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Sample records for kaigo shien chino

  1. 2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the north, looking over the flooded fields between Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, just upstream of the Prado Dam site. File number written on negative: R & H 80 024. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  2. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: Yavapai College, Chino Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Yavapai College of Chino Valley, Arizona. These college students built a Building America Builders Challenge house that achieved the remarkably low HERS score of -3 and achieved a tight building envelope.

  3. Analysis of Landsat TM data for active tectonics: the case of the Big Chino Fault, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano

    1994-12-01

    The Big Chino Valley is a 50 km-long tectonic depression of the Basin and Range province of the South- western United States. It is bordered on the NE side by an important normal fault, the Big Chino Fault. The activity of the latter has been hypothesised on the basis of the presence of a 20 m-high fault scarp and on local geomorphological studies. Moreover, a magnitude 4.9 earthquake occurred in southern Arizona in 1976 has been attributed to this fault. The climate in the Big Chino Valley is semi-arid with average rainfall of about 400 mm per year; a very sparse vegetation cover is present, yielding a good possibility for the geo-lithologic application of remote sensing data. The analysis of the TM spectral bands shows, in the short wave infrared, a clear variation in the reflected radiance across the fault scarp. Also the available radar (SLAR) images show a marked difference in response between the two sides of the fault. An explanation of this phenomena has been found in the interaction between the geomorphic evolution, the pedological composition, and the periodic occurrence of coseismic deformation along the fault. Other effects of the latter process have been investigated on colour D- stretched images whose interpretation allowed to detect two paleoseismic events of the Big Chino Fault. This work demonstrates that important information on the seismological parameters of active faults in arid and semiarid climates can be extracted from the analysis of satellite spectral data in the visible and near -infrared.

  4. Adaptive Management of Land Subsidence and Ground Fissuring in the Chino Groundwater Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, A.; Rolfe, T.; Wildermuth, M.; Kavounas, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Chino Basin, located in southern California, is a large alluvial groundwater basin with storage in excess of five million acre-feet. The basin has a long history of groundwater development for various uses dating back to the early 1900s. As a result, piezometric heads declined basin-wide during the past century - in some areas by more than 200 feet. Declines of this magnitude typically cause irreversible aquifer-system compaction, which in turn results in subsidence at the ground surface. In portions of Chino Basin, land subsidence has been differential and accompanied by ground fissuring, which damaged existing infrastructure and poses concerns for new and existing development.Chino Basin Watermaster, the agency responsible for groundwater basin management, has recognized that land subsidence and ground fissuring should be minimized to the extent possible. At the same time, Watermaster is implementing aggressive groundwater-supply programs that include controlled overdraft and the possibility of causing head declines in areas prone to subsidence and fissuring. The groundwater-supply programs must also address the subsidence and fissuring phenomena.From 2001 to 2005, Watermaster conducted a technical investigation to characterize the extent, rate, and mechanisms of subsidence and fissuring. The investigation employed InSAR and ground-level surveying of benchmarks to monitor ground-surface deformation, and borehole extensometers and piezometric monitoring to establish the relationships between groundwater production, piezometric levels, and aquifer-system deformation. Based on the results of the investigation, Watermaster developed: (i) subsidence-management criteria for the areas experiencing acute subsidence and fissuring, and (ii) an adaptive management program to minimize the potential for future subsidence and fissuring across the entire Chino Basin. The science-based program includes ongoing monitoring, which now includes sophisticated fissure

  5. Ground-water outflow from Chino Basin, Upper Santa Ana Valley, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, James J.

    1972-01-01

    Ground-water outflow from Chino basin was calculated ,by a direct method using the equation Q = PIA, in which Q is the quantity of ground-water outflow, P is the average coefficient of permeability of the sediments through which the flow occurs, I is the average hydraulic gradient, and A is the cross-sectional area of the sediments through which the flow occurs. The period selected for the calculation was 1930-66. Permeability of the water-bearing sediments was calculated from aquifer test data and from computations involving specific-capacity data from 200 wells in the outflow area. Permeability ranged from less than 100 to more than 5,000 gallons per day per square foot. The annual hydraulic gradient was derived from contour maps of average water levels in wells for each water year for the period 1930-66. The cross-sectional area used to calculate ground-water outflow from Chino basin extends southwestward from Pedley Hills to Puente Hills. The area of the outflow section is the saturated thickness of permeable materials measured along the line of section. Part of the lower boundary is the interface between the alluvium and the underlying basement complex, and part is a change in permeability within sedimentary rocks. Geological methods were combined with geophysical methods to determine the cross-sectional area of the water-bearing sediments. Gravity and seismic traverses, drill-hole logs, and data from a more than 600 drill holes, including eight test holes drilled as a part of this investigation, were used to delineate the size and the shape of the outflow area. For the period of calculation, 1930-66, the total area of the outflow section varied from about 16 to 22 million square feet. The fluctuation in total area is caused by changes in the altitude of the water table. Annual ground-water outflow from Chino basin calculated by the direct method for the period 1930-66 ranged from 38,000 acre-feet in the 1941 water year to 9,400 acre-feet in the 1966 water

  6. Right to use groundwater in Arizona after Chino Valley II and Cherry vs Steiner

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E.K.

    1983-01-01

    Two cases which upheld Groundwater Code provisions are reviewed, Chino Valley II and Cherry vs Steiner. Arizona law regarding private rights in groundwater and the state's police power authority to limit those rights are also considered. The possibility of constitutional protection for already-exercised rights to use groundwater is explored through a discussion of decisions in other jurisdictions, and statements are made which indicate that Arizona will follow those decisions. It is thought that state-mandated conservation measures would provide adequate regulation of police-powered regulation of private interests. 158 references.

  7. Integrated geophysical surveys for mapping lati-andesite intrusive bodies, Chino Valley, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    El-Kaliouby, Hesham; Sternberg, Ben K.; Hoffmann, John P.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2012-01-01

    Three different geophysical methods (magnetic, transient electromagnetic (TEM) and gravity) were used near Chino Valley, Arizona, USA in order to map a suspected lati-andesite intrusive body (plug) previously located by interpretation of aeromagnetic data. The magnetic and TEM surveys provided the best indication of the location and depth of the plug. The north-south spatial extent of this plug was estimated to be approximately 600 meters. The depth to the top of the plug was found from the TEM survey to be approximately 350 meters near the center of the survey. The location of the plug defined by the ground magnetic data is consistent with that from the TEM data. Gravity data mostly image the basin-basement interface with a small contribution from the plug of about 0.5 mGal. Results from this investigation can be used to help define the irregular subsurface topography caused by several intrusive lati-andesite plugs that could influence groundwater flow in the area.

  8. Learning to Play in a Stylized (Chinos) Game: Some Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Abia, Luis; San-Fabián, Emilio; Louis, Enrique; Vega-Redondo, Fernando

    2003-04-01

    In a previous paper, we studied the rich strategic and information-revelation considerations arising in simple guessing game which is very popular in some European countries: the so-called Chinos game. Here, we complement that analysis with a preliminary study of the learning dynamics induced when players no longer can assume that others play according to fixed (possibly equilibrium) rules but, instead, have to use past evidence to understand or interpret their opponent's behavior. We show that if all players are flexible learners, they will eventually succeed in playing according to the unique Nash equilibrium of the game. This outcome, however, is also found to be rather fragile: if only one player (say, a "noise agent") is unable or unwilling to learn, this wrecks havoc in the overall population dynamics. In that case, this dynamics never settles and a complex cyclical pattern typically ensues. The implications of this conclusion for the study of information-revelation mechanisms in the real world (e.g. asset markets) is quite apparent but yet to be tackled in full detail.

  9. Silica Deposition in Abaxial Epidermis before the Opening of Leaf Blades of Pleioblastus chino (Poaceae, Bambusoideae)

    PubMed Central

    MOTOMURA, H.; FUJII, T.; SUZUKI, M.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Silica deposition is one of the important characteristics of the family Poaceae. The distribution, deposition process and physiology of silica in this family have been extensively investigated. Bamboos among members of Poaceae have leaves with a fairly long life span, and the leaves continuously accumulate silica in their tissues throughout their life, not only during the course of leaf opening, but also after opening. It has been revealed that the silica deposition process in relation to ageing of the bamboo leaf after opening differed depending on the cell types comprising the tissues. However, silica deposition has never been examined during the development and maturation periods of bamboo leaves. Hence, to clarify the silica deposition process in a developmental stage of the bamboo leaf, distribution of silica was observed in the abaxial epidermis before the opening of the leaf blades of Pleioblastus chino. • Methods Abaxial epidermal tissues of leaves were examined using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalyser. • Key Results Among seven cell types comprising the abaxial epidermis, three types of cells, guard cells, prickle hairs and silica cells, deposited silica conspicuously, and another four types, cork cells, long cells, micro hairs and subsidiary cells, deposited only a little silica. Among the former group of cell types, silica cells and guard cells deposited silica over their entire surfaces, while prickle hairs deposited silica only in the point-tips. Silica deposition was detected firstly in prickle hairs, and then in silica cells and guard cells. Only silica cells were assumed to deposit silica conspicuously before leaf opening but not conspicuously after opening. • Conclusions Cell types in leaf epidermis of bamboo are classified into three groups according to the silica deposition pattern. Silica deposition in silica cells may be positive as a part of the physiological

  10. Commission Review of a Proposal by the Chaffey Community College District To Establish an Educational Center in the City of Chino. Commission Report 04-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this report, the Commission considers the request by the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges (BOG) and the Chaffey Community College District (CCCD) to establish an Educational Center in the City of Chino. The need for this educational center dates back to 1991 when the BOG adopted the community college system?s Long Range…

  11. Unlicensed to Prescribe Herbs: A Chinese Healer - Médico Chino - in Puerto Rico, 1851-1853.

    PubMed

    Rigau-Pérez, José G

    2016-06-01

    In Puerto Rico and Cuba, the phrase "can't be saved even by the Chinese physician" ("no lo salva ni el médico chino") indicates a person with an incurable disease. The documents at the Archivo General de Puerto Rico include three requests for a medical license from a Chinese immigrant, Juan de Dios Sian (Lin Hua Cheng). Despite lacking legal credentials, he used herbal therapies to treat chronically ill persons in Ponce, San Juan and Mayaguez from 1851 to 1853. Before arriving in Ponce he had spent four years in Cuba, where he is again found by 1865. Sian's petitions show that Puerto Rico, like Cuba, experienced a widely known "médico chino." The anecdote reminds us of important issues in our medical and social history: Asiatic immigration (earlier, larger and more diverse than usually considered), access to care (and its limitations), and the long history of herbal medicine in Oriental and Western cultures. Elements of this story, such as the eagerness for new treatments among patients who have derived no benefit from standard therapy, the ethics of medical licensing, the impotence of licensing agencies and the toleration of authorities regarding an unorthodox but popular healer, exemplify dilemmas that accompany medical practice at all times. PMID:27232873

