 280-650 nm spectral range, when the particles are illuminated with a 263-nm laser. Different burning materials have different profiles, some of them (cigarette, hair, uniform, paper, and plastics) show small changes during the burning process, and while others (beef, bread, carrot, Styrofoam, and wood) show big variations, which initially exhibit a single UV peak (around 310-340 nm) and a long shoulder in visible, and then gradually evolve into a bimodal spectrum with another visible peak (around 430-450 nm) having increasing intensity during the burning process. These spectral profiles could mainly derive from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with the combinations of tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, and other humic-like substances. About 68 % of these single-particle fluorescence spectra can be grouped into 10 clustered spectral templates that are derived from the spectra of millions of atmospheric aerosol particles observed in three locations; while the others, particularly these bimodal spectra, do not fall into any of the 10 templates. Therefore, the spectra from particulate emissions of burning materials can be easily discriminated from that of common atmospheric aerosol particles. The SFFS technology could be a good tool for monitoring burning pit emissions and possibly for distinguishing them from atmospheric aerosol particles.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Multi-wavelength Spectra of M87 Core Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, G.; Liang, E. P.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral fits to M87 core data from radio to hard X-ray are generated via a specially selected software suite, comprised of the High-Accuracy Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics GRMHD accretion disk model and a two-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transport code. By determining appropriate parameter changes necessary to fit X-ray-quiescent and flaring behavior of M87's core, we assess the reasonableness of various flaring mechanisms. This shows that an accretion disk model of M87's core out to 28 GM/c 2 can describe the inner emissions. High spin rates show GRMHD-driven polar outflow generation, without citing an external jet model. Our results favor accretion rate changes as the dominant mechanism of X-ray flux and index changes, with variations in density of approximately 20% necessary to scale between the average X-ray spectrum and flaring or quiescent spectra. The best-fit parameters are black hole spin a/M > 0.8 and maximum accretion flow density n <= 3 × 107 cm-3, equivalent to horizon accretion rates between \\dot{m} = \\dot{M}/\\dot{M}_{Edd} \\approx 2\\times 10^{-6} and 1 × 10-5 (with \\dot{M}_{Edd} defined assuming a radiative efficiency η = 0.1). These results demonstrate that the immediate surroundings of M87's core are appropriate to explain observed X-ray variability.

  4. Simulation of emission spectra from nonuniform reactive laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Jörg; Lorusso, Antonella; Perrone, Alessio; Strafella, Francesco; Dutouquet, Christophe; Torralba, Béatrice

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that chemical reactions leading to the formation of AlO radicals in plasmas produced by ablation of aluminum or Ti-sapphire with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses can be predicted by the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, emission spectra recorded with an echelle spectrometer and a gated detector were compared to the spectral radiance computed for uniform and nonuniform equilibrium plasmas. The calculations are based on analytical solutions of the radiation transfer equation. The simulations show that the plasmas produced in argon background gas are almost uniform, whereas temperature and density gradients are evidenced in air. Furthermore, chemical reactions exclusively occur in the cold plume periphery for ablation in air. The formation of AlO is negligible in argon as the plasma temperature is too large in the time interval of interest up to several microseconds. Finally, the validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium is shown to depend on time, space, and on the elemental composition. The presented conclusions are of interest for material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and for laser materials processing.

  5. Discharge Modes Suggested by Emission Spectra of Nitrogen Dielectric Barrier Discharge with Wire-Cylinder Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuxiang; Mu, Zongxin; Zhang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, nitrogen dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was generated in a quartz tube with coaxial wire-cylinder electrodes at atmospheric pressure. By varying the nitrogen gas flow (FN) in the range of 0-1 m3/h, the plasma optical emission spectra (OES) were measured and studied. The vibration (Tvib) and rotation temperature (Trot) of nitrogen were obtained, by fitting the rovibronic bands of N2(C3?u B3?g, 0-1), and by the Boltzmann plot method for purposes of comparison. Tvib increased up to 2481 K with increasing nitrogen flow till 0.2 m3/h, and then decreased with further increasing FN, while Trot decreased monotonously and approached to ?350 K for FN ? 0.6 m3/h. The intensity of N2(C3?u B3?g, 0-0, 1-0, 0-3) and N2+ (B2?u+ X2 ?+g, 0-0) exhibited similar evolution with increasing FN to those of the Tvib and Trot, respectively. The discharge photos revealed that the discharge filaments gradually decreased with increasing FN, and eventually disappeared, which implied that a discharge mode transition emerged with increasing FN. The possible mechanism for the discharge mode transition is studied in detail according to the vibration (Tvib) and rotation temperature (Trot) of nitrogen. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475040, 11375041) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. DUT14ZD[G]04)

  6. A study of the silicate emission features of the IRAS low resolution spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; Jourdain de Muizon, M.; Papoular, R.; Pegourie, B.

    1987-09-01

    Using the IRAS catalog of low resolution spectra, the authors have analyzed 1808 silicate emission features, the union of classes 2n and 6n. The sample size is large enough to establish average properties (e.g. energy distributions); correlations between luminosities, excesses, colour and coordinates; histograms and galactic distributions, with a good degree of confidence. Of particular interest are: the detection of the largest silicate excesses ever observed (⪆10) and their location in the bulge of the Galaxy; the progressive strengthening of the 10-μm silicate feature as the objects become fainter (and hence more distant); the tendency for the 10-μm excess to decrease as the galactic latitude increases; the ranges of "effective" dust temperatures (150 to 500K), star colour temperatures (700 to 5000K) and envelope optical thicknesses (0 to ≡0.5 at 10 μm). This analysis also points to the similarity of dust properties between IRAS objects and previously observed Long Period Variables.

  7. Comparison of Cathodoluminescent and Photoluminescent Emission Spectra of LuPO4 with Different Dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Goedeke, Shawn; Hollerman, William Andrew; Allison, Stephen W; Gray, P A; Lewis, Linda A; Smithwick III, Robert W; Boatner, Lynn A; Glasgow, David C; Wise, H.

    2008-01-01

    The current interest in returning human exploration to the Moon and Mars makes cost-effective and low-mass health monitoring sensors essential for spacecraft development. In space, there are many surface measurements that are required to monitor the condition of the spacecraft including: surface temperature, radiation dose, and impact. Through the use of tailored phosphors, these conditions can be monitored. Practical space-based phosphor sensors will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of phosphors to ionizing radiation and their ability to anneal or 'self-heal' from damage caused by ionizing radiation. For the present research, a group of lutetium orthophosphate (LuPO{sub 4}) crystals with dopants including europium, erbium, and neodymium were characterized. Cathodoluminescence (CL) testing was performed using the low energy electron system located at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The data were collected using an Ocean Optics HR4000 spectrometer and a fiber optic feed-through. Previous research has shown that increases in both beam energy and current density improved the CL fluorescence yield. While the total electron dose was small, the intention was to maximize the number of irradiated materials. Additionally, these samples were evaluated using a PTI Quantum Master Spectrophotometer to determine the photoluminescence emission spectra.

  8. Simulation of emission spectra from nonuniform reactive laser-induced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Jörg; Lorusso, Antonella; Perrone, Alessio; Strafella, Francesco; Dutouquet, Christophe; Torralba, Béatrice

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that chemical reactions leading to the formation of AlO radicals in plasmas produced by ablation of aluminum or Ti-sapphire with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses can be predicted by the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, emission spectra recorded with an echelle spectrometer and a gated detector were compared to the spectral radiance computed for uniform and nonuniform equilibrium plasmas. The calculations are based on analytical solutions of the radiation transfer equation. The simulations show that the plasmas produced in argon background gas are almost uniform, whereas temperature and density gradients are evidenced in air. Furthermore, chemical reactions exclusively occur in the cold plume periphery for ablation in air. The formation of AlO is negligible in argon as the plasma temperature is too large in the time interval of interest up to several microseconds. Finally, the validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium is shown to depend on time, space, and on the elemental composition. The presented conclusions are of interest for material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and for laser materials processing. PMID:26651798

  9. Influence of Oil-in-Water Emulsions on Fluorescence Properties as Observed by Excitation-Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Zielinski, O.; Otremba, Z.; Toczek, H.

    2013-10-01

    Oil poses a major threat to marine ecosystems. This work describes a set of studies focused on introducing an efficient method for the identification of oil in the form of oil emulsions through fluorescence spectra analyses. Hence the concept of classification of oil pollution in seawater based on fluorescence spectroscopy using a high sensitive fluorimeter [1] suitable for laboratory and in situ measurements is introduced. We consider that this approach, in the future, will make it possible to collect specific fluorescence information allowing us to build a base of the oil standards. Here we examined excitation-emission fluorescence spectra (EEMs) of water containing oil-in-water emulsion prepared artificially under laboratory conditions. Water polluted with oil-in-water emulsion was studied with the objective to estimate differences in three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. Studies included various types of oils and oil concentrations. Essential differences in fluorescence spectra for various oils are indicated.

  10. VUV emission spectra from binary rare gas mixtures near the resonance lines of Xe I and Kr I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Krylov, B.; Gerasimov, G.; Arnesen, A.; Hallin, R.

    2003-05-01

    Emission spectra of Xe-X (X = He, Ne, Ar and Kr) and of Kr-Y (Y = He, Ne and Ar) mixtures with low concentrations of the heavier gases (0.1-1%) and moderate total pressures (50-200 hPa) have been recorded near each of the two resonance lines of Xe and Kr in DC glow capillary discharges. The recorded intense emissions have narrow spectral profiles with FWHM of about 0.1 nm. The profiles are very similar in shape to profiles of known high resolution absorption spectra recorded at comparable gas pressures. A tentative identification of the emission structures is given, which involves transitions in heteronuclear molecules and quasimolecules between weakly-bound states.

  11. The Case for General Relativistic Effects in the Fe K(alpha) Profile of an Active Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Mushotzky, R.; Yaqoob, T.; George, I. M.; Snowden, S. L.; Netzer, H.; Kraemer, S. B.; Nandra, K.; Chelouche, D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a simultaneous Chandra HETG (High Energy Transmission Grating) and XMM (X-ray Multi-mirror Mission)-Newton observation of NGC 3516. We find evidence for several narrow components of Fe K(alpha) along with a broad line. We consider the possibility that the lines arise in a blob of material ejected from the nucleus with velocity of approximately 0.25c. We also consider an origin in a neutral accretion disk, suffering enhanced illumination at 35 and 175 R(sub g), perhaps due to magnetic reconnection. The presence of these narrow features indicates there is no Comptonizing region along the line-of-sight to the nucleus. This in turn is compelling support for the hypothesis that broad Fe K(alpha) components are, in general, produced by strong gravity.

  12. MID-INFRARED ATOMIC FINE-STRUCTURE EMISSION-LINE SPECTRA OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: SPITZER/IRS SPECTRA OF THE GOALS SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Inami, H.; Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; Marshall, J.; Charmandaris, V.; Groves, B.; Kewley, L.; Petric, A.; Rich, J.; Haan, S.; Evans, A. S.; Mazzarella, J.; Lord, S.; Appleton, P.; Spoon, H.; Frayer, D.; Matsuhara, H.; and others

    2013-11-10

    We present the data and our analysis of mid-infrared atomic fine-structure emission lines detected in Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph high-resolution spectra of 202 local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We readily detect emission lines of [S IV], [Ne II], [Ne V], [Ne III], [S III]{sub 18.7{sub μm}}, [O IV], [Fe II], [S III]{sub 33.5{sub μm}}, and [Si II]. More than 75% of these galaxies are classified as starburst-dominated sources in the mid-infrared, based on the [Ne V]/[Ne II] line flux ratios and equivalent width of the 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature. We compare ratios of the emission-line fluxes to those predicted from stellar photo-ionization and shock-ionization models to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the gas in the starburst LIRG nuclei. Comparing the [S IV]/[Ne II] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] line ratios to the Starburst99-Mappings III models with an instantaneous burst history, the emission-line ratios suggest that the nuclear starbursts in our LIRGs have ages of 1-4.5 Myr, metallicities of 1-2 Z{sub ☉}, and ionization parameters of 2-8 × 10{sup 7} cm s{sup –1}. Based on the [S III]{sub 33.5{sub μm}}/[S III]{sub 18.7{sub μm}} ratios, the electron density in LIRG nuclei is typically one to a few hundred cm{sup –3}, with a median electron density of ∼300 cm{sup –3}, for those sources above the low density limit for these lines. We also find that strong shocks are likely present in 10 starburst-dominated sources of our sample. A significant fraction of the GOALS sources (80) have resolved neon emission-line profiles (FWHM ≥600 km s{sup –1}) and five show clear differences in the velocities of the [Ne III] or [Ne V] emission lines, relative to [Ne II], of more than 200 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, six starburst and five active galactic nucleus dominated LIRGs show a clear trend of increasing line width with ionization potential, suggesting the possibility of a compact energy source and stratified interstellar medium in their nuclei. We confirm a strong correlation between the sum of the [Ne II]{sub 12.8{sub μm}} and [Ne III]{sub 15.5{sub μm}} emission, as well as [S III]{sub 33.5{sub μm}}, with both the infrared luminosity and the 24 μm warm dust emission measured from the spectra, consistent with all three lines tracing ongoing star formation. Finally, we find no correlation between the hardness of the radiation field or the emission-line width and the ratio of the total infrared to 8 μm emission (IR8), a measure of the strength of the starburst and the distance of the LIRGs from the star-forming main sequence. This may be a function of the fact that the infrared luminosity and the mid-infrared fine-structure lines are sensitive to different timescales over the starburst, or that IR8 is more sensitive to the geometry of the region emitting the warm dust than the radiation field producing the H II region emission.

  13. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1…

  14. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectra (EEMS) of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced during Microbial Incubation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, N.; Nelson, N. B.; Parsons, R.

    2013-12-01

    The chromophoric or light-absorbing fraction of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is present ubiquitously in natural waters and has a significant impact on ocean biogeochemistry, affecting photosynthesis and primary production as well direct and indirect photochemical reactions (Siegel et al., 2002; Nelson et al., 2007). It has been largely researched in the past few decades, however the exact chemical composition remains unknown. Instrumental methods of analysis including simultaneous excitation-emission fluorescence spectra have allowed for further insight into source and chemical composition. While certain excitation-emission peaks have been associated with ';marine' sources, they have not been exclusively linked to bacterial production of CDOM (Coble, 1996; Zepp et al., 2004). In this study, ';grazer diluted' seawater samples (70% 0.2μm filtered water; 30% whole water) were collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) site in the Sargasso Sea (31° 41' N; 64° 10' W) and incubated with an amendment of labile dissolved organic carbon (10μM C6H12O6), ammonium (1μM NH4Cl) and phosphate (0.1μM K2HPO4) to facilitate bacterial production. These substrates and concentrations have been previously shown to facilitate optimum bacterial and CDOM production (Nelson et al., 2004). Sample depths were chosen at 1m and 200m as water at these depths has been exposed to UV light (the Subtropical Mode Water at 200m has been subducted from the surface) and therefore has low initial concentrations of CDOM. After the samples were amended, they were incubated at in-situ temperatures in the dark for 72 hours, with bacteria counts, UV-Vis absorption and EEMS measurements taken at 6-8 hour intervals. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements were collected daily. For the surface water experiment specific bacteria populations were investigated using Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis. Results showed a clear production of bacteria and production of CDOM, which can be linked to this bacterial production. FISH analysis showed percentage abundance of Pelagibacter ubique (SAR 11) and of Alteromonas. On-going and future work will ascertain if specific microbial communities produce CDOM more readily than others, and if these different populations produce varying fluorescence peaks, thus indicating a range of chromophoric groups being produced by bacteria. An additional suite of probes will be used for further FISH analysis to identify percentages of other populations, and seasonal/temporal variations will be investigated.

  15. An interferometer experiment to explore the aspect angle dependence of stimulated electromagnetic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isham, B.; Hagfors, T.; Khudukon, B.; Yurik, R. Yu.; Tereshchenko, E. D.; Rietveld, M. T.; Belyey, V.; Grill, M.; La Hoz, C.; Brekke, A.; Heinselman, C.

    2005-01-01

    When the Earth's ionosphere is irradiated by a radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic wave of sufficiently high power density and tuned to match a natural E- or F-region plasma frequency, ionospheric magnetoionic wave modes may be excited and may generate RF electromagnetic sideband waves via nonlinear interactions. These secondary emissions, which may then escape from the ionosphere, have been termed stimulated electromagnetic emission or SEE. The frequency spectra of this radiation has been studied extensively, and a number of characteristic spectral features have been identified and in some cases related to particular plasma processes. The separation in frequency between the RF pump and the harmonics of the local electron gyrofrequency is critical in determining the amount of anomalous absorption suffered by the pump wave and the spectral properties of the stimulated sidebands. The pump can excite electrostatic waves which do not propagate away but can in some cases be observed via radio-wave scattering from the electron density fluctuations associated with them. These enhanced density fluctuations are created by processes commonly referred to as upper-hybrid and Langmuir turbulence. Langmuir turbulence has been the subject of 930-MHz scattering observations with antenna scanning through several pre-selected angles between the geographic and geomagnetic zenith directions, and a preference for pointing angles between the Spitze angle and geomagnetic field-aligned was identified. Other phenomena, such as the generation of enhanced electron temperatures and artificial aurora, have more recently been shown to have special behavior at similar angles, near but apparently not quite at field-aligned. In view of this evidence for angular structure in several pump-induced effects, in light of the rich variety of SEE phenomena strongly dependent on the geomagnetic field via the frequency interval between the pump and the gyrofrequency harmonics, and in view of the not yet understood but complex relationship between electrostatic fluctuations and SEE, it is of interest to investigate experimentally whether a similar angular structure is present in the various spectral features of the SEE signals and to compare the results with radar and other observations of RF-pump-induced effects. To this end we describe a simple two-element radio interferometer designed to search for aspect angle dependence of SEE features. We present an example of the initial data produced by this system, and draw preliminary conclusions based on the example data.

  16. Construction of a low-temperature gun and high-resolution field emission spectra from a Nb superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, C.; Fujii, H.; Yamashita, T.; Uchiyama, S.; Yamada, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Sakurai, T.

    1999-05-01

    To investigate the fine structures in high-resolution field electron emission (FE) spectra from superconductors, we have constructed new apparatuses including a low-temperature FE gun, which can be operated at about 2.2 K. The FE patterns have been observed with an optical-fiber measuring system and the electrons emitted in the direction of the tip axis are analyzed with the resolution of ˜1 meV. By using this experimental apparatus, we have observed a sharp peak at the Fermi level in FE spectra from a niobium superconducting emitter.

  17. Practical retrieval of land surface emissivity spectra in 8-14 μm from hyperspectral thermal infrared data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Wang, Ning; Ni, Li; Tang, Bo-Hui; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2012-10-22

    A practical physics-based regression method was developed and evaluated for nearly real time estimate of land surface emissivity spectra in 8-14 μm from hyperspectral thermal infrared data. Two spectral emissivity libraries and one atmospheric profile database fully covering all the possible situations for clear sky conditions were elaborately selected to simulate the radiances at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The regression coefficients were determined by the main principal components of emissivity spectra and those of simulated brightness temperature at TOA using a ridge regression method. The experience with the simulated Interferometer Atmospheric Sounding Instrument (IASI) data showed that the emissivity spectra could be retrieved under clear sky conditions with root mean square errors of 0.015 and 0.03 for 714-970 cm(-1) (10.3-14.0 μm) and 970-1250 cm(-1) (8.0-10.3 μm), respectively, for various land surface and atmospheric conditions. This indicates the proposed method may be robust and applicable for all hyperspectral infrared sensors. PMID:23187241

  18. Near-surface thermal gradients and their effects on mid-infrared emission spectra of planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, B. G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    We model the heat transfer by radiation and conduction in the top few millimeters of a planetary surface to determine the magnitude of near-surface (approximately 100 micrometers) thermal gradients and their effects on mid-infrared emission spectra for a number of planetary environments. The model is one-dimensional and uses a finite difference scheme for approximately 10 micrometers layers. Calculations are peformed for samples heated at the base and from above by sunlight. Our results indicate that near-surface radiative cooling creates significant thermal gradients in the top few hundred microns of surfaces in which radiation is an importamnt heat transfer mechanism. The effect is maximized in evacuated, underdense particulate media with sufficiently high temperatures. Near-surface thermal gradients will be significant in fine-grained particulate surfaces on the Moon (40-60 K/100 micrometers) and Mercury (approximately 80 K/100 micrometers), increasing spectral contrast and creating emission maxima in the transparent regions of the spectra. They will be of lesser importance on the surface of Mars, with a maximum value of around 5 k/100 micrometers in areas of low thermal inertia, and will be negligible on planets with more substantial atmospheres (less than 1 K/100 micrometers). We conclude that the effects that thermal gradients have on mid-IR emission spectra are predictable and do not negate the utility of emission spectroscopy for remote determination of planetary surface composition.

  19. Calculation of emission and absorption spectra of LTE plasma by the STA (Super Transition Array) method

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Shalon, A.; Oreg, J. . Nuclear Research Center-Negev); Goldstein, W.H. )

    1991-01-11

    Recent improvements in the Super Transition Array (STA) method for calculating Bound-Bound (BB) and Bound-Free (BF) emission and absorption spectra for LTE plasma are described and illustrated. The method accounts for all possible BB and BF radiative transitions in the plasma. Full detailed first order quantum relativistic treatment is used for calculating transition energies and probabilities. The enormous number of configurations are divided into sets of superconfigurations comprised of a collection of energetically grouped configurations. The contribution of the transition array between two superconfigurations to a specific one-electron transition is then represented by a Gaussian whose moments are calculated accurately using a technique that bypasses the necessity of direct summation over all the levels involved. The calculation of these moments involves the populations of the configurations given by their statistical weights and the Boltzmann factor. For each configuration within the super configuration we use zeroeth order energies in the Boltzmann factor corrected by a super configuration averaged first order term. The structure of the spectrum is increasingly revealed by splitting each STA into a number of smaller STAs. When the spectrum converges it describes the detailed UTA' structure, where each configuration-to-configuration array is represented by a separate Gaussian with first order energy in the Boltzmann factor. Convergence is reached with only a few thousand STAs, at most, which makes the calculations practical. It should be pointed out that in this treatment the STA moments are obtained by summing over all level-to-level transitions, rather than configuration-to-configuration average transitions. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Visible Electronic Emission Spectra of Diatomic Molecules: Analysis of the Aluminum Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naxakis, Stavros

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-five bands of the B^2Sigma - X^2Sigma system of AlO with 0 <=q v^ ' <=q 9 and 0 <=q v^{'' } <=q 6 have been photographed at high resolution. The measured positions of the assigned lines of each band have been fitted by least-squares to obtain estimates of the constants (B^' ,D^',B ^{''}, D ^{''}) the band origin, and Deltagamma_ {upsilon^'upsilon^ {''}}, the difference of the upper and lower state spin-doubling constants. The parameters from individual bands have been merged to single -valued estimates, as well as to polynomial representations in (v + 1/2). New visible systems of red-degraded bands have been observed in emission from reactions of discharged helium with PCl_3, AsCl _3 and SeOCl_2, and assigned as ^2Pi to X^2Pi transitions of PCl ^{+}, AsCl^{+ } and SeO^{+}. The same excitation technique with BI_3 substrate was employed for the observation of the a ^3Pi(0^{+},1) to X^1Sigma^ {+} band systems of BI; the a(1) to X system was observed for the first time. Head positions measured from photoelectrically recorded spectra have been fitted by least-squares to obtain estimates of the vibrational constants of the states involved in the transitions. In addition, eight bands of the a(0 ^{+}) to X system and two bands of the a(1) to X system of ^{11}BI have been rotationally analyzed. Three bands (0-16, 0-17, 0-18) of the ^2Pi - X^2Pi system of P^{35}Cl ^{+} have been rotationally analyzed. The determined constants include the first estimated spin-orbit coupling constants for both states. The reliability of these estimates is discussed. Finally, the results of the reactions of discharged helium with PBr_3, and various other substrate molecules are also discussed.

  1. Effect of heat treatment on the far-infrared emission spectra and fine structures of black tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun

    2014-05-01

    Mineral black tourmaline powders were heat-treated at different temperatures. Their crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffractometer. Their infrared absorption and emission spectra before and after the heat treatment were analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The corresponding fine structures were discussed in detail. The results showed that the powders possessed higher infrared emissivity at the band where they showed stronger infrared absorption. However, there is no certain correlation between the peak intensity of infrared absorption and emissivity values at the same frequency. Because of the crystal shrinkage of c-axis, the electronic transitions were stimulated between different energy levels, and the abilities of infrared absorption and emission were enhanced with increasing the temperature of heat treatment. PMID:24734598

  2. HST-COS Observations of AGNs. I. Ultraviolet Composite Spectra of the Ionizing Continuum and Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stevans, Matthew; Danforth, Charles W.

    2012-06-01

    The ionizing fluxes from quasars and other active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are critical for interpreting the emission-line spectra of AGNs and for photoionization and heating of the intergalactic medium. Using ultraviolet spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have directly measured the rest-frame ionizing continua and emission lines for 22 AGNs. Over the redshift range 0.026 < z < 1.44, COS samples the Lyman continuum and many far-UV emission lines (Lyα λ1216, C IV λ1549, Si IV/O IV] λ1400, N V λ1240, O VI λ1035). Strong EUV emission lines with 14-22 eV excitation energies (Ne VIII λλ770, 780, Ne V λ569, O II λ834, O III λ833, λ702, O IV λ788, 608, 554, O V λ630, N III λ685) suggest the presence of hot gas in the broad emission-line region. The rest-frame continuum, F_{\

  3. Effect of nearest-neighbor ions on excited ionic states, emission spectra, and line profiles in hot and dense plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzmann, D.; Stein, J.; Goldberg, I. B.; Pratt, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the cylindrical symmetry imposed by the nearest-neighbor ions on the ionic levels and the emission spectra of a Li-like Kr ion immersed in hot and dense plasmas is investigated using the Stein et al. (1989) two-centered model extended to include computations of the line profiles, shifts, and widths, as well as the energy-level mixing and the forbidden transition probabilities. It is shown that the cylindrical symmetry mixes states with different orbital quantum numbers l, particularly for highly excited states, and, thereby, gives rise to forbidden transitions in the emission spectrum. Results are obtained for the variation of the ionic level shifts and mixing coefficients with the distance to the nearest neighbor. Also obtained are representative computed spectra that show the density effects on the spectral line profiles, shifts, and widths, and the forbidden components in the spectrum.

  4. Paradigms and challenges for bioapplication of rare earth upconversion luminescent nanoparticles: small size and tunable emission/excitation spectra.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling-Dong; Wang, Ye-Fu; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2014-04-15

    Rare earth (RE) materials, which are excited in the ultraviolet and emit in the visible light spectrum, are widely used as phosphors for lamps and displays. In the 1960's, researchers reported an abnormal emission phenomenon where photons emitted from a RE element carried more energy than those absorbed, owing to the sequential energy transfer between two RE ions--Yb(3+)-sensitized Er(3+) or Tm(3+)--in the solid state. After further study, researchers named this abnormal emission phenomenon upconversion (UC) emission. More recent approaches take advantage of solution-based synthesis, which allows creation of homogenous RE nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled size and structure that are capable of UC emission. Such nanoparticles are useful for many applications, especially in biology. For these applications, researchers seek small NPs with high upconversion emission intensity. These UCNPs have the potential to have multicolor and tunable emissions via various activators. A vast potential for future development remains by developing molecular antennas and energy transfer within RE ions. We expect UCNPs with optimized spectra behavior to meet the increasing demand of potential applications in bioimaging, biological detection, and light conversion. This Account focuses on efforts to control the size and modulate the spectra of UCNPs. We first review efforts in size control. One method is careful control of the synthesis conditions to manipulate particle nucleation and growth, but more recently researchers have learned that the doping conditions can affect the size of UCNPs. In addition, constructing homogeneous core/shell structures can control nanoparticle size by adjusting the shell thickness. After reviewing size control, we consider how diverse applications impose different requirements on excitation and/or emission photons and review recent developments on tuning of UC spectral profiles, especially the extension of excitation/emission wavelengths and the adjustment and purification of emission colors. We describe strategies that employ various dopants and others that build rationally designed nanostructures and nanocomposites to meet these goals. As the understanding of the energy transfer in the UC process has improved, core/shell structures have been proved useful for simultaneous tuning of excitation and emission wavelengths. Finally, we present a number of typical examples to highlight the upconverted emission in various applications, including imaging, detection, and sensing. We believe that with deeper understanding of emission phenomena and the ability to tune spectral profiles, UCNPs could play an important role in light conversion studies and applications. PMID:24422455

  5. Investigating Possible Departures from Maxwellian Energy Distributions in Nebulae using High-Resolution Emission Line Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbyfill, Amanda; Dinerstein, H. L.; Sterling, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    The derivation of ionic abundance ratios from collisionally excited emission lines in gaseous nebulae requires knowledge of the physical state of the gas, particularly the electron kinetic temperature, Te, to which the resulting abundances are highly sensitive. A long-standing problem in nebular analyses has been pervasive discrepancies among values of Te obtained from different diagnostic ratios for a single nebula. Recently, Nicholls et al. (2012, ApJ, 752, 148) have suggested that the nebular electrons may not obey an equilibrium Maxwell-Boltzmann (M-B) energy distribution, but instead follow a “κ distribution” seen in many solar system plasmas, a family of distributions for which the M-B distribution is the limiting case where κ → ∞. The high-energy tail of supra-thermal electrons in κ distributions have a disproportionate effect on strongly energy dependent quantities, such as Te diagnostics, for even modest departures from M-B distributions. We apply prescriptions given by Nicholls et al. (2013, ApJS, 207, 21) to high-resolution (R=36,700) optical spectra of 10 planetary nebulae obtained with the 2d-coudé echelle spectrograph on the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The advantages of these data include their broad spectral coverage and sufficiently high spectral resolution to separate blended lines and assess possible atmospheric absorption issues. The line fluxes were obtained using ROBOSPECT, an automated spectral line measurement package developed by Waters & Hollek (2013, PASP, 125, 1164). We solve both for Te under the assumption of M-B distributions, and the parameters of κ distributions consistent with the data. Our goal is to test whether the κ distribution hypothesis provides a better fit to the observed line ratios. Finally, we discuss effects on the derived ionic abundances under this alternate description of the particle energy distributions. This research was supported by NSF grant AST 0708245 and the John W. Cox Endowment for Advanced Studies in Astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin.

  6. The characteristics of the IR emission features in the spectra of Herbig Ae stars: evidence for chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, C.; Bouwman, J.; Lahuis, F.; van Kerckhoven, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Henning, T.

    2008-06-01

    Context: Infrared (IR) spectra provide a prime tool to study the characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in regions of star formation. Herbig Ae/Be stars are a class of young pre-main sequence stellar objects of intermediate mass. They are known to have varying amounts of natal cloud material still present in their direct vicinity. Aims: We characterise the IR emission bands, due to fluorescence by PAH molecules, in the spectra of Herbig Ae/Be stars and link observed variations to spatial aspects of the mid-IR emission. Methods: We analysed two PAH dominated spectra from a sample of 15 Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Results: We derived profiles of the major PAH bands by subtracting appropriate continua. The shape and the measured band characteristics show pronounced variations between the two Spitzer spectra investigated. Those variations parallel those found between three infrared space observatory (ISO) spectra of other, well-studied, Herbig Ae/Be stars. The derived profiles are compared to those from a broad sample of sources, including reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, H II regions, young stellar objects, evolved stars and galaxies. The Spitzer and ISO spectra exhibit characteristics commonly interpreted respectively as interstellar matter-like (ISM), non-ISM-like, or a combination of the two. Conclusions: We argue that the PAH emission detected from the sources exhibiting a combination of ISM-like and non-ISM-like characteristics indicates the presence of two dissimilar, spatially separated, PAH families. As the shape of the individual PAH band profiles reflects the composition of the PAH molecules involved, this demonstrates that PAHs in subsequent, evolutionary linked stages of star formation are different from those in the general ISM, implying active chemistry. None of the detected PAH emission can be associated with the (unresolved) disk and is thus associated with the circumstellar (natal) cloud. This implies that chemical changes may already occur in the (collapsing?) natal cloud and not necessarily in the disk.

  7. Simulation of the single-vibronic-level emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Daniel K. W.; Lee, Edmond P. F.; Dyke, John M.

    2016-05-01

    The single-vibronic-level (SVL) emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO have been simulated by electronic structure/Franck-Condon factor calculations to confirm the spectral molecular carrier and to investigate the electronic states involved. Various multi-reference (MR) methods, namely, NEVPT2 (n-electron valence state second order perturbation theory), RSPT2-F12 (explicitly correlated Rayleigh-Schrodinger second order perturbation theory), and MRCI-F12 (explicitly correlated multi-reference configuration interaction) were employed to compute the geometries and relative electronic energies for the X ˜ 1 A ' and A ˜ 1 A ″ states of HAsO. These are the highest level calculations on these states yet reported. The MRCI-F12 method gives computed T0 (adiabatic transition energy including zero-point energy correction) values, which agree well with the available experimental T0 value much better than previously computed values and values computed with other MR methods in this work. In addition, the potential energy surfaces of the X ˜ 1 A ' and A ˜ 1 A ″ states of HAsO were computed using the MRCI-F12 method. Franck-Condon factors between the two states, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, were then computed and used to simulate the recently reported SVL emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO [R. Grimminger and D. J. Clouthier, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184308 (2011)]. Our simulated SVL emission spectra confirm the assignments of the molecular carrier, the electronic states involved, and the vibrational structures observed in the SVL emission spectra but suggest a loss of intensity in the reported experimental spectra at the low emission energy region almost certainly due to a loss of responsivity near the cutoff region (˜800 nm) of the detector used. Computed and experimentally derived re (equilibrium) and/or r0 {the (0,0,0) vibrational level} geometries of the two states of HAsO are discussed.

  8. Simulation of the single-vibronic-level emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO.

    PubMed

    Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2016-05-14

    The single-vibronic-level (SVL) emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO have been simulated by electronic structure/Franck-Condon factor calculations to confirm the spectral molecular carrier and to investigate the electronic states involved. Various multi-reference (MR) methods, namely, NEVPT2 (n-electron valence state second order perturbation theory), RSPT2-F12 (explicitly correlated Rayleigh-Schrodinger second order perturbation theory), and MRCI-F12 (explicitly correlated multi-reference configuration interaction) were employed to compute the geometries and relative electronic energies for the X̃(1)A(') and Ã(1)A(″) states of HAsO. These are the highest level calculations on these states yet reported. The MRCI-F12 method gives computed T0 (adiabatic transition energy including zero-point energy correction) values, which agree well with the available experimental T0 value much better than previously computed values and values computed with other MR methods in this work. In addition, the potential energy surfaces of the X̃(1)A(') and Ã(1)A(″) states of HAsO were computed using the MRCI-F12 method. Franck-Condon factors between the two states, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, were then computed and used to simulate the recently reported SVL emission spectra of HAsO and DAsO [R. Grimminger and D. J. Clouthier, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184308 (2011)]. Our simulated SVL emission spectra confirm the assignments of the molecular carrier, the electronic states involved, and the vibrational structures observed in the SVL emission spectra but suggest a loss of intensity in the reported experimental spectra at the low emission energy region almost certainly due to a loss of responsivity near the cutoff region (∼800 nm) of the detector used. Computed and experimentally derived re (equilibrium) and/or r0 {the (0,0,0) vibrational level} geometries of the two states of HAsO are discussed. PMID:27179480

  9. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  10. Oxygen emission lines in the high resolution spectra of 9P/Tempel 1 following the Deep Impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capria, M. T.; Cremonese, G.; Bhardwaj, A.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.

    2008-02-01

    Context: On 2005 July 4, the NASA spacecraft Deep Impact delivered an impactor on the comet 9P/Tempel 1 to study the material ejected from the nucleus. A worldwide observation campaign accompanied the mission, to characterize the activity of 9P/Tempel 1 before and after the impact. Aims: At La Palma (Canary Islands), the comet was observed from July 2 to July 9 using the echelle spectrograph SARG on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). Fifteen spectra were obtained with a resolving power of R=29 000 in the spectral range 4620-7920 Å. Many interesting emission lines can be found in this range, in particular the [OI] lines at 5577 Å ("green line”) and at 6300 and 6364 Å ("red doublet”). From the analysis of these lines it is possible to derive information on the processes that produce these emissions. Methods: The three atomic oxygen lines are clearly visible in most of the spectra. The intensity ratio between the green line and the sum of the red lines, indicative of the parent of these lines, was computed for 9 of the 15 spectra. The value of the intensity ratio for the night of July 5 was compared with the model results obtained from a coupled chemistry transport model. Results: The intensity ratio of green to red oxygen lines obtained from the observed spectra and the one derived from the model suggest water is the main parent of the [OI] emissions on comet 9P/Tempel 1. Based on observations collected at the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), operated on the island of La Palma by the Centro Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  11. HST-COS OBSERVATIONS OF AGNs. I. ULTRAVIOLET COMPOSITE SPECTRA OF THE IONIZING CONTINUUM AND EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, J. Michael; Stevans, Matthew; Danforth, Charles W. E-mail: matthew.stevans@colorado.edu

    2012-06-20

    The ionizing fluxes from quasars and other active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are critical for interpreting the emission-line spectra of AGNs and for photoionization and heating of the intergalactic medium. Using ultraviolet spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have directly measured the rest-frame ionizing continua and emission lines for 22 AGNs. Over the redshift range 0.026 < z < 1.44, COS samples the Lyman continuum and many far-UV emission lines (Ly{alpha} {lambda}1216, C IV {lambda}1549, Si IV/O IV] {lambda}1400, N V {lambda}1240, O VI {lambda}1035). Strong EUV emission lines with 14-22 eV excitation energies (Ne VIII {lambda}{lambda}770, 780, Ne V {lambda}569, O II {lambda}834, O III {lambda}833, {lambda}702, O IV {lambda}788, 608, 554, O V {lambda}630, N III {lambda}685) suggest the presence of hot gas in the broad emission-line region. The rest-frame continuum, F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}{sub {nu}}}, shows a break at wavelengths {lambda} < 1000 A, with spectral index {alpha}{sub {nu}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.14 in the FUV (1200-2000 A) steepening to {alpha}{sub {nu}} = -1.41 {+-} 0.21 in the EUV (500-1000 A). The COS EUV index is similar to that of radio-quiet AGNs in the 2002 HST/FOS survey ({alpha}{sub {nu}} = -1.57 {+-} 0.17). We see no Lyman edge ({tau}{sub HI} < 0.03) or He I {lambda}584 emission in the AGN composite. Our 22 AGNs exhibit a substantial range of FUV/EUV spectral indices and a correlation with AGN luminosity and redshift, likely due to observing below the 1000 A spectral break.