  12. Continuous monitoring of an earth fissure in Chino, California, USA - a management tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Continuous measurements of deformation have been made in Chino, California across an earth fissure and nearby unfissured soil since 2011 in two buried, horizontal, 150 mm pipes, 51 m long, which are connected by sealed boxes enclosing vertical posts at mostly 6 m intervals. Horizontal displacements and normal strain are measured in one line using nine end-to-end quartz tubes that are attached to posts and span fissured or unfissured soil. The free ends of the tubes are supported by slings and move relative to the attachment post of the next quartz tube. Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) sensors measure the relative movements. Five biaxial tilt sensors were also attached to selected posts in that line. Relative vertical movement was measured at nine locations along the line in the second pipe using low-level differential pressure sensors. The second pipe is half full of water giving a free water surface along its length. Data are recorded on a Campbell CR10 using multiplexers. The quartz-tube horizontal extensometers have exhibited more than 3 mm of predominantly elastic opening and closing in response to about 32 m of seasonal drawdown and recovery, respectively, in an observation well 0.8 km to the south. The nearest production well is 1.6 km to the west. The horizontal strain was 5.9 × 10-5 or 30 % of the lowest estimate of strain-at-failure for alluvium. Maximum relative vertical movement was 4.8 mm. Maximum tilt in the fissure zone was 0.09 arcdeg while tilt at a separate sensor 100 m to the east was 0.86 arcdeg, indicating a wider zone of deformation than is spanned by the instrumentation. High correlation of horizontal displacements during drawdown, and especially recovery, with change in effective stress supports differential compaction as the mechanism for earth-fissure movement. The continuous measurements of horizontal strain coupled with water-level fluctuations and vertical borehole extensometry can provide a real-time adaptive management

  13. Distribution of Ground Motions for the 2008 Mw5.4 Chino Hills Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, A.; Hough, S. E.; Wills, C. J.; Wald, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    The 29 July 2008 Mw5.4 Chino Hills earthquake was widely felt throughout the greater Los Angeles region. Over 40,000 people filled out the Community Internet Intensity Map (CIIM), also known as the "Did You Feel It?" questionnaire, and the ShakeMap for the event is constrained by amplitudes from over 500 stations. The CIIM responses provide Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) values for 802 Zip codes. Due to the dense population of the greater Los Angeles region, intensity values averaged within Zip codes provide good spatial correlation to the location of the actual reporting sites. We use a least-squares approach to fit the average MMI to a standard functional form, MMI = A - Br - C log r (where r represents distance from the observation site to the epicenter and A, B and C are constants), and calculate the residuals. The distribution of average intensities clusters closely around the curve of the equation, corroborating the conclusion (e.g., Atkinson and Wald, SRL, 2006) that CIIM intensities provide a consistent measure of earthquake ground motions. A comparison of CIIM intensities and instrumentally determined ShakeMap intensities reveals generally good correspondence, but suggests a tendency for ShakeMap intensities to be higher at basin sites. We conclude that the ShakeMap intensities reflect long-period amplification, whereas observed intensities were more controlled by higher frequency accelerations. Where both the CIIM map and ShakeMap show systematic variations, the distributions show a strong correlation with near-surface geological structure, as well as with basin depth. Our preliminary conclusions are: 1) as expected, intensities are lower at hard rock sites; 2) intensities are systematically higher in the deepest parts of the basin and significantly lower in shallow regions. Intensities are systematically lower to the west of the Newport-Inglewood fault correlating with subtle topographic relief and shallower basin depths; 3) there is a suggestion that

  14. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the lower Big Chino Valley and Williamson Valley areas, Yavapai and Coconino Counties, Arizona--1975-76

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, B.L.; Laney, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Arizona is divided into 67 ground-water areas, and individual areas are selected for intensive data collection once every 6 years. The data collected in the lower Big Chino Valley and Williamson Valley areas are given on maps that show depth to water, well depth, and altitude of the water level, 1975-76; pumpage, 1950-74; and specific conductance, fluoride concentration, and irrigated area, 1974. Scale 1:125,000. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Application of a watershed model (HSPF) for evaluating sources and transport of pathogen indicators in the Chino Basin drainage area, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hevesi, Joseph A.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Church, Clinton D.; Mendez, Gregory O.

    2011-01-01

    A watershed model using Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) was developed for the urbanized Chino Basin in southern California to simulate the transport of pathogen indicator bacteria, evaluate the flow-component and land-use contributions to bacteria contamination and water-quality degradation throughout the basin, and develop a better understanding of the potential effects of climate and land-use change on water quality. The calibration of the model for indicator bacteria was supported by historical data collected before this study and by samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from targeted land-use areas during storms in water-year 2004. The model was successfully calibrated for streamflow at 5 gage locations representing the Chino Creek and Mill Creek drainages. Although representing pathogens as dissolved constituents limits the model's ability to simulate the transport of pathogen indicator bacteria, the bacteria concentrations measured over the period 1998-2004 were well represented by the simulated concentrations for most locations. Hourly concentrations were more difficult to predict because of high variability in measured bacteria concentrations. In general, model simulations indicated that the residential and commercial land uses were the dominant sources for most of the pathogen indicator bacteria during low streamflows. However, simulations indicated that land used for intensive livestock (dairies and feedlots) and mixed agriculture contributed the most bacteria during storms. The calibrated model was used to evaluate how various land use, air temperature, and precipitation scenarios would affect flow and transport of bacteria. Results indicated that snow pack formation and melt were sensitive to changes in air temperature in the northern, mountainous part of the Chino Basin, causing the timing and magnitude of streamflow to shift in the natural drainages and impact the urbanized areas of the central Chino Basin. The relation between

  16. GOSAT CO2 and CH4 validation activity with a portable FTS at Pasadena, Chino, and Railroad Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kataoka, F.; Hedelius, J.; Viatte, C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.; Roehl, C. M.; Leifer, I.; Tanaka, T.; Iraci, L. T.; Bruegge, C. J.; Schwandner, F. M.; Crisp, D.

    2015-12-01

    The column-average dry air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (XCO2) and methane (XCH4) were measured with a portable Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), EM27/SUN, using direct sunlight at 1) Caltech, in Pasadena, a northern Los Angeles suburb, 2) Chino, a dairy region east of Los Angeles, and 3) Railroad Valley (RRV), a desert playa in Nevada. They were conducted during the GOSAT/OCO-2 joint campaign for vicarious calibration and validation (cal/val) and its preparatory experiments in June-July 2015. JAXA's GOSAT has been operating since 2009 to monitor the greenhouse gases XCO2 and XCH4 using surface-reflected sunlight from space. GOSAT carries a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and a Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI). NASA's OCO-2 has been operating since 2014, carries a grating spectrometer to make precise XCO2 observations with a-few-kilometer resolution. Their polar orbits have 12:46 pm (GOSAT) and 1:30 pm (OCO-2) observing times. For cal/val, these sites were targeted with coincident , near simultaneous ground-based and vertical profiling measurements. These sites are different types of suburban, dairy, and desert areas. Before the campaign, measurements from the JAXA EM27/SUN were compared with those from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and from the Caltech EM27/SUN at Pasadena. We compared the retrieved values and simultaneously observed diurnal enhancements by advection from the Los Angeles basin. Then, we observed a diurnal cycle at Chino dairy area, an area of concentrated husbandry, producing a CH4 point source. Finally, we conducted the cal/val campaign at RRV coincident with GOSAT and OCO-2 overpass observations. Over RRV, vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 were measured using the Alpha Jet research aircraft as a part of the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) . We will compare experimental results from the cal/val campaign for XCO2 and XCH4 with a portable FTS.

  17. Artificial recharge in the northern part of Chino ground-water basin, upper Santa Ana Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koehler, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    This study was made to help management design and implement a recharge-recapture system for State Water Project water in Chino Basin. Nine test holes were drilled in the study area. Analyses of data from these test holes and drillers ' logs of water wells indicate the presence of clay deposits. The clay deposits cannot be correlated between holes which indicates that they are in the form of discontinuous beds or lenses. The existence and location of two ground-water barriers (Barrier ' J ' and Red Hill Barrier) have been postulated in previous reports. Water-level data indicate that Barrier ' J ' is probably not effectively stopping the movement of ground water. Data are insufficient to determine the effectiveness of the Red Hill barrier. Five existing recharge facilities in the study area were previously constructed to control floodflow. Infiltration tests were conducted at three of the facilities, and results of these tests indicate infiltration rates of 2.6 feet per day at Day Creek, 2.0 feet per day at East Etiwanda, and 1.3 feet per day at San Sevaine. A total of about 9,000 acre-feet of State Water Project water was recharged between June 1980 and July 1981. Rising water levels in wells indicate that recharge water is percolating down to the water table. (USGS)

  18. Lucky morning glory, Calystegia felix (Convolvulaceae): a new species from Southern California, with notes on the historical ecology of the Chino ciénega belt.

    PubMed

    Provance, Mitchell C; Sanders, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    A new morning glory, Calystegia felixProvance & A.C. Sanders sp. nov. (Convolvulaceae), is described from the Los Angeles, San Gabriel, and Santa Ana River basins. Historical collections of the species, which prior to 2011 had not been seen alive in 94 years, have been misidentified as Calystegia sepium (L.) R. Br. subsp. binghamiae (Greene) Brummitt. The undescribed species was rediscovered in the City of Chino in April of 2011, a few miles north of the location where the most recent previous collection had been made by I. M. Johnston in 1917. The plants were found just prior to their likely destruction by grading and trenching for an underground power line. Intensive searches have resulted in the discovery of five additional occurrences, all of them in the City of Chino. Calystegia felix is at high risk of soon becoming extinct in the wild. All of the known extant occurrences are associated with well-watered landscaping on recently completed industrial, commercial, and residential developments. Every known living occurrence is within the limits of a ciénega belt, which is now mostly historical. Otherwise, the new species is only known only from collections made around the turn of the 20(th) century in what are now heavily urbanized areas, including one from South Los Angeles and another from Pico Rivera in Los Angeles County. Calystegia felix lacks the large bracts that immediately subtend, and enclose the calyx, which are always present in members of the Calystegia sepium complex. Affinities to Calystegia felix are found among other western US species with graduated sepals and small, often somewhat remote bracts. We discuss the enduring confusion between Calystegia felix and Calystegia sepium subsp. binghamiae, and differentiate the new species from some of its more likely relatives. The taxonomic treatment is supplemented by photos of herbarium specimens and living plants. We also discuss the ecological setting of Chino's ciénega belt, which was a mosaic of

  19. Lucky morning glory, Calystegia felix (Convolvulaceae): a new species from Southern California, with notes on the historical ecology of the Chino ciénega belt

    PubMed Central

    Provance, Mitchell C.; Sanders, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new morning glory, Calystegia felixProvance & A.C. Sanders sp. nov. (Convolvulaceae), is described from the Los Angeles, San Gabriel, and Santa Ana River basins. Historical collections of the species, which prior to 2011 had not been seen alive in 94 years, have been misidentified as Calystegia sepium (L.) R. Br. subsp. binghamiae (Greene) Brummitt. The undescribed species was rediscovered in the City of Chino in April of 2011, a few miles north of the location where the most recent previous collection had been made by I. M. Johnston in 1917. The plants were found just prior to their likely destruction by grading and trenching for an underground power line. Intensive searches have resulted in the discovery of five additional occurrences, all of them in the City of Chino. Calystegia felix is at high risk of soon becoming extinct in the wild. All of the known extant occurrences are associated with well-watered landscaping on recently completed industrial, commercial, and residential developments. Every known living occurrence is within the limits of a ciénega belt, which is now mostly historical. Otherwise, the new species is only known only from collections made around the turn of the 20th century in what are now heavily urbanized areas, including one from South Los Angeles and another from Pico Rivera in Los Angeles County. Calystegia felix lacks the large bracts that immediately subtend, and enclose the calyx, which are always present in members of the Calystegia sepium complex. Affinities to Calystegia felix are found among other western US species with graduated sepals and small, often somewhat remote bracts. We discuss the enduring confusion between Calystegia felix and Calystegia sepium subsp. binghamiae, and differentiate the new species from some of its more likely relatives. The taxonomic treatment is supplemented by photos of herbarium specimens and living plants. We also discuss the ecological setting of Chino’s ciénega belt, which was a

  20. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Chino Mine in Silver City, New Mexico. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kiatreungwattana, K.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Chino Mine site in Silver City, New Mexico, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  1. Palabras de origen chino en el habla cubana (Words of Chinese Origin in Cuban Spanish).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela, Beatriz

    1979-01-01

    Presents a historical analysis of the Chinese in Cuba and examines the influence of the Chinese language on Spanish. Examples are given of Chinese words used in Cuba today and it is concluded that they have made a considerable contribution to Cuban Spanish. (NCR)

  2. "El destierro de los Chinos": Popular Perspectives on Chinese-Mexican Intermarriage in the Early Twentieth Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Robert Chao

    2007-01-01

    This essay examines Chinese-Mexican interracial marriage during the early twentieth century through the lens of Mexican popular culture. Comedy, poetry, cartoons, and musical recordings of the time portrayed these marriages as relationships of abuse, slavery, and neglect, and rejected the offspring of such unions as subhuman and unworthy of full…

  3. 77 FR 52736 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... Solutions (NVO & OFF), 14144 Central Avenue, H, Chino, CA 91710, Officers: Xiaosong Liu, Secretary..., Director, (Qualifying Individual), Daniel D. Ferraz, Director, Application Type: Add Trade Names...

  4. A Comparison of Chinese and Colombian University EFL Students Regarding Learner Autonomy (Comparación entre estudiantes universitarios de inglés chinos y colombianos con respecto a su autonomía como aprendices)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buendía Arias, Ximena Paola

    2015-01-01

    This research seeks to gain deeper understanding of learner autonomy in English as a Foreign Language students from different cultures through the identification and analysis of similarities and differences between Chinese and Colombian students from two public universities: Tianjin Foreign Studies University in China and Universidad Surcolombiana…

  5. Pushing Too Little, Praising Too Much? Intercultural Misunderstandings between a Chinese Doctoral Student and a Dutch Supervisor (¿Empujando muy poco, felicitando demasiado? Malentendidos interculturales entre un estudiante de doctorado Chino y un supervisor Holandés)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Yanjuan; van Veen, Klaas; Corda, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    To understand the challenges and their causes in interactions between Western supervisors and international doctoral students, we conducted a self-study of our experiences as a Chinese international student and her Dutch supervisor during her doctoral research project. We found the supervisor and the student to differ in their expectations of the…

  6. Courtside: "Ungodly" Agency Shop Fees Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    On 26 September 2001, the Chino Valley School District, which is approximately 30 miles east of Los Angeles, signed a negotiated agreement with the duly authorized union representing the certified employees, the Associated Chino Teachers (ACT). The agreement provided that every member of the represented unit would become either a member of the ACT…

  7. Bacterial Composition in Urban Watershed Creeks Impacted by Contaminants from different Sources.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to monitor changes in microbial and chemical composition along Chino Creek Reach 1 region, which, in 2002, was placed on the 303(d) list as an impaired waterbody. Pollutants in the Chino Creek basin mainly consist of pathogens and nutrients due to the densely populated areas...

  8. Hydrogeology of the upper and middle Verde River watersheds, central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blasch, Kyle W.; Hoffmann, John P.; Graser, Leslie F.; Bryson, Jeannie R.; Flint, Alan L.

    2006-01-01

    The upper and middle Verde River watersheds in central Arizona are primarily in Yavapai County, which in 1999 was determined to be the fastest growing rural county in the United States; by 2050 the population is projected to more than double its current size (132,000 in 2000). This study combines climatic, surface-water, ground-water, water-chemistry, and geologic data to describe the hydrogeologic systems within the upper and middle Verde River watersheds and to provide a conceptual understanding of the ground-water flow system. The study area includes the Big Chino and Little Chino subbasins in the upper Verde River watershed and the Verde Valley subbasin in the middle Verde Rive watershed...more...A geochemical mixing model was used to quantify fractions of ground-water sources to the Verde River from various parts of the study area. Most of the water in the uppermost 0.2 mile of the Verde River is from the Little Chino subbasin, and the remainder is from the Big Chino subbasin. Discharge from a system of springs increases base flow to about 17 cubic feet per second within the next 2 miles of the river. Ground water that discharges at these springs is derived from the western part of the Coconino Plateau, from the Big Chino subbasin, and from the Little Chino subbasin. More...

  9. Preliminary report on geophysics of the Verde River headwaters region, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Duval, J.S.; Wirt, Laurie; DeWitt, Ed

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the acquisition, data processing, and preliminary interpretation of a high-resolution aeromagnetic and radiometric survey near the confluence of the Big and Little Chino basins in the headwaters of the Verde River, Arizona. The goal of the aeromagnetic study is to improve understanding of the geologic framework as it affects groundwater flow, particularly in relation to the occurrence of springs in the upper Verde River headwaters region. Radiometric data were also collected to map surficial rocks and soils, thus aiding geologic mapping of the basin fill. Additional gravity data were collected to enhance existing coverage. Both aeromagnetic and gravity data indicate a large gradient along the Big Chino fault, a fault with Quaternary movement. Filtered aeromagnetic data show other possible faults within the basin fill and areas where volcanic rocks are shallowly buried. Gravity lows associated with Big Chino and Williamson Valleys indicate potentially significant accumulations of low-density basin fill. The absence of a gravity low associated with Little Chino Valley indicates that high-density rocks are shallow. The radiometric maps show higher radioactivity associated with the Tertiary latites and with the sediments derived from them. The surficial materials on the eastern side of the Big Chino Valley are significantly lower in radioactivity and reflect the materials derived from the limestone and basalt east of the valley. The dividing line between the low radioactivity materials to the east and the higher radioactiviy materials to the west coincides approximately with the major drainage system of the valley, locally known as Big Chino Wash. This feature is remarkably straight and is approximately parallel to the Big Chino Fault. The uranium map shows large areas with concentrations greater than 5 ppm eU, and we expect that these areas will have a significantly higher risk potential for indoor radon.

  10. 75 FR 8943 - Notice of a Regional Project Waiver of Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... circumstances. The IEUA's Rancho Cucamonga groundwater recharge project will include the purchase of three transducers with associated hardware manufactured by Solinst in Canada, for monitoring in two recharge basins... recharge recycled water into the Chino Groundwater Basin through the Victoria Basin and San Sevaine...

  11. Lessons in Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Wallace Loh still remembers the sting of hearing his high school teachers in Peru call him "el chino"--Spanish for "Chinese boy." Why didn't they simply use his name? After all, they did so with his classmates. They typically did not single out students of other foreign nationalities, such as calling the German student "el aleman." Loh had…

  12. Why Does a Large Prison Population Yield So Few Participants in a College Program Offered at Prison Sites?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, S. M. Steve

    A study was conducted to determine why such a small number (less than 2 percent) of the approximately 9,000 adult male prisoners housed in the 3 complexes of the California Institution for Men (Chino, California) in the mid-1980s were actively participating in the college program offered at the prison sites. Data were collected through interviews…

  13. IMPACT OF PLANT DENSITY AND MICROBIAL COMPOSITION ON WATER QUALITY FROM A FREE WATER SURFACE CONSTRUCTED WETLAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Prado Wetlands in Chino, CA is a free water surface (FWS) constructed wetland consisting of 50 shallow ponds that treats approximately 50% of Santa Ana River water prior to its passage to Orange County, CA where it is used for groundwater recharge. The main function of Prado Wetlands has been t...

  14. 1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the northeast taken from the northeast extremity of the canyon, showing, in the middle distance, the confluence of Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, site of the future Prado Dam. File number written on negative: R & H 80 026. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  15. Relationship between the Damage Emergence of Agricultural Infrastructure and the Period after the Occurrence of the 2004 Chuetsu Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Safumi

    Although the disaster restoration in the agricultural land and rural villages has progressed since the 2004 Chuetsu Earthquake, potential small-scale damages of the agricultural infrastructure have been continuously coming to surface. The notable difference between the earthquake disaster and other disasters is that the former induces extensive ground damages which, in turn, lead to a long-term continuation of small-scale damage emergence. However, there exists no measure devised to deal with those small-scale damages due to the difficulty in technically proving the relationship between the damages and the earthquake even though the damages are actually caused by the earthquake. Although it has been pointed out that longer-term restoration measures are necessary to cope with the peculiar characteristic of a earthquake disaster, these are not realized in practice owing mainly to the unavailability of the secular change data of damages. In this research, the damage characteristics in the Chuetsu area were clarified through the analysis of tracking records of the Small-scale Disaster Restoration Project (SDRP: In Japanese "Tezukuri-tanaoshi-tou-shien" Project), and the results of questionnaires for the farmers. In conclusion, a proposition was made on long-term measures for the disaster restoration after the occurrence of a large-scale earthquake.

  16. Groundwater movement, recharge, and perchlorate occurrence in a faulted alluvial aquifer in California (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Teague, Nicholas F.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Bohlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate from military, industrial, and legacy agricultural sources is present within an alluvial aquifer in the Rialto-Colton groundwater subbasin, 80 km east of Los Angeles, California (USA). The area is extensively faulted, with water-level differences exceeding 60 m across parts of the Rialto-Colton Fault separating the Rialto-Colton and Chino groundwater subbasins. Coupled well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data show decreases in well yield and changes in water chemistry and isotopic composition, reflecting changing aquifer properties and groundwater recharge sources with depth. Perchlorate movement through some wells under unpumped conditions from shallower to deeper layers underlying mapped plumes was as high as 13 kg/year. Water-level maps suggest potential groundwater movement across the Rialto-Colton Fault through an overlying perched aquifer. Upward flow through a well in the Chino subbasin near the Rialto-Colton Fault suggests potential groundwater movement across the fault through permeable layers within partly consolidated deposits at depth. Although potentially important locally, movement of groundwater from the Rialto-Colton subbasin has not resulted in widespread occurrence of perchlorate within the Chino subbasin. Nitrate and perchlorate concentrations at the water table, associated with legacy agricultural fertilizer use, may be underestimated by data from long-screened wells that mix water from different depths within the aquifer.