  12. The Mystery of the Double-Peaked Emission Lines in Late-time Spectra of Core-Collapse SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Gerardy, Christopher L.; Hoflich, Peter; Modjaz, Maryam

    2008-02-01

    Late-time spectra of core-collapse SNe often show double-peaked line profiles in [O I] 6300,6364, Mg I] 4571, and [Ca II] 7291,7324. In a few cases, the double-peaked profile is seen blueshifted by 1000 - 2000 km/s. Such double-peaked line profiles have had widely different interpretations including ejecta rings, disks, jets, line blending, line opacities, and ejecta clumping. Whatever the correct explanation(s), recent late-time spectra of Type II, Ib, and Ic SNe have now made it clear that double-peaked line profiles are, in fact, very common - suggesting an important and unifying underlying characteristic may connect all core-collapse supernovae. Here we propose a Gemini N & S GMOS program of three recent and relatively bright Type II supernovae at ages of 200-350 days past maximum light that will yield better S/N and higher resolution spectra to better characterize the phenomena. These data will allow an accurate comparison for the expansion properties of O,Ne,Mg vs. S,Si,Ca rich ejecta zones through Mg I], O I, [O I], and [Ca II] line emissions. We will then examine the observed late-time emission properties using detailed core-collapse models.

  13. Cataloguing Emission Line Spectra from Fe VII-Fe XXIV in the Extreme Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kahn, D. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Mauche, C. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed laboratory astrophysics measurements are, in progress to produce spectral tables for the Fe VII Fe XXIV line emission in the EUV wavelength band. Results for Fe XIII are presented that update line lists used in the Chandra Emission Line Project.

  14. Infrared spectra of protonated coronene and its neutral counterpart in solid parahydrogen: implications for unidentified interstellar infrared emission bands.

    PubMed

    Bahou, Mohammed; Wu, Yu-Jong; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2014-01-20

    Large protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (H(+) PAHs) are possible carriers of unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands from interstellar objects, but the characterization of infrared (IR) spectra of large H(+) PAHs in the laboratory is challenging. IR absorption spectra of protonated coronene (1-C24 H13 (+) ) and mono-hydrogenated coronene (1-C24 H13 (.) ), which were produced upon electron bombardment of parahydrogen containing a small proportion of coronene (C24 H12 ) during matrix deposition, were recorded. The spectra are of a much higher resolution than those obtained by IR multiphoton dissociation by Dopfer and co-workers. The IR spectra of protonated pyrene and coronene collectively appear to have the required chromophores for features of the UIR bands, and the spectral shifts on an increase in the number of benzenoid rings point in the correct direction towards the positions of the UIR bands. Larger protonated peri-condensed PAHs might thus be key species among the carriers of UIR bands. PMID:24310834

  15. Effects of Incident Electron Fluence and Energy on the Election Yield Curves and Emission Spectra of Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Alec; Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, Clint

    2005-01-01

    We present an experimental study of evolution of electron emission yields and spectra as a result of internal charge build up due to electron dose. Reliable total, backscattered and secondary yield curves and electron emission spectra for un-charged insulators using a low fluence, pulsed electron beam (= or < 5 microsec at = or < 3 nA/sq mm or = or < 10(exp 5) e/sq mm per pulse) with low energy electron and UV flooding to neutralize the charging between pulses. Quantifiable changes in yield curves are observed due to < 100 fC/sq mm fluences for several excellent dielectric thin film materials. We find good agreement with a phenomenological argument based on insulator charging predicted by the yield curve; this includes an approximately linear decrease in the magnitude of the yield as incident energies approach the crossover energies and an exponential decrease in yield as accumulated internal charge reduces the landing energy to asymptotically approach a steady state surface charge and unity yield. We also find that the exponential decay of yield curves with fluence exhibit an energy dependent decay constant, alpha(E), over a broad range of incident energies below, between and above the crossover energies. Finally, we present some preliminary physics-based models for this energy dependence and attempt to relate our charging measurements to knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and transport, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators.

  16. Vibronic structure induced in spin-forbidden transitions in emission and absorption spectra by excited-state coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, D.; Zink, J.I.

    1992-10-29

    Spectroscopic effects of spin-orbit coupling of excited-state potential surfaces are calculated by using the numerical integration of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation and the time-dependent theory of electronic spectroscopy. Intensity borrowing by a spin-forbidden transition from a nearby spin-allowed transition is calculated in terms of amplitude transfer of the wave packet between states. The main emphasis of the calculations is to analyze the vibronic structure in emission and a absorption spectra arising from coupled surfaces. The coupling causes dramatic changes in both the relative intensities of the vibronic bands and the spacings between members of a progression. These changes are quantitatively calculated, and the theory is applied to the spectra of transition-metal complexes. The intensity and spacing between vibronic peaks in the absorption spectrum of K{sub 2}NiO{sub 2} are calculated and analyzed. A striking example of relative intensities in vibronic peaks in the absorption spectrum of K{sub 2}NiO{sub 2} are calculated and analyzed. A striking example of relative intensities in vibronic peaks induced by spin-orbit coupling is found in the emission spectra of d{sup 2} and d{sup 3} metal ions in octahedral environments where the lowest energy spin-forbidden transitions arise from a change in the spin state with no change in the orbital component. Short progressions in totally symmetric modes are frequently observed even though no changes in the orbital populations, bond properties, or force constants are expected. The vibronic structure in spectra of Ti{sup 2+}, V{sup 3+}, Cr{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 4+} ions in octahedral halide lattices is analyzed. 32 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Spitzer Secondary Eclipse Observations of Five Cool Gas Giant Planets and Empirical Trends in Cool Planet Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Joshua A.; Knutson, Heather A.; Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Deming, Drake; Burrows, Adam; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Laughlin, Gregory P.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Morley, Caroline V.; Moses, Julianne I.; Showman, Adam P.; Todorov, Kamen O.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm secondary eclipse observations of five new cool (\\lt 1200 K) transiting gas giant planets: HAT-P-19b, WASP-6b, WASP-10b, WASP-39b, and WASP-67b. We compare our measured eclipse depths to the predictions of a suite of atmosphere models and to eclipse depths for planets with previously published observations in order to constrain the temperature- and mass-dependent properties of gas giant planet atmospheres. We find that the dayside emission spectra of planets less massive than Jupiter require models with efficient circulation of energy to the night side and/or increased albedos, while those with masses greater than that of Jupiter are consistently best-matched by models with inefficient circulation and low albedos. At these relatively low temperatures we expect the atmospheric CH4/CO ratio to vary as a function of metallicity, and we therefore use our observations of these planets to constrain their atmospheric metallicities. We find that the most massive planets have dayside emission spectra that are best-matched by solar metallicity atmosphere models, but we are not able to place strong constraints on metallicities of the smaller planets in our sample. Interestingly, we find that the ratio of the 3.6 and 4.5 μm brightness temperatures for these cool transiting planets is independent of planet temperature, and instead exhibits a tentative correlation with planet mass. If this trend can be confirmed, it would suggest that the shape of these planets’ emission spectra depends primarily on their masses, consistent with the hypothesis that lower-mass planets are more likely to have metal-rich atmospheres.

  18. Hot topic: Innovative lactation-stage-dependent prediction of methane emissions from milk mid-infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Vanlierde, A; Vanrobays, M-L; Dehareng, F; Froidmont, E; Soyeurt, H; McParland, S; Lewis, E; Deighton, M H; Grandl, F; Kreuzer, M; Gredler, B; Dardenne, P; Gengler, N

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop, apply, and validate a new method to predict an indicator for CH4 eructed by dairy cows using milk mid-infrared (MIR) spectra. A novel feature of this model was the consideration of lactation stage to reflect changes in the metabolic status of the cow. A total of 446 daily CH4 measurements were obtained using the SF6 method on 142 Jersey, Holstein, and Holstein-Jersey cows. The corresponding milk samples were collected during these CH4 measurements and were analyzed using MIR spectroscopy. A first derivative was applied to the milk MIR spectra. To validate the novel calibration equation incorporating days in milk (DIM), 2 calibration processes were developed: the first was based only on CH4 measurements and milk MIR spectra (independent of lactation stage; ILS); the second included milk MIR spectra and DIM information (dependent on lactation stage; DLS) by using linear and quadratic modified Legendre polynomials. The coefficients of determination of ILS and DLS equations were 0.77 and 0.75, respectively, with standard error of calibration of 63g/d of CH4 for both calibration equations. These equations were applied to 1,674,763 milk MIR spectra from Holstein cows in the first 3 parities and between 5 and 365 DIM. The average CH4 indicators were 428, 444, and 448g/d by ILS and 444, 467, and 471g/d by DLS for cows in first, second, and third lactation, respectively. Behavior of the DLS indicator throughout the lactations was in agreement with the literature with values increasing between 0 and 100 DIM and decreasing thereafter. Conversely, the ILS indicator of CH4 emission decreased at the beginning of the lactation and increased until the end of the lactation, which differs from the literature. Therefore, the DLS indicator seems to better reflect biological processes that drive CH4 emissions than the ILS indicator. The ILS and DLS equations were applied to an independent data set, which included 59 respiration chamber measurements of CH4 obtained from animals of a different breed across a different production system. Results indicated that the DLS equation was much more robust than the ILS equation allowing development of indicators of CH4 emissions by dairy cows. Integration of DIM information into the prediction equation was found to be a good strategy to obtain biologically meaningful CH4 values from lactating cows by accounting for biological changes that occur throughout the lactation. PMID:26026761

  19. Emission Line Spectra in the Soft X-Ray Region 20-75 (Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Behar, E; Kahn, S M

    2002-06-18

    As part of a project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II, we studied emission lines of argon and sulfur in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet region. Here we present observations of Ar IX through Ar XVI and S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 {angstrom} to illustrate our work.

  20. How to Collect National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Traceable Fluorescence Excitation and Emission Spectra.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Adam Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary spectrofluorimeters comprise exciting light sources, excitation and emission monochromators, and detectors that without correction yield data not conforming to an ideal spectral response. The correction of the spectral properties of the exciting and emission light paths first requires calibration of the wavelength and spectral accuracy. The exciting beam path can be corrected up to the sample position using a spectrally corrected reference detection system. The corrected reference response accounts for both the spectral intensity and drift of the exciting light source relative to emission and/or transmission detector responses. The emission detection path must also be corrected for the combined spectral bias of the sample compartment optics, emission monochromator, and detector. There are several crucial issues associated with both excitation and emission correction including the requirement to account for spectral band-pass and resolution, optical band-pass or neutral density filters, and the position and direction of polarizing elements in the light paths. In addition, secondary correction factors are described including (1) subtraction of the solvent's fluorescence background, (2) removal of Rayleigh and Raman scattering lines, as well as (3) correcting for sample concentration-dependent inner-filter effects. The importance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable calibration and correction protocols is explained in light of valid intra- and interlaboratory studies and effective spectral qualitative and quantitative analyses including multivariate spectral modeling. PMID:24108620

  1. Study of solvation dynamics in the interior of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) using picosecond-resolved emission spectra of tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guangyu; Li, Yu; Wang, Wei; Men, Jing; Zhong, Dongping; Wang, ShuFeng; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-09-01

    We report here our study on ultrafast spectral dynamics in the interior of SNase using picosecond-resolved emission spectra of tryptophan through site-directed mutagenesis. By probing the solvation dynamics in the nucleotide binding pocket and the Ca2+ binding pocket as well as in the interior of hydrophobic core, two robust relaxation time scales on a few picoseconds and on tens of picoseconds have been observed. Both two time scales are strongly correlated with local structural and chemical properties of protein. These distinct differences in solvation dynamics reflect the intimate relationship between the dynamic structures and the functions of enzyme.

  2. X-ray emission spectra and gaps of CuFeO2 with the modified Becke-Johnson potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, San-Dong

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the electronic structures of CuFeO2 by using Tran and Blaha's modified Becke and Johnson exchange potential. The calculated X-ray emission spectra of CuFeO2 for O-K and Fe-L are quite compatible with experimental data. The calculated energy band gap and optical band gap are 0.15 eV and 1.03 eV, respectively, and the theoretical magnetic moment for Fe atom is 4.11μB, which is very close to experimental value 4.2 ± 0.1μB.

  3. Neutron Emission Spectra from Inelastic Scattering on 58,60Ni with a White Neutron Source at FIGARO

    SciTech Connect

    Rochman, D.; Haight, R.C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Grimes, S.M.; Talou, P.

    2005-05-24

    Neutron emission spectra from inelastic neutron scattering on natural nickel at the FIGARO facility have been measured by a double time-of-flight technique. The incident neutrons are produced from the spallation source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility, and their energies are determined by time of flight. The emitted neutrons and gamma rays are detected by 16 liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. The results for incident neutron energies from 2 to 10 MeV are compared with predictions of nuclear model calculations performed with the code EMPIRE-II. Finally, the level density parameters 'a' and ''{delta}'' are extracted.

  4. Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Capture on 234,236,238U Measured with DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Mosby, S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C.-Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the 238U(n, ?) cross section using a thin 48 mg/cm2 target was made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE over the energy range from 10 eV to 500 keV. The results confirm earlier measurements. Measurements of the gamma-ray emission spectra were also made for 238U(n, ?) as well as 234,236U(n, ?). These measurements help to constrain the radiative strength function used in the cross-section calculations.

  5. Experimental measurement of the neutron time-emission spectra at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocko, M.; Muhrer, G.; Kelsey, Ch. T.; Duran, M. A.; Tovesson, F.

    2011-03-01

    A series of neutron-beam-characterization measurements was carried out during the 2009 run cycle at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. The experimental data of time-emission spectra, reflecting the resolution of the neutron-beam pulses, were compared to measurements made in 2002, shortly after commissioning of the target-moderator-reflector-shield (TMRS) assembly. This comparison allows us to determine any possible changes to the performance (resolution) of the TMRS in its seven years in service (2002-2009). During our experimental campaign we were able to characterize four out of a total of six moderators installed in the TMRS system.

  6. Temperature sensitivity of Cu K(alpha) imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K U; Key, M H; Chung, H K; Hansen, S B; Freeman, R R; Chen, M H; Gregori, G; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Izumi, N; King, J A; Kuba, J; Norreys, P; Mackinnon, A J; Murphy, C D; Snavely, R; Stepehens, R; Stoeckel, C; Theobald, W; Zhang, B

    2006-08-07

    The Vulcan laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory was used to study the interaction of a 75 J 10 ps, high intensity laser beam with low-mass solid, Cu targets. Two instruments were fielded as diagnostics of the Cu K-shell emission from the targets: A single photon counting CCD spectrometer provided the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield and a spherically bent Bragg crystal recorded 2D monochromatic images with a spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m. Due to the shifting and broadening of the K{sub {alpha}} spectral lines with increasing temperature, there is a temperature dependence of the crystal collection efficiency. This provides a temperature diagnostic when cross calibrated against a single hit CCD spectrometer, and it affects measurements of the spatial pattern of electron transport. The experimental data showing changing collection efficiency are presented. The results are discussed in light of modeling of the temperature-dependent spectrum of Cu K-shell emission.

  7. Emission and absorption spectra of some bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, J. M.; Pathirana, R. N.; Stibbard, J. H. A.

    Absorption spectra in neutral and acidic media are reported for a series of bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines, which are unable to tautomerize. Comparison is made with non-bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines capable of tautomeric rearrangement. Both bridged and non-bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines are essentially non-fluorescent due to the "proximity effect" of interaction between singlet ηπ* and ππ* states of similar energy, a phenomenon previously recognised in six-membered nitrogen heterocycles.

  8. Bremsstrahlung and K(alpha) fluorescence measurements for inferring conversion efficiencies into fast ignition relevant hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C D; Patel, P K; Hey, D S; Mackinnon, A J; Key, M H; Akli, K U; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Chawla, S; Chen, H; Freeman, R R; Higginson, D P; Link, A; Ma, T Y; MacPhee, A G; Stephens, R B; Van Woerkom, L D; Westover, B; Porkolab, M

    2009-07-24

    The Bremsstrahlung and K-shell emission from 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm planar targets irradiated by a short-pulse 3 x 10{sup 18}-8 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} laser were measured. The Bremsstrahlung was measured using a filter stack spectrometer with spectral discrimination up to 500 keV. K-shell emission was measured using a single photon counting charge coupled device (CCD). From Monte Carlo modeling of the target emission, conversion efficiencies into 1-3 MeV electrons of 3-12%, representing 20-40% total conversion efficiencies were inferred for intensities up to 8 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Comparisons to scaling laws using synthetic energy spectra generated from the intensity distribution of the focal spot imply slope temperatures less than the ponderomotive potential of the laser. Resistive transport effects may result in potentials of a few hundred kV in the first few tens of microns in the target. This would lead to higher total conversion efficiencies than inferred from Monte Carlo modeling but lower conversion efficiencies into 1-3 MeV electrons.

  9. BROADBAND EMISSION SPECTRA FROM THE CYGNUS X-3 JET IN THE SOFT SPECTRAL STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Lu, Ju-Fu E-mail: lujf@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    In order to understand the main observational characteristics of the Galactic X-ray binary Cygnus X-3, we propose a radiation model in which high-energy electrons accelerate in the dissipation zone of a jet and produce nonthermal broadband emissions. Broadband spectral energy distributions are computed to compare the AGILE and Fermi LAT data with the multi-band data during soft X-ray spectral states. By fitting observations at different locations of the jet, we find that the emission region is rather compact and should be located at a distance of about one orbital radius. Our results can explain the current multi-frequency observations and also predict the TeV band emission. The model could be tested by a polarization measurement at IR band, and/or by a correlation study between the GeV and TeV bands once very-high-energy observations are available.

  10. Taking the spectral overlap between excitation and emission spectra of fluorescent materials into account with Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyre, Sven; Ryckaert, Jana; Acuna, Paula; Audenaert, Jan; Meuret, Youri; Hofkens, Johan; Durinck, Guy; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Monte Carlo ray tracing is an important simulation tool in applications where fluorescence is present, e.g. in bio-medical applications and in the design of luminaires and luminescent solar concentrators. A frequently used ray tracing procedure for fluorescence is the `dual stage' approach. In this approach, first, all sources are traced through the system and the rays absorbed in the fluorescent components are stored. Next, the emission from the fluorescent components is traced. This approach does not allow for subsequent re-absorption and re-emission effects in fluorescent materials with a spectral overlap between excitation and emission spectra. In this work, a `multi stage' ray tracing procedure for the simulation of luminescence is presented. Herein, wavelengths are traced from short to long separately and no distinction is made regarding the origin of emission (either a fluorescent component or a source). The presented approach can be easily implemented in existing commercial ray tracing software thus reducing the programming efforts for the new ray tracing algorithm and taking advantage of the strength of the selected ray tracing package concerning the modelling of complex geometrical systems. Both techniques are compared to investigate the influence of the selected ray tracing approach on the efficiency and colour prediction of a remote phosphor LED module.

  11. Analysis of emission spectra of Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh, V. Buddhudu, S.

    2014-04-24

    In the present paper, we report on the absorption and emission properties of (0.1-1.5 mol %) Ho{sup 3+} doped LFBCd (Li{sub 2}O{sub −}LiF{sub −}B{sub 2}O{sub 3−}CdO) glasses prepared via melt quenching method. On exciting these glasses at (λ{sub exci}) = 452 nm, two emissions at 556 nm ({sup 5}S{sub 2}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}; Green), 655 nm ({sup 5}F{sub 5}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}; Red) have been obtained. Upon exciting these glasses with a 980 nm diode laser, NIR emissions at 1195 nm ({sup 5}I{sub 6}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}), 1951 nm ({sup 5}I{sub 7}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}) have been measured for 1 mol % Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glass. For higher concentration beyond 1.0 mol %, emission quenching of Ho{sup 3+} glass has been noticed and which has successfully been explained in terms of an energy level diagram. From absorption cross-section data, stimulated emission cross-section has been evaluated by applying McCumber's theory and further cross-sectional gain has also been computed for the emissions at 1195 nm (∼1.20 μm) and 1951 nm (∼2.0 μm) of 1 mol % Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glass.

  12. Designer emission spectra through tailored energy transfer in nanoparticle-doped silica preforms.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Courtney; Kokuoz, Baris; Edmondson, Dale; Griese, David; Miller, Michael; James, Andrew; Baker, William; Ballato, John

    2009-08-01

    This Letter provides a qualitative proof of concept for purposefully tailoring the emission spectrum of glass by spatially localizing dissimilar dopants to control the degree of energy transfer. More specifically, modified-chemical-vapor-deposition-derived silica preforms were solution doped with either a solution of individually Eu(3+)- or Tb(3+)-doped nanoparticles or a solution of Eu(3+)/Tb(3+)-codoped nanoparticles. The preform prepared using the codoped nanoparticles exhibited energy transfer from the Tb(3+) to the Eu(3+) ions, whereas the preform containing individually doped nanoparticles yielded only discretely Tb(3+) or Eu(3+) emissions. The extension of this work to broadband amplifiers and lasers is discussed. PMID:19649090

  13. Experimental study on the emission spectra of microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guixin; Liao, Shanshan

    2014-01-28

    An experimental study on microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure was conducted by employing optical emission spectroscopy. Based on a microwave plasma generation device developed for nanoparticle synthesis, we studied the influence of input microwave power and gas flow rate on the optical emission behaviors and electron temperature of plasma using Ar, He, and N{sub 2} as working gas, respectively. The physics behind these behaviors was discussed. The results are useful in characterizing microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure and can be used for improving nanoparticle synthesis system for commercial use in the future.

  14. Plasma modulation of harmonic emission spectra from laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Boyd, T J M; Ondarza-Rovira, R

    2007-03-01

    We report results from particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of intense laser light with overdense plasma designed to examine the effects of plasma waves generated by pulses of fast electrons on high-order harmonic emission from the plasma. We show that the emission spectrum is modulated at the plasma frequency and identify combinations of parameters and circumstances favorable for modulation. In particular, the observed modulation is shown to depend not only on the chosen plasma electron density and intensity of the incident light but on the density profile and pulse shape. PMID:17358542

  15. Long-term X-ray studies of Sco X-1. [emission spectra of constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Kaluzienski, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    No modulation of the 3-6 keV X-ray intensity of Sco X-1 at a level of excess of 1% was observed at the optical period of .787313d. Evidence is found for shot-noise character in a large fraction of the X-ray emission. Almost all of the Sco X-1 emission can be synthesized in terms of approximately 200 shots per day, each with a duration of approximately 1/3 day. A pinhole camera was used to obtain data and the data were statistically analyzed.

  16. Equatorial electromagnetic emission with discrete spectra near harmonics of oxygen gyrofrequency during magnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Kokubun, S.; Hayashi, K. )

    1994-02-01

    The authors examine ELF data taken by the Akebono satellite in the low altitude plasmasphere during magnetic storms. They find that there are a set of these wave observations which are frequency related to the oxygen ion gyrofrequency. They observe emissions at frequencies closely related to the first and second harmonic of the oxygen ion gyrofrequency. The spacing between bands observed in the ELF are at the first or second oxygen ion gyrofrequency, and the frequency varies with the geomagnetic field. The authors argue that these emissions orginate from oxygen ions in the ring current region.

  17. A characterization of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) through a spatio-temporal map of the APPJ's optical emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapaldo, James; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    APPJs have become increasingly important in the past years in medical, science, and industry. However, there still remains a largely unsolved problem of characterizing APPJs to determine the quantity of species they deliver; the type of atomic, molecular, and radical species they deliver, both charged and neutral; as well as the energy of the species they deliver. In this paper, we will present our work on the characterization of the type of charged species delivered by our APPJ through a spacial and temporal map of the APPJ's optical emission spectra. This spatial-temporal emission spectra enables us to track how the relative abundance of individual emitting species changes as a function of distance from the jets central axis and as a function of time (distance from the APPJ's orifice). Using a helium working gas, we tested our method of characterization by measuring the relative abundances of different helium, nitrogen, and oxygen emitting species under three different conditions: using a shielding gas of oxygen, using a shielding gas of nitrogen, and using no shielding gas at all-just the He jet directly into the atmosphere. The results of this study will be presented. The research described herein was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy through Grant No. DE- FC02-04ER15533.

  18. BROADBAND X-RAY SPECTRA OF TWO LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI NGC 1566 AND NGC 4941 OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi

    2013-06-20

    We report the first broadband X-ray spectra of the low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), NGC 1566 (type 1.5) and NGC 4941 (type 2), observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT covering the 0.5-195 keV band. Both targets have hard X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 41-42} erg s{sup -1} in the 15-55 keV band. The spectra of the nucleus are well reproduced by a sum of partially or fully covered transmitted emission and its reflection from the accretion disk, reprocessed emission from the torus accompanied by a strong narrow iron-K{alpha} line, and a scattered component (for NGC 4941). We do not significantly detect a broad iron-K{alpha} line from the inner accretion disk in both targets, and obtain an upper limit on the corresponding solid angle of {Omega}/2{pi} < 0.3 in NGC 1566. The reflection strength from the torus is moderate, {Omega}/2{pi}=0.45{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10} in NGC 1566 and {Omega}/2{pi}=0.64{sup +0.69}{sub -0.27} in NGC 4941. Comparison of the equivalent width of the narrow iron-K{alpha} line with a model prediction based on a simple torus geometry constrains its half-opening angle to be {theta}{sub oa} {approx_equal} 60 Degree-Sign -70 Degree-Sign in NGC 4941. These results agree with the obscured AGN fraction obtained from hard X-ray and mid-infrared selected samples at similar luminosities. Our results support the implication that the averaged covering fraction of AGN tori is peaked at L {approx} 10{sup 42-43} erg s{sup -1} but decreases toward lower luminosities.

  19. Emission from water vapor and absorption from other gases at 5-7.5 μm in Spitzer-IRS Spectra Of Protoplanetary Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, B. A.; Forrest, W.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Richter, I.; Tayrien, C.; D'Alessio, P.; Calvet, N.; Furlan, E.; Green, J.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2014-09-10

    We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph 5-7.5 μm spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 μm due to the ν{sub 2} = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures >500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other 6 of the 13 stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 μm, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.

  20. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. I. Full cumulant expansions and system-bath entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    We study the Förster resonant energy transfer rate, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. The multichromophoric Förster theory (MCFT) is determined from an overlap integral of generalized matrices related to the donor’s emission and acceptor’s absorption spectra, which are obtained via a full 2nd-order cumulant expansion technique developed in this work. We calculate the spectra and MCFT rate for both localized and delocalized systems, and calibrate the analytical 2nd-order cumulant expansion with the exact stochastic path integral method. We present three essential findings: (i) The role of the initial entanglement between the donor and its bath is found to be crucial in both the emission spectrum and the MCFT rate. (ii) The absorption spectra obtained by the cumulant expansion method are nearly identical to the exact spectra for both localized and delocalized systems, even when the system-bath coupling is far from the perturbative regime. (iii) For the emission spectra, the cumulant expansion can give reliable results for localized systems, but fail to provide reliable spectra of the high-lying excited states of a delocalized system, when the system-bath coupling is large and the thermal energy is small. This paper also provides a simple golden-rule derivation of the MCFT, reviews existing methods, and motivates further developments in the subsequent papers.

  1. Measurement of Neutron Emission Spectra in Li(d,xn) Reaction with Thick and Thin Targets for 40-MeV Deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, M.; Itoga, T.; Kawata, N.; Hirabayashi, N.; Oishi, T.; Yamauchi, T.; Baba, M.; Sugimoto, M.; Muroga, T.

    2005-11-15

    To improve the data accuracy of the neutron emission spectra of the {sup nat}Li(d,xn) reaction that will be used as the neutron source in the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, the authors have measured the neutron emission spectra from thick and thin lithium targets bombarded by 40-MeV deuterons at the AVF cyclotron (K = 110) facility of Tohoku University. The neutron spectra were measured at nine laboratory angles between 0 and 110 deg with the time-of-flight method using a beam-swinger system and a well-collimated neutron flight channel, obtained over almost the entire energy range of secondary neutrons using a two-gain method. The data obtained revealed the shape and angular dependence of emission spectra up to the high-energy region called a 'high-energy tail'. The experimental results are compared with other experimental data and calculations.

  2. Dynamics of hot spots in the DPF-78 plasma focus from x-ray spectra and REB emission

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Wang, X.X.

    1995-12-31

    The X-ray emission from hot spots in the plasma focus DPF-78 was investigated with the help of two X-ray quartz crystal spectrometers of the Johann type and a 4 fold magnifying X-ray pinhole camera. In the experiments the working gas was chosen to be 300 Pa deuterium with 20 Pa argon admixture. X-ray spectra in the wavelength range from 3.55 {angstrom} to 4.0 {angstrom}, including H-like and He-like Argon lines, were recorded on Kodak DEF-2 film. From the spatially resolved spectra recorded side-on, a relative spectral shift between different hot spots of the same shot was often observed. The shift could be attributed to the Doppler shift. From spectral characteristics such as intensities and FWHM of Ar resonant and intercombination lines electron densities of up to 3 {times} 10{sup 27} m{sup {minus}3} were determined. Radial dimensions of the hot spots ranging from about 140 {micro}m to 300 {micro}m were found from pinhole pictures applying the penumbra method. Usually two pulses of relativistic electron beams were observed using Cherenkov detectors in a magnetic spectrometer. The energy of the first pulse, which was emitted at the time of maximum compression, was higher than that of the second pulse. The measured FWHM of the REB pulses ranges from 3 ns to about 10 ns. The characteristics of the time-integrated X-ray spectra and the time resolved REB spectra and their dependence on the composition of the filling gas are discussed.

  3. Infrared, X-ray, and XUV astrophysics. [emission spectra/galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An observational program covering wavelengths from the near infrared to 1 millimeter is reviewed. The program of millimeter observations largely consisted of analyzing previous observations since the summer humidity was too high for new observations. Maps of millimeter emission from W3, Sgr B2, W49 and M42 were made. Five extragalactic sources were detected and are discussed. Energy distributions of several of the discrete sources at the Galactic Center were studied. A 5-year visual/infrared program on Markarian galaxies is discussed which showed the presence of both thermal and nonthermal infrared radiation sources and established correlations between the infrared sources and the emission line regions. The Nova Cygnus 1975, caught during its rise as well as subsequent dimming, is also discussed. Several other continuing programs are described, including studies of dark clouds and CO maser sources.

  4. Density and temperature sensitive features in high temperature plasma L-shell xenon emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, C. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Osterheld, A. L.; Kania, D. R.

    1994-05-01

    We present model calculations demonstrating new density and temperature sensitive ratios of groups of F- and Ne-like Xe lines which are suitable for diagnosing plasma conditions. The method is illustrated by using L-shell Xe emission to infer Te in the fuel region of indirectly driven plastic capsules filled with deuterium and doped with 0.1% Ar and 0.02% Xe. The technique uses tractable atomic models and appears scalable to other Ne-like ions.

  5. Effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Study by short-interval double pulses with different pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Ayaka Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Takashi; Ogata, Yukio H.; Fukami, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-14

    We investigate the effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra of laser ablation plasma in water. We use short-interval (76 ns) double pulses with different pulse durations of the composing two pulses for the irradiation of underwater target. Narrow atomic spectral lines in emission spectra are obtained by the irradiation, where the two pulses are wide enough to be merged into a single-pulse-like temporal profile, while deformed spectra are obtained when the two pulses are fully separated. The behavior of the atomic spectral lines for the different pulse durations is consistent with that of the temporal profiles of the optical emission intensities of the plasma. All these results suggest that continuous excitation of the plasma during the laser irradiation for ∼100 ns is a key to obtain narrow emission spectral lines.

  6. Broadening and splitting of emission spectra of a GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade laser in a quantising magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zasavitskii, I I; Pashkeev, D A; Bushuev, E V; Mikaelyan, G T

    2013-02-28

    We have studied the effect of a relatively weak quantising magnetic field on emission spectra of a GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade laser near 10 K. The results demonstrate that, as the magnetic field induction increases to 7 T, the spectra broaden (to 5 meV) and split into three emission bands. As a result, we observe simultaneously up to 80 longitudinal lasing modes in the three bands and the integrated laser output intensity increases 70 times. The presence of bands in the emission spectra can be accounted for in terms of the magnetic quantisation of the laser levels into spinsplit Landau levels. The increase in emission intensity is attributable primarily to phonon resonance adjustment in a magnetic field. (lasers)

  7. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity ratios showed distinct differences between the closed CANDU primary coolant system and radiopharmaceutical production releases. According to the concept proposed by Kalinowski and Pistner (2006), the relationship between different isotopic activity ratios based on three or four radioxenon isotopes was plotted in a log-log diagram for source characterisation (civil vs. nuclear test). The multiple isotopic activity ratios were distributed in three distinct areas: HC atmospheric monitoring ratios extended to far left; the CANDU primary coolant system ratios lay in the middle; and 99Mo stack monitoring ratios for ANSTO and CRL were located on the right. The closed CANDU primary coolant has the lowest logarithmic mean ratio that represents the nuclear power reactor operation. The HC atmospheric monitoring exhibited a broad range of ratios spreading over several orders of magnitude. In contrast, the ANSTO and CRL stack emissions showed the smallest range of ratios but the results indicate at least two processes involved in the 99Mo productions. Overall, most measurements were found to be shifted towards the reactor domain. The hypothesis is that this is due to an accumulation of the isotope 131mXe in the stack or atmospheric background as it has the longest half-life and extra 131mXe emissions from the decay of 131I. The contribution of older 131mXe to a fresh release shifts the ratio of 133mXe/131mXe to the left. It was also very interesting to note that there were some situations where isotopic ratios from 99Mo production emissions fell within the nuclear test domain. This is due to operational variability, such as shorter target irradiation times. Martin B. Kalinowski and Christoph Pistner, (2006), Isotopic signature of atmospheric xenon released from light water reactors, Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 88, 215-235.

  8. Light emission spectra of molecules in negative and positive back discharges in nitrogen with carbon dioxide mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Tadeusz; Sobczyk, Arkadiusz Tomasz; Jaworek, Anatol

    2015-10-01

    Results of spectroscopic investigations and current-voltage characteristics of back discharge generated in point-plane electrode geometry with plate covered fly ash layer in a mixture of N2 + CO2 at atmospheric pressure, for positive and negative polarity of the discharge electrode are presented in this paper. Point-plane electrode configuration was chosen in these studies in order to simulate the physical processes occurring in electrostatic precipitator. Three forms of back discharge for both polarities were investigated: glow, streamers and low-current back-arc. Diatomic reactions and dissociation products of N2 and CO2 (OH, NO, CN), atoms from fly ash layer (N, Ti, Na), free radicals, molecules or ions, which have unpaired valence electrons, and other active species, e.g., N2 (in C,B,A-state), N 2 + (B) were identified in the discharges by the method of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The measurements shown that atomic and molecular optical emission spectral lines from back discharge depend on the forms of discharge and the discharge current. In normal electrical discharges, the emission spectra are dominated by gaseous components, but in the case of back discharge, atomic lines belonging to chemical compounds of fly ash were also recorded and identified.

  9. EARLY RESULTS FROM THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: C III EMISSION LINES IN Of SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Sota, Alfredo; MaIz Apellaniz, Jesus; Alfaro, Emilio J.; Barba, Rodolfo H.; Arias, Julia I.; Gamen, Roberto C. E-mail: sota@iaa.es E-mail: emilio@iaa.es E-mail: rbarba@dfuls.cl E-mail: rgamen@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar

    2010-03-10

    On the basis of an extensive new spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, we introduce the Ofc category, which consists of normal spectra with C III {lambda}{lambda}4647-4650-4652 emission lines of comparable intensity to those of the Of defining lines N III {lambda}{lambda}4634-4640-4642. The former feature is strongly peaked to spectral type O5, at all luminosity classes, but preferentially in some associations or clusters and not others. The relationships of this phenomenon to the selective C III {lambda}5696 emission throughout the normal Of domain, and to the peculiar, variable Of?p category, for which strong C III {lambda}{lambda}4647-4650-4652 emission is a defining characteristic, are discussed. Magnetic fields have recently been detected on two members of the latter category. We also present two new extreme Of?p stars, NGC 1624-2 and CPD -28 deg. 2561, bringing the number known in the Galaxy to five. Modeling of the behavior of these spectral features can be expected to better define the physical parameters of both normal and peculiar objects, as well as the atomic physics involved.

  10. Predicting the stellar and non-equilibrium dust emission spectra of high-resolution simulated galaxies with DART-RAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natale, Giovanni; Popescu, Cristina C.; Tuffs, Richard. J.; Debattista, Victor P.; Fischera, Jörg; Grootes, Meiert W.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the calculation of the stochastically heated dust emission using the 3D ray-tracing dust radiative transfer code DART-RAY, which is designed to solve the dust radiative transfer problem for galaxies with arbitrary geometries. In order to reduce the time required to derive the non-equilibrium dust emission spectra from each volume element within a model, we implemented an adaptive spectral energy distribution library approach, which we tested for the case of axisymmetric galaxy geometries. To show the capabilities of the code, we applied DART-RAY to a high-resolution N-body+SPH galaxy simulation to predict the appearance of the simulated galaxy at a set of wavelengths from the UV to the sub-mm. We analyse the results to determine the effect of dust on the observed radial and vertical profiles of the stellar emission as well as on the attenuation and scattering of light from the constituent stellar populations. We also quantify the proportion of dust re-radiated stellar light powered by young and old stellar populations, both bolometrically and as a function of infrared wavelength.

  11. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-11-15

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd{sup 3+} lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho{sup 3+} was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+} was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar{sup +} laser, Kr{sup +} laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  12. Analysis of the emission line spectra of a solar flare observed from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C.-C.

    1978-01-01

    Skylab observations in the EUV spectra made with the NRL split spectrograph during the Sept. 5, 1973 flare have revealed that chromospheric and transition zone lines were enhanced, especially the allowed lines. Greatest enhancement was noted in the Ni II and P II lines (by a factor of 800). The chromospheric lines maintain their sharp and Gaussian profiles and are not appreciably broadened. The transition zone lines, however, show a red shifted component during the initial phase of the flare. Turbulent downward mass motions are observed, probably due to the imbalance between hot flare plasma (13 x 10 to the 6th K) and cooler plasma (10 to the 5th K). High density is recorded in the transition zone, whose thickness, therefore, is deduced to be small.