  17. Groundwater movement, recharge, and perchlorate occurrence in a faulted alluvial aquifer in California (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbicki, John A.; Teague, Nicholas F.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Böhlke, J. K.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2015-05-01

    Perchlorate from military, industrial, and legacy agricultural sources is present within an alluvial aquifer in the Rialto-Colton groundwater subbasin, 80 km east of Los Angeles, California (USA). The area is extensively faulted, with water-level differences exceeding 60 m across parts of the Rialto-Colton Fault separating the Rialto-Colton and Chino groundwater subbasins. Coupled well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data show decreases in well yield and changes in water chemistry and isotopic composition, reflecting changing aquifer properties and groundwater recharge sources with depth. Perchlorate movement through some wells under unpumped conditions from shallower to deeper layers underlying mapped plumes was as high as 13 kg/year. Water-level maps suggest potential groundwater movement across the Rialto-Colton Fault through an overlying perched aquifer. Upward flow through a well in the Chino subbasin near the Rialto-Colton Fault suggests potential groundwater movement across the fault through permeable layers within partly consolidated deposits at depth. Although potentially important locally, movement of groundwater from the Rialto-Colton subbasin has not resulted in widespread occurrence of perchlorate within the Chino subbasin. Nitrate and perchlorate concentrations at the water table, associated with legacy agricultural fertilizer use, may be underestimated by data from long-screened wells that mix water from different depths within the aquifer.

  18. Analysis of stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ2H) in precipitation of the Verde River watershed, Arizona 2013 through 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beisner, Kimberly R.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Tucci, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope delta values (δ18O and δ2H) of precipitation can vary with elevation, and quantification of the precipitation elevation gradient can be used to predict recharge elevation within a watershed. Precipitation samples were analyzed for stable isotope delta values between 2003 and 2014 from the Verde River watershed of north-central Arizona. Results indicate a significant decrease in summer isotopic values overtime at 3,100-, 4,100-, 6,100-, 7,100-, and 8,100-feet elevation. The updated local meteoric water line for the area is δ2H = 7.11 δ18O + 3.40. Equations to predict stable isotopic values based on elevation were updated from previous publications in Blasch and others (2006), Blasch and Bryson (2007), and Bryson and others (2007). New equations were separated for samples from the Camp Verde to Flagstaff transect and the Prescott to Chino Valley transect. For the Camp Verde to Flagstaff transect, the new equations for winter precipitation are δ18O = -0.0004z − 8.87 and δ2H = -0.0029z − 59.8 (where z represents elevation in feet) and the summer precipitation equations were not statistically significant. For the Prescott to Chino Valley transect, the new equations for summer precipitation are δ18O = -0.0005z − 3.22 and δ2H = -0.0022z − 27.9; the winter precipitation equations were not statistically significant and, notably, stable isotope values were similar across all elevations. Interpretation of elevation of recharge contributing to surface and groundwaters in the Verde River watershed using the updated equations for the Camp Verde to Flagstaff transect will give lower elevation values compared with interpretations presented in the previous studies. For waters in the Prescott and Chino Valley area, more information is needed to understand local controls on stable isotope values related to elevation.

  19. Sources of springs supplying base flow to the Verde River headwaters, Yavapai County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wirt, Laurie; Hjalmarson, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence were used to identify source aquifers, quantify their respective contributions, and trace the ground-water flow paths that supply base flow to the uppermost reach of the Verde River in Yavapai County, Arizona. Ground-water discharge via springs provides base flow for a 24-mile long reach from the mouth of Granite Creek (river mile 2.0) to Perkinsville (river mile 26). The flowing reach is important to downstream water users, maintains critical habitat for the recovery of native fish species, and has been designated a Wild and Scenic River. Sources of base flow are deduced from (a) geologic information, (b) ground-water levels, (c) precipitation and streamflow records, (d) downstream changes in base-flow measurements, (e) hydrologic analysis of water-budget components, and (f) stableisotope geochemistry of ground water, surface water, and springs. Combined, this information clearly indicates that interconnected aquifers in Big Chino Valley are the primary source of Big Chino Springs, presently supplying at least 80 percent of the upper Verde River?s base flow.

  20. Rapid probabilistic source characterisation in 3D earth models using learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, A. P.; Kaeufl, P.; Trampert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Characterising earthquake sources rapidly and robustly is an essential component of any earthquake early warning (EEW) procedure. Ideally, this characterisation should:(i) be probabilistic -- enabling appreciation of the full range of mechanisms compatible with available data, and taking observational and theoretical uncertainties into account; and(ii) operate in a physically-complete theoretical framework.However, implementing either of these ideals increases computational costs significantly, making it unfeasible to satisfy both in the short timescales necessary for EEW applications.The barrier here arises from the fact that conventional probabilistic inversion techniques involve running many thousands of forward simulations after data has been obtained---a procedure known as `posterior sampling'. Thus, for EEW, all computational costs must be incurred after the event time. Here, we demonstrate a new approach---based instead on `prior sampling'---which circumvents this problem and is feasible for EEW applications. All forward simulations are conducted in advance, and a learning algorithm is used to assimilate information about the relationship between model and data. Once observations from an earthquake become available, this information can be used to infer probability density functions (pdfs) for seismic source parameters, within milliseconds.We demonstrate this procedure using data from the 2008 Mw5.4 Chino Hills earthquake. We compute Green's functions for 150 randomly-chosen locations on the Whittier and Chino faults, using SPECFEM3D and a 3D model of the regional velocity structure. We then use these to train neural networks that map from seismic waveforms to pdfs on a point-source, moment-tensor representation of the event mechanism. We show that using local network data from the Chino Hills event, this system provides accurate information on magnitude, epicentral location and source half-duration using data available 6 seconds after the first station

  1. Introduction. [usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques for studying components of California water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Since May 1970, personnel on several campuses of the University of California have been conducting investigations which seek to determine the usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques for studying various components of California's earth resources complex. Emphasis has been given to California's water resources as exemplified by the Feather River project and other aspects of the California Water Plan. This study is designed to consider in detail the supply, demand, and impact relationships. The specific geographic areas studied are the Feather River drainage in northern California, the Chino-Riverside Basin and Imperial Valley areas in southern California, and selected portions of the west side of San Joaquin Valley in central California. An analysis is also given on how an effective benefit-cost study of remote sensing in relation to California's water resources might best be made.

  2. Plants used as abortifacients and emmenagogues by Spanish New Mexicans.

    PubMed

    Conway, G A; Slocumb, J C

    1979-10-01

    Individuals of Spanish and Mexican descent in New Mexico have used a number of plants as emmenagogues and abortifacients. Of the plants used, cotton root bark (Gossypium sp.), inmortal ((Asclepias capricornu Woodson), poleo chino (Hedeoma oblongifolia (Gray) Heller), rue Ruta graveolens L.), wormseed (Chenopodium ambrosioides L.), and three species of Artemesia seem to be used most widely. Of these, the cotton root bark, when used as an abortifacient, seems to exhibit the lowest toxicity. Rue is notable because of its use independently within different cultures, but may exhibit toxic side effects when used as an abortifacient. Seven other plants are outlined on the basis of anecdotal and folkloric reports. Investigations are underway to look at use effectiveness, side effects, impact on fertility, and acceptance among cultures of the Southwestern United States. PMID:232204

  3. Water demand studies. [central and southern California regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, L. W.; Estes, J. E.; Churchman, C. W.; Johnson, C. W.; Huning, J. R.; Rozelle, K.; Hamilton, J.; Washburn, G.; Tinney, L. R.; Thaman, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The areas of focus of the Santa Barbara and Riverside groups in conducting water demand studies are the central and southern California regional test sites, respectively. Within each test site, sub-areas have been selected for use in the making of detailed investigations. Within each of these sub-areas an in-depth evaluation is being made as to the capability of remote sensing systems to provide pertinent data relative to water demand phenomena. These more limited sub-areas are: (1) Kern County and the San Joaquin Basin; (2) Chino-Riverside Basin; and (3) the Imperial Valley. Rational for the selection of these subareas included the following: Much of the previous remote sensing research had been conducted in these areas and therefore a great deal of remote sensing imagery and pertinent ground truth for the areas was already available.

  4. Airborne Trace Gas Mapping During the GOSAT-COMEX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratt, D. M.; Leifer, I.; Buckland, K. N.; Johnson, P. D.; Van Damme, M.; Pierre-Francois, C.; Clarisse, L.

    2015-12-01

    The GOSAT-COMEX-IASI (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite - CO2 and Methane EXperiment - Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) experiment acquired data on 24-27 April 2015 with two aircraft, a mobile ground-based sampling suite, and the GOSAT and IASI platforms. Collections comprised the Kern Front and Kern River oil fields north of Bakersfield, Calif. and the Chino stockyard complex in the eastern Los Angeles Basin. The nested-grid experiment examined the convergence of multiple approaches to total trace gas flux estimation from the experimental area on multiple length-scales, which entailed the integrated analysis of ground-based, airborne, and space-based measurements. Airborne remote sensing was employed to map the spatial distribution of discrete emission sites - crucial information to understanding their relative aggregate contribution to the overall flux estimation. This contribution discusses the methodology in the context of the airborne GHG source mapping component of the GOSAT-COMEX experiment and its application to satellite validation.

  5. Polymorphism at the ITS and NTS Loci of Perkinsus marinus isolated from cultivated oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in Nayarit, Mexico and phylogentic relationship to P. marinus along the Atlantic Coast.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Fregoso, C; Arzul, I; Carrasco, N; Gutiérrez-Rivera, J N; Llera-Herrera, R; Vázquez-Juárez, R

    2015-04-01

    Prevalence of the protozoan Perkinsus spp. in the gills of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis from two estuaries in Nayarit, Mexico, was measured. The protozoan was identified by PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rDNA of Perkinsus spp. The pathogen was found in 92% of oysters from Boca de Camichín and 77% of oysters from Pozo Chino. ITS sequences characterized from C. corteziensis showed 96-100% similarity to Perkinsus marinus. The most frequent ITS sequence (GenBank JQ266236) had 100% identity with the ITS locus of P. marinus from New Jersey, Maryland, South Carolina and Texas, and the second most frequent observed sequence (GenBank JQ266240) was 100% identical to ITS sequences of P. marinus from New Jersey, South Carolina, Louisiana, and Bahía Kino, Sonora, Mexico. The 14 sequences from the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) showed 98% similarity to P. marinus from Texas. The most frequent polymorphism identified was at nucleotide 446 of the ITS region; however, the NTS showed the highest nucleotide diversity, thereby suggesting that this region is suitable for genotype identification. Moreover, the most conserved ITS marker is better for species-specific diagnosis. Both the ITS and NTS sequences of P. marinus obtained from C. corteziensis were grouped in two clades, identifying two allelic variants of P. marinus. PMID:23607743

  6. Measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air by collection onto an ion exchange resin and analysis by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-02-01

    Ammonia and amines are common trace gases in the atmosphere and have a variety of both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, with a major contribution coming from agricultural sites. In addition to their malodorous nature, both ammonia and amines have been shown to enhance particle formation from acids such as nitric, sulfuric and methanesulfonic acids, which has implications for visibility, human health and climate. A key component of quantifying the effects of these species on particle formation is accurate gas-phase measurements in both laboratory and field studies. However, these species are notoriously difficult to measure as they are readily taken up on surfaces, including onto glass surfaces from aqueous solution as established in the present studies. We describe here a novel technique for measuring gas-phase ammonia and amines that involves uptake onto a weak cation exchange resin followed by extraction and analysis using ion chromatography. Two variants, one for ppb concentrations in air and the second with lower (ppt) detection limits, are described. The latter involves the use of a custom-designed high-pressure cartridge to hold the resin for in-line extraction. These methods avoid the use of sampling lines, which can lead to significant inlet losses of these compounds. They also have the advantages of being relatively simple and inexpensive. The applicability of this technique to ambient air is demonstrated in measurements made near a cattle farm in Chino, CA.