  13. Nickel Lα spectra measured by a high resolution particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, T.; Mogi, M.; Jun, Kawai; Maeda, K.; Sasa, Y.; Uda, M.

    1993-04-01

    The satellite spectra of Ni Lα X-rays induced by 21.0 MeV/amu N 2+ ion bombardment were measured using a high-resolution soft X-ray spectrometer which was specially designed for the chemical state analysis by PIXE. We succeeded in observing two distinguished satellite lines, whose energies were estimated by the use of a relativistic self-consistent field program. Relative intensities of the satellites observed here were also well reproduced by theoretical values estimated from the semiclassical approximation after correcting the X-ray selfabsorption. The satellites were confirmed to originate from the multiply ionized states with one L 3 and n M electron vacancies.

  14. Modeling of Emission Spectra for Molecular Rings - LH2 And LH4 Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horák, Milan; Hĕrman, Pavel; Zapletal, David

    Computer simulation of steady state fluorescence spectra of the ring molecular systems (resembling, e.g. the light harvesting rings from LH2 and LH4 photosynthetic complexes of purple bacteria) is presented in this paper. The general organization of the LH2 and LH4 complexes is the same: identical subunits are repeated cyclically in such a way that a ring-shaped structure is formed. However, the symmetries of these rings are different: LH2 is usually nonameric but LH4 is octameric. The other difference is the presence of four bacteriochlorophyll molecules per repeating unit in LH4 rather than three ones found in LH2. Transi- tion dipole moments of bacteriochlorophylls in B850 ring of LH2 have nearly tangential orientation whereas in LH4 they are organized in a more radial fashion. The dynamical aspects in ensemble of rings are reflected in optical line shapes of electronic transitions. The observed linewidths reflect the combined influence of different types of static and dynamic disorder. To avoid the broadening of lines due to ensemble averaging one uses the single-molecule spectroscopy technique to obtain a fluorescence-excitation spectrum. For our simulations we have used the ring of tightly bound two-level systems. Static disorder is taken into account simultaneously with dynamic disorder in Markovian approximation. The cumulant-expansion method of Mukamel et al. is used for the calculation of spectral responses of the system with exciton-phonon coupling. Comparison of steady state fluorescence spectra for B850 ring from LH2 and LH4 ring is done.

  15. Complex X-ray Absorption and the Fe K(alpha) Profile in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; George, I. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Botorff, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We present data from simultaneous Chandra, XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken during 2001 April and November. We have investigated the nature of the very flat observed X-ray spectrum. Chandra grating data show the presence of X-ray absorption lines, revealing two distinct components of the absorbing gas, one which is consistent with our previous model of the UV/X-ray absorber while the other, which is outflowing at a velocity of approximately 1100 kilometers per second, has a larger column density and is much more highly ionized. The broad-band spectral characteristics of the X-ray continuum observed with XMM during 2001 April, reveal the presence of a third layer of absorption consisting of a very large column (approximately 2.5 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) of highly ionized gas with a covering fraction approximately 50%. This low covering fraction suggests that the absorber lies within a few 1t-days of the X-ray source and/or is filamentary in structure. Interestingly, these absorbers are not in thermal equilibrium with one another. The two new components are too highly ionized to be radiatively accelerated, which we suggest is evidence for a hydromagnetic origin for the outflow. Applying our model to the November dataset, we can account for the spectral variability primarily by a drop in the ionization states of the absorbers, as expected by the change in the continuum flux. When this complex absorption is accounted for we find the underlying continuum to be typical of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The spectral curvature attributed to the high column absorber, in turn, reduces estimates of the flux and extent of any broad Fe emission line from the accretion disk.

  16. INTENSITY ENHANCEMENT OF O VI ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION LINES IN SOLAR SPECTRA DUE TO OPACITY

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, F. P.; Mathioudakis, M.; Doyle, J. G.; Madjarska, M. S.; Rose, S. J.; Bowler, L. A.; Britton, J.; McCrink, L.

    2014-04-01

    Opacity is a property of many plasmas. It is normally expected that if an emission line in a plasma becomes optically thick, then its intensity ratio to that of another transition that remains optically thin should decrease. However, radiative transfer calculations undertaken both by ourselves and others predict that under certain conditions the intensity ratio of an optically thick to an optically thin line can show an increase over the optically thin value, indicating an enhancement in the former. These conditions include the geometry of the emitting plasma and its orientation to the observer. A similar effect can take place between lines of differing optical depths. While previous observational studies have focused on stellar point sources, here we investigate the spatially resolved solar atmosphere using measurements of the I(1032 Å)/I(1038 Å) intensity ratio of O VI in several regions obtained with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite. We find several I(1032 Å)/I(1038 Å) ratios observed on the disk to be significantly larger than the optically thin value of 2.0, providing the first detection (to our knowledge) of intensity enhancement in the ratio arising from opacity effects in the solar atmosphere. The agreement between observation and theory is excellent and confirms that the O VI emission originates from a slab-like geometry in the solar atmosphere, rather than from cylindrical structures.

  17. Interpreting the ionization sequence in star-forming galaxy emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.; Allen, James T.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ferland, Gary J.; Crider, Anthony; Meskhidze, Helen

    2016-05-01

    High-ionization star-forming (SF) galaxies are easily identified with strong emission-line techniques such as the BPT diagram, and form an obvious ionization sequence on such diagrams. We use a locally optimally emitting cloud model to fit emission-line ratios that constrain the excitation mechanism, spectral energy distribution, abundances and physical conditions along the star formation ionization sequence. Our analysis takes advantage of the identification of a sample of pure SF galaxies, to define the ionization sequence, via mean field independent component analysis. Previous work has suggested that the major parameter controlling the ionization level in SF galaxies is the metallicity. Here we show that the observed SF sequence could alternatively be interpreted primarily as a sequence in the distribution of the ionizing flux incident on gas spread throughout a galaxy. Metallicity variations remain necessary to model the SF sequence, however, our best models indicate that galaxies with the highest and lowest observed ionization levels (outside the range -0.37 < log [O III]/Hβ <-0.09) require the variation of an additional physical parameter other than metallicity, which we determine to be the distribution of ionizing flux in the galaxy.

  18. Demonstration of Successful X-ray Thomson Scattering Using Picosecond K-(alpha) X-ray Sources for the Characterization of Dense Heated Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Doeppner, T; Falcone, R; Glenzer, S; Morse, E C

    2008-05-05

    We discuss the first successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering experiment from solid density plasmas for use as a diagnostic in determining the temperature, density, and ionization state of warm dense matter with picosecond resolution. The development of this source as a diagnostic and stringent requirements for successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering are addressed. Data for the experimental techniques described in this paper [1] suggest the capability of single shot characterization of warm dense matter and the ability to use this scattering source at future Free Electron Lasers (FEL) where comparable scattering signal levels are predicted.

  19. Theoretical emission line ratios for [Fe III] and [Fe VII] applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Francis P.; Aller, Lawrence H.; Ryans, Robert S. I.; Hyung, Siek

    2001-01-01

    Recent calculations of electron impact excitation rates and Einstein A-coefficients for transitions among the 3d6 levels of Fe III and among the 3d2 levels of Fe VII are used to derive theoretical emission line ratios applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae. Results for [Fe III] are generated for electron temperatures Te = 7,000–20,000 K and densities Ne = 102-108 cm−3, whereas those for [Fe VII] are provided for Te = 10,000–30,000 K and Ne = 102-108 cm−3. The theoretical line ratios are significantly different in some instances from earlier calculations and resolve discrepancies between theory and observation found for the planetary nebulae IC 4997 and NGC 7027. PMID:11493676

  20. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; Van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment to measure photoemission with the predictions of three different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. The Monte Carlo codes TIGER and TIGERP can calculate the net photon-induced electron emission but accurate results may require that statistical error be minimized. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. The authors find that all of the codes substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. However, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, the codes overpredict relative to measurements.

  1. Fourier Transform Emission Spectra of the (000)-(000) Band of the λ4051.6 Band of C3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabashi, A.; Hirao, T.; Amano, T.; Bernath, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    The (000)-(000) band of the 4051.6 Å group (A˜1Πu-X˜1Σ+g) of C3 was recorded in emission with a Bruker IFS 120HR Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer at the University of Waterloo. The band was excited by a microwave discharge in isopropanol (less than a few mtorr) diluted in helium (2 torr). Our new FT data provide more reliable and accurately calibrated transition wavenumbers than those from the grating spectra given by Gausset and coworkers. Analysis of our new spectrum combined with the data by McCall and coworkers confirmed that the lower J levels in the A˜ state were strongly perturbed, as reported by Gausset and coworkers. The unidentified lines observed by McCall and coworkers could be attributed to extra transitions to an unknown perturbing state.

  2. Neutron Emission Spectra from Inelastic Scattering on 58,60Ni with a White Neutron Source at FIGARO.

    SciTech Connect

    Rochman, D.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Grimes, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron emission spectra from inelastic neutron scattering on natural nickel at the FIGARO facility have been measured by a double time-of-flight technique. The incident neutrons are produced from the spallation source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility, and their energies are determined by time of flight. The emitted neutrons and gamma rays are detected by 16 liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. The results for incident neutron energies from 2 to 10 MeV are compared with predictions of nuclear model calculations performed with the code EMPIRE-II. Finally, the level density parameters 'a' and '{Delta}E' are extracted.

  3. Ultraviolet emission lines of Si II in cool star and solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Sibasish; Keenan, Francis P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Ramsbottom, Catherine A.; Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Ayres, Thomas R.; Chatzikos, Marios; van Hoof, Peter A. M.; Williams, Robin J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent atomic physics calculations for Si II are employed within the CLOUDY modelling code to analyse Hubble Space Telescope (HST) STIS ultraviolet spectra of three cool stars, β Geminorum, α Centauri A and B, as well as previously published HST/GHRS observations of α Tau, plus solar quiet Sun data from the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph. Discrepancies found previously between theory and observation for line intensity ratios involving the 3s23p 2PJ-3s3p2 4P_{J^' }} intercombination multiplet of Si II at ˜ 2335 Å are significantly reduced, as are those for ratios containing the 3s23p 2PJ-3s3p2 2D_{J^' }} transitions at ˜1816 Å. This is primarily due to the effect of the new Si II transition probabilities. However, these atomic data are not only very different from previous calculations, but also show large disagreements with measurements, specifically those of Calamai et al. for the intercombination lines. New measurements of transition probabilities for Si II are hence urgently required to confirm (or otherwise) the accuracy of the recently calculated values. If the new calculations are confirmed, then a long-standing discrepancy between theory and observation will have finally been resolved. However, if the older measurements are found to be correct, then the agreement between theory and observation is simply a coincidence and the existing discrepancies remain.

  4. Absorption and Emission Spectra of a Flexible Dye in Solution: a Computational Time-Dependent Approach

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Susanna; Prampolini, Giacomo; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the organic chromophore 4-naphthoyloxy-1-methoxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (NfO-TEMPO-Me) in toluene solution are explored through an integrated computational strategy combining a classical dynamic sampling with a quantum mechanical description within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach. The atomistic simulations are based on an accurately parametrized force field, specifically designed to represent the conformational behavior of the molecule in its ground and bright excited states, whereas TDDFT calculations are performed through a selected combination of hybrid functionals and basis sets to obtain optical spectra closely matching the experimental findings. Solvent effects, crucial to obtain good accuracy, are taken into account through explicit molecules and polarizable continuum descriptions. Although, in the case of toluene, specific solvation is not fundamental, the detailed conformational sampling in solution has confirmed the importance of a dynamic description of the molecular geometry for a reliable description of the photophysical properties of the dye. The agreement between theoretical and experimental data is established and a robust protocol for the prediction of the optical behaviour of flexible fluorophores in solution is set. PMID:26504457

  5. Emission line spectra of S VII ? S XIV in the 20 ? 75 ? wavelength region

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P; Behar, E; Kahn, S M

    2004-08-06

    As part of a larger project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II, the authors present observations of sulfur lines in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet regions. The database includes wavelength measurements with standard errors, relative intensities, and line assignments for 127 transitions of S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 {angstrom}. The experimental data are complemented with a full set of calculations using the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC). A comparison of the laboratory data with Chandra measurements of Procyon allows them to identify S VII-S XI lines.

  6. Thermal Emission Spectra of Silica-coated Basalt and Considerations for Martian Surface Mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Michalski, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Among the most important discoveries made during the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission was that the rocky materials of Mars are broadly divisible into two distinct rock types. The geological significance of this finding is dependent on the mineralogy of these rock types as well as their geographic and stratigraphic positions. Much work has yet to be done to understand these relationships and the small-scale variability of these units. For now, it is worth considering various scenarios that could have resulted in Mars global-scale mineralogical dichotomy. Such work will make clearer what must be looked for in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (THEMIS) data, what to test with other data sets, and what geological processes can be considered or ruled out as we advance with interpreting Martian geologic history. Here, we suggest that exogenic coatings of secondary silica on basaltic rocks may provide a plausible explanation for the newly discovered distribution of rock types.

  7. Anomalous Series of Bands in the Edge Emission Spectra of CdS(О)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, N. K.; Kanakhin, A. A.; Galstyan, V. G.; Shnitnikov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    The region of the edge emission spectrum of CdS(O) single crystals with cadmium excess is examined. An anomalous series of equidistant bands with leading line at 514 nm and phonon replicas has been revealed. These bands grow in intensity with increase of the excitation density up to 1026-1027 cm-3ṡs-1 at 80 K, and the leading line of the series is observed even at 300 K. It is shown that luminescence is conditioned by the exciton spectrum in perfect bulk single-crystals of CdO. Some characteristics of this spectrum are presented, in particular, the dependence on temperature, excitation intensity, composition and size of the crystals, and the LO interaction. The results experimentally confirm the theoretically calculated magnitude of the direct band gap of CdO.

  8. Ion temperatures in HIP-1 and SUMMA from charge-exchange neutral optical emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures were obtained from observations of the H sub alpha, D sub alpha, and He 587.6 nm lines emitted from hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas in the SUMMA and HIP-1 mirror devices at Lewis Research Center. Steady state discharges were formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical or annular anodes and hollow cathodes located at the peaks of the mirrors. The ion temperatures were found from the Doppler broadening of the charge-exchange components of spectral lines. A statistical method was developed for obtaining scaling relations of ion temperature as a function of current, voltage, and magnetic flux density. Derivations are given that take into account triangular monochromator slit functions, loss cones, and superimposed charge-exchange processes. In addition, the Doppler broadening was found to be sensitive to the influence of drift on charge-exchange cross section. The effects of finite ion-cyclotron radius, cascading, and delayed emission are reviewed.

  9. The Evolving Structure of AG Pegasi, Emerging from the Interpretation of the Emission Spectra at Different Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, Marcella

    1997-07-01

    A model of AG Peg is presented, focusing on the physical conditions in the emission nebulae. The model accounts in a consistent way for photoionization by the star and ionization by shocks. The SUMA code is used in the calculations of the spectra. We show that two regions contribute to the UV and optical line spectra. The broad lines are emitted from photoionized gas surrounding the hot star, while narrow lines are emitted by shocked gas--which is also reached by the ionizing flux from the hot star--near the red giant. At an early phase (φ = 2.33) the emitting region is between the stars but already very close to the red giant. The nebula surrounding the hot star is not exactly symmetric. At a later phase (φ = 7.05) the shock created by ``head-on-back'' collision of the winds propagates outward and slightly accelerates throughout the giant atmosphere characterized by a decreasing slope of the density. The strong shock caused by head-on collision of the winds from the two stars cannot be recognized in the UV-optical line spectrum. The spectral energy distribution of the continuum is well fitted by blackbody emissions from the stars. The fit of the optical-UV observed continuum at the early phase presents some problems connected with the reddening correction of the data. On the other hand, the fit of the data at a later phase is consistent with the parameters deduced by the modeling of the system. The far-IR data are well fitted by reradiation by dust, which could not be recognized without modeling, and indicate a dust-to-gas ratio similar to the Galactic one.

  10. THE LOCAL DUST FOREGROUNDS IN THE MICROWAVE SKY. I. THERMAL EMISSION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Dikarev, Valeri; Preuss, Oliver; Solanki, Sami; Krueger, Harald; Krivov, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    Analyses of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps made by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have revealed anomalies not predicted by the standard inflationary cosmology. In particular, the power of the quadrupole moment of the CMB fluctuations is remarkably low, and the quadrupole and octopole moments are aligned mutually and with the geometry of the solar system. It has been suggested in the literature that microwave sky pollution by an unidentified dust cloud in the vicinity of the solar system may be the cause for these anomalies. In this paper, we simulate the thermal emission by clouds of spherical homogeneous particles of several materials. Spectral constraints from the WMAP multi-wavelength data and earlier infrared observations on the hypothetical dust cloud are used to determine the dust cloud's physical characteristics. In order for its emissivity to demonstrate a flat, CMB-like wavelength dependence over the WMAP wavelengths (3 through 14 mm), and to be invisible in the infrared light, its particles must be macroscopic. Silicate spheres of several millimeters in size and carbonaceous particles an order of magnitude smaller will suffice. According to our estimates of the abundance of such particles in the zodiacal cloud and trans-Neptunian belt, yielding the optical depths of the order of 10{sup -7} for each cloud, the solar system dust can well contribute 10 muK (within an order of magnitude) in the microwaves. This is not only intriguingly close to the magnitude of the anomalies (about 30 muK), but also alarmingly above the presently believed magnitude of systematic biases of the WMAP results (below 5 muK) and, to an even greater degree, of the future missions with higher sensitivities, e.g., Planck.

  11. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y.

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  12. Using violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for crop yield assessment of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Tetteh, Jonathan P.

    2004-07-01

    The use of violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra to monitor the growth of five varieties of cowpea in the University of Cape Coast Botanical Garden is presented. Radiation from a continuous-wave violet laser diode emitting at 396 nm through a fibre is closely incident on in vivo leaves of cowpea to excite chlorophyll fluorescence, which is detected by an integrated spectrometer with CCD readout. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra with peaks at 683 and 731 nm were used for growth monitoring of the cowpea plants over three weeks and analysed using Gaussian spectral functions with curve fitted parameters to determine the peak positions, area under the spectral curve and the intensity ratio F683/F731. The variation in the intensity ratio of the chlorophyll bands showed sensitive changes indicating the photosynthetic activity of the cowpea varieties. A discussion of the fluorescence result as compared to conventional assessment is presented with regard to discrimination between the cowpea varieties in terms of crop yield performance.

  13. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  14. Ly(alpha) emission and absorption features in the spectra of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. L.; Neufeld, David A.

    1994-01-01

    The combined effects of interstellar dust absorption and of scattering by hydrogen atoms may give rise to a Ly(alpha) spectral feature of negative equivalent width, as has been observed in several star-forming galaxies. By considering the transfer of Ly(alpha) line radiation and of neighboring stellar continuum radiation within a dusty galaxy, we find that dust absorption has three effects: (1) it reduces the apparent ultraviolet continuum luminosity at all wavelengths; (2) it preferentially decreases the apparent Ly(alpha) line luminosity from H II regions; and (3) it creates an 'attenuation feature' in the continuum spectrum -- centered at the Ly(alpha) rest frequency -- which occurs because the attenuation of the stellar continuum radiation increases as the Ly(alpha) rest frequency is approached, due to the effects of scattering by hydrogen atoms. For plausible values of the galactic dust content and of the disk thickness, these effects can lead to a negative net Ly(alpha) equivalent width, even for galaxies in which the unattenuated spectrum would show a strong Ly(alpha) emission line.

  15. On Correlations between the Broad Absorption Lines and Adjacent Broad Emission Lines in QSO Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lincoln W.; Turnshek, David A.

    1995-11-01

    We compare the C IV broad absorption line (BAL) and broad emission line (BEL) properties in the sample of 72 BAL QSOs which have been studied by Korista and coworkers. A principal-component analysis and subsequent fits to some of the measured properties are utilized to derive quantitatively, for the first time, some empirical relationships between BAL properties and the adjacent BEL properties. The most interesting result stems from a correlation between the FWHM of the C IV BEL and both (1) the minimum outflow velocity of the generally detached BAL trough and (2) the outflow velocity at minimum BAL intensity. These correlations suggest that at least some type of secondary physical relationship exists between the gases in the BAL and BEL regions. This must be explained by any successful model for these regions. However, we find no correlation between continuum luminosity and BAL properties. This suggests that radiation pressure may not be a dominant force in driving the outflowing BAL region clouds.

  16. Simultaneous physical retrieval of Martian geophysical parameters using Thermal Emission Spectrometer spectra: the φ-MARS algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Fonti, Sergio; Mancarella, Francesca; Roush, Ted L

    2015-03-20

    In this paper, we present a new methodology for the simultaneous retrieval of surface and atmospheric parameters of Mars. The methodology is essentially based on similar codes implemented for high-resolution instruments looking at Earth, supported by a statistical retrieval procedure used to initialize the physical retrieval algorithm with a reliable first guess of the atmospheric parameters. The methodology has been customized for the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), which is a low-resolution interferometer. However, with minor changes to the forward and inverse modules, it is applicable to any instrument looking at Mars, and with particular effectiveness to high-resolution instruments. The forward module is a monochromatic radiative transfer model with the capability to calculate analytical Jacobians of any desired geophysical parameter. In the present work, we describe the general methodology and its application to a large sample of TES spectra. Results are drawn for the case of surface temperature and emissivity, atmospheric temperature profile, water vapor, and dust and ice mixing ratios. Comparison with climate models and other TES data analyses show very good agreement and consistency. PMID:25968519

  17. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX in normal and tumoral tissue of the human bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrer, Martin; Glanzmann, Thomas M.; Mizeret, Jerome C.; Braichotte, Daniel; Wagnieres, Georges A.; van den Bergh, Hubert; Jichlinski, Patrice; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg

    1995-01-01

    In vivo spectrofluorometric analysis represents a tool to obtain information about fluorophore distribution in tissue. Based on a Peltier-cooled CCD we designed a fluorescence excitation and emission spectrograph which allows to obtain tissue spectra endoscopically and in a clinical environment. Clinical studies were performed on patients with positive cytology or tumor recurrence in the urinary bladder. Patients received a 50 ml instillation of 3% ALA solution at pH 5.5 during 3 to 4 hours and underwent a normal white light cystoscopic examination together with light induced fluorescence photodetection at 5 to 8 hours after the beginning of the instillation. Local fluorescence measurements with a single fiber were performed before photodetection. These showed fluorescence ratios between tumor and normal tissue of 1.5 to 20 with the strongest ratios for exophytic papillary tumors. Fluorescence excitation between 380 nm and 450 nm revealed that the higher Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) signal on tumor tissue is accompanied by a decrease of the autofluorescence at the emission wavelength of 500 nm.

  18. Observation and explanation of light-emission spectra from statistically rough Cu, Ag, and Au tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P.; Walmsley, D. G.; Quinn, H. A.; Ferguson, A. J. L.

    1984-09-01

    A detailed description of the experimentally observed light output from statistically rough Al-Al2O3-M (M=Ag,Au,Cu) tunnel junctions is presented. These data include a comprehensive description of the polarization and angular distribution of the light emitted from Al-Al2O3-Au junctions as well as spectra from reverse-biased Al-Al2O3-Ag junctions. It is argued, principally on the grounds of an examination of surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) damping, that the bulk of the output from statistically rough tunnel junctions is due to the fast-SPP mode. The idea of fast-SPP mediation is found, in many respects, to be much more consistent with currently available experimental results than that of slow- (or junction) SPP mediation. Extant theoretical models hold slow-SPP mediation to be the dominant means of visible-regime emission. The view of the emission mechanism presented in this paper suggests that the statistically rough tunnel junction could emit light more efficiently (if the scale of the surface roughness were altered) and that it has potential as a spectroscopic tool.

  19. Investigation of temporal-resolved emission spectra of highly charged Al ions from laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, M. G.; Cao, S. Q.; Sun, D. X.; Min, Q.; Dong, C. Z.

    2016-03-01

    Temporal evolution of extreme ultraviolet emission from laser-produced aluminum (Al) plasma has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. Al plasmas have been measured by using the temporal-spatially resolved laser-produced plasma technique. The emission lines can be identified from 2p-3s, 3d, 4s, 4d, 5d transition lines from Al3+ to Al6+ ions. In order to quickly diagnose the plasma, the assumptions of a normalized Boltzmann distribution among the excited states and a steady-state collisional-radiative model are used to estimate the values of electron temperature and electron density in plasma. We succeeded in reproducing the simulated spectra related to the different time delays, which are in good agreement with experiments. Temporal evolution behavior of highly charged Al ions in plasma has been analyzed, and the exponential decay about electron temperature and electron density has been obtained. The results indicate that the temporal-spatially resolved measurement is essential for accurate understanding of evolution behavior of highly charged ions in laser-produced plasmas.

  20. Tentative identification of pyrene as a polycyclic aromatic molecule in UV spectra of comet P/Halley: An emission from 368 to 384 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clairemidi, J.; Bréchignac, P.; Moreels, G.; Pautet, D.

    2004-07-01

    Emission spectra of comet P/Halley in the 275- 710 nm wavelength range were obtained using a spectrometer mounted on the Vega 2 spacecraft, which encountered the comet on March 9, 1986. The spectra, after the removal of the dust-scattered solar continuum, show the presence of a broad-band emissive feature between 340 and 390 nm with three peaks at 371, 376 and 382 nm. Near the nucleus, the intensity increase illustrates that the molecules responsible for the emission are most likely of the parent type. Our cometary spectra were compared with UV laboratory spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons having 4 benzenoid rings. A laser-induced fluorescence experiment conducted in the laboratory recorded the dispersed emission spectrum of pyrene under jet-cooled conditions. Moreels et al. (Astron. Astrophys. 284 (1994) 643) demonstrated that phenanthrene was a possible candidate for the four bands at 347, 356, 364 and 374 nm. The comparison between the cometary and laboratory spectra suggests the possible presence of another PAH, probably pyrene, in Halley's comet. This new suggestion illustrates the link between cometary and interstellar matter. These observations are coherent with the detection of the cometary IR band at 3.28 μm assigned to an X-CH organic compound.

  1. [Two-temperature diagnostic studies by emission spectra for nonequilibrium Ti-H plasma].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-feng; Lu, Biao; Wu, Chun-lei; Wang, Yi-fu; Wen, Zhong-wei

    2014-12-01

    Using the T-H solid solution made by titanium absorbed hydrogen as the cathode, the Ti-H plasma produced by the pulsed vacuum are ion source was nonequilibrium: it contained both the component of titanium and hydrogen; there existed gradient in the radiaL, the horizontal and the time. As a result, it could not be described by a single temperature. The present paper assumed that the subsystem consisting of electrons and the subsystem consisting of other heavy particles reached equilibrium respectively, meaning that the Ti-H plasma was described by the two temperatures as electron temperature and heavy ion temperature, it was non-equilibrium two-temperature plasma Using Culdberg-Waage dissociation equation to describe the molecular dissociation process in the system, using Saha ionization equation to describe the atomic ionization process, combining plasma's charge quasi-neutral condition and introducing atomic emission spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic method which would not interfere the plasma at the same time; the temperature and the particle number density of the Ti-H plasma were diagnosed. Using MATLAB as a tool, both the titanium atoms and monovalent titanium ions' ionization were considered, and the calculated results showed that with the electtron density determined by the Stark broadening of spectral lines in advance, except the heavy particle temperature and the hydrogen number density, the Ti-H plasma's parameters could be diagnosed fairly accurately; the accuracy of the electron density values had a great effect on the calculation results; if the heavy particle temperature could be determined in advance, the temperature and the particle number density of the Ti-H plasma could be accurately analyzed quantitatively. PMID:25881442

  2. Single Nanoparticle Mass Spectrometry as a High Temperature Kinetics Tool: Sublimation, Oxidation, and Emission Spectra of Hot Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Howder, Collin R; Long, Bryan A; Gerlich, Dieter; Alley, Rex N; Anderson, Scott L

    2015-12-17

    In single nanoparticle mass spectrometry, individual charged nanoparticles (NPs) are trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected optically, allowing their mass, charge, and optical properties to be monitored continuously. Previous experiments of this type probed NPs that were either fluorescent or large enough to detect by light scattering. Alternatively, small NPs can be heated to temperatures where thermally excited emission is strong enough to allow detection, and this approach should provide a new tool for measurements of sublimation and surface reaction kinetics of materials at high temperatures. As an initial test, we report a study of carbon NPs in the 20-50 nm range, heated by 10.6 μm, 532 nm, or 445 nm lasers. The kinetics for sublimation and oxidation of individual carbon NPs were studied, and a model is presented for the factors that control the NP temperature, including laser heating, and cooling by sublimation, buffer gas collisions, and radiation. The estimated NP temperatures were in the 1700-2000 K range, and the NP absorption cross sections ranged from ∼0.8 to 0.2% of the geometric cross sections for 532 nm and 10.6 μm excitation, respectively. Emission spectra of single NPs and small NP ensembles show a feature in the IR that appears to be the high energy tail of the thermal (blackbody-like) emission expected from hot particles but also a discrete feature peaking around 750 nm. Both the IR tail and 750 nm peak are observed for all particles and for both IR and visible laser excitation. No significant difference was observed between graphite and amorphous carbon NPs. PMID:26513667

  3. COS Spectra of High-Redshift AGN: Probing Deep into the Rest-Frame Ionizing Continuum and Broad Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J.

    2013-10-01

    The order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity of COS over previous spectrographs has increased the number of AGN available for far-UV spectroscopy covering the rest-frame EUV. In archival work, we have enlarged our composite spectrum from 22 to 150 AGN, but the maximum redshift is z_max = 1.47. We request COS/G140L observations of 11 bright AGN {z = 1.45 to 2.13} to extend the composite below 400 A and greatly improve the statistics. At these redshifts, the G140L {1105 A setting} covers 1120-2000 A, probing the rest-frame continuum and emission lines down to 360-450 A. We will observe the Lyman continuum {LyC} below the He I edge {504 A} as it approaches the He II Lya break {304 A}. Obtaining 11 well-exposed QSO spectra will greatly increase our knowledge in the EUV beyond the few AGN currently observed in this band. These LyC photons are responsible for ionizing hydrogen, helium, and many metal ions, for ionizing QSO broad emission-line regions {BELR}, and for heating the IGM. Characterizing the AGN spectrum in the far-UV and ionizing EUV is also a crucial ingredient for studies of accretion disk structure and QSO outflows. We will also measure {or limit} the He I continuum edge {504 A} expected in some models of accretion disks, and will identify and characterize the key QSO broad emission lines in the FUV and EUV {Ne II, Ne III, Ne V, Ne VI, Ne VIII, O II, O III, O IV, O V, O VI}. Detecting multiple ions from the same element {Ne and O} will yield more accurate diagnostics of BELR temperatures and metallicities.

  4. A frequent kinase domain mutation that changes the interaction between PI3K[alpha] and the membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelker, Diana; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Zhu, Jiuxiang; Cheong, Ian; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in oncogenes often promote tumorigenesis by changing the conformation of the encoded proteins, thereby altering enzymatic activity. The PIK3CA oncogene, which encodes p110{alpha}, the catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase alpha (PI3K{alpha}), is one of the two most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancers. We report the structure of the most common mutant of p110{alpha} in complex with two interacting domains of its regulatory partner (p85{alpha}), both free and bound to an inhibitor (wortmannin). The N-terminal SH2 (nSH2) domain of p85{alpha} is shown to form a scaffold for the entire enzyme complex, strategically positioned to communicate extrinsic signals from phosphopeptides to three distinct regions of p110{alpha}. Moreover, we found that Arg-1047 points toward the cell membrane, perpendicular to the orientation of His-1047 in the WT enzyme. Surprisingly, two loops of the kinase domain that contact the cell membrane shift conformation in the oncogenic mutant. Biochemical assays revealed that the enzymatic activity of the p110{alpha} His1047Arg mutant is differentially regulated by lipid membrane composition. These structural and biochemical data suggest a previously undescribed mechanism for mutational activation of a kinase that involves perturbation of its interaction with the cellular membrane.

  5. Emission Line Spectra from Fe VII to XVI in the Soft X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kahn, S. M.; Liedahl, D. A.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-10-01

    Stellar coronae are rich emitters of iron radiation in the soft x-ray and EUV. This spectral region has been opened up first by the EUV Explorer and now by the Chandra X-ray Observatory for detailed observations with high resolution. Lines in this region are a valuable diagnostic tool for temperature and density, but accurate analysis and interpretation requires accurate spectral models and data. We have shown in previous laboratory measurements that the line lists available for the low charge states of iron, especially Fe VII through Fe XIII are strikingly incomplete. Many of the lines left out in the line lists are weak, but because there are many of them, a substantial amount of spectral flux (more than 50%) is missing. Incomplete accounting of these lines can have marked consequences when modeling the coronae of cool stars, such as α Cen, both by underestimating the flux of the lowest iron charge states and by incorrect assignments of the base level of those strong lines that sit on top of the flux caused by many unresolved weak lines. We are addressing this problem by using the unique spectroscopic abilities of the Lawrence Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap to compile a catalogue of the relevant line emission in the soft x-ray and EUV region. As part of this catalogue we present here spectra and line lists for Fe VII - Fe XVI between 50-140 Å. Our line lists include wavelengths and line intensities that allow us to estimate the contributions from unresolved lines relative to those of known lines from the same charge state. We also compare these line lists and spectra with the MeKa and CHIANTI models and HULLAC calculations.

  6. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. II. Diagnostic Tools for X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis to the 2 - 10 keV energy region, and in particular to the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe Ka with the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is approx. 800 eV for models with log Epsilon approx. 1.5, and decreases monotonically as Epsilon increases. For lower values of Epsilon the Fe K(alpha) EW decreases to a minimum near log Epsilon approx. 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low ionized, reflection dominated cases, the 2 -10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power-law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L(alpha) lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca x K(alpha) line. In some cases the S xv blends with the He-like Si RRC producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  7. X-ray emission spectra of the plasma produced by an ultrashort laser pulse in cluster targets

    SciTech Connect

    Stenz, C; Bagnoud, V; Blasco, F; Roche, J R; Salin, F; Faenov, A Ya; Skobelev, I Yu; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A

    2000-08-31

    The first observation of x-ray emission spectra of multiply charged ions in the plasma produced by a 35-fs laser pulse with an intensity up to 10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2} in CO{sub 2} and Kr gas jet targets is reported. The emission in the wavelength ranges of the 1snp-1s{sup 2}(n=3-6) transitions of O VII ions and the Ly{sub {alpha}} line of O VIII ions, as well as of the (2s{sub 1/2}2p{sup 6}3p{sub 3/2}){sub 1}-2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {sup 1}S{sub 0} and (2s{sub 1/2}2p{sup 6}3p{sub 1/2}){sub 1}-2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {sup 1}S{sub 0} lines of Ne-like KrXXVII ions testifies that the highly ionised plasma is formed by collision processes in clusters. Modelling the shape of the spectral lines of oxygen ions by including the principal mechanisms of broadening and absorption in optically dense plasmas reveals that the main contribution to the time-integrated intensity is made by the plasma with the parameters N{sub e}=(2-20)x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and T{sub e}=100 - 115 eV. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  8. ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION-LINE CORRELATIONS IN HST/COS SPECTRA OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: SINGLE-EPOCH BLACK HOLE MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Evan M.; Shull, J. Michael E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu

    2013-09-01

    Effective methods of measuring supermassive black hole masses in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are of critical importance to studies of galaxy evolution. While there has been much success in obtaining masses through reverberation mapping, the extensive observing time required by this method has limited the practicality of applying it to large samples at a variety of redshifts. This limitation highlights the need to estimate these masses using single-epoch spectroscopy of ultraviolet (UV) emission lines. We use UV spectra of 44 AGNs from HST/COS, the International Ultraviolet Explorer, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of the C IV {lambda}1549, O VI {lambda}1035, O III] {lambda}1664, He II {lambda}1640, C II {lambda}1335, and Mg II {lambda}2800 emission lines and explore their potential as tracers of the broad-line region and supermassive black hole mass. The higher signal-to-noise ratio and better spectral resolution of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) resolve AGN intrinsic absorption and produce more accurate line widths. From these, we test the viability of mass-scaling relationships based on line widths and luminosities and carry out a principal component analysis based on line luminosities, widths, skewness, and kurtosis. At L{sub 1450} {<=} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, the UV line luminosities correlate well with H{beta}, as does the 1450 A continuum luminosity. We find that C IV, O VI, and Mg II can be used as reasonably accurate estimators of AGN black hole masses, while He II and C II are uncorrelated.

  9. Determination of the texture of arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes from the angular dependence of the X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Okotrub, A. V. Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Gusel'nikov, A. V.; Kudashov, A. G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2008-09-15

    The properties of materials containing carbon nanotubes depend on the degree of alignment and the internal structure of nanotubes. It is shown that the degree of misorientation of carbon nanotubes in samples can be evaluated from the measurements of the angular dependences of the carbon X-ray emission and carbon X-ray absorption spectra. The CK{sub {alpha}} emission and CK X-ray absorption spectra of the array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic thermolysis of a mixture of fullerene and ferrocene are measured. A comparison of the calculated model dependences of the relative intensities of the {pi} and {sigma} bands in the spectra with the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate the degree of misorientation of nanotubes in the sample and their internal texture.

  10. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and QUICKE2 net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment with the predictions of four different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, TIGER and QUICKE2) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. Accurate calculation of net photon-induced electron emission yields at material interfaces using Monte Carlo codes can be particularly difficult if the forward and reverse partial yields are of similar magnitudes. In such a circumstance, the statistical error in the Monte Carlo solution (TIGER or TIGERP) must be kept to a minimum to accurately resolve the difference. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. QUICKE2 evaluates an analytical approximation and is also much less expensive to run than the Monte Carlo codes. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. We find that all of the codes except QUICKE2 substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. Howver, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, all the codes overpredict relative to measurements.

  11. Measurements of the Temperature of Subsonic CO{sub 2} Induction Plasma Flows by Analyzing Their Emission Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bykova, N.G.; Kuznetsova, L.A.

    2004-11-15

    Results are presented from measurements of the temperature characteristics of subsonic CO{sub 2} plasma flows generated by a 100-kW induction plasmatron at the Institute for Problems of Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences. The atomic excitation temperature T{sub a} and the population temperature T{sub e} of the electronic states of C{sub 2} molecules (both averaged over the jet diameter) were measured from the absolute intensities of the atomic spectral lines and the spectrum of C{sub 2} molecules in different generation regimes at gas pressures of 25-140 hPa and anode supply powers of 29-72 kW. The longitudinal and radial profiles of the temperatures were determined for some of these regimes and compared to those obtained from numerical calculations of equilibrium induction plasma flows in the discharge channel. For some generation regimes, the dependences of the averaged (over the line of sight) rotational and vibrational temperatures (T{sub r} and T{sub v} ) on the discharge parameters, as well as the radial profiles of these temperatures, were determined from the best fit of the measured and calculated spectra of C{sub 2} molecules (Swan bands). The self-absorption of molecular emission was observed at sufficiently high temperatures and gas pressures, and its influence on the measured values of the molecular temperatures T{sub e} , T{sub v} , and T{sub r} was examined.

  12. Global stratospheric HOCl distributions retrieved from infrared limb emission spectra recorded by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; HöPfner, M.; Kellmann, S.; Linden, A.; Mengistu Tsidu, Gizaw; Milz, M.; Steck, T.; Stiller, G. P.; Fischer, H.; Funke, B.

    2006-03-01

    Vertical profiles of stratospheric HOCl were retrieved from limb emission spectra recorded by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) aboard the Envisat research satellite. These are the first HOCl measurements with global coverage. The ν2 transitions between 1215.725 and 1275.550 cm-1 were used for inference of the vertical profiles. The maximal volume mixing ratios were found in the tropics at altitudes of ˜35 km (daytime) and ˜37 km (nighttime), with values up to 0.22 ppbv and 0.23 ppbv for zonal mean values at 5° latitude binning. The peak altitude of nonpolar nighttime measurements is on average higher by 2.4 ± 0.3 km compared to nonpolar daytime measurements and higher by 2.2 ± 0.3 km at high latitudes poleward of ±45° compared to respective equatorward latitudes. The diurnal variability is largest at 30°S at 46 km altitude, reaching amplitudes of 0.11 ppbv. In the Antarctic a secondary peak at 23-25 km (0.14 ppbv) was found on 19-24 September 2002, which is attributed to heterogeneous chemistry. An estimated single-profile precision of 0.03-0.08 ppbv could be achieved at an altitude resolution of 9 km in an altitude range between 20 and 50 km. Taking the trend into account, these measurements are reasonably consistent with former far-infrared measurements.

  13. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  14. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  15. Diagnosis of lubricating oil by evaluating cyanide and carbon molecular emission lines in laser induced breakdown spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnasharty, I. Y.; Kassem, A. K.; Sabsabi, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    To prevent engine failure it is essential to change lubricating oil regularly before it loses its protective properties. It is also necessary to monitor the physical and chemical conditions of the oil to reliably determine the optimum oil-change intervals. The present work focuses on studying evolution of the cyanide (CN) and carbon (C 2) molecular spectral emission lines in the laser induced breakdown spectra of lubricating oil as a function of its consumption. The intensities of these molecular bands have been taken as indicator of engine oil degradation at certain mileage. Furthermore, the percentage of decay of CN and C 2 integral intensity values at the corresponding mileage was calculated in order to relate it to the degree of consumption of the motor oil. Such percentage decay of the CN and C 2 integral intensities have been found to increase gradually with increasing mileage which is accompanied with increasing depletion of engine oil. The results of using LIBS technique in the present measurements proved that it is possible to have a direct, straightforward and easy method for prediction of lubricating oil degree of consumption. This may facilitate scheduling the proper time and/or mileage intervals for changing the oil to avoid any possibility of engine failure.

  16. Absolute, time-resolved emission of non-LTE L-shell spectra from Ti-doped aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, C. A.; Feldman, U.; Weaver, J. L.; Seely, J. F.; Constantin, C.; Holland, G.; Lee, R. W.; Chung, H.-K.; Scott, H. A.

    2006-05-01

    Outstanding discrepancies between data and calculations of laser-produced plasmas in recombination have been observed since the 1980s. Although improvements in hydrodynamic modeling may reduce the discrepancies, there are indications that non-LTE atomic kinetics may be the dominant cause. Experiments to investigate non-LTE effects were recently performed at the NIKE KrF laser on low-density Ti-doped aerogels. The laser irradiated a 2 mm diameter, cylindrical sample of various lengths with a 4-ns square pulse to create a volumetrically heated plasma. Ti L-shell spectra spanning a range of 0.47 3 keV were obtained with a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. The diagnostic can be configured to provide 1-dimensional spatial resolution at a single photon energy, or 18 discrete energies with a resolving power, λ/δλ of 3 20. The data are examined and compared to calculations to develop absolute emission measurements that can provide new tests of the non-LTE physics.

  17. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-time Spectra of a Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; De Cia, A.; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83-148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ˜1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ˜ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70-220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ˜ 1051 erg, Ekin ˜ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ˜4500 km s-1 and a ˜300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ˜2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ˜4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95-150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ˜15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  18. Spectral and spatial resolution of the 12.8 micron Ne 2 emission from the galactic center. [astronomical spectroscopy/emission spectra, radio sources (astronomy)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollman, E. R.; Geballe, T. R.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Rank, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of the Ne II 12.8 micron fine-structure line in emission from the galactic center cloud Sgr A West show a line-center LSR radial velocity of + 75 + or - 20 km/sec. and a velocity dispersion of about 200 km/sec. The line has been observed with spectral resolution as high as 0.10/cm and spatial resolution as high as 8 sec. This appears to provide a direct measurement of conditions in the 45 sec. ionized region at the galactic center. The radial velocity and dispersion are more-or-less independent of position and indicate that events as recent as the last 4 million years have given the ionized gas a systematic motion with respect to the massive stellar component of material at the galactic center. An upper limit for the mass approximately equal to four million times the solar mass was obtained from the velocity distribution, with the mass located within 0.8 parsecs of the galactic center.

  19. X-Ray Emission Spectra and Electronic Structures of Red Phosphorus, 3d Transition-Metal Phosphides and III V Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1995-07-01

    The P Kβ emission spectra in fluorescence from red amorphous phosphorus, 3d transition-metal phosphides TiP, CrP, FeP, Fe2P, Fe3P, CoP, Co2P, Ni5P4, Ni2P, Ni3P, Cu3P, ZnP2 (black) and Zn3P2, and the semiconducting phosphides of the III-V type, BP, AlP, GaP and InP are measured with a high-resolution two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with Ge(111) crystals. The influence of the metal atoms appears distinctly on the P Kβ fluorescence emission spectra. The measured spectra are compared with available X-ray emission and XPS valence-band spectra and theoretical energy-band calculations on a common energy scale. It is shown that considerable p-d, s mixing occurs in the valence bands of the 3d transition-metal phosphides and the P 3p states mix fairly with the P 3s states in the valence bands of red phosphorus, Gap and InP

  20. The ‘Excess’ Emission from the Warm Surface Adjacent to Active Fissures on Enceladus from Combined VIMS and CIRS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Howell, Robert R.

    2015-11-01

    The exciting discovery of thermal emission from the tiger stripe fissures at the S. pole of Enceladus is a major highlight of the Cassini mission. Both VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) detect the thermal ‘blackbody’ spectrum emitted from the warm fissure areas. The VIMS instrument is uniquely suited to measuring the hottest active locations because VIMS covers the 3 to 5 micron wavelength range where the rising edge of the Planck function for these T~200 K areas dominates the emission spectrum. At longer wavelengths, the spectrum is more complicated because contributions from small hot areas and larger cooler areas combine to form the broad emission spectrum that is detected by the CIRS instrument at wavelengths >6.7 microns. It is the combination of VIMS and CIRS spectra that paint a more complete portrait of the fissure heat transfer processes. Using spectra that span both the VIMS and CIRS wavelengths places a stronger constraint on the T distribution near the fissures than consideration of the spectra from either instrument alone.We show that when the best (= highest spatial resolution, 800 m/pixel and smaller) VIMS and CIRS spectra of the fissure thermal emission are considered together, there is a large (up to 400%) component of ‘excess’ emission spanning 7 to 17 microns that requires explanation. New analysis of ~2 km spatial resolution VIMS spectra of the Damascus hot spot on 8/13/2010 are similar to the highest resolution 4/14/2012 VIMS Baghdad spectra, confirming that differences in location or time between the best VIMS and CIRS spectra do not explain away the excess. The obvious interpretation is that there are processes that transfer heat from the fissure eruption to the surface within 400 m of the fissure center in addition to heat conduction through the fissure walls. Candidate heat transfer processes include fallback of large warm low velocity ice particles from the edges of the plume, and condensation of the low velocity component of water vapor expanding outward from the edge of the plume.This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technolgy, Pasadena, CA.

  1. Sky spectra at a light-polluted site and the use of atomic and OH sky emission lines for wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.; Martel, Andre

    1992-01-01

    Spectra of the night sky show the great increase of light pollution by sodium high- and low-pressure lamps in comparison with previous spectra taken in 1975. The usefulness of the emission lines of the night-sky spectrum for wavelength calibration is mentioned. In the far-red and near-infrared regions, where there are only few atomic night-sky lines, the OH vibration-rotation spectrum can be used for this purpose. Accurate rest wavelengths for these lines, calculated from the best laboratory determinations, are tabulated, and the special suitability of the P1 (and to a lesser extent P2) lines is discussed.

  2. The Broad Iron K-alpha line of Cygnus X-1 as Seen by XMM-Newton in the EPIC-pn Modified Timing Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duro, Refiz; Dauser, Thomas; Wilms, Jorn; Pottschmidt, Katja; Nowak, Michael A.; Fritz, Sonja; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Kirsch, Marcus G. F.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Staubert, Rudiger

    2011-01-01

    We present the analysis of the broadened, flourescent iron K(alpha) line in simultaneous XMM-Newton and RXTE data from the black hole Cygnus X-I. The XMM-Newton data were taken in a modified version of the Timing Mode of the EPIC-pn camera. In this mode the lower energy threshold of the instrument is increased to 2.8 keV to avoid telemetry drop outs due to the brightness of the source, while at the same time preserving the signal to noise ratio in the Fe K(alpha) band. We find that the best-fit spectrum consists of the sum of an exponentially cut-off power-law and relativistically smeared, ionized reflection. The shape of the broadened Fe K(alpha) feature is due to strong Compton broadening combined with relativistic broadening. Assuming a standard, thin accretion disk, the black hole is close to maximally rotating. Key words. X-rays: binaries - black hole physics - gravitation

  3. Discovery of Rubidium, Cadmium, and Germanium Emission Lines in the Near-infrared Spectra of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, N. C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Kaplan, Kyle F.; Bautista, Manuel A.

    2016-03-01

    We identify [Rb iv] 1.5973 and [Cd iv] 1.7204 μm emission lines in high-resolution (R = 40,000) near-infrared spectra of the planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 7027 and IC 5117, obtained with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. We also identify [Ge vi] 2.1930 μm in NGC 7027. Alternate identifications for these features are ruled out based on the absence of other multiplet members and/or transitions with the same upper levels. Ge, Rb, and Cd can be enriched in PNe by s-process nucleosynthesis during the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution. To determine ionic abundances, we calculate [Rb iv] collision strengths and use approximations for those of [Cd iv] and [Ge vi]. Our identification of [Rb iv] 1.5973 μm is supported by the agreement between Rb3+/H+ abundances found from this line and the 5759.55 Å feature in NGC 7027. Elemental Rb, Cd, and Ge abundances are derived with ionization corrections based on similarities in ionization potential ranges between the detected ions and O and Ne ionization states. Our analysis indicates abundances 2-4 times solar for Rb and Cd in both nebulae. Ge is subsolar in NGC 7027, but its abundance is uncertain due to the large and uncertain ionization correction. The general consistency of the measured relative s-process enrichments with predictions from models appropriate for these PNe (2.0-2.5 M⊙, [Fe/H] = -0.37) demonstrates the potential of using PN compositions to test s-process nucleosynthesis models. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  4. Time-resolved emission spectra of 4-dimethylamino-4‧-cyano-stilbene and resveratrol in high viscosity solvents and silica matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiak, Małgorzata; Grobelna, Beata; Synak, Anna; Bojarski, Piotr; Kubicki, Aleksander A.

    2013-11-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra of 4-dimethylamino-4‧-cyano-stilbene (DMACS) and 3,5,4‧-trihydroxy-stilbene (resveratrol, RSV) in propylene glycol and in rigid silica xerogel matrix at 23 °C were studied. For the polar molecule DMACS in propylene glycol, a 66 nm shift of maximum wavelength of emission spectra was observed within 1 ns after excitation, and most of the shift occurred during the first 200 ps. For resveratrol in propylene glycol no such a shift was observed. The rigid silica environment eliminates some deactivation pathways and stabilizes spectroscopic properties of both molecules. Spectral properties of nonpolar and high dipole moment molecules in viscous liquids and rigid environments are compared. Results are explained on the basis of intramolecular processes and solute-solvent relaxation, as well.

  5. Solvent effect on UV/Vis absorption and emission spectra in aqueous solution based on a modified form of solvent reorganization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, HaiSheng; Ming, MeiJun; Zhu, Jun; Ma, JianYi; Li, XiangYuan

    2013-09-01

    In this Letter, novel form of solvatochromic shifts for absorption and emission spectra are proposed. As a typical test, the lowest transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution are investigated. The obtained absorption solvent shift of 0.22 eV is in good agreement with the experimental value of 0.20 eV. In addition, we predict emission solvent shift of -0.16 eV. This value seems more reasonable comparing with the value of -0.12 eV by the traditional theory. The contributions to the shift are discussed and electrostatic polarization components are found to be crucial for electronic spectra of acrolein in water.

  6. The region of a recent burst of star formation in the Irr Galaxy IC10: the emission spectra, structure, and kinematics of ionized and neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, O. V.; Lozinskaya, T. A.; Moiseev, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    We report the preliminary results of investigation of ionized and neutral gas structure, kinematics and emission spectra in the complex of a recent burst of star formation in the Irr Galaxy IC10 based on the observations made with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences using MPFS field spectrograph and SCORPIO focal reducer operating in the Fabry-Perot interferometer mode. From FPI observations in the Hα and [SII](λ6717A˚) lines we estimate the expansion velocities of the two brightest shell-like nebulae HL111 and HL106 and reveal faint high-velocity features in the complex. An analysis of 21-cm line VLA observations of the galaxy allowed us to identify two local HI shells surrounding HL111 and HL106, and estimate their expansion velocities. We briefly discuss the emission spectra and the metallicity of the ionized gas in the galaxy.

  7. Emission spectra of the cations of 1,3- and 1,4-dibromotetrafluorobenzene and of 1,3,5-tribromotrifluorobenzene in the gaseous phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, John Paul; Marthaler, O.; Mohraz, Manijeh; Shiley, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A search was made for radiative decay of electronically excited cations of 24 bromobenzenes and of their fluoro-substituted derivatives in the gaseous phase. The only emission spectra detected were for the cations of 1,3- and 1,4-dibromotetrafluorobenzene and of 1,3,5-tribromotrifluorobenzene. The band systems, which are found between 670 and 830 nm, are assigned to the B(??-1) ??? A(??-1), X(??-1) electronic transitions of these cations. The assignments are based on the Ne(I) photoelectron spectra which are also presented for some of the studied species. The interpretation for the absence of detectable emission is that the nature of the B cationic states is ??-1, except in the case of 1,3- and 1,4-dibromobenzene cations for which B states are still formed by ??-1 processes. Possible reasons for these observations are discussed. The symmetries of the lowest three electronic states of the studied cations are given. ?? 1980.

  8. Revealing discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts: Line-intensity correlation analysis from laser-induced plasma emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yonghoon; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Han, Song-Hee; Yoo, Jonghyun; Jeong, Sungho

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). For the ten different sea salts from South Korea, China, Japan, France, Mexico and New Zealand, LIBS spectra were recorded in the spectral range between 190 and 1040 nm, identifying the presence of Na, Cl, K, Ca, Mg, Li, Sr, Al, Si, Ti, Fe, C, O, N, and H. Intensity correlation analysis of the observed emission lines provided a valuable insight into the discriminating power of the different elements in the sea salts. The correlation analysis suggests that the elements with independent discrimination power can be categorized into three groups; those that represent dissolved ions in seawater (K, Li, and Mg), those that are associated with calcified particles (Ca and Sr), and those that are present in soils contained in the sea salts (Al, Si, Ti, and Fe). Classification models using a few emission lines selected based on the results from intensity correlation analysis and full broadband LIBS spectra were developed based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and their performances were compared. Our results indicate that effective combination of a few emission lines can provide a dependable model for discriminating the edible sea salts and the performance is not much degraded from that based on the full broadband spectra. This can be rationalized by the intensity correlation results.

  9. Neutron Emission Spectra of 104,105,106,108,110Pd Isotopes for (p,xn) Reactions at 21.6 MeV Proton Incident Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büyükuslu, H.; Kaplan, A.; Tel, E.; Aydin, A.; Yıldırım, G.

    2010-02-01

    Palladium, which is a rare and lustrous silvery-white color from precious metals, plays important role in fusion-fission reactions and different fields of nuclear technology. In addition, it is used for not only cold fusion experiments but also separation of hydrogen isotopes researches for fusion reactors. In this study, neutron-emission spectra produced by (p,xn) reactions for structural fusion material 104,105,106,108,110Pd isotopes have been investigated by a proton beam at 21.6 MeV. Moreover, multiple pre-equilibrium mean free paths constant from internal transition, and the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium level density parameters have been analyzed for some (p,xn) neutron-emission spectra calculated. New evaluated hybrid model and geometry dependent hybrid model, full exciton model and cascade exciton model were used to calculate the pre-equilibrium neutron-emission spectra. For the reaction equilibrium component, Weisskopf-Ewing model calculations were preferred. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data and found agreement with each other.

  10. Impact of temperature field inhomogeneities on the retrieval of atmospheric species from MIPAS IR limb emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, M.; Arnone, E.; Dudhia, A.; Carlotti, M.; Castelli, E.; von Clarmann, T.; Dinelli, B. M.; Kleinert, A.; Linden, A.; Milz, M.; Papandrea, E.; Stiller, G.

    2010-04-01

    We examine volume mixing ratios (vmr) retrieved from limb emission spectra recorded with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). In level 2 (L2) data products of three different retrieval processors, which perform one dimensional (1-D) retrievals, we find significant differences between species' profiles from ascending and descending orbit parts. The relative differences vary systematically with time of the year, latitude, and altitude. In the lower stratosphere their monthly means can reach maxima of 20% for CFC-11, CFC-12, HNO3, H2O, 10% for CH4 and N2O. Relative differences between monthly means of 1-D retrieval results and of the true atmospheric state can be expected to reach half of these percentage values, while relative differences in single vmr profiles might well exceed those numbers. Often there are no physical or chemical reasons for these differences, so they are an indicator for a problem in the data processing. The differences are generally largest at locations where the meridional temperature gradient of the atmosphere is strong. On the contrary, when performing the retrieval with a tomographic two dimensional (2-D) retrieval, L2 products generally do not show these differences. This implies that inhomogeneities in the temperature field, and possibly in the species' fields, which are accounted for in the 2-D algorithm and not in standard 1-D processors, may cause significant deviations in the results. Inclusion of an externally given adequate temperature gradient in the forward model of a 1-D processor helps to reduce the observed differences. However, only the full tomographic approach is suitable to resolve the horizontal inhomogeneities. Implications for the use of the 1-D data, e.g. for validation, are discussed. The dependence of the ascending/descending differences on the observation strategy suggests that this problem is to be expected to affect in general 1-D retrievals of infrared limb sounders, if the line of sight of the instrument has a significant component in the direction of the horizontal temperature variation.

  11. Impact of temperature field inhomogeneities on the retrieval of atmospheric species from MIPAS IR limb emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, M.; Arnone, E.; Dudhia, A.; Carlotti, M.; Castelli, E.; von Clarmann, T.; Dinelli, B. M.; Kleinert, A.; Linden, A.; Milz, M.; Papandrea, E.; Stiller, G.

    2010-10-01

    We examine volume mixing ratios (vmr) retrieved from limb emission spectra recorded with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on board Envisat. In level 2 (L2) data products of three different retrieval processors, which perform one dimensional (1-D) retrievals, we find significant differences between species' profiles from ascending and descending orbit parts. The relative differences vary systematically with time of the year, latitude, and altitude. In the lower stratosphere their monthly means can reach maxima of 20% for CFC-11, CFC-12, HNO3, H2O, 10% for CH4 and N2O. Relative differences between monthly means of 1-D retrieval results and of the true atmospheric state can be expected to reach half of these percentage values, while relative differences in single vmr profiles might well exceed those numbers. Often there are no physical or chemical reasons for these differences, so they are an indicator for a problem in the data processing. The differences are generally largest at locations where the meridional temperature gradient of the atmosphere is strong. On the contrary, when performing the retrieval with a tomographic two dimensional (2-D) retrieval, L2 products generally do not show these differences. This suggests that inhomogeneities in the temperature field, and possibly in the species' fields, which are accounted for in the 2-D algorithm and not in standard 1-D processors, may cause significant deviations in the results. Inclusion of an externally given adequate temperature gradient in the forward model of a 1-D processor helps to reduce the observed differences. However, only the full tomographic 2-D approach is suitable to resolve the horizontal inhomogeneities. Implications for the use of the 1-D data, e.g. for validation, are discussed. The dependence of the ascending/descending differences on the observation strategy suggests that this problem may affect 1-D retrievals of infrared limb sounders, if the line of sight of the instrument has a significant component in the direction of the horizontal temperature variation.

  12. Near-infrared emission-line spectra of the Orion Nebula, NGC 4151, and other Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Osterbrock, D.E.; Shaw, R.A.; Veilleux, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Near-IR CCD moderate-resolution spectra in the 7000-11,000 wavelength range were obtained for NGC 1976 and NGC 4151 in three overlapping segments. The strongest three lines in both objects are forbidden S III 9531, He I 10830, and forbidden S III 9069. Also, lower resolution spectra of 14 additional Seyfert galaxies were obtained. In all but two of these spectra, the strongest line is forbidden S III 9531. The line strengths among these galaxies are compared to trace ionization behavior. 59 refs.

  13. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, Sebastian; Harris, D.E.; Marshall, H.L.; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  14. A time-dependent density-functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field method study of vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin.

    PubMed

    Li, Junfeng; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Cao, Zexing

    2014-07-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations have been used to determine equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies of the ground state and several singlet low-lying excited states of coumarin. Vertical and adiabatic transition energies of S1, S2, and S3 have been estimated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF/PT2. Calculations predict that the dipole-allowed S1 and S3 states have a character of (1)(ππ*), while the dipole-forbidden (1)(nπ*) state is responsible for S2. The vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin have been simulated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF calculations within the Franck-Condon approximation, respectively. The simulated vibronic spectra show good agreement with the experimental observations available, which allow us to reasonably interpret vibronic features in the S0→S1 and S0→S3 absorption and the S0←S1 emission spectra. Based on the calculated results, activity, intensity, and density of the vibronic transitions and their contribution to the experimental spectrum profile have been discussed. PMID:25005288

  15. A time-dependent density-functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field method study of vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Cao, Zexing

    2014-07-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations have been used to determine equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies of the ground state and several singlet low-lying excited states of coumarin. Vertical and adiabatic transition energies of S1, S2, and S3 have been estimated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF/PT2. Calculations predict that the dipole-allowed S1 and S3 states have a character of 1(ππ*), while the dipole-forbidden 1(nπ*) state is responsible for S2. The vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin have been simulated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF calculations within the Franck-Condon approximation, respectively. The simulated vibronic spectra show good agreement with the experimental observations available, which allow us to reasonably interpret vibronic features in the S0→S1 and S0→S3 absorption and the S0←S1 emission spectra. Based on the calculated results, activity, intensity, and density of the vibronic transitions and their contribution to the experimental spectrum profile have been discussed.

  16. Simultaneous X-ray and Far-Ultraviolet Spectra of AGN with ASCA and HUT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.

    1997-01-01

    We obtained ASCA spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516 in March 1995. Simultaneous far-UV observations were obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope on the Astro-2 shuttle mission. The ASCA spectrum shows a lightly absorbed power law of energy index 0.78. The low energy absorbing column is significantly less than previously seen. Prominent 0 VII and 0 VIII absorption edges are visible, but, consistent with the much lower total absorbing column, no Fe K absorption edge is detectable. A weak, narrow Fe K(alpha) emission line from cold material is present as well as a broad Fe K(alpha) line. These features are similar to those reported in other Seyfert 1 galaxies. A single warm absorber model provides only an imperfect description of the low energy absorption. In addition to a highly ionized absorber with ionization parameter U = 1.66 and a total column density of 1.4 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm, adding a lower ionization absorber with U = 0.32 and a total column of 6.9 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm significantly improves the fit. The contribution of resonant line scattering to our warm absorber models limits the Doppler parameter to less than 160 km/s at 90% confidence. Turbulence at the sound speed of the photoionized gas provides the best fit. None of the warm absorber models fit to the X-ray spectrum can match the observed equivalent widths of all the UV absorption lines. Accounting for the X-ray and UV absorption simultaneously requires an absorbing region with a broad range of ionization parameters and column densities.

  17. The Early X-ray Emission From V382 Velorum (=Nove Vel 1999): An Internal Shock Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Koji; Ishida, Manabu

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of ASCA and RXTE observations of the early X-ray emission from the classical nova V382 Velorum. Its ASCA spectrum was hard (kT approximately 10 KeV) with a strong (10(exp 13)/sq cm) intrinsic absorption. In the subsequent RXTE data, the spectra became softer both due to a declining temperature and a diminishing column. We argue that this places the X-ray emission interior to the outermost ejecta produced by V382 Vel in 1999, and therefore must have been the result of a shock internal to the nova ejecta. The weakness of the Fe K.alpha lines probably indicates that the X-ray emitting plasmas are not in ionization equilibrium.

  18. High-resolution Electron-impact Emission Spectra and Vibrational Emission Cross Sections from 330-1100 nm for N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangina, Rao S.; Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Electron-impact emission cross sections for N2 were measured in the wavelength range of 330-1100 nm at 25 eV and 100 eV impact energies. Cross sections of several molecular emission bands of the first positive band system B 3Π g +(ν') → A 3Σ g +(ν'') and the second positive band system C 3Π u (ν') → B 3Π g (ν'') of N2, the first negative band (1NB) system B 2Σ u +(ν') → X 2Σ g +(ν'') and Meinel band system A 2Π u (ν') → X 2Σ g +(ν'') of N2 + ions as well as line emissions of N (N I) and N+ (N II) in the visible-optical-near-IR wavelength range reported in this work were measured for the first time in a single experimental setup at high spectral resolving power (λ/Δλ ≈ 10000) under single-collision-scattering geometry and optically thin conditions. Rotational emission lines of N2 and N2 + were observed for strong emission bands at a gas temperature of about 300 K. The absolute cross section of the strongest (0,0) vibrational band at 391.43 nm of 1NB was determined using the standard Hα emission cross sections of H2 by electron impact at both 25 eV and 100 eV electron-impact energies, and the cross sections for the remainder of the emissions were determined using (0,0) 1NB value. A comparison of the present emission cross sections with the earlier published data from both electron energy loss and electron-impact-induced fluorescence emission is discussed.

  19. Log-parabolic spectra and particle acceleration in blazars. III. SSC emission in the TeV band from Mkn501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Tramacere, A.; Perri, M.; Giommi, P.; Tosti, G.

    2006-03-01

    Curved broad-band spectral distributions of non-thermal sources like blazars are described well by a log-parabolic law where the second degree term measures the curvature. Log-parabolic energy spectra can be obtained for relativistic electrons by means of a statistical acceleration mechanism whose probability of acceleration depends on energy. In this paper we compute the spectra radiated by an electron population via synchrotron and Synchro-Self Compton processes to derive the relations between the log-parabolic parameters. These spectra were obtained by means of an accurate numerical code that takes the proper spectral distributions for single particle emission into account. We found that the ratio between the curvature parameters of the synchrotron spectrum to that of the electrons is equal to ~0.2 instead of 0.25, the value foreseen in the δ-approximation. Inverse Compton spectra are also intrinsically curved and can be approximated by a log-parabola only in limited ranges. The curvature parameter, estimated around the SED peak, may vary from a lower value than that of the synchrotron spectrum up to that of emitting electrons depending on whether the scattering is in the Thomson or in the Klein-Nishina regime. We applied this analysis to computing the synchro-self Compton emission from the BL Lac object Mkn 501 during the large flare of April 1997. We fit simultaneous BeppoSAX and CAT data and reproduced intensities and spectral curvatures of both components with good accuracy. The large curvature observed in the TeV range was found to be mainly intrinsic, and therefore did not require a large pair production absorption against the extragalactic background. We regard this finding as an indication that the Universe is more transparent at these energies than previously assumed by several models found in the literature. This conclusion is supported by recent detection of two relatively high redshift blazars with HESS.

  20. Mixing effect in the NH3 absorption and MIR emission spectra pumped by a continuously tunable CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, S.; Simili, R.; Giorgi, M.

    1993-07-01

    By tuning a high pressure CO2 laser (HPL) around strong ammonia lines nearly coincident with CO2 lines an off-resonant absorption is observed which can be confirmed by the superfluorescent MIR emission. This effect is related to a two-frequency nu1, nu3 HPL emission in the regime of moderate pulling. Around a strong absorption line a mixed nu4 = 2nu1 - nu3 frequency is produced that is strongly absorbed.

  1. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  2. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Wen, Jin; Ma, Jing

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changes and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.

  3. Chemical effects of satellites on X-ray emission spectra-III. A theory of the origin of chemical effects for small covalency limits and its application to Cl Kα, spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Jun; Satoko, ChIkatoshi; Gohshi, Yohichi

    A theory is presented to predict the satellite intensity of X-ray fluorescence spectra (XRF) for ionic compounds. The Asada-Sugano theory, which predicts the intensity of shake-up satellites of transition-metal compounds, has been applied to the calculation of shake-off satellite intensity of X-ray emission spectra. Covalency of outer shell is increased due to the creation of an inner-shell hole when the resonance condition holds. The spectator hole, which has been produced by shake-off is delocalized through the temporal molecular orbital formed by a resonance of atomic orbitals, thus the satellite intensity becomes weak. The probability of resonant electron transfer through the temporal molecular orbitals has been theoretically formulated by a two-configuration model. Satellite intensities of Cl Kα″ for LiCl, NaCl, KC1, RbCl and CsCl have been numerically calculated with the result that the satellite intensities of RbCl and CsCl have been found to be significantly weaker than those of LiCl, NaCl and KCl. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. This theory is found to be efficient for localized electron systems, which implies a potential for use with PIXE satellites emitted from localized deep-core levels.

  4. Emissions and ambient distributions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) in a ponderosa pine ecosystem: interpretation of PTR-MS mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A.; Tyndall, G.; Orlando, J.; Harley, P.; Rasmussen, R.; Apel, E.

    2010-02-01

    Two proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry systems were deployed at the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08; July to September, 2008) at the Manitou Forest Observatory in a ponderosa pine woodland near Woodland Park, Colorado USA. The two PTR-MS systems simultaneously measured BVOC emissions and ambient distributions of their oxidation products. Here, we present mass spectral analysis in a wide range of masses (m/z 40+ to 210+) to assess our understanding of BVOC emissions and their photochemical processing inside of the forest canopy. The biogenic terpenoids, 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO, 50.2%) and several monoterpenes (MT, 33.5%) were identified as the dominant BVOC emissions from a transmission corrected mass spectrum (PTR-MS), averaged over the daytime (11 a.m. to 3 p.m., local time) of three days. To assess contributions of oxidation products of local BVOC, we calculate an oxidation product spectrum with the OH- and ozone-initiated oxidation product distribution mass spectra of two major BVOC emissions at the ecosystem (MBO and β-pinene) that were observed from laboratory oxidation experiments. The majority (~76%) of the total signal in the transmission corrected PTR-MS spectra could be explained by identified compounds. The remainder are attributed to oxidation products of BVOC emitted from nearby ecosystems and transported to the site, and oxidation products of unidentified BVOC emitted from the ponderosa pine ecosystem.

  5. An analysis of the emission line spectra of AG Pegasi between phases 7.34 and 9.44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, Marcella

    2003-02-01

    The UV and optical spectra from the HST Faint Object Spectrograph and from the Fast Spectrograph for the Tillinghast Telescope (FAST) spectrograph at the Whipple Observatory reported by Kenyon, Proga & Keyes at different phases are analysed, leading to new results about the configuration of AG Pegasi. The FAST spectra contain both Hα and Hβ lines, whose ratio changes with phase indicating that different nebulae contribute to each spectrum. In particular, the spectrum emitted from one of the nebulae must be collision dominated, in order to justify the relatively-high Hα/Hβ. Consistent modelling by the code SUMA, which accounts for the coupled effect of the photoionization from the hot star and the shock, shows the important role of at least three nebulae: (1) the nebula between the stars, downstream of the shock created by collision of the winds, which propagates in reverse towards the white dwarf; (2) the nebula downstream of the shock expanding in the outskirts of the giant atmosphere; and (3) the shock propagating outwards from the binary system, which is not reached by the hot source radiation. The relative contributions of the three nebulae to the final spectra at different phases are calculated for all the lines. It is found that the contribution to the different lines changes with the viewing angle of the system. The relatively-low pre-shock density and magnetic field adopted in the modelling of the expanding shocks reveal that they are merging with the ISM, thus explaining the slow decline of AG Pegasi.

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON-IMPACT EMISSION SPECTRA AND VIBRATIONAL EMISSION CROSS SECTIONS FROM 330-1100 nm FOR N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mangina, Rao S.; Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Electron-impact emission cross sections for N{sub 2} were measured in the wavelength range of 330-1100 nm at 25 eV and 100 eV impact energies. Cross sections of several molecular emission bands of the first positive band system B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} A {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and the second positive band system C {sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} ({nu}'') of N{sub 2}, the first negative band (1NB) system B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and Meinel band system A {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') of N{sub 2} {sup +} ions as well as line emissions of N (N I) and N{sup +} (N II) in the visible-optical-near-IR wavelength range reported in this work were measured for the first time in a single experimental setup at high spectral resolving power ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 10000) under single-collision-scattering geometry and optically thin conditions. Rotational emission lines of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2} {sup +} were observed for strong emission bands at a gas temperature of about 300 K. The absolute cross section of the strongest (0,0) vibrational band at 391.43 nm of 1NB was determined using the standard H{sub {alpha}} emission cross sections of H{sub 2} by electron impact at both 25 eV and 100 eV electron-impact energies, and the cross sections for the remainder of the emissions were determined using (0,0) 1NB value. A comparison of the present emission cross sections with the earlier published data from both electron energy loss and electron-impact-induced fluorescence emission is discussed.

  7. Cassini UVIS Observations of Titan Ultraviolet Airglow Spectra with Laboratory Modeling from Electron- and Proton-Excited N2 Emission Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, J. M.; West, R. A.; Malone, C. P.; Gustin, J.; Esposito, L. W.; McClintock, W. E.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Stevens, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Joseph M. Ajello, Robert A. West, Rao S. Mangina Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 Charles P. Malone Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 & Department of Physics, California State University, Fullerton, CA 92834 Michael H. Stevens Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Jacques Gustin Laboratoire de Physique Atmosphérique et Planétaire, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium A. Ian F. Stewart, Larry W. Esposito, William E. McClintock, Gregory M. Holsclaw Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 E. Todd Bradley Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed photon emissions of Titan's day and night limb-airglow and disk-airglow on multiple occasions, including three eclipse observations from 2009 through 2010. The 77 airglow observations analyzed in this paper show EUV (600-1150 Å) and FUV (1150-1900 Å) atomic multiplet lines and band emissions (lifetimes less than ~100 μs), including the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) band system, arising from photoelectron induced fluorescence and solar photo-fragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N2). The altitude of peak UV emission on the limb of Titan during daylight occurred inside the thermosphere/ionosphere (near 1000 km altitude). However, at night on the limb, the same emission features, but much weaker in intensity, arise in the lower atmosphere below 1000 km (lower thermosphere, mesosphere, haze layer) extending downwards to near the surface at ~300 km, possibly resulting from proton- and/or heavier ion-induced emissions as well as secondary-electron-induced emissions. The eclipse observations are unique. UV emissions were observed during only one of the three eclipse events, and no Vegard-Kaplan (VK) or LBH emissions were seen. Through regression analysis using laboratory spectra, we have analyzed the intensity and identified each spectral feature from the limb or disk emission spectrum. The strongest dipole-allowed transitions of N2 occur in the EUV. The electronic transitions proceed from the X 1Σg+ ground-state to about seven closely spaced (~12-15 eV) Rydberg-valence (RV) states, which are the source of the molecular emissions in the EUV observed by spacecraft and have recently been studied in our laboratory at medium-to-high spectral resolution (delta-λ = 0.1 Å FWHM). Three of these RV states (b 1Πu, b' 1Σu+, and c4' 1Σu+) are highly-perturbed, weakly-to-strongly predissociated, and have significant emission cross sections, which will be summarized in this paper. We will also discuss our recently published proton and electron impact emission cross sections for the LBH (a 1Πg - X 1Σg+) band system of N2, and their significance to the modeling of the day and night FUV spectra of the atmospheres of Earth and Titan.

  8. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Colgan, J.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Abdallah, J.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. K.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  9. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S. B. E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com; Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J.; Faenov, A. Ya. E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C.; Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronic, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien Platz 1, Jena, D-07743 ; and others

    2014-03-15

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  10. Broad excitation spectra and bright reddish-orange emission of transparent phosphate glass excited by sunshine for greenhouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yingdong; Song, Feng; Li, Qiong; Wang, Fengxiao; Ming, Chengguo; Tian, Jianguo

    2014-11-01

    A series of Mn2+/Sm3+ co-doped phosphate glasses have been synthesized by high temperature melting method to investigate reddish-orange emission materials for greenhouses. Experiments show that the Mn2+/Sm3+ co-doped glasses can be effectively excited by a wide spectrum (300-560 nm) and emit bright reddish-orange light. The intense emission bands for the co-doped phosphate glasses are from 590 nm to 660 nm, which exactly locate in the absorption domain of chlorophylls. Bright red-orange light emission is straightly observed by naked eyes when the sample is illuminated by sunlight without focused-lens. These improved luminescent properties show potential application in glass greenhouses.