  7. Gene expression profiling of rice seedlings in response to glutamine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Chia-Cheng; Chung, Tsui-Yun; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in humans (Curi et al., 2007 [1]), has many functions. In addition to protein, amino acid, and nucleic acid biosynthesis, glutamine also regulates the expression of genes related to metabolism, cell defense, and signal transduction in humans (Curi et al., 2007 [1]; Brasse-Lagnel et al., 2009 [2]). Glutamine is also one of the major forms of nitrogen in rice (Fukumorita and Chino, 1982 [3]). In addition to metabolic and nutritional effects, glutamine may function as a signaling molecule to regulate gene expression in plants. To this end, we used microarray analysis to identify genes that are rapidly induced by 2.5 mM glutamine in rice roots. The results revealed that glutamine induced the expression of at least 35 genes involved in metabolism, transport, signal transduction, and stress responses within 30 min (Kan et al., 2015 [4]). Here, we provide the details of the experimental procedure associated with our microarray data deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO ID: GSE56770). PMID:26697351

  8. The Relationship Between Fossil and Dairy Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Complex Urban Land-Use Patterns by In Situ and Remote Sensing Data from Surface Mobile, Airborne, and Satellite Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Melton, C.; Tratt, D. M.; Kuze, A.; Buckland, K. N.; Butz, A.; Deguchi, A.; Eastwood, M. L.; Fischer, M. L.; Frash, J.; Fladeland, M. M.; Gore, W.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kataoka, F.; Kolyer, R.; Leen, J. B.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Shiomi, K.; Suto, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thompson, D. R.; Yates, E. L.; Van Damme, M.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    The GOSAT-COMEX-IASI Experiment (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite-CO2and Methane EXperiment) demonstrated a novel approach to airborne-surface mobile in situ data fusion for interpretation and validation of satellite and airborne remote sensing data of greenhouse gases and direct calculation of flux. Key data were collected for the Chino Dairy in the Los Angeles Basin, California and for the Kern River Oil Fields adjacent to Bakersfield, California. In situ surface and remote sensing greenhouse gas and ammonia observations were compared with IASI and GOSAT retreivals, while hyperspectral imaging data from the AVIRIS, AVIRIS NG, and Mako airborne sensors were analyzed to relate emissions and land use. Figure - platforms participating in the experiment. TANSO-FTS aboard the Ibuki satellite (GOSAT) provided targeted pixels to measure column greenhouse gases. AMOG is the AutoMObile Gas Surveyor which supports a suite of meteorology and in situ trace gas sensors for mobile high speed measurement. AVIRIS, the Airborne Visual InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer aboard the NASA ER-2 airplane collected hyperspectral imaging data at 20 m resolution from 60,000 ft. Mako is a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer that was flown on the Twin Otter International. AJAX is a fighter jet outfitted for science sporting meteorology and greenhouse gas sensors. RAMVan is an upward looking FTIR for measuring column methane and ammonia and other trace gases.

  9. Locating earthquakes with surface waves and centroid moment tensor estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shengji; Zhan, Zhongwen; Tan, Ying; Ni, Sidao; Helmberger, Don

    2012-04-01

    Traditionally, P wave arrival times have been used to locate regional earthquakes. In contrast, the travel times of surface waves dependent on source excitation and the source parameters and depth must be determined independently. Thus surface wave path delays need to be known before such data can be used for location. These delays can be estimated from previous earthquakes using the cut-and-paste technique, Ambient Seismic Noise tomography, and from 3D models. Taking the Chino Hills event as an example, we show consistency of path corrections for (>10 s) Love and Rayleigh waves to within about 1 s obtained from these methods. We then use these empirically derived delay maps to determine centroid locations of 138 Southern California moderate-sized (3.5 > Mw> 5.7) earthquakes using surface waves alone. It appears that these methods are capable of locating the main zone of rupture within a few (˜3) km accuracy relative to Southern California Seismic Network locations with 5 stations that are well distributed in azimuth. We also address the timing accuracy required to resolve non-double-couple source parameters which trades-off with location with less than a km error required for a 10% Compensated Linear Vector Dipole resolution.

  10. A new compact fixed-point blackbody furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraka, K.; Oikawa, H.; Shimizu, T.; Kadoya, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Ishii, J.

    2013-09-11

    More and more NMIs are realizing their primary scale themselves with fixed-point blackbodies as their reference standard. However, commercially available fixed-point blackbody furnaces of sufficient quality are not always easy to obtain. CHINO Corp. and NMIJ, AIST jointly developed a new compact fixed-point blackbody furnace. The new furnace has such features as 1) improved temperature uniformity when compared to previous products, enabling better plateau quality, 2) adoption of the hybrid fixed-point cell structure with internal insulation to improve robustness and thereby to extend lifetime, 3) easily ejectable and replaceable heater unit and fixed-point cell design, leading to reduced maintenance cost, 4) interchangeability among multiple fixed points from In to Cu points. The replaceable cell feature facilitates long term maintenance of the scale through management of a group of fixed-point cells of the same type. The compact furnace is easily transportable and therefore can also function as a traveling standard for disseminating the radiation temperature scale, and for maintaining the scale at the secondary level and industrial calibration laboratories. It is expected that the furnace will play a key role of the traveling standard in the anticipated APMP supplementary comparison of the radiation thermometry scale.

  11. Measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air by collection onto an ion exchange resin and analysis by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    Ammonia and amines are common trace gases in the atmosphere and have a variety of both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, with a major contribution coming from agricultural sites. In addition to their malodorous nature, both ammonia and amines have been shown to enhance particle formation from acids such as nitric, sulfuric and methanesulfonic acids, which has implications for visibility, human health and climate. A key component of quantifying the effects of these species on particle formation is accurate gas-phase measurements in both laboratory and field studies. However, these species are notoriously difficult to measure as they are readily taken up on surfaces, including onto glass surfaces from aqueous solution as established in the present studies. We describe here a novel technique for measuring gas-phase ammonia and amines that involves uptake onto a weak cation exchange resin followed by extraction and analysis using ion chromatography. Two variants - one for parts per billion concentrations in air and the second with lower (parts per trillion) detection limits - are described. The latter involves the use of a custom-designed high-pressure cartridge to hold the resin for in-line extraction. These methods avoid the use of sampling lines, which can lead to significant inlet losses of these compounds. They also have the advantages of being relatively simple and inexpensive. The applicability of this technique to ambient air is demonstrated in measurements made near a cattle farm in Chino, CA.

  12. Finite Element Simulation of Earthquakes with Coupling Tsunamis in Large Domains — A Case Study of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake and Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoglu, H.; Bielak, J.

    2014-12-01

    Seaquakes and tsunamis are usually coupled in nature. This is especially evident around the subduction zones where most of the top ten strongest earthquakes have been recorded in the last century.Addressing the coupled nature of the two phenomena requires concurrent simulations. Accordingly, this study deals with the simulation of strongly-coupled subduction zone earthquakes, with a focus on the generation of tsunami waves.We present an application to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and tsunami employing a multi-system finite element method for the elastoacoustic problem. In the past, we have reported on the simulation capabilities of Hercules, our finite element tool, for earthquake scenarios such as ShakeOut and Chino-Hills using ideal anelastic material models with kinematic faulting. With the latest improvements we have introduced into Hercules, we can now incorporate oceans and the attendant gravity waves into our three-dimensional simulations.We examine the relationship between the fault rupture, the generation of the tsunami, and the ocean's effects on the propagation of seismic waves through the solid and acoustic media. Additionally, we clarify the validity of common assumptions made for the tsunami generation mechanism with classical tsunami simulation methods. While our focus is on the physical interpretation of the results and its comparison with observations, we also report on the current understanding of the geologic structure of the Japan Trench, computing resources, and the numerical method.

  13. Introduction and potential establishment of Aedes albopictus in California in 2001.

    PubMed

    Linthicum, Kenneth J; Kramer, Vicki L; Madon, Minoo B; Fujioka, Kenn

    2003-12-01

    Aedes albopictus was discovered in Los Angeles, California, in June 2001 in a maritime cargo container from China containing a shipment of a commercial plant product known as "Lucky Bamboo" (Dracaena spp.). To keep the plants alive during the ocean transit, they were shipped in 5-8 cm of water, providing an excellent habitat for Ae. albopictus. Mosquito infestations were subsequently detected at 15 nursery distributors of Dracaena in 2 northern and 4 southern California counties. The distribution of the Ae. albopictus infestations was limited to the vicinity of those nursery distributors with documented infestations. Infestations persisted for more than 5 months near some of the nurseries, and eggs were found in ovitraps until mid-November 2001 up to 1,000 m from the original infestation sites. Overwintering Ae. albopictus populations were discovered in April, July, and August 2002 at original infestation sites in Chino, San Bernardino County, and Monterey Park and Rowland Heights, Los Angeles County, respectively. Specimens were found at some sites of overwintering populations until October 2002. PMID:14710730

  14. Rasgrp1 mutation increases naïve T-cell CD44 expression and drives mTOR-dependent accumulation of Helios+ T cells and autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Darienne R; Polakos, Noelle K; Enders, Anselm; Roots, Carla; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Miosge, Lisa A; Sjollema, Geoff; Bertram, Edward M; Field, Matthew A; Shao, Yunli; Andrews, T Daniel; Whittle, Belinda; Barnes, S Whitney; Walker, John R; Cyster, Jason G