  11. Validation and comparison of two models based on the Mie theory to predict 8-14 µm emissivity spectra of mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Santos, Vicente; Valor, Enric; Caselles, Vicente; Doña, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    Remote sensing is a powerful tool for studying the planetary regolith surfaces through emission in the thermal infrared region (TIR, 8-14 µm). Theoretical emissivity models are needed to interpret the measured data and eventually to get surface characteristics (such as the refraction index) through model inversion. A new era of orbiting satellites carrying Hyperspectral TIR sensors is coming, and the necessity of understanding the thermal emission of Earth and other planet surfaces at all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum is of prime interest. In this paper we review most of the existing analytical models for predicting the emissivity spectra of minerals for different viewing angles, which are based on the Mie theory, and validated and compared two of them: the Hapke model with two compactness correction methods not tested yet and a model based on the δ-Eddington approximation, which has not been validated for mineral surfaces. The validation was performed using measurements over two samples rich in quartz and gypsum, respectively. The Hapke model showed the best results when compared with the Warren-Wiscombe-Dozier (WWD) model with respect to measured data, showing a RMSE of ±0.04 in emissivity for particle diameter size of a quartz sample greater than 75 µm. This model also showed improvements with regard to results of past published works, after applying to Mie solutions the compactness correction proposed for the WWD model. These results were confirmed for a gypsum sample, a mineral different to the widely used quartz. Finally, the results showed the deficiencies of both models in simulating mineral emissivity around 8.7 µm, probably due to the underestimation of multiple scattering for large values of the imaginary part of the refractive index.

  12. A Bulk Comptonization Model for the Prompt GRB Emission and its Relation to the Fermi GRB Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    We present a model in which the GRB prompt emission at E E(sub peak) is due to bulk Comptonization by the relativistic blast wave motion of either its own synchrotron photons of ambient photons of the stellar configuration that gave birth to the GRB. The bulk Comptonization process then induces the production of relativistic electrons of Lorentz factor equal to that of the blast wave through interactions with its ambient protons. The inverse compton emission of these electrons produces a power law component that extends to multi GeV energies in good agreement with the LAT GRB observations.

  13. The role of optical excitation power on the emission spectra of a strongly coupled quantum dot-micropillar system.

    PubMed

    Münch, S; Reitzenstein, S; Franeck, P; Löffler, A; Heindel, T; Höfling, S; Worschech, L; Forchel, A

    2009-07-20

    A strongly coupled quantum dot-micropillar cavity system is studied under variation of the excitation power. The characteristic double peak spectral shape of the emission with a vacuum Rabi splitting of 85 microeV at low excitation transforms gradually into a single broad emission peak when the excitation power is increased. Modelling the experimental data by a recently published formalism [Laussy et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 083601 (2008)] yields a transition from strong coupling towards weak coupling which is mainly attributed to an excitation power driven decrease of the exciton-photon coupling constant. PMID:19654688

  14. Fluorescent excitation of Fe 2, Mn 2, Ti 2, N 1 lines by V 4, N 5, O 6: Emission lines in the spectra of symbiotic stars and Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilra, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of the published IUE and ground based high resolution spectra of symbiotic stars, particularly RR Tel, shows that the dominant excitation mechanism of Fe II, Mn II, Ti II, and N I lines is the selective fluorescent excitation of some levels by the strong C IV, N V, and O VI emission lines. The same mechanism should work for the excitation of Fe II lines in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies and Q60's whose emission spectra are quite similar to those of symbiotic stars. The similarities and differences between the fluroescent excitation mechanism reported herein and the Bowen's mechanism is analyzed.

  15. The application and comparison of several chemometric methods of excitation-emission matrix spectra in studying the interactions of metal complexes with DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Wang, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Chen-Jian; Wang, Xiu-Lin

    2007-09-19

    The interactions of fs DNA and two metal complexes [Cu(phen)SO4] x 2 H2O and [Ni(phen)SO4] x 2 H2O were explored by several chemometric methods, including parallel factor (PARAFAC), singular value decomposition-least squares (SVD-LS), and singular value decomposition-nonnegative least squares (SVD-NNLS) of excitation-emission matrix spectra (EEMs). The applications of SVD-LS and SVD-NNLS in this domain have been discussed. Rayleigh scatter part is avoided by ordered zero and reconstructed by linear interpolation. The importance of avoiding Rayleigh scatter has also been discussed. All the three methods do well in qualitative analysis. SVD-LS does best in present small changes of ethidium bromide (EB). In order to get accurate results, PARAFAC and SVD-NNLS can be utilized together in quantitative analysis. All the three chemometric methods indicate that the DNA binding modes of [Cu(phen)SO4] x 2 H2O are hydrogen bond effect and intercalation, while intercalation is the only DNA binding mode for [Ni(phen)SO4] x 2 H2O. These results are verified by the electronic absorption and emission fluorescence spectra. Just like PARAFAC, both SVD-LS and SVD-NNLS are proven to be convenient and convincing in studying the interactions between nucleic acids and complexes. PMID:17870282

  16. Stacking analysis of 12CO and 13CO spectra of NGC 3627: Existence of non-optically thick 12CO emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokuma-Matsui, Kana; Sorai, Kazuo; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Kuno, Nario

    2015-02-01

    We stacked 12CO and 13CO spectra of NGC 3627 after redefining the velocity axis of each spectrum of the mapping data so that the zero corresponds to the local mean velocity of the 12CO spectra. The signal-to-noise ratios of the resulting spectra are improved by a factor of up to 3.2 compared to those obtained with normal stacking analysis. We successfully detect a weak 13CO emission from the interarm region where the emission was not detected in the individual pointings. We compare the integrated intensity ratios I_{^{12}{CO}}/I_{^{13}CO} among six characteristic regions (center, bar, bar-end, offset, arm, and interarm). We find that I_{^{12}{CO}}/I_{^{13}CO} in the bar and interarm are higher than those in the other regions by a factor of ˜ 2 and I_{^{12}{CO}}/I_{^{13}CO} in the center is moderately high. These high I_{^{12}{CO}}/I_{^{13}CO} ratios in the bar and center are attributed to a high intensity ratio (T_{^{12}{CO}}/T_{^{13}CO}), and that in the interarm is attributed to a high ratio of the full width at half maximum of spectra (FWHM_{^{12}{CO}}/FWHM_{^{13}CO}). The difference between FWHM_{^{12}CO} and FWHM_{^{13}CO} of the interarm indicates the existence of two components, one with a narrow line width (˜ FWHM_^{13CO}) and the other with a broad line width (˜ FWHM_^{12CO}). Additionally, the T_{^{12}{CO}}/T_{^{13}CO} ratio in the broad-line-width component of the interarm is higher than the other regions. The high T_{^{12}{CO}}/T_{^{13}CO} in the center and bar and of the broad-line-width component in the interarm suggest the existence of non-optically thick 12CO components. We find that more than half of the 12CO emissions of the interarm are likely to be radiated from the diffuse component. Our result suggests that the use of a universal CO-to-H2 conversion factor might lead to an overestimation of molecular gas mass and underestimation of star-formation efficiency in the interarm by a factor of a few.

  17. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Haight, Robert Cameron; Jandel, Marian; Mosby, Shea Morgan; O'Donnell, John M.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Krticka, Milan

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  18. Prediction of the hydrophilic antioxidant capacity of tomato pastes from the IR and fluorescence excitation-emission spectra of extracts and intact samples.

    PubMed

    Orzel, Joanna; Stanimirova, Ivana; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Boguslawa; Daszykowski, Michal

    2015-06-01

    The performance of the recently proposed excitation-emission fluorescence method was compared to the method using infrared measurements for the evaluation of the antioxidant properties of intact samples and extracts that had been obtained from tomato pastes. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC) was applied in order to estimate the antioxidant capacity of the extracts, while the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent was adopted for the evaluation of the total phenolic content. The optimal extraction conditions for tomato pastes (three minutes of sonication under 80°C) were determined using the central composite design. Chemometric models such as the partial least squares regression and its N-way variant were further constructed in order to predict the antioxidant capacity or total phenolic content of the samples using either the IR or fluorescence spectra. The prediction errors that were obtained for the total antioxidant content were evaluated as the Trolox equivalents from the ORAC assay and were found to be equal to 2.011 (14.21%) for the fluorescence and 2.426 (17.15%) for the IR spectra, respectively. The prediction errors of the total phenolic content expressed as gallic acid equivalents were 0.067 (10.78%) for the fluorescence and 0.033 (5.36%) for the IR spectra, which were used as independent variables in the regression models. PMID:25863373

  19. Site-selective excitation and polarized absorption and emission spectra of trivalent thulium and erbium in strontium fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, J.B.; Wright, A.O.; Seltzer, M.D.; Zandi, B.; Merkle, L.D.; Hutchinson, J.A.; Morrison, C.A.; Allik, T.H.; Chai, B.H.

    1997-05-01

    Polarized fluorescence spectra produced by site-selective excitation and conventional polarized absorption spectra were obtained for Tm{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} ions individually incorporated into single crystals of strontium fluorapatite, Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F. Substitution of the trivalent rare earth ion for divalent strontium was achieved by passive charge compensation during Czochralski growth of the fluorapatite crystals. Spectra were obtained between 1780 and 345 nm at temperatures from 4 K to room temperature on crystals having the hexagonal structure [P6{sub 3}/m(C{sub 6h}{sup 2})]. The polarized fluorescence spectra due to transitions from multiplet manifolds of Tm{sup 3+}(4f{sup 12}), including {sup 1}D{sub 2}, {sup 1}G{sub 4}, and {sup 3}H{sub 4} to manifolds {sup 3}H{sub 6} (the ground-state manifold), {sup 3}F{sub 4}, {sup 3}H{sub 5}, {sup 3}H{sub 4}, and {sup 3}F{sub 3} were analyzed for the details of the crystal-field splitting of the manifolds. Fluorescence lifetimes were measured for Tm{sup 3+} transitions from {sup 1}D{sub 2}, {sup 1}G{sub 4}, and {sup 3}H{sub 4} at room temperature and from {sup 1}G{sub 4} at 16 K. Results of the analysis indicate that the majority of Tm{sup 3+} ions occupy sites having C{sub s} symmetry. A point-charge lattice-sum calculation was made in which the crystal-field components, A{sub nm}, were determined assuming that trivalent thulium replaces divalent strontium in the metal site having C{sub s} symmetry. Results support the conclusion that the nearest-neighbor fluoride (F{sup {minus}}) is replaced by divalent oxygen (O{sup 2{minus}}), thus preserving overall charge neutrality and local symmetry. Crystal-field splitting calculations predict energy levels in agreement with experimental data. By varying the crystal-field parameters, B{sub nm}, we obtained a rms difference of 7cm{sup {minus}1} between 43 calculated and experimental Stark levels for Tm{sup 3+}(4f{sup 12}) in Tm:SFAP. (Abstract Truncated)

  20. 3d spectator hole satellites of the Cu K{beta}{sub 1,3} and K{beta}{sub 2,5} emission spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Enkisch, H.; Sternemann, C.; Paulus, M.; Volmer, M.; Schuelke, W.

    2004-08-01

    The intensity evolution of the Cu K{beta}{sub 1,3} and K{beta}{sub 2,5} emission spectra is measured as a function of excitation energy using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy. The contribution of 1s3d lowbar shake satellites to the Cu K{beta}{sub 1,3} as well as to the Cu K{beta}{sub 2,5} emission spectrum is extracted. Both emission spectra indicate an additional contribution of 1s3p lowbar shake satellites. The intensity evolution of the shake satellites from threshold to saturation is compared to the Thomas model and shows a similar saturation behavior as found for the Cu K{alpha}{sub 1,2} 1s3d lowbar shake satellites, stating that the shake process is independent of the reemission shell. These 1s3d lowbar shake satellites rapidly reach their saturation limit in contrast to Cu 1s2p lowbar and 1s1s lowbar shake satellites. Furthermore, the contribution of the KMN and the KNN radiative Auger satellites to the Cu K{beta}{sub 1,3} and Cu K{beta}{sub 2,5} emission spectra is obtained, respectively. The KNN radiative Auger satellite is shown to play an important role in the interpretation of valence fluorescence spectra.

  1. On the Early-Time X-Ray Spectra of Swift Afterglows. I. Evidence for Anomalous Soft X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, N. R.

    2007-02-01

    We have conducted a thorough and blind search for emission lines in >70 Swift X-ray afterglows of total exposure ~107 s. We find that most afterglows are consistent with pure power laws plus extinction. Significant outliers to the population exist at the 5%-10% level and have anomalously soft, possibly thermal spectra. Four bursts are singled out via possible detections of two to five lines: GRB 060218, GRB 060202, GRB 050822, and GRB 050714B. Alternatively, a blackbody model with kT~0.1-0.5 keV can describe the soft emission in each afterglow. The most significant soft-component detections in the full data set of ~2000 spectra correspond to GRB 060218/SN 2006aj, with line significances ranging up to ~20 σ. A thermal plasma model fit to the data indicates that the flux is primarily due to L-shell transitions of Fe at roughly solar abundance. We associate (>4 σ significant) line triggers in the three other events with K-shell transitions in light metals. We favor a model where the possible line emission in these afterglows arises from the mildly relativistic cocoon of matter surrounding the GRB jet as it penetrates and exits the surface of the progenitor star. The emitting material in each burst is at a similar distance ~1012-1013 cm, a similar density ~1017 cm-3, and subject to a similar flux of ionizing radiation. The lines may correlate with the X-ray flaring. For the blackbody interpretation, the soft flux may arise from breakout of the GRB shock or plasma cocoon from the progenitor stellar wind, as recently suggested for GRB 060218 (Campana et al. 2006). Due to the low z of GRB 060218, bursts faint in gamma rays with fluxes dominated by this soft X-ray component could outnumber classical GRBs 100 to 1.

  2. Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 eV ionization shift in Ir K{alpha}{sub 2} from a near-coincident Lu K-edge

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Weber, B. V.; Phipps, D.; Schumer, J. W.; Seely, J. F.; Carroll, J. J.; VanHoy, J. R.; Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M.

    2012-10-15

    Close to an x-ray filter's K-edge the transmission depends strongly on the photon energy. For a few atom pairs, the K-edge of one is only a few tens of eV higher than a K-line energy of another, so that a small change in the line's energy becomes a measurable change in intensity behind such a matching filter. Lutetium's K-edge is Asymptotically-Equal-To 27 eV above iridium's K{alpha}{sub 2} line, Asymptotically-Equal-To 63.287 keV for cold Ir. A Lu filter reduces this line's intensity by Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 % when it is emitted by a plasma, indicating an ionization shift {Delta}E Asymptotically-Equal-To 10{+-}1 eV.

  3. The ultraviolet continuous and emission-line spectra of the Herbig-Haro objects HH 2 and HH 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.; Cardelli, J. A.; Nemec, J. M.; Boehm, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    Recent studies of the continuous spectrum of Herbig-Haro (HH) objects at optical and near-infrared wavelengths and the observation of continuous radiation in the ultraviolet have shown an unexpectedly steep increase of the flux toward shorter wavelengths. The present investigation provides the results of ultraviolet observations of HH 2. The obtained data are compared with the HH 1 data. It is found that HH 2 has an ultraviolet continuous and emission-line spectrum which is similar to that of HH 1. The UV line spectrum of HH 2H indicates an even somewhat larger ionization than does the HH 1 spectrum. As in HH1, the UV emission-line spectrum shows a much higher degree of ionization than that derived from the optical spectrum. Consequently, the same difficulty arises as in the case of HH 1. The complete UV plus optical spectrum cannot be explained by a single plane-parallel shock-wave model.

  4. Energy transfer pathways among phycobilin chromophores and fluorescence emission spectra of the phycobilisome core at 293 and 77 K.

    PubMed

    Stadnichuk, V I; Lukashev, E P; Yanyushin, M F; Zlenko, D V; Muronez, E M; Stadnichuk, I N; Krasilnikov, P M

    2015-11-01

    Energy transfer pathways between phycobiliproteins chromophores in the phycobilisome (PBS) core of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were investigated. The computer 3D model of the PBS core with determination of chromophore to chromophore distance was created. Our kinetic equations based on this model allowed us to describe the relative intensities of the fluorescence emission of the short(peaked at 665 nm) and long-wavelength (peaked at 680 nm) chromophores in the PBS core at low and room temperatures. The difference of emissions of the PBS core at 77 and 293 K are due to the back energy transfer, which is observed at room temperature and is negligible at 77 K. PMID:26728735

  5. Emission spectra of LiYNbO 3:RE 3+ (=Sm 3+ or Dy 3+) ceramic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar Kumar, G.; Buddhudu, S.

    2008-12-01

    Sm 3+ or Dy 3+:LiYNbO 3 ceramic powders have been synthesized by a solid-state reaction method to study their photoluminescence properties in order to evaluate emission performance. Upon exposure to the UV lamp, these luminescent ceramic powders have displayed a bright reddish-orange ( 4G 5/2→ 6H 7/2) (Sm 3+) and an yellow ( 4F 9/2→ 6H 13/2) (Dy 3+) color emissions, respectively. In addition, these phosphors have also been characterized for their structures and morphology from the measurement of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDAX, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) results.

  6. The use of the bulk properties of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra for the study of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Adam

    The study of bulk spectral properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is important to understanding the physics behind these powerful explosions and may even be an aide in studying cosmology. The prompt emission spectral properties have long been studied by a growing community of researchers, and many theories have been developed since the discovery of GRBs. Even though the exact physics of these phenomena is not completely understood, GRBs have been proposed to give insight on other astrophysical phenomena from dark matter to the expansion of the universe. Obviously, using GRBs to study cosmology requires a large sample size to adequately constrain results and provide confident conjectures. For this reason, BATSE and GBM results are paramount to the study of the prompt emission of GRBs. Using results from both instruments, I study the bulk spectral properties of GRBs and describe analysis techniques that can be used to study cosmology.

  7. The ground-based H-, K-, and L-band absolute emission spectra of HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Waldmann, Ingo P.

    2014-11-20

    Here we explore the capabilities of NASA's 3.0 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and SpeX spectrometer and the 5.08 m Hale telescope with the TripleSpec spectrometer with near-infrared H-, K-, and L-band measurements of HD 209458b's secondary eclipse. Our IRTF/SpeX data are the first absolute L-band spectroscopic emission measurements of any exoplanet other than the hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Previous measurements of HD 189733b's L band indicate bright emission hypothesized to result from non-LTE CH{sub 4} ν{sub 3} fluorescence. We do not detect a similar bright 3.3 μm feature to ∼3σ, suggesting that fluorescence does not need to be invoked to explain HD 209458b's L-band measurements. The validity of our observation and reduction techniques, which decrease the flux variance by up to 2.8 orders of magnitude, is reinforced by 1σ agreement with existent Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRAC1 observations that overlap the H, K, and L bands, suggesting that both IRTF/SpeX and Palomar/TripleSpec can measure an exoplanet's emission with high precision.

  8. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. II. Hybrid cumulant expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Moix, Jeremy; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-01

    We develop a hybrid cumulant expansion method to account for the system-bath entanglement in the emission spectrum in the multi-chromophoric Förster transfer rate. In traditional perturbative treatments, the emission spectrum is usually expanded with respect to the system-bath coupling term in both real and imaginary time. This perturbative treatment gives a reliable absorption spectrum, where the bath is Gaussian and only the real-time expansion is involved. For the emission spectrum, the initial state is an entangled state of the system plus bath. Traditional perturbative methods are problematic when the excitations are delocalized and the energy gap is larger than the thermal energy, since the second-order expansion cannot predict the displacement of the bath. In the present method, the real-time dynamics is carried out by using the 2nd-order cumulant expansion method, while the displacement of the bath is treated more accurately by utilizing the exact reduced density matrix of the system. In a sense, the hybrid cumulant expansion is based on a generalized version of linear response theory with entangled initial states.

  9. The Ground-based H-, K-, and L-band Absolute Emission Spectra of HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Waldmann, Ingo P.

    2014-11-01

    Here we explore the capabilities of NASA's 3.0 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and SpeX spectrometer and the 5.08 m Hale telescope with the TripleSpec spectrometer with near-infrared H-, K-, and L-band measurements of HD 209458b's secondary eclipse. Our IRTF/SpeX data are the first absolute L-band spectroscopic emission measurements of any exoplanet other than the hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Previous measurements of HD 189733b's L band indicate bright emission hypothesized to result from non-LTE CH4 ν3 fluorescence. We do not detect a similar bright 3.3 μm feature to ~3σ, suggesting that fluorescence does not need to be invoked to explain HD 209458b's L-band measurements. The validity of our observation and reduction techniques, which decrease the flux variance by up to 2.8 orders of magnitude, is reinforced by 1σ agreement with existent Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRAC1 observations that overlap the H, K, and L bands, suggesting that both IRTF/SpeX and Palomar/TripleSpec can measure an exoplanet's emission with high precision.

  10. Infrared radiative transfer in atmospheres of Earth-like planets around F, G, K, and M stars. I. Clear-sky thermal emission spectra and weighting functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, M.; Schreier, F.; Gimeno García, S.; Kitzmann, D.; Patzer, B.; Rauer, H.; Trautmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The atmosphere of Earth-like extrasolar planets orbiting different types of stars is influenced by the spectral dependence of the incoming stellar radiation. The changes in structure and composition affect atmospheric radiation, hence the spectral appearance of these exoplanets. Aims: We provide a thorough investigation of infrared radiative transfer in cloud-free exoplanets atmospheres by not only analyzing the planetary spectral appearance but also discussing the radiative processes behind the spectral features in detail and identifying the regions in the atmosphere that contribute most at a given wavelength. Methods: Using cloud-free scenarios provided by a one-dimensional radiative-convective steady-state atmospheric model, we computed high-resolution infrared transmission and emission spectra, as well as weighting functions for exoplanets located within the habitable zone of F, G, K, and M stars by means of a line-by-line molecular absorption model and a Schwarzschild solver for the radiative transfer. The monochromatic spectra were convolved with appropriate spectral response functions to study the effects of finite instrument resolution. Results: Spectra of the exoplanets of F, G, K, and M stars were analyzed in the 4.5 μm N2O band, the 4.3 μm and 15 μm CO2 bands, the 7.7 μm CH4 band, the 6.3 μm H2O band, and the 9.6 μm O3 band. Differences in the state of the atmosphere of the exoplanets clearly show up in the thermal infrared spectra; absorption signatures known from Earth can be transformed to emission features (and vice versa). Weighting functions show that radiation in the absorption bands of the uniformly mixed gases (CO2, CH4, N2O) and (to some extent) ozone comes from the stratosphere and upper troposphere, and also indicate that changes in the atmospheres can shift sources of thermal radiation to lower or higher altitudes. Molecular absorption and/or emission features can be identified in the high-resolution spectra of all planets and in most reduced resolution spectra. Conclusions: Insight into radiative transfer processes is essential for analyzing exoplanet spectral observations; for instance, understanding the impact of the temperature profile (nb. non-existence of an inversion) on the CO2 bands facilitates their interpretation and can help avoid false positive or negative estimates of O3. The detailed analysis of the radiation source and sink regions could even help give an indication about the feasibility of identifying molecular signatures in cloud-covered planets, i.e. radiation mainly coming from the upper atmosphere is less likely to be hidden by clouds. Infrared radiative transfer and biomarker detectability in cloud-covered exoplanets will be presented in a companion paper. Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. HST/COS SPECTRA OF DF Tau AND V4046 Sgr: FIRST DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ABSORPTION AGAINST THE Ly{alpha} EMISSION LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Hao; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; France, Kevin E-mail: jlinsky@jilau1.colorado.edu

    2011-03-20

    We report the first detection of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption in the Ly{alpha} emission line profiles of two classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), DF Tau and V4046 Sgr, observed by the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. This absorption is the energy source for many of the Lyman-band H{sub 2} fluorescent lines commonly seen in the far-ultraviolet spectra of CTTSs. We find that the absorbed energy in the H{sub 2} pumping transitions from a portion of the Ly{alpha} line significantly differ from the amount of energy in the resulting fluorescent emission. By assuming additional absorption in the H I Ly{alpha} profile along our light of sight, we can correct the H{sub 2} absorption/emission ratios so that they are close to unity. The required H I absorption for DF Tau is at a velocity close to the radial velocity of the star, consistent with H I absorption in the edge-on disk and interstellar medium. For V4046 Sgr, a nearly face-on system, the required absorption is between +100 km s{sup -1} and +290 km s{sup -1}, most likely resulting from H I gas in the accretion columns falling onto the star.

  12. Emissions and ambient distributions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) in a Ponderosa pine ecosystem: interpretation of PTR-MS mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A.; Tyndall, G.; Orlando, J.; Harley, P.; Rasmussen, R.; Apel, E.

    2009-10-01

    Two proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry systems were deployed at the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08; July to September 2008) at the Manitou Forest observatory in a Ponderosa pine woodland near Woodland Park, Colorado USA to simultaneously measure BVOC emissions and ambient distributions of their oxidation products. Here, we present mass spectral analysis in a wide range of masses (m/z=40+ to 210+) to assess our understanding of BVOC emissions and their photochemical process inside of the forest canopy. The biogenic terpenoids, 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO, 50.2%) and several monoterpenes (MT, 33.5%) were identified as the dominant BVOC emissions from a transmission corrected mass spectrum, averaged over the daytime (11 am to 3 p.m., local time) of three days. To assess contributions of oxidation products of local BVOC, we calculate a oxidation product spectrum with the OH- and ozone-initiated oxidation product distribution mass spectra of two major BVOC at the ecosystem (MBO and β-pinene) that were observed from laboratory oxidation experiments. A majority (~73%) of the total signal could be explained by known compounds. The remainder are attributed to oxidation products of BVOC, emitted from nearby ecosystems and transported to the site, and oxidation products of unidentified BVOC emitted from the Ponderosa pine ecosystem.

  13. Cospatial Longslit UV-Optical Spectra of Ten Galactic Planetary Nebulae with HST STIS: Description of observations, global emission-line measurements, and empirical CNO abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, R. J.; Kwitter, K. B.; Shaw, R. A.; Balick, B.; Henry, R. B. C.; Miller, T. R.; Corradi, R. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    This poster describes details of HST Cycle 19 (program GO 12600), which was awarded 32 orbits of observing time with STIS to obtain the first cospatial UV-optical spectra of 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). The observational goal was to measure the UV emission lines of carbon and nitrogen with unprecedented S/N and wavelength and spatial resolution along the disk of each object over a wavelength range 1150-10270 Ang . The PNe were chosen such that each possessed a near-solar metallicity but the group together spanned a broad range in N/O. This poster concentrates on describing the observations, emission-line measurements integrated along the entire slit lengths, ionic abundances, and estimated total elemental abundances using empirical ionization correction factors and the ELSA code. Related posters by co-authors in this session concentrate on analyzing CNO abundances, progenitor masses and nebular properties of the best-observed targets using photoionization modeling of the global emission-line measurements [Henry et al.] or detailed analyses of spatial variations in electron temperatures, densities, and abundances along the sub arcsecond resolution slits [Miller et al. & Shaw et al.]. We gratefully acknowledge AURA/STScI for the GO 12600 program support, both observational and financial.

  14. Detection of Copper (II) and Cadmium (II) binding to dissolved organic matter from macrophyte decomposition by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra combined with parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dong-hai; Guo, Xu-jing; Wen, Li; He, Lian-sheng; Wang, Jing-gang; Li, Jun-qi

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from macrophyte decomposition, and to study its complexation with Cu (II) and Cd (II). Both the protein-like and the humic-like components showed a marked quenching effect by Cu (II). Negligible quenching effects were found for Cd (II) by components 1, 5 and 6. The stability constants and the fraction of the binding fluorophores for humic-like components and Cu (II) can be influenced by macrophyte decomposition of various weight gradients in aquatic plants. Macrophyte decomposition within the scope of the appropriate aquatic phytomass can maximize the stability constant of DOM-metal complexes. A large amount of organic matter was introduced into the aquatic environment by macrophyte decomposition, suggesting that the potential risk of DOM as a carrier of heavy metal contamination in macrophytic lakes should not be ignored. PMID:25969375

  15. A Grid of Composite Models for the Simulation of the Emission-Line Spectra from the Narrow-Line Regions of Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, M.; Viegas, S. M.

    2001-02-01

    A grid of composite models for the narrow-line region of active galaxies, which consistently account for both the effect of a photoionizing radiation from the active center and of a shock front, is presented. Theoretical results, calculated with the SUMA code, are given for different values of shock velocities, preshock densities, geometrical thickness of the clouds, and, particularly, for the ionizing radiation intensity in a large range. The input parameters are chosen within the ranges indicated by previous fits of several observed emission-line and continuum spectra from active galaxies. Shock velocities from 100 to 1500 km s -1 and preshock densities from 100 to 1000 cm-3 are considered. The line intensities of the most important ultraviolet, optical, and infrared transitions are obtained and are listed in several tables.

  16. Palagonitic (Not Andesitic) Mars: Evidence from Thermal Emission and VNIR Spectra of Palgonitic Alteration Rinds on Basaltic Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Mertzman, S. A.; Lane, M. D.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    Visible and near-IR (VNIR) spectra of both Martian bright and dark regions are characterized by a ferric absorption edge extending from approx. 400 to 750 nm, with bright regions having about twice the reflectivity at 750 nm as dark regions. Between 750 nm to beyond 2000 nm, bright and dark regions have nearly constant and slightly negative spectral slopes, respectively. Depending on location, bright regions have shallow reflectivity minima in the range 850-910 nm that are attributed to ferric oxides. Similarly, dark regions have shallow reflectivity minima near approx. 950 and 1700-2000 nm that are attributed to ferrous silicate minerals (pyroxene). Among terrestrial geologic materials, the best spectral analogues for Martian bright regions are certain palagonitic tephras from Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii). By definition, palagonite is a "yellow or orange isotropic mineraloid formed by hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass". The ferric pigment in palagonite is nanometer-sized ferric oxide particles (np-Ox) dispersed throughout the hydrated basaltic glass matrix. The hydration state of the np-Ox particles is not known, but the best Martian spectral analogues contain allophane-like materials and not crystalline phyllosilicates.

  17. Monte Carlo study of the neutron time emission spectra at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocko, M.; Muhrer, G.; Ino, T.; Ooi, M.; Daemen, L. L.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    2008-09-01

    A campaign of neutron-beam characterization measurements was carried out in 2001-2002 at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos National Laboratory. These experiments provided a valuable comprehensive data set to define the neutron-beam characteristics of the Lujan Center's target-moderator-reflector-shield assembly. To validate the current computer models of the target assembly, we carried out multiple Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron time emission pulses. The results of our simulations are directly compared with the experimental data characterizing five of the six moderators installed in the Lujan target-moderator-reflector-shield system. Our results not only present an important benchmark test of the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport model of the target assembly, but also show the capabilities of the MCNPX code in designing upgrade and future spallation neutron sources.

  18. Emission spectra of a laser based on an In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, M. M. Buyalo, M. S.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Zolotareva, R. V.; Vasil’ev, A. P.; Ustinov, V. M.; Portnoi, E. L.

    2015-10-15

    The spectral characteristics of a laser with an active region based on a ten-layer system of In(Ga)As/GaAs vertically correlated quantum dots with 4.5-nm GaAs spacer layers between InAs quantum dots are studied under the conditions of spontaneous and stimulated emission, depending on the current and the duration of pump pulses. Data obtained by transmission electron microscopy and electroluminescence and absorption polarization anisotropy measurements make it possible to demonstrate that the investigated system of tunnel-coupled InAs quantum dots separated by thin GaAs barriers represents a quantum-dot superlattice. With an increase in the laser pump current, the electroluminescence intensity increases linearly and the spectral position of the electroluminescence maximum shifts to higher energies, which is caused by the dependence of the miniband density-of-states distribution on the pump current. Upon exceeding the threshold current, multimode lasing via the miniband ground state is observed. One of the lasing modes can be attributed to the zero-phonon line, and the other is determined by the longitudinal-optical phonon replica of quantum-dot emission. The results obtained give evidence that, under conditions of the laser pumping of an In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice, strong coupling between the discrete electron states in the miniband and optical phonons takes place. This leads to the formation of quantum-dot polarons, resulting from the resonant mixing of electronic states whose energy separation is comparable to the optical-phonon energy.

  19. Emission lines of FeXI in the 257-407Å wavelength region observed in solar spectra from EIS/Hinode and SERTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Milligan, R. O.; Jess, D. B.; Aggarwal, K. M.; Mathioudakis, M.; Thomas, R. J.; Brosius, J. W.; Davila, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical emission-line ratios involving FeXI transitions in the 257-407Å wavelength range are derived using fully relativistic calculations of radiative rates and electron impact excitation cross-sections. These are subsequently compared with both long wavelength channel Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectra from the Hinode satellite (covering 245-291Å) and first-order observations (~235-449Å) obtained by the Solar Extreme-ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS). The 266.39, 266.60 and 276.36Å lines of FeXI are detected in two EIS spectra, confirming earlier identifications of these features, and 276.36Å is found to provide an electron density (Ne) diagnostic when ratioed against the 257.55Å transition. Agreement between theory and observation is found to be generally good for the SERTS data sets, with discrepancies normally being due to known line blends, while the 257.55Å feature is detected for the first time in SERTS spectra. The most useful FeXI electron density diagnostic is found to be the 308.54/352.67 intensity ratio, which varies by a factor of 8.4 between Ne = 108 and 1011cm-3, while showing little temperature sensitivity. However, the 349.04/352.67 ratio potentially provides a superior diagnostic, as it involves lines which are closer in wavelength, and varies by a factor of 14.7 between Ne = 108 and 1011cm-3. Unfortunately, the 349.04Å line is relatively weak, and also blended with the second-order FeX 174.52Å feature, unless the first-order instrument response is enhanced.

  20. Lines and continuum sky emission in the near infrared: observational constraints from deep high spectral resolution spectra with GIANO-TNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Scuderi, S.; Benatti, S.; Carleo, I.; Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Biliotti, V.; Carbonaro, L.; Falcini, G.; Giani, E.; Iuzzolino, M.; Massi, F.; Sanna, N.; Sozzi, M.; Tozzi, A.; Ghedina, A.; Ghinassi, F.; Lodi, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Pedani, M.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: Determining the intensity of lines and continuum airglow emission in the H-band is important for the design of faint-object infrared spectrographs. Existing spectra at low or medium resolution cannot disentangle the true sky continuum from instrumental effects (e.g. diffuse light in the wings of strong lines). We aim to obtain, for the first time, a high-resolution infrared spectrum that is deep enough to set significant constraints on the continuum emission between the lines in the H-band. Methods: During the second commissioning run of the GIANO high-resolution infrared spectrograph at La Palma Observatory, we pointed the instrument directly at the sky and obtained a deep spectrum that extends from 0.97 to 2.4 μm. Results: The spectrum shows about 1500 emission lines, a factor of two more than in previous works. Of these, 80% are identified as OH transitions; half of these are from highly excited molecules (hot-OH component) that are not included in the OH airglow emission models normally used for astronomical applications. The other lines are attributable to O2 or unidentified. Several of the faint lines are in spectral regions that were previously believed to be free of line emission. The continuum in the H-band is marginally detected at a level of about 300 photons/m2/s/arcsec2/μm, equivalent to 20.1 AB-mag/arcsec2. The observed spectrum and the list of observed sky lines are published at the CDS. Conclusions: Our measurements indicate that the sky continuum in the H-band could be even darker than previously believed. However, the myriad of airglow emission lines severely limits the spectral ranges where very low background can be effectively achieved with low- or medium-resolution spectrographs. We identify a few spectral bands that could still remain quite dark at the resolving power foreseen for VLT-MOONS (R ≃ 6600). Tables 1, 2, and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/581/A47

  1. Environmentally friendly Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA heterosystem nanocomposite: UV-stimulated emission and absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, N. G.; Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr

    2016-02-01

    Zn0.75Cd0.25S nanoparticles prepared at different temperatures were composited with polyvinyl alcohol for functionalization it in wide spectrum of applications such as in photocatalysis. The nanostructure of the Zn0.75Cd0.25S mother phase is confirmed by X-ray diffraction in addition to absorption and fluorescence spectra. UV/VIS. measurements show that, the transmittance coefficient of Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA nanocomposite is lesser than that of pure PVA by 0.33% and varies upon increasing the preparation temperature; reaching a maximum value for the sample prepared at 300 °C. It was found that the optical band gap tunes with annealing temperature which, in turns, with particle size. The refractive index of the Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA nanocomposite films decrease with increasing wavelength and saturates at high wavelengths. The optical conductivity increases with increasing photon energy which may be due to the excitation of electrons by photon energy. The optical conductivity of Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA nanocomposite is lesser than that of pure PVA and it decreases as the preparation temperature of Zn0.75Cd0.25S nanoparticles in PVA matrix increases which could be related to the decrease in the extinction coefficient and the density of localized states in the gap. Abroad peak deconvoluted, by Gaussian fitting function, into two violet and blue colors was observed in the fluorescence spectra under UV light irradiation. The two emission bands are attributed to band edge emission and neutral oxygen vacancies respectively. Analysis of fluorescence (FL) spectra reveals quenching in FL intensity and a peak shifting towards the lower wavelength side with increasing the preparation temperature of the mother phase. The results suggest that the 200 °C Zn0.75Cd0.25S/PVA nanocomposites have been regarded as a promising candidate in many technical fields, such as photocatalytic hydrogen production and/or photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes under UV irradiation due to its high optical conductivity and high FL intensity.

  2. X-ray emission-line spectra of photoionized plasmas - Density sensitivity of the Fe L-shell series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liedahl, Duane A.; Kahn, Steven M.; Osterheld, Albert L.; Goldstein, William H.

    1992-01-01

    The circumsource environments of accretion-powered X-ray sources are likely to support relatively dense (greater than 10 exp 11/cu cm) photoionized X-ray emission-line regions. The Fe L-shell ions provide a versatile class of plasma diagnostics in this regime, their multielectron structures resulting in diverse spectral phenomena. Attention is given to the spectral response of Fe L-shell ions to variations in electron density over the range 10 exp 11 to 10 exp 16/cu cm. It is found that density-sensitive line ratios exist in the wavelength interval 12-17 A for the ions Fe XVII-XXI. The prominent role of radiative recombination in the population kinetics distinguishes the density-sensitive Fe lines in photoionized plasmas from those which operate in coronal equilibrium plasmas. The results of detailed atomic modeling of these ions are presented and applications to spectroscopic observations of accretion-driven X-ray sources are discussed.