    2013-01-01

    Missense variants are a major source of human genetic variation. Here we analyze a new mouse missense variant, Rasgrp1Anaef, with an ENU-mutated EF hand in the Rasgrp1 Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Rasgrp1Anaef mice exhibit anti-nuclear autoantibodies and gradually accumulate a CD44hi Helios+ PD-1+ CD4+ T cell population that is dependent on B cells. Despite reduced Rasgrp1-Ras-ERK activation in vitro, thymocyte selection in Rasgrp1Anaef is mostly normal in vivo, although CD44 is overexpressed on naïve thymocytes and T cells in a T-cell-autonomous manner. We identify CD44 expression as a sensitive reporter of tonic mTOR-S6 kinase signaling through a novel mouse strain, chino, with a reduction-of-function mutation in Mtor. Elevated tonic mTOR-S6 signaling occurs in Rasgrp1Anaef naïve CD4+ T cells. CD44 expression, CD4+ T cell subset ratios and serum autoantibodies all returned to normal in Rasgrp1AnaefMtorchino double-mutant mice, demonstrating that increased mTOR activity is essential for the Rasgrp1Anaef T cell dysregulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01020.001 PMID:24336796

  15. A Dynamic study of Mantle processes applying In-situ Methods to Compound Xenoliths: implications for small to intermediate scale heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baziotis, Ioannis; Asimow, Paul; Koroneos, Antonios; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Poli, Giampero

    2013-04-01

    The mantle is the major geochemical reservoir of most rock-forming elements in the Earth. Convection and plate-tectonic driven processes act to generate local and regional heterogeneity within the mantle, which in turn through thermal and chemical interactions modulates ongoing geophysical processes; this feedback shapes the dynamics of the deep interior. Consequently, these processes contribute to the evolution of the earth throughout its geological history. Up to now, the heterogeneity of the mantle has been extensively studied in terms of conventional methods using basalt chemistry, bulk rock and mineral major and trace element analysis of isolated xenolith specimens of varying lithology, and massif exposures. The milestone of the present study, part of an ongoing research project, is the application of in-situ analytical methods such as microprobe, LA-ICP-MS and high resolution SEM in order to provide high quality major and trace element analyses as well as elemental distribution of the coexisting phases in the preserved intra-mantle lithologies, Particularly, in the context of the current study we used selected compound xenoliths from San Carlos (Arizona, USA), Kilbourne Hole (New Mexico, USA), Cima Dome and Dish Hill suites (California, USA), San Quintin (Baja California, Mexico) and Chino Valley (Arizona, USA), from the Howard Wilshire collection archived at the Smithsonian Institution. The selection of these compound xenoliths was based upon freshness and integrity of specimens, maximum distance on both sides of lithologic contacts, and rock types thought most likely to represent subsolidus juxtaposition of different lithologies that later partially melted in contact. The San Carlos samples comprise composite xenoliths with websterite, lherzolite and clinopyroxenite layers or clinopyroxenite veins surrounded by lherzolite or orthopyroxenite-rich rims. The Kilbourne Hole suite comprises spinel-(olivine) clinopyroxenite and orthopyroxenite dikes cutting

  16. Simulation of radioactive tracer transport using IsoRSM and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAYA, A.; Chang, E.; Yoshimura, K.; Oki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the massive earthquakes and tsunami on March 11 2011 in Eastern Japan, Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was severely damaged and some reactors were exploded. To know how the radioactive materials were spread and how much they were deposited into the land, it is important to enhance the accuracy of radioactive transport simulation model. However, there are uncertainties in the models including dry and wet deposition process in the models, meteorological field and release amount of radioactive materials. In this study we analyzed these uncertainties aiming for higher accuracy in the simulation. We modified the stable isotope mode of Regional Spectral Model (IsoRSM, Yoshimura et al., 2009) to enable to simulate the transport of the radioactive tracers, namely iodine 131 and cesium 137, by including the dry and wet deposition processes. With this model, we conducted a set of sensitivity experiments using different parameters in the deposition processes, different diffusivity in advection processes, and different domain sizes. The control experiment with 10km resolution covering most of Japan and surrounding oceans (132.7oE-151.5oE &28.3oN-46.7oN) and the emission estimated by Chino et al. (2011) showed reasonable temporal results for Toukatsu area (eastern part of Tokyo metropolis and western part of Chiba prefecture where low-level contamination was occurred), i.e., on 22 March, the tracers from Fukushima were reached and precipitated in a significant amount as wet deposition. Thus we conducted 4 experimental simulations to analyze the simulation uncertainty due to 1) different meteorological pattern, different parameters for 2) wet and 3) dry deposition and 4) diffusion. Though the temporal patterns of deposition of radioactive particles were somewhat similar each other in all experiments, we revealed that the impacts to the area mean deposition were large. Results of the simulations with different diffusivity and different domain size showed that the

  17. Devonian brachiopods of southwesternmost laurentia: Biogeographic affinities and tectonic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boucot, A.J.; Poole, F.G.; Amaya-Martinez, R.; Harris, A.G.; Sandberg, C.A.; Page, W.R.

    2008-01-01

    Three brachiopod faunas discussed herein record different depositional and tectonic settings along the southwestern margin of Laurentia (North America) during Devonian time. Depositional settings include inner continental shelf (Cerros de Los Murcielagos), medial continental shelf (Rancho Placeritos), and offshelf continental rise (Rancho Los Chinos). Ages of Devonian brachiopod faunas include middle Early (Pragian) at Rancho Placeritos in west-central Sonora, late Middle (Givetian) at Cerros de Los Murcielagos in northwestern Sonora, and late Late (Famennian) at Rancho Los Chinos in central Sonora. The brachiopods of these three faunas, as well as the gastropod Orecopia, are easily recognized in outcrop and thus are useful for local and regional correlations. Pragian brachiopods dominated by Acrospirifer and Meristella in the "San Miguel Formation" at Rancho Placeritos represent the widespread Appohimchi Subprovince of eastern and southern Laurentia. Conodonts of the early to middle Pragian sulcatus to kindlei Zones associated with the brachiopods confirm the ages indicated by the brachiopod fauna and provide additional information on the depositional setting of the Devonian strata. Biostratigraphic distribution of the Appohimchi brachiopod fauna indicates continuous Early Devonian shelf deposition along the entire southern margin of Laurentia. The largely emergent southwest-trending Transcontinental arch apparently formed a barrier preventing migration and mixing of many genera and species of brachiopods from the southern shelf of Laurentia in northern Mexico to the western shelf (Cordilleran mio-geocline) in the western United States. Middle Devonian Stringocephalus brachiopods and Late Devonian Orecopia gastropods in the "Los Murcielagos Formation" in northwest Sonora represent the southwest-ernmost occurrence of these genera in North America and date the host rocks as Givetian and Frasnian, respectively. Rhynchonelloid brachiopods (Dzieduszyckia sonora) and

  18. Perkinsus marinus in pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis from Nayarit, Pacific coast of México.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Martínez, J; Vásquez-Yeomans, R; Padilla-Lardizábal, G; del Río Portilla, M A

    2008-09-01

    Culture of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis is emerging as an alternative to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) for oyster producers, who face severe mortalities since 1997 in Northwest México. For determining the health status of this species, we conducted a histopathological analysis of cultured populations from two estuaries in the Pacific coast of México. Macroscopical analysis revealed animals with transparent and retracted mantle. Histopathological analysis of these specimens showed tissue alterations and parasitic forms consistent with Perkinsus sp. infection. Stages of the parasite identified included tomont and trophozoites with an eccentric vacuole characteristic of Perkinsus spp. Pieces of tissues of infected oysters were incubated in Fluid Thioglycollate Medium (FTM) resulting in blue-black hypnospores after incubation. The identity of the parasite was confirmed by species specific PCR-based assay in DNA samples from oysters, tissue fractions from FTM cultures, and deparaffined samples with Perkinsus-like parasite detected by histology. Sequencing of positive amplified fragments (307bp) showed a sequence similar to Perkinsus marinus strain TXsc NTS ribosomal RNA gene (100% coverage and 98% identity, GenBank Accession No. AF497479.1) and to P. marinus, Genomic DNA, (100% coverage and 97% identity, GenBank Accession No. S78416.1). The prevalence of P. marinus varied from 1 to 5% in Boca del Camichín and from 1 to 6% in Pozo Chino. In general, the intensity of infection was moderate. The infection was observed in oysters from 31 to 110mm of shell length. This is the first record of P. marinus in oysters from the North America Pacific coast and the first record in C. corteziensis. The origin of this parasite in the area is unknown, but it may be associated to introductions of Crassostrea virginica from the East coast of United States of America or Gulf of México. PMID:18423484

  19. A novel begomovirus isolated from sida contains putative cis- and trans-acting replication specificity determinants that have evolved independently in several geographical lineages.

    PubMed

    Mauricio-Castillo, J A; Torres-Herrera, S I; Cárdenas-Conejo, Y; Pastor-Palacios, G; Méndez-Lozano, J; Argüello-Astorga, G R

    2014-09-01

    A novel begomovirus isolated from a Sida rhombifolia plant collected in Sinaloa, Mexico, was characterized. The genomic components of sida mosaic Sinaloa virus (SiMSinV) shared highest sequence identity with DNA-A and DNA-B components of chino del tomate virus (CdTV), suggesting a vertical evolutionary relationship between these viruses. However, recombination analysis indicated that a short segment of SiMSinV DNA-A encompassing the plus-strand replication origin and the 5´-proximal 43 codons of the Rep gene was derived from tomato mottle Taino virus (ToMoTV). Accordingly, the putative cis- and trans-acting replication specificity determinants of SiMSinV were identical to those of ToMoTV but differed from those of CdTV. Modeling of the SiMSinV and CdTV Rep proteins revealed significant differences in the region comprising the small β1/β5 sheet element, where five putative DNA-binding specificity determinants (SPDs) of Rep (i.e., amino acid residues 5, 8, 10, 69 and 71) were previously identified. Computer-assisted searches of public databases led to identification of 33 begomoviruses from three continents encoding proteins with SPDs identical to those of the Rep encoded by SiMSinV. Sequence analysis of the replication origins demonstrated that all 33 begomoviruses harbor potential Rep-binding sites identical to those of SiMSinV. These data support the hypothesis that the Rep β1/β5 sheet region determines specificity of this protein for DNA replication origin sequences. PMID:24737005

  20. Differential column measurements using compact solar-tracking spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia; Viatte, Camille; Hedelius, Jacob K.; Jones, Taylor; Franklin, Jonathan E.; Parker, Harrison; Gottlieb, Elaine W.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the use of compact solar-tracking Fourier transform spectrometers (Bruker EM27/SUN) for differential measurements of the column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of CH4 and CO2 within urban areas. Using Allan variance analysis, we show that the differential column measurement has a precision of 0.01 % for XCO2 and XCH4 with an optimum integration time of 10 min, corresponding to Allan deviations of 0.04 ppm and 0.2 ppb, respectively. The sensor system is very stable over time and after relocation across the continent. We report tests of the differential column measurement, and its sensitivity to emission sources, by measuring the downwind-minus-upwind column difference ΔXCH4 across dairy farms in the Chino area, California, and using the data to verify emissions reported in the literature. Ratios of spatial column differences ΔXCH4/ΔXCO2 were observed across Pasadena within the Los Angeles basin, indicating values consistent with regional emission ratios from the literature. Our precise, rapid measurements allow us to determine significant short-term variations (5-10 min) of XCO2 and XCH4 and to show that they represent atmospheric phenomena.Overall, this study helps establish a range of new applications for compact solar-viewing Fourier transform spectrometers. By accurately measuring the small differences in integrated column amounts across local and regional sources, we directly observe the mass loading of the atmosphere due to the influence of emissions in the intervening locale. The inference of the source strength is much more direct than inversion modeling using only surface concentrations and less subject to errors associated with small-scale transport phenomena.

  1. Quantifying sources of methane using light alkanes in the Los Angeles basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Brioude, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Andrews, A. E.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D.; Daube, B. C.; Gouw, J. A.; Dlugokencky, E.; Frost, G. J.; Gentner, D. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Kofler, J.; Kuster, W. C.; Lang, P. M.; Novelli, P. C.; Santoni, G. W.; Trainer, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Parrish, D. D.

    2013-05-01

    Methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and C2-C5 alkanes were measured throughout the Los Angeles (L.A.) basin in May and June 2010. We use these data to show that the emission ratios of CH4/CO and CH4/CO2 in the L.A. basin are larger than expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories, consistent with previously published work. We use experimentally determined CH4/CO and CH4/CO2 emission ratios in combination with annual State of California CO and CO2 inventories to derive a yearly emission rate of CH4 to the L.A. basin. We further use the airborne measurements to directly derive CH4 emission rates from dairy operations in Chino, and from the two largest landfills in the L.A. basin, and show these sources are accurately represented in the California Air Resources Board greenhouse gas inventory for CH4. We then use measurements of C2-C5 alkanes to quantify the relative contribution of other CH4 sources in the L.A. basin, with results differing from those of previous studies. The atmospheric data are consistent with the majority of CH4 emissions in the region coming from fugitive losses from natural gas in pipelines and urban distribution systems and/or geologic seeps, as well as landfills and dairies. The local oil and gas industry also provides a significant source of CH4 in the area. The addition of CH4 emissions from natural gas pipelines and urban distribution systems and/or geologic seeps and from the local oil and gas industry is sufficient to account for the differences between the top-down and bottom-up CH4 inventories identified in previously published work.

  2. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    San Mauro Martin, Ismael; Mendive Dubourdieu, Paula; Paredes Barato, Víctor; Garicano Vilar, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la tradición de la comida picante desempeña un papel muy importante en el gusto por este tipo de comida y su tolerancia. Las preferencias alimentarias muestran influencia genética y ambiental.Objetivos: estudiar la tolerancia y el gusto por el picante de tres poblaciones, y la influencia hereditaria y del ambiente.Métodos:se realizó una encuesta a 522 sujetos, de tres continentes (Asia, Europa y Latinoamérica) en tres idiomas (español, inglés y chino) a través de Internet. Se realizaron preguntas acerca de la tolerancia al picante, el gusto por los alimentos picantes, su uso, la edad de comienzo de consumo, el gusto del padre y de la madre y si ella lo consumía durante el embarazo y/o lactancia.Resultados: existe diferencia entre el gusto por el picante del hijo y el sexo (p < 0,001), la tolerancia (p < 0,001) y, solo en el sexo femenino, el gusto de la madre por el picante (p < 0,001), su consumo durante el embarazo (p < 0,001) y la lactancia (p = 0,005) y el gusto del padre por el picante (p = 0,003). Existe correlación entre el continente de residencia (p = 0,007) y de nacimiento (p = 0,012) y la tolerancia a los alimentos picantes.Conclusión: la influencia de los progenitores, el género y la composición corporal se relacionaron con gustos y tolerancias diferentes. PMID:27571668

  3. How we use online broadcasting - Web TV - for community engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. L.; Conway, F. M.; Matti, J.; Palmer, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Arizona Geological Survey uses online broadcasting (Webcast or 'Web TV') to help fulfill our statutory mission to 'Inform, advise and assist the public in matters concerning the geological processes, materials and landscapes and the development and use of the mineral resources of this state.' We launched a monthly online broadcast called 'Arizona Mining Review' via Livestream, a low-cost or free video streaming service. The show provides news, interviews, and discussions about mining and mineral resources topics of interest in Arizona, the nation's second largest non-fuel mining state. The costs to set up and broadcast are minor. Interviews with local guests are held in a corner of the AZGS conference room with easy chairs and a couch; long-distance interviews are held via Skype. The broadcast originates from a desktop computer with a webcam, a $60 microphone, three sets of earbud headphones and a powered amplifier. During broadcasts, we supplement interview footage with slides, photos, or video clips that we have or are provided by guests. Initial broadcasts were live; recordings of these were later uploaded to our YouTube channel. Because scheduling and executing a live Internet broadcast is stressful and demanding for both the production team and guests, we recently elected to record and produce episodes prior to broadcasting them. This allows us more control over supplementary materials used during the broadcast; it also permits us to record the broadcast using a high-definition digital video camera that cannot be used for streaming video. In addition to the Arizona Mining Review, we record conferences and workshops and special presentations on topical issues. A video on the recently discovered Little Chino fault has drawn over 3,000 views. Our latest presentations are short 1-2 minute 'video abstracts' delivered by authors of new publications released by the Survey. These include maps and graphics from the reports to help illustrate the topics and their

  4. Husbandry Trace Gas Emissions from a Dairy Complex By Mobile in Situ and Airborne and Spaceborne Remote Sensing: A Comex Campaign Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Tratt, D. M.; Bovensmann, H.; Buckland, K. N.; Burrows, J. P.; Frash, J.; Gerilowski, K.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kolyer, R.; Krautwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Leen, J. B.; Hu, C.; Melton, C.; Vigil, S. A.; Yates, E. L.; Zhang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field study reviews on the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) found significant underestimation from fossil fuel industry and husbandry. The 2014 COMEX campaign seeks to develop methods to derive CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from remote sensing data by combining hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages synergies between high spatial resolution HSI column abundance maps and moderate spectral/spatial resolution NIS. Airborne husbandry data were collected for the Chino dairy complex (East Los Angeles Basin) by NIS-MAMAP, HSI-Mako thermal-infrared (TIR); AVIRIS NG shortwave IR (SWIR), with in situ surface mobile-AMOG Surveyor (AutoMObile greenhouse Gas)-and airborne in situ from a Twin Otter and the AlphaJet. AMOG Surveyor uses in situ Integrated Cavity Off Axis Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, H2O, H2S and NH3 at 5-10 Hz, 2D winds, and thermal anomaly in an adapted commuter car. OA-ICOS provides high precision and accuracy with excellent stability. NH3 and CH4 emissions were correlated at dairy size-scales but not sub-dairy scales in surface and Mako data, showing fine-scale structure and large variations between the numerous dairies in the complex (herd ~200,000-250,000) embedded in an urban setting. Emissions hotspots were consistent between surface and airborne surveys. In June, surface and MAMAP data showed a weak overall plume, while surface and Mako data showed a stronger plume in late (hotter) July. Multiple surface plume transects using NH3 fingerprinting showed East and then NE advection out of the LA Basin consistent with airborne data. Long-term trends were investigated in satellite data. This study shows the value of synergistically combined NH3 and CH4 remote sensing data to the task of CH4 source attribution using airborne and space-based remote sensing (IASI for NH3) and top of atmosphere sensitivity calculations for Sentinel V and Carbon Sat (CH4).

  5. The time series analysis of the radionuclide emissions from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant by online global chemistry transport model and inverse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Takashi; Tanaka, Taichu; Kajino, Mizuo; Sekiyama, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Mikami, Masao

    2013-04-01

    The accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant that occurred in March 2011 emitted a large amount of radionuclide. The important feature of this accident was that the source position was evidently clear, however, time and vertical emission variations were unknown (in this case, it was known that the height of emission was not so high in altitude). In such a case, the technique of inverse model was a powerful tool to gain answers to questions; high resolution and more precise analysis by using prior emission information with relatively low computational cost are expected to be obtainable. Tagged simulation results by global aerosol model named MASINGAR (Tanaka et al., 2005) were used; the horizontal resolution was TL319 (about 60 km). Tagged tracers (Cs137) from lowest model layer (surface to 100m) were released every three hours with 1Tg/hr which accumulated daily mean. 50 sites' daily observation data in the world (CTBTO, Ro5, Berkeley, Hoffmann and Taiwan) were collected. The analysis period was 40 days, from 11 March to 19 April. We tested two prior emission information. The first information was JAEA posterior emission (Chino et al., 2011) and the second was NILU prior emission (not posterior) (Stohl et al.,2011) as our observation data were almost similar to their study. Due to consideration for observation error and space representation error, the observation error was set as 20%. Several sensitivity tests were examined by changing prior emission flux uncertainties. As a result, Cs137 estimated the total emission amount from 11 March to 19 April as 18.5PBq with the uncertainty of 3.6PBq. Moreover, the maximum radio nuclei emission occurred during 15 March, which was larger than prior information. The precision of the analysis was highly dependent on observation data (quantity and quality) and precision of transport model. Possibility to obtain robust result by using multi-model ensemble results with inverse model was also considered. The results of

  6. Comparison of CISN computed Spectral Accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagos, L.; Haddadi, H. R.; Shakal, A.

    2010-12-01

    ShakeMaps produced by the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) use response spectral acceleration values computed at three periods 0.3s, 1.0s and 3.0s using two methodologies - the method of Nigam and Jennings (1969) based on the exact solution to the governing differential equation, and the rapid approximation of pseudo spectral acceleration developed by Kanamori et al. (1999) for continuous monitoring of ground motion parameters. With the aim of studying the accuracy of the pseudo spectral amplitudes obtained using the latter method, we present a comparison with values obtained from the method of Nigam and Jennings, using data from the M7.2 Sierra El-Mayor earthquake of 4 April 2010, the M5.4 Chino Hills earthquake of 29 July 2008, and the M5.4 Alum Rock earthquake of 30 Oct 2007. These earthquakes were recorded by a number of stations sufficient to conduct this study. For these analyses, only response spectral amplitudes derived from accelerometer data are considered. Preliminary results show that there is a general agreement between the two sets of spectral amplitudes calculated for all periods and for all the three earthquakes - although the deviations may vary slightly from period to period. The mean deviations are generally less than 1%g for all periods of 0.3s, 1.0s and 3.0s. Tests also show that spectral amplitudes computed for the 3.0s period may be sensitive to the corner frequency of the filter employed in data processing especially for the larger events of most importance in engineering. The pseudo spectral acceleration estimates generally show higher values when short period corners were used, and lower values when long period corners were used. In general, this comparison confirms the effectiveness of the recursively calculated pseudo-acceleration values of the Kanamori et al. (1999) method used by the real time networks in continuously determining ground motion parameters. However, it would be desirable to replace these estimates of response