  3. One-Dimensional Fluorescent Silicon Nanorods Featuring Ultrahigh Photostability, Favorable Biocompatibility, and Excitation Wavelength-Dependent Emission Spectra.

    PubMed

    Song, Bin; Zhong, Yiling; Wu, Sicong; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2016-04-13

    We herein report a kind of one-dimensional biocompatible fluorescent silicon nanorods (SiNRs) with tunable lengths ranging ∼100-250 nm, which can be facilely prepared through one-pot microwave synthesis. In addition to the strong fluorescence (quantum yield value: ∼15%) and negligible toxicity, the resultant SiNRs exhibit excitation wavelength-dependent photoluminescence whose maximum emission wavelength ranges from ∼450 to ∼600 nm under serial excitation wavelengths from 390 to 560 nm, providing feasibility for multicolor biological imaging. More significantly, the SiNRs are ultrahighly photostable, preserving strong and nearly unchanged fluorescence under 400 min high-power UV irradiation, which is in sharp contrast to severe fluorescence quenching of organic dyes (e.g., FITC) or II-VI quantum dots (QDs) (e.g., CdTe QDs and CdSe/ZnS QDs) within 15 or 160 min UV treatment under the same experiment conditions, respectively. Taking advantage of these attractive merits, we further exploit the SiNRs as a novel type of color converters for the construction of white light-emitting diodes (LED), which is the first proof-of-concept demonstration of LED device fabricated using the one-dimensional fluorescent silicon nanostructures. PMID:27010956

  4. Study of Iron Dimers Reveals Angular Dependence of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a developing technique that probes the occupied molecular orbitals of a metal complex. As an element-specific probe of metal centers, Kβ XES is finding increasing applications in catalytic and, in particular, bioinorganic systems. For the continued development of XES as a probe of these complex systems, however, the full range of factors which contribute to XES spectral modulations must be explored. In this report, an investigation of a series of oxo-bridged iron dimers reveals that the intensity of valence-to-core features is sensitive to the Fe–O–Fe bond angle. The intensity of these features has a well-known dependence on metal–ligand bond distance, but a dependence upon bond angle has not previously been documented. Herein, we explore the angular dependence of valence-to-core XES features both experimentally and computationally. Taken together, these results show that, as the Fe–O–Fe angle decreases, the intensity of the Kβ″ feature increases and that this effect is modulated by increasing amounts of Fe np mixing into the O 2s orbital at smaller bond angles. The relevance of these findings to the identification of oxygenated intermediates in bioinorganic systems is highlighted, with special emphasis given to the case of soluble methane monooxygenase. PMID:25211540

  5. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; et al

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changesmore » and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.« less

  6. Four micron high-resolution spectra of Jupiter in the North Equatorial Belt: H3(+) emissions and the C-12/C-13 ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marten, A.; De Bergh, C.; Owen, T.; Gautier, D.; Maillard, J. P.; Drossart, P.; Lutz, B. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    Spectra of the North Equatorial Belt of Jupiter were obtained in March 1992 at an unapodized resolution of 0.1/cm between 2450 and 2600/cm with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer at the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) on Mauna Kea. Several emissions from the nu(sub 2) band of H3(+) were detected. The excitation temperature derived from the relative intensities of these emissions averaged over a wide range of longitudes is 800 +/- 100 K, and the H3(+) column density is 1.56(sup +1.0)(sub -0.5) x 10(exp 11)/sq. cm. In addition, several strong absorption features due to (13)CH4 were observed. A comparison between (12)CH4 and (13)CH4 absorptions allowed us to obtain a new measurement of the C-12/C-13 ratio. We found that this ratio, estimated for the first time in this spectral range, is 89 (+/- 25), in agreement with the terrestrial value.

  7. Simulation of emission molecular spectra by a semi-automatic programme package: the case of C 2 and CN diatomic molecules emitting during laser ablation of a graphite target in nitrogen environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, S.

    2004-07-01

    Some emission spectra of diatomic molecules were calculated by a semi-automatic programme package in order to infer the rotational and vibrational temperatures in Boltzmann distribution by comparing them with the corresponding experimental ones. The calculation procedure was applied in the case of CN radical and C 2 molecule whose optical emission spectra were recorded during pulsed excimer laser ablation of a graphite target in low-pressure nitrogen environment. Computed similar or dissimilar values of rotational and vibrational temperatures let to verify the existence or not of local thermodynamic equilibrium and to hypothesise the temporal range necessary to establish it in such experiments.

  8. Simulation of emission molecular spectra by a semi-automatic programme package: the case of C2 and CN diatomic molecules emitting during laser ablation of a graphite target in nitrogen environment.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, S

    2004-07-01

    Some emission spectra of diatomic molecules were calculated by a semi-automatic programme package in order to infer the rotational and vibrational temperatures in Boltzmann distribution by comparing them with the corresponding experimental ones. The calculation procedure was applied in the case of CN radical and C2 molecule whose optical emission spectra were recorded during pulsed excimer laser ablation of a graphite target in low-pressure nitrogen environment. Computed similar or dissimilar values of rotational and vibrational temperatures let to verify the existence or not of local thermodynamic equilibrium and to hypothesise the temporal range necessary to establish it in such experiments. PMID:15248989

  9. Estimation of Mass-Loss Rates from Emission Line Profiles in the UV Spectra of Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. G.; Robinson, R. D.; Harper, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    The photon-scattering winds of cool, low-gravity stars (K-M giants and supergiants) produce absorption features in the strong chromospheric emission lines. This provides us with an opportunity to assess important parameters of the wind, including flow and turbulent velocities, the optical depth of the wind above the region of photon creation, and the star's mass-loss rate. We have used the Lamers et al. Sobolev with Exact Integration (SEI) radiative transfer code along with simple models of the outer atmospheric structure to compute synthetic line profiles for comparison with the observed line profiles. The SEI code has the advantage of being computationally fast and allows a great number of possible wind models to be examined. We therefore use it here to obtain initial first-order estimates of the wind parameters. More sophisticated, but more time-consuming and resource intensive calculations will be performed at a later date, using the SEI-deduced wind parameters as a starting point. A comparison of the profiles over a range of wind velocity laws, turbulence values, and line opacities allows us to constrain the wind parameters, and to estimate the mass-loss rates. We have applied this analysis technique (using lines of Mg II, 0 I, and Fe II) so far to four stars: the normal K5-giant alpha Tau, the hybrid K-giant gamma Dra, the K5 supergiant lambda Vel, and the M-giant gamma Cru. We present in this paper a description of the technique, including the assumptions which go into its use, an assessment of its robustness, and the results of our analysis.

  10. Combining Single-Molecule Optical Trapping and Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements to Compute the Persistence Length of a Protein ER/K [alpha]-Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Sung, J.; Ali, M.; Doniach, S.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Spudich, J.A.

    2010-01-12

    A relatively unknown protein structure motif forms stable isolated single {alpha}-helices, termed ER/K {alpha}-helices, in a wide variety of proteins and has been shown to be essential for the function of some molecular motors. The flexibility of the ER/K {alpha}-helix determines whether it behaves as a force transducer, rigid spacer, or flexible linker in proteins. In this study, we quantify this flexibility in terms of persistence length, namely the length scale over which it is rigid. We use single-molecule optical trapping and small-angle x-ray scattering, combined with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate that the Kelch ER/K {alpha}-helix behaves as a wormlike chain with a persistence length of 15 nm or 28 turns of {alpha}-helix. The ER/K {alpha}-helix length in proteins varies from 3 to 60 nm, with a median length of 5 nm. Knowledge of its persistence length enables us to define its function as a rigid spacer in a translation initiation factor, as a force transducer in the mechanoenzyme myosin VI, and as a flexible spacer in the Kelch-motif-containing protein.

  11. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. III - General spectral properties of X1-X5 type flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Kreplin, R. W.; Cohen, L.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra of six class X1-X5 solar flares are discussed. The spectra were recorded by spaceborne Bragg crystal spectrometers in the ranges 1.82-1.97, 2.98-3.07 and 3.14-3.24 A. Electron temperatures derived from dielectronic satellite line to resonance line ratios for Fe XXV and Ca XIX are found to remain fairly constant around 22,000,000 and 16,000,000 K respectively during the rise phase of the flares, then decrease by approximately 6,000,000 K during the decay phase. Nonthermal motions derived from line widths for the April 27, 1979 event are found to be greatest during the rise phase (approximately 130 km/sec) and decrease to about 60 km/sec during decay. Volume emission measures for Fe XXV, Ca XIX and Ca XX are derived from photon fluxes as a function of temperature, and examination of the intensity behavior of the Fe K alpha emission as a function of time indicates that it is a result of fluorescence. Differences between the present and previous observations of temperature variation are discussed, and it is concluded that the flare plasmas are close to ionization equilibrium for the flares investigated.

  12. Secondary ion emission from CO2-H2O ice irradiated by energetic heavy ions: Part I. Measurement of the mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farenzena, L. S.; Collado, V. M.; Ponciano, C. R.; da Silveira, E. F.; Wien, K.

    2005-05-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to investigate ion emission from a frozen-gas mixture (T = 80-90 K) of CO2 and H2O bombarded by MeV nitrogen ions and by 252Cf fission fragments (FF). The aim of the experiments is to produce organic molecules in the highly excited material around the nuclear track and to detect them in the flux of sputtered particles. Such sputter processes are known to occur at the icy surfaces of planetary or interstellar objects. Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry is employed to identify the desorbed ions. Mass spectra of positive and negative ions were taken for several molecular H2O/CO2 ratios. In special, positive ions induced by MeV nitrogen beam were analyzed for 9 and 18% H2O concentrations of the CO2-H2O ice and negative ions for ~5% H2O. The ion peaks are separated to generate exclusive the spectra of CO2 specific ions, H2O specific ions and hybrid molecular ions, the latter ones corresponding to ions that contain mostly H and C atoms. In the mass range from 10 to 320 u, the latter exhibits 35 positive and 58 negative ions. The total yield of the positive ions is 0.35 and 0.57 ions/impact, respectively, and of negative ions 0.066 ions/impact. Unexpected effects of secondary ion sputtering yields on H2O/CO2 ratio are attributed to the influence of water molecules concentration on the ionization process.

  13. Spectra, Emission Yields, Cross Sections, and Kinetic Energy Distributions of Hydrogen Atoms from H2 X 1Eg+-d 3IIu Excitation by Electron Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianming; Shemansky, Donald E.; Yoshii, Jean; Johnson, Paul V.; Malone, Charles P.; Ajello, Joseph M.

    2016-02-01

    Electron-impact excitation of H2 triplet states plays an important role in the heating of outer planet upper thermospheres. The {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state is the third ungerade triplet state, and the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ emission is the largest cascade channel for the a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ state. Accurate energies of the d{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-(v, J) levels are calculated from an ab initio potential energy curve. Radiative lifetimes of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u(v, J) levels are obtained by an accurate evaluation of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ transition probabilities. The emission yields are determined from experimental lifetimes and calculated radiative lifetimes and are further verified by comparing experimental and synthetic {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ spectra at 20 eV impact energy. Spectral analysis revealed that multipolar components beyond the dipolar term are required to model the {X}1{{{Σ }}}g+-{d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u excitation, and significant cascade excitation occurs at the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u(v = 0,1) levels. Kinetic energy (Ek) distributions of H atoms produced via predissociation of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state and the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+-b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ cascade dissociative emission are obtained. Predissociation of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state produces H atoms with an average Ek of 2.3 ± 0.4 eV/atom, while the Ek distribution of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+-b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ channel is similar to that of the {X}1{{{Σ }}}g+-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+-b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ channel and produces H(1s) atoms with an average Ek of 1.15 ± 0.05 eV/atom. On average, each H2 excited to the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state in an H2-dominated atmosphere deposits 3.3 ± 0.4 eV into the atmosphere, while each H2 directly excited to the a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ state gives 2.2-2.3 eV to the atmosphere. The spectral distribution of the calculated a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ -b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ continuum emission due to the {X}1{{{Σ }}}g+-{d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u excitation is significantly different from that of direct a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ excitation.

  14. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 Micrometer PAH Emission Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    A population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related materials are thought to be responsible for the family of infrared emission features that are seen towards a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons whose edges contain excess H atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs). While it has been suggested that this type of compound may be present in the interstellar population, it has been difficult to properly assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable infrared laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of the astronomical data. We present the 4000-500 cm(exp -1) (2.5-20 micrometers) infrared spectra of 23 H(sub n)-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices, under conditions suitable for use in the interpretation of astronomical data. The spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show unique characteristics that distinguish them from their fully aromatic PAH equivalents. We discuss the changes to the spectra of these types of molecules as they transition from fully aromatic to fully aliphatic forms. The implications for the interpretation of astronomical spectra are discussed with specific emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 micrometer features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, in addition to IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 micrometer features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H(sub n)-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  15. Analysis on heavy quarkonia transitions with pion emission in terms of the QCD multipole expansion and determination of mass spectra of hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Hong-Wei; Tang, Jian; Hao, Xi-Qing; Li, Xue-Qian

    2007-10-01

    One of the most important tasks in high energy physics is the search for the exotic states, such as glueball, hybrid, and multiquark states. The transitions {psi}(ns){yields}{psi}(ms)+{pi}{pi} and {upsilon}(ns){yields}{upsilon}(ms)+{pi}{pi} attract great attention because they may reveal characteristics of hybrids. In this work, we analyze those transition modes in terms of the theoretical framework established by Yan and Kuang. It is interesting to notice that the intermediate states between the two gluon emissions are hybrids, therefore by fitting the data, we are able to determine the mass spectra of hybrids. The ground hybrid states are predicted as 4.23 GeV (for charmonium) and 10.79 GeV (for bottonium) which do not correspond to any states measured in recent experiments, thus it may imply that, very possibly, hybrids mix with regular quarkonia to constitute physical states. Comprehensive comparisons of the potentials for hybrids whose parameters are obtained in this scenario with the lattice results are presented.

  16. STUDYING THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM IN EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Ursino, E.; Branchini, E.; Ohashi, T.; Kawahara, H.; Piro, L.; Corsi, A.; Amati, L.; Den Herder, J. W.; Kaastra, J.; Galeazzi, M.; Moscardini, L.; Roncarelli, M.; Nicastro, F.; Paerels, F.; Viel, M.

    2011-06-20

    We assess the possibility of detecting the warm-hot intergalactic medium in emission and characterizing its physical conditions and spatial distribution through spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy, in the framework of the recently proposed DIOS, EDGE, Xenia, and ORIGIN missions, all of which are equipped with microcalorimeter-based detectors. For this purpose, we analyze a large set of mock emission spectra, extracted from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. These mock X-ray spectra are searched for emission features showing both the O VII K{alpha} triplet and O VIII Ly{alpha} line, which constitute a typical signature of the warm-hot gas. Our analysis shows that 1 Ms long exposures and energy resolution of 2.5 eV will allow us to detect about 400 such features per deg{sup 2} with a significance {>=}5{sigma} and reveals that these emission systems are typically associated with density {approx}100 above the mean. The temperature can be estimated from the line ratio with a precision of {approx}20%. The combined effect of contamination from other lines, variation in the level of the continuum, and degradation of the energy resolution reduces these estimates. Yet, with an energy resolution of 7 eV and all these effects taken into account, one still expects about 160 detections per deg{sup 2}. These line systems are sufficient for tracing the spatial distribution of the line-emitting gas, which constitute an additional information, independent from line statistics, to constrain the poorly known cosmic chemical enrichment history and the stellar feedback processes.

  17. Non-LTE modeling of narrow emission components of He and Ca lines in optical spectra of classical T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, A. V.; Lamzin, S. A.; Sitnova, T. M.

    2013-05-01

    Using LTE calculations of the structure of T Tauri stellar atmospheres heated by radiation from an accretion shock (Dodin and Lamzin 2012), we have calculated the spectrum of the hot spot emerging on the stellar surface by taking into account non-LTE effects for He I, He II, Ca I, and Ca II. Assuming the pre-shock gas density N 0 and velocity V 0 to be the same at all points of the accretion stream cross section, we have calculated the spectrum of the star+circular spot system at various N 0, V 0, and parameters characterizing the star and the spot. Using nine stars as an example, we show that the theoretical optical spectra reproduce well the observed veiling of photospheric absorption lines as well as the profiles and intensities of the so-called narrow components of He II and Ca I emission lines with an appropriate choice of parameters. The accreted gas density in all of the investigated stars except DK Tau has been found to be N 0 > 1012 cm-3. We have managed to choose the parameters for eight stars at a calcium abundance in the accreted gas ξ Ca equal to the solar one, but we have been able to achieve agreement between the calculations and observations for TW Hya only by assuming ξ Ca to be approximately a factor of 3 lower than the solar one. The estimated parameters do not depend on interstellar extinction, because they have been determined from the spectra normalized to the continuum level. The calculated intensity of Ca II lines has turned out to be lower than the observed one, but this contradiction can be eliminated by assuming that, in addition to the accreted gas with a high density N 0, a more rarefied gas also falls onto the star. The theoretical equivalent widths and relative intensities of the subordinate He I lines disagree significantly with the observations. This is apparently because non-LTE effects should be taken into account when calculating the structure of the upper layers of the hot spot, the accuracy of the cross sections for collisional processes from upper levels is insufficient, and the spot inhomogeneity should probably be taken into account.

  18. THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH EXCESS PERIPHERAL H ATOMS (H {sub n} -PAHs) AND THEIR RELATION TO THE 3.4 AND 6.9 {mu}m PAH EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (H {sub n} -PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm{sup -1} (2.5-20 {mu}m) infrared spectra of 23 H {sub n} -PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 {mu}m weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 {mu}m, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11-15 {mu}m region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH{sub 2}- deformation mode near 6.9 {mu}m. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 {mu}m features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 {mu}m features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H {sub n} -PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  19. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (Hn-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 µm PAH Emission Features

    PubMed Central

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (Hn-PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm−1 (2.5–20 µm) infrared spectra of 23 Hn-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 µm weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 µm, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11–15 µm region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH2-deformation mode near 6.9 µm. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 µm features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 µm features. We show that ‘normal’ PAH emission objects contain relatively few Hn-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules. PMID:26435553

  20. Iron K-shell emission from NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Klein, Richard I.; Castor, John I.; Nash, J. K.

    1990-01-01

    The X-ray iron line emission from NGC 1068 is modeled using the new multiline, multilevel, non-LTE radiative transport code Altair and a detailed atomic model for Ne-like through-stripped iron. The X-rays passing through the ionized gas induce iron K-alpha line emission. The atomic model was constructed to describe in detail the K-shell ionization and K-alpha line emission, as well as to calculate the ionization state properly. A greater equivalent width than previously predicted is found because the observed K-alpha line is produced not only by fluorescence but also by line scattering of the continuum into the line of sight. The K-alpha equivalent width and energy are functions not only of the ionization parameter, but also of the column depth and temperature. For a likely model of NGC 1068, it is found that the iron abundance is about twice solar, but that modifications of this model may permit a smaller abundance.

  1. (π−1) → (π−1), (π−1) emission spectra of chlorofluorobenzene cations in the gaseous phase and their lifetimes in the (0o) states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, John Paul; Marthaler, O.; Mohraz, Manijeh; Shiley, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The radiative decay of seventeen electronically excited chlorofluorobenzene cations in the gaseous phase has been detected. The reported emission spectra, which have been obtained using low energy electron beam excitation, are assigned to the B(??-1 ??? X(??-1 electronic transitions of these cations on the basis of their Ne(I) photoelectron spectra. In another sixteen chloroflourobenzene cations, the B ??? X radiative decay could not be detected, from which is inferred that the B states are now associated with Cl 3p(??-1 ionisation processes. The lifetimes of the studied cations in the lowest vibrational levels of the B(??-1 state have been measured. ?? 1980.

  2. [Formation and emission spectra of C2 Swan bands during the reaction of laser ablation Al plume with CF4, CCl4 and CH2Br2 beams].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-dong; Li, Hai-yang

    2004-11-01

    The emission spectra of C2 Swan bands transition were observed in 430-600 nm region by Q-switched laser ablation target of Al reacting with CF4, CCl4 and CH2Br2 beams. Five vibration band sequences (delta v = 2, 1, 0, -1 and -2) of d3 pi(g)-a3 pi(g) were identified and the largest vibration number of excited state d is 6. Using a local thermal equilibrium model, the vibrational temperature of d state was determined to be about 6000 K. Meanwhile, some bumps, separated by about 0.3 nm, were observed between vibrational bands of delta v = 0 and -1 sequences, which were due to accidental and periodical accumulations of rotational lines belonging to several vibrational bands. The formation mechanism of excited C2 d3 pi(g) state is considered as when laser induced Al plasma expansion in the background reaction gas sample, the collisions between metal particles and gas sample molecules cause the dissociation of precursors, so atomic C is produced. Meanwhile, the shock wave induced by plasma expansion might cause molecules dissociation as well. Then C atoms combine to form C2 in the ground state X1 sigma(g)+ (Te = 0 cm(-1)) or first excited state a3 pi(u) = (Te = 716 cm(-1)). The electronic energy transfer between excited state Al (2S(1/2)) (Te = 25,348 cm(-1)) and C2 a3 pi(u) state produces the excited state d3 pi(g) (Te = 20,022 cm(-1)). Another mechanism that may be possible is that b3 sigma(g)+ state of C2 is produced first, then undergoes a radiationless transition into d3 pi(g) state through crossing with the d3 pi(g), v' = 6 level. But the vibrational population of v' < 6 levels isformed by collision relaxation. PMID:15762455

  3. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-{alpha}1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju; Weber, Joseph; Mohanakumar, T.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. {yields} Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. {yields} Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. {yields} Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-{alpha}1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 {+-} 1.1-, 3.2 {+-} 0.9-, and 3.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of {beta}-methyl cyclodextran ({beta}MCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 {+-} 0.3, vs {beta}MCD untreated being 6.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase) upon stimulation with KAT Abs. Depletion of cholesterol on NHBE cells upon treatment with {beta}MCD also resulted in decreased partitioning of caveolin in the membrane fraction indicating a decrease in raft-domains. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an important role for lipid raft-mediated ligation of Abs to KAT on the epithelial cell membrane, which results in the upregulation of growth factor cascades involved in the pathogenesis of BOS following human lung transplantation.

  4. Possible Charge-Exchange X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop Detected with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Hiroko; Kimura, Masashi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hewitt. John W.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2011-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopic measurements of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant indicate that metal abundances throughout most of the remnant s rim are depleted to approx.0.2 times the solar value. However, recent X-ray studies have revealed in some narrow regions along the outermost rim anomalously "enhanced" abundances (up to approx. 1 solar). The reason for these anomalous abundances is not understood. Here, we examine X-ray spectra in annular sectors covering nearly the entire rim of the Cygnus Loop using Suzaku (21 pointings) and XMM-Newton (1 pointing). We find that spectra in the "enhanced" abundance regions commonly show a strong emission feature at approx.0.7 keV. This feature is likely a complex of He-like O K(gamma + delta + epsilon), although other possibilities cannot be fully excluded. The intensity of this emission relative to He-like O K(alpha) appears to be too high to be explained as thermal emission. This fact, as well as the spatial concentration of the anomalous abundances in the outermost rim, leads us to propose an origin from charge-exchange processes between neutrals and H-like O. We show that the presence of charge-exchange emission could lead to the inference of apparently "enhanced" metal abundances using pure thermal emission models. Accounting for charge-exchange emission, the actual abundances could be uniformly low throughout the rim. The overall abundance depletion remains an open question. Subject headings: ISM: abundances ISM: individual objects (Cygnus Loop) ISM: supernova remnants X-rays: ISM atomic processes

  5. Use of neural network based auto-associative memory as a data compressor for pre-processing optical emission spectra in gas thermometry with the help of neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenko, S. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Pal, A. F.; Persiantsev, I. G.; Serov, A. O.

    2003-04-01

    Determination of temperature from optical emission spectra is an inverse problem that is often very difficult to solve, especially when substantial noise is present. One of the means that can be used to solve such a problem is a neural network trained on the results of modeling of spectra at different temperatures (Dolenko, et al., in: I.C. Parmee (Ed.), Adaptive Computing in Design and Manufacture, Springer, London, 1998, p. 345). Reducing the dimensionality of the input data prior to application of neural network can increase the accuracy and stability of temperature determination. In this study, such pre-processing is performed with another neural network working as an auto-associative memory with a narrow bottleneck in the hidden layer. The improvement in the accuracy and stability of temperature determination in presence of noise is demonstrated on model spectra similar to those recorded in a DC-discharge CVD reactor.

  6. A newly discovered DLA and associated Lyα emission in the spectra of the gravitationally lensed quasar UM673A,B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan; Pettini, Max; Steidel, Charles C.; King, Lindsay J.; Rudie, Gwen C.; Rakic, Olivera

    2010-12-01

    The sightline to the brighter member of the gravitationally lensed quasar pair UM673A,B intersects a damped Lyα system (DLA) at z = 1.62650 which, because of its low redshift, has not been recognized before. Our high-quality echelle spectra of the pair, obtained with HIRES on the Keck I telescope, show a drop in neutral hydrogen column density N(HI) by a factor of at least 400 between UM673A and UM673B, indicating that the DLA's extent in this direction is much less than the 2.7 h-170kpc separation between the two sightlines at z = 1.62650. By re-assessing this new case together with published data on other quasar pairs, we conclude that the typical size (radius) of DLAs at these redshifts is R ~= (5 +/- 3) h-170kpc, smaller than previously realized. Highly ionized gas associated with the DLA is more extended, as we find only small differences in the CIV absorption profiles between the two sightlines. Coincident with UM673B, we detect a weak and narrow Lyα emission line which we attribute to star formation activity at a rate SFR >~ 0.2Msolaryr-1. The DLA in UM673A is metal poor, with an overall metallicity ZDLA ~= 1/30Zsolar, and has a very low internal velocity dispersion. It exhibits some apparent peculiarities in its detailed chemical composition, with the elements Ti, Ni and Zn being deficient relative to Fe by factors of 2-3. The [Zn/Fe] ratio is lower than those measured in any other DLA or Galactic halo star, presumably reflecting somewhat unusual previous enrichment by stellar nucleosynthesis. We discuss the implications of these results for the nature of the galaxy hosting the DLA. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. E-mail: rcooke@ast.cam.ac.uk

  7. Relativistic Iron Emission and Disk Reflection in Galactic Microquasar XTE J1748-288

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fox, D. W.; Matteo, T. DI; Wijnands, R.; Belloni, T.; Pooley, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2001-01-01

    We report evidence for an Fe K(alpha) fluorescence line feature and disk reflection in the very high, high-, and low-state X-ray spectra of the Galactic microquasar XTE J1748-288 during its 1998 June outburst. Spectral analyses are made on data gathered throughout the outburst by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array. Gaussian line, relativistic disk emission line, and ionized disk reflection models are fitted to the data. In the very high state the line profile appears strongly redshifted, consistent with disk emission from the innermost stable orbits around a maximally rotating Kerr black hole. In the high state the line profile is less redshifted and increasingly prominent. The low-state line profile is very strong (approx. 0.5 keV equivalent width) and centered at 6.7 +/- 0.10 keV; disk line emission model fits indicate that the inner edge of the disk fluctuates between approx. 20Rg and approx. 100Rg in this state. The disk reflection fraction is traced through the outburst; reflection from an ionized disk is preferred in the very high and high states, and reflection from a relatively neutral disk is preferred in the low state. We discuss the implications of our findings for the binary system dynamics and accretion flow geometry in XTE J1748-288.

  8. Relativistic Iron Emission and Disk Reflection in Galactic Microquasar XTE J1748-288

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fox, D. W.; DiMatteo, T.; Wijnands, R.; Belloni, T.; Pooley, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2001-01-01

    We report evidence for an Fe K-alpha fluorescence line feature and disk reflection in the very high, high-, and low-state X-ray spectra of the Galactic microquasar XTE J1748 - 288 during its 1998 June outburst. Spectral analyses are made on data gathered throughout the outburst by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array. Gaussian line, relativistic disk emission line, and ionized disk reflection models are fitted to the data. In the very high state the line profile appears strongly redshifted, consistent with disk emission from the innermost stable orbits around a maximally rotating Kerr black hole. In the high state the line profile is less redshifted and increasingly prominent. The low-state line profile is very strong (approx. 0.5 keV equivalent width) and centered at 6.7 +/- 0.10 keV; disk line emission model fits indicate that the inner edge of the disk fluctuates between approx. 20R(sub g) and - approx. 100R(sub g) in this state. The disk reflection fraction is traced through the outburst; reflection from an ionized disk is preferred in the very high and high states, and reflection from a relatively neutral disk is preferred in the low state. We discuss the implications of our findings for the binary system dynamics and accretion flow geometry in XTE J1748 - 288.

  9. Intraoperative detection of 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites using the increased probe counting efficiency of the K-alpha probe design and variance-based statistical analysis with the three-sigma criteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative detection of 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites during 18F-FDG-directed surgery can be very challenging when utilizing gamma detection probes that rely on a fixed target-to-background (T/B) ratio (ratiometric threshold) for determination of probe positivity. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the counting efficiency and the success rate of in situ intraoperative detection of 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites (using the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method and the ratiometric threshold criteria method) for three different gamma detection probe systems. Methods Of 58 patients undergoing 18F-FDG-directed surgery for known or suspected malignancy using gamma detection probes, we identified nine 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites (from amongst seven patients) that were seen on same-day preoperative diagnostic PET/CT imaging, and for which each 18F-FDG-avid tissue site underwent attempted in situ intraoperative detection concurrently using three gamma detection probe systems (K-alpha probe, and two commercially-available PET-probe systems), and then were subsequently surgical excised. Results The mean relative probe counting efficiency ratio was 6.9 (± 4.4, range 2.2–15.4) for the K-alpha probe, as compared to 1.5 (± 0.3, range 1.0–2.1) and 1.0 (± 0, range 1.0–1.0), respectively, for two commercially-available PET-probe systems (P < 0.001). Successful in situ intraoperative detection of 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites was more frequently accomplished with each of the three gamma detection probes tested by using the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method than by using the ratiometric threshold criteria method, specifically with the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method being significantly better than the ratiometric threshold criteria method for determining probe positivity for the K-alpha probe (P = 0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that the improved probe counting efficiency of the K-alpha probe design used in conjunction with the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method can allow for improved detection of 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites when a low in situ T/B ratio is encountered. PMID:23496877

  10. Transition metal atomic multiplets in the ligand K-edge x-ray absorption spectra and multiple oxidation states in the L2,3 emission of strongly correlated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Mier, J.; Olalde-Velasco, P.; Yang, W.-L.; Denlinger, J.

    2014-07-01

    We present results that show that atomic multiplet ligand field calculations are in very good agreement with experimental x-ray absorption spectra at the L2,3 edge of transition metal (TM) di-fluorides (MF2, MCrCu). For chromium more than one TM oxidation state is needed to achieve such an agreement. We also show that signature of the TM atomic multiplet can be found at the pre-edge of the fluorine K-edge x-ray absorption spectra. TM atomic multiplet ligand field calculations with a structureless core hole show good agreement with the observed pre-edges in the experimental fluorine absorption spectra. Preliminary results for the comparison between calculated and experimental resonant x-ray emission spectra for nominal CrF2 with more than one oxidation state indicate the presence of three chromium oxidation states in the bulk.

  11. Investigation of Emission Band HeII+Ha in the Spectra of the Wolf-Rayet Type Star WR 136 = HD 192163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustamov, J. N.

    2007-06-01

    Results of investigation of the emission band HeII+Ha using 24 eshelle-spectrograms of the WR type star WR 136 = HD 192163 are presented. Observations carried out in 2005-2007 years at Cassegrain focus of 2-meter telescope of the ShAO named after N.Tusi of the National Academy of Sciences of the Azerbaijan, using eshelle-spectrometer. Determined various parameters of the emission band HeII+Ha: equivalent widths, radial velocity, central intensity, widths at half intensity. Variability of the violet part of the emission band HeII+Ha is revealed.

  12. Spectral Monitoring of Emission Band HeII+Ha^? in the Spectra of the Wolf-Rayet Type Star HD 192163 during 2005-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustamov, J. N.

    2008-12-01

    Results of investigation of the emission band HeII+Ha using 38 eshelle-spectrograms of the WR type star HD 192163 are presented. Observations carried out in 2005-2008 years at Cassegrain focus of 2-meter 'Zeiss' telescope of the ShAO named after N.Tusi of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, using eshelle-spectrometer. Determined equivalent widths and radial velocity of emission band ^B^NII+^B<95>. Variability of these parameters with the Julian date and variability of the violet part (from Lamda=6496 <9e> to Lamda=6532 <9e>) of the emission band HeII+Ha is revealed.

  13. Dissecting the Power Sources of Low-Luminosity Emission-Line Galaxy Nuclei via Comparison of HST-STIS and Ground-Based Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Anca; Shields, Joseph C.; Ho, Luis C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Castillo, Christopher A.

    2015-12-01

    Using a sample of ∼100 nearby line-emitting galaxy nuclei, we have built the currently definitive atlas of spectroscopic measurements of Hα and neighboring emission lines at subarcsecond scales. We employ these data in a quantitative comparison of the nebular emission in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based apertures, which offer an order-of-magnitude difference in contrast, and provide new statistical constraints on the degree to which transition objects and low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are powered by an accreting black hole at ≲10 pc. We show that while the small-aperture observations clearly resolve the nebular emission, the aperture dependence in the line ratios is generally weak, and this can be explained by gradients in the density of the line-emitting gas: the higher densities in the more nuclear regions potentially flatten the excitation gradients, suppressing the forbidden emission. The transition objects show a threefold increase in the incidence of broad Hα emission in the high-resolution data, as well as the strongest density gradients, supporting the composite model for these systems as accreting sources surrounded by star-forming activity. The narrow-line LINERs appear to be the weaker counterparts of the Type 1 LINERs, where the low accretion rates cause the disappearance of the broad-line component. The enhanced sensitivity of the HST observations reveals a 30% increase in the incidence of accretion-powered systems at z ≈ 0. A comparison of the strength of the broad-line emission detected at different epochs implies potential broad-line variability on a decade-long timescale, with at least a factor of three in amplitude. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  14. Studies of electronic configurations in the emission spectra of lanthanides and actinides: application to the interpretation of Es I and Es II, predictions for Fm I

    SciTech Connect

    Wyart, Jean-Francois . E-mail: jean-francois.wyart@lac.u-psud.fr; Blaise, Jean; Worden, Earl F.

    2005-02-15

    The interpretation of the spectra of free atoms and gaseous ions in the 4f{sup N} and 5f{sup N} periods became less active after critical compilations of energy levels appeared. However, several spectra are still under study and the application of the Racah-Slater and HFR methods to extended sets of configurations leads to revisions and additions. In doubly charged ions of lanthanides, the treatment of configuration interaction by means of effective parameters and by extension of the basis of states are both important. Concerning actinides, calculations of several observables (Lande factors and isotope shifts in Pu I, hyperfine constants, transition probabilities) prove the quality of eigenfunctions. The classification of Es I and Es II has been extended and radial parameters for fine and hyperfine structures have been derived. Level predictions for the next element fermium are supported by parameter extrapolations.

  15. Effect of the design of the active region of monolithic multi-color LED heterostructures on their spectra and emission efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F. Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Sinitsyn, M. A.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Karpov, S. Y.

    2015-11-15

    The design features of light-emitting-diode heterostructures with a monolithic InGaN/GaN active region containing several InGaN quantum wells (QWs) emitting at different wavelengths, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, are studied. It is shown that the number of emission bands can be raised to three by increasing the number of deposited InGaN QWs with different indium contents. The emission efficiency decreases by approximately 30% with increasing number of QWs at high currents. The dependences of the optical properties of the heterostructures on the number of QWs and types of barriers between the QWs (GaN layer or InGaN/GaN short-period superlattice) are analyzed. It is demonstrated that the ratio between the intensities of the emission lines widely varies with current flowing through the structure and greatly depends on the type and width of the barriers between the QWs.

  16. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  17. Theoretical modeling of UV-Vis absorption and emission spectra in liquid state systems including vibrational and conformational effects: Explicit treatment of the vibronic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    D’Abramo, Marco; Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitá Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome ; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2014-04-28

    Here, we extend a recently introduced theoretical-computational procedure [M. D’Alessandro, M. Aschi, C. Mazzuca, A. Palleschi, and A. Amadei, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114102 (2013)] to include quantum vibrational transitions in modelling electronic spectra of atomic molecular systems in condensed phase. The method is based on the combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations within the Perturbed Matrix Method approach. The main aim of the presented approach is to reproduce as much as possible the spectral line shape which results from a subtle combination of environmental and intrinsic (chromophore) mechanical-dynamical features. As a case study, we were able to model the low energy UV-vis transitions of pyrene in liquid acetonitrile in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Palagonitic Mars from Rock Rinds to Dust: Evidence from Visible, Near-IR, and Thermal Emission Spectra of Poorly Crystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Mertzman, S. A.; Lane, M. D.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    Visible and near-IR (VNIR) spectral data for Martian bright regions are characterized by a general shape consisting of a ferric absorption edge extending from about 400 to 750 nm and relatively constant reflectivity extending from about 750 nm to beyond 2000 nm . Among terrestrial geologic materials, the best spectral analogues are certain palagonic tephras from Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii). By definition, palagonite is a yellow or orange isotropic mineraloid formed by hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass. The ferric pigment in palagonite is nanometer-sized ferric oxide particles (np-Ox) dispersed throughout the hydrated basaltic glass matrix. The hydration state of the np-Ox particles is not known, and the best Martian spectral analogues contain allophane-like materials and not crystalline phyllosilicates. We show here that laboratory VNIR and TES spectra of palagonitic alteration rinds developed on basaltic rocks are spectral endmembers that provide a consistent explanation for both VNIR and TES data of Martian dark regions.

  19. Theoretical modeling of UV-Vis absorption and emission spectra in liquid state systems including vibrational and conformational effects: explicit treatment of the vibronic transitions.

    PubMed

    D'Abramo, Marco; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2014-04-28

    Here, we extend a recently introduced theoretical-computational procedure [M. D'Alessandro, M. Aschi, C. Mazzuca, A. Palleschi, and A. Amadei, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114102 (2013)] to include quantum vibrational transitions in modelling electronic spectra of atomic molecular systems in condensed phase. The method is based on the combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations within the Perturbed Matrix Method approach. The main aim of the presented approach is to reproduce as much as possible the spectral line shape which results from a subtle combination of environmental and intrinsic (chromophore) mechanical-dynamical features. As a case study, we were able to model the low energy UV-vis transitions of pyrene in liquid acetonitrile in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:24784250

  20. Normal incidence X-ray telescope power spectra of X-ray emission from solar active regions. I - Observations. II - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Golub, Leon

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to very high resolution image of coronal active regions obtained by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope is used to find a broad isotropic power-law spectrum of the spatial distribution of soft X-ray intensities. Magnetic structures of all sizes are present down to the resolution limit of the instrument. Power spectra for the X-ray intensities of a sample of topologically different active regions are found which fall off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. A model is presented that relates the basic features of coronal magnetic fluctuations to the subphotospheric hydrodynamic turbulence that generates them. The model is used to find a theoretical power spectrum for the X-ray intensity which falls off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. The implications of a turbulent regime in active regions are discussed.

  1. Superfluorescence spectra of excitons in quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Burau, G. K. G.; Stolz, H.; Vogel, W.

    2013-11-01

    We study the fluorescence light emitted from GaAs excitons in semiconductor quantum wells. The excitons are modeled as interacting bosons. By combining quantum optical methods for the excitonic emission spectrum with many particle descriptions of the transmission through the medium, we can evaluate the spectra outside the well. Comparing with experimental spectra, we get a very good agreement. The method helps to explain the main features of the observed spectra. It is demonstrated that the observed spectra show clear evidence of superfluorescent emission.

  2. Proton, deuteron, and triton emission at target rapidity in Au+Au collisions at 10.20A GeV: Spectra and directed flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ashktorab, K.; Beavis, D.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; Chu, Y.Y.; Cumming, J.B.; Debbe, R.; Gonin, M.; Gushue, S.; Levine, M.; Moskowitz, B.; Olness, J.; Remsberg, L.P.; Tannenbaum, M.J.; Videbaek, F.; Zhu, F.; Crawford, H.J.; Engelage, J.; Judd, E.; Chang, J.; Eldredge, W.; Fung, S.Y.; Seto, R.; Xu, G.; Zhu, Q.; Chi, C.; Cole, B.A.; Moulson, M.; Nagamiya, S.; Nayak, T.K.; Wang, F.Q.; Wang, Y.; Wu, Y.; Zajc, W.A.; Akiba, Y.; Hamagaki, H.; Homma, S.; Sako, H.; Kaneko, H.; Britt, H.C.; Cianciolo, V.; Luke, J.; Namboodiri, M.N.; Sangster, T.C.; Soltz, R.; Thomas, J.H.; Tonse, S.R.; Ahle, L.; Baker, M.D.; Heintzelman, G.; Ogilvie, C.A.; Steadman, S.G.; Stephans, G.S.; Sung, T.; Woodruff, D.S.; Zachary, D.; Hayano, R.S.; Shigaki, K.; Kumagai, A.; Kurita, K.; Miake, Y.; Ueno-Hayashi, S.; Yagi, K.; Kang, J.H.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Hansen, A.G.; Hansen, L.

    1998-03-01

    Systematic results are presented on proton, deuteron, and triton emission from the target spectator region in collisions of 10.20A GeV gold projectiles with a gold target. A forward hodoscope utilizes detection of projectile spectator fragments to determine the orientation of the reaction plane, event by event. The directed flow {l_angle}p{sub x}{r_angle} is determined as a function of pseudorapidity. Projectile spectator energy is used to estimate impact parameters. Results are compared to current theoretical models ARC, ART, and RQMD. In all cases good agreement with theory is obtained for calculations utilizing a pure cascade without nuclear potential contributions. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Effects of thermal annealing on photoluminescence spectra in π-conjugated polymer film: evidence for dual emission by temperature dependent measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. Z.; Yang, X.; Wang, Y. C.; Sheng, C.-X.; Chen, Q.

    2014-09-01

    Various spectroscopy techniques such as absorption, photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy, were used to study the photophysics in poly [2-methoxy-5-(20-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) films, which were dropped cast on glass substrates using its toluene solution and being annealed at various temperatures. With the analysis of temperature dependence PL intensities, we conclude that PL emission around 680 nm at low temperature is due to intertain excimers instead of intrachain excitons for 450 K annealed film. On the other hand, this relative intensity difference is much smaller in both unannealed and 500 K annealed films, in which the morphology is amorphous and microcrystalline, respectively. We conclude that the interchain photoexcitations play crucial roles in the photophysics of MEH-PPV films. The further measurements on PIA spectrum of MEH-PPV films suggest that the interchain photoexciation is also important for the generation of triplet excitons.

  4. Analysis of the absorption spectra of gas emission of patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by laser optoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukreeva, Ekaterina B.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Kistenev, Yurii V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Tuzikov, Sergei A.; Yumov, Evgenii L.

    2013-02-01

    It is important to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer in the early stages of the disease. The method of laser opto-acoustic gas analysis, in this case, can act as a promising tool for diagnostics. The material for this study were the gas emission samples collected from patients and healthy volunteers - samples of exhaled air, swabs from teeth and cheeks. A set of material was formed three groups: healthy volunteers, patients with COPD, lung cancer patients. The resulting samples were analyzed by means of laser opto-acoustic gas analyzers: with intracavity location detector (ILPA-1), with extracavity location detector (LGA-2). Presentation of the results in an easy to visual form was performed using the method of elastic maps, based on the principal component analysis. The results of analysis show potentialities of usage of laser optoacoustic spectroscopy application to assess the status of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

  5. A study of radiative Auger emission, satellites and hypersatellites in photon-induced K x-ray spectra of some elements in the range 20≤Z≤32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, H. R.

    2000-09-01

    Photon-induced K x-ray spectra of Ca, Ti, Fe, Zn and Ge have been investigated. The measurements have been made using a crystal spectrometer combined with a thin scintillation detector. Excited by the collimated photon beam from an Rh-anode x-ray tube, the spectra of all these elements reveal the existence of radiative Auger emission (RAE) structure and the satellite and hypersatellite lines along with the diagram lines. The energies and intensities of the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1,3 and Kβ5 diagram lines and the Kα satellites and hypersatellite transitions are presented. The intensity of the RAE structure corresponding to the Kβ1,3 x-ray transition and the energy of the RAE edge for each element is also reported. The measured results have been compared with the values from other sources such as electron/heavy-ion excitation and theoretical values. From the intensities of the satellite lines of these elements, the average L-vacancy fraction PL has been deduced in each case.

  6. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of size-expanded Janus-type AT nucleobases and effect of base pairing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we design benzo- and naphtha-expanded Janus AT base analogues, using DFT, TDDFT, and CIS methods to investigate the structural and optical properties of the Janus AT base analogues (termed as J-AT, xJ-AT, yyJ-AT, BF, xBF and yyBF), and also consider the effect of base pairing. The results show that the Janus AT base analogues can pair with T and A simultaneously to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The ground state structure of J-AT is similar to BF, the size expansion is 2.42 for the x-Janus AT bases and 4.86 for the yy-Janus AT bases. The excited state geometries of J-AT and BF change dramatically, while the other bases are similar to the ground state geometries. The lowest excited singlet transitions of the Janus AT base analogues are predicted to be of ??(*) character and mainly dominated by the configuration HOMO-LUMO. The maximum absorption wavelengths of size expansion Janus AT base analogues are greatly red shifted compared with J-AT (or BF). BF, xBF and yyJ-AT have larger oscillator strengths than J-AT, xJ-AT and yyBF. The emission wavelengths of the Janus AT base analogues also exhibit red shifts from x-Janus AT bases to yy-Janus AT bases. However, the emission wavelengths of J-AT and BF change greatly, which are coincident with the structures observed in the excited state geometries. With regard to the WC base pairs, the B3LYP functional reveals that the lowest energy transitions of some base pairs are charge transfer excitation, while the other base pairs are local excitation. The CAM-B3LYP functional predicts that all the lowest transitions are localized on the Janus AT bases, and show good agreement with the results of the M062X functional. PMID:24368287

  7. Co-spatial Long-slit UV/Optical AL Spectra of 10 Galactic Planetary Nebulae with HST/STIS. I. Description of the Observations, Global Emission-line Measurements, and CNO Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Shaw, Richard A.; Henry, Richard B. C.; Balick, Bruce; Corradi, Romano L. M.

    2015-04-01

    We present observations and initial analysis from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 19 program using STIS to obtain the first co-spatial, UV-optical spectra of 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNs). Our primary objective was to measure the critical emission lines of carbon and nitrogen with unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and spatial resolution over the wavelength range 1150-10270 Å, with the ultimate goal of quantifying the production of these elements in low- and intermediate-mass stars. Our sample was selected from PNs with a near-solar metallicity, but spanning a broad range in N/O based on published ground-based and IUE spectra. This study, the first of a series, concentrates on the observations and emission-line measurements obtained by integrating along the entire spatial extent of the slit. We derived ionic and total elemental abundances for the seven PNs with the strongest UV line detections (IC 2165, IC 3568, NGC 2440, NGC 3242, NGC 5315, NGC 5882, and NGC 7662). We compare these new results with other recent studies of the nebulae and discuss the relative merits of deriving the total elemental abundances of C, N, and O using ionization correction factors (ICFs) versus summed abundances. For the seven PNs with the best UV line detections, we conclude that summed abundances from direct diagnostics of ions with measurable UV lines give the most accurate values for the total elemental abundances of C and N (although ICF abundances often produced good results for C). In some cases where significant discrepancies exist between our abundances and those from other studies, we show that the differences can often be attributed to their use of fluxes that are not co-spatial. Finally, we examined C/O and N/O versus O/H and He/H in well-observed Galactic, LMC, and SMC PNs and found that highly accurate abundances are essential for properly inferring elemental yields from their progenitor stars. Future papers will discuss photoionization modeling of our observations, of both the integrated spectra and spatial variations of the UV versus optical lines along the STIS slit lengths, which are unique to our observations. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  8. Investigation of the europium emission spectra of the europium-oxytetracycline complex in the presence of human low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luciane dos Santos; Grasso, Andréa Nastri; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Neto, Antonio M Figueiredo; Vieira, Nilson Dias; Gidlund, Magnus; Steffens, Juliana; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2011-05-01

    Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL), often known as "bad cholesterol" is one of the responsible to increase the risk of coronary arterial diseases. For this reason, the cholesterol present in the LDL particle has become one of the main parameters to be quantified in routine clinical diagnosis. A number of tools are available to assess LDL particles and estimate the cholesterol concentration in the blood. The most common methods to quantify the LDL in the plasma are the density gradient ultracentrifugation and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, these techniques require special equipments and can take a long time to provide the results. In this paper, we report on the increase of the Europium emission in Europium-oxytetracycline complex aqueous solutions in the presence of LDL. This increase is proportional to the LDL concentration in the solution. This phenomenum can be used to develop a method to quantify the number of LDL particles in a sample. A comparison between the performances of the oxytetracycline and the tetracycline in the complexes is also made. PMID:20177749

  9. Suzaku Monitoring of Hard X-Ray Emission from Eta Carinae Over a Single Binary Orbital Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yuasa, Takayuki; Ishida, Manabu; Gull, Theodore R.; Pittard, Julian M.; Russell, Christopher M. P.; Madura, Thomas I.

    2014-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray observatory monitored the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae 10 times during the whole 5.5 year orbital cycle between 2005 and 2011. This series of observations presents the first long-term monitoring of this enigmatic system in the extremely hard X-ray band between 15 and 40 kiloelectron volts. During most of the orbit, the 15-25 kiloelectron volts emission varied similarly to the 2-10 kiloelectron volts emission, indicating an origin in the hard energy tail of the thermal energy approximately equal to 4 kiloelectron volts wind-wind collision (WWC) plasma. However, the 15-25 kiloelectron volts emission declined only by a factor of three around periastron when the 2-10 kiloelectron volts emission dropped by two orders of magnitude due probably to an eclipse of the WWC plasma. The observed minimum in the 15-25 kiloelectron volts emission occurred after the 2-10 kiloelectron volts flux had already recovered by a factor of approximately 3. This may mean that the WWC activity was strong, but hidden behind the thick primary stellar wind during the eclipse. The 25-40 kiloelectron volts flux was rather constant through the orbital cycle, at the level measured with INTEGRAL in 2004. This result may suggest a connection of this flux component to the gamma-ray source detected in this field. The helium-like Fe K-alpha line complex at approximately 6.7 kiloelectron volts became strongly distorted toward periastron as seen in the previous cycle. The 5-9 kiloelectron volts spectra can be reproduced well with a two-component spectral model, which includes plasma in collision equilibrium and a plasma in non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) with tau approximately equal to 10 (sup 11) per cubic centimeter per second. The NEI plasma increases in importance toward periastron.

  10. Photobleaching Response of Different Sources of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Exposed to Natural Solar Radiation Using Absorption and ExcitationEmission Matrix Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L.; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN?TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN?TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 09, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein-like fluorescence substance. Photobleaching was an important driver of CDOM and nutrients biogeochemistry in lake water. PMID:24204852

  11. Spectra of Irradiated Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Sudarsky, David

    2002-11-01

    As many as 101 extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) have been detected by radial-velocity techniques, but none has been detected directly by its own emission or by reflection of the light from its parent star. We review the current state-of-the-art in the theoretical modeling of the spectra of giant planets outside the solar system and the basic theory of EGP spectra and atmospheres. We are now entering a new era of planet discovery and measurement. This contribution is meant to communicate some of the excitement in the astronomical community as the hunt for these exotic and remarkable objects accelerates.

  12. Detailed non-LTE calculations of the iron emission from NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Klein, Richard I.; Castor, John I.; Nash, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray iron line emission from NGC 1068 observed by the Ginga satellite is modeled using the new multiline, multilevel, non-LTE radiative transport code ALTAIR and a detailed atomic model for Ne-like through stripped iron. The parameter space of the obscured type 1 Seyfert nucleus model for this object is studied. The equivalent width is greater than previously predicted. It is found that detailed radiative transfer can have a significant effect on the observed line flux both for the K alpha line and for the L-shell emission. The ionization of the iron increases with temperature. Therefore the K alpha equivalent width and energy is a function not only of the ionization parameter, but also of the column depth and temperature. For a likely model of NGC 1068 it is found that the iron abundance is about twice solar, but that modifications of this model may permit a smaller abundance.

  13. EXPANSION VELOCITY OF EJECTA IN TYCHO's SUPERNOVA REMNANT MEASURED BY DOPPLER BROADENED X-RAY LINE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Hayato, Asami; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Katsuda, Satoru; Hwang, Una; Hughes, John P.; Ozawa, Midori; Bamba, Aya; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Terada, Yukikatsu; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Kunieda, Hideyo

    2010-12-10

    We show that the expansion of ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) is consistent with a spherically symmetric shell, based on Suzaku measurements of the Doppler broadened X-ray emission lines. All of the strong K{alpha} line emissions show broader widths at the center than at the rim, while the centroid energies are constant across the remnant (except for Ca). This is the pattern expected for Doppler broadening due to expansion of the SNR ejecta in a spherical shell. To determine the expansion velocities of the ejecta, we applied a model for each emission-line feature having two Gaussian components separately representing red- and blueshifted gas, and inferred the Doppler velocity difference between these two components directly from the fitted centroid energy difference. Taking into account the effect of projecting a three-dimensional shell to the plane of the detector, we derived average spherical expansion velocities independently for the K{alpha} emission of Si, S, Ar, and Fe, and K{beta} of Si. We found that the expansion velocities of Si, S, and Ar ejecta of 4700 {+-} 100 km s{sup -1} are distinctly higher than that obtained from Fe K{alpha} emission, 4000 {+-} 300 km s{sup -1}, which is consistent with segregation of the Fe in the inner ejecta. Combining the observed ejecta velocities with the ejecta proper-motion measurements by Chandra, we derived a distance to Tycho's SNR of 4 {+-} 1 kpc.

  14. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  15. SPECTRAL DECONVOLUTION OF FLUORESCENCE SPECTRA FROM PLANT EXTRACTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluorescence emission spectra have been observed to yield information pertaining to the identification of plant species. One approach to acquiring these characteristic spectra has been to record the spectral signature resulting from an extract of the plant. Often these spectra have been overwhelme...

  16. Infrared reflectance spectra (4-12 micron) of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here are infrared reflectance spectra of a typical set of Apollo samples to illustrate spectral character in the mid-infrared (4 to 12 microns) of lunar materials and how the spectra varies among three main forms: soil, breccia, and igneous rocks. Reflectance data, to a close approximation, are the inverse of emission spectra; thus, for a given material the spectral reflectance (R) at any given wavelength is related to emission (E) by 1 - R equals E. Therefore, one can use reflectance spectra of lunar samples to predict how emission spectra of material on the lunar surface will appear to spectrometers on orbiting spacecraft or earthbound telescopes. Spectra were measured in the lab in dry air using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer. Shown here is only the key portion (4 to 12 microns) of each spectrum relating to the principal spectral emission region for sunlit lunar materials and to where the most diagnostic spectral features occur.

  17. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  18. Mid-infrared spectra of Martian komantiite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes, David P.

    1992-01-01

    Synthetic mid-infrared emissive spectra of basalts of possible Martian komatiitic compositions were generated to show what might be seen in data returned from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). TES is flying on the Mars Observer arriving at Mars in late 1993. The synthetic Martian komatiite spectra were generated using mineralogy based on Shergottite, Nakhlite, and Chassigny (SNC) meteorites and Viking X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) data. These data sets provide strong evidence for the existence of ultramafic lavas on Mars, particularly lavas of komatiitic composition.

  19. Automatic analysis of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padayachee, J.; Meyer, K. A.; Prozesky, V. M.

    2001-07-01

    It has been shown that Bayesian statistics is a powerful tool in the analysis of ion beam analysis (IBA) data. Past work has shown its applicability to the deconvolution of the detector response function from micro-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectra, subtraction of the background from PIXE spectra, the extraction of depth profiles from PIXE spectra using two detectors and the extraction of depth profiles from RBS spectra. However, the method has some drawbacks, e.g. numerical integration, α-marginalisation, etc., all of which result in very long computation times. In this paper, preliminary results are presented from the application of the Bayesian theory to the automatic extraction of depth profiles from RBS spectra with the aim of creating an online RBS analysis program, which has the advantage of minimal user input while still being as computationally intensive as conventional RBS analysis packages to extract a depth profile.

  20. New LRS spectra for 356 bright IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kevin; Cohen, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The low-resolution spectra of all IRAS point sources with F(nu) (12 microns) greater than 40 Jy that were not included in the Atlas of Low-Resolution Spectra are presented. These have been classified into eight groups based upon the spectral morphology. Silicate emission spectra and red-continuum spectra associated with H II region sources form about 60 percent of this sample. All types of spectra in the LRS Atlas are represented in the sample except for emission-line sources. The sample is used to test a recent classification scheme for IRAS sources based on broadband colors. The spectra is used to test a recent classification scheme for IRAS sources based on broadband colors. The spectra are consistent with the classifications from the colors in most cases.

  1. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012), where, for the ellipsoidal model, we set the rotational phase at 0 degrees. We observed significant differences between the two models for the band-I area and the band-II area but, we did not find significant differences for the BAR parameter. For the spectral slope, we have meaningful differences between the two models, where the variation of the spectral slope is in the first decimal place, and this difference is bigger when we increase the phase parameter b.

  2. Analysis of observational spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The first step in the analysis of gamma ray energy loss spectra is their conversion to differential energy and differential angular photon spectra. This conversion can be carried out if the detector response and the background are both known. Once these parameters are known, there are many techniques that can be used to convert pulse height spectra to photon spectra. These techniques are discussed and background problems are considered. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of energy loss spectra in the lower gamma ray energy domain. Problems of transportations from pulse height to photon space are most complex in this domain and the methods shown illustrate many of the problems which arise in the general analysis of energy loss spectra.

  3. Spectra of explosive glowing of heavy metal azides at initiation by high-current electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleshko, V. I.; Lysyk, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Glowing spectra of products resulted by heavy metal azides explosive decomposition initiated by high-current electron beam were measured and identified. Intensive emission lines related to atoms of alkali metals were observed in spectra of samples under study. These atoms enter explosives during their preparation. Emission lines of elements being part of a sample holder were also presented in spectra of explosion.

  4. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  5. K-Shell Diagram and Hypersatellite Spectra of 4D Transition Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Diamant, R.; Kao, C.; Huotari, S.; Hamalainen, K.; Sharon, R.; Honkimaki, V.; Buslaps, T.; Deutsch, M.

    2009-07-25

    The K-shell diagram (K{alpha}{sub 1,2} and K{beta}{sub 1,3}) and hypersatellite (HS) (K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 1,2}) spectra of Y, Zr, Mo, and Pd have been measured with high energy-resolution using photoexcitation by 90 keV synchrotron radiation. Comparison of the measured and ab initio calculated HS spectra demonstrates the importance of quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects for the HS spectra. Phenomenological fits of the measured spectra by Voigt functions yield accurate values for the shift of the HS from the diagram lines, the splitting of the HS lines, and their intensity ratio. Good agreement with theory was found for all quantities except for the intensity ratio, which is dominated by the intermediacy of the coupling of the angular momenta. The observed deviations imply that our current understanding of the variation of the coupling scheme from LS to jj across the periodic table may require some revision.

  6. Elevated temperature reference spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Phillips, B.; Tussey, L.

    1997-12-31

    A compilation of infrared spectra at elevated temperatures is required for the accurate quantification of gas concentrations for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extractive sampling of stack gases and FTIR in-situ process monitoring. Analysis of high temperature gases utilizing ambient temperature reference spectra can result in significant quantification errors. The US Air Force`s Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is currently assisting the EPA in measuring reference spectra and making existing and new data available to the public through two ongoing efforts. One of these efforts is the measurement of elevated temperature infrared reference spectra of the low vapor pressure hazardous air pollutants (HAP) compounds, as well as spectral interfering compounds. The equipment and procedures used for the elevated temperature reference spectra measurements is described as well as some of the challenges encountered in these measurements. Examples of the reference spectra are also presented. To make the reference spectra developed by AEDC and other EPA programs easily accessible, AEDC has also been tasked to maintain a site on the World Wide Web containing reference spectra, reports, and software tools of interest to the optical sensing community. This web site has seen increased use during the three years that it has been in existence with users from academia, commercial, and government, both domestic and foreign. The site has undergone several improvements since inception and actively solicits inputs for further improvements from its users. A description of this web site and recent improvements and additions is given in this paper.

  7. Quantum synchrotron spectra from semirelativistic electrons in teragauss magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron spectra are calculated from quantum electrodynamic transition rates for thermal and power-law electron distributions. It is shown that quantum effects appear in thermal spectra when the photon energy is greater than the electron temperature, and in power-law spectra when the electron energy in units of the electron rest mass times the magnetic field strength in units of the critical field strength is of order unity. These spectra are compared with spectra calculated from the ultrarelativistic approximation for synchrotron emission. It is found that the approximation for the power-law spectra is good, and the approximation for thermal spectra produces the shape of the spectrum accurately but fails to give the correct normalization. Single photon pair creation masks the quantum effects for power-law distributions, so only modifications to thermal spectra are important for gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to 10 mm. Methods: Parallel double-station video observations allowed us to compute heliocentric orbits for all meteors. Most observations were performed during the periods of activity of major meteor showers in the years between 2006 and 2012. Spectra are classified according to relative intensities of the low-temperature emission lines of Mg, Na, and Fe. Results: Shower meteors were found to be of normal composition, except for Southern δ Aquariids and some members of the Geminid shower, neither of which have Na in the meteor spectra. Variations in Na content are typical for the Geminid shower. Three populations of Na-free mereoroids were identified. The first population are iron meteorites, which have an asteroidal-chondritic origin, but one meteoroid with low perihelion (0.11 AU) was found among the iron meteorites. The second population were Sun-approaching meteoroids in which sodium is depleted by thermal desorption. The third population were Na-free meteoroids of cometary origin. Long exposure to cosmic rays on the surface of comets in the Oort cloud and disintegration of this crust might be the origin of this population of meteoroids. Spectra (Figs. 17-30) are only, Tables 4-6 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A67

  9. New carbon stars identified from low-resolution IRAS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little-Marenin, I. R.; Ramsay, M. E.; Stephenson, C. B.; Little, S. J.; Price, S. D.

    1987-03-01

    The authors have classified 176 IRAS sources as carbon stars based on the presence of the SiC emission feature at 11.2 micron in their low-resolution spectra (LRS). The right ascension and declination, the LRS characterization, and the quality of the two halves of the LRS spectra are shown for each source. Associations with other catalogs are also given.

  10. The width of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Borgonovo, Luis

    2015-03-01

    The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper, we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the EFE spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability <10-6). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes - synchrotron and blackbody radiation - the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78 per cent of long GRBs and 85 per cent of short GRBs are incompatible with the minimum width of standard slow cooling synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, with fast cooling spectra predicting even wider spectra. Photospheric emission can explain the spectra if mechanisms are invoked to give a spectrum much broader than a blackbody.

  11. Spectra over complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, H.A.; Larko, D.; Lipschutz, R.; Stone, G.

    1981-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over land downwind of a water surface, over hilltops and escarpments, and over rolling farmland. The following hypotheses can be used to explain the differences between these spectra. (1) For wavelengths short compared to the fetch over the new terrain, spectral densities are in equilibrium with the new terrain. (2) For wavelengths long compared to this fetch, spectral densities remain unchanged if the ground is horizontal. If the flow is over a steep hill, the low-frequency structure is modified by distortion of the mean flow, with the longitudinal component losing energy relative to the lateral and vertical components. Because vertical-velocity spectra contain relatively less low-frequency energy than horizontal-velocity spectra, energetic vertical-velocity fluctuations tend to be in equilibrium with local terrain.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  13. Algorithms for classification of astronomical object spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Szuppe, J.; Hryniewicz, K.

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining interesting celestial objects from tens of thousands or even millions of recorded optical-ultraviolet spectra depends not only on the data quality but also on the accuracy of spectra decomposition. Additionally rapidly growing data volumes demands higher computing power and/or more efficient algorithms implementations. In this paper we speed up the process of substracting iron transitions and fitting Gaussian functions to emission peaks utilising C++ and OpenCL methods together with the NOSQL database. In this paper we implemented typical astronomical methods of detecting peaks in comparison to our previous hybrid methods implemented with CUDA.

  14. Correlation of molecular structure with fluorescence spectra in rare earth chelates. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Degnan, J.; Filipescu, N.; Mcavoy, N.

    1968-01-01

    Rare earth chelates fluorescence spectra correlation with molecular structure, analyzing emission spectrum internal Stark splitting of tetramethylammonium tetrakis /dibenzoylmethido/europate microcrystals

  15. The analysis of spectra of novae taken near maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stryker, L. L.; Hestand, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wehrse, R.; Hauschildt, P.; Spies, W.; Baschek, B.; Shaviv, G.

    1988-01-01

    A project to analyze ultraviolet spectra of novae obtained at or near maximum optical light is presented. These spectra are characterized by a relatively cool continuum with superimposed permitted emission lines from ions such as Fe II, Mg II, and Si II. Spectra obtained late in the outburst show only emission lines from highly ionized species and in many cases these are forbidden lines. The ultraviolet data will be used with calculations of spherical, expanding, stellar atmospheres for novae to determine elemental abundances by spectral line synthesis. This method is extremely sensitive to the abundances and completely independent of the nebular analyses usually used to obtain novae abundances.

  16. Infrared emission from interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The mid-IR absorption and Raman spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the mechanisms determining them are reviewed, and the implications for observations of similar emission spectra in interstellar clouds are considered. Topics addressed include the relationship between PAHs and amorphous C, the vibrational spectroscopy of PAHs, the molecular emission process, molecular anharmonicity, and the vibrational quasi-continuum. Extensive graphs, diagrams, and sample spectra are provided, and the interstellar emission bands are attributed to PAHs with 20-30 C atoms on the basis of the observed 3.3/3.4-micron intensity ratios.

  17. "Decoupled" Proton NMR Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, M.; Freeman, R.

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra are recorded in a new form where all resonances are singlets at the chemical-shift frequencies, with no spin-spin splittings. These "decoupled" proton spectra are derived from two-dimensional J spectra after real Fourier transformation (without frequency discrimination in F1) so that each spin multiplet lies along both the 45° and the 135° diagonal, forming a pattern similar to St. Andrew's cross, with C 4 symmetry. The chemical shifts are located by searching for these centers of symmetry with a postacquisition data-processing algorithm. This is designed to facilitate the separation of overlapping and interpenetrating spin multiplets. The method is illustrated with applications to the 400 MHz high-resolution proton spectra of dehydrotestosterone and 4-androsten-3,17-dione. It is also possible to separate the spectra of components in a mixture and this is illustrated by breaking down the spectrum of an aqueous solution of D-glucose into subspectra from the α and β anomers, in order to follow the time evolution of the mutarotation.

  18. Removing The Instrument Function From Fluorescence Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Andrew F.

    1989-05-01

    The spectrum acquired at the sample phototnultiplier tube of a fluorescence spectrophotometer is a product of the sample spectrum and the instrument function. The determination of the instrument function and its removal from the acquired spectrum is often critical to the accurate determination of the physical properties of the sample. Methods are discussed for the determination and removal of the instrument function from excitation and emission spectra. Methods considered include quantum counters and ratio circuits for excitation correction, and emission correction against calibrated excitation systems, calibrated tungsten lamps, and NBS standard quinine sulfate.

  19. Interpreting Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.

    1996-06-01

    Interpreting Astronomical Spectra D. Emerson Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edingurgh "Interpreting Astronomical Spectra" describes how physical conditions such as temperature, density and composition can be obtained from the spectra of a broad range of astronomical environments ranging from the cold interstellar medium to very hot coronal gas and from stellar atmospheres to quasars. In this book the author has succeeded in providing a coherent and integrated approach to the interpretation of astronomical spectroscopy, placing the emphasis on the physical understanding of spectrum formation rather than on instrumental considerations. MKS units and consistent symbols are employed throughout so that the fundamental ideas common to diverse environments are made clear and the importance of different temperature ranges and densities can be seen. Aimed at senior undergraduates and graduates studying physics, astronomy and astrophysics, this book will also appeal to the professional astronomer.

  20. Interpreting Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.

    1999-03-01

    Interpreting Astronomical Spectra D. Emerson Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edingurgh "Interpreting Astronomical Spectra" describes how physical conditions such as temperature, density and composition can be obtained from the spectra of a broad range of astronomical environments ranging from the cold interstellar medium to very hot coronal gas and from stellar atmospheres to quasars. In this book the author has succeeded in providing a coherent and integrated approach to the interpretation of astronomical spectroscopy, placing the emphasis on the physical understanding of spectrum formation rather than on instrumental considerations. MKS units and consistent symbols are employed throughout so that the fundamental ideas common to diverse environments are made clear and the importance of different temperature ranges and densities can be seen. Aimed at senior undergraduates and graduates studying physics, astronomy and astrophysics, this book will also appeal to the professional astronomer.

  1. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  2. Discrimination of phytoplankton classes using characteristic spectra of 3D fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Lei, Shu-He; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Chen-Jian

    2006-02-01

    The discrimination of phytoplankton classes using the characteristic fluorescence spectra extracted from three-dimensional fluorescence spectra was investigated. Single species cultures of 11 phytoplankton species, representing 5 major phytoplankton divisions, were used. The 3D fluorescence spectra of the cultures grown at different temperatures (20 and 15 degrees C) and illumination intensities (140, 80 and 30 microM m(-2) s(-1)) were measured and their feature extraction methods were explored. Ordering Rayleigh and Raman scattering data as zero, the obtained excitation-emission matrices were processed by both singular value decomposition (SVD) and trilinear decomposition methods. The resulting first principal component can be regarded as the characteristic spectrum of the original 3D fluorescence spectrum. The analysis shows that such characteristic spectra have a discriminatory capability. At different temperatures, the characteristic spectra of Isochrysis galbana, Platymonas helgolanidica and Skeletonema costatuma have high degrees of similarity to their own species samples, while the spectra similarities of Alexandrium tamarense, Prorocentrum dentatum, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Ch. Debilis, Ch. Didymus and Synechococcus sp. are not as significant as the other three species. C. curvisetus, Ch. Debilis and Ch. Didymus, belonging to genus Chaetoceros, have identical spectra and cannot be discriminated at all. Regarding all six diatom species as one class, the average discriminant error rate is below 9%. It is worth mentioning that the diatom class can be distinguished from A. tamarense and P. dentatum, which belong to Dinophyta. PMID:16024277

  3. Discrimination of phytoplankton classes using characteristic spectra of 3D fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Lei, Shu-He; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Chen-Jian

    2006-02-01

    The discrimination of phytoplankton classes using the characteristic fluorescence spectra extracted from three-dimensional fluorescence spectra was investigated. Single species cultures of 11 phytoplankton species, representing 5 major phytoplankton divisions, were used. The 3D fluorescence spectra of the cultures grown at different temperatures (20 and 15 °C) and illumination intensities (140, 80 and 30 μM m -2 s -1) were measured and their feature extraction methods were explored. Ordering Rayleigh and Raman scattering data as zero, the obtained excitation-emission matrices were processed by both singular value decomposition (SVD) and trilinear decomposition methods. The resulting first principal component can be regarded as the characteristic spectrum of the original 3D fluorescence spectrum. The analysis shows that such characteristic spectra have a discriminatory capability. At different temperatures, the characteristic spectra of Isochrysis galbana, Platymonas helgolanidica and Skeletonema costatuma have high degrees of similarity to their own species samples, while the spectra similarities of Alexandrium tamarense, Prorocentrum dentatum, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Ch. Debilis, Ch. Didymus and Synechococcus sp. are not as significant as the other three species. C. curvisetus, Ch. Debilis and Ch. Didymus, belonging to genus Chaetoceros, have identical spectra and cannot be discriminated at all. Regarding all six diatom species as one class, the average discriminant error rate is below 9%. It is worth mentioning that the diatom class can be distinguished from A. tamarense and P. dentatum, which belong to Dinophyta.

  4. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  5. Signatures of hot electrons and fluorescence in Mo Kα emission on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S. B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Jennings, C. A.; Coverdale, C. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Dunham, G.; Ouart, N.; Dasgupta, A.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.

    2014-03-15

    Recent experiments on the Z accelerator have produced high-energy (17 keV) inner-shell K-alpha emission from molybdenum wire array z-pinches. Extensive absolute power and spectroscopic diagnostics along with collisional-radiative modeling enable detailed investigation into the roles of thermal, hot electron, and fluorescence processes in the production of high-energy x-rays. We show that changing the dimensions of the arrays can impact the proportion of thermal and non-thermal K-shell x-rays.

  6. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  7. Camera artifacts in IUE low-dispersion spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. Michael; Norman, Dara J.; Bruegman, Otto W.

    1990-01-01

    Sky-background images obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) were analyzed to study artificial spectral features (camera artifacts) in low-dispersion spectra. The artifacts mimic emission features and have been present in long-exposure spectra since the launch of the IUE satellite. The camera artifacts are strong in spectra characterized by long exposure times because they scale in time-integrated flux with the background level, which increases during the exposure due to camera phosphorescence. The artifacts cannot be detected in spectra obtained from short, direct exposures of flat-field lamps or standard stars. Plots of average sky-background spectra for the three operational IUE cameras (SWP, LWP, and LWR) are given to aid scientists in the identification of artifacts in their spectra.

  8. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  9. Dual multifractal spectra.

    PubMed

    Roux, Stéphane; Jensen, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    The multifractal formalism characterizes the scaling properties of a physical density rho as a function of the distance L. To each singularity alpha of the field is attributed a fractal dimension for its support f(alpha). An alternative representation has been proposed by considering the distribution of distances associated to a fixed mass. Computing these spectra for a multifractal Cantor set, it is shown that these two approaches are dual to each other, and that both spectra as well as the moment scaling exponents are simply related. We apply the same inversion formalism to exponents obtained for turbulent statistics in the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model and observe that the same duality relation holds here. PMID:14995714

  10. Mass spectra of copolymers.

    PubMed

    Montaudo, Maurizio S

    2002-01-01

    Recent and older literature (covering the last 12-13 years) in the field of mass spectra of random and block copolymers is reviewed. A detailed description is given of the information on copolymer properties that can be recovered from the analysis of the low-mass region of the spectrum (the region below 500 Da) and the high-mass region. The features of mass spectra of copolymers obtained by different synthetic routes are discussed, such as free radical, condensation, ring-chain equilibration, microbial synthesis, ring-opening, simple anionic, cationic, Ziegler-Natta, and/or metallocene catalysis, along with some random and block copolymers that occur in Nature. The emphasis is on copolymer composition and average molar mass determination, and on the benefits of coupling mass spectrometry (MS) with separation techniques such as size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:12373747

  11. Stars and their Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    1997-03-01

    This unique and informative text describes how stars are classified according to their spectral qualities and temperature. James Kaler explains the alphabet of stellar astronomy, running from cool M stars to hot O stars, and tells the story of their evolution. Before embarking on a voyage of cosmic discovery, the author discusses the fundamental properties of stars, their atomic structure and the formation of spectra. Then, Kaler considers each star type individually and explores its spectra in detail. A review of unusual, hard-to-classify stars, and a discussion of data related to the birth, life and death of stars round out the text. This book is an important resource for all amateur astronomers and students of astronomy. Professionals will find it a refreshing read as well.