  7. SCEC CVM-Toolkit (CVM-T) -- High Performance Meshing Tools for SCEC Community Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Ely, G. P.; Olsen, K. B.; Withers, K.; Graves, R. W.; Jordan, T. H.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The SCEC Community Velocity Model Toolkit (CVM-T) enables earthquake modelers to quickly build, visualize, and validate large-scale 3D velocity meshes using SCEC CVM-H or CVM-4. CVM-T is comprised of three main components: (1) a current SCEC community velocity model for Southern California, (2) tools for extracting meshes from this model and visualizing them, and (3) an automated test framework for evaluating new releases of CVMs using SCEC’s AWP-ODC forward wave propagation software and one, or more, ground motion goodness of fit (GoF) algorithms. CVM-T is designed to help SCEC modelers build large-scale velocity meshes by extracting material properties from the most current version of Community Velocity Model H (CVM-H) and to provide a consistent interface as new CVM-H versions are developed. The CVM-T software provides a highly-scalable interface to CVM-H 6.2 (and later) voxets. Along with an improved interface to CVM-H material properties, the CVM-T software adds a geotechnical layer (GTL) to CVM-H 6.2+ based on Ely’s Vs30-derived GTL. The initial release of CVM-T also extends the coverage region for CVM-H 6.2 with a Hadley-Kanamori 1D background. Smoothing is performed within the transition boundary between the core model and the 1D background. The user interface now includes a C API that allows applications to query the model either by elevation or depth. The Extraction and Visualization Tools (EVT) include a parallelized 3D mesh generator which can quickly generate meshes (consisting of Vp, Vs, and density) from either CVM-H or CVM-4 with over 100 billion points. Python plotting scripts can be employed to plot horizontal or profile slices from existing meshes or directly from either CVM. The Automated Test Framework (ATF) is a system for quantitatively evaluating new versions of CVM-H and ensuring that the model improves against prior versions. The ATF employs the CruiseControl build and test framework to run an AWP-ODC simulation for the 2008 Chino

  8. Structure and Deformation in the Transpressive Zone of Southern California Inferred from Seismicity, Velocity, and Qp Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.

    2004-12-01

    deeper and shows a more complex 3D distribution in areas exhibiting compressional tectonics within the Pacific plate. The VP values are 0.2 to 0.4 km/s too high to support an abundant occurrence of schist beneath the Mojave Desert and the San Gabriel Mountains. The models reflect mapped changes, from east to west, in the lithology of the Peninsular Ranges. The interface between the shallow Moho of the Continental Borderland and the deep Moho of the continent forms a broad zone to the north beneath the western Transverse Ranges, Ventura basin and the Los Angles Basin and a narrow zone to the south, along the Peninsular Ranges. Similarly, the 3D Qp model includes several features that correspond to regional tectonic features and possibly the thermal structure of the southern California crust. A clear low Qp zone extends from the San Bernardino Basin, across the Chino Basin, San Gabriel Valley, into the Los Angeles Basin. This zone is consistent with the geology and decreases with depth from east to west. The Peninsular Ranges have a high Qp zone consistent with the high velocities in the 3D VP model. There are also zones of high Qp in the southern Mojave and southern Sierras. Several clear transition zones of rapidly varying Qp, extend across major late Quaternary faults and connect regions of high and low Qp. The strongest low Qp zone coincides with the Salton Trough where near-surface low Qp is associated with the sediments and the deeper low Qp may be associated with elevated mid-crustal temperatures.

  9. Regional groundwater-flow model of the Redwall-Muav, Coconino, and alluvial basin aquifer systems of northern and central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, D.R.; Blasch, Kyle W.; Callegary, James B.; Leake, Stanley A.; Graser, Leslie F.

    2011-01-01

    capita water use for exempt wells. Accuracy of the simulated groundwater-flow system was evaluated by using observational control from water levels in wells, estimates of base flow from streamflow records, and estimates of spring discharge. Major results from the simulations include the importance of variations in recharge rates throughout the study area and recharge along ephemeral and losing stream reaches in alluvial basins. Insights about the groundwater-flow systems in individual basins include the hydrologic influence of geologic structures in some areas and that stream-aquifer interactions along the lower part of the Little Colorado River are an effective control on water level distributions throughout the Little Colorado River Plateau basin. Better information on several aspects of the groundwater flow system are needed to reduce uncertainty of the simulated system. Many areas lack documentation of the response of the groundwater system to changes in withdrawals and recharge. Data needed to define groundwater flow between vertically adjacent water-bearing units is lacking in many areas. Distributions of recharge along losing stream reaches are poorly defined. Extents of aquifers and alluvial lithologies are poorly defined in parts of the Big Chino and Verde Valley sub-basins. Aquifer storage properties are poorly defined throughout most of the study area. Little data exist to define the hydrologic importance of geologic structures such as faults and fractures. Discharge of regional groundwater flow to the Verde River is difficult to identify in the Verde Valley sub-basin because of unknown contributions from deep percolation of excess surface water irrigation.

  10. RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Clifton; Dave Wall; Jamal Zughbi

    2007-06-30

    This is the final technical report for the RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project (REEP). The report summarizes, in a comprehensive manner, all the work performed during the award period extending between July 12, 2002 and June 30, 2007. This report has been prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines and summarizes all of the activities that occurred during the award period. The RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project, under development by the Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA), is comprised of a series of full-scale demonstration projects that will showcase innovative combinations of primary and secondary generation systems using methane gas derived from local processing of biosolids, dairy manure and other organic material. The goal of the project is to create renewable energy-based generation systems with energy efficiencies 65% or more. The project was constructed at the 15 MGD Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant No. 5 located in the City of Chino in California where the Agency has constructed its new energy-efficient (platinum-LEED rating) headquarters building. Technologies that were featured in the project include internal combustion engines (ICE), absorption chillers, treatment plant secondary effluent cooling systems, heat recovery systems, thermal energy storage (TES), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) secondary power generation system, the integration of a future fuel cell system, gas cleaning requirements, and other state-of-the-art design combinations. The RP-5 REEP biogas source is coming from three manure digesters which are located within the RP-5 Complex and are joined with the RP-5 REEP through gas conveyance pipelines. Food waste is being injected into the manure digesters for digester gas production enhancement. The RP-5 REEP clearly demonstrates the biogas production and power generation viability, specifically when dealing with renewable and variable heating value (Btu) fuel. The RP-5 REEP was challenged with meeting

  11. Study of Differential Column Measurements for Urban Greenhouse Gas Emission Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia; Hedelius, Jacob K.; Viatte, Camille; Jones, Taylor; Franklin, Jonathan E.; Parker, Harrison; Wennberg, Paul O.; Gottlieb, Elaine W.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas are home to 54% of the total global population and account for ˜ 70% of total fossil fuel emissions. Accurate methods for measuring urban and regional scale carbon fluxes are required in order to design and implement policies for emissions reduction initiatives. In this paper, we demonstrate novel applications of compact solar-tracking Fourier transform spectrometers (Bruker EM27/SUN) for differential measurements of the column-averaged dry-air mole fractions (DMFs) of CH4 and CO2 within urban areas. Our differential column method uses at least two spectrometers to make simultaneous measurements of CO2, CH4 and O2 column number densities. We then compute the column-averaged DMFs XG for a gas G and the differences ΔXG between downwind and upwind stations. By accurately measuring the small differences in integrated column amounts across local and regional sources, we directly observe the mass loading of the atmosphere due to the influence of emissions in the intervening locale. The inference of the source strength is much more direct than inversion modeling using only surface concentrations, and less subject to errors associated with modeling small-scale transport phenomena. We characterize the differential sensor system using Allan variance analysis and show that the differential column measurement has a precision of 0.01% for XCO2 and XCH4 using an optimum integration time of 10 min, which corresponds to standard deviations of 0.04 ppm, and 0.2 ppb, respectively. The sensor system is very stable over time and after relocation across the contiguous US, i.e. the scaling factors between the two Harvard EM27/SUNs and the measured instrument line function parameters are consistent. We use the differential column measurements to determine the emission of an area source. We measure the downwind minus upwind column gradient ΔXCH4 (˜ 2 ppb, 0.1%) across dairy farms in the Chino California area, and input the data to a simple column model for comparison with

  12. Modality effect in false recognition: evidence from Chinese characters.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei Bin; Yang, Zhi Liang; Wang, Lin Song

    2010-02-01

    ó varias explicaciones que compiten entre sí. En el presente trabajo, los autores estudiaron el efecto de la modalidad en el falso reconocimiento utilizando una condición de presentación en bloques y otra condición de presentación de forma aleatoria. El presente experimento encontró un efecto de la modalidad diferente de los resultados de los estudios anteriores. En concreto, el reconocimiento falso ha resultado ser mayor después del estudio visual que después del estudio auditivo, especialmente en caso de la presentación en bloques en comparación con la condición de presentación aleatoria. Los autores argumentan que este efecto inverso de la modalidad puede ser causado por diferentes características de codificación y procesamiento entre caracteres chinos y palabras inglesas. En comparación con las palabras inglesas, los grafemas visuales de las palabras críticas en chino tienen probabilidad de ser activadas y codificadas en las mentes de los participantes, por tanto, es más difícil discriminar posteriores grafemas internos de los que fueron presentados en la modalidad visual. Por tanto, la presentación visual podría conducir a más falsos reconocimientos que la presentación auditiva en los listados de palabras chinas. Los resultados del presente experimento demostraron que la activación semántica durante las fases de codificación y recuperación jugó un rol importante en el efecto de falso reconocimiento según modalidad y que nuestros resultados se pueden explicar teniendo en cuenta la activación y la vigilancia. PMID:22043843

  13. Analog model study of the ground-water basin of the Upper Coachella Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tyley, Stephen J.

    1974-01-01

    An analog model of the ground-water basin of the upper Coachella Valley was constructed to determine the effects of imported water on ground-water levels. The model was considered verified when the ground-water levels generated by the model approximated the historical change in water levels of the ground-water basin caused by man's activities for the period 1986-67. The ground-water basin was almost unaffected by man's activities until about 1945 when ground-water development caused the water levels to begin to decline. The Palm Springs area has had the largest water-level decline, 75 feet since 1986, because of large pumpage, reduced natural inflow from the San Gorgonio Pass area, and diversions of natural inflows at Snow and Falls Creeks and Chino Canyon starting in 1945. The San Gorgonio Pass inflow had been reduced from about 18,000 acre-feet in 1986 to about 9,000 acre-feet by 1967 because of increased ground-water pumpage in the San Gorgonio Pass area, dewatering of the San Gorgonio Pass area that took place when the tunnel for the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California was drilled, and diversions of surface inflow at Snow and Falls Creeks. In addition, 1944-64 was a period of below-normal precipitation which, in part, contributed to the declines in water levels in the Coachella Valley. The Desert Hot Springs, Garnet Hill, and Mission Creek subbasins have had relatively little development; consequently, the water-level declines have been small, ranging from 5 to 15 feet since 1986. In the Point Happy area a decline of about 2 feet per year continued until 1949 when delivery of Colorado River water to the lower valley through the Coachella Canal was initiated. Since 1949 the water levels in the Point Happy area have been rising and by 1967 were above their 1986 levels. The Whitewater River subbasin includes the largest aquifer in the basin, having sustained ground-water pumpage of about 740,000 acre-feet from 1986 to 1967, and will probably