  12. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  13. Discriminating the Progenitor Type of Supernova Remnants with Iron K-Shell Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Badenes, Carles; Petre, Robert; Nakano, Toshio; Castro, Daniel; Enoto, Teruaki; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hughes, John P.; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Nobukawa, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) retain crucial information about both their parent explosion and circumstellar material left behind by their progenitor. However, the complexity of the interaction between supernova ejecta and ambient medium often blurs this information, and it is not uncommon for the basic progenitor type (Ia or core-collapse) of well-studied remnants to remain uncertain. Here we present a powerful new observational diagnostic to discriminate between progenitor types and constrain the ambient medium density of SNRs using solely Fe K-shell X-ray emission. We analyze all extant Suzaku observations of SNRs and detect Fe K-alpha emission from 23 young or middle-aged remnants, including five first detections (IC 443, G292.0+1.8, G337.2-0.7, N49, and N63A). The Fe K-alpha centroids clearly separate progenitor types, with the Fe-rich ejecta in Type Ia remnants being significantly less ionized than in core-collapse SNRs. Within each progenitor group, the Fe K-alpha luminosity and centroid are well correlated, with more luminous objects having more highly ionized Fe. Our results indicate that there is a strong connection between explosion type and ambient medium density, and suggest that Type Ia supernova progenitors do not substantially modify their surroundings at radii of up to several parsecs. We also detect a K-shell radiative recombination continuum of Fe in W49B and IC 443, implying a strong circumstellar interaction in the early evolutionary phases of these core-collapse remnants.

  14. High-energy thermal synchrotron emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, J. N.; Epstein, R. I.; Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown how the thermal synchrotron emission spectrum is modified when the photon energy is greater than the mean energy of the radiating particles. The effect if applying this energy conservation constraint is to produce spectra which have less high-energy photon emission than had been previously estimated. The thermal synchrotron spectra provide satisfactory fits to recently observed very high energy gamma ray spectra of certain burst sources.

  15. Gold Spectra Measurements from LLNL EBIT Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Chung, H. K.; Gu, M.; Hansen, S. B.; Schneider, M. B.; Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2008-11-01

    Spectra have been recorded from gold that has been injected into the Lawrence Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT-II). Both mono-energetic and experimentally simulated Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) plasmas were created for these measurements. The beam plasmas had energies of 2.75, 3.0, 3.6, 4.6, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5 keV. The MB plasmas had electron temperatures of 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 keV. M-band gold spectra (n = 4-3, 5-3, 6-3 and 7-3 transitions) were recorded between 1 - 8 keV from K-like to Kr-like ions in the x-ray. The emission of gold was recorded by crystal spectrometers and a micro-calorimeter from the Goddard Space Flight Center. A full survey of the recorded spectra will be presented along with line emission and charge state modeling from the flexible atomic code (FAC). Some comparisons with laser produced plasmas will be made. *This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Phosphorescence spectra of bacteriochlorophylls

    SciTech Connect

    Takiff, L.; Boxer, S.G.

    1988-06-22

    The authors wish to report phosphorescence spectra of the lowest triplet state of a number of bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) which provide the first accurate values for the triplet state energies of these chromophores. There have been many previous attempts to estimate the triplet state energies of bacteriochlorins motivated by the possible importance of triplet states in photosynthesis, the utility of these chromophores as sensitizers and quenchers of singlet oxygen, model studies of electron transfer, and intrinsic theoretical interest in the excited state energies of extended conjugated macrocycles.

  17. Staggered ladder spectra.

    PubMed

    Arvedson, E; Wilkinson, M; Mehlig, B; Nakamura, K

    2006-01-27

    We exactly solve a Fokker-Planck equation by determining its eigenvalues and eigenfunctions: we construct nonlinear second-order differential operators which act as raising and lowering operators, generating ladder spectra for the odd- and even-parity states. The ladders are staggered: the odd-even separation differs from even-odd. The Fokker-Planck equation corresponds, in the limit of weak damping, to a generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process where the random force depends upon position as well as time. The process describes damped stochastic acceleration, and exhibits anomalous diffusion at short times and a stationary non-Maxwellian momentum distribution. PMID:16486675

  18. IUE archived spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Edward C.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Heap, Sara R.; West, Donald K.; Schmitz, Marion

    1988-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite has been in continuous operation since January 26, 1978. To date, approximately 65,000 spectra have been stored in an archive at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. A number of procedures have been generated to facilitate access to the data in the IUE spectral archive. This document describes the procedures which include on-line quick look of the displays, search of an observation data base for selected observations, and several methods for ordering data from the archive.

  19. IUE archived spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E.C.; Bohlin, R.C.; Heap, S.R.; West, D.K.; Schmitz, M.

    1988-06-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite has been in continuous operation since January 26, 1978. To date, approximately 65,000 spectra have been stored in an archive at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. A number of procedures have been generated to facilitate access to the data in the IUE spectral archive. This document describes the procedures which include on-line quick look of the displays, search of an observation data base for selected observations, and several methods for ordering data from the archive.

  20. Infrared spectra of protostellar collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David J.; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neufeld, David A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the formation of low mass stars by cloud collapse predict that OI(63 micrometers) and IR rotational lines of CO and H2O dominate the cooling in the freefalling region 10-1000 AU from the protostar. The freefalling gas supersonically hits the protoplanetary disk orbiting the protostar, forming an accretion shock with strong IR emission in rotational lines of H2O and OH, and OI(63 microns). The accretion shock spectra and line profiles depend on the mass flux through the shock and the typical distance r-bar at which the freefalling gas strikes the disk. The line widths are of order the Keplerian speed, or approx. 10(r-bar/10AU)(exp -0.5) km/s, for the accretion shock lines, and less for the lines from the infalling gas. Measurements of the IR line fluxes and profiles from the freefalling gas and the accretion shock diagnoses how a protostar and disk are formed and requires high sensitivity and high spectral and spatial resolving power. SOFIA will be the optimum observatory for many of these lines, although ISO will contribute and the KAO may make a few pioneering detections.

  1. Afterpulse time spectra of high-speed photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-01-10

    Recent progress of understanding of the afterpulse time spectra of high-speed photon detectors using photoemission and secondary emission processes is reviewed and summarized. Furthermore, the afterpulse time spectra of high-gain conventionally designed and microchannel plate photon detectors has been investigated. Specifically, the devices studied included RCA 8850, RCA 8854 and ITT F 4129f photomultipliers. Descriptions are given of the measuring techniques. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  3. Assessment of maturity during co-composting of penicillin mycelial dreg via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra: Characteristics of chemical and fluorescent parameters of water-extractable organic matter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihua; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Qinxue; Ma, Jiangya; He, Zhonghua

    2016-07-01

    To investigate characteristics of water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) from different stages and evaluate the maturity for co-composting penicillin mycelial dreg (PMD) via fluorescence regional integration (FRI) of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM), a pilot-scale co-composting was carried out. The results showed that a classical temperature profile showed and a degradation rate of 98.1% for residual penicillin was obtained on the 6th day. DOC and DOC/DON ratio were in a low level of 4.0 g kg(-1) and 3.7, respectively, after the 32nd day. In addition, respirometric rate (SOUR) decreased to 0.87 mg O2 g(-1) VS h(-1) finally. The EEM showed that the specific Ex/Em peak related to microbial byproduct-like vanished on the 32nd day, while those related to fulvic-like and humic acid-like appearing on the 24th day. The fluorescence regional integration (FRI) results demonstrated that PV,n/PIII,n increased to 3.28 finally, suggesting a desirable maturity for co-composting PMD. The EEM-FRI consequently has the potential for characterizing the WEOM from the co-composting of PMD. PMID:27135697

  4. Pluto and Charon's UV spectra from IUE to New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindhelm, Eric; Stern, S. Alan; Gladstone, Randy; Zangari, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    We compare Mid-Ultraviolet (MUV) spectra of Pluto taken over a period of 20 years by the International Ultraviolet Explorer, the HST-Faint Object Spectrograph, and the HST-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We extract Pluto-only spectra from the IUE data and associate them with corrected longitudes when necessary. Comparing them with HST spectra provides further evidence of temporal changes in Pluto's geometric albedo between 2000 and 3200 . These various spectra are used to explore the contributions of atmospheric or surface changes to Pluto's reflectance. We also provide predictions for the Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) surface reflectance and atmospheric emission spectra of Pluto that will be measured by the Alice spectrograph (Stern, S.A. et al. [2008]. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 155-187) during the New Horizons flyby of Pluto in 2015. FUV surface reflectance predictions are also made for Charon, Hydra, and Nix.

  5. SPECTRAFACTORY.NET: A DATABASE OF MOLECULAR MODEL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Cami, J.; Van Malderen, R.; Markwick, A. J. E-mail: Andrew.Markwick@manchester.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    We present a homogeneous database of synthetic molecular absorption and emission spectra from the optical to mm wavelengths for a large range of temperatures and column densities relevant for various astrophysical purposes, but in particular for the analysis, identification, and first-order analysis of molecular bands in spectroscopic observations. All spectra are calculated in the LTE limit from several molecular line lists, and are presented at various spectral resolving powers corresponding to several specific instrument simulations. The database is available online at http://www.spectrafactory.net, where users can freely browse, search, display, and download the spectra. We describe how additional model spectra can be requested for (automatic) calculation and inclusion. The database already contains over half a million model spectra for 39 molecules (96 different isotopologues) over the wavelength range 350 nm-3 mm ({approx}3-30000 cm{sup -1})

  6. Observations of silicate reststrahlen bands in lunar infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E., Jr.; Morgan, T. H.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal emission spectra of three lunar sites (Apollo 11, Descartes Formation, and Tycho central peak) are measured in the 8-14 micron spectral range. Transmission and instrument effects are accounted for by forming ratios of the Descartes and Tycho spectra to the Apollo 11 spectrum. The ratio spectra are compared with ratios of published laboratory spectra of returned lunar samples and also with ratio spectra calculated using the Aronson-Emslie (1975) model. The comparisons show pyroxene bands in the Descartes ratio spectrum and plagioclase bands in the Tycho ratio spectrum. The Tycho spectrum is found to be consistent with the existence of fine plagioclase dust (approximately 1 micron) at the rock surface and a higher-than-usual sodium content of the plagioclase.

  7. X-ray Grating Spectra of Classical and Recurrent Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, M.; Behar, E.; Polina, Z.

    2014-07-01

    We present high resolution XMM-Newton RGS grating spectra of recent recurrent novae of the last 5 years, taken after the outburst in the supersoft X-ray phase. We show cases that can be fitted with white dwarf static atmospheric models and cother examples that should be fitted with white dwarf "wind" atmospheric models. We also show how to disentagle emission line spectra produced in he ejecta from the hot and luminous white dwarf atmosphere. We discuss innovative ways to examine the spectra taking into account the secular evolution, the accretion history, and optical observations done immediately after the outburst.

  8. Ultraviolet spectra and chromospheres of cool carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis R.; Luttermoser, Donald G.

    1987-01-01

    The authors assemble and discuss all available low-resolution IUE spectra of N-type carbon stars - including TW Hor, BL Ori, UU Aur, NP Pup, U Hya, T Ind, and TX Psc. Identification of spectral features is aided by a composite spectrum. Shortward of 2850 A only emission lines of C II, Mg II, Al II, and Fe II are seen, while the spectrum longward of 2850 A appears to be a photospheric absorption spectrum with a few superposed emission lines of Fe II. The most prominent absorption features are due to Fe I, CH, and CaCl. The emission feature at 2325 A, second only to Mg II in strength, is conclusively identified as C II (UV 0.01). Ultraviolet spectra of N-type carbon stars are similar to, though the emission-line fluxes are generally weaker than, those of the coolest M-giant stars available, such as HD 18191 (M6 III).

  9. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  10. A rapid technique for classifying phytoplankton fluorescence spectra based on self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Aymerich, Ismael F; Piera, Jaume; Soria-Frisch, Aureli; Cros, Lluïsa

    2009-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for characterizing phytoplankton communities in marine environments. Using different fluorescence spectra techniques, it is now possible to discriminate the major phytoplankton groups. However, most of the current techniques are based on fluorescence excitation measurements, which require stimulation at different wavelengths and thus considerable time to obtain the complete spectral profile. This requirement may be an important constraint for several mobile oceanographic platforms, such as vertical profilers or autonomous underwater vehicles, which require rapid-acquisition instruments. This paper presents a novel technique for classifying fluorescence spectra based on self-organizing maps (SOMs), one of the most popular artificial neural network (ANN) methods. The method is able to achieve phytoplankton discrimination using only fluorescence emission spectra (single wavelength excitation), thus reducing the acquisition time. The discrimination capabilities of SOM using excitation and emission spectra are compared. The analysis shows that the SOM has a good performance using excitation spectra, whereas data preprocessing is required in order to obtain similar discrimination capabilities using emission spectra. The final results obtained using emission spectra indicate that the discrimination is properly achieved even between algal groups, such as diatoms and dinoflagellates, which cannot be discriminated with previous methods. We finally point out that although techniques based on excitation spectra can achieve a better taxonomic accuracy, there are some applications that require faster acquisition processes. Acquiring emission spectra is almost instantaneous, and techniques such as SOM can achieve good classification performance using appropriately preprocessed data. PMID:19531300

  11. Temporal Evolution of Intermetallic Diffuse Band Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labazan, Irena; Azinović, Davorka; Gogić, Srećko; Milošević, Slobodan

    LiZn and LiCd vapour mixtures prepared in the heat-pipe oven are irradiated with pulsed excimer laser emission at 308 nm. Temporal evolution of the fluorescence spectra is observed showing that different processes occur such as multiphoton excitation, collisional energy transfer, photochemical reaction, relaxation etc. Temporal change of the LiZn and LiCd blue-green diffuse bands spectral shape is observed and interpreted in terms of previous spectral simulations. The effective lifetimes of different spectral features are determined.

  12. AKN 564: An Unusual Component in the X-ray Spectra of NLSy1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; George, I. M.; Netzer, Hagai

    1999-01-01

    We present an ASCA observation of the narrow-line Seyfert l (NLSyl) Arakelian 564. The X-ray light curve shows rapid variability, but no evidence for energy-dependence to these variations, within the 0.6 - 10 keV bandpass. A strong (EW approximately 70 eV) spectral feature is observed close to 1 keV. A similar feature has been observed in TON S180, another member of the NLSyl class of objects, but has not been observed in broad-line Seyfert galaxies. The feature energy suggests a large contribution from Fe L-shell lines but its intensity is difficult to explain in terms of emission and/or absorption from photoionized gas. The models which predict most emission at 1 keV are characterized by extreme values of column density, Fe abundance and ionization parameter. Models based on gas in thermal equilibrium with kT approximately l keV provide an alternative parameterization of the soft spectrum. The latter may be interpreted as the hot intercloud medium, undergoing rapid cooling and producing strong Fe L-shell recombination lines. In all cases the physical conditions are rather different from those observed in broad-line Seyferts. The hard X-ray spectrum shows a broad and asymmetric Fe K(alpha) line of large equivalent width (approximately 550 eV) suggestive of significant emission from the inner accretion disk. The profile can be explained by a neutral disk viewed at approximately 60 deg to the line-of-sight, contrary to the hypothesis that NLSyls are viewed pole-on. The large EW of this line, the strong 1 keV emission and the strong optical Fe emission lines all suggest an extreme Fe abundance in this and perhaps other NLSyls.

  13. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  14. Interpreting chromosome aberration spectra.

    PubMed

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-03-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH (multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry. PMID:17456013

  15. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  16. Ultraviolet spectra of the X-ray transient A0538-66

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra were obtained before and after the optical spectrum changed from absorption to emission lines. The continuum brightness dropped by a factor of 2. Spectra with bright continua show N V, Si IV, and C IV in absorption, while the spectrum with fainter continuum has these lines in emission. The emission lines of N V and Si IV are anomalously bright compared with C IV. The brighter spectra indicate an effective temperatury of 25,000 K, while the fainter continuum indicates a somewhat lower temperature. Probable interstellar absorption lines due to galactic halo and the LMC interstellar medium are observed.

  17. Thermal Infrared Spectra of Lunar Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Basu, Abhijit; Fischer, Erich M.

    1997-11-01

    We have measured the infrared (2.08-14 μm) directional hemispherical reflectance spectra of lunar soils representing the major lithologic units so far sampled on the lunar surface, and soils of different exposure ages within those units. Such reflectance (R) spectra can be used to calculate absolute emissivity (E) using Kirchhoff's Law (E= 1 -R). The effects of exposure age vary with wavelength region. In the 2-5 μm and 8-14 μm regions, lunar soils darken with exposure age, consistent with spectral behavior in the VNIR and the dominant optical effect of increasing amounts of finely divided metallic iron in more mature soils. However, in the 5-8 μm region soils tend to show higher reflectances with greater exposure age, which suggests some unanticipated change in the optical properties of fine metallic iron at those wavelengths. The most useful spectral feature for compositional remote sensing is the Christiansen reflectance minimum (emissivity maximum), the spectral contrast of which is enhanced by the lunar environment, and the wavelength position of which can be related to composition without being much affected by exposure age. The vacuum environment at the lunar surface not only enhances the spectral contrast of the Christiansen feature, but also shifts it slightly to shorter wavelength, an effect that must be compensated for in inferring composition. By contrast with the Christiansen feature, the weak and relatively few overtone/combination tone absorption bands in the volume scattering region between 3 and 8 μm appear to be of limited usefulness. The reststrahlen bands are also very weak in absolute emissivity spectra, and are evidently not enhanced by the lunar environment in the same fashion as the Christiansen feature. Thus, they can only be used for remote sensing with measurements of extraordinarily high signal-to-noise (1000/1). However, these features, as well as the transparency feature (which is particularly prominent in spectra of feldspathic soils), do contain important mineralogical information, such as the relative abundances of plagioclase and pyroxene, and can be used for laboratory studies of lunar soils. More certain and more quantitative mineralogical analyses of lunar soils appear feasible after additional spectral analysis of soil separates, and additional mineralogical analysis of soil samples for which spectral data are available.

  18. Catalog of total excitation-emission and total synchronous fluorescence maps with synchronous fluorescence spectra of homologated fluorescent pesticides in large use in Morocco: development of a spectrometric low cost and direct analysis as an alert method in case of massive contamination of soils and waters by fluorescent pesticides.

    PubMed

    Foudeil, S; Hassoun, H; Lamhasni, T; Ait Lyazidi, S; Benyaich, F; Haddad, M; Choukrad, M; Boughdad, A; Bounakhla, M; Bounouira, H; Duarte, R M B O; Cachada, A; Duarte, A C

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a direct spectrometric approach to monitor soils and waters, at a lower cost than the widely used chromatographic techniques; a spectrometric approach that is effective, reliable, fast, easy to implement, and without any use of organic solvents whose utilization is subject to law limitation. It could be suitable at least as an alert method in case of massive contamination. Here, we present for the first time a catalog of excitation-emission and total synchronous fluorescence maps that may be considered as fingerprints of a series of homologated pesticides, in large use in Morocco, aiming at a direct detection of their remains in agricultural soils and neighboring waters. After a large survey among farmers, agricultural workers and product distributors in two important agricultural regions of Morocco (Doukkala-Abda and Sebou basin), 48 commercial pesticides, which are fluorescent, were chosen. A multi-component spectral database of these targeted commercial pesticides was elaborated. For each pesticide, dissolved in water at the lowest concentration giving a no-noise fluorescence spectrum, the total excitation-emission matrix (TEEM), the total synchronous fluorescence matrix (TSFM) in addition to synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) at those offsets giving the highest fluorescence intensity were recorded. To test this preliminary multi-component database, two real soil samples, collected at a wheat field and at a vine field in the region of Doukkala, were analyzed. Remains of the commercial Pirimor (Carbamate) and Atlantis (Sulfonylurea) were identified by comparison of the recorded TEEM, TSFM, and SFS to those of the preliminary catalog at one hand, and on the basis of the results of a field pre-survey. The developed approach seems satisfactory, and the fluorimetric fingerprint database is under extension to a higher number of fluorescent pesticides in common use among the Moroccan agricultural regions. PMID:25424031

  19. Investigating the Near-Infrared Properties of Planetary Nebulae II. Medium Resolution Spectra. 2; Medium Resolution Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hora, Joseph L.; Latter, William B.; Deutsch, Lynne K.

    1998-01-01

    We present medium-resolution (R approximately 700) near-infrared (lambda = 1 - 2.5 micrometers) spectra of a sample of planetary nebulae (PNe). A narrow slit was used which sampled discrete locations within the nebulae; observations were obtained at one or more positions in the 41 objects included in the survey. The PN spectra fall into one of four general categories: H1 emission line-dominated PNe, H1 and H2 emission line PNe, H2 emission line-dominated PNe, and continuum-dominated PNe. These categories correlate with morphological type, with the elliptical PNe falling into the first group, and the bipolar PNe primarily in the H2 and continuum emission groups. The categories also correlate with C/O ratio, with the O-rich objects falling into the first group and the C-rich objects in the groups. Other spectral features were observed in all catagories, such as continuum emission from the central star, and warm dust continuum emission towards the long wavelength end of the spectra. H2 was detected in four PNe in this survey for the first time. An analysis was performed using the H2 line ratios in all of the PN spectra in the survey where a sufficient number of lines were observed to determine the ortho-to-para ratio and the rotational and vibrational excitation temperatures of the H-2 in those objects. One unexpected result from this analysis is that the H-2 is excited by absorption of ultraviolet photons in most of the PNe, although there are several PNe in which collisional excitation plays an important role. The correlation between bipolar morphology and H2 emission has been strengthened with the new detections of H2 in this survey.

  20. Mercury Analogue Materials: Spectral Reflectance, Its Comparison with TIR Spectral Emission, and a Space Weathering Simulation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, L. V.; Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Sasaki, S.; Bischoff, A.; Jessberger, E. K.

    2007-03-01

    We present reflectance spectra of Mercury analog materials, compare the TIR reflectance spectra of the samples to their emission spectra to evaluate deviations from Kirchhoff's law, and report on a space weathering simulation experiment on feldspar.

  1. EUV spectra from highly charged terbium ions in optically thin and thick plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, C.; Koike, F.; Murakami, I.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Long, E.; Sheil, J.; White, E.; O'Reilly, F.; Sokell, E.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2015-01-01

    We have observed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from terbium (Tb) ions in optically thin and thick plasmas for a comparative study. The experimental spectra are recorded in optically thin, magnetically confined torus plasmas and dense laser-produced plasmas (LPPs). The main feature of the spectra is quasicontinuum emission with a peak around 6.5-6.6 nm, the bandwidth of which is narrower in the torus plasmas than in the LPPs. A comparison between the two types of spectra also suggests strong opacity effects in the LPPs. A comparison with the calculated line strength distributions gives a qualitative interpretation of the observed spectra.

  2. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA WITH LOCAL LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew; Vanderplas, Jake; Schneider, Jeff; Xiong Liang

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the use of dimensionality reduction techniques for the classification of stellar spectra selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using local linear embedding (LLE), a technique that preserves the local (and possibly nonlinear) structure within high-dimensional data sets, we show that the majority of stellar spectra can be represented as a one-dimensional sequence within a three-dimensional space. The position along this sequence is highly correlated with spectral temperature. Deviations from this 'stellar locus' are indicative of spectra with strong emission lines (including misclassified galaxies) or broad absorption lines (e.g., carbon stars). Based on this analysis, we propose a hierarchical classification scheme using LLE that progressively identifies and classifies stellar spectra in a manner that requires no feature extraction and that can reproduce the classic MK classifications to an accuracy of one type.

  4. INFRARED SPECTRA OF ISOLATED PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Knorke, Harald; Langer, Judith; Dopfer, Otto; Oomens, Jos

    2009-11-20

    Gas-phase infrared (IR) spectra of larger protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules, H{sup +}PAH, have been recorded for the first time. The ions are generated by electrospray ionization and spectroscopically assayed by IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer using a free electron laser. IRMPD spectra of protonated anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, and coronene are presented and compared to calculated IR spectra. Comparison of the laboratory IR spectra to an astronomical spectrum of the unidentified IR emission (UIR) bands obtained in a highly ionized region of the interstellar medium provides for the first time compelling spectroscopic support for the recent hypothesis that H{sup +}PAHs contribute as carriers of the UIR bands.

  5. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  6. Dynamic energy/power spectra from X-ray spectra and light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Jan-Uwe

    2015-09-01

    The key data product of an X-ray observation is an events table with information of calibrated position, energy, and arrival time for each individual X-ray photon. Many X-ray sources are variable and clues for origins for variations can be found in spectral changes along with light curve variations. This is commonly done by extracting spectra from certain episodes of variability such as low-states/high-states. I present a systematic approach of a dynamic X-ray spectrum, a 3-dimensional representation of wavelength/energy, time, and intensity. It is constructed from a series of spectra extracted from adjacent short time intervals, displayed as wavelength (or energy) versus time and a colour code for intensity. The same concept can be used for dynamic power spectra, displaying the evolution of periodic oscillations in an X-ray light curve. Dynamic energy/power spectra constructed from XMM-Newton and Chandra data have revealed some surprises such as short-lived emission lines during a flare, softening owed to changes in the absorption column of OI, or transient short-period oscillations in various supersoft sources. Some examples are shown to illustrate the diagnostic power of these diagrams.

  7. Observational and theoretical spectra of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Swartz, Douglas A.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1993-05-01

    Progress in nuclear astrophysics by means of quantitative supernova spectroscopy is discussed with special concentration on type Ia, Ib and Ic and on SN 1987A. Spectral calculations continue to support an exploding C/O white dwarf as the best model of a SN Ia. Deflagration model W7 produces good maximum light spectra of SN Ia and seems to have a better composition distribution compared to delayed detonation models, but proper treatment of opacity remains a problem and the physical basis of SN Ia explosions is still not completely understood. All models for SN Ia predict large quantities of 56Co in the ejecta, but it is not clear that observations confirm this. Although the evolutionary origin of SN Ia remains uncertain, there is recent evidence that transfer of hydrogen in a binary system may be involved, as long suspected. There has been progress in comparing dynamical models with the optical/IR spectra of SN 1987A. The evolution of the [OI] λλ6300, 6364 feature and the presence of strong persistent HeI λ10 830 indicate that both the envelope and core material contribute substantially to the formation of emission lines in the nebular phase and that neither the core nor the envelope can be neglected. Blending with nearby hydrogen lines may affect both of these spectral features, thereby complicating the analysis of the lines. The effects of continuum transfer and photoionization have been included and are under study. The discrepancies between theoretical and observed spectra are due primarily to the one-dimensional hydrodynamic models. The spectral data are not consistent with the high density ``spike'' (in radial coordinate) of the core material that is predicted by all such models. Analysis of the light curves of SN Ib and SN Ic supernovae implies that there are significant differences in their physical properties. Some SN Ib have considerably more ejecta mass than SN Ic events. SN Ib require He-rich atmospheres to produce the observed strong optical lines of HeI somewhat after maximum. SN Ic events require a considerable depletion, if not absence, of helium. Calculations of the nebular phase after about 200 days show that the optical spectra of SN Ib/c will not reveal HeI even if helium is present. The spectra at that phase are rather insensitive to variations in the mass and composition. The similarity of the optical spectra of SN Ib and Ic events at late times thus does not mean that they are physically very similar. Observations of the HeI λ10 830 line could provide a good diagnostic of the atmospheric composition of Sn Ib and SN Ic.

  8. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  9. EFFECTS OF FORSTERITE GRAIN SHAPE ON INFRARED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, C.; Imai, Y.; Chihara, H.; Murata, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Suto, H.; Tachibana, S.; Ohara, S.

    2010-02-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) detected several sharp infrared features around young stars, comets, and evolved stars. These sharp features were identified as Mg-rich crystalline silicates of forsterite and enstatite by comparison with spectra from laboratory data. However, certain infrared emission bands in the observed spectra cannot be identified because they appear at slightly shorter wavelengths than the peaks in forsterite laboratory spectra, where the shapes of forsterite particles are irregular. To solve this problem, we measured infrared spectra of forsterite grains of various shapes (irregular, plate-like with no sharp edges, elliptical, cauliflower, and spherical) in the infrared spectral region between 5 and 100 mum. The spectra depend on particle shape. The spectra of the 11, 19, 23, and 33 mum bands, in particular, are extremely sensitive to particle shape, whereas some peaks such as the 11.9, 49, and 69 mum bands remained almost unchanged despite different particle shapes. This becomes most evident from the spectra of near-spherical particles produced by annealing an originally amorphous silicate sample at temperature from 600 to 1150 deg. C. The spectra of these samples differ strongly from those of other ones, showing peaks at much shorter wavelengths. At a higher annealing temperature of 1200 deg. C, the particle shapes changed drastically from spherical to irregular and the spectra became similar to those of forsterite particles with irregular shapes. Based on ISO data and other observational data, the spectra of outflow sources and disk sources may correspond to differences in forsterite shape, and further some unidentified peaks, such as those at 32.8 or 32.5 mum, may be due to spherical or spherical-like forsterite.

  10. Effects of Forsterite Grain Shape on Infrared Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Imai, Y.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.; Murata, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Tachibana, S.; Ohara, S.

    2010-02-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) detected several sharp infrared features around young stars, comets, and evolved stars. These sharp features were identified as Mg-rich crystalline silicates of forsterite and enstatite by comparison with spectra from laboratory data. However, certain infrared emission bands in the observed spectra cannot be identified because they appear at slightly shorter wavelengths than the peaks in forsterite laboratory spectra, where the shapes of forsterite particles are irregular. To solve this problem, we measured infrared spectra of forsterite grains of various shapes (irregular, plate-like with no sharp edges, elliptical, cauliflower, and spherical) in the infrared spectral region between 5 and 100 μm. The spectra depend on particle shape. The spectra of the 11, 19, 23, and 33 μm bands, in particular, are extremely sensitive to particle shape, whereas some peaks such as the 11.9, 49, and 69 μm bands remained almost unchanged despite different particle shapes. This becomes most evident from the spectra of near-spherical particles produced by annealing an originally amorphous silicate sample at temperature from 600 to 1150°C. The spectra of these samples differ strongly from those of other ones, showing peaks at much shorter wavelengths. At a higher annealing temperature of 1200°C, the particle shapes changed drastically from spherical to irregular and the spectra became similar to those of forsterite particles with irregular shapes. Based on ISO data and other observational data, the spectra of outflow sources and disk sources may correspond to differences in forsterite shape, and further some unidentified peaks, such as those at 32.8 or 32.5 μm, may be due to spherical or spherical-like forsterite.

  11. The Ultraviolet Emission Spectra of AN HII Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Nancy

    1991-07-01

    ONE OF THE ADVANTAGES OF THE NEW INSTRUMENTS SUCH AS THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IS TO BE ABLE TO STUDY THE UNIVERSE AT WAVELENGTHS PREVIOUSLY UNOBSERVABLE FROM UNDER THE EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE. ONE THE THESE IS THE UV REGION OF THE STECTRUM. USING HST'S FOS, I WOULD LIKE TO TAKE A UV SPETRUM OF AN HII REGION, M8, THE LAGOON NEBULA (HOURGLASS REGION). HII REGIONS ARE AREAS OF STARBIRTH AND ARE SAMPLES OF THE INTERSTELLAR MATTER OUT OF WHICH STARS ARE BEING BORN. HOT, YOUNG O STARS WHICH RADIATE STRONGLY IN THE UV ARE EMBEDDED IN M8. MANY EMSSION LINES ARE EXPECTED BETWEEN 912-3300 ANGTROMS. USING WF/PC, AN IMAGE OF THE HOURGALSS WILL BE TAKEN LOOKING FOR FILIMENTARY STRUCTURE AND NEW BORN STARS.

  12. Vacuum ultraviolet spectra of heteronuclear dimers of inert gases in a direct-current discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, G. N.; Krylov, B. E.; Hallin, R.; Morozov, A. O.; Arnesen, A.; Heijkenskjold, F.

    2003-03-01

    The emission bands appearing near the resonance lines of Kr and Xe in the spectra of the gas-discharge plasma of binary Xe-X and Kr-Y mixtures (X is He, Ne, Ar, or Kr; Y is He, Ne, or Ar) are experimentally studied. It is concluded that the emission bands investigated are related to electronic transitions in hetero-nuclear dimers. The mechanisms of formation of the spectra under study are analyzed.

  13. A Statistical Analysis of Dust Features in the IRAS Low Resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; de Muizon, M.; Papoular, R.; Pegourie, B.

    Using the IRAS catalog of low resolution spectra, the authors have analyzed the silicate features in emission and absorption, the carbon-rich emission features and the featureless spectra, in the range 8 - 22 μm. The sample sizes are large enough to allow average properties to be established (e.g. energy distributions), as well as correlations between luminosities, excesses, colors and coordinates, and histograms and galactic distributions, all with a good degree of confidence.

  14. Millimeter emission of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagnibeda, V. G.; Smirnova, V. V.; Ryzhov, V. S.; Zhiltsov, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    We analyzed two unique radio observations of millimeter solar flares at 93 and 140 GHz with the THz component in these spectra. Data were obtained from ground-based radio-telescope RT-7.5 operated by Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU) with the spacial resolution of 2.5 and 1.5 arc-minutes. We analyzed temporal structure of observed radio-bursts and their dynamics in comparison with soft and hard X-ray light-curves obtained from GOES and RHESSI space-based observations. It was found the 140 GHz emission enhancement at the spectra that is new independent confirmation of the THz component existance. Also, we analyzed data of microwave solar flares with the emission enhanced at 35 GHz obtained from Nobeyama radioheliograph (NoRH) and radiopolarimeter (NoRP). It was found that the maximum of the flux density spectra was shifted toward high frequencies that didn't agree with the model spectrum obtained from microwave observations. We assumed, that such kind of spectra are associated with the gyro-synchrotron radiation of the significant number of high-energetic electrons emission with energies of about 500 keV. The emission mechanism at millimeter waves is the gyro-synchrotron radiation. However, if the energetic electrons are not enough the thermal emission mechanism could be dominant factor at millimeter radiation that could also explain the spectral maximum shift to high frequencies.

  15. Multifractal spectra in shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, L. R.; Deane, Anil E.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of three-dimensional homogeneous shear flow and fully developed channel flow, are used to calculate the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation field. Only weak parameterization of the results with the nondimensional shear is found, and this only if the flow has reached its asymptotic development state. Multifractal spectra of these flows coincide with those from experiments only at the range alpha less than 1.

  16. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  17. Photoionization Modeling of Oxygen K Absorption in the Interstellar Medium:. [The Chandra Grating Spectra of XTE J1817-330

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatuzz, E.; Garcia, J.; Mendoza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Witthoeft, M.; Lohfink, A.; Bautista, M. A.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present detailed analyses of oxygen K absorption in the interstellar medium (ISM) using four high-resolution Chandra spectra toward the X-ray low-mass binary XTE J1817-330. The 11-25 Angstrom broadband is described with a simple absorption model that takes into account the pile-up effect and results in an estimate of the hydrogen column density. The oxygen K-edge region (21-25 Angstroms) is fitted with the physical warmabs model, which is based on a photoionization model grid generated with the xstar code with the most up-to-date atomic database. This approach allows a benchmark of the atomic data which involves wavelength shifts of both the K lines and photoionization cross sections in order to fit the observed spectra accurately. As a result we obtain a column density of N(sub H) = 1.38 +/- 0.01 × 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2); an ionization parameter of log xi = -2.70 +/- 0.023; an oxygen abundance of A(sub O) = 0.689 (+0.015/-0.010); and ionization fractions of O(sub I)/O = 0.911, O(sub II)/O = 0.077, and O(sub III)/O = 0.012 that are in good agreement with results from previous studies. Since the oxygen abundance in warmabs is given relative to the solar standard of Grevesse & Sauval, a rescaling with the revision by Asplund et al. yields A(sub O) = 0.952(+0.020/-0.013), a value close to solar that reinforces the new standard.We identify several atomic absorption lines-K(alpha), K(beta), and K(gamma) in O(sub I) and O(sub II) and K(alpha) in O(sub III), O(sub VI), and O(sub VII)-the last two probably residing in the neighborhood of the source rather than in the ISM. This is the first firm detection of oxygen K resonances with principal quantum numbers n greater than 2 associated with ISM cold absorption.

  18. Photoionization Modeling of Oxygen K Absorption in the Interstellar Medium: The Chandra Grating Spectra of XTE J1817-330

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatuzz, E.; Garcia, J.; Menodza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Witthoeft, M.; Lohfink, A.; Bautista, M. A.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present detailed analyses of oxygen K absorption in the interstellar medium (ISM) using four high-resolution Chandra spectra towards the X-ray low-mass binary XTE J1817-330. The 11-25 A broadband is described with a simple absorption model that takes into account the pileup effect and results in an estimate of the hydrogen column density. The oxygen K-edge region (21-25 A) is fitted with the physical warmabs model, which is based on a photoionization model grid generated with the XSTAR code with the most up-to-date atomic database. This approach allows a benchmark of the atomic data which involves wavelength shifts of both the K lines and photoionization cross sections in order to fit the observed spectra accurately. As a result we obtain: a column density of N(sub H) = 1.38 +/- 0.01 x 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2); ionization parameter of log xi = .2.70 +/- 0.023; oxygen abundance of A(sub O) = 0.689(exp +0.015./-0.010); and ionization fractions of O I/O = 0.911, O II/O = 0.077, and O III/O = 0.012 that are in good agreement with previous studies. Since the oxygen abundance in warmabs is given relative to the solar standard of Grevesse and Sauval (1998), a rescaling with the revision by Asplund et al. (2009) yields A(sub O) = 0.952(exp +0.020/-0.013, a value close to solar that reinforces the new standard. We identify several atomic absorption lines.K-alpha , K-beta, and K-gamma in O I and O II; and K-alpha in O III, O VI, and O VII--last two probably residing in the neighborhood of the source rather than in the ISM. This is the first firm detection of oxygen K resonances with principal quantum numbers n greater than 2 associated to ISM cold absorption.

  19. Preparation of linoleic acid capped gold nanoparticles and their spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ratan; Nath, Siddhartha S.; Bhattacharjee, Ramendu

    2010-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol with linoleic acid as a protecting layer to the nanoparticles. X-Ray diffraction study and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal that the particles are mostly spherical in shape with an average size of nearly 10 nm. The UV/vis absorption spectra show absorption maximum at 510 nm, which is due to surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Photoluminescence spectra of gold nanoparticles have also been analysed, which show an emission peak at 770 nm when illuminated at 550 nm. The most important fact is that the produced nanoparticles remain stable for more than 1 week.

  20. Features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Paczynski, Bohdan; Goodman, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Gravitational lensing of cosmological gamma-ray bursts by objects in the mass range about 10 exp 17 to 10 exp 20 g (femtolensing) may introduce complicated interference patterns that might be interpreted as absorption or emission lines in the bursts' spectra. This phenomenon, if detected, may be used as a unique probe of dark matter in the universe. The BATSE spectral data should allow one to detect such spectral features or to put significant upper limits on the cosmic density of a dark matter component that may be in the femtolensing range. Software to generate theoretical spectra has been developed, and it is accessible over the computer network with anonymous ftp